Page 1


HE.ORACLE. FOR

THE

I

PUB L I

HED

BY

YEA.R

87 3.

T HE

S TU D E N T S

OF

4 ollin �niuernitn.

WATER PRI

ILLE:

TED BY i\IAXHAM & WI

1 8 7 3.

G . . . . MAIL OFF! E.


EDITOR .

FRED FULLER,

L. H. CLEMENT.

H. W. S TEWART,

N. BU TLER, Jn.


PROLOGUE. G the general form and

ON ERNI of

labor

a form suitable

ta te .

now pre entecl i n

Hea on ha

guided all om act .

(J'eueral reading to thos

of a

a

ion

to our

ur private

fruitful theme for

d i po ition,

but we

tory to sink into obliv­

pa\ er i

devoted to the inter­

tuclent . that in the aJTangement of the

flatter ow elv

W

u tom, t h

mild

u· hl

feel con trained to allow t h ontraJ·y to u ual

and

1i cu

that after a great deal of pap r i

meeting· would uncloubteclly furni h

e. t" of the

management

Editors beo· leave to remark,

paper th

thi

(which arrangement was determined by

a

ecret societies,

a cent, )

flip of

we have

faithfully represented the cordial, congenial, bear-bugging dispo ition and ympathy exi ting between them.

We pr

ent a priz

poem in the pre. ent i

all the att 'ntion of all who truly love and

It i

I ccially note1\· rtby, .'inc

clent cle cl

of ·which th

ue, to which we would

appre

it cbroni ·le

good

iat

xc ·pt to

at

the

tudent '

ner, we fe>l obliged to omit their name .

any connex­

ommencement din­

cmious may see

Th

thing purporting to be. uch a body in tb, annual catalogu .

We

plen-

ollege can boru't.

incc we could never cli cover that t he Tru t ·e. bav ion with the College,

poetry.

one of the mo t r

ome­

regret to say also that we were obliged to abandon our de ign

of pr ·· ·nting a fronti ·p i e ce . an engravin

w • . dected

of tb

, M

W

propo. cl to adorn our page

with

•morial Hall, but that being too large an object,

our

lofty pur uits.

mcnt, ancl to di· 'lo e tbe marvellous m chani m of t h

celestial con-

Thi cav

lofty

tbe College

li ervat ry, a

typical of

noble tructmt>, de igned to rtvcal the mysterie of ermed truly inspil'ing.

cl

ign into exe ·ution.

found that tl1i

An arti t wa

empl yed to put thi

Wh 11 w' got on the bill, however, we

nob!' structurl' was not to be

ex pen i\·c t o µ;et a man to

the finna­

·

n.

Deeming it too

hovel it out, we abandon d tb

purpo. e.


ilJ;he

4

®ratlt.

We beg you not to censure u , but rather the so abundant just now.

"emblem of purit)', " how­

not o much to blame,

The sno·w wa

ever.

Considering Base Ball one of the bea of Revelation, we omit any notice of organization of that kind ex:iSting h re. Various ex­ planatory remark will be found throughout om paper, de igned to enlighten the world at large.

Tb se .'1r

both intere ting and in. truc­

tive. Con icl e ring double title bomba tic, we accordingly correct the Ii t of Teachers. Delphi. much

in

The

Proverb

That the oracle i

and

came

from

That there i

uperintendent'

or­

In previou paperN the editor , being

o excessively stucliou to avoid thi criticised, till the pamphlet was tate

pon

elf eyident.

it which may offend tho e of a highly wrnuo-ht nervou

ganization, we are well aware.

the

Oracular r

not a fraud i

full

fault, have pruned, cut clown and a intere ting and in tructiYe a

chool report.

We arc al o aware that

there are many ready to cavil at any innovation with the hackneyed cry,

"Di grace to the Colleg . " neve1thele

"·ith

i>arne t hope

that it may please

we pre

nt our paper,

and thereby fulfil it. mi

ion.


�ht

®t.atl.e.

5

EDITORIAL.

ANOTHER

year, freighted with bright hopes and golden

opportunities, has gone to swell the ever lengthening ages of the past. To us the stern decrees of fate have allotted a ta k, by no means without a precedent, yet on that account certain1y none the less difficult.

And while we claim but little of the talent

predecessor , for interpreting the respon e

bown by our

of the 0RAOLE, yet it is

to be hoped that the intere t of the subject matter may compensate for our lack of

kill in. pre

nting it.

everal changes were made in the roll of tbe Faculty at the last ommencement.

Pre . Champlin,

who ha

the College for over thirty years, tendered hi ffect at the beginning of the spring term

·

been connected with re ignation, to take

but a

no one has yet

been appointed to succeed him, he will probably remain till the end of the year.

The

niver ity

is

much indebted to her retiring Presi­

dent ; and po terity will n ver cease to honor the memory of him through 'vho e

kill,

nergy and untirinO' zeal, a well a through the

princely liberality of th

bri tian merchant who e name it bear ,

tbe in titution wa. rai ed from a tate of want to comparative inde­ p�nclence, endowed with a liberal

bed

ni

in the

witb the mean

i

widely and favorably known a au author of col­

text book , and i

ouncl moral rea. oner.

eff

and fm­

ountry.

Dr. Champlin l<:'g

y tern of scholarship ,

of giving an edu ·ation worthy of any college

ctive t acher

·

p cially clistingui heel as a powerful and

H

and it i

i

a ripe scholar, a plea ant, genial and

our earne t wi. h that his futw·e may be

pra eful and happy a hil pa t has been active and useful.

Two new Profe ated, and Prof

when

or .

or. !Jip , Latin and Mathematic , have been cre­

the e are fill d it will gr atly reli ve our over-ta keel


�ht

6 With plea ur

w

®rntlt.

announce the return of Prof. Hall from Europe.

The prin ipal object of th

Profe

or wa

of the modern language�, to which be i ollege dutie

our mind

ar

ued pro perity of Alma Mater.

the many indication New aspect

to one who has not Yi ited u

enter upon the College ground . inet

and

greet

Laborat.ory,

the

hl

knowlecl(l"e to hi

He r turn

"-ith new zeal.

Ever foremo t in them elv

to extend

devoted.

ight.

in external appearan e, ha

for the

p

t year,

a

be

From the north, tile beautiful Cab­

which ha

What wa

of the contin­

of the place will pre ent

ju. t receiYed it fini hing touche

formerly Torth Colle(J'e much improved been dignified with the name of

'haplin

Hall; new walk have been laid out on cliff er nt part of the ground : while the nn i(J'htly cattle ,heel� and fence

opposite the

ollege build­

ings have given place to the fine new Union Depot, recently com­ pleted

by

the Maine

ad.

entral Railr

It is rumored that a hed(J'e i

to be planted along College- treet, and that the though

ub tantial fence i

to be

de ign.

replac

omewhat ancient

cl by one of mor

modern

The Cabinet and Laboratory i a fine trncture and an honor to the friend ment

of the Unive1 ity through who�e liberality o many impro>e­ l.la>e been undertaken and completed.

It

upplie a want that

has long been felt and mu t be a our e of ati faction to Prof. Ham­ lin, who�e rt!markable zeal and inchu_try in his department cannot be too hlghly appreciat

cl,

and who e \Yell known abilitie

him a wide reputation.

The building i

two

torie

have gi>en

hlcrh; the fust

being u�ed for the laboratory, cla the cabinet a working room,

and

way well adapted for it

purr o e .

It i

all the other modern impro>ement pointment

is

un urpa

is in every wi th o-a�, and ha that are de irable; and in it ap­ imilar building in the country. of elegant ca e._ and

beautiful hall urroundecl by two

ed by any

lighted

Many niluable contribution ha>e recently been made to the cabinet

by Mr.

Merrill and

the1

; and the

atural Hi tory Department i

one of which the University may ju tly feel proud. orth

ollege has bt>en thorouO'hly reno>ated

convenient and elegant rooms heated hall , there i� nothlng further to longer do craz

wooden door- tep

swell the "general average, _

be

by

team

·

and what with the

and the well lighted

de ired in that

dir

ction.

No

tempt the " totall. depraved ' to

by using them to make bonfir

; or in-


7 vite mammoth iron dumb-bell

to "'0 era hing tlll'Ough their frail pro­

portions from fourth tory windows.

o longer doc

axe re oun l in Colby's classic halls, or the witne

tbe venerable Doctor hastenincr at an undignified pace to the

funeral I yre of his old friend , tb.c !\!Citation

II

the woodman's

tru"tled hour of midnight eats.

is, or oug t to be, th• object of the college or univer iLy to im­

part a broad and liberal culture ; to train and improve every faculty of the hLlID�n

oul ; to

trengthen tile intellect ;

to lay a fu-m and

broad foundation for th· RUp:!r tructure to be reared in after life. perfectly trained man mu t have all hi

power

cultivated.

A

All the

faculties of the mind are e . ential to the perfect mind, as much as of the body arc e

all the member

order to t!Jis, the habit u h a

will b<> t

of

In

of recitation must be

harpen the intellect and induce habits of manly,

incl'pendent thought and reflection. of progre

ential to the perfect body.

tucly and method

The in tractors should be men nter with ready

ive and comprehen ive view ; willing to

ympathy into the in pirations threshold of the worl'd, ·where

of their

pupils;

o many path

to stand

on

are opening out,

the all

bright with the hues of hope, and point the way to tho e only which lead to di tinction ; to aid in th

developement of

and to expand, invigorate and emich them.

all

their powers;

Those who have expect­

tuclents into men of talent,

ed that education would transform all

and 'ven men of g •nius, are doomed to cli appointment ; but it cer­ tainly should aid in building up a true, tian manhood.

In

.

o ial, intellectual and Chris­

too many of our in titutions of learning the meth­

o ls of stutly-and instruction tend to 1rrpetuate naJTo:vne s of view, They generate the habit of

and littlene s of aim.

the words and repeating th m from m 'mory. i

dwaded and tinted; it be ome

fa ·t .

a mere receptacle of indigested

u ·h a man, thougll he may be

of learning, i

far from po

merely learning

The re ult i , the mind

on icl reel a perfect prodigy

essiug the highest elements of cultw·e.

Instead of being al.Jle to •:rra p the reality, the underlying principle of what he ha. ac 1uir cl

·

in tead of hei11"' able to grapple with the great

prol.Jleml3 that will continually pre ent themselv •s ; when pushed into the arena of th, world's life he will totter and fall for la k of base. To quote from a Ji tinguished writer,

"There is no more defective

'ducat10n than that whi ·h tmcouracres a mer· knowledge ot words, rule

and formulas, to the negl • ·t of ideas."

And now, a

we lay a icle the v nerable eclitorial quill, which it has

b ,en ow· duty to wield for a little while, w

cannot drive away the


i!!ht .�ha.ci t .

8

thought, that when, a t the end o f another twelve-month, the dust shall be shaken off, and the point again dipped in the ink, to mark the changes that have taken pface in om· little community, we shc1.ll be far away; and may it be the duty of those whom revolving time shall bring to occupy om places, to record nothing but unbounded pro perity and usefulne s for our beloved Alma Mater.

---:---

ANNALS. � �l

R INKING that perhaps a light history of this paper would be pleasing to our fellow student , and being willing

do anything in the world" to give them

a

"to

moment s gratification, we

have attempted this little article for their special gratification. You are well a·ware that last term four unfortunate victim selected to pread th

ed institution-in other words,

to get up a College paper.

poor deluded mortals are pos essed

fun

of

to edit a College paper: at lea t we should think as briefly a

po

ible,

Some

the idea that it is nothing but o from the

frantic endeavors they made to get into the editorial breeches.

we are going,

were

wings of fame once more over this time honor­

Now

to give you a faint idea of the

ineffable, inexhaustible, inexpres ible fun we have had in getting this paper ready for an admiring public. To begin with, one of our honored number was so elated at bi. suc­ cess that, deeming the remainder of hi

College course uperfiuou , he

immediately picked up hi overalls and left us. to as ume the rightful position of a man whom Providence (R. I.) cleli.ghts to honor.

It is

needless to say that thfa shameful desertion filled our hearts with grief and lamentation, and left a gap in our rankR that could never be filled. After clothing omselves in sackcloth anrl ashes.

and fa ting - at the


9 Williams House- for a week or so, we telegraphed the oracle at Delphi and received the following respon e. Thi re ponse, like all the replies of the oracle, wa ghren in a peculiar metre of the Greek, which translated is a follow.: KNOW yer editor, drat yer,

Quickly one lean1ed brother

'S a man of low stature

Mr.

Who ne'er could look at yer

Will proceed to utter.

'Thout wanting to snatch yer

Or rather to stutter,

s

The following slur:

Bald-headed,

'

they say.

omething or other­

Repair ye to the chapel

As one editor's missing,

Prepared for to grapple

I think 't is the best thing

The matter in question,

-Since the staff are all fools,

As 't who is the be t 'un

And I'm sure but mere tools­

Pro one run away.

To make th�m Fooler.

We proceeded to do as the oracle directed, and me enough, it all ame true. The honorable gentleman mentioned accepted his fate, and all was erene once more. But only for a brief space of per·iod did thi. la t. The editor had a meeting. Now perhaps you don't ee anything trange in the editor having a meeting; but you would if you bad been there. A cene such a never truck the a toni heel gaze of mortal man would have met your view, and caused each sep­ arate twig of the lLtxurious growth on the top of yow· cranium to point dire ·tly towards the ceiling. You would have looked upon a ·en of devastation a.nd blood heel sw·passing .even the "tempest in a teapot. ' Umbrella flying, book ailinO', ink up etting, tabl s tip­ ping, gla s crashinO', bones breaking, hair floating, pi tols di charging and blood flowing "While upon the floor, rolling over and over, and hugging each other in the embrace of editorial affection, migllt have been seen your fow· dignified editor . What was the trouble? Wlly, on of their llUlllber bad a ·tually thought of a joke for the paper, and the: re t were o mad with j alou y tbat tlley immediately attackd him with intent to do O'J'i vous bodily battery. He fought like an infuriated flea, hut all to no purpo , ; though marter than a mustard ·<te d poulti e, he wa overp wer cl by numbers, and for eel to take an oath to r iO'n on the next day. Raving gather cl together the t •ctb he had h cl during the affray, b, left the room a adder but wi er man. u ·h is ever the fate of hin1 who would a pire to things

ltiO'ber tha11 common clay i wont to a quire.

Aft r bi

exit it was

'


m;bt

10

®urlt .

Also,

voted that no jokes whatever should be allowed in the paper. that

aid paper should be devoted exclu ively to the promotion

nf

love, purity and fidelity in this institution, and to the rooting out of icllene

, fri"rnlity, and the use of ponies on the College " campus."

After shaking hand

and congratulating each other on our llappy mis­

ery, we adjourned by singing the doxology. The next day ...mea ures were taken to secure another editor.

It

being rather expensive, we resolved not to consult the oracle at Del­ plli, but to leave the result to fate.

Accordingly lots were ca t, and

sent, we sought for him in the highway proclaim unto

him

and hedges, that ' e might

the joyful tidings of his great glory.

day journey we found him sitting beneath the wid es of an umbrageous apple-tree in Prof. leaf.

ab­

As Nathaniel wa

the lot fell upon one Nathaniel the Gittight.

After

even

preading branch­

S-'s garden, chewing a fig

At sight of us he would have fled "like a bird to you moun­

tain," but we fell upon hi "Wilt come with u Then we pre

neck and ki sed him.

ancl be an eclitor

?"

and he

Then we said, aicl,

wilt."

"I

eel him to our palpitating bosom, and exclaimed

in

the

language of Chri topher Oolumbn when he landed on Mount Ararat, "What art man ? "

Having wasbecl his face and put a clean apron

on him, we brought him back to bis father s hou e.

Although his

father did not kill the fatted calf, yet the fatted calf (G. M.

. ) near­

ly died of envy. The editor '

drawers being

again filled, we re olvecl to proceed once

more with our laudable undertaking, and of course called another meeting.

Rem mbering our last meeting, we approached the

of conflict \Yith faint hearts and shaking knees. b� his turn to r� ign.

cene

Each felt it would

After sittino- a long time in silence, one broth­

er, bolder than the rest-for the rca on that he sat nearest the door­ in trembling accents remarked that he supposed it would be nece to appoint a chief editor, him by ballot. votes.

At this we all pricked up our ears and wrote our

When they were counted it wa

for himself.

ary

and he thought it wouJd be well to elect

Thi

found that each had voted

!eel to considerable polite talk all round, which

perhaps it would be be t not to mention. One said he wa Nat-urally adapted to the po ition, and possessed afull knowledge of it require­ ment .

Another declared that be had a Fulle1· knowledge of the

duties and re ·ponsibilities than any other man. hitherto lie bad been very

Clement

toward.

Tlle third

aid that

his brother editors, but


unle

b

11

®t.lHl.t.

�he

was made chi f pen scratcher h e should n ort t o blows. was found Llllclcr the

On looking round for the fourth editor, b

making frantic endeavors to hide

lounge, \rhere he wa the wratll to come.

malle t, and had

As he wa the

all, the re ·t concluded h

hims

lf from

aid notlling at

\ras the one to vent their pite upon, so

They fell upon him, one and all Picked

him up and let him fall.

Kicked him round like

a foot-ball,

And left him howling in the hall. But on his promi e to behave, And of the honors none to crave But be

as

as

silent

the grave,

'l'hey brought him back to the conclave.

Order being at length re torecl, it wa tell the bigge t lie hould be

fuo

t editor.

decided that he who could It

is needle

to ay that all

felt comparatively afe at this decision, for each one of tllem was, and now is, noted for the length of hi tongue and the elasticity of his coruci nee. eemed nece

After an hmu·

pent in this pleasant pastime,

ary to call it a draw game, when

;

brother excl imed, " Let

top-I can t po

it

uclclenly one of the

ibly tell another lie . '

t tbi the re t fell down ancl did him homage, a

having told the

bi.,ge t lie of all. Thus we ele ted oLu· clli�f editor.

o if you find anything in this

paper that is r •markal.Jly tough, you m�y attribute it to him_


12

M1scELLANEous. _

A

· FTER a careful study of twenty- even editorials to college

papers, we have come to the conclu ion that "there is no royal road We make this statement with the greate t confidence.

to learning."

We would also inform our readers that there is something they call a We do not know what a "campu "somewhere about all colleges. "campus" is, but it appeaTs to be something that is always "green. " If tho e facetiou editor referred to their Faculty i n this jocose man­ ner we would not approve their ta te.

"campu "

If a

is anything

t.hat is essential to college pro perity, or is any new invention that we have not got, we would advise the Trustees to look into 1he matter. These twenty-seven

jocose editors,

after

having

" campus " is "green," all inform u that "the is "·te p." thi

axiom

learning i

hill

stated that the of knowledge "

Some, with a startling degree of boldness, have changed to

"the hill of science is steep, '' and add "the way to

hard."

Now we \vi h it distinctly understooa that we do

not approve this innovation.

There is a certain order of things which

is fit, but this is not one of them.

Mor over we inform tho e twenty­

seven editors that when they solemnly declare that "education is a priceles jewel," they are making a bold statement for a college pa­ per.

We

hould hardly want to commit ourselves in our early youth

to making any uch statement, espe ially in a college paper. any one asks you if education is a goo

thing,

by saying yes, but rather answer cautiously. will afterwards be sorry for. n t.

When

don't commit yourself Don't say anything you

Say "Some doe , while others does­

We do not wTite to you twenty-seven editors to find fault, but

simply to inspire caution.

Headlong, tempestuous youth are apt to

ay and do thing that are rash. This is always wrong. But when you come to print any such bold statements as "There is no royal road to learning," ''Education is a good thing,'' you are going too far. will hurt the sale of your paper.

You

No college student would feel jus­

tified in sending to his par nts or friend a paper with uch statements

THE wise man jesteth. and the fool requireth him to explain the point.


�ht as the above.

13

® utl t .

College students have more sense.

We are proud to

say that no student here would send away a paper in which the editors had called the Faculty "the old campu ," and then, as if that were not enough, called them "green." our Faculty here.

We have more respect for

Indeed, one of our editor , in speaking of our

Faculty, said they were " weak-backed,

leather-headed, do-nothing

kind of men ; " which was not half so bad a

calling them " old cam­

pus," and yet we would not let it be printed.

We would not let any

such go into our paper. We earne tly urge you, ye twenty- even ra h young editors, to to be cautious in your tatements. but it is very bad to be bad.

Be good.

It is good to be good,

(See Lamentations of J er miab, 5,

23.)

''GETTING ON IN THE WORLD. "-This book is the production of

Prof. :.Mathews, of Chicago.

'I'he book i

characteristic of the man.

is pithily de cribed by a scholar of note a "a man scrap knowledge." Thi book indicate as much. It

Prof. Mathew extensive

simply a erie of quotations arranged in a r adable order. of the schoolboy' one idea, that success in life require

of is

Possessed

industry and

energy, he has multiplied quotation and introduced a few connecting words of bi 01\'n to prove what no one

In

ver thought of disputing.

hi own word , used by him in ref rence to a part of our la t

Commencement, " Getting on in the Woriel " is "the mo t stupid,

dull, lifele

,

piritle

to drag throu(Th.

, cli intfr sLing " produ tion it wa ever our lot

We would

arne tly advi e the learned Profe

or

to ·onfine hjs attention to berating Waterville and the doings of bi alma mater, in which capacity be will find to his ta tt

and m�r

·

omcthing more congenial

suited to hi talent than book writing e ms to

be.

Do TUE LEARNED, cb crinrr aft r th, delivery of a pc ch in r..atin, applaud the peecb, or their ability to und '1' tand it 1

Answer next

'ommencement.

th

T1rn r'ligiou!' world will doubtl . feel un lcr eternal obligati n Lit rar_y P1·at rnity for deciding that ·ci 'nee ancl r ligion

recon ·ilablc.

to are


14

•; �

�ht

®utl.e.

DR. Cr:u..MPLIN i about to leave the executive chair of this Univer ity, it may not be out of place to pre ent a brief uch a ketch, properly prepared, would sketch of his active life. illu trate the fact, that a quiet life by no means implie a life of idle­ ne ; and that though one " profe ion may not bring him per onally before the mas of men, in hi own day, yet by a life of industry one may render him elf highly u eful in that noblest of pur uits-tb education of men-and create for him elf a name which shall long urvive him . J�s TIFT CHA..,IPLTh', D. D. , wa born in the town of Colchester, Conn., June 9th, 1 11. In hi early youth hi father removed to Lebanon, in the ame tate, and at the age of H, he unitell with the Baptist chmch in that place. In the autumn of 182 he repaired to his native town, for the pm­ po e of commencing a cow e of tucly, preparatory to entering col­ lege. He did not complete thi cour e here, however, but remoYed to Plainfield Academy, from whence, in the fall of 1 30, he entered Brown Univer ity, of which institution Franci Wayland was then pre. iclent. Ptu uing hi conr e \\ithout interruption, he duly gradu­ ated, with highe t honor, being elected valeclictorian of hi clas_. ome time previou to his graduation he had accepted the position of Principal in the l\Ianual Labor chool at Pa1'rtuck t, R. I., and he immecliately a �umed lli du tie_. In Sept., 1 35 he a urned a tuto1 hip in the niver ity from w ich he had graduated, where he continued till the pring of 1 38, when he became pa tor of the Federal t. (Bapti t) church in Portland, �Ie. He was ordainell )lay 3d, l 3 , Pre ident Pattison, of Waterville olleae, prcarhing the ermon. Tlli-ee year later h� left hi pa torate to take the profe or­ ship of Ancient Language in Waterville olleg ; a_ uming hi clu­ tie in ept. , 1 -±1. This po ition he filled mo t ably, until 1 57, when, President Patti.on re ignina, Prof. hamplin became his uc­ ces or. Three year later he receiYed from Brown Univer ity the degree of D. D. ; the �ame degree having been previou ly conferred by the Cnive1 ity at Rorhc ter. During hi connection with th olleg�, Dr. hamplin ha been the autbor and clitor of numerouc and valuable text books. The fu' t edition of " hamplin' Demosthene �on the ro"�n ' appeared in


15 1843; following which, in rapid S�lect Orations" (1 ± ) lation of Kuhner' Grammru· ";

Grammar;

ucce ion, came "Demo thene '

chine on the Crown" (1850); a trnns­ ''

A

ho1t and Compreh nsive Greek

Butler'

Analogy, and Ethical Discom es; " A Text n Intellectual Philo ophy" (1 60); "Fi.rt PrinciplE of Eth­

Book ic '

"1E

·

1851):

"Text Book of Political Economy" (186 ).

ucce -

ive edition of many of the e book have been is ue l and they are

now exten ively u.ed ru: text books. Whrn Dr.

bamplin a

(then Waterville

umecl the pre idency of Colby University,

ollege,) t:ie college building wer

exteruive repair , and

ther buildi11g

in tlie treasw·y, however, amounted to only :Measure wer

bapel, and

The ftmd

·12,000 or

'·10,000.

immediately taken to enrich the tJ.· asury, and "25,000

were oon added to the fund. dily becrun.

in great need of

were al o required.

'file needed improvements were pee­

The Memorial Builclincr, ollege Library, wa

The old

ontaining the Memorial Hall,

fir t built, at an expen e of $40,-

hapel building, now

remocldecl, the improvement

hamplin Hall, wa

thoroughly

co ting more than "6,000.

Repair

on the Torth C.:ollege, now Chaplin Hall, co t $ ,000; and the Lab­ oratory i ju t completed at a co t of nearly

in

having been paid for, there remain 0 0.

-·ao,o

It is often aid that Colby i not pro perou . a full number of tuclent

0.

All of the e

th, trea ury a ftmd of $200,But if by pro perity

i meant, we reply that never, till now, ha

.he been ready for pro perity.

The Univ 1"ity i

now e tablisbecl

on a fu-m footing, and in every ·way fully prepared for a brilliant fu­

ture.

To accompli,h

uch a 'tate of affair

amount of labor, ancl an exerci e of ml'n could command, and perltap nt.

u ·h

ba

kill a

f•wer would take th' pains to ex­

That a new line of policy i now need d i

lmt that Dr.

'hamplin 11'

L a fact which his. uc ·e

r quired a vu t

comparatively f w undoubtedly true;

been th� ' right man in the right pla e," or will have ai.Junclant occa ion to acknowl­

ed•re. De r

i<Tuecl in .July, 1

he will hav

At th

lJ en conn' ted with tbi

for over ltalf Utat time a

n •xt annual

Pre ident.

In lcavin<r the pr• iden y of Colby Univer ity, carry witlJ Lim th and will

I

h arty good wi

ave l>eliind him

to lier we! far .

omm n emrnt,

i11 ·tHution thirty-two year ,

Ile

DT.

of her friend

hampliu will and patron ,

ub t· ntia.1 'Vidence of his in ·ere devotion


16

PRIZE

POEM.

DEEMING the study of the Classics all important, a

the great power of e}..-pre

teaching one

ion which the Old English admits, and at

the rune time giving an in igbt into the great flexibility of our ance tral language, we pre ent a poem on thi om¡ many poets.

Among the variou

page, compo eel by one of

produ tion

competing for the

prize offered for the be t specimen of the all-re pected vernacular, this one wa

adj udged the best.

to clo e analysis of the en e involved w tic than this poem present , unle

R

la

ic of om

For training the mind

know of no better gymna -

it be Analytical Geometry.

l\C P "C"

off ttime remot, I ing a quoth Johun off Bedatre I ing a ong off ttim rem te off time remote ayed bee y one off .:. ormann Hal'l"eld ware one off mutch jeallon they caused a triff off mut 11 renoun which wa nigh to deadle collected they, inn clo c arraye, l>eforre ye chapelle do re, 'rrougbt deed off hame and deed a in tho e claye off yorre ffor too <md had

ffre hmen gr ene had oft beene allie out beforrc ffre hmen greene I wot I ween not clone o off yorrc

of ffame

eene

ye ¡opb they told i nn tone too bold beforre you wee will bee ye oph they tarred and oon declared god wot, they oon should c


�he

�Utlt.

one morne they mett and traightway sett themsel:ffs too triffe deacUee alle thought twas sayed blood would bee shed qnotiJ Johnn off Bedatree mid t haire pulled oute and doubtfnll route y partie stTOve amaiue mid t toothe knockt out it was a doubt which victorie would aaine

I doubt nott t i l l figh ting they would bee did uott th y ff are ye prex might keere quoth Jobllll off Bedatree onn, onn, they ffought and

thi was ye eend and bbothe coutende they won th victoree stil l a l l e agree twixt you and mee that twa a ffaimou e victoree o quoth Johnn off Beclatr>e

I AM truly an unfortunate mau . All day I work j ust a bard a. I can ; I I Jove l path , I w ·ep out the entry ; And tu 'n - tbo e na ty . lops I mu. t empty ! t l l · .tud ·nt all say I am lazy, to rm n t me t i ll I am mo t crazy · :i\Ly eye grow dim, my I.Jone· o ti k out Prof. H. t h i n k t'i hi k(·letoo about.

'till Ami

La t term I t l iouaht I wa doing qu.itt· well ; But my cri.rl, al· . turned out a ell. I can 't t:tan l it . - l ' U r, i"n - ye. , tomorrow ! .Jump i n U i e ri\'1•r and c l ro w n my i'IOrrow !

17


�h .e

18

JAME

® u .c t.e .

T.

D . D.

HJUI P LIN

Acting President.

AM

EL

MIT H , D. D.

K.

Profe . or of Rhetoric.

CHARLES E. HAMLIN, A. )\I.

1errill Professor of Chemistry and "atural History.

l\10

E

l\l.

LYFORD, A .

Prof . sor of l\Iixed ::Hath matics.

JORN B. FO TEH

Prof

E.

.

A.

or of Greek.

W. R

�LL, A.

l\'.L

l\L

Profe .. or of Frc•nch ancl German .

.J"C"LIAN

D. TAYLOR

A. M.

Tutor.

Two new profe" ore hip:-; were the Tru tc

,

not yet filled.

reatecl at the la t annual meeting of

one of Lat in , the other of Mathematics.

These are

The Pre. iclency, made vacant by the r signation of

Dr. Champlin, i s not yet . upplied.


�ht .

.. ............

� h a .c h �

...............

19

••••••o••o•••••• . . . . . . . . . . . .........................

JUodatiou

0f

t� t

J iumni.

I'RESIDBNT.

E.

E. c

I.MING

SECRETARY

C.

AND

'

D. D.

NECROLOGI. T.

H AMLIN, A. M.

E.

TREASURER.

E.

w. RALL, A. M. C'OUNCILLORS.

M. LYFORD, A. M. REUBE . MEADEH, A. B.

FO

TER, A. B.

-

Annual fccting .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

July

23,

1 8"8.

#


� b. .e

20

® r a r t .e .

(FOUNDED IN 1 20.)

ociety was oriufoally,

Tms

ociety.

It is now

object i

a.

it

name implie , a mis 10nary

imply the Praying

ircle of the College.

tiou.

.ME.JIBER�� . B

TLER, jr.

A. H . KELLEY,

G. i\I . S:l\I I T H ,

J.

TAY LOR,

\VILLIAM GO L D T H WAIT. S. A . READ, E. A . READ, E.

J.

COL ' O R D,

D. WEB.TER,

.J. 0. TILTON,

C. E. WILL ilUI

G. B.

HOW

T. F. W HITE,

J.

H.

COX,

C'. E.

Y O "L�G,

H . TI LDE

CHA E

J.

F.

A.

Its

the encomagement of practical Christianity in the in titu­

C'.

H A LL,

C. E. MELENY, E. WOOD UM, A. W .

MALL,

R D,

,

A. T H O}IP

0

H . H ALLOWELL, E.

LONG

J. B.

B ROWN,

C'. C'.

T I L LEY.


�h e

�hatl t.

21

Seniors. . Nathaniel But! er, J r.

J.

Abraham B · C ate Ed wanl J.

Herbert

Horace W ·

'o'P1•om.ores.

yr u

George B. Ro war 1 ,

Howard J:Iall OW ll ' . b10n W. mall,

F • Herbert Parlm ·

HenrY H uclson ' J· r.

okonl '

William Go1 clthwait '

A.l.

Philbnck, .

.JT,Unio1·s.

.

.

tew"'t .

Lesr"

C. Corni•b '

Josiah 0 · Tilton. . 8 . Edward H- · m1ley .

K . Merriam '

.F?'eshmen .

Jo eph A . TL 1omp on' An Georg F. y oungman, I y Ezra Wooclsum.

Charles C. Tilley, Eben G. Russell.


�ht

22

® n t t l t.

1 8 7 3.

FRED. FULLER.

�BERT B . ALLEN, THEODORE F. WHITE,

1 8 7 4.

w ILLIAM L . PALMER

CHARLE

E. w ILLIAMS.

1 8 7 5.

GEORGE w. HALL. FRED. v. CHASE

EDWIN c. LONG,

1 8 1 6.

ATWOOD c. HaLL,

CLARENO I<: c. M ELEN�:Y.


TrrE E

oc i et i e

upplied w ith

a

the

promote

are designed to

l ibrary, the volume

about five thou

we k

23

® nu l t .

� h .e

·weclne clay afternoon and

a nd .

ar ' given by the

Each is

tlle foren ic art.

of "·hich number conjointly evening of each

ollege for the prepamtion of part

taken by

tuclents in t he e oci t i t>. .

day ,vening

of

"tatecl mectino- of ach, on during tenn t i m e, at 7 o ·lock.

each wee :.:,

"FIC'EH .

0

Pre.

id n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Vi ·e Presid nt

. .

Tl'Pa81lt'

.

. . . . .

.

. .

·,, ·r tary . .

orr sponding Recm·ding

. . .

.

.

. .

C. P. Weston. . . .

. .

Wedn s­

. .

. A.

. . .

.

. .

.

.

.

.

B. P.

Allen.

Weston.

. K. Merriam

c1· tary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T. F. : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E.

Fi,..-t Librarian . . . . . .

White. Young.

. F. Hall.

A ss't L i brarian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

lro$ophian ldelphi. ( Fmmrlerl P!'e.sld,nt . . . . . . Vic Pl'esidenl .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

.

.

.

. . . .

Corre1Spo11din,,q , ' cret i.".1/ .

R

co1·ding

1 3:-l.

O J•F I CEH�.

. . .

.

. . . . . . . • . . . . . .

'e cretary . . . . . .

.

.

.

.

. . .

.

.

. .

.

.

1'rea . ·u1· r. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fi1·.st L ibra1·ian .

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . . .

A .�.s't Libl'al'ittn .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . . .

. . . .

. .

. . . .

.

G . M.

mitb.

H . \V. tcwart. . A. J I. Ke l l ey . . A. C. Hall.

. . . . . .

. .

. . .

. . . . . .

'Wm. L. Palmer.

A. . 11.

. .

B.

.

T i l 1 n.

'ate

.


24

LITER.ARY FRATERNI'l'Y . . . . MEMBERS. Seniors. J. Taylor,

N. Butler, jr.

L. H.

D. Webster,

C. P. We ton.

'I'.

A. B. Al l en,

Clement,

C. E. Young.

F. WbitC',

Sophomores.

E. J. Colcord

G. W. R al l , C. R. Merri am,

L. C. Stearns,

C. E. Meloney,

E.

A. Read,

. 0. Reacl.

C.

F. Ral l ,

E. C. Long, A. W. Small, J. A. Tbomp on .

. C. Tilley,

ERO S OPHlli� ADELPHI . . . . MEMBERS.

Senior. . F.

Fu l ler

G. M. Smith,

F. H. Parlin,

J. H. Philbrick.

A. B. Cate ,

Wm. H. Kelly,

Jun iors.

J. 0.

Wm. L. Palme r,

A . H . K e l l y,

H. W. Stewart,

Tilton.

Sophomores. Wm. Goldthwait,

L. C. Corni h,

H. Hu l on, jr.

.T.

B . Brown,

F. V.

G. I. Peavy, J . • H. Cox, H. Tild n .

E. H. "' miley,

Fr shrnen.

C'hase,

A. C. Hall,

C'. H . Hallowell.


ini h e

25

Ohatlt.

Class

o/ 1873.

AWARDS FOR BEST F1T IN ENTERING COLLEGE. -First Prize, Geo. turdy ; Second Prize, G. M .

H.

OPHOMORE PnrzEs. -Award

rnith. for best Declamation, First Prize,

N. Butler, Jr. ; Second Prize, J. Taylor.

JUNIOR PRIZE . -Award

for he t Composition and Declamation,

Fir t Prize, J. Taylor ; 8econd Prize, N . Butler, Jr. HONORARY PART

AWAlmED FOR BEST MARKING, CALLED JUNIOR

J. H. Philbrick ; FoUl'th, F. H. Parlin.

PA.RT . -Fir t ,

Taylor ;

econd, G. M. Smith ;

Third, J.

'ENlOR PRIZE FOR BE T CoMPo ITION. -Fred Fuller.

of 187 4.

Glass

Kell

FJrn HMAN PmzE . -First, Wm. H.

Vv.

OPHOMORE PmzE .-First, H.

•o

d.

.J PNIOH PART . -First,

. E.

William ;

mass

of 187 5.

Class

uf 1876.

Third, Wm. H. Kelley ; Fourth, Wm.

F R E J T M A N PR1zE . -Fir t , :Mary

'

ni b.

FRE. EDfAN PmzE . -

c ·ond, G.

F.

y.

tewart

.

S

"econcl, G. W. Os­

·

ond,

L. Pa l mer.

Lowe ;

Youngman.

C. E.

econd,

L.

Young ;

C. C or-


26

O FFI CER t).

LA

SF.� I O R:<. President, P . We t o n

·

G. :i.\L

Poet

:r. Butler, j r . ;

Fre l Full r ·

phet

lclres

i'\[ru ,llal, J .

Web ter :

t er

mith ;

t;

ry, F.

H.

Pru·Jin ; .

HUorian

at the 'f'ree

H . Philbrick :

J.

H.

Taylor ;

Orator, C .

Kelley :

Pro­

Chaplain, D.

Ocli t, L . H . Clemen t .

JDIIO RS. P r ,�iclent, Wm. L . Palmer · Vice President, Wm. II. Kelley ; retary,

A.

. E . Youno- : Orator

I J Uorian

B. Allen ; Poet

C. E. Will iam. ; Prophet

Wm. R.

ec­

tewru·t :

A. B. CateE<.

OPITQ)l RE .

B. Tilden ; Poet E. J. ol

President

mil y ;

0.

ord ;

tru-y

.

Prophet ter

L.

C.

E. ..

FRE R �I EK.

ha.e : ·nee Pr

:\Ieleny :

B.

Ha l l owe l l

A.

. E. )feleny on Ollei>,

_

. C . Woodsum,

Teo.

·

ltarle,

ident

W. "mall ; : Hi�torian J. A. Thorn 1 Orator

Hi torian,

. Til ley ·

Poet, E .

F.

Y . C H A ""' E

E . .J.

O LC

)la -

. Til ley. F. Youngman

A.

C.

OPRAN"(l. -

HD

WM . H. GOLDT H " A I T H . T I LD E K

er-

Long ;

on ; Toast

Hall.

A . H . K E LLEY

E. H. J.

. A. �earl ; Orator

G. W. Hall

Prophet

Tilton.

Presidt>nt Fred Y . r

Yice Pr , ident,

TES R.

ALTO. BA, .

OR . A.i."1::!1'.

V A.LUAB�E L�FOR.l\UTION. - · · \\" e ee whllt we ee. and k-uow what we know." - " Frederick the Gre:it wa a Russia n." Gue s so, - next !

[ Taken from

Ari� /olle.


27

� h a r l .e .

m; h e

Ye persevering distorter and twister of harmony, GOLDTHWAIT. Ye possessor of a voice sweet and alluring as a babe's n ight . ly howl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAMS. Ye perpetual utterer of ound. that cause the timid frog to retire to his lofty eyry and hide, beneath his wing his blushing face . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHA E. Ye torturer of the in ide of a cat, accompanied by the tearmoving strains of a dying sinner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LONG. Ye con tant dispen er of suicidal mnsic putting to shame even the devil' -fiddle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COLCORD.

Ye happy owner of a voice smpa sing in sweetnes the harmoniou shriek:; of an ungreased wheel-barrow . . . . . . .

WESTON.

Ye splitter of tympanums and destroyer of reason . . . . . . . H AL L OWE L L .

y� Ancient l\farin

r.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Heywood .

y.. W dcling Guest, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burrage . y- Albatro

, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White .

y .. '" Life-in - Death, " ( nightmare ) . . . . . . . . . . L t1ce.

y..

tar cl 0gecl Moon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Read 1 st.

y.. " :tfany men s

beauti ful," . . . S un drie S tu dent .

Y"' Voice.· in the Air . . . . . . . . . . Web ter & T ilden.

ye , 'eraph Band, h avenly sight, C la sical In titute.

y� Hermit, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janitor.


28

THE WICKED FLEAS, That

f led

11 hile no 1nan

pitrsnecl.

ALSO

THE RIGHTEOUS, That were

as

bold

as a

lion.

THE wrnKED FLEAS.-The immortal seven _who j ow-neyecl Clinton­

ward,. No ll1AN.-Bill THE THE

RIGIITEO

Ed .

. . ds.

s.-The Faculty and

LION.-E.

R. D . . .

. .

. D.

ix jmymen.


29 .

$tlll[ch f!tq $crij!furts. EmTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lam. Jer. iii, 46. tudent to the Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . Job xii, 2. The Fa ulty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lam. J er. v, 1 3 Prof. ' mi th . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. xxvii, 23. Long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Luke xv, 24. mal l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eccl. ii, 25. mith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. xxvi, 1 7. team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. viii, 1 . P h ilbrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. :\'Xiv, 23. Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. xx.ii, 6. Heywood . .' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. xxti, 2 . Tild n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. viii, 6. Colcord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eccl. i, 1 6. To our Patron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. i, 14. Fre hmen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. i, 22. Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prov. xx, 1 4. Students generally . . . . . . . . . . Prov. xxv, 17.

C o N LL' ION . . . . . . . . Prov. x x ii,

20.

Oracular Responses. A. W. S.

Nature formed but one such son, And broke the die in moulding Albion.

A. B. C.

'T is plea ant sure to see one's name i.n print, An item 's an item although there 's nothing in 't.

F. V, C.

For my voice I have lost it with hollaring, and singing of anthems.

C. P. W .

Argument sprouted within him, And twinkled in his little eye ; He lay and calmly debated, When average babies cry.

J. O. T.

A lion among ladies i

a most dreafilul thing.

III. C. L.

In beauty or wit, o mortal as yet To que tion your empire has dared ; But men of discerning Have thought in learning To yield to a hdy wa hard.

E. J .

.

He draws out the thread of bis verbosity Finer than the staple of his argument.

L . C. S.

Whopl well in pixed the Oracle pronounced The wisest of men.

J . H. P.

Deep versed in books, And shallow in himself.

A. H . R.

ot to know him argues yourself unknown, The lowest of your throng. s

A. D. A.

Darkne

J. T.

Instructive emblem of this mortal state.

that ma.y be felt.


30

�ht

�h a . d e .

MONG the >ariou improvements proposed to be made in town, we are glad to learn that the Watenille avings Bank corporation i to �rect a fine tructure on }fain tre t nearly opposite tbe pre ent loca­ tu­ tion of the avings Bank. We would call the attention of th dent to tlli institution, reminding you that you can place your rnon y in the Bank and draw intere t upon it a long a it remains there.ince money can be drnwn out at any tin1e thi Bank afford a afr, con>enient and profitable mean of cli po ing of yom money till needed. Tho e who have money on band, from their winter earning , ·will find Mr. Percirnl, the ca hier, ready to receive it and give you · any further information de ired.

AFTER much deliberation we llave concluded, in con ideration of ome bekel , to advertise certain kinds of busine in our paper. We do not, like other people given to puffing, recommend the bone ty and fair dealing of tbuse we advertise, for we have b en gouged by them all more than once ; but till we can con ciention ly ay that they are the lea t · harp of all the long li t of sharper in Waterville. The e men, who e name follow, have materially helped us in the publication of our paper · and o in retmn, -we earne tly recommend that you carefully note their name , and patronize them exclusively.

Buy

your C!oth£ng o/ P. S. HEALD , J.lierch m t Ta £lo1·. If you want

an

Elegant Fitting Suit of Clothes , G O 'l' O

C'ujf ,

'ollars,

'T

S. k)

lY ck Ties, of all kinds and 81'YLES, constantly on h and.

Gloves,

LA TE

HEALD

of th

Hi� affaule Clerk i alway prompt to anticipate yom , ligllte t wi b.


�he

Alil

an�

WJLL,

for

a

(!h . u l .e .

very

slight

Boots

31

compensation,

make you

Tbat will , tand the scraping of t he An ,\ 1 INAJ3LE CoN RETE IDE­ Thi i recommendation enouo-h. Give him W A LK' of '\Vaterville. a cal l. If you want clod-hopper. don't go ther , but i f you want an elegant fitting boot be sure to cal l . He will give you FITS. � Wllen we

pok

about

,qouging

"·e clid not I ru"ti u la.rly refer to

S H A W, Tile Barber,

Who ke ps the neate t shop in '\Vater\' i l le. N arly all th tudents pa.t TO ni z' him . T ho ·c who clon 't had b tter go-better late than never. ;1;

T U DE.i: T

de irinO' to fit up

their

room w i l l do well to con ult

C. H. R EDIN Who keeps, (cheap for

FUR

A.I

IT

RE

' ET

'

L

'A R PET MP , &

'.

TO 'a,h, )

NEE D F U L &c.

RO ' K E RY,

o, con tantly on hand, hru·cl and oft wood COFFIN -no 'Xf'hangc made-which h would recommend to · ·rtain individual · who tole hi apple l a t yearunle · they ca.1 1 hortly. "

on ultino- \Y itll myself, I 1t wa no kvity of mind. "

fiml

( Thowas a' Ken1pfa.

In endle�

THA

variety, at the

E R (Y M

tore of

R

TO N .

- A L 'l l, -

(' ·!: 7'iN1, < 'ollar. , -fl" H E DY-. f •

( '11ff.�, .Fruu'.IJ Uoo<L· & ) 'a u kf'e rotiou . DE 'L01' H I ' - LATE T TYLE , al way$ on band.

J JOR T ' D EV I L ' F ID D L E8, K ETTLE Dlt f f ' TO I - T O I ' and otll ·r mubical io trum •nt · :uitablc for 'ol lt·g ' purpoRe . AR ro LD & C EA DE H . For sale by


32

COLLEGE BO OK-STORE.

Keeps con tautly o n hand

Dail,1.J

Journals,

and

T ATIO ffiRY

G ne ral

'- chool Book

College Text-books,

all Periodicals

veryth ing

th at is r adabl .

l

Plain and Fancy

L

·

C H R Ol\IO ,

PI TURE ,

Literature,

L ib1·a ri

MP ,

E

CHAl�DELIERS,

GRATING .

�Ponies on all the Greek and Latin read in College.�

IRA H. LOW & 00. TS l'T APOTIIECAJUE'

DRUGGI PHENIX BL O CK.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D al r

GLY ERThTE

--

b · o± all Toilet oap

'IALA G O G

IRA

H. LOW .

.

kind.,. in very Variety. moker ' Arti le

having Bl'ltsh s Mugs ponge� Bay R u m .

&Try .

1'REET.

'E ' and ERRHLl'{E, '.

- Tobacco- nuff-and

�o�somAL-

MA. IN

R O A BAY WA'l'ER, -- PER FUMERY, HAIR - OIL - &c.

@" omb and Bru igar - Pipe

in

Low .

.,,� Co .

.

'oaps

"\Vild Cherry Bitte1 .

& .

generally.

( Ir am�

,

GEO. W. DORR.


Profile for Colby College Libraries

The Colby Oracle 1873  

Colby College’s yearbook for the Class of 1873. (Alternate titles: The Oracle; Colby Oracle; Colby Yearbook.)

The Colby Oracle 1873  

Colby College’s yearbook for the Class of 1873. (Alternate titles: The Oracle; Colby Oracle; Colby Yearbook.)