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the following is a collection of of architecture candidate at re enj


f works by cody seipp, bachelor ensselaer polytechnic institute. joy!


expo current 51 detroit work

"We are continuously engaged in the attempt to organize our surroundings, to structure and identify them. Various environments are more or less amenable to such treatment. when reshaping cities it should be possible to give them form which facilitates these organizing efforts rather than frustrates them." -kevin lynch

Critic | Chris Perry Advisors | Brad Horn, Christianna Bennett, Lydia Kallipoliti The later half of the 20th century reshaped the image of Detroit with dilapidated structures, vacant plots of land, and struggling businesses. In the wake of this blight, government officials, professional planning groups, and community initiatives began to reassure hope for the city through small creative endeavors. In 2017, global tech industry titan, Amazon, announced its aspiration to erect a second headquarters in the United States. The headquarters was estimated to bring over 50,000 jobs and billions of dollars in capital investment. Detroit planners saw this as a potential catalyst for the re-invention of Detroit. In an attempt to stand out amongst hundreds of competing cities, Detroit offered to sell itself to Amazon, submitting complete control over policies, activities, and redevelopment operations. In 2018, Amazon accepted the offer and began rebuilding Detroit as a hyper-designed corporate campus that radically engaged the public realm. The new image of the city rejected automotive transit in favor of public transit and pedestrian movement. Amazon orchestrated the city’s redevelopment over several decades, concluding with EXPO 51, an international exhibition welcoming works of celebrity architects, exponentially increasing tourism, and ultimately giving Detroit a global presence.


downtown detroit Skyline

elevated public

elevated transit

agriculture

mobility & public realm logic


downtown detroit


downtown detroit


project book


interhood

HOUSING UNIT CLUSTER


EXTERIOR VIEW

"Aesthetic Theory is not a frivolous pursuit: as it is the branch of philosophy that deals not only with the artistic categories of the beautiful, but also the forms and products of architecture as they relate directly to individual and collective users." -Mark Foster Gage Critic | Adam Dayem Collaborator | Andres de la Paz A majority of residential neighborhoods fail to facilitate a spatial link between their surrounding developments. Interhood is a melting pot of developed residential typologies that offers a dynamic environment accessed by rich variety of urban dwellers. This housing cluster assumes two major developed typologies: urban & suburban. Public and private nest within one another to facilitate a social condition that challenges a privileged suburban mentality. The civilian experience is open to all property, whether it is physical or visual. An intermingling of vehicular and pedestrian circulation creates moments of high activity and density, which are mediated with large, open areas of stillness and greenery. The varying spatial intricacies of its design promote public meandering and way-finding, rejecting the typically divisive condition that residential communities tend to impose.


Jogged Isometric Section


North-South Section


PARC

"A space exists when one takes into consideration vectors of direction, velocities, and time variables. Thus space is composed of intersections of mobile elements. It is in a sense actuated by the ensemble of movements deployed within it. Space occurs as the effect produced by the operations that orient it, situate it, temporalize it, and make it function in a polyvalent unity of conflictual programs of contractual proximities." -Michel de Certeau


EAST ENTRANCE

Critics | Eric Chruchill, Bryan Kim Collaborator | Allison Turner Facilities for artistic and cultural expression are incredible assets to a community. They unite creative disciplines and strengthen civic pride & character. However, a great deal of centers like this cannot spread their influence throughout an urban setting because of their reliance on event-based program. When performances are not ongoing, the space is essentially dormant. This is why informal space is the primary force behind PARC, a performing arts, recreation, and cultural center situated in downtown Halifax. The organizational focus extends beyond blocks of programs and towards spatial interrelations; how can an in-between space become a moment of attraction? A combination of visual intrigue and experiential opportunism encourages the community to explore the space and make it their own. Event-based program is housed in distinct blocks within a tectonic rib system. These ribs sculpt the circulation and partitions moments both internally and externally. The result is a monumental array of public spaces throughout the site, each of which allow for impromptu performance, general recreation, and cultural exchange events such as markets and craft fairs.


EXISTING SITE

EXTEND STREET LEVEL AS SLOPED ROOF


RAISE PEAKS TO HINT at PROGRam BLOCKS BELOW

LINK PROGRam BLOCKS WITH INFORMAL GatHERING SPACE

INTRODUCE RIB SYSTEM FOR STRUCTURE & Organization

DELamINatIONS ALLOW FOR VISUAL ACCESS & DAYLIGHTING


N

0 1m

5m

10m

MAIN LEVEL

0

1m

5m

SECTION-A

10m


N

0 1m

5m

10m

ROOFTOP PLAZA


MAIN COMMUNITY HALL


controvert

"For the desire to rebuild any great city in a modern way is to engage in a formidable battle. Can you imagine people engaging in a battle without knowing their objectives? Yet that is exactly what is happening. The authorities are compelled to do something, so they give the police white sleeves or set them on horseback, they invent sound signals and light signals, they propose to put bridges over streets or moving pavements under the streets; more garden cities are suggested, or it is decided to suppress the tramways, and so on. And these decisions are reached in a sort of frantic haste in order, as it were, to hold a wild beast at bay. That beast is the great city. It is infinitely more powerful than all these devices. And it is just beginning to wake. What will to-morrow bring forth to cope with it?" -Le Corbusier


STREET VIEW

Critic | Lonn Combs By design, Madison, Wisconsin has little vertical fluctuation; a rigid array of structures maintain a medium to low-rise configuration throughout the urbanscape. The one exception to this vertical occupancy being the Washington State Capitol Building, standing over 200 feet in height. A conservative planning strategy still enacted today projects a height restriction on all buildings within the vicinity of the Capital. Although these regulations do not pose any immediately pressing issues for the urban fabric, the policy does not suit the future condition of Madison. Controvert, a forestry research center, acts as the proponent of a vertical expansion movement. The structure stacks definitively programmed spaces on opposing ends of the site, reaching heights over 200 feet so as to directly defy the Capital building. These forms begin to lean and beckon towards specific edge conditions defined by the surrounding context. The envelope and interior layouts reflect a rigid grid generated from these particular edge conditions, creating a repetitive series of perforations, partitions, and folds. The design embodies a strong sense of opposition to the present context, while simultaneously respecting particular sets of contextual forces.


HEIGHT RESTRICTION

FRACTURED FLOOR PLatES PERMIT VERTICAL CONNECTIVITY

DIVIDED PROGRam STACKS REJECT HEIGHT RESTRICTION

communicating STAIR WRAPS PRIMARY ENCLOSURE

STACKS LEAN TOWARDS SURROUNDING BUILDING EDGES

Elevated PUBLIC SPACE provides LINK BETWEEN STACKS

RECESSED COURTYARD FOR PARKING & PUBLIC Gathering

LAB SUPPORT SPACES WRAP courtyard


TIMBER-CONRETE COMPOSITE WALL FRamE and FLOOR SLABS

VERTICAL Circulation & FIRE STAIRS

GLASS & STEEL CURTAIN WALL

PERFORATED STEEL SHADING & Weather SCREEN .

library

gallery

genomics Restaurant office Conference Laboratory Administration

increas

ing pub lic acc

e ss

Laboratory


RECESSED COURTYARD


FRE

KRIS KUKSI SCULPTURE


section model

"As is true of any other convention, sculpture has its own internal logic, its own set of rules, which, though they can be applied to a variety of situations, are not themselves open to very much change. The logic of sculpture, it would seem, is inseparable from the logic of the monument. By virtue of this logic a sculpture is a commemorative representation. It sits in a particular place and speaks in a symbolical tongue about the meaning or use of that place." -Rosalind Krauss Critic | Fleet Hower Kris Kuksi’s material assembly piece, “Intelligent Redesign,” amasses a collection of individual items and gives new meaning to their form. The dynamic subdivision of volumes fosters a grand, orchestral intensity that radiates a profound response to its surroundings. FRE, Formal Reinvention Exhibit, imagines an artist residency at OMI International Arts Center as once being a sculptural installation referential of Kuksi’s “Intelligent Redesign.” However, rather than a symbolic responsiveness, the sculpture reacts to the changing environment around it in a literal, formal sense. As the surrounding landscape becomes more pampered and manipulated, the volumes of the sculpture begin to swell and swarm the park. The resulting form is composed of two highly contrasting spatial conditions, which is then colonized by the owners of the arts center and converted a multifunctional accessory to the park. The sculpture becomes both extension of the park, allowing visitors to flow through and observe assorted works, as well a live/work space for artists.


TEMPORAL EXHIBITION

main EXHIBITION


section model

aerial view


19

18 20

22 21

1. South entrance 2. Changing exhibition 3. Exterior walkway 4. Cafe 5. Main exhibition 6. Women's restroom 7. Men's restroom 8. Studio 9. Long exhibition 10. Maintenance closet 11. Lounge 12. Kitchen & dining 13. Media resource lab 14. Conference room 15. Director's office 16. South entrance 17. sculpture field 18. Residencies 19. Laundry 20. Practice room 21. Photo room 22. Library & performance space

FLOOR 2


16 15 14

13 8

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12

11

3

10

7

6

17 5

4

2

1

FLOOR 1


sol

"The floor on which one walks, the chair on which one sits, the bed on which one rests, the wall that protects, the roof that shelters, and all other units of the man-built environment are significant for what they are: but they also possess nuclear multiple-force. It is commonly assumed that these are dead objects; actually they present an interplay of action with one another and with nature." -Fredrick J. Keilser Project Coordinator | Alexandra Rempel Collaborators | Deanna Valcour, Sarah Bertis, Sarah Farnham, Zachary Pearson Once an icon of institutional building innovation, the RPI Visitor’s Center has devolved into a vessel of rejection and displeasure. The project utilized a south-facing solar collection space as a means to passively heat the interior. Other manually operated mechanisms allowed for passive cooling in warmer months. The solar space has reached its obsolescence, as the internal systems have been poorly managed and the building now serves as a headquarters for the department of public safety. Sol is a redesign proposal based on empirical data collection and observation. The redesign seeks to implement simple modifications to the solar space in order to make it more accommodating for its users and to alleviate general discomfort within the building’s micro-climate.


EAST-WEST SECTION

SOLAR COLLECTION SPACE


1

existing interior 2 1

daylighting air quality privacy storage thermal comfort

1

white-washed walls & ceiling

2 elevated planters

3

oper wind


rable lower dows

5 1

4

3 6

4 exterior/interior light shelf

5 flyaway bike rack

6 operable translucent roller shades


media solar

roessleville elementary media center (photo taken by mosaic associates)

"The sun never knew how great it was until it hit the side of a building." -Louis Kahn Project Coordinators | Michael Fanning, Christopher Nolte, Shane Gavitt Collaborators | John Ruggieri, Emily Estes Consulting Partner | Alexandra Rempel The manipulation of daylight is a critical game architects are continually engaging in. While solar radiation has the capacity to bring comfort and pleasure to its occupants, it also has the means to negatively intrude on a space. In the winter of 2016, these negative potentials brought me in contact with Mosaic Associates, an architecture practice in downtown Troy. Mosaic was coordinating media center additions to two elementary schools in the Capitol Region. As both additions were nearing the end of the design development phase, they wanted to ensure their south-facing facades were not allowing an unhealthy infiltration of daylight. I was recruited as a consultant for both projects, running solar analysis simulations for a myriad of conditions. Using DIVA for Rhino, I was able to identify issues with glare and propose solutions to allow the most amount of sunlight to penetrate the media centers without causing visual discomfort. Both projects (currently in construction) integrate fritted and translucent glazing in addition to interior and exterior light shelves. Throughout the analysis, I felt it necessary to document the experience and create an instruction manual for the DIVA analysis software. This offers practitioners an accessible means of incorporating daylighting analysis in future endeavors.


Exterior light shelf

Transparent glazing

fritted glazing

translucent glazing

roessleville media center exterior


INSTRUCTIONAL MANUAL WITH PROPOSED SOLUTIONS


roessleville elementary media center (photo taken by mosaic associates)

forest park elementary media center (photo taken by mosaic associates)


fluff

shell prototype with cat on top (photo taken by sarah reynolds)

"A brick doesn't know its neighbor. It's just a brick. Can one know the next one? and know the next one? and get a chain?" -Marc fornes Critic | Holger Schulze-Ehring Collaborator | Lauren Ruskauff Principles of structure are not only meant to influence and refine form; they have the capacity to generate form. Digital fabrication and surface optimization have paved a path for designers to span impressive distances with unconventional materials. Fluff adopts panelization techniques and lasercutting tools to imagine a shell structure at a less familiar scale. The primary constructed surface is composed of 88 unique pieces, stitched together at their edges with interlocking joints. The joints are assigned a particular angle and profile to generate the complete surface topography. Material thickness and aperture size vary depending on load distribution. The shell’s load path terminates at its four corners, which are anchored in a friction-fit pocket. The primary shell is given an additional layer of pillow modules, which give the structure an entirely new aesthetic and functional character. Fluff challenges the characterization of shell structures as an enclosure, suggesting a tactile engagement with the upper surface at the scale of a furniture piece.


full scale shell prototype


3

25

7 24

30

18

12

5

2

19

13

6

1

29 17

11 5.1

16

10

21

15

8

34

28

22

4 9

33

23

27

20

14

32

40

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26 39

35

1/4" mdf 41

46

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52

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43 48

51

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50 56

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54

1/8" mdf

64

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62

53

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71

70

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61

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75 78

83

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68 74

67 73

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85 82

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lasercut profiles

1

cut fabric to mdf plate size

2

stuff cotton between fabric and mdf plates

3

staple fabric to underside of mdf plates

4

adhere pillow to main mdf shell


5'

5'

shell assembly

full scale mdf shell


shell prototype with cat on top (photo taken by sarah reynolds)

shell prototype with cat underneath (photo taken by sarah reynolds)


shell prototype with person on top

shell prototype with person underneath


sonicloud

"All architecture is shelter, all great architecture is the design of space that contains, Exalts, or stimulates the persons in that space." -phillip johnson


tendril footings (photo taken by virgile s. bertrand)

Project Coordinator | Evan Douglis Lead Designer | Parker Bunce The 11th Shanghai Biennale challenged creators around the world to address the conflicts and compromises that arise from inquiry. Evan Douglis Studio chose to pursue inquiry as an experiential device; how can there be a tangible feedback between an occupant and a space? Sonicloud explores movement, perspective, and sensory engagement in a series of single occupant pavilions placed within a Shanghai courtyard. The project stimulates inquiry in its alien presence within a traditional courtyard. Dramatic formal gestures offer ever-changing morphologies to passersby. Delicate tendrils dance up from the ground to support the major volume of the pieces, the “cloud.” The formal mysteries aim to invite passersby to enter the “cloud.” Upon entry, the pavilion is designed to radiate soundscapes and illuminate. The result is an intimate performance exclusive to the occupant. The main clouds are an assemblage of fiber GRP pieces and the tendrils are a series of bent metal tube coated in fiber GRP. The project required a great deal of physical experimentation and a thorough fabrication set. I assisted with the design development phase through construction of a full scale prototype, equipment scheduling, and technical detailing.


full scale cardboard prototype


final installation in shanghai (photo taken by virgile s. bertrand)


ma ta he

Installation Panorama

"Pollution is nothing but the resources we are not harvesting. We allow them to disperse because we've been ignorant of their value." -R. Buckminster Fuller Project Coordinators | Anna Dyson, Demetrios Comodromos, Joshua Draper, Mae-ling Lokko Collaborators | Allison Turner, Elaine Zhang, Elijah Coley, Sarah Reynolds, Vivian Mok In spring of 2016, the Center for Architecture Science and Ecology (CASE) invited undergraduate students to develop a flagship proposal for a working prototype - a panel composed of up-cycled agriculture waste materials such as coconut husk, corn husk, and soy. Student research evolved over the academic semester, and carried into the summer in preparation for a design-build in Accra, Ghana. The panels were configured into an open air pavilion that marked the entrance to the Chale Wote, a street art festival in Jamestown, Accra. The festival hosts a variety of creators throughout the Ghanaian region. The pavilion caught the attention of festival-goers and festival creators alike, stimulating a dialogue of material culture in the built environment. Two curving walls cradled an interior from which a local company sold recycled plastic products. The shading structure is made from recycled plastic fabrics stitched onto local bamboo. I was able to work closely with CASE faculty in the development of the final design, and travel to Ghana to coordinate its construction. The project embodies a hopeful spirit important to the architecture discourse, imagining new potentials in wasted materials and facilitating a profound exchange between cultures.


Bamboo umbrella

upcycled panel

4"x4"x11" Footers

acrylic grill

stepped planter full pavilion Installation


ingredients

heat press in formwork

panel output

flat plates

four angle

step angle

bamboo stalk

cut & peel

Secure with crown

canonical

curve

mirror


miter angled edges

negative angle

top angle

corner

positive angle

stitch on plastic tarp

step

delete

accessorize


west entrance (photo taken by sarah reynolds)

INSTALLatION INTERIOR


WINDOW DETAIL

EAST ENTRANCE


CODY SEIPP Architecture Floor 2 107 14th Street Troy, NY 12180 c: (845) 674.7124 e: seippc2@rpi.edu

Recognitions & Awards • Final Project Awards Review | 2018 • Bedford Traveling Fellowship | 2018 • AIA Westchester & Hudson Valley Undergraduate Grant | 2016 & 2017 • Norman Waxman Memorial Award | 2016 • Rensselaer Design Award | 2015 & 2016 • Rensselaer Leadership Award | 2013 • Rensselaer Grant | 2013 • Dean’s List | 9 semesters • Studio Archival | 7 semesters • Honors Review | 6 semesters

Coursework S’18 • Final Project Design Studio • Architecture Design 2 Course Assistant • Architecture Design 4 Course Assistant

Selected Work www.behance.net/cdseipp https://issuu.com/codyseipp https://sketchfab.com/cdseipp.

Overview Bachelor of Architecture recipient seeking professional opportunity to expand and enhance skillsets in the fields of Architecture, Urbanism, and Fabrication. .

Education Troy, NY Class of 2018

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Bachelor of Architecture

Skills Digital Modelling & Drafting Rhinoceros Sketch Up Revit Maya AutoCAD ZBrush

Fabrication CNC Milling Laser Cutting 3D Printing

Graphics Photoshop Illustrator InDesign

Programming & Analysis Grasshopper Excel Dynamo DIVA Ladybug RISA

Experience Method Design | Summer 2017, Winter 2017 Intern: Assist with predesign discovery packages, site analysis, schematic design, and construction documentation for commerical, residential, and cultural projects throughout the Greater New York City area. Post Design | Fall 2016 - Spring 2017 Intern: Assist with design and installation of Operation Railbridge, a community-based design initiative to revitalize neglected urban infrastructure in Schenectady, NY. CASE | Spring 2016 - Fall 2017 Research/Design Assistant: Assist with integration of advanced research involving agricultural byproducts as building materials, concentrated solar collection, and phyoremediation technology into a shelter in Accra, Ghana built in August, 2016. Evan Douglis Studio LLC | Summer 2015, Winter 2015 Intern: Assist with production and development of Sonicloud Project, an interactive installation set in Shanghai, China. Assist with documentation of glass-blown lighting fixtures. Mosaic Associates | Winter 2015 Daylighting Consultant: Analyze two design schemes for elementary school media centers. Run simulations of daylight and glare performance. Propose alternative design approaches to best mitigate or work collectively with solar radiation given certain design parameters. RPI CANstruction | Fall 2013 - present Co-President: Design and build large structures composed entirely of canned food items which are then donated to the Food Pantries of the Capital District to help feed those in need.

Other Interests Studies drums. Performed with bands at charity events and professional venues. Enjoys creating original rhythms and implementing them in the works of favourite artists such as Dance Gavin Dance and Everything Everything.


ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO_Cody Seipp  
ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO_Cody Seipp  
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