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CONTENTS

May 2019

FEATURES 16 40

Stronger Together

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Cattle Community Comes Together for Disaster Relief

MCA Junior Show Preview

MCA All- Breeds Junior Show Preview

June 6-9, 2019 • Sedalia, Missouri

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Hooves & Health

Adverse Spring Weather Can Lead to Hoof Problems and Performance Loss

MEMBER NEWS 6 12 28

Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

Stronger Together

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COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective The Hat

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Property is the Fruit of Our Labor

Sign Sale to Benefit MCA PAC

Three Wheel Roping

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Junior Spotlight

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Cowboy Poetry

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CattleWomen’s Corner

Showmanship & Fellowship

Spring

Day Out in Jefferson City

MAY 2019

ON THE COVER:

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Photo by Coby Wilson

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 12 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

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Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

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CBB News

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MBIC Election Legal Notice

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Simmental News

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Brangus News

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LMA News

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NCBA News

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Advertisers Index

2019 MCA Officers

Bobby Simpson, President 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, President-Elect 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, Vice President 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2019 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

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AllisonCoats, Richmond, MO Clarence Dailing, Dailing Ranch, Plato, MO Danny Goth, Montrose, MO Carson Long, Long Farms, Cabool, MO Darrell Neuner Jr., Lexington, MO Westen Niermann, Hollywood’s Herefords, Stockton, MO Randy Phillips, Tebbetts, MO Taylor Phillips, Lees Summit, MO Justin Sambo, Eolia, MO John Kevin Stiles, Mercer, MO Katie Walker, El Dorado Springs, MO Jason Wieczorek, Wieczorek Farms, Perry, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 79

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Property is the Fruit of Our Labor Carved in stone in the rotunda of the Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City are words that speak volumes to who we are as Missourians and Americans. The next time you are at the Capitol, look up and you will see these simple words: “Property is the Fruit of Our Labor.” That is who we are as Missourians. It’s who we are as Americans. It’s who we are as farmers and ranchers. We are stewards of the land and our freedom to own property is a fundamental right that we hold dear and will fight relentlessly to defend. When you look back on how this country was founded, private property rights are at the very core of this nation’s creation.

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Hundreds of farmers and ranchers from every region of the state put much-needed farm work on hold April 16 to head to Jefferson City to stand in firm defense of those sacred rights. These families were pushing for immediate passage of House Bill 1062, sponsored by Rep. Jim Hansen (R-40). The legislation would make it more difficult for a private, for-profit entity to acquire eminent domain.

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It’s true, the urgency of this legislation is in response to the Public Service Commission granting eminent domain for the Grain Belt Express project in late March. Private investors will now have the authority to take land from private landowners in eight counties. Rep. Hansen made clear this is far bigger than eight counties. House and Senate leadership, as well as Lieutenant Governor Mike Kehoe, called it a Missouri issue. Simply put, this project will undoubtedly lead to more. Other states have stood firm and rejected the notion of setting a precedent for private companies to acquire cheap land through eminent domain from private property owners and it’s time Missouri does the same.

Executive Vice President Farm and ranch families understand the purpose of eminent domain. Many may not like it, but they get it. It is also understood that this authority should only be used as a last resort for the most essential needs of Missouri citizens and not for private development. While figures on this project seem to change constantly as investors scramble to convince decisionmakers of its legitimacy with countless promises, the latest number I have heard is that 12 percent of the energy will stay in Missouri. The rest will reportedly be sold at a higher price in Indiana and further East. This is not what landowners consider a justified reason for taking their property. Some municipalities were promised cheap power by investors. I get that, but at what cost. Lt. Gov. Kehoe, who is also a cattleman, responded best. “I know municipalities may be able to save a little bit on electricity, but giving up somebody else’s property rights to do that, I just think is a bad tradeoff. I think property rights have to be first and foremost in our mind.” Call your elected leaders in Jefferson City and ask that private property rights remain at the core of who we are as Missourians with a yes vote on HB 1062. Remind them to look up and read the powerful words: “Property is the Fruit of Our Labor.”


Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Gearing Up for May is Beef Month!

With Samantha Riley, Director of Education and Marketing What is Your Checkoff Working On? Promotional and educational efforts at the state and national level continue to reach more and more consumers every day with the beef message. Consumers now eat 8.9% more beef in 2019, than in 2015, and demand has increased 15% since 2012. The Beef Checkoff continues to expand into new markets, with Chuck Knows Beef, the artificial intelligence available on Alexa and Google Home devices. These innovative ways to reach consumers, continue to drive beef demand. Whether its retailers using Chuck to educate consumers at the meat case, or teaming up with bloggers to share great beef recipes while they use Chuck, consumers have a multitude of ways to learn about beef; from how to choose cuts, to recipes for dinner. Chuck is all-beef -knowing, easily accessible, powered by Google AI, constantly learning, and even provides a fun personality, with the occasional dad joke from time to thyme.

These three attributes, pleasure, people and protein, showcase beef’s taste and attainable eating experience for anyone. Appealing to the millennial mom, who comes from a generation who needs quick and easy meals, “Nicely Done” showcases the beef eating experience can be simple enough to incorporate into the meal plan rotation, over and over again. Beef supplies their families with a nutritious source of protein they can feel good about. Beef demand isn’t only strong for retail consumer consumption, but also at foodservice establishments. 97% of foodservice establishments report having beef on the menu, which in turn has been shown to increase restaurant traffic by 45%. (2017 Usage and Volumetric Assessment of Beef in Foodservice study) More than ever, beef is what people want on their plates. This trend of consumer demand increasing and the beef industry gaining momentum shows no signs of slowing down.

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Chuck Knows Beef, the all-beef knowing sidekick in the kitchen, is sure to help consumers feel more confident when cooking beef.

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The “Nicely Done” campaign continues to receive great response from consumers, with its catchy phrases showing consumers beef is relevant and accessible, to a younger generation. This campaign focuses on the taste of a delicious beef meal everyone knows and loves (the pleasure), the dedication of our beef community and how a tasty beef meal gets to their plate (the people), and the strength beef provides (the protein).

MBIC and May is Beef Month The Missouri Beef Council will be busy for beef month. Working with KFEQ in St. Joseph, there will be an entire segment on their station on May 7th to highlight May is Beef Month, specifically focusing on ways that consumers can use the new craze – the InstaPot – to cook beef! Another segment airing on May 20th, will focus on the beef industry and taking listener questions, via call in. MBIC will be participating in one education event in Kansas City - Nutrition Adventure, and cosponsoring the Hospital Hill Run in Kansas City at the


end of May to promote beef and share with consumers and influencers how beef is such a powerful protein and can fit any lifestyle. MBIC partners with several county Cattlemen’s Associations in their efforts to promote beef in May is Beef Month, beginning in April and running through May. SEMO Cattlemen’s are hosting a youth education field day for 3rd graders on April 24th in Jackson, using the Beef O’Keefe activity books provided by MBIC as well as beef sticks. This event includes a live beef cattle exhibit and discussion about nutrition, by products and cattle production.

Junior Show June 7-9. New for 2019 is the costumed chef portion in addition to the Burger Bragging Rights Contest. Chefs must choose a theme for their burger and dress in costume to represent the theme! These events are great for young advocates to get experience that they can help to use spread the beef message from now and into the future. For those interested, visit the mobeef.org website for further details. Not only do junior members get to present a tasty burger, but judges also quiz them on how to prepare beef, what’s going on in the beef industry and the nutrition of beef.

The Benton County Cattlemen’s are setting up a booth at their local G-W Foods in Warsaw. They plan to hand out beef sticks and beef coupons to shoppers at the grocery store while sharing with them the power of beef in the diet. The Polk County Cattlemen’s are hosting a similar event at the Woods Supermarket in Bolivar on May 25th. They plan to cook beef tri-tip and serve to customers entering and leaving the store, while sharing with them how they too can cook a tri-tip at home. They also plan to share pamphlets provided by MBIC about other recipes, cuts and cooking tips. Dallas County Cattlemen’s is hosting an event for fourth grade students from Buffalo and Urbana on April 23rd at the Dallas County Fairgrounds. This event rotates the children through several stations educating them on the complete story of “pasture to plate”. Students will be served all beef hot dogs and receive prizes at the stations, including items made from byproducts of cattle, like crayons or soccer balls.

MAY 2019

Junior Member Burger Bragging Rights and Speaking Contests Get excited Junior MCA members! The Burger Bragging Rights and Costume Contest and the Extemp Speaking Contest are back again this year for the MCA All Breeds

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Cattlemen’s Beef Board Names New CEO Souce: CBB CENTENNIAL, CO (Apr. 16, 2019) -- The Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion & Research Board (CBB) has named Gregory Hanes of Colorado as their new chief executive officer, effective June 17, 2019. “Knowledge of beef producers and the overall beef industry is a must in this role,” notes Chuck Coffey, CBB chairman from Davis, Oklahoma. “Greg is wellregarded – both here in the U.S. and abroad – for his background and understanding of promoting beef and building industry relationships.” The Beef Board is a body which oversees the Beef Checkoff and works very closely with the USDA, state beef councils, contractors, beef industry leaders and cattle producers. As a result, the person who serves as the Beef Board’s operational leader needs to function in many different roles and in many environments. According to Coffey, Hanes fits that description very well. “Greg is extremely talented with a diversified skillset,” said Coffey. “He already has knowledge of the Beef

Checkoff, and he’s an outstanding public speaker who clearly articulates his message, has a great work ethic and is a team builder at all levels. Most importantly, he is passionate about the beef industry. The Cattlemen’s Beef Board is elated to have him as part of the team.” Hanes comes to the CBB from the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) in Denver, Colorado, where he most recently was vice president of international marketing programs, and he led the marketing team through global strategic planning processes. Hanes also served as the USMEF liaison to the beef industry and worked with a variety of national and state beef organizations. From 2006 to 2009, he was the director of the USMEF’s Tokyo-based office, where he was responsible for all activities occurring in Japan. During his time as the USMEF Japan director, Hanes lived in Japan for nearly 11 years. Throughout his time overseas, he was the only foreigner in a Japanese company, and he held an additional position with responsibilities across Asia. Hanes currently serves as the chair of the U.S. Agricultural Export Development Council (USAEDC), a group comprised of 80 U.S. commodity trade associations, farmer cooperatives and state regional trade groups from around the country, representing the interests of growers and processors of U.S. agricultural products.

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In addition to a master’s degree in international management with an emphasis in marketing from the Thunderbird School of Management at Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona, Hanes also holds a B.A. in economics from Colorado College. Hanes was born and raised in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

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For more information about the Beef Checkoff and its programs, including promotion, research, foreign marketing, industry information, consumer information and safety, visit DrivingDemandforBeef.com.


Missouri Beef Industry Council Director Election - Legal Notice Notice is hereby given that the Director of Agriculture will be conducting an election to fill three positions on the Missouri Beef Industry Council Board of Directors. One regional council member is to be elected in each of Regions 1, 4 and At-Large. Terms of office are three years. Any cattle producer within the specified regions of the State of Missouri who is producing cattle for market and the legal owner of one or more head of cattle becomes eligible to vote in the election by registering at his/her respective Farm Service Agency (FSA), or electronically at http://mda.mo.gov/councils/ prior to July 19, 2019. Cattle producers who have voted in any of the previous three (3) elections are not required to register unless their address has changed. The Missouri Department of Agriculture will mail ballots to registered producers August 16, 2019. Ballots must be postmarked no later than August 31, 2019 to be valid. Any qualified producer may be nominated and have his/ her name placed on the ballot provided the independent

nomination is accompanied by petition of not fewer than 100 producers in the nominee’s region and written permission of the candidate. Petitions must be delivered to the Director of Agriculture on or before July 19, 2019. Petition forms are available from the Missouri Department of Agriculture by calling 573-526-4620.

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Northeast Missouri

Show-Me-Select

Replacement Heifer Sale June 1, 2019 • 6:00 p.m. F&T Livestock Market • Palmyra, Missouri Sale located 5 miles south of Palmyra on Hwy. 24

110 Crossbred & Purebred Heifers Mostly Angus & Angus Cross Heifers with BWF Simmental, and some Red Angus

Mostly bred A.I. to: Connealy Comrade 1385 KG Solution 0018 KM Broken Bow 002 S S Traveler T510 2T22

MAY 2019

Program Requirements: • Heifers meet standards for reproductive soundness, pelvic size, BCS, wt., and are blemish free • Bulls meet strict CE requirements • Strict immunization program • Heifers will calve from mid August to December 1 • All Heifers are tested & Negative for BVD-PI

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www.nemobeef.com For info. contact… Daniel Mallory 573-985-3911 malloryd@missouri.edu


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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Pat & Patty Wood, MCA Beef House Managers Sign Sale to Benefit MCA PAC Did you miss out on getting the bid for a custom metal art sign at Convention in January? Thanks to the generosity and sponsorship of LAG Industries, the Missouri Beef House patio entrance will have new custom metal art signs on display on a yearly basis. “With a common vision and a continuing commitment to work together for the good of agriculture, we appreciate the opportunity to partner with the Cattlemen, ” said the Brackmans. The Brackmans of LAG Industries have partnered with the Missouri Beef House to bring a unique opportunity to the highest bidder, the chance to put your name or business on a 9” x 48” metal sign. The custom metal art signs will be on display for a year and will become the buyer’s possession at the end of the year, buyers cannot be a competitor of the Missouri Beef House or LAG Industries, and the design details will be worked out by the buyer in cooperation with LAG Industries and the Missouri Beef House.

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We will auction the Missouri Beef House patio entrance/

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southside sign opportunity at the Cattleman’s Steak Fry held in June. The proceeds will benefit MCA’s Political Action Committee, whose purpose is to be involved in the political process by supporting those elected officials who support the beef industry as well as those issues that directly impact the nature of the beef business. So, mark your calendar now for June 8, 2019, and be ready to make a bid on this unique opportunity for a custom metal art sign with your name or business to be displayed June 2019 to June 2020 at the Missouri Beef House patio entrance! Thought for the Month: “What do you call a cow with no legs? Ground beef!


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Beef, Dairy Collaboration Launches HOLSim™ Program

First-of-its-kind branded program promises to reshape beef-on-dairy opportunities. Source: American Simmental Association Bozeman, MT — The American Simmental Association (ASA) and Holstein Association USA (HAUSA) have announced the formation of the HOLSim™ branded program. The program identifies elite SimAngus™ bulls with specific production attributes as mating solutions for dairy producers who breed some of their herd to beef. The program’s objective is threefold: to provide additional revenue to dairy producers through the production of value-added terminal calves; to offer new marketing avenues for progressive beef seedstock operations; and to offer a consistent supply of highquality calves better situated to capture market premiums.

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“Holstein producers now have the opportunity to easily participate by simply selecting from the list of HOLSim bulls carried by their semen provider,” says Chip Kemp, ASA Director of Commercial and Industry Operations.

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“Through the International Genetic Solutions platform, we took a breed agnostic look at what type of beef bulls make the most sense to complement a Holstein female to add the most profitability to the terminal calf.” Qualifying for the sire list is not easy, and bulls that do so represent an elite group of beef genetics. All bulls in the program will be required to include the HOLSim logo in all marketing and promotional material. “The bulls must be homozygous black, homozygous polled, have a minimum birth weight accuracy of .4, and meet a minimum threshold in the HOLSim Index,” Kemp explains.


The HOLSim Index uses the IGS Feeder Profit CalculatorTM (FPC), the industry leader in feeder cattle evaluation, as the foundation for this effort. The results from the FPC are then adjusted for the unique economic situations relevant to Holstein cattle, namely, the need for added calving ease, muscle conformation, grading ability and sensitivity to carcass length. John Meyer, CEO of Holstein Association USA, says the HOLSim program has the potential to change the beefon-dairy dynamic. “Instead of just breeding Holsteins to a black beef bull, now dairy farmers can breed to a SimAngus bull that ranks high on the HOLSim index. By doing that, they can raise more profitable offspring coveted by both the feedlot and the consumer,” Meyer says. The program is underpinned by HAUSA’s industryleading animal identification program, something that will add increasing value in the marketplace as consumers require more information about where their food comes from. Because dairy operations calve year-round, a continuous and steady supply of highquality beef will be available to distributors, retailers and restaurateurs that have struggled historically with

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seasonal fluctuations of supplies. To qualify for the program, all animals must have a Registered Holstein® dam, and be bred to SimAngus bulls identified through the IGS Feeder Profit Calculator. The HOLSim program is the first of its kind and offers dairy farmers a unique opportunity to build new profit centers. “To my knowledge, this is the first time that a beef and a dairy breed association have collaborated to have a specific program to benefit both organizations and their respective members and industries,” Meyer says. Those wanting to learn more can visit simmental. org or holsteinusa.com, or contact Darin Johnson at 802.451.4048, djohnson@holstein.com. Founded in 1968, the American Simmental Association is headquartered in Bozeman, MT. ASA is committed to leveraging technology, education, and collaboration to accelerate genetic profitability for the beef industry. In keeping with its commitment, ASA, along with its partners, formed International Genetic Solutions — the world’s largest genetic evaluation of beef cattle. Learn more at www.simmental.org.

For Your Simmental Needs Contact One of These Missouri Breeders… STEAKS ALIVE John & Jeanne Scorse Semen, embryos and foundation stock available at the ranch P.O. Box 3832 • Joplin, MO 64803 Phone: 417-437-0911 • Fax: 316-856-2338 E-mail: scorsej@steaksalive.com Web Page: http://www.steaksalive.com

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MAY 2019

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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Johnson County Cattlemen What a winter! It has certainly been different than the last few. We have had a lot more snow and ice this winter. As a result of the extended wintry weather, some cattlemen have experienced a shortage of hay. So, the warmer weather we have currently been having, is certainly welcomed. Hopefully, we will be seeing additional pastures green up with new grass. With the warmer temperatures and longer days we are seeing pastures come alive with the birth of spring calves. It is a welcomed sight! Calving time, as always, continues to be a busy time. Along with spring’s arrival also comes time to begin thinking about how to control flies that can become detrimental to cattle herds throughout the state. Johnson County Cattlemen’s met at the Bryan Moon Farm on March 21, 2019. Those in attendance were treated to a delicious meal from Millers BBQ along with desserts from the county cattle women. A thank you to Missouri Livestock Supplement for sponsoring the meal.

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Mike Moon introduced our guest speaker, Mike Richner, from Missouri Livestock Supplement. Mike Richner, in-turn, introduced several guests who discussed the importance of fly control for cattle herds. All agreed that the one fly which should be controlled is the horn fly. While we know that the fly can never be eradicated, they must be controlled. This one small blooded feeding fly, can be the most economically devastating pest to cattle. These flies can cause billions of dollars of damage along with substantial loss to the cattle industry each year. With an average of more than 400 of these pests per animal, the negative effect on the health and productivity of cattle is enormous. That is why it is vital to control these pests.

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So how do we fight this enemy? One way is with the use of Altosid added to loose minerals when feeding or it can be provided in lick tubs that are fed cattle. The key to using this ingredient is to begin feeding before fly season starts and continue feeding it up to the first hard frost. In order to reap the benefits of this product, consumption is key; therefore, put the feed where the cattle have easy access and will consume it. It is important to remember that horn flies don’t travel, so just because neighbors fail to control the fly, it is not a futile cause to the control the pests in our individual herds. One

herd may not be affected; however, the neighboring herd might be heavily infected, so it is important to treat independently. As mentioned, we are fighting for the continued livelihood of cattle herds. The meeting provided educational and informational assistance for those interested in maintaining healthy herds. In closing, please remember those in the cattle industry who are experiencing devastating flooding and aftermath. Keep them in your thoughts and prayers and help wherever possible.

Barton County The Barton County Cattlemen met April 4, 2019, at Memorial Hall in Lamar, Missouri. A beef brisket dinner, catered by Scott Noting, was sponsored by Superior Beef Genetics. Mike Deering, executive vice president of MCA spoke on some of the many topics the association is involved with and explained how they are working for cattlemen. He discussed advertising laws such as the new law saying that fake meat, which is cultured, can’t be advertised as meat. Missouri, with the help of the Misouri Cattlemen’s Association, was the first state to pass this law. Another change was in the liability law when a trespasser gets hurt by your animals on your property. It is no longer the responsibility of the landowner if they didn’t have permission to be there. The trespasser on your property is now responsible. A bill being worked on now deals with animal confiscation. Currently, when a livestock owner is turned in for abuse or neglect of animals and found innocent, the owner still has to pay for the care of their livestock before they can get them back. These and many other issues concerning cattlemen are being addressed by our state association and you when you participate in Cowboys at the Capitol. Our second speaker was immigration attorney Matthew Keltner. He explained the steps to legal immigration to the United States. He answered questions concerning both legal and illegal immigration. Our next meeting will be in September.


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I-35 Cattlemen The I-35 Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, February 26, 2019, to hold their annual winter meeting. The meeting was held at the Cameron Community Building with 58 members in attendance and many guests. A brisket meal was served by Dale and Joann Akey. President Brad Bray called the meeting to order.

Deb Thummel took the stage as Region 4 Vice President for Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. She touched on MCA staffing changes, the Top 100 Profitability Challenge and the Cowboys at the Capitol events during the legislative session. The next session for Region 4 will be March 27.

Dean Snyder read a thank you from Crayton Crawford, a 2018 recipient of a $500 Scholarship from I-35 Cattlemen’s. Mike Green read a thank you note from Ashley Osborn, a 2018 recipient of a $500 scholarship from I-35 Cattlemen’s.

President Brad Bray then welcomed the meeting sponsor to the floor, Austin Story with 8 Story Farms. Austin sponsored the meeting and spoke about his upcoming production sale of Registered Charolais Cattle on Saturday, March 23 at the Daviess County Livestock Market.

Brad Bray spoke of the events held by the I-35 Cattlemen’s in the past year including the bus tour to Kansas State Beef Facility in Manhattan, Kansas, and the sponsorships to the local county fair beef shows.

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

Brad Bray then welcomed the meeting speaker, Tonya Amen from National Center for Beef Excellence, Genetics Director. Tonya’s message was using all the tools in your genetic toolbox. The minutes from the 2018 annual meeting were read by Secretary Mandi Bird and approved. Nancy Snyder gave the treasurer’s report and reported an account balance of $3,654.47. Brad Bray then held the officer elections. Current bylaws read the President and Vice President are elected on odd numbered years, Secretary and Treasurer are elected on even numbered years. Representatives for D counties (Daviess and DeKalb) are odd numbered years, and C counties (Caldwell, Clinton and Clay) are elected on even numbered years. The following officers were elected for a two-year term: President-Austin Story, new officer, Vice PresidentJohn Crawford, new officer, DeKalb County Rep- Dale Buhman, new officer, Daviess County Rep- Cindy Grady, new officer. Due to John Crawford leaving his position of Caldwell County rep to fill the Vice president position, the bylaws allow for the election of another member to finish out the current term of Caldwell County Rep. Mike Green was nominated and elected to fulfill a one-year term as Caldwell County Rep. Based on election results, Brad Bray and Kenny Youtsey will be removed from the bank account and Austin Story and John Crawford’s names will be added.

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Items donated to the raffle drawing were given and a motion was made and seconded to adjourn the meeting.

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Lincoln/Pike County It was a sunny but chilly Saturday in Millwood, Missouri, as the Lincoln/Pike County chapter of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association held its 7th Annual Scholarship Banquet and Auction at the local Knights of Columbus hall on March 23. Tickets for this event continue to sell out each year within a matter of days. Several Cattlemen members showed up before lunchtime to warm up the grills in preparation for the evening’s self-prepared dinner. Doors opened at 5 p.m., where folks browsed through several silent auction items and enjoyed a nice social hour. 50/50 tickets were a hot commodity, and a pistol drawing sold several tickets too. The 50/50 pot totalled $1,400 and the winner for half was Geordan Luebrecht. The pistol was won by Tara Twellman. After President Jim Boedeker’s introduction and invocation by cattlemen member Ben Houston, dinner was served at 6 p.m., a delicious rib-eye steak dinner with dessert. Scholarship recipients for 2019 were on hand to help serve the meal and interact with the public.

The oral auction ensued, which always produces stellar items and extreme generosity from the attendants! Usual big ticket items were sold, with St. Louis Cardinals tickets, rifles, homemade items, seed beans and seed corn, beef processing and a table at next year’s banquet among the top items. Once concluded, the dance floor was opened up for some good times. A live band kept everyone entertained into the late hours of the night, as another successful fundraiser for the Lincoln/Pike County Missouri Cattlemen’s Association had come to a close.

MCA Regional V.P. Chuck Miller receiving the PAC contribution.

After dinner, President Boedeker introduced Regional Vice President Chuck Miller who was in attendance. On behalf of the local chapter, Chuck was presented a $2,500 PAC contribution, and gave a short dialogue on news and activity from the state level. Next came the chapter’s proudest moment of the evening, where local high school seniors and college undergraduates were awarded the 2019 scholarships in front of a full house. These scholarships totalled $28,500 amongst 28 students! Those students were (in no particular order): Nicholas Stone, Scott Kuntz, Tess Crouch, Hannah Barber, Kyle Schroer, Faith Zimmerman, Garrett Swarnes, Claire Lavy, Amanda Horne, Taylor Eisenbath, Lane Conderman, Caleb Hudson, Sara Van Ausdal, Drew Kientzy, Chloe Momphard, Elise Bailey, Riley Johnson, Payton Teasley, Caitlyn Twellman, Kate McDonald, Jane Zuroweste, Ally Grote, Henery Kientzy, Kaylee Calvin, Alicia Flowers, Katie St. Pierre, Brooke Bruns, and Jessica Hoelting.

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28 students receiving their scholarships with President Jim Boedeker.

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Douglas/Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, April 9, 2019, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri, at Club 60 Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a steak dinner with sides sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim. President Ernie Ehlers opened the meeting and brought the group up to speed with current news, gave a treasury report, and introduced the speaker. John Campbell asked for the blessing before the meal, and members in attendance enjoyed fellowship during dinner. David Hutsell of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Board was in attendance. After dinner, Dr. John Davidson of Boehringer

Ingelheim gave a presentation on matching the threat in herd health programs. He discussed the 11 habits of high-return producers including the importance of yearly breeding soundness exams in bulls, tract scoring and pelvic measuring heifers prior to breeding, and palpating females to determine non-producers. Dr. Davidson also discussed the effects of parasitism along with options that producers have for parasite control in their herds, as well as timelines and proper protocols for effective control. Our local Boehringer Ingelheim sales representative, Randy Schilling answered questions alongside Dr. Davidson at the conclusion of the meeting. The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their next meeting on Tuesday, May 14, 2019, at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove. Edgellar & Harper and Vermeer will sponsor the meeting. Cattlemen in the area are always welcome and encouraged to attend.

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Polk County The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association held it’s April meeting on April 11, at Smiths Restaurant in Bolivar. The meeting was sponsored by Springfield Livestock Marketing Center. President Keith Stevens started the meeting by welcoming over 65 members. He then updated members about the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association Board meeting, that happened earlier that day. Keith also talked about the BQA training that would be held in Dallas County in May, and discussed some of the benefits of becoming BQA certified. We were fortunate to have MCA Executive Vice President Mike Deering in attendance to give a special presentation to the members. He talked about some of the things that are going on in the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, and discussed some of the legislation that the MCA has supported over the past few years, and is supporting now. Next Josh Ford from the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center talked about what they offer producers to help them market their cattle. He also commented on the beef futures market, and touched on what kind of effect the floods in Nebraska would have on the market. Finally, Samantha Riley with MO Beef for MO Kids discussed the MO Beef for MO Kids program with members. Many Polk County Members are considering getting involved in this program with local schools. The Next meeting will be replaced by the Polk County Cattlemen’s Scholarship Auction, on Saturday May 11. The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association holds a scholarship auction every two years, and all of the funds go towards the several college scholarships they give out each year to members enrolled in college. The Auction will be held at the Rockin R Auction Company, the doors will open at 4:30 p.m.

Two representatives from the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center that were present at the meeting.

Samatha Riley Discussing MO Beef for MO Kids.

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David Means

John P. Harrison

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Mike Deering speaking to members.

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MAY 2019

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AHIR and ultrasound information available on all bulls. Herd sires are selected based on a combination of traits and not on any single trait.

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Cedar County The Cedar County Cattlemen held their Annual Banquet and Fundraiser Auction on Saturday, April 6, 2019, at the Ray H. Zumwalt Expo Center in Stockton at 6 p.m. Special guests for the evening were Representative Mike Stephens, MCA President Bobby Simpson and MCA Manager of Membership Sydney Thummel, Brian Worthington with Missouri Beef Industry Council, Haleigh Ankrom representing MCA Leadership College and Clay Doeden the MCA Region 6 Vice President. Each guest addressed the members and discussed the current legislative issues and priorities. Dinner was sponsored by MoKan Livestock Auction in Butler. Bill Nance, field representative, spoke about the services they provide their customers, specifically their Max Advantage Pre-Vac Program. This program allows producers to add value to their cattle operations and maximize profits.

MCA President Bobby Simpson and MCA Leadership College representative, Haleigh Ankrom give a legislative update.

During the event, a silent and live auction was held. Proceeds from both auctions support the beef exhibitors at the local youth fairs and the college scholarship fund. Special thanks to Bruce & LeAnn and Nance Auction Company for conducting the auction.

MAY 2019

Thank you to the following businesses for the silent and live auction donations: Missouri Livestock Supplements, Lowrey’s Feed and Show Supply, Shelter InsuranceTravis Farran, Nichols Threads, Zara Nichols, Chad Boyles Hauling, Bill Nance Hauling, Tom Bryant, Debbie Kays, Countryside Vet, Diamond L, Mid Missouri Bank, Bills Feed, MSTA, Legacy Farm & Lawn- John Deere-Nevada, Zumwalt Pharmacy, MFA Stockton, MFA- Producer’s Grain El Dorado Springs, Cargill Small Engines-Travis Cargill, Massage for Health- Carla Paige, The Boathouse, Kinkaid Seed, Ewing Concrete, C & M Feeds- Humansville, Mitchell Vet Clinic, El Dorado Springs Vet Clinic- Dr. Brian Collins, DVM, Stockton Seed House, Abbie’s Burlap Bucket, Jones Boots, Pennington Seed, S & H Farm Supply, Cedar Creek Beef Jerky, GRB Sales, Ash Grove Aggregates, Cubbage Feeds, El Dorado Cycle, Jeff and Cameron Parrish, Joplin Regional Stockyards, Integrity Squared, Missouri Farm, Home and Land Realty, Springfield Livestock Market, Bruce & LeAN Auction Service, Farmers Market- Stockton, CarX/Sawyer Tire, Larry’s Ag Repair, Magnabilities by Georgetta Branstetter

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Billy Bruce conducted the auction with the help of Tom Bryant.

Over 80 members and guests attended the annual banquet and auction.


St. Clair County St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, April 9 at 7 p.m. at Farmhouse Kitchen in Appleton City. There were 29 members present at the meeting. Appleton City Feed Service was the sponsor for our meeting, and we appreciate all they do for the Cattlemen’s Association. May is Beef Month! St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association will set up at Food Fair in Appleton City, Carney’s Five Star Supermarket in Osceola and Buzz’s Market in Collins on Saturday, May 4, 2019. The Cattlemen will be giving away 2 - $125 Beef Coupons, 2 Beef Logo Lawn Chairs, and 1 Grill set at each of the Grocery stores. Everyone is invited to stop by one the Grocery stores to sign up! St. Clair County Cattlemen will be set up at the Appleton City Fair to sell Steak Sandwiches again this year on Friday, June 7. Please plan to come see the Cattlemen on June 7! St. Clair County Cattlemen are pleased to announce that they are working on starting the Mo Beef for Mo Kids Program in St. Clair County. This program is

designed to Beef Up School lunches in our local schools. St. Clair County Cattlemen will hold a kick-off meeting on Tuesday, June 11 at Lakeland School District. Anyone interested in more information should contact Lawanna Salmon at 660-492-7259. Next Meeting scheduled for June 11, 2019 at 7 p.m. at Lakeland R-III School District. MoBeef for MoKids Program, meeting sponsored by OPAA Food Service.

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Henry County The sun is shining, the birds are singing, and the frogs are giving a concert every night. But best of all, the mud is drying up! Watching the cattle laying around in the pasture makes you feel great. We have had two dinner/presentations in the last couple months. Windsor Livestock Auction sponsored the February meeting and Golden Valley Tractor did the March meeting. We certainly appreciate our sponsors, both the delicious meals and the information they bring to our group. We served lunch for the Harriman Bull Sale. This is always a fun activity, and we like to help support one of our members.

Helping at the Harriman Bull Sale are Pam Carney, Judy Micke, Roy Batschlett, (seated). Standing are Gene Reid, Kent Carney, Danny Goth, David Micke, Tony Trolinger, Anthony Lesmeister, and Joyce Trolinger.

Travis and Whitney Smith introducing their twins to the members of our association.

Josiah and Chelsea Town showing off their new son.

Jake Drenon visiting with Cattlewoman Marylin Lesmeister. Roy Batschelett and Danny Goth waiting for lunch.

MAY 2019

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Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business. Grouping and Marketing customers’ calves since 1992!

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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The April 2 meeting of the association was held in Lockwood at the Lutheran school gym. There was a nice turnout of around 75 persons. The big reason some came was the meal was catered by Cookys of Golden City. Cooky’s is well known for their pies and they did not disappoint. Providing the meal was S & H Farm Supply, Lockwood and Specialty Insurance. Kenny Bergman spoke on behalf of S & H and their 50 years of helping farmers in the community. Currently the big trend is going to haylage versus dry hay harvesting. Representing Specialty were Kevin Charleston and Mike Berrey. They gave brief comments on their insurance programs for farmers and answered questions concerning coverage of difference causes of death such as poisoning, injury or disease.

Cade & Madison listen to a question regarding immigration.

Billy Magers, FFA student from Ash Grove gave a short “thank you speech” for the help the association provided in setting up the MO Beef for MO Kids lunch program at the Ash Grove school. Cade Shepherd and Madison Lacy represented the Mt. Vernon FFA. They were seeking input from the

The small group conversations following the meeting are where big decisions are made.

audience as they prepared for the state contest on public issues. Their topic stimulated much conversation and questions on immigration, legal vs illegal and farm labor needs. Business items were limited. Russell Mairon will be heading to Jeff City tomorrow for Cowboys at the Capitol. Traves Merrick spoke about his meeting with a committee on Senate Bill 391.

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President Jeff Kaal reported on the grilling schedule in the next three months. Their popularity continues to keep them busy.

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Wrapping up the evening, Jeanne Jones read several thank you notes from Mt. Vernon 4th grade students regarding the help given them by the back pack program. In return, Jeanne read a letter she and Jeff had drafted to send to the students that had taken time to send their letters.


Bates County The April meeting of the Bates County Cattlemen was held April 9 at MoKan Livestock Market near Butler. New Day Genetics sponsored the meal and Ted Cunningham, general manager, gave an informative presentation on the need to develop cattle that are adapted to fescue. He highlighted the New Day Genetics program and invited everyone to attend the spring bull sale on April 13 at MoKan. Dave Warfield announced that Briarwood Angus had donated two cows to the “MO Beef for MO Kids” program at Butler. This should be enough to finish out the school year, and he will be looking for a cow to be processed in August. We were honored to have our regional vice-president, Clay Doeden, attend the meeting. Clay discussed some of the current issues affecting producers, especially legislation concerning county health regulations and eminent domain. There are two bills in the state capitol right now that are working to reduce the impact of these areas. Senate Bill 391 would prohibit county health ordinances from being more restrictive that state and federal DNR rulings concerning soil and water for agriculture operations. House Bill 1062 deals with eminent domain and would restrict for-profit companies from using this approach to seize private property. Eminent domain is legal when used by public service organizations to benefit the local population. Clay announced the rally being held at the capitol on April 16 to support the passage of HB 1062 and encouraged everyone to attend.

Marilyn Duckworth reported the 4-H Trivia Night raised $13,000 for the MU Extension service staff budgets. It was a huge success, and we were proud to be a part of the event. Austin Black reported on his recent trip with the Missouri Cattlemen’s Leadership College. This session was held in Washington D.C. and coincided with the NCBA spring legislative conference. Austin shared about his experience visiting with members of Congress and encouraged everyone to contact their legislators to discuss issues whenever possible. The group wrapped up the meeting with discussion about hosting a BQA training with neighboring counties. Clay Doeden volunteered to assist with planning and logistics. We look forward to work with other affiliates in this endeavor. Our next meeting will be May 14 at the Farmhouse Restaurant in Appleton City.

We are gearing up for spring cooking events and are excited to once again provide burgers for the Child Advocacy Center on April 25. This program provides free meals to children on Tuesdays and Thursdays. We have participated in this outreach before and received excellent feedback for cooking burgers. Looking ahead to beef month promotions, we plan to do our third free-will donation burger feed at the Family Center in Butler. This event has been very successful, and we look forward to doing it again the first Saturday in May.

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The group will also be cooking April 30 for Dr. Long’s retirement party. “Doc” has been serving Bates County families for decades and has decided to close the door of his practice. We wish him the best of luck and thank him for his many, many years of service in our community. Next month, we will continue to support Doc by cooking for his Prairie Days event. Doc has one of the largest native prairies in the area and hosts an annual field day complete with tours, lunch and educational speakers.

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Dallas County A fifth generation farmer who is now the top agriculture official in the state was the featured speaker at the April 9 meeting of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association. Chris Chinn, director of the Missouri Department of Agriculture, addressed the 160 members of the group at Prairie Grove School. Chinn hails from Clarence, Missouri, and was appointed to her position in January of 2017. She spent her first 100 days on the job traveling all across the state visiting with all kinds of people. She learned that the Department of Agriculture was doing okay, but could do more. From that finding came MORE—which is the guiding principal of the department to meet challenges in the agriculture industry by focusing on four pillars. We in agriculture have to feed people; we need to reach the consumer and tell our story; we need to connect to communities; and we need to empower more Missouri farm families for generations to come. Chinn talked about agriculture being the number one industry in the state, a 88.4 billion dollar industry. “We don’t all have to farm the same way, but it is our job to feed people,” she said. Because one in three kids in rural communities in Missouri experience food insecurity, her department is working to address the problem. She wants consumers to know that farmers and ranchers care. She has hosted events such as inviting chefs to farms to see where their food comes from.

certification. Buffalo FFA officers Devyn Rackley and Mackenzie Gann also reported on the chapter’s recent activities. Earlier in the evening, members and guests enjoyed a brisket dinner prepared by ladies of the Mennonite community and sponsored by Headings Bros. Feeds and Missouri Livestock Supplements. We very much thank the ladies for the great food and also a huge thanks to the sponsors. DCCA members will be attending the Buffalo FFA banquet and sponsoring an award on May 3. We look forward to announcing our scholarship winners soon. Our May 14 meeting will be held at the O’Bannon Community Center in Buffalo and sponsored by MidMissouri Stockyards, Gibson Insurance, and AgriServices of Lebanon.

Buffalo FFA officer Mackenzie Gann, Chris Chinn, FFA officer Devyn Rackley.

Chinn addressed the need to have high speed internet in rural areas. Her department has the ability to talk about it and will keep fighting to bring rural broadband to all Missourians. She told the audience, “Government is there to help you—not hurt you.” She urged everyone to work together to protect agriculture as one person can make a difference.

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Also speaking at the meeting were representatives of Missouri Livestock Supplements, owner Michael Watkins and sales rep Mike Richner, as well as Zinpro representative Adam Warren. Warren touted the use of his product as a source of trace minerals to promote reproductive performance and growth. The company is located in Brighton and also offers a variety of “profit builder cattle products”.

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DCCA President Bobby Stewart invited all cattle producers to a Beef Quality Assurance meeting on May 2 at Prairie Grove School at 6:30 p.m. Dr. Craig Payne from the University of Missouri will present the program. Those in attendance will receive BQA

Zinpro representative Adam Warren.

Missouri Livestock Supplement owner Michael Watkins speaking at DCCA meeting


Lafayette County

Cass/Jackson County

The 2018 Lafayette County Cattlemen of the year is Don Schlesselman. He is a life-long resident of Lafayette County and still lives on the farm where he grew up with his wife of 32 years. They raised two children there and are the proud grandparents of two.

The Cass/Jackson County Cattlemen’s March meeting was sponsored by Leeton Feed and Fertilizer with Bill Frank as representative of ADM spoke on balanced animal nutrition through the roles of individual minerals. Seth Shackleford of Leeton Feed and Fertilizer was the host for the meeting for 39 members and guests. Prior to the meeting, the meal served was catered by Country Keepsakes Tea Room of Belton, Missouri. Owner Molly Fries, with mother Beverly Bruce, did the serving. Several members of the association attended the BQA certification on March 8, 2019, hosted by Valley Oaks Steak Company. Merck Corporation did the presentation along with MCA. Also several members attended the Kansas pilot project for Animal Disease Traceability by using technology at sale barns. The Kingsville Livestock Auction Barn is being used as a test site where the presentation was held.

This gentleman has been very active in the county association, always volunteering to help with cookouts and events and even serving as a state board member. He hails from the dairy industry, and milked up until 2009 when he decided to focus on farming and beef cattle. He is not shy when it comes to his volunteer work as he serves on numerous boards and committees including Board of Elders at his church, Lafayette County Planning and Zoning, MFA Board of Directors, volunteer fireman and was just elected as the county vice president. MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 11:08 AM Page 65

Catering Crew: left Beverly Bruce; right Molly Fries. President Bill Oelrich presents Don Schlesselman the Cattlemen of the year award.

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Marsha Corbin recognized W.A. Schlesselman for 55 years membership in LCCA.

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MAY 2019

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Cole County On Monday April 1, the Cole County Cattlemen’s Association held their general membership meeting at the Lincoln University Research Farm. The doors opened at 6 p.m., dinner was blessed, a beef meal was served and the meeting was called to order by President, Travis Roling at 7:10 p.m. Prior to the meeting, members had the opportunity to tour the LU Hoop Building. The meeting began with hearing an update from Anita Ellis from MU Extension, who also provided educational information regarding breeding stock and nutritional requirements. After approval of the secretary’s minutes, treasurer’s report and reporter’s statement, new business began with board member nominations to fill four open positions and discuss the 5th Annual CCCA Banquet and Fundraiser to be held on April 6. Judy Ehrhardt, coordinator of the CCCA youth membership, tells of the youth activities during the meeting. “The Cole County Cattlemen’s Association Junior

Youth group is growing. At this meeting, we added eight possible new members. We are well into our second year. At our last meeting, thanks to Jeremiah Markway, farm manager, and a student, Tyler Edward, we were able to tour the fish hatchery at George Washington Carver Farm at Lincoln University while the parents attended their meeting. We are not only growing, but we are also learning very different aspects of agriculture. We have elected officers. These officers will offer suggestions and set up meetings of interest to the group. We have had a meeting on the makings of condiments, which really surprised some who don’t like tomatoes and yet they use ketchup. They studied the good bugs and bad bugs of farmer’s fields and gardens. They made a cotton gin out of cardboard and were able to extract the seeds from a cotton ball and identify what daily products we use that come from cotton. These are just a few of agricultural diversity areas that these youth have been exposed to. The older kids are a big help directing the younger ones. There is no age limit; kindergarten and up through high school are welcome. We also have some college students, but most are away at school, so we don’t see them often. There are three adult leaders.”

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The next meeting of the CCCA is to be held in late May with further details to be announced via email and Facebook. Like the Cole County Cattlemens Association Facebook page to stay updated on current events.

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We would like to thank all in attendance for helping to make this meeting a success. A special thank you goes to Anita Ellis, Jeremiah Markway and Tyler Edward.


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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Three Wheel Roping I’ve always sorta figgered the reason there is more cowboy poetry than there is farmer poetry has to do with horses. Most cowboy poetry is about wrecks. One person plus one cow equals a wreck now and then. One person plus one cow plus one horse equals a wreck every time! But then farmers discovered the three-wheeler! Honda invented the ATV! It was the farmer’s first real horse replacement, complete with speed, weight, maneuvering, swerving, rolling, flipping, crashing and getting bucked off! The bonus was… they became a great inspiration for Cowboy/Farmer poetry! Kelly was workin’ for John, his brother and his dad. They were farmers who ran steers on wheat pasture in western Oklahoma. They didn’t use horses. They used three wheelers but they treated them like horses.

John had spotted a snotty nose so he picked up Kelly and they drove back out to find the critter. Kelly sat in the seat behind John as the three wheeler sailed over the sandy wheat field. John pointed to a brockle calf with a little ear. He was a tad wasty and looked to weigh about 600 pounds. “Rope him!” directed John as he goosed the tricycle and snapped Kelly’s neck. They flew across the field toward the fence. John followed the racing calf, swerving from side to side. “Rope him!” he screamed. Kelly was standing, tears streaming from his eyes, sand stinging his face and trying to swing a loop over the top of Kingfishers county’s answer to Evil Knievel. “Git on the other side,” hollered Kelly, swingin’ his lefthand loop at the steer on the wrong side.

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MAY 2019

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Kelly fired a bullet of a loop. It looked like a monkey ropin’ a gnu off the back of a galloping triceratops. He caught the steer! Now what. Kelly was gatherin’ slack as John hazed the steer. John grabbed the tail of the rope and tried to dally to the handlebars. The steer stumbled at the fence. Kelly bounced over the pilot, hit the dirt and managed to take a wrap on one of the creosote posts. When the steer hit the end of the slack the post broke off catapulting Kelly into the tangle. He clung to the post till the steer slowed to a crawl. Over the horizon came John’s brother Steve and their dad. They were pullin’ the fishtailin’ stock trailer behind the careening pickup. Kelly was plowing a furrow and poundin’ his pockets full of sand when Steve leaped out. He dropped the tailgate and, just like it was choreographed, the steer jumped toward the trailer. “Let go of the post, you dummy!” shouted Steve, “You’ll get hurt.” Kelly did. Like a slingshot, the post left his grip and whacked Steve square on the butt. His head hit the crossbar above the tailgate and he executed a complete backflip. John and his dad slammed the tailgate on the steer (and Steve who hung like a gutted white tail from the highest slats.)

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Time has gone by and 4x4’s have replaced the three-wheeler. And it has its advantages, but neither three wheelers or four can beat a horse and cowboy with a rope in his hand for getin’ the job done and makin’ a good story.

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IBBA Announces New EVP Source: International Brangus Breeders Association (San Antonio, Texas) Eddy Roberts, president of the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA), announced that Dr. Darrell Wilkes will assume the role of executive vice president of the 70-year-old Brangus cattle breed registry. Dr. Wilkes comes with an extensive list of credentials and experience over a career that spans stints with National Cattleman’s Association (now NCBA), ABS Global and most recently running the family registered cattle operation in Wyoming, while also teaching at Eastern Wyoming College and serving on their board of trustees.

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“We as a board have been searching diligently for a new leader; a person of character, familiar with all aspects of beef production from pasture to plate”, said Roberts, adding, “Our executive vice president sets the tone for the Brangus breed from the office, to active engagement of the membership and spanning all aspects of the Industry from the commercial cow calf segment all the way to creating a great eating experience with the consumer.” Roberts also noted, “Dr. Wilkes’ considerable experience and contacts across the breadth

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of the beef industry will serve us well, as we set a path for growth in the coming years.” Dr. Wilkes says, “I am very excited to be involved with a breed of cattle that I believe brings enormous value to the beef industry, and has a great opportunity to grow its market share. I have dedicated my career to improving the beef industry, and look forward to continuing this quest at IBBA. The association is on the leading edge of genetic evaluation and is populated with down-to-earth genuine cattlemen and women who are truly dedicated to the same goals that I have embraced my entire career.” Dr. Wilkes earned B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Wyoming in Zoology/Biochemistry and Animal Breeding, respectively. He then became a Buckeye, earning a Ph.D. in quantitative genetics from The Ohio State University. He was recognized as a Distinguished Alumni of Ohio State for his work at the (then) National Cattlemen’s Association, including such initiatives as the National Consumer Retail Beef Study, the Beef Quality Assurance Program, the National Beef Quality Audit and the Strategic Alliance Field Study, to name a few. As founder and president of the consulting


firm Integrated Beef Technologies, he helped launch the use of Electronic ID (EID) and developed systems to seamlessly transfer ID from cattle-to-carcass in packing plants, thus allowing explosive growth in the amount of carcass data available to cattle breeders. He spent over a decade with ABS Global, advising breeders on genetic improvement and reproductive management. The search committee had a three-month intense search for their new executive vice president. The committee stated, “The applicants for the position were from across the nation and from four different countries. The qualities of the candidates interviewed were outstanding. We and the Board of Directors ultimately decided on Dr. Darrell Wilkes. His experience in beef association organizations, private industry, and as a seed stock producer give him a unique skill set. We as a committee felt his qualifications, experience, and personality would make him a great addition to the IBBA organization.” “On behalf of the IBBA Board of Directors, I would like to thank Dr. Tommy Perkins, past executive vice president, for his tireless effort, travel and time selling the value of both the Brangus breed, as well as the importance and further development of using the most modern genomic testing programs to enhance our EPD accuracy and our overall DNA database and breeder acceptance of the new technology,” added Roberts.

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Cattlemen Raise Over $20,000 to Support Crowder Aggies Source: by Samantha Athey The sixth annual Crowder Aggie Calf Auction raised over $20,000 last month at the Joplin Regional Stockyards near Carthage, Missouri, to support Crowder College agriculture and veterinary technology students. The weekly Wednesday Cow and Bull Sale was paused while community members and area cattlemen bid on a Limousin calf and a grill and made donations. The Limousin calf, donated by Gary and Linda Emmert at Flying E Ranch in Seneca, Missouri, sold for $5,000. The grand total included the calf sale, donation bids from community members at the auction, pre-sale donations and sponsorships from area businesses. “It’s a community effort,” said Dr. Ron Rogers, an area cattleman who has been involved with the event since the first calf auction fundraiser. “It’s a success because of the community support behind the students at Crowder College.”

Rogers expressed appreciation to the Newton and McDonald County Cattlemen, Crowder College and Joplin Regional Stockyards for their involvement in organizing the auction. Crowder agriculture students put in time and effort by halter breaking the calf prior to the auction. The event was sponsored by Al’s Gas Company, Southwest Missouri Bank, State Farm Insurance – Fred Harris, Liberty Utilities - Empire District, Hunke Spray Service, B&M Tire, Cornerstone Bank, New Mac Electric, Animal Clinic of Diamond, Opal Foods CoOp, Farm Talk Newspaper, Joplin Regional Stockyards, and Whitehead Farm Supply. Multiple donations were also collected from community members at the calf auction. At the event, the Newton and McDonald County Cattlemen’s Association presented the Crowder College Agriculture Division with an award celebrating the recent 50th annual Crowder Aggie Day for FFA students. The Newton and McDonald County Cattlemen’s Association also donated five calves to the Cash Moore Foundation to help underprivileged and needy children. The proceeds from the auction and donations will support the Crowder Aggies and vet tech activities including professional and leadership development contests, experiential travel, and national competitions.

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Proceeds from previous years supported Crowder students in their recent successes at the National Professional Agriculture Students Conference in Loveland, Colorado. Crowder students brought home over 20 awards in areas ranging from employment interview and career planning to agronomy, livestock management and equine science.

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“Once again, the Crowder Aggies have proven that they are some of the best students in the country. The Ag Division is extremely proud to work with these future leaders of the ag industry,” said Jorge Zapata, Agriculture Division chair, in a press release with the results from the conference.


Mikayla Lund of Carthage, Missouri, Kendra Hayworth of Washburn, Missouri, and Emily Block of Carthage, Missouri, took home second in the nation honors in the equine science event, and Block was third high individual for the contest. The Crowder Aggies won the PAS National Championship in Agriculture Knowledge College Bowl. Team members were Cheston Stacy of Stockton, Missouri, Hilsden Moseley of Wheaton, Missouri, Nastasia Neier of Bella Vista, Arkansas, Chance Wallace of Seneca, Missouri, and Wyatt Graves of El Dorado Springs, Missouri. The Crowder Aggies also host events at the Roughrider Arena in Neosho, Missouri, throughout the year to raise money to support student activities. For more information, like the “Crowder Aggies� page on Facebook or contact Jorge Zapata at 417-455-5496.

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3390 Winbrook Dr., Memphis, TN 38116

Service age bulls, bred cows, cow/calf pairs, show prospect heifers available.

417-652-3425 417-839-7205 www.oryscircle7.com

MAY 2019

ORYS 07 RED ANGUS

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Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

MAY 2019

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

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Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”


Beef Heifer Producers Meet at Vienna to Learn About Show-Me-Select Sales Source: MU Extension News VIENNA, Mo. – Ozark beef herd owners met March 21 at the sale barn in Vienna to consider expanding the Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program in the area. That could include spring and fall sales, the marketing part of the University of Missouri Extension educational program. “Area herd owners want a sale closer to home,” said Anita Ellis, regional specialist, Fulton. “Our farmers don’t want to haul heifers to sales two hours away.” There are now six SMS sales in Missouri: Joplin, Palmyra, Fruitland, Farmington, Kingsville and Kirksville. There’s an unserved region in the middle of the state. The meeting at South Central Regional Stockyards, west of Vienna, gave a dinner served by the sale barn cafe. They served 73 producers. “It was a great turnout,” Ellis said. “They were eager and engaged cattle producers.” MU Extension livestock specialists told heifer rules and benefits. The discussion was helped by producers enrolled in the program, she said. Heifers enrolled in Show-Me-Select carry trademarked ear tags that certify the heifers meet rigid standards in management and genetics. Jordan Thomas, MU specialist from Columbia, told “Why and How of Development.” Pre-breeding exams eliminate heifers that cannot be bred successfully. Pelvicopening measurements are a first step. That cuts death losses of calves and heifers. Reproductive tract scores prevent breeding pre-puberty heifers. That leads to fewer failed breedings. Veterinary exams add value to farm herds.

your product, giving customer satisfaction,” he said. “You must deliver top quality.” Thomas said sales sell more than heifers. They offer background data on each animal in the sale catalog. Rules do not allow heifers with any blemishes. All consignments in a sale are examined on arrival by Missouri Department of Agriculture graders. Exams go beyond body condition scores. With fixed-time artificial insemination, expected calving dates are given to buyers. Those shorten calving seasons and cut labor. Eric Bailey, MU Extension livestock nutritionist, gave feeding tips. Balanced rations reduce feed costs. Proper nutrition aids calving rates. Extra fat might look good but may hurt conceptions. Local veterinarians provide required health checks. They certify reproductive tract scores for enrolled heifers. Ellis gave out enrollment forms for producers to fill out and submit. If enough farmers sign up, sales can be planned. Local sales are organized by area farmers. From farmer response, Ellis said, “The number of heifers for sale can more than double.” Reach Ellis at snella@missouri.edu or at the MU Extension Center in Callaway County, 5803 County Road 302, Fulton, MO 65251. Ellis covers counties on the north from Howard to Callaway and south in a line from Camden, Pulaski and Maries to Gasconade. Farmers must enroll 30 to 60 days ahead of breeding. Protocols start with pre-breeding exams. Regional extension specialists give on-farm assistance.

While heifer sales make news based on high prices at sale time, the main value builds the home-farm herds. Jordan said 90 percent of heifers in the program are bred by artificial insemination. That allows use of top genetics in a breed, which adds value for heifer buyers.

Other sales across Missouri are open for enrollment.

Zac Erwin, a regional livestock specialist who coordinates the Kirksville sale, gave what he called the hard facts. “Sale success depends on standing behind

SMS details are at agebb.missouri.edu/select.

Protocol guides lead farmers through the rules. “Guides seem forbidding, but they come one step at a time,” Thomas said. “Help is available.” MAY 2019 71


Champion Auctioneer and Livestock Market Owners “Sell” Pies and Policy on Capitol Hill Source: Livestock Marketing Association WASHINGTON, D.C. – D.C. policy leaders learned about issues affecting the livestock marketing industry and participated in a mock auction during Livestock Marketing Association’s (LMA) Washington D.C. Fly In. World Livestock Auctioneer Champion, Jared Miller, auctioned pies during Hill staff briefings for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. Legislative staff gained a better understanding of how the auction method of selling drives up price for producers’ livestock. Bidders from around the room joined in on the competition by raising their hands. The sale topping pie went for $100,000 of mock money. “Where else can you buy a pie for that?” joked Miller, who also owns LMA member market Lamoni Livestock Auction in Iowa. The pie auction and briefing were just one piece of LMA’s annual D.C. Fly In. LMA members and staff also met individually with legislators and legislative staff to discuss issues that affect LMA member businesses. Participants educated policy leaders about livestock marketing and the extreme pressure their businesses face under current law. On the top of the LMA’s list was support for the creation of a Dealer Statutory Trust. In the 2018 Farm Bill, Congress directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to conduct a feasibility study of Dealer Statutory Trust.

MAY 2019

Under the Packers and Stockyards Act, markets are

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required to maintain a custodial account and pay sellers for livestock promptly, even if the buyer does not pay the livestock market. Under current law, the ability to recover livestock or funds when a livestock dealer defaults is extremely limited. The creation of a Dealer Statutory Trust would give unpaid sellers of livestock first priority to reclaim livestock or, if they have been resold, the proceeds/receivables from livestock. It would not require a change in day-to-day operations. Rather, it would simply provide unpaid sellers (producers selling directly or markets selling on their behalf) priority in the event of a dealer default. Livestock marketers in town for the Fly In also discussed the continued need for a livestock hauler Electronic Logging Device (ELD) exemption while pursuing needed Hours of Service (HOS) drive time flexibility. LMA members also met with officials from the USDA Packers and Stockyards Division, which regulates livestock markets, packers, and dealers on payment and fair trade practices. Animal Disease Traceability was the main topic discussed in the LMA meeting with USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. “Livestock markets and dealers work hard day in and day out to gain top dollar for producers’ livestock,” said Chelsea Good, LMA Vice President of Government and Industry Affairs and Legal. “I’m proud of our members who invested their time to leave the barn for the Beltway to connect with policy leaders who make decisions affecting their lives.”


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WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION MAY 2019

“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

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Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898


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NCBA CEO Kendal Frazier Announces Plans for Retirement Source: NCBA DENVER (April 23, 2019) - After 34 years with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), the past four as CEO, Kendal Frazier announced his plans for retirement this morning. Kendal’s career began as a farm broadcaster in Kansas, where he also served as director of communications for Kansas Livestock Association, before moving to Denver, Colo., to join the staff of the National Cattlemen’s Association (NCA), predecessor organization to NCBA. During his illustrious career, he served the beef industry through some of its most challenging times and events. “For more than three decades, the beef industry has benefitted from Kendal’s vision and leadership. There is no doubt in my mind that he has played a major role in ensuring the success of our industry today,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “It has been my pleasure to work closely with Kendal for many years and I can say without a doubt that we are far better off because of his service to cattlemen and cattlewomen.” When NCA merged with the National Livestock and Meat Board in 1996, Frazier was a member of the team who worked with staff and beef industry volunteer leaders to address a steep decline in demand, helping to address the consumer concerns which had led to losses in market share and falling prices. This work ultimately helped to reverse those declines and set the industry on a new, consumer-focused path.

MAY 2019

Frazier was also instrumental in helping secure the passage of the checkoff referendum and worked to secure resources for the first checkoff-funded public relations and issues management work conducted by NCBA as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff in 1998. That prescient work would prove to be vital to the long-term success of the beef industry in 2003, when the first domestic case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy was announced. The work done by Frazier and the NCBA team helped

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maintain consumer confidence around the globe and ensured that every effort to minimize the impact on the beef industry was minimized. “Words really can’t express the industry’s appreciation for Kendal’s leadership on so many significant industry issues,” said Ross Wilson, CEO of Texas Cattle Feeders Association. “His steady hand and thoughtful leadership have been a key part of so many opportunities and challenges that have shaped the beef industry now and literally for the past few decades. We truly are a better industry because of Kendal Frazier. As CEO, Frazier has kept a sharp focus on the issues that matter most to the members and the industry he represents. During his tenure, his commitment to improving domestic and international demand for beef has been unwavering. Likewise, he has dedicated significant resources to ensuring beef producers continue to enjoy the freedom to operate by ensuring member’s priorities in Washington, D.C., remain a core focus for the association. “I’m a lucky man to have worked in the cattle industry, what a wonderful journey this has been,” said Frazier in making the announcement. “It has been an honor to serve the men and women who make their living in the cattle business. I am confident that I’m leaving NCBA in a good place. Over the past several years, we have worked to strengthen NCBA’s relationship with our stakeholders, build the association’s financial resources and deepen our staff talent pool while ensuring we continue to meet growing demand for great tasting, high-quality beef at home and abroad and NCBA will continue its tradition of excellence long after my departure.” NCBA will begin the search process to select a new CEO immediately, and Frazier will remain in place to assist with the transition process, until Dec. 31, 2019.


SALE REPORTS Briarwood Angus Farms 3.17.19 – Butler, MO 14 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $4,114 20 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $3,090 11 Open Heifers............................................ Avg. $1,195 1 Bred Heifer................................................. Avg. $2,400 8 Bred Cows.................................................. Avg. $1,450 7 Spring Pairs................................................ Avg. $1,921 KW Cattle Company 3.19.19 – Ft. Scott, KS 59 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $3,931

Gardiner Angus Ranch 4.06.19 – Ashland, KS 187 20-month-old Registered Bulls............... Avg. $8,844 113 16-18-month-old Registered Bulls......... Avg. $6,332 47 Donors................................................... Avg. $10,457 66 3-N-1 Pairs............................................... Avg. $5,803 89 Bred Cows................................................ Avg. $3,211 131 Bred Heifers........................................... Avg. $4,319 18 Bred Commercial Cows........................... Avg. $2,211 128 Bred Commercial Heifers...................... Avg. $2,592 2 Load Lots Commercial Heifers (71 HD)... Avg. $1,780 Four State Angus Association 4.06.19 – Springfield, MO 20 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $2,102 7 Yearling Bulls............................................. Avg. $2,378 11 Open Heifers............................................ Avg. $1,559 10 Bred Heifers............................................. Avg. $2,030 3 Bred Cows.................................................. Avg. $2,066 1 Open Cow.................................................. Avg. $1,200 7 Fall Pairs..................................................... Avg. $3,135 8 Spring Pairs................................................ Avg. $2,068 3 Embryos........................................................ Avg. $500

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Worthington Angus 3.23.19 – Dadeville, MO 37 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $5,635 12 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $4,433 3 Open Heifers.............................................. Avg. $1,550 16 Bred Cows................................................ Avg. $2,834 16 Spring Pairs.............................................. Avg. $3,006 28 Commercial Pairs..................................... Avg. $2,157 GeneTrust ad Suhn Cattle Company 3.26.19 – Eureka, KS 139 Bulls........................................................ Avg. $5,357 Brockmere Farms, Inc. – Annual Performance Tested Bull Sale 4.1.19 – New Cambria, MO 58 Registered Bulls........................................ Avg. $4,048 10 Open Heifers............................................ Avg. $3,350 20 Commercial Open Heifers....................... Avg. $1,193 Meyer Cattle Company – Performance in the Pasture 4.5.19 – Bowling Green, MO 19 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $4,626 13 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $4,053 30 Commercial Pairs..................................... Avg. $2,388

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info:

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon • Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

www.wheelerauctions.com

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

MAY 2019

Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

SydGen Spring Influence 4.9.19 – New Cambria, MO 26 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $3,534 44 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $3,555 13 Commercial Pairs..................................... Avg. $2,669

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SALE CALENDAR May 3 May 11 May 11 May 13

Southeast Missouri Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Fruitland, MO Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO Harriman Santa Fe Complete Female Dispersal Sale, Windsor, MO Gardiner Angus Ranch 4th Annual “Meating Demand” Bull Sale, Ashland, KS

May 17 May 18 June 1 June 8

Southwest Missouri Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Carthage, MO WMC Cattle Co. Ladies of the Ozarks Sale, Wasola, MO Northeast Missouri Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Palmyra, MO Complete Dispersal of the Chastain Farms Beefmaster Herd, Fayetteville, AR

MAY 2019

MCA All-Breeds Junior Show June 6-9 • Sedalia

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Webinar Outlines 2019 Calf Market Expectations Source: CattleFax CENTENNIAL, CO — April 9, 2019 — How will the market respond after a prolonged winter created poor conditions for much of the cattle industry? An upcoming free CattleFax webinar will address that question as well as provide an outlook for the cow-calf and entire beef industry. The CattleFax Trends+ Cow-Calf Webinar, which is free to attendees thanks to sponsor Elanco Animal Health, will be held May 22, 2019, at 5:30 p.m. MT. To participate in the webinar and access program details, producers and industry leaders simply need to register online at https://www.cattlefax.com/#!/about Even though one of the most aggressive U.S. beef cowherd expansions in the last four decades has recently slowed its pace, the rapid growth has increased beef supplies and caused cow-calf profitability to be reduced back toward long-term levels. As profits have narrowed, well-informed producers can maintain healthy margins by adjusting production, marketing and risk management plans with increasing supplies in mind.

MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164.

CattleFax analysts will discuss a variety of topics in the one-hour session, including: • Cattle and feedstuff market projections for the next 12 to 18 months • Outlook of the summer and fall calf markets for 2019 • Review of the recent CowCalf Survey

MAY 2019

The Trends+ webinar is designed to update cattle producers about current market realities and provide producers with decisionfriendly information to assist in making intelligent marketing decisions. More than 6,500 producers have benefited from the analysis and strategies shared through the webinar series since fall 2013.

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MAY 2019

Advertiser Index

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ADM .....................................................................33 AgPower John Deere..............................................37 AgriLabs Vet Gun .................................................49 Angus Field Day ....................................................63 BioZyme.................................................................53 BIVI Alpha............................................................ 31 BQA.......................................................................67 Buffalo Livestock Market.......................................83 Callaway Livestock Center Inc..............................34 Cargill Beef............................................................ 41 Central Life Sciences - Altosid...............................27 Central Missouri Sales Co..................................... 15 Chastain Dispersal Beefmaster Sale......................26 Circle A Angus Ranch...........................................35 Classified................................................................85 Clearwater Farm....................................................35 Crystalyx................................................................ 15 DMCC Private Treaty Bull Sale............................ 21 Durham Simmental Farms....................................25 Eastern Missouri Commission Company..............45 FCS of Missouri.....................................................88 Galaxy Beef LLC...................................................35 Gallagher Fence.....................................................55 GDI........................................................................ 14 GeneTrust...............................................................65 Gerloff Farms.........................................................35 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick................35 Green’s Welding & Sales........................................72 Harriman Santa Fe Dispersal Sale........................29 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.....................................35 HydraBed...............................................................65 ILS...........................................................................3 Irsik & Doll............................................................87 Jim’s Motors...........................................................48 JJ Skyline Angus....................................................35 Joplin Regional Stockyards....................................66 Kingsville Livestock Auction.................................48 Lucas Cattle Co.....................................................25 Marshall & Fenner Farms......................................35 MCA Dury Plaza Hotel - Columbia......................84 MCA Junior Show............................................. 51-62 MCA Membership Form.......................................79 MCA Presidents Council.......................................75

MCA Show-Me-Select Sale Credit........................42 MCA Steak Fry................................................ 39-40 McBee Cattle Co....................................................38 McPherson Concrete Products...............................85 Mead Cattle Co......................................................24 Mead Farms...........................................................35 Mead Farms Angus Sale........................................23 Merck Ad............................................................... 61 Merry Meadows Simmental..................................25 Missouri Angus Association...................................35 Missouri Angus Breeders.......................................35 Missouri Beef Industry Council............................. 13 Missouri Simmental Association............................25 Missouri Simmental Breeders................................25 Missouri Valley Commission Company................45 MLS Tubs..............................................................64 MultiMin USA....................................................... 47 Naught-Naught Agency..........................................67 Northeast Show-Me-Select Sale............................. 18 Ory’s 07 Red Angus...............................................69 Oval F Ranch........................................................25 Profitability Challenge...................................... 73-74 ProServe.................................................................69 Richardson Ranch.................................................35 RLE Simmental.....................................................25 Sellers Feedlot........................................................70 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle....................................25 South Central Regional Stockyards.......................70 Southwest Missouri Show-Me-Select Sale.............43 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef...............................35 Superior Steel Sales..................................................7 Sydenstricker Genetics...........................................35 Sydenstricker Implement........................................ 19 Valley Oaks Angus.................................................35 Weiker Angus Ranch.............................................35 Westway Feed...........................................................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate............................83 Wheeler Livestock Market.....................................32 P.H. White .............................................................46 Mike Williams........................................................83 Windsor Livestock Auction....................................78 Y-Tex.................................................................. 2, 11 Zeitlow Distributing...............................................30


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Profile for Coby Wilson

May 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

May 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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