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CONTENTS

November 2019

FEATURES 22

Everything Used Except the Moo!

48

Cattle Caretakers:

Leather Industry Brings Value and Efficency as a Beef Byproduct

Views from Veterinarians

22 Everything Used

MEMBER NEWS 6 20 34

Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective Help Wanted

10

CattleWomen’s Corner

32

Straight Talk: Mike Deering

54

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Convention is the Place to Be

Communications Fail

NOVEMBER 2019

Medical or Nutritional

4

48

Cattle Caretakers

66

Junior Spotlight

68

Capitol Update

Leading for the Future

Efficent Leadership

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 18 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2019 MCA Officers

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

Bobby Simpson, President 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, President-Elect 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, Vice President 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069

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Shorthorn News

David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

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MCF Golf Tournament

2019 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

63

USMEF News

74

Advertisers Index

NOVEMBER 2019

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Tom & Tracy Asher, Asher Farms, Pomona, MO Elizabeth Billups, Palmyra, MO Sarah Bybee, Bowling Green, MO Leo Paul Campbell, Memphis, MO David Cummings, Sarcoxie, MO Braden Dement, Ashland, MO Flentje Farms LLC, Quincy, IL Noah Franke, Franke Farms, Altenburg, MO Eric Fuchs, Fuchs Farms, Mill Spring, MO Jaycee Graves, Fairfax, MO Savannah Gruber, Urbana, MO Luke Hopper Chillicothe, MO Trevor Howlett, Howlett Cattle Co., Flemington, MO Doug Wright, Humeston Livestock Exchange LLC, Humeston, IA Taylor Huskey, Desoto, MO Neil Lenox, Urbana, OH Cyler McClain, Plainview, IL Eric Meusch, Rolla, MO

Caleb Miller, Circle M Agriculture, Rogersville, MO Susan Murray, SEMO Department of Agriculture, Cape Girardeau, MO William Newsome, Neenah, WI David Osborn, Neosho, MO Lane Osborn, Neosho, MO James Paullus, Neosho, MO Brilyn Pearl, Canton, MO Bruce Plummer, Polo, MO Lydia Reitzel, Whitewater, MO Emma Roth, Perryville, MO Madelyn Sowarsh, Cape Girardeau, MO Alyssa Spencer, Cape Girardeau, MO Emily Steinbeck, Odessa, MO Leon Telgemeier, Leon Telgemeier Inc, Sibley, MO Dustin Thompson, Dover, MO David Triplett, Sarcoxie, MO Sidney Wilson, Risen Son Ranch, Willard, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 69

Show-Me-Select™ Replacement Heifers, Inc. Missouri

elect Me-S

Show

Replacement Heifers

• Improving heifer development • Increasing marketing opportunities • Providing a reliable source of quality replacements

2019 Fall Sale Schedule Location Joplin Regional Stockyards, Inc., Carthage, MO Kirksville Livestock Acution, Kirksville, MO Kingsville Livestock Auction, Kingsville, MO SEMO Livestock Sales LLC, Fruitland, MO Farmington Regional Stockyards LLC, Farmington MO F&T Livestock Market, Palmyra, MO

Select

-MeShow

Replacement Heifers

Date Time November 15 7:00 p.m. November 22 6:30 p.m. November 30 11:00 a.m. December 7 11:00 a.m. December 13 7:00 p.m. December 14 12:30 p.m.

For More Information Contact: Judy Burton (573) 289-1979 or check out our website: agebb.missouri.edu/select. The Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifers, Inc. and sales are sponsored by the Missouri Beef Cattle Improvement Association in cooperation with University of Missouri Extension; College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources; Division of Animal Sciences; College of Veterinary Medicine; Missouri Department of Agriculture; and the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.

NOVEMBER 2019

Coordinator Eldon Cole 417-466-3102 Zac Erwin 660-665-9866 David Hoffman 816-380-8460 Erin Larimore 573-243-3581 Kendra Graham 573-756-4539 Daniel Mallory 573-985-3911

Missouri

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NOVEMBER 2019


22nd Annual Production Sale

Saturday, November 30, 2019

Noon, on the farm at Jackson, MO

25 Yearling Bulls 45 Female Lots Many will qualify for the Show Me Heifer Program All will be fertility tested with production data available

CED: +5 BW: +1 WW: +70 YW: +137 Milk: +29 $C: +249

SS Niagara Z29

Including cow/calf pairs and bred cows Productive lots from the heart of the herd

Stevenson Turning Point

CED: +12 BW: -2.5 WW: +58 YW: +120 Milk: +19 $C: +241

CED: +17 BW: -2.3 WW: +56 YW: +91 Milk: +17 $C: +240

CED: +11 BW: +.1 WW: +66 YW: +129 Milk: +28 $C: +308

Barstow Bankroll B73

Connealy Confidence Plus NOVEMBER 2019

DNA tested - “All will be fertility and DNA tested with production data available” Other sires: Vist our Bubs Southern Charm website EXAR Stud for more CTS Remedy information: HA Prime Cut www.ButchsAngus.com 17 Connealy Black Granite


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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS MBA, BQA, and Nicely Done, Beef! With Mark Russell, Executive Director

MBA Closes the Information Gap Between Beef and Consumers Bringing Pasture and Plate Closer Together - Many consumers today have an increasing interest in the beef they eat and how cattle are raised. Market research tells us that consumers trust cattle producers, even if they don’t know exactly what they do or why they do it. The Masters of Beef Advocacy (MBA) program from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, was created 10 years ago to help close the gap between pasture and plate by engaging beef industry advocates and equipping them to effectively communicate with consumers. The program recently recognized 15,000 graduates, making it one of the strongest beef advocacy efforts in the industry. Each year, advocates reach tens of millions of consumers as a result of their advocacy efforts. “Participation in the MBA program is open to anyone,” says Ryan Goodman, director of grassroots advocacy and spokesperson development for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. “This includes everyone, from those working in the beef industry, to consumers interested in helping others learn more about beef and how cattle are raised.”

NOVEMBER 2019

To become an MBA graduate, a series of online lessons must be completed. Those lessons explore the beef lifecycle and answer questions consumers commonly ask about beef production. Advocates then continue to engage with the program through monthly advocacy newsletters and an exclusive Facebook community where updates are provided on the latest consumer trends and beef research.

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Engaging State Beef Quality Assurance Leaders Expands Value of Program’s Efforts - Beef Quality Assurance, which benefits consumers by providing systematic, useful information to U.S. beef producers, stepped up its game in 2019 by engaging the leaders numerous times at the state level.

Through summer meetings of its advisory group and a summer session for state coordinators, along with BQA Train the Trainer Meetings in five states, BQA staff and participants stimulated more knowledge of BQA principles and strengthened the nationally coordinated and state implemented program. BQA features guidelines designed to assure that all beef consumers can take pride in the beef they purchase, thereby improving trust and confidence in the entire beef industry. The common-sense husbandry practices and accepted scientific knowledge it advocates encourage cattle to be raised under optimum management and environmental conditions. BQA is supported by the Beef Checkoff. The Beef Checkoff Program - has helped keep up with the quickly evolving marketing landscape by introducing a new artificial intelligence tool called Chuck Knows Beef. Powered by Google Artificial Intelligence, Chuck Knows Beef is a guide to all things beef – recipes, cooking tips, cut information, production background – and can help source customized responses from content found on the BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com website. He has the knowledge of a rancher, the skills of a chef and the sense of humor of a Dad. Chuck Knows Beef was built on a solid foundation of cutting-edge beef promotion that started more than 25 years ago, when the Beef Checkoff Program gave birth to an iconic consumer brand: Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. At that time, it featured celebrity voices and Aaron Copland’s famous “Hoe-Down” from Rodeo, hitting the airwaves with a force that pushed beef to the forefront of consumer advertising and into the center of the dinner plate. In 2014 the checkoff ’s advertising efforts went 100 percent digital to reach more consumers, particularly older millennial parents, who are more digitally connected. As a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association refreshed and re-launched the long-loved Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner brand in


2017 – an ideal time given that per capita beef consumption was on the rise. Today the brand focuses on promoting beef’s greatest strengths: the unbeatable taste of beef, the people and production process behind beef, the variety and ease of cooking beef, and the nutritional strength that beef provides. These are unique attributes beef has when compared to other protein sources. Complete with an updated logo, a new digital website BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com answers questions consumers have about beef from pasture to plate. Coupled with the strongest assets from the brand’s 25year history – the tagline, the Rodeo music and the strong male voice in advertising – the refreshed Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner brand had more than 160 million consumer touchpoints last year.

For example, one of the ads – “Nicely done, beef. You’ve proven that meat substitutes are just that – substitutes.”, subtly suggests that meat substitutes can’t beat beef while another ad, “Nicely done, beef. You keep the land optimized and fertilized.” showcases the environmental benefits of raising beef. Yet another, “Nicely done, beef. You might be the only meat that gets better with age.”, showcases the great taste of beef. The new ads allow beef to bring the primary messages about taste, nutritional value and the amazing stories of the people who raise it, to the consumer with one brand voice, look and feel.

During that time, more than 11 million people visited the new website, which has answers to the questions consumers have about beef. Nicely Done, Beef! You’ve Created a Hit with Consumers As part of the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner brand relaunch, a series of new creative digital advertisements and videos were created to appeal to a younger generation by being more edgy, bringing back some of the beef swagger with tongue-incheek humor and clever plays on words. Utilizing the tagline, “Nicely done, beef,” the new ads are meant to communicate that beef is the number one protein and position beef’s core benefits – the stories of the amazing people who raise beef, the strength and nutritional benefit beef provides and the unbeatable taste of beef.

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JAYLOR 5425 SERIES MIXERS. IN STOCK AND READY FOR THE FARM.... $37,400 Moscow Mills (636) 366-9400 Curryville (573) 594-6493 Tipton (660) 433-5596 Hermann (573) 486-3204 Dutzow (636) 433-2256 Salisbury (660) 388-6166

www.JAYLOR.com

NOVEMBER 2019

sydenstrickers.com

Mexico (573) 581-5900 Macon (660) 385-2177 Rocheport (573) 446-3030 Kirksville (660) 665-1500 Chillicothe (660) 646-5493 Palmyra (573) 769-2112

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“W oper e’ve mo ation ved o I-44 to ex across th ur sales i e t 22, hig Co west unty Ro then sou hway” ½ m ad 10 th on ile o n Bla 0 then ckbe rry.

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Further Thoughts on the 2017 National Sire Test Source: Matt Woolfolk, American Shorthorn Association Director of Performance Programs In the February issue of Shorthorn Country, there was a Performance Review from the 2017 ASA National Sire Test (NST) at the University of Illinois highlighting what we gathered from the data on the first set of Shorthornsired calves to go through the NST program. The first round of the NST created some positive energy among breeders who are interested in performance testing and using data in their breeding programs. With this project, a lot of data was collected that is either new to the industry or hasn’t been as prevalent in the Shorthorn database. There have been some questions as to what data is the most important or should be emphasized by Shorthorn breeders. I don’t think there is a single correct answer to that, but I certainly have an opinion on what I think is important to consider as a breeder, as well as the Shorthorn breed as a whole.

Crestmead Farm Herd est. 1888

NOVEMBER 2019

Registered Polled Shorthorn Bulls For Sale Gentle, Good EPD’s Delivery Available

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Herd Sire for Sale. Waukaru Global 4099.

Bill Betteridge 660-888-9790 Kaylan Cassil 573-823-9512

Sire Test Field Day.

Feed Intake

Having the NST calves on a GrowSafe system is the cornerstone for building a data bank for feed efficiency traits. While we do have some breeder submissions into our database, the NST data is the largest and most diverse set we have been able to collect to this point. While there are several pieces and parts to feed efficiency data, I feel that feed intake measurements are an integral piece. Measuring feed intake is a direct tie to feed costs. Simply put, cattle that eat less are going to have a lower feed bill. As agricultural input costs continue to rise, identifying cattle and genetics that can perform adequately on less feed is becoming more valuable. We have been able to collect and analyze cattle’s ability to gain on feed for a long time, but adding the intake piece to the puzzle gives us more opportunity to dissect the information. Figures such as Feed to Gain ratio and cost per pound of gain allow us to measure growth performance while factoring in efficiency and the economics of feeding cattle. Over the 188-day feeding trial, the average dry matter intake for all cattle was 18.6 pounds per day, with a range from 13.1 to 23.6 pounds of dry matter per day. Over the course of that feeding period, the difference in the high and low intake


calves from the NST comes out to 1,974 pounds of dry matter consumed. Regardless of your feed costs, that’s a significant difference in what it will take to feed a calf to market.

Carcass Merit

As seedstock producers, carcass traits are several steps removed from our operations at the cow/calf level. In general, I think as seedstock producers we sometimes do not emphasize carcass traits because they don’t directly affect our bottom line (unless we are retaining ownership of feeder cattle). However, producing carcasses that meet industry standards does have an impact on our customers, as well as those who are buying and feeding their calves. Cattle need to meet grading standards in order to be eligible for premiums on the grid, and they need to do so with an acceptable yield to avoid discounts. The cattle in the 2017 NST were successful in meeting these benchmarks, with 85% of the cattle grading USDA Choice or better, which is right in line with the current industry standards. In terms of USDA Yield Grade, 86% of the cattle graded YG 3 or lower. These cattle were able to produce enough red meat product without excess fat cover. The protocol for the NST is a good representation of what cow herds are like in our nation’s commercial industry, and these cattle met the marks that they needed to hit in order to produce cattle that are profitable on the rail.

6 scale) were taken on all cattle at weaning. 74% of the cattle graded as a 1 (Very Docile) when evaluated for temperament at weaning. While docility is viewed as a trait to make cattle work easier and safer, it had an effect on performance in the NST. The average weaning weight ratio for the cattle that scored a 1 for docility was 101, while those that scored 2 or 3 averaged a 97 weaning weight ratio. The cattle with scores of 1 had higher marbling scores and better feed to gain ratios as well, requiring less feed per pound of gain. Over the 188 day feeding trail, the 1-scored cattle had an ADG 0.19 pounds per day more than their counterparts scored as 2 or 3. That’s an additional 36 pounds gained. In our constantly evolving industry, we can’t sit still in our pursuit of breeding better cattle that fit what the customer wants. In recent times, demand has developed for docile, above average carcass merit, and low-maintenance, feed efficient cattle. I don’t see those traits becoming deemphasized anytime soon. In fact, I would bet that we continue to hear more about the need for cattle that fit these criteria moving forward. The breeders and breeds that make a commitment to raising these cattle will take a place at the forefront of the industry. Thanks to the NST, we have an opportunity to identify Shorthorn genetics to fill the needs and gain our position at the front of the herd.

Docility

I think we can all agree that docility is a trait of importance in the operation. While labeled by many as a “convenience trait”, I believe there are more cowmen that would define it as a necessity rather than a convenience! In the 2017 NST, docility scores (1 to

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

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David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

NOVEMBER 2019

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month:

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Communications Fail There are some communications experts chastising those of us sharing information about the ingredients and health risks of fake meat products. They say sharing negative information about these products doesn’t look good on us. I counter with doing nothing certainly doesn’t look good on us. I spent many years in agricultural communications, and it always blows my mind when very educated colleagues say we shouldn’t give the opposition credibility or elevate their message by pointing out facts that may be perceived as negative. We are told to take the high road and only focus on the positive. Give me a break. While that strategy has merit in certain situations, it is rare. That’s old school thinking predating social media. Some hide behind that outdated philosophy because doing nothing carries less risk than jumping in the fire. The fake meat companies have millions of dollars and skilled communications professionals to elevate their message. Sharing factual information about these products is not giving them any new attention but may help a friend think twice about replacing beef in their diet. The rhetoric behind these products is alarming. It is no secret fake meat companies are relentlessly coming after the livestock industry. One of the biggest is Beyond Meat. Part of their mission states, “We are creating one savory solution that solves four growing issues attributed to livestock production: human health, climate change, constraints on natural resources and animal welfare.” Or how about the messaging behind Impossible Foods and its so-called “Impossible Whopper?” It claims that “using animals to make meat is a prehistoric and destructive technology.”

Executive Vice President Let’s venture over to Memphis Meats where their magic happens in a petri dish using DNA from livestock. They claim to be the world’s savior from destructive families making a living off the land. Their site states, “We believe that the planet will be the ultimate beneficiary of our product.” Don’t forget Paul Shapiro, former Humane Society of the United States Vice President of Farm Animal Protection, wrote the “nonfiction” book, “Clean Meat” on lab-grown food. I’ve read this 256-page bestselling trash and it’s scary that this way of thinking is celebrated by many. These companies are coming after us. They want you gone. I agree we have a story to tell, and we must be positive in communicating about the good things we do for the environment and our animals. That’s sound advice but ignoring this extremism is the wrong strategy. Playing nice and only telling our story isn’t going to cut it. We must push back on the rhetoric villainizing farm and ranch families and aggressively communicate why our products are healthier and not full of questionable ingredients. Advising you to enjoy the gut punch is not something you will hear from me. We cannot pretend to live in Mayberry where our biggest fear is what mishap Barney will get into. We will continue our fight on behalf of the families who are the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


NOVEMBER 2019

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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Lafayette County Lafayette County Cattlemen have been busy grilling and promoting beef! Two full crews worked at the Beef House at the Missouri State Fair, Saturday, August 10 and Thursday, August 15. Both were busy days and members enjoyed visiting with fairgoers and legislators. Members got a little help from KC Wolf grilling over 600 beef burgers for the Wood & Huston Tailgate Party August 30 before the Lafayette County C-1 Husker football game. (A few pictures were taken with the Chief’s cheerleaders as well!) The grill team served up ribeye sandwiches for MFA Agriservices in Odessa at their annual fall beef meeting on Tuesday, September 10. The annual Higginsville Country Fair is one of the largest cookouts we serve, and this year was no exception. Saturday, September 21 found LCCA members in downtown Higginsville. Ribeye sandwiches, 1/3 lb. beef burgers and 1/4 lb. hot dogs were on the menu. As usual, it was a sell-out day.

Extra help is always welcome at the LCCA grill.

On Sunday, September 22, we served the same menu at the Kleinschmidt’s 50th anniversary Rodeo held at their store location. Unfortunately, the weather set in just as predicted and although the cowboys toughed it out, the spectators headed for dryer ground. We enjoyed visiting with the cowboys from Mississippi that took refuge in the trailer during the worst of the storm.

Kingsville Livestock Auction

NOVEMBER 2019

Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

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Show-Me-Select Bred Heifer Sale Saturday, November 30 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

The rodeo doesn’t stop due to a “little” rain and mud!


Dallas County Area cattle producers heard about “How to be Competitive in Today’s Cattle Market” at the October 8 meeting of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association (DCCA). Speaking to the group at the O’Bannon Community Center in Buffalo was Steve Tegarden, senior territory manager for Merck Animal Health. We would like to thank Merck for sponsoring the delicious brisket meal catered by Halfway FFA advisor Jeff Voris and his students. Tegarden’s presentation for the evening focused on parasite control, which he considers the center of any health platform. The prevalence of parasites in cattle can affect feed intake, average daily gain, conception rates, a healthy functioning immune system, and the efficacy of vaccines. Tegarden touted the use of his company’s Safeguard and Panacur wormers. When used at the same time as wormer from the Avermection class (such as Dectomax, Ivomec, Cydectin or Long Range), studies have shown 99.6% effectiveness. In feedlot cattle it has been proven that there is a $10 return for each $1 spent on Safe Guard. Tegarden also discussed using Ralgro to stimulate weaning weights. Ralgro can increase weaning weights by as much as 20-35 pounds in calves. Buffalo FFA student representative Devyn Rackley thanked everyone who supported the chapter’s recent labor auction and pie auction.

Speaking to the group at the O’Bannon Community Center in Buffalo was Steve Tegarden, senior territory manager for Merck Animal Health.

Our annual meeting will be held November 12 at Prairie Grove School. As always, we look forward to Mike Deering as well as some other special guests spending the evening with us!

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St. Clair County Cattlemen St. Clair County Cattlemen met Tuesday, October 8, 2019, at Osceola School District in Osceola. There were 33 members and guests present. Raysha Tate, ag business specialist with MU Extension presented on the topic of succession planning. Raysha discussed how vital a succession plan can be in the continuation of a business or farm to the next generation. With this being said, only 30% of second-generation family owned businesses are successful. This number is so low due to lack of planning and communication between family members. Raysha then went over the elements within a succession plan that would need to be discussed in order to help a family business transition to the next generation. The six elements Raysha touched on were 1) conduct a S.W.O.T. analysis, identifying your farm’s Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats allows you to accurately plan for what you want in the future, 2) review your financial records to assess if the farm can support another family from the farm income, 3) determine your farm’s direction to properly plan and set goals, 4) identify and develop successors to make them the best they can be, 5) implement transition gradually, and 6) monitor progress and be willing to make changes as needed. Throughout the discussion, Raysha drove home the point the biggest factor of all was communication. Without discussing what you want or plan on happening, it will not only make succession harder but may lead to the failure of the business. Raysha concluded the talk by saying a lot more goes into the creating of a succession plan, and you can discover more in her program “Your Farm, Your Business, Your Future” where they focus on the planning for retirement, succession, and estate planning.

NOVEMBER 2019

St. Clair County Cattlemen have been a busy group the past month. The cattlemen sent four cattle to Powell’s Meat Company for the MO Beef for MO

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Meeting at Osceola.

Participating in Food for America day.

Kids program. A special thanks to our donors: Josh Salmon, Larry and Rhonda Shelby, Eddie Meredith, and Craig Johnson. The cattlemen will send more cattle throughout the school year as the schools need the beef. St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association was a part of Food for America day hosted by the Lakeland FFA. The cattlemen served hot dogs and Larry Shelby talked to the students about the importance of beef. The students were also given a goodie bag with a coloring book, activity book, pencil and my plate literature. Thanks to Lakeland FFA for letting us come be a part of Food for America. We also set up and sold 150 ribeye steak sandwiches at the Apple Festival in Appleton City and cooked 200 ribeye steaks for Wheeler Livestock Auction Customer Appreciation Day. Our annual meeting is scheduled for November 9, 2019, at 6:30 p.m. at Assembly of God Church in Osceola.

Cooking at Wheeler Customer Appreciation Day.


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Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

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21320 Hwy 179 • Jamestown, MO 65046 Lifetime Member of the American Angus Association Since 1957

NOVEMBER 2019

MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

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Vernon County The Vernon County Cattlemen met at 3 Cedars Event Center for their October 17 meeting. A big thank you goes to Ed Trotter of Zoetis and Carl Johnson of Vernon County Farm Bureau for sponsoring the meal, which was prepared by the Gobblers Roost. A big thank you goes to the Vernon County Cattlemen for sharing their trailer with Rinehart Christian Church. Each Saturday in October the church hosted a free corn maze for the public, complete with inflatables, a corn pit, fire pits, hot dog lunch, face painting, pumpkin painting, hayride, petting zoo and outdoor games. The trailer worked great and was very appreciated. It even matched the Fall decorations!

Approximately 50 people attended and earned their BQA Certification. We really appreciate Dr. Erik Andersen, DVM, for conducting the training.

Editorial Note:

NOVEMBER 2019

Please send County News items via email to: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Andy Atzenweiler Deadline for the 2019 December Convention issue is November 15.

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Polk County The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association met at Smith Restaurant on October 10. There were about 70 members present at the meeting. Wehrman Insurance sponsored the meeting. Greg and Clint Wehrman talked about the pasture insurance, cattle price insurance and other products that NAU Country offers. President Keith Stevens updated the members on cookings and other activities in the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association.

There were about 70 members present at the meeting.

The next meeting will be Thursday November 14, at Sacred Heart Church in Bolivar. This meeting will be held with Extension, and there will be several speakers. It will be starting at 4:30 p.m., and is a great opportunity to listen to some good speakers, and eat a good meal.

Mark Driskell From NAU Country giving a presentation.

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Nodaway County On Friday, September 6, the Nodaway County Cattlemen Association partnered with the Gentry County Cattlemen’s Association to coordinate a 2019 Beef Tour. A total of 31 people attended the event to learn about various aspects of the beef industry. The tour included stops and a presentation from staff at Valley Oak Steak Company in Lone Jack, Trans Ova Genetics in Chillicothe and Show Me Ethanol LLC in Carrollton. The group culminated the tour by stopping in St. Joseph for dinner at Boudreaux’s Louisiana Seafood & Steaks. In addition, the Nodaway County Cattlemen Association held their first fall meeting on Thursday, September 19. The program for the meeting featured Dr. Eric Bailey, assistant professor of CAFNR and state beef extension specialist for the University of Missouri Extension. Dr. Bailey shared best practices for calf weaning protocols and answered many questions. The organization provided a meal of grilled steaks and catered sides to all members attending the meeting.

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Lastly, on September 19, the Nodaway County Cattlemen Association donated and grilled hamburgers and beef hot dogs for 75 attendees at the annual Big Brothers Big Sisters Match Picnic in Nodaway County.

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Barton County The Barton County Cattlemen met September 9, 2019, at Memorial Hall in Lamar Missouri. A beef brisket dinner, catered by Scott Noting, Lamar, Missouri, was sponsored by Seed and Farm, Lamar. Our speaker was Mike John, Director of Health Track Operations, MFA, Inc. He discussed traceability and how it can be used to prevent the shutdown of the beef industry. He used the example that several years ago uncooked meat was taken to Europe from Africa containing foot and mouth disease. It started to spread. In Europe, many local butcher shops process 8 to 10 animals a week, whereas in the United States some plants process as many as 7,000 a day. In the U.S. if an animal has a disease such as foot and mouth and the animal goes through a sale barn, by the next day, it could be infecting cattle in as many as 17 different states. Through the individual identification of animals, the infected animal’s original location can be easily be made known and can be checked to see if other infected animals are at the original location. With identification, the source can be isolated and unaffected animals can remain in the market. Many are requiring the RFID tags in the ears of animals, such as show animals currently. Identification

can be useful in the stockyard sales as well to identify where the animal originated. RFID tags can also be used to manage herd health feed efficiency, average daily gain and the optimum harvest date. The Barton County Cattlemen’s Association met October 17, 2019, in Lamar, Missouri. A brisket dinner was enjoyed, sponsored by Maneval Inc. Grain and Feed. Levon Tipton, a resource conservationist at the Jasper County Natural Resources Conservation Services office in Carthage, Missouri, was our speaker. He presented a program that will cost share for the construction of an animal feeding and waste facility. This is not a containment structure; but to be used to feed cattle under a roof. This program is called the Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQUIP). He explained the qualifications and how the requirements can be met. The resource conservationist will work with the cattleman on the application process and the contract. He will also help with any questions. He described what the limitations are on the building and how the cost share is determined. There are caps on the amount of coverage for a roof, waste transfer, and waste storage. Our next meeting will be November 18, 2019, at 7 p.m. at Memorial Hall in Lamar, Missouri.

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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The October 1 meeting of the Southwest Missouri Cattlemen had only 55 in attendance but an excellent roast beef meal kicked off the evening. The caterer was Prime Cut, Monett. Sponsor was Crown Power, Monett and Vermeer. Boyd Quinley, territory manager for Vermeer along with Cory North explained the various pieces of forage handling equipment. The company handles balers, rakes, mowers, bale processors, haylage wrappers and tedders. Their highlight of the evening was a video that showed a self-propelled baler that is not available yet. Of course, everyone wanted to know how much will it cost? The reply was “around $200,000. Cory mentioned the trend is to wet wrap more forage, and that’s an area Vermeer is working on. The question was asked about disposing of all that plastic, both the wrap and the net wrap. He had no answer but said they’d refer that to the research folks.

Cody Washam describes the many services he and his family provide for local cattlemen.

During the business session, Russell Marion reported on the booth activity at the SW Center Field Day for the public and FFA students on September 12. He, Rebecca Mettler and Scynthia Schnake visited with the visitors about Cattlemen Association activities. Rebecca and Scynthia talked about how to communicate via social media, smartly. Several students even “liked” the Facebook page while they were describing it. President Jeff Kaal asked David Cope, Southwest Center superintendent to add comments. David said actual FFA attendance was just over 1,500 students. He invited the cattlemen to attend the ribbon cutting for the new building on October 25.

Kenny Elbert believes in keeping his hay covered as much is possible or at least setting it on his well-drained area.

NOVEMBER 2019

The tour on September 21 had around 115 in attendance with lots of favorable comments. As usual the grillers are very busy in October with Ozark Fall Farmfest, Mt. Vernon Apple Butter Makin’ Days, at least two member’s purebred sales and more.

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Tour attendees select steers that Russell Marion will enter in the Missouri Feedout.


Cedar County The Cedar County Cattlemen met on October 4, 2019, at the Land O’ Lakes Youth Fairgrounds in El Dorado Springs at 6:30 p.m. The evening started with a presentation by the Missouri Beef Industry Council on the MO Beef for MO Kids school lunch initiative. The sponsor and speaker for the evening was Mike Richner, Premier (Missouri) Livestock Supplements and Mike Ferguson, Chr Hansen. They spoke about the value of feeding cooked mineral tubs and probiotics to livestock and how these supplements improve herd health and performance. Miranda Lowrey presided over the business portion of the meeting. She announced the winners of the whole beef raffle, which was Jeff Stacy and Randy Cooper, each received a half beef. We would like to say a big thank you to Tom Bryant for donating the steer.

Thank you, Tom Bryant, Pet Rock Ranch, for donating a steer to raffle!

Mike Richner (left) and Mike Ferguson share how properly formulated mineral plus probiotics will improve herd health.

NOVEMBER 2019

Mark Russell, MBIC, shares the benefits of the MO Beef for MO Kids program.

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Hickory County On Thursday, October 10 the Hickory County Cattlemen met for our monthly meeting at the McCarty Senior Center in Wheatland. More than 60 members and guests opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by the invocation led by State Representative Warren D. Love. After the blessing of the meal, sloppy joes prepared by Ginger Culbertson along with sides and desserts prepared by members in attendance, it was time to get to down to regular business! The 2019 Skyline FFA Agronomy team, who qualified for FFA National Contest by winning the state competition this Spring were our special guests. The team members included Madison Haynes, Sabrina Turnbow, Chris and Connor Logan and Dax Beem. The Hickory County Cattlemen, in reward for the FFA team’s hard work and dedication to vocational agriculture, were each awarded a $25 gift certificate to spend on their trip to nationals in Indianapolis this fall. The Hickory County Cattlemen’s Association is beyond proud to have such dedicated and hard-working youth not only involved in our community, but also in our association. We want to wish them the very best in competition and safe travels. Being the first regular meeting of fall, President Carl Button touched on some of the activities of the group over summer.

NOVEMBER 2019

On Saturday, June 22, the Hickory County Cattlemen had the special opportunity to host the 50/50 raffle at the Lucas Oil Invitational Pro Bull Ride held at Lucas Oil Speedway. With the help of members and many junior members, Hickory County Cattlemen’s Association was able to raise $1,102 for the chapter which will go towards our scholarship program. One of our association’s most important matters of business each year is awarding one scholarship to all four Hickory County schools to graduating seniors who show strong qualities of community leadership, academic achievement, and interest in the advancement of agriculture. President Button commended Lucas Oil for the great opportunity afforded to the group to raise funds at such a great local event.

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On Thursday, August 8, opening day of the 2019 Missouri State Fair, the Hickory County Cattlemen worked the first shift of the Missouri Beef House. Our 14 members made their way to Sedalia to cook and serve a beef lunch to fair-goers. The Beef House is an annual tradition at the State Fair where fair-goers can enjoy a fresh, hand-prepared beef lunch of burgers or ribeye

steaks. It is a great event to promote a beef diet and work with different Missouri cattlemen and beef enthusiasts from around the state. On Saturday, July 6, the Hickory County Cattlemen cooked a beef lunch for visitors of the annual Market Days, held on the Hermitage Square. Although there wasn’t a large turnout, members were happy to be able to have the opportunity to promote a beef diet to Market Day visitors and have a positive presence in the local community. Jake Drennon from Windsor Livestock was the October special guest. He invited Katie Stewart, of Missouri Farmers Care Group to speak about a special program that is taking shape statewide. MO Beef for MO Kids is a program in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Agriculture and Missouri Beef Industry Council to help get more local beef in the diet of public schools. In conjunction with this program, local producers can donate to local schools to help ensure that public school lunch programs have more beef on the menu. The goal is to double the amount of beef served to public school children. Currently, Stewart claimed, roughly 1 in 10 school meals feature beef. There are guidelines that local producers must follow, and agreements to be made by local schools and producers, but it was clear that there is local interest in looking further into the program for opportunities to put more local beef on the menu of our local schools. Next month’s regular meeting will be held November 14 at the Weaubleau High School. All regular members, and beef enthusiasts are encouraged to attend. Meetings consist of great food, friends, and beef fellowship. If you’re not a member but would like to join or would like more information, ask a member! We’d love to have you as a member of our Hickory County Beef family! (Continued in the December issue)


Douglas/Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, October 8, 2019, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri, at Club 60 Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a steak dinner with sides sponsored by the Red Angus Association of America. President Ernie Ehlers welcomed the group and gave a treasury report. The board has received 12 essays for the 2019 Douglas/Wright County Cattlemen’s Bred Heifer Essay Contest, and the board of directors will be spending the next few weeks narrowing them down to the top three.The top three essays will be read at the November 12, 2019, meeting, and the the winner will be announced at the meeting on December 2. Ernie proceeded with a blessing before the meal, and 62 members in attendance enjoyed fellowship during dinner. Following dinner, the presentation commenced by the Red Angus Association of America’s Commercial Marketing Director, Harold Bertz. He discussed the many benefits and details of using Red Angus genetics in our herds, along with the marketing programs available when doing so. The FCCP Yellow Tag Program is amongst the most popular when the calf proves to be at least 50% Red Angus, and allows for age and source verification of calves sent to feedlots, and can be traced

back to their farm/ranch of origin. To learn more about the program, visit RedAngus.org. The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their next meeting on Tuesday, November 12, 2019, at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove, Missouri. We look forward to welcoming Hannah Kelly, our 141st District State Representative, as the speaker. Cattlemen in the area are always welcome and encouraged to attend.

Cass/Jackson County In August, the Cass/Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association worked the Missouri Beef House on opening day of the Missouri State Fair. In September, we held our annual picnic at the Harrisonville City Park with grilled steaks and hamburgers. Jordan Johnson and Levi Rushly provided the expertise on the grill for the 35 members and guests present. Congratulations were offered to Bruce and Tracey Mershon for their selection as the winners of the 2019 Beef Producers Improvement Federation “Commerical Producer of the Year.” On October 15, 2019, the association met at the Harrisonville Community Center for a soup and dessert meal and to listen to Dr. R.C. Ebert of the Pleasant Hill Animal Clinic for a presentation on regulations coming concerning electronic ear tags for animal I.D. for disease tracing. The 39 members and guests also heard about several magazines that provide good information on various subjects concerning animal health. The business meeting concerned upcoming elections for 2020 and the vacancies to be filled. Also, the November 19 meeting with its Thanksgiving meal was discussed and what organization(s) to consider sponsoring. The scholarship committee discussed their progress and what outlines to follow.

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Six Show-Me-Select Heifer Sales Set for Fall Season Across Missouri Source: Duane Dailey, University of Missouri Extension COLUMBIA, MO. – Six sales of Show-Me-Select heifers from spring-calving herds are set for this fall. The sales extend a Missouri benefit for beef farmers. The fall auctions offer bred heifers with known development and genetics. They come from farms in the University of Missouri Extension heifer program. Six sales run from Nov. 15 to Dec. 15. Next spring sales will offer fall-calving heifers. SMS heifer protocols use 22 years of research, says David Patterson, MU beef reproduction specialist. The program continues to improve with new findings.

Sales often make news when heifers set record prices. “Prices are bid up by satisfied buyers returning for more,” Patterson says. “They learned the value of proven heifers.” “Show-Me-Select sales are educational events,” the MU specialist says. “Buyers learn data that improve their herds.” Advantages are many. First-calf heifers are difficult to manage and suffer high death loss at calving. Prebreeding exams help farmers cull heifers that can’t produce a live calf. With better genetics, heifers improve herds. They replace cows of lower value. While sales make big news, the real value grows in participating farm herds. Farmers enrolled benefit big; but, buyers gain as well. When buying in replacements, farmers need not do detailed development work themselves. Only heifers certified by local MU Extension livestock specialists qualify for sales. Show-Me-Select heifers carry

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a black-and-gold logo ear tag. MU specialists manage sales which are run by SMS producers. Fall sales offer bred replacements that will calve next spring. Spring sales sell from a growing number of fall-calving cow herds in Missouri. Each sale offers a catalog with data on each heifer. That adds value. Producers guarantee their heifers to be bred. Consignments are pregnancy checked twice by veterinarians. All heifers are checked by graders from the Missouri Department of Agriculture. Any with faults are sent home. Sale dates, times, locations and area extension specialists are: • Nov. 15, 7 p.m., Joplin Reginal Stockyards, Carthage; Eldon Cole, Mount Vernon • Nov. 22, 6:30 p.m., Kirksville (Mo.) Livestock Auction; Zac Erwin. Kirksville • Nov. 30, 11:30 a.m., Kingsville (Mo.) Livestock Auction; David Hoffman, Harrisonville • Dec. 7, 11 a.m., SEMO Livestock Sales, Fruitland; Erin Larimore, Jackson • Dec. 13, 7 p.m., Farmington (Mo.) Livestock Auction; Kendra Graham, Farmington • Dec. 14, 12:30 p.m., F&T Livestock Market, Palmyra; Daniel Mallory, New London

MU Extension field specialists survey buyers after sales to check satisfaction

After each sale MU Extension specialists survey buyers to check satisfaction. Buyers like known expected calving dates. With ultrasound, veterinarians see stage of calf development at pregnancy checks. Daniel Mallory with the Palmyra sale learned projected calving dates were 98% accurate last year. In southwest Missouri, Eldon Cole, sale manager at the Joplin Regional Sale, found buyers liking calving ease. His returns, so far, show no calving help needed. All calves survived. Specialists find the calving-ease trait often brings early delivery, ahead of predicted date. At sales, they urge buyers to start watching heifers early.

The Show-Me-Select heifer program is part of the MU College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources, the MU College of Veterinary Medicine and MU Extension.

NOVEMBER 2019

Ahead of sales, buyers can find the latest information each event on the web: AgEBB.missouri.edu/Select/sales/sales.php

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Medical or Nutritional One of the most important traits of a good feedlot manager is the ability to assign blame. That is the reason they often employ consulting vets and nutritionists. It keeps them from having to fire regular employees. Unfortunately it also pits the vets against the nutritionist in their everlasting battle to decide whether a problem is “nutritional” or “medical”. The feedlot manager sat across the desk from his nutritionist of the month and his Vet de Jour. He spoke, “I’ve been looking at our death loss records and we’ve had a lot of bloats this month.”

NOVEMBER 2019

“Obviously nutritional,” interjected the vet who sat back relieved.

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“Now let’s not jump to conclusions.” said Super Nute. “I just read an article in the Academy of Sciences Journal where they suspect an increase in esophageal thickening in mastodons during the last ice age which could lead to interference with normal rumen gas elimination thus contributing to the increase in bloating. And you know it’s been a cool autumn.” “What!” said the vet.


Nute continued, “And not only that, you are aware that sudden decreases in atmospheric pressure may increase the gas pressure inside the rumen. I’ve been keeping daily records of the barometric pressure which proves my point,”

“Well, I’m breathing a lot of fertilizer in this room,” said the manager. “How ‘bout the increasing incidence of brainers?”

The manager wiped his eyes. “In addition we’re losing more weaners than normal to pneumonia this fall.”

“Thiamine deficiency,” said the vet.

“Obviously medical,” said the nutritionist, glad to be out of the hot seat.

“Organism”, said Nute.

“Bad eyes?” asked the manager “Wheat chaf”, said the vet.

“Well, yes,” admitted the vet, “but I’ve not been able to culture any visual bugs out of the lungs so they should be responding to our treatment. But they aren’t which leads me to believe it could be something in the hay or possibly the supplement which is the initial causative agent. Maybe a mineral deficiency or ration imbalance.”

“Viral”, said the nutritionist.

“What!” said the nutritionist.

“Yes, but as I recall,” said Nute, “they ran over him in the sick pen.”

Merlin, the vet continued, “Plus the original insult may be the result of calves breathing ammonous fertilizer.”

“I give up,” gasped the manager. “Oh, I see we had one die from trauma, he was hit by a feed truck.” “Definitely nutritional,” said the vet.

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NOVEMBER 2019

…on Friday in Bowling Green.

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Harrison County

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Moniteau County

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Knox County

Moniteau County


ShowMe Genetic Services LLC Purchases Genex Facility in Strafford, Missouri Source: ShowMe Genetics STRAFFORD, Missouri — ShowMe Genetic Services, LLC announces its purchase of the GENEX Custom Collection facility, Strafford, Missouri, from GENEX Cooperative. The agreement was finalized Oct. 18, 2019. Locally owned and operated by the Steven and Jamie Rogers family, ShowMe Genetic Services, LLC will focus on custom semen collection, freezing, semen and embryo storage, shipping, liquid nitrogen tank refills and retail sales of artificial insemination breeding supplies. ShowMe Genetic Services is accredited through Certified Semen Services, which allows the collection, freezing and shipment of bull semen for export. At capacity, the facility can house 78 bulls. “We are dedicated to serving the agriculture industry,” said Steven Rogers. “We hope to help farmers and ranchers succeed by adding value to the beef industry, and the purchase of the GENEX Custom Collection facility in Strafford is a natural fit for us.”

ShowMeGenetic Services plans to retain the current staff in the day-to-day business operations to maintain the highest level of customer service and satisfaction to provide a seamless management transition. “We are proud to serve our fellow cattle producers here in the heart of cow/calf country as they continue to improve the genetic base of their operations,” Rogers said. “Providing custom bull semen collection services allows our customers to protect their investments in high-quality herd bulls.” Long-time breeders of registered and commercial Red Angus cattle with Jamie’s parents, Jim and Jan Lile, the Rogers’ farm near Strafford. The Rogers are also involved in the family’s quarry business and maintain leadership roles in a number of local, state and national agricultural organizations.

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Red Angus Excel at Missouri State Fair Carcass Steer Show Source: Missouri Red Angus Association The Missouri Red Angus Association is pleased to announce results from the 2019 Missouri State Fair Carcass Steer Show featured considerable success for Red Angus sired steers. Reserve Grand Overall, Reserve in Hotel/Restaurant Class and Champion Red Angus Carcass steer was shown by Caleb Casebolt. Caleb is from Kansas City and the son of Richard and Vicki Casebolt. Sired by Jacobson Freedom 4056, this steer weighed 1385 pounds grading Choice 60 with a Yield Grade of 2.01. Missouri Red Angus awarded Casebolt $750.00 for the Reserve Overall and Champion Red Angus Carcass Steer. The second top-placing Red Angus Carcass Steer, placing 4th in the Hotel/Restaurant class, as selected by the carcass judge, was exhibited by Gracie Rogers of Princeton, daughter of Nathan and Carrie Rogers. Sired by Jacobson Freedom 4056, this steer weighed 1375 pounds grading Choice 20 with a Yield Grade of 1.96. Missouri Red Angus awarded Rogers $250 for the Reserve Champion Red Angus Carcass Steer. Additionally, Kaylee Lower of Weaubleau FFA exhibited a Red Angus steer that was Champion in the Lean Retail Division. Sired by Feddes Oscar X28, this steer weighed 1190 pounds grading Select with at Yield Grade of 0.44. Kaylee is the daughter of Dr. Brent and Amy Lower.

NOVEMBER 2019

Were a total of 6 registered Red Angus steers entered in the carcass show, all of which were born and raised in Missouri. This is the second time in 3 years that a Red Angus sired steer has placed either Grand or Reserve Grand Overall in the Missouri State Fair Carcass Show.

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The Missouri Red Angus Association exists to promote the Red Angus breed and to foster cooperation and communication amongst Red Angus breeders and commercial producers in our state. This award program is designed to highlight the carcass value of Red Angus genetics and reward exhibitors for their achievement in the carcass show.


August Exports Strong for U.S. Pork; Beef Exports Below Last Year U.S. pork exports continued to post very strong results in August, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), while beef exports were below the recordlarge totals of August 2018. August pork exports increased 22% from a year ago to 221,586 metric tons (mt), while export value climbed 19% to $588.8 million. These results pushed JanuaryAugust export volume 4% ahead of last year’s pace at 1.7 million mt, while value increased 1% to $4.35 billion. Pork export value averaged $54.18 per head slaughtered in August, up 22% from a year ago. For January through August, the per-head average was down 2% to $51.70. August exports accounted for 27.1% of total U.S. pork production and 23.7% for muscle cuts only, up significantly from a year ago (21.9% and 19.2%, respectively). January-August exports accounted for 26.4% of total pork production and 23% for muscle cuts, both up slightly year-over-year. August beef exports totaled 114,119 mt, a 4% decline from last year’s large volume, while export value ($690.3 million) was down 8%. January-August beef exports were slightly below last year’s record pace, declining 2% in volume (881,526 mt) and 1% in value ($5.44 billion). Beef export value per head of fed slaughter averaged $298.94 in August, down 7% from a year ago, while the January-August average was down 3% to $309.85. August exports accounted for 14% of total U.S. beef production and 11.3% for muscle cuts only, down from 14.3% and 12.2%, respectively, last year. Through the first eight months of the year, exports accounted for 14.2% of total beef production and 11.6% for muscle cuts, down from 14.6% and 12.1%, respectively, in 2018.

Emerging markets strong for U.S. pork, even as exports rebound to China and Mexico Although still held back by China’s retaliatory duties, China/Hong Kong was the largest destination for U.S. pork in August at 63,656 mt, more than tripling the August 2018 volume, while export value climbed 160% to $137.6 million. For January through August, exports to China/Hong Kong were up 38% in volume (356,322 mt) and 17% in value ($717.9 million). Since Mexico removed its 20% retaliatory duty on U.S. pork in late May, exports have rebounded significantly but are still trailing the record-large numbers posted in 2017. August exports to Mexico were down 1% yearover-year in volume (61,365 mt), but value increased 18% to $121.1 million. A slow start to the year still weighs on January-August exports to Mexico, which were down 11% from a year ago in both volume (473,309 mt) and value ($821.8 million). “China’s demand for imported pork has increased steadily over the past few months and the U.S. industry is well-positioned to help fill that need,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “But the really positive story behind these numbers is that even as U.S. exports to China/Hong Kong have surged and exports to Mexico rebounded after the removal of retaliatory duties, demand in other markets is proving resilient and continues to grow. This is exactly why the U.S. industry invested in emerging markets over the years, and it is definitely paying dividends.” The U.S. and Japan recently announced an agreement that will bring tariffs on U.S. pork in line with those imposed on major competitors, and August export results illustrated the pressing need for tariff relief. August volume was down 19% to 28,240 mt, while value fell 18% to $120.1 million. Through August, (Continued on page 64)

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exports to Japan trailed last year’s pace by 6% in both volume (250,540 mt) and value ($1.03 billion). U.S. exports of ground seasoned pork to Japan have been hit particularly hard by the tariff gap (20% compared to 13.3% for the European Union and Canada), with Japan’s imports through August falling by 28% — nearly $60 million — compared to last year.

million. In mid-September, South Korea confirmed its first cases of African swine fever (ASF), with 13 outbreaks reported in the northwest corner of the country near the border with North Korea. While the disease is still confined to a relatively small area, ASF is certainly a pressing concern for Korea’s domestic pork industry.

January-August highlights for U.S. pork include: Led by steady growth in mainstay market Colombia and surging demand in Chile, exports to South America climbed 28% above last year’s record pace in volume (105,344 mt) and 30% in value ($264.7 million). Shipments to Peru cooled in August but have also contributed to export growth in 2019.

ASF has also impacted pork production in Southeast Asia, especially in Vietnam but also recently spreading into the Philippines. While U.S. exports to the ASEAN trailed last year’s pace by 10% in volume (35,164 mt) and 19% in value ($81.1 million), the region’s need for imported pork is likely to trend higher in coming months.

Exports to Central America were 16% above last year’s record pace in volume (60,727 mt) and 19% higher in value ($147 million). Honduras and Guatemala are the largest Central American destinations for U.S. pork, and MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62 exports trended higher to both markets. Panama, Costa Rica and Nicaragua also contributed to regional growth, with exports increasing by double digits. Exports to Oceania were up 38% from a year ago to 77,556 mt, while value increased 32% to $217.1 million. A key destination for hams and other muscle cuts used for further processing, exports to Australia jumped 36% from a year ago to 69,692 mt, valued at $192.5 million (up 31%). Growth to New Zealand was also impressive, with exports up 52% in volume (7,864 mt) and 48% in value ($24.6 million). While January-August exports to South Korea were down 9% from last year’s record pace in volume (145,690 mt) and fell 10% in value ($411.8 million), August exports were up significantly as volume climbed 27% to 14,336 mt and value surged 35% to $42.2

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

U.S. beef exports cool in August, but remain on strong pace After setting new value records in June and July, U.S. beef exports to South Korea slowed 9% from a year ago in August to 22,307 mt, while value dropped 11% to $157.4 million. But for January through August, exports to Korea were still 8% ahead of last year’s record pace in volume (174,290 mt) and 10% higher in value ($1.26 billion). Korean import data through August showed double-digit growth for U.S. beef in the top two cut categories: short rib and short plate/brisket. The United States accounted for more than 55% of Korea’s chilled/ frozen beef import volume, up from 53% in the first eight months of 2018. Similar to pork, the U.S. beef industry looks forward to gaining tariff relief in leading market Japan, where August exports slipped 15% from a year ago to 28,646 mt. Value was down 22% to $164.3 million, although it is important to note that exports in August 2018 were a post-BSE record $209.3 million. For January through August, exports to Japan were 3% below last year’s pace in volume (217,698 mt) and 4% lower in value ($1.36 billion). Beef variety meat exports to Japan (mainly tongues and skirts) have been a bright spot in 2019, increasing 31% in volume (44,617 mt) and 18% in value ($260 million). U.S. tongues and skirts face higher duty

Jim and Scott Cape… 57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840


rates than competitors’ products but are tariffed at 12.8% compared to 38.5% for U.S. muscle cuts. “The U.S. beef industry is extremely excited at the prospect of lower tariffs in Japan, as 38.5% is the highest rate assessed in any major market,” Halstrom said. “As we’ve seen in Korea, where the tariff rate was once 40% but has been reduced by more than half, lower tariffs make U.S. beef even more affordable for a wider range of customers. While the agreement still needs parliamentary approval in Japan, importers are already enthused and preparing for long-awaited tariff relief.” January-August beef exports to China/Hong Kong fell 24% from a year ago in volume (60,259 mt) and 20% in value ($510.7 million). Several factors have impacted U.S. exports to the region, including street protests in Hong Kong that have slowed commerce and tourism. While supermarket sales remain strong in Hong Kong, the disruption has been particularly hard on the restaurant sector. Although China remains a small destination for U.S. beef and exports are hampered by China’s retaliatory duties, January-August volume increased 23% from a year ago to 5,625 mt, valued at $44.7 million (up 12%). January-August highlights for U.S. beef include: Exports to Mexico, the third-largest international market for U.S. beef, were slightly lower than a year ago in volume (156,528 mt, down 1%), but value increased 5% to $729.5 million. Beef variety meat exports to Mexico were down 3% from a year ago to 62,504 mt, but commanded better prices as export value increased 12% to $166 million. Although beef exports to Taiwan were modestly lower year-over-year in August, January-August exports were still 10% percent above last year’s record pace in volume (42,785 mt) and 7% higher in value ($383.9 million). Led by surging demand in Indonesia and solid growth in the Philippines and Vietnam, beef exports to the ASEAN region were 27% above last year’s pace in volume (37,206 mt) and 12% higher in value ($180.6 million).

For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

Beef exports to the Dominican Republic continue to reach new heights, as volume increased 45% from a year ago to 6,060 mt, while value climbed 35% to $48.6 million. Halstrom noted that the temporary loss of a major processing plant to a fire likely had a negative effect on August exports, but he does not expect to see a lasting impact. “Beef supplies are tight throughout the world but the U.S. maintains a supply advantage, as production is expected to be record-large in 2020,” he said. “Both domestic and international demand for U.S. beef remains strong, and there is significant potential for further export growth, especially once the U.S.-Japan agreement is implemented.” Lamb exports trend lower in August August exports of U.S. lamb were down 12% year-overyear at 1,193 mt, while value declined 8% to $1.84 million. For January through August, exports remained 32% above last year’s pace at 10,626 mt, while value increased 13% to $17.5 million. Lamb muscle cut exports were 17% lower than a year ago in volume (1,397 mt) but slightly higher in value ($9.5 million, up 1%). Markets showing promising muscle cut growth included the Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago and Panama.

“Dedicated to Producing”

No Excuse Herefords Offering One of the Area’s Largest Selection of Breed Leading EPD Hereford Bull Prospects at the Farm!

J. D. Bellis Family Herefords Jim D. and Carla Bellis 19264 Lawrence 2170 Aurora, MO 65605 Cell: 417-466-8679 E-mail: jimbellis@missouristate.edu

NOVEMBER 2019

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock

Strong August results in Central America pushed exports 4% above last year’s pace in volume (9,898 mt) and 10% higher in value ($56.7 million), led by a strong performance in Panama and steady growth in Guatemala and Honduras.

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SALE REPORTS Pasture View Angus 9.12.19 – Dunlap, IL 198 Total Lots............................................... Avg. $5,256 Gardiner Angus – Fall Bull Sale 9.30.19 – Ashland, KS 364 Older Bulls............................................. Avg. $5,462 105 Bred Heifers........................................... Avg. $3,928 18 Bred Cows................................................ Avg. $2,541 331 Commercial Bred Heifers...................... Avg. $1,736 12 Commercial Bred Cows........................... Avg. $1,650 28th Annual Genetically Yours Journagan Ranch/MSU Sale 10.5.19 – Springfield, MO 26 1/2 Bulls.................................................... Avg. $2,540 62 Females..................................................... Avg. $3,674 Jac’s Ranch Production Sale 10.5.19 – Bentonville, AR 35 Registered Bulls........................................ Avg. $3,030 88 Registered Females................................... Avg. $4,397 Express Ranch – Rancher’s Bull Sale 10.7.19 – Yukon, OK 149 Older Bulls............................................. Avg. $5,436 105 Yearling Bulls......................................... Avg. $6,014 30 Bred Heifers............................................. Avg. $1,861 300 Commercial Bred Heifers...................... Avg. $1,658 32 Commercial Pairs..................................... Avg. $1,331 J&N Ranch’s Fall Production Sale 10.12.19 – Leavenworth, KS 19 Black Hereford Bulls................................ Avg. $5,285 21 Black Hereford Cows............................... Avg. $2,821 8 Angus cows................................................. Avg. $2,363 44 Commercial Bred Heifers........................ Avg. $1,530

Circle A Fall Bull & Heifer Sale 10.19.19 – Iberia, MO 14 1/2-blood Wangus bulls............................ Avg. $6,892 18 1/4-blood Wangus bulls............................ Avg. $4,489 39 Angus bulls............................................... Avg. $3,935 50 Bred heifers.............................................. Avg. $1,946 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Association 10.19.19 – West Plains, MO 21 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $2,664 3 Yearling Bulls............................................. Avg. $2,900 15 Open Heifers............................................ Avg. $1,223 4 Bred Heifers............................................... Avg. $1,475 3 Bred Cows.................................................. Avg. $1,633 16 Fall Pairs................................................... Avg. $2,606 3 Spring Pairs................................................ Avg. $3,100 3 Embryos........................................................ Avg. $250 Frank/Hazelrigg Cattle Company 10.20.19 – Fulton, MO 64 Registered Bulls........................................ Avg. $4,092 12 Open Heifers............................................ Avg. $2,441 7 Bred Heifers............................................... Avg. $2,042 14 Bred Cows................................................ Avg. $2,878 12 Fall Pairs................................................... Avg. $2,700 3 Pregnancies................................................ Avg. $7,166 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus 10.21.19 – Nevada, MO 38 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $5,736 37 Bull Calves............................................... Avg. $5,250 1 Open Heifer............................................. Avg. $28,000 18 Commercial Bred Heifes.......................... Avg. $2,067

NOVEMBER 2019

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

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SALE CALENDAR Nov. 1 Nov. 1 Nov. 1-2 Nov. 2 Nov. 2

Moser Ranch Bull Sale, Wheaton, KS Jamison Hereford Sale, Quinter, KS GeneTrust Sale, Concord, AR Worthington Angus Sale, Dadeville, MO Seedstock Plus Red Reward Fall Sale, Osceola, MO

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

Nov. 2 Nov. 2 Nov. 9 Nov. 9 Nov. 9 Nov. 15 Nov. 16 Nov. 18 Nov. 22 Nov. 23 Nov. 23 Nov. 23 Nov. 30 Nov. 30 Nov. 30 Dec. 7 Dec. 7 Dec. 13 Dec. 14

Red Tie Event at Brickhouse Farms, Salem, MO Ridder Farms Charolais Sale, Hermann, MO Four State Shorthorn Sale, Diamond, MO 23rd Annual Show-Me Plus Gelbvieh & Balancer® Sale, Springfield, MO Moriando Sale, Mt. Vernon, MO Show-Me- Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Joplin Regional Stockyards Show-Me Polled Hereford Classic Sale, Windsor, MO Green Springs Spring Bull Test Sale, Nevada, MO Show-Me- Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Kirksville Livestock Auction Sydenstricker Genetics Sale, Mexico, MO Seedstock Plus - Two Sales - One Day, Kingsville, MO Dalebanks Angus Bull Sale, Eureka, KS Show-Me- Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Kingsville College of the Ozarks Hereford Sale, Point Lookout Butch’s Angus Sale, Jackson, MO Wright Charolais Sale, Kearney, MO Show-Me- Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Fruitland Show-Me- Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Farmington Show-Me- Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Palmyra

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

NOVEMBER 2019

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

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Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048


MBC Classified AAA Announces the MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only Ten Missouri Breeders The 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of who Registered the month before an issue. Most Angus “REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, The 10 producers who registered the most Angus beef cattle in the state of Missouri recorded a total of 4430 Angus with the American Angus Association® during fiscal year 2019, which ended September 30, according to Mark McCully, Association chief executive officer. The 10 top recorders in Missouri are: Alan W Mead, Barnett; Sydenstricker Genetics Inc, Mexico; Kenny Ogden, Lockwood; Square B Ranch & Cattle, Warsaw; Jim & Sherry Brinkley, Milan; Galaxy Beef LLC, Graham; Hawk Angus Farms, Bolivar; Hopewell Farms Livestock LLC, Paris; Jerry Bennett Farms Inc, Browning; Tharp Cattle Co, Naylor. Angus breeders across the nation in 2019 registered 304,577 head of Angus cattle. “Despite a challenging year, our Angus breeders continue to see strong demand for Angus genetics,” McCully said. “Our members are committed to providing genetic solutions to the beef cattle industry that maintain our long-held position as a leader in the beef cattle industry.”

“REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. The American Angus Association is the nation’s largest beef breed organization, serving nearly 25,000 members across the United States, Canada and several other countries. The Association provides programs and services to farmers, ranchers and others who rely on Angus to produce quality genetics for the beef industry and quality beef for consumers. For more information about Angus cattle and the Association, visit www. ANGUS.org.

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Advertiser Index American Angus Association ............................... 19 American Shorthorn Association.......................... 29 Bellis Family Herefords......................................... 65 Buffalo Livestock Market...................................... 64 Butch’s Angus Sale................................................ 17 Callaway Livestock Center Inc............................. 31 Central Missouri Sales Co.................................... 72 Circle A Angus Ranch.......................................... 37 Classified............................................................... 73 Clearwater Farm................................................... 37 College of the Ozarks Sale.................................... 28 Crestmead Shorthorn............................................ 30 Dalebanks Sale...................................................... 33 Eastern Missouri Commission Company............. 55 F&T Livestock Market.......................................... 38 Four State Shorthorn Sale..................................... 31 Galaxy Beef LLC.................................................. 37 Gallagher Fence.................................................... 47 Gerloff Farms........................................................ 37 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick............... 37 Green Springs Tested Bull Sale............................. 41 Green’s Welding & Sales....................................... 54 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.................................... 37 HydraBed.............................................................. 52 Jim’s Motors.......................................................... 64 JJ Skyline Angus................................................... 37 JRS ....................................................................... 61 Kingsville Livestock Auction................................ 34 Marshall & Fenner Farms..................................... 37 MCA Convention............................................. 13-16 Missouri Cattlemen’s Leadership College............. 18 MCA Membership Form...................................... 69 MCA Presidents Council...................................... 67

NOVEMBER 2019

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION

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“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

MCA Proud Member Signs.................................. 70 McBee Cattle Co................................................... 63 McPherson Concrete Products.............................. 73 Mead Cattle Co..................................................... 53 Mead Farms.......................................................... 37 Merck Animal Health........................................... 75 Missouri Angus Association.................................. 37 Missouri Angus Breeders...................................... 37 Missouri Beef Industry Council - MBMK............ 21 Missouri Valley Commission Company............... 55 MLS Tubs............................................................. 39 Naught-Naught Agency......................................... 35 NCBA Convention ad........................................... 59 Northeast Show-Me-Select Sale............................ 46 Orys O7 Red Angus ............................................ 40 Preifert .................................................................... 3 Richardson Ranch................................................ 37 Sellers Feedlot....................................................... 42 Show-Me-Select Sales............................................. 7 South Central Regional Stockyards...................... 71 Southeast Show-Me-Select Sale............................ 46 Southwest Show-Me-Select Sale........................... 51 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef.............................. 37 Stockade................................................................ 43 Superior Steel Sales............................................... 27 Sydenstricker Genetics.......................................... 37 Sydenstricker Genetics Sale..................................... 2 Sydenstricker Implement - JayLor......................... 25 Valley Oaks Angus................................................ 37 Vitalix.................................................................... 76 Weiker Angus Ranch............................................ 37 West Central Show-Me-Select Sale....................... 50 Westway Feed.......................................................... 9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate........................... 65 Wheeler Livestock Market.................................... 45 Mike Williams....................................................... 65 Windsor Livestock Auction................................... 74 Zeitlow Distributing.............................................. 72


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Profile for Macey Hurst

November 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

November 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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