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CONTENTS

January 2019

FEATURES 16

A Gift For Growth

56

Cow Care

Journagan Ranch Provides Land for Learning at Missouri State University

16

Cow Nutrition Plays a Big Role in Calving Preparation

A Gift For Growth

MEMBER NEWS 6 22 42

Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

Cow Care

COLUMNS 8

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MCA President’s Perspective Roots Run Deep

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Unloaded Gun

Strength in Numbers, Knowledge, and Integrity

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Prejudice

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Junior Spotlight

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Cowboy Poetry

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Capitol Update

Thankful and Inspired

Cowboy’s Fun

New Year, New Faces

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 8 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Maria Washburn • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Maria@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

DEPARTMENTS 7 26

New MCA Members University of Missouri Extension News

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USMEF News

74

Advertisers Index

ON THE COVER: Photo by Jennifer Carrico

2018 MCA Officers (2019 next month) Greg Buckman, President 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Bobby Simpson, President-Elect 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, Vice President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ , Cole Camp, MO 65325 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2018 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Tony Washburn, 4912 457th Street King City, MO 64463 • 660-483-0038 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

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Jared & Chelsie Barnett, JC Barnett Cattle, Doniphan, MO Fred Brakensiek, Brakensiel Farm, Foristell, MO James & Ledina Campbell, Campbell Cattle Co., Granby, MO Sue Euliss, Morrisville, MO Grace Ewing, Jefferson City, MO Josh Gilbert, Gilbert Cattle Company, Oldfield, MO Ed Greife, Clouer Leaf Stock Farm, Adrain, MO Dale, Adam, & William Ransdell, Ransdell Farms, Holliday, MO Jeffery Reed, Rolling Shoals Farm Inc., Williamsville, MO Brett Schellen, Schellen Farms, Aurora, MO Sarah Sims, Kingdom City, MO Kim Smith, Smith Valley Angus, Salem, MO

Daniel Sullivan, Freeman, MO Jason & Sara Thomas, Holliday, MO Gary Waters, Waters Farms, Stella, MO Ryan Waters, Waters Farms, Stella, MO Wyatt Wilson, Wilson Farms, Ava, MO

See the MCA Membership Form on page 65.

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404

Is Your Risk Management Plan Adequate for Your Livestock and Pasture?

Richard Hallock • Risk Management Agent • 660-425-2261 Office 660-947-2474 Office • 641-442-5222 Cellphone

JANUARY 2019

The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Program protects livestock producers from losses to productivity caused by poor forage conditions due to lack of rainfall. The Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Program protects against a decline in the CME Feeders Cattle Price Index. Farmers Risk Management LLC can assist you in the Risk Management of your cattle operation with a loan and or insurance to assist you in running your operation.

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Unloaded Gun An unloaded gun is nothing more than a hunk of steel. When it’s loaded with the right ammunition, it’s a useful tool but can be dangerous when operated with carelessness or ill intent. The same is said for a tractor, chainsaw or many other objects we work with on the farm. This is also true for people.

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The Missouri Rural Crisis Center has mastered the science of fear mongering. They have loaded guns and are determined to spread fiction as fact in order to handcuff innovative farmers and ranchers looking to expand or add value to their business. Their dangerous rhetoric shoots down opportunities for the next generation to come back to the farm or ranch. This carelessness gut-punches local communities and sets ablaze economic activity for businesses from the farm equipment dealer to the bank to the diner on Main Street. It causes people to leave their rural community and forces school districts to start talking consolidation. If agriculture leaves, no industry can fully fill that void. Nationwide, rural areas have lost some 3 million people.

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They put agriculture in a box and anything outside of that is vehemently protested. Pitting farmer against farmer and creating unsubstantiated fear with suburban neighbors about modern agricultural technology and animal feeding operations is the ammunition of choice for the Missouri Rural Crisis Center. Pushing for emotionally driven, scientifically unfounded measures on the county and state levels results in defining agriculture by regulation rather than innovation. The people in agriculture do not need labeled or confined to a box. We need farms and ranches of all sizes and all production methods collectively providing food locally and beyond.

Executive Vice President I am a loaded gun who will fight for this industry. Your association leaders are ready and your new president, Bobby Simpson, is not one to back down. A lot of the fight doesn’t happen in your rural community. It happens in Jefferson City. You can bet other organizations will be at the capitol spreading dangerous rhetoric, but we have ammunition they don’t have. We have you. We are starting another year of “Cowboys at the Capitol” where cattle producers are present every single Wednesday of legislative session. This grassroots advocacy program works because you put a face to the issues and silence much of the hysteria caused by organizations like the Humane Society of the United States and their mouthpieces at the Missouri Rural Crisis Center. Our industry is worth fighting for and we will be on the frontlines. We need to assemble the artillery and bring the entire infantry. We must demobilize efforts to cripple growth in agriculture. We owe it to our future. Let’s make 2019 the year when the signal is stronger than ever that Missouri agriculture is conducive to growth and open to new technology, innovation and, most importantly, new faces.


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Missouri Cattlemen’s Optimistic About New Water Rule

- EPA and Army Corps of Engineers Reject Obama Administration’s WOTUS Rule, Propose Alternative Source: MCA Prime Cuts 12-13-18 On December 11, 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) rolled out their much anticipated proposed rule revising the definition of “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS) and setting the scope of federal authority to regulate waterways and wetlands under the Clean Water Act. This comes after the Obama Administration’s 2015 WOTUS rule that caused massive consternation in the agricultural community. Missouri Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President Mike Deering called the previous rule the “most pervasive invasion of private property rights” he has seen since his time working for the state association. “The 2015 rule literally would have given the federal government regulatory authority over every drop of

water in the country,” said Deering. “From puddles to dry ditches, the federal government would have had jurisdiction. We are very optimistic about the new rule. It is comprehensive, yet very easy to understand and provides a good level of certainty to the producers we represent.” In the new proposed rule, EPA and the Corps took a fundamentally different approach than the previous Administration, creating six categories of waterways that would fall under CWA jurisdiction and excluding all others. The six categories of covered waters are: 1. Traditional navigable waters 2. Tributaries to those navigable waters, meaning perennial or intermittent rivers and streams that contribute flow to a traditional navigable water in a typical year 3. Certain ditches, such as those used for navigation or those affected by the tide 4. Certain lakes and ponds that are similar to traditional navigable waters or that provide perennial or intermittent flow in a typical year to a traditional navigable water 5. Impoundments such as check dams and perennial rivers that form lakes or ponds behind them 6. Wetlands that abut or have a direct hydrologic surface connection to another water in the U.S. EPA will seek comment for 60 days after the proposed rule is published in the Federal Register, which is anticipated in January.

JANUARY 2019

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock

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For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com


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We Market Cattle Across Missouri Weekly:

573-324-2295 • www.emcclivestock.com

…on Tuesday in Boonville…

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We routinely find true price discovery weekly across Missouri. We work for sellers and with buyers to keep our industry moving forward.

JANUARY 2019

…on Friday in Bowling Green.

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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS What is Demand? With Mark Russell, Executive Director, MBIC (Credits to Alison Krebs, NCBA) In 2018, retail beef demand has been strong! While that sounds good, what exactly does it mean? Is it because consumption has continued to increase since the tight supplies of 2015? Consumption has indeed been increasing, but this is only half the story‌ the other half is price. Learn how demand is measured, as well as how it varies by primal, season, and quality grade.

strong economy helps, but consumers have been avidly enjoying all the available beef at a robust price. In other words, beef is worth it for shoppers, and strong retail sales are the result.

Price adds perspective and takes us from consumption, to demand. Said another way, understanding consumers’ willingness to pay for the available supply of beef, empowers us to go from merely noting consumption, to measuring demand. Then, we use demand indices to compare demand across time and products. Indexes tells us how much more (or less) consumers are paying than would have been expected, if demand were flat. As the latest Beef Demand Index shows, 2018 retail beef demand is 15% higher than in January 2012 (Chart 1).

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Diving deeper into the sales data, we can break out demand by category/primal (Chart 2). Here, you see beef demand being driven by the loin and ground beef, whereas, chuck demand has been steady, and round demand, weaker. Further, the importance of the summer grilling season is very pronounced whereas end-cut demand improves in the fall through winter months (think pressure cookers, slow cookers or the short ribs). Ground beef demand remains relatively steady throughout the year given its staple role. The opposing

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Plugging monthly retail sales data into the index enables us to see distinct seasonal trends. For example, total beef demand is typically weakest in November (due to Thanksgiving) and strongest through the summer grilling season and the December holidays. Further, we can see that 2018 demand has been particularly robust as index values have averaged 6% higher yearto-date than for January-October of 2017. No doubt a


consumer willingness to pay for beef has clear peaks as well as overall trends. And at the end of the day, it’s pretty much always the season for beef. GET BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE (BQA) CERTIFIED! MCA AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS ARE HOSTING LIVE TRAINING/CERTIFICATIONS ACROSS THE STATE IN 2019. DEMAND, FOR CATTLE THAT ARE NOT BQA OWNER-CERTIFIED, WILL CERTAINLY BE LIMITED IN THE FUTURE. CHECK OUT TRAINING LOCATIONS AT MOCATTLE.COM

seasonality of whole-muscle cuts and constant presence of ground beef, show how beef can help drive total store sales throughout the year. Another way to look at beef demand is by quality grade. If there were any doubt, the data confirms consumers are loving the higher quality beef supply coming to market. Chart 3 shows strong increases in consumer demand for USDA choice quality grade, whereas, select demand has withered. Branded programs have helped drive this quality awareness and experience amongst consumers, although demand for all choice beef is robust. The good news for this quality demand story is the share of prime and choice beef production has grown. Farmers and ranchers continue to improve genetics and other herd management practices to produce more of the higher quality beef consumers are demanding. The resilient choice-select spread – despite increasing volumes – further confirms this strong demand for higher quality beef.

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Beef Demand Chart 4 Overall, retail beef demand is strong. Despite other lower priced proteins, consumers have remained willing to pay robust retail prices for the increasing supplies of higher quality beef. While volumes may vary somewhat throughout the year,

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Dailey Receives Symposium’s Lifetime Achievement Award Source: University of Missouri Extension KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – University of Missouri Extension writer Duane Dailey won the 2018 Agriculture Educator Lifetime Achievement Award at the Missouri Livestock Symposium on November 30. The award honors an educator making significant contributions to agriculture in northeastern Missouri, says Zac Erwin, MU Extension livestock specialist and symposium organizer. For 57 years, Dailey “taught through the media.” He writes science stories easily understood. He tells about MU research on forages, cattle and economics. “All go together,” Dailey says. “Cows eat grass and make money for 38,000 Missouri farmers.” In recent years, he told how to replace toxic K-31 tall fescue. He shares beef reproduction research in common words to help farmers boost profits and save time. He promotes fixed-time artificial insemination. AI led to the Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program. For 30 years, he wrote economic outlooks from the MU Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute. He still covers MU economists.

He retired 23 years ago after serving as an extension professor and news director in MU Ag Information. He says he “flunked retirement” to return as an MU writer.

Dailey grew up near Mercer, Missouri. The farm boy left to earn a bachelor’s degree in agricultural journalism in 1957. Then he served two years in the U.S. Army before returning to MU to earn a master’s degree in extension education. He stayed in the Army Reserve, rising to the rank of captain.

An award-winning photographer, Dailey documented stories of more than 100 mule people. A 2014 exhibit, “Missouri Mules and Men,” showed the life of the state animal and its people. His black-and-white photos preserve history. He and the late Melvin Bradley made four books on mules.

Kingsville Livestock Auction

JANUARY 2019

Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

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Special Cow/Bull & Cow/Calf Sale Saturday, January 19 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

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For 15 years, Dailey was co-director of the Missouri Photo Workshop. Now he continues to teach professionals there. In 2007, the Missouri Photojournalism Hall of Fame inducted Dailey as a member. He holds numerous honors from media and agricultural groups. Named in his honor, the F. Duane Dailey MU Student Enrichment Fund helps agricultural journalism students. The fund, still growing, pays student travel. Dailey lives in Columbia and has two grown daughters. In acceptance, Dailey said the award was given too soon. He isn’t done yet.


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Feeding Corn to Cows Replaces Hay Care Needed When Adding Starch to Diet Source: University of Missouri Extension KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – Wintering cows in a year with bad hay or shortages of hay proves challenging to beef farmers. Prolonged drought last summer upset haymaking plans. Beef nutritionist Eric Bailey, University of Missouri Extension, answered farmers’ questions December 2 at the Missouri Livestock Symposium in Kirksville. His topic: “Winter Feeding With Expensive Hay.” He cleared up misconceptions. Less hay can be fed by feeding grain supplements. But that takes management. Hay per cow can be cut from 30 or 40 pounds to 10 pounds. However, hay should not be eliminated. The cow rumen digests fiber. Overfeeding starch disturbs rumen microbes without proper adaptation. “From the standpoint of feed costs, corn makes sense,” Bailey said. But too much corn upsets rumen digestion. He told the group that corn can solve some feed needs this winter, but caution is needed when feeding highstarch supplements. Limit corn to 6 pounds per head per day, he warned. “There’s an answer for high-price, low-quality hay,” Bailey said. “This is where distillers grains shine.” Byproduct feeds contain both protein and energy. Most of the starch went into making fuel. Lower starch makes distillers grains more useful than cheaper corn. But Bailey doesn’t dismiss use of corn.

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“Feeding a bale of $85 hay makes no sense. It’s tough to pencil a profit,” he said.

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He outlined ways to limit the amount of hay fed. Plan only 10 pounds of hay a day for a safe start in making a ration. A major price problem faces farmers. Much hay became too pricey to feed. Second, available hay may not have enough TDN (total digestible nutrients).

Earlier he’d said a cow needs hay of at least 55 percent TDN. That $85 hay might be only 50 percent TDN, which means it needs supplement. “If hay is scarce and overpriced, corn has a place,” he said. Whole or cracked corn can be used. Cracked corn digests better, but the cost and trouble of grinding corn may not be worth it. Feed it whole. Bailey also cautions about using haylage. The highmoisture forage requires more pounds of feed than dry hay. Harvesting and plastic-wrapping poor-quality forage doesn’t boost feed value. Added value comes from cutting and wrapping hay in the wet spring season, before forage matures. Haylage cut in spring is better than dry hay baled in August. In follow-up, farmers had questions about that 6-pound limit on corn for cows. They were taught 3 pounds was the limit. Bailey said research at Kansas State University shows 6 pounds to be safe. “That’s been duplicated in other research,” he added. Again and again, Bailey said, “More corn means more management.” Care is needed when adding corn to hay of unknown TDN. Too often producers don’t know the energy or protein in hay they buy. That’s needed to determine the supplement. Hay testing is a start. Ration-building advice is available from MU Extension specialists. Regional specialists can be located through county extension centers. “We’re here to help,” Bailey said. That’s at the state and regional level. Bailey keeps busy with extension meetings. His talks on winter feeding prove popular across the state. Bailey proves the new Mizzou motto: the University for Missouri. The Missouri Livestock Symposium gives free programs on wide ranges of topics. Area farmers pick topics and speakers for their annual meeting. Many speakers come from the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, Columbia.


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2018’s Weather was ‘Near Normal,’ but Averages Hide Record-Setting Events Source: University of Missouri Extension

more than 40 years, Guinan said.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Do the math on temperatures and rainfall for all of 2018. On average, you get “near normal,” says Pat Guinan, University of Missouri Extension climatologist.

In May, the St. Joseph airport recorded 23 inches of rain from May 2017 through May 2018. Their normal is 41 inches.

“Weather was anything but that,” Guinan adds. Recordsetting numbers hide in an average. For starters, look at the “non-spring” of 2018. April was the second coldest on record going back to 1895. That was followed by the hottest May on record. That reaches back 124 years. There’s more. June was eighth hottest. June heat built on top of the May record to become the hottest MayJune combination on record. Hang on for more extremes. The record-setting early blizzard warnings in November came later. Late spring extremes came from a stubborn highpressure ridge over the Midwest. It was persistent and warm. Many locations were above normal every day of May. This beat the prior record set in 1962. Farmers faced many problems all year from planting to harvest. What started as too cold to plant and then too warm and dry became too wet to harvest. Soybeans were stranded in snow-covered fields.

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A spring planting season also needs rainfall. The 2018 spring continued from an abnormally dry ending to 2017. Those previous September rains were 3 inches below normal. September-to-January rains were 57 percent of normal. That was the driest similar period in

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

The shortage of rain, and lack of subsoil moisture, led right into that hot 2018 heat. Heat made water shortages worse. Lack of water and high heat hit grass farmers hard. That stopped forage growth of grass and hay for livestock herds. Missouri is No. 2 in cow numbers in the nation. Cows normally grazing fall pastures were fed winter hay early. Unlike many droughts, this one seemed to make Missouri the bull’s-eye. “The largest precipitation deficits in the central United States built up in Missouri,” Guinan said. Not only soil moisture suffered, stock water ran short. Farmers were hauling water, a decades-old memory. For crop farmers the cold April delayed planting. Earlyplanted corn and soybeans emerged late. But warm weather hastened crop maturity, leading to an early start at harvest. Then another flip came. November became the fourth coldest on record. Go back to 1976 for comparison. This year, many locations across northern Missouri recorded single-digit minimum temperatures. When precipitation returned, it included unfamiliar early snow. That became one of the snowiest Novembers in decades. Five separate snow events hit the state. Snow accumulations of 5 to 10 inches were common in the northern two-thirds of the state. The biggest snow event was a highly unusual blizzard after Thanksgiving. Heavy snows came with high winds. Kansas City International Airport recorded a wind gust of 55 mph. The bright report is less drought as subsoil moisture gains. There is still time for December to finish with surprises. Guinan reports on the weather that occurred. He gives no guesstimates on a white Christmas. He continues to be amazed at what happened in 2018.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

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Steve Miller and Family 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 (660) 582-1334 E-mail: bigmilr@grm.net Sale Dates • Feb. 15 & March 9

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

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35004 E. McQuerry Rd • Oak Grove, MO 64075 www.valleyoaksangus.com The Ward Family David Ward– 816-229-8115 Tony Ward – 816-365-5930 tony@valleyoaksangus.com Kyle Lynn – 573-721-6382 – Herdsman kyle@valleyoaksangus.com

Spring Sale March 2 2019

Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke • Kevin Lennon

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Spring Production Sale March 16

JJ Skyline Angus

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Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

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MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

April 9 Sydenstricker Influence Sale

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U.S. Beef Exports Still Red-Hot Pork Exports Slightly Below Year-Ago Level Source: USMEF U.S. beef exports remained on a record-shattering value pace in October, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). October pork exports trended seasonally higher compared to recent months but were still below the results posted in October 2017. Lamb export volume in October more than doubled year-over-year, while value increased nearly 50 percent. October beef exports totaled 117,838 metric tons (mt), up 6 percent from a year ago, valued at $727.4 million – up 10 percent and the second-highest monthly total on record. For January through October, beef exports totaled 1.13 million mt, up 9 percent year-over-year, while value was up 17 percent to $6.92 billion. For beef muscle cuts only, exports increased 12 percent in volume (867,714 mt) and 19 percent in value ($6.19 billion). Exports accounted for 13 percent of total beef production in October, which was steady with last year, and 11.6 percent for muscle cuts only (down slightly). For January through October, exports accounted for 13.5 percent of total production and 11.1 percent for muscle cuts – up from 12.8 percent and 10.2 percent, respectively, last year. Beef export value equated to $317.53 per head of fed slaughter in October, up 5 percent from a year ago. For January through October, the per-head average was up 15 percent to $320.50. “Demand for U.S. beef continues to climb in nearly every region of the world, with annual records already falling in some markets,” said Dan Halstrom, USMEF president and CEO. “Per-head export value will also easily set a new record in 2018, which illustrates the strong returns exports are delivering for cattle producers and for the entire supply chain.”

JANUARY 2019

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October pork export volume was 207,725 mt, the largest since May but still 2 percent lower year-over-year, reflecting smaller variety meat exports. Export value ($536.5 million) was also the largest since May but still down 5 percent from a year ago. For January through October, pork exports were 1 percent above last year’s record pace at 2.02 million mt, while value was also up 1 percent to $5.33 billion. For pork muscle cuts only, January-October exports increased 5 percent from a year ago in volume (1.63 million mt), valued at $4.43 billion (up 2 percent). October exports accounted for 23.6 percent of total pork production, down from 25.4 percent a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported was 20.7 percent – down from 21.6 percent in October 2017. For January through October, pork exports accounted for 25.8 percent of total production, down from 26.4 percent last year, but the percentage of muscle cuts exported increased from 22 to 22.5 percent. Export value per head slaughtered was down 10 percent from a year ago in October to $46.07. The January-October average was $51.74, down 2 percent. “Despite some very significant obstacles, global demand dynamics for U.S. pork remain strong,” Halstrom said. “We are hopeful that the events of the past week – the signing of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement and the return of trade negotiations between the U.S. and China – represent progress toward elimination of retaliatory duties imposed by key trading partners. If we can put that situation behind us, U.S. pork is well-positioned to regain the momentum displayed early in the year.” Halstrom added that upcoming trade negotiations with Japan are critical for the U.S. pork and beef industries, as all major competitors in the Japanese market will soon benefit from significant tariff reductions. USMEF, along with producers, exporters and other industry

Ron McBee 221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517 E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com Website: McBeeCattleCompany.com


organizations submitted comments to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) underscoring the importance and urgency of these negotiations and will convey these points again in USTR’s Dec. 10 public hearing. New value records for U.S. beef in Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines Beef exports to South Korea, which had already set a new annual value record through September, remained on a torrid pace as October exports reached 20,171 mt (up 17 percent from a year ago) valued at $153.1 million (up 25 percent). January-October exports were up 35 percent in volume (200,666 mt) and 47 percent in value ($1.44 billion). These results included a 21 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 44,440 mt, valued at $431 million (up 31 percent). While Korea’s imports from Australia and New Zealand have also edged higher

in 2018, U.S. beef’s market share has increased sharply, jumping from 49 to 53 percent. October beef exports to leading market Japan were up 12 percent from a year ago in volume (26,954 mt) and 13 percent higher in value ($166.8 million). For January through October, exports to Japan were up 7 percent from a year ago in volume (279,825 mt) while value increased 10 percent to $1.76 billion. Chilled beef exports to Japan were down 1 percent to 123,712 mt, but value increased 8 percent to $990 million. New record for U.S. pork in Korea; growth in Japan, ASEAN also bolster October exports Pork exports to South Korea continued to gain momentum in October, increasing 27 percent from a year ago in volume (19,588 mt) and 17 percent in value (Continued on page 36)

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($49.2 million). January-October exports to Korea increased 41 percent in volume (191,610 mt) and 44 percent in value ($538.4 million) – already topping the annual records set in 2011. Even as imports from all main suppliers have expanded this year, U.S. share of Korea’s pork imports has increased significantly, rising from 36 to 39 percent.

Lamb exports solid in October October exports of U.S. lamb more than doubled from a year ago to 1,161 mt (up 107 percent). Export value was also strong, climbing 48 percent to $1.96 million. Lamb muscle cut exports were 207 mt in October, up 20 percent from a year ago, valued at $1.13 million (up 27 percent).

October pork exports to leading value market Japan totaled 35,134 mt, up 8 percent from a year ago, while export value climbed 9 percent to $146.6 million. This pushed January-October exports 2 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (330,480 mt) and 3 percent higher in value ($1.36 billion). This included a slight decrease in chilled pork volume (176,118 mt) while value was up 2 percent to $849 million. U.S. share of Japan’s pork imports held close to 35 percent, down slightly from last year. But Japan imported a record volume of ground seasoned pork from the European Union in October and U.S. share in that category has dropped from 71 to 65 percent in 2018. Unfortunately this trend is likely to continue with upcoming implementation of the Japan-EU Economic Partnership Agreement and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for TransPacific Partnership, which will reduce tariffs on all pork and phase the import duty on ground seasoned pork to zero over the next six years.

Through the first 10 months of the year, lamb exports were 69 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (10,371 mt) and 19 percent higher in value ($19 million). While the increase is mainly attributable to stronger variety meat demand in Mexico, muscle cut exports were sharply higher to the Bahamas, the Dominican Republic, the United Arab Emirates, Taiwan and the Philippines. Complete January-October export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics web page. Monthly charts for U.S. pork and beef exports are also available online.


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Simmental Sires Recognized by IBA Source: American Simmental Association BOZEMAN, MT--- Simmental sires are now recognized by Integrity Beef Alliance (IBA) as part of their value-added program. IBA is a comprehensive beef production system, through which members can utilize standardized management practices, marketing outlets, data utilization, assistance procuring replacement cattle, and additional support. IBA’s Terminal Calf Program provides members with the option of participating in a value-added calf sale and offers producers additional support such as data consultation. The Replacement Female Program offers producers the opportunity to market females to IBA Terminal Calf Program participants. IBA helps members produce a product that exceeds consumer expectations. “Integrity Beef Alliance is pleased to announce the recent inclusion of the Simmental breed as an approved bull for use in the value-added program,” said Robert Wells, Alliance Executive Director. “Simmental cows were already approved. We believe this will allow commercial producers utilizing Simmental genetics an additional opportunity to be recognized and receive premiums for all the value-added traits they build into

their cattle. Integrity Beef Alliance has an 18-year track record of producing high-quality value-added calves for the industry and which consumers are demanding.” Chip Kemp, American Simmental Association Director of Commercial and Industry Operations, expressed ASA’s enthusiasm about ASA’s relationship with IBA. “The inclusion of SimGenetics into the Integrity Beef Alliance program is a win for all involved,” said Kemp. “This allows those savvy, profit-focused commercial producers involved with IBA the freedom to incorporate today’s Simmental influenced genetics to add serious value to their feeder calves and to add meaningful maternal merit as well. The evolution of SimGenetics, and the fact that this evolution is backed with factbased science, makes for an ideal complement to the predominant cow base in the south central US. The data is clear, the overwhelming majority of commercial operations can benefit from an infusion of Simmental genetics. We are pleased the IBA leadership team has welcomed SimGenetics into their progressive and highly regarded data-driven program.” To learn more about IBA, please visit www. integritybeef.org.

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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association cooked and served the meal for the Cattlemen Field Day on Saturday, November 24 at the farm of John Stewart in Lowry City. The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association partnered with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to provide a great educational opportunity for Cattlemen in our county. Topics for the day were NRCS awareness, the farm bill as well as demonstrations for soil health, water management, rotational grazing and stockpiling warm season grasses.

this to show their Christmas Spirit and is a great way for the cattlemen to be involved in our county. The display remained until the first of the year. Please make sure to drive down main street of Appleton and see the display in the City Hall window next year if you missed it. Happy Holidays from the St. Clair County Cattlemen!

St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association has also put a window display in the Appleton City “Decorate your Store Front and Window Contest.” Appleton City uses

Cattlemen’s Field Day. Cattlemen’s Field Day.

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

JANUARY 2019

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

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Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

Cattlemen’s Christmas Window Display


Barton County The Barton County Cattlemen met Tuesday, December 11 in the basement of Memorial Hall in Lamar, Missouri. The meal was sponsored by Joe Brown, Tech Rep from the Multimin USA company. The beef brisket was furnished by Doug Haile, and the great meal was prepared by Scott Nolting A discussion was held concerning the Beef Quality Assurance education program and that it will probably soon be a requirement in order to give shots, handle other medications, and also do business with some of the finishing feedlots. It was agreed that the Barton County Cattlemen’s Association would seek out this education and have it covered at a future meeting. Joe Brown gave a presentation on the importance of trace minerals and shared that some feeds lack the required amount necessary to maintain a fully healthy herd. Additionaly, some feeds will tie up the trace minerals that are given. When trace minerals are insufficient, the first important loss a cow suffers is that of conception. Each cow will absorb and retain trace minerals differently, so Multimin is injected subcutaneously in the neck (at a maximum dose of 7

mil). Multimin is also good to use on calves at a rate of 1 mil per 100 pounds. There is no fear of an overdose since the liver regulates trace minerals. The Barton County Cattlemen will have their next meeting January 22, 2019, in the basement of Memorial Hall in Lamar, Missouri.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association December 1 was the annual meeting for the Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association at the MARC in Mt. Vernon. About 200 people attended the combination annual meeting, fish fry and benefit auction. The auction funds are used for scholarships and a multitude of benevolent efforts for youth in the region. During the brief business meeting, Kent Arnaud gave the nominating committee report. The following persons were named and elected by acclamation: Jeff Kaal, Verona, president; Scynthia Schnake, Stotts City, vice president; Stephanie Fizette, Golden City, secretarytreasurer. Board members included: Kent Arnaud, Monett; Traves Merrick, Miller; Josh Worthington, Dadeville; and Russell Marion, Pierce City. Russell will be filling Scynthia’s spot as she moved into the vicepresident’s spot. The auctioneer for the evening was Skyler Moore, Mt. Vernon. He was assisted by a number of ringmen who found many active buyers for a large amount of goods and services such as: feed, minerals, power fencers, semen, ova transfer, tires, oil, books, pictures, bull breeding soundness certificates, desserts, cattle panels, wine, bale feeders, dewormers and an Australian Shepherd puppy. An antique beef road sign, formerly

located along I-44 on the University of Missouri Southwest Research Center’s property closed out the auction. It was probably installed in the late 80’s and has now been replaced by a smaller more colorful sign. The sign sold for $160 on a bid from Chuck Daniel, Arcola. He plans to place it at his farm’s entrance in northern Dade county. The auction made just over $16,000.

How many cattlemen does it take to make Suzie-Q’s?

Scynthia Schnake capturing video for the Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association Facebook Page. Auctioning BEEF road sign.

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION JANUARY 2019

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Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

Rebecca and Blaine Mettler love their new puppy.


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Southeast Missouri Cattlemen The SEMO Cattlemen’s Association hosted a meeting covering rural crime on November 27, 2018, at the Cape Girardeau County Extension Office in Jackson. An upwards of 60 members and guests attended the presentation delivered by Master Sargent Troy Linneman with the Rural Crimes Investigative Unit of the Missouri State Highway Patrol. Other special guests included Sargent Brenda Cone, Rural Crimes Investigation Unit; Ruth Ann Dickerson, Cape Girardeau County Sherriff; Eric Friedrich, Commander Criminal Investigations Division. Sargent Linneman discussed the types of thefts and crimes that fall under this division, but that you should always involve the local authorities. Tips were provided for keeping the farm safe including being a good neighbor and reporting any suspicious activity. He warned of making purchases on sites like Craigslist and Facebook, and that knowing the value of items posted for sale is important so that you do not fall victim to purchasing a stolen item. “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is,” was a quote Sargent Linneman emphasized. He mentioned most property crimes in Missouri are committed to feed a drug addiction. Targeted items are those that can be easily turned into cash or traded for drugs.

Master Sargent Troy Linneman.

Corey Givens, Boehringer Ingelheim animal health products, and Alliance Bank sponsored the evening. Brett Harper from Alliance Bank.

10' Feed Bunk Featuring our THREE TON PORTABLE FEED BIN

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(660) 476-5598 Fax: (660) 476-2801

JANUARY 2019

• Ground Opening Lid • Sight Glass • Pin Hitch • Spout just right for a five gallon bucket

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Johnson County Once again, we have seen quite a change in our weather. I recently received a text message that precisely describes what type of weather we have been experiencing. The first picture, “Saturday in Missouri,” featured a man in shorts mowing his yard while the second picture showed a man dressed in winter clothing shoveling snow with the caption, “Sunday in Missouri.” The pictures reminded me of the old saying, “If you don’t like the weather in Missouri, wait five minutes and it will change!” How accurate that has been the past several weeks. Johnson County Cattlemen’s November meeting was held at the Johnson County Fairgrounds, and attendance was good. The meeting began with Treasurer Susan Smarr, presenting the financial report. During the meeting there was discussion that Johnson County Cattlemen had grilled for Kleinschmidt’s on Black Friday and that the event was a success. Bruce Mershon, Region 5 Vice President, provided our group with information regarding current things that have been happening within the Cattlemen’s Association. Bruce discussed the need for cattlemen to begin looking at becoming BQA (Beef Quality Assurance) certified. He advised that in today’s market, consumers are looking at where beef comes from and exactly how it is being raised. Bruce reminded everyone that in order to be competitive, one must be aware of customer wants and needs. The MCA website and magazine has information regarding dates, times, and location for training sessions on how to become BQA certified. You can also go online and complete the BQA course. Bruce then discussed the importance of attending Cowboys at the Capital event as a way to ensure that state legislators are aware of cattlemen’s concerns.

JANUARY 2019

Guest speakers, Ms. Stacy Roth and Dr. Marc Campbell, DVM, from Bayer Ag Division presented a program on Bayer cattle de-wormers and lice control. Ms. Roth discussed the product Cydectin, a pour-on

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and injectable solution that treats internal and external parasites. Dr. Campbell discussed the benefits of using de-wormers and lice control products on cattle. Dr. Campbell made it clear that by ensuring the health of cattle, cattlemen could easily increase their profit margin. As we all know, flies are a continuous and pesky problem, particularly during the summer months. Bayer offers a product called Clean-up II with IGR for both, fly and lice control. Dr. Campbell discussed the benefits of using Clean-up II to kill lice eggs before they hatch. Clean-up II also provides control of biting and sucking adult lice and assists in controlling flies. Another benefit is that it is an oil-based product, which means it will stay on the animal for a longer period of time. Dr. Campbell emphasized the importance of using products to keep cattle healthy. Several informational handouts were available. Thanks to both, Ms. Roth and Dr. Campbell for providing an informational program on lice, fly, and parasite control and for sponsoring the meal. I would like to conclude with a closing thought. One of the best ways to fight ignorance of those who do not understand what cattlemen are about is through education. As cattlemen, we are constantly attacked and criticized by those who do not understand what we represent or what we do. Should the opportunity arise, take time to explain and show others our way of life.

Johnson County Cattlemen grilled for Kleinschmidt’s on Black Friday.

Ms. Stacy Roth and Dr. Marc Campbell, DVM, from Bayer Ag Division.


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Polk County As the saying goes, “A good time was had by all.” At least it seemed just about everybody had a good time at the Polk County Cattlemen’s Christmas Party, which was held at the Citizens Memorial Hospital Community Rooms, on Saturday, December 1. A delicious meal was prepared by the hospital kitchen staff. There was approximately 100 guests present to enjoy the good food and all the fun activities. For the past few years, our association has sold gun raffle tickets to earn money for Share Your Christmas, with the drawing being done at our Christmas party. This year, we raffled a Polk County Missouri Special Edition Henry, which was won by Alan Roberts, and a shotgun, which was won by Russell Neill. Congratulations to both winners. I don’t remember the exact amount earned from the raffle, but I know it will be used to MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59the AMprocessing Page 62 of beef animals pay for expenses and for that were donated to our association. Local beef producers have donated animals that are processed into hamburger, which we give to needy families at Share Your Christmas. The hamburger meat surely is a blessing to those families. We give thanks to God that we can be of help to them. Part of the fun for the evening was the cowboy poetry done by Danny McCurry. We always enjoy having Mr. McCurry do his poetry for us. He also read a Christmas story and lead us in Christmas songs. This was followed by a surprise entrance of Ole Saint Nick, all dressed in his Santa red and white suit. Santa had a wagon filled with gifts for everyone. It was a fun evening, and a great way to wrap up a very successful year for the Polk County Cattlemen.

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Several of our members helped hand out gifts and food at the Share Your Christmas distribution center on December 13 and 14. It is quite amazing to see all the donations made for this cause. We are not yet sure of the plans for the January meeting. Please watch for the card you should receive early in January, that will announce the place and time for the meeting.

Part of the Polk County crew that helped with the Share Your Christmas distributions.

Picture of the crowd at the party.

JANUARY 2019

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

The Cowboy Poet, Danny McCurry delivered special Christmas poems and songs.


JANUARY 2019

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Dent/Phelps County Our group’s traveling grill was put to good use cooking burgers in Dent County and steaks in Phelps County this fall. On September 20, Dent County Beef Days was a success. For all our local third graders, the fifteen educational and interactive presentations were fun and unique learning experiences. One of their teachers said in a survey, “This is seriously one of my favorite days of the school year!” Every teacher surveyed said that Beef Day improves their student’s knowledge about agriculture and where their food comes from. Combine that with a great tasting burger and that’s success! On October 13, our group partnered with the state cattlemen’s association and Rolla Shooting Club for our second annual Saturday Shoot. There were seven teams and a few individuals who enjoyed the day and the steaks. The winning team was from Networth Feed and Feeding. The board wants to thank all those who helped with these two events, especially the generous sponsors for each of the competing teams.

JANUARY 2019

An early snow on November 8 was unfortunate and attendance at our group meeting was lower than usual. However, everyone who ventured out for the Succession & Financial Planning meeting went home with great information and at least one door prize. Thank you to Phelps County Bank for hosting our group and to Verna Brand, Investment Management Consultant, and Michele Kelsaw, Attorney at Law, MBA who spoke to us. We had a better turnout on December 13, even with a day and night of steady rain. Those attending our annual Chili Dinner meeting enjoyed chili from Main Street Cafe of Salem. The hosts and speakers were new members, Kim and Brian Smith of Smith Valley Angus. The location of Smith Valley Angus Barn, a new event facility near the Salem city limits, didn’t feel like a barn. The combination of classy comfort great for any party and customized area perfect for a livestock auction, make it an unique and practical venue for the area. Brian spoke to us about their cattle operation and recent sale that was held at the barn. Then, Kim shared what she has been learning about a new program titled ANGUSLINK. It involves a verification of your herd’s genetics and includes promotional tools that aid in the

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sale of your cattle. She will share more with us later after she has used the program for their herd. We also had the pleasure of getting an update from Kenadee Barnitz who has been busy this year representing the state as our Missouri Beef Queen. Kenadee shared her experiences and thanked our group for all their support.


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Douglas / Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Monday, December 3, 2018, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri, at Club 60 Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a homestyle chicken fried steak dinner sponsored by the members of our own group. President Karla Besson opened the meeting and brought us up-to-speed with current news, and new officers who will fill board positions in January 2019. Raffle tickets were distributed at check-in, and tickets were drawn for door prizes. New president of the Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s group, Ernie Ehlers introduced the President of Missouri CattleWomen’s Association, Janet Crow, who gave an update on the Missouri Beef Industry Council to the group. Karla then asked the blessing before the meal, and the members enjoyed fellowship during dinner. After dinner, auctioneer J.D. Shannon donated his services for the live auction to sell the steer calf born from the red angus heifer that was donated by Gourley Red Angus in 2017. Two of our members who had the winning bid generously donated the calf back to be auctioned off again. The final bid belonged to Rocky and Peggy Dailing. Proceeds were split 50/50 between the cattlemen’s association for future heifer projects with our youth, and first essay winner Caleb Higgins.

JANUARY 2019

The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their January meeting on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove, Missouri. Double S / Pro Energy Feeds and Bob Reed Farms will sponsor the meeting with a presentation on liquid feed supplements. Cattlemen in the area are always welcome to attend.

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Douglas/Wright county board members Karla Besson and Ashley Watson with winning bidders in the steer calf auction: Rocky and Peggy Dailing, Mickey and Brenda Plummer, Randy and Jane Miller, Lonnie Dowden, Charlie Besson, and Caleb Higgins.

J.D. Shannon auctioned off the steer calf born from essay winner, Caleb Higgins’ heifer.

Lafayette County The Lafayette County Cattlemen grilled for Black Friday shoppers at Kleinschmidt’s Western Store on Friday, November 23. Shoppers enjoyed ribeye steak sandwiches, 1/4 lb. all-beef hotdogs, chili and homemade cinnamon rolls.


Newton-McDonald County Association Newton-McDonald County Cattlemen President Ruhl recognizes Karen Fink’s many contributions during the Association’s Annual Meeting. Jennifer Lutes presentation on the new federal tax law and implications for ranchers, during the Newton-McDonald County Cattlemen Annual Meeting. The Newton-McDonald County Cattlemen grilling team also prepared steaks for our Crowder College partners as they fed participants in the recent college competition they hosted for the state’s association of Professional Agriculture students.

Newton-McDonald County Cattlemen President Ruhl recognizes Karen Fink.

Jennifer Lutes presents to the association at the annual meeting.

JANUARY 2019

The Newton-McDonald County Cattlemen grilling team preparing steaks for our Crowder College partners.

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Prejudice Prejudice is a funny thing. When a city slicker or a dude comes meanderin’ into the Montana bar in Glasgow he’s liable to get a lot of hard stares. But, I’m here to tell ya, when the shoe’s on the other foot, it can be mighty uncomfortable.

JANUARY 2019

Years ago in Kansas City, I set out one night to find one of them ‘down home guitar blues pickers that I had read about in the Sunday paper. I was drivin’ around Saturday night lookin’ for Walter’s Crescendo Lounge. I had some ribs at Money’s on Prospect and asked directions. The feller told me not to go over there after dark. Then, after thinkin’ about it, he scribbled his name and phone number on a piece of paper and said,

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“When you git in trouble, have’m call me.” Nice of him, I thought. Somehow I never found Walter’s but at the corner of 39th and Jackson I spied Willie’s Total Experience Lounge. I recognized the name from the paper so I went in. I was dressed normal; hat, Levi’s and boots. The bartender was a lady named Bert. She served me a


scotch and creme soda. I sat at a table in front of the band. As the clientele came in they all sat around by the walls. Kind of like they were circlin’ me. Nobody said much and they weren’t real friendly. Finally the band leader, Freddy, came over to my table and asked me, “Hey man, what are you doin’ here?” I told him I heard this was the best music in Kansas City and I came to find out! Well he must have thought the same thing ‘cause it sure tickled him! He couldn’t do enough to make me feel at home. His sister was the waitress and he told her to make sure my grape Nehi never went dry. By then I wuz smarter’n a tree full o’ owls, ten foot tall and bullet proof, as Tink would say! But I couldn’t get nobody to dance with me! Eventually this lady named Elizabeth consented. She must have figured I wasn’t so bad after all ‘cause she sat at my table and invited Louise and Wilma to join us. The four of us danced until closin’ time. It was a fine evening and although they didn’t take to me at first they must have decided that cowboys aren’t from outer space, just different. I remember that little lesson when I see a kid wearin’ a headband and sandals in a cowboy bar. I always try to give’m the benefit of the doubt. After all, he might be friskin’ customers at the door next time I make it Willie’s Total Experience Lounge!

For More Information About Simmental Cattle Please Visit: MissouriSimmental.com

Durham Simmental Farms Your Source for Quality Simmental in Central Missouri

38863 185th Road • Nelson, MO 65347

Ralph 660-837-3353

Garry 660-784-2242

For Your Simmental Needs Contact One of These Missouri Breeders… STEAKS ALIVE John & Jeanne Scorse Semen, embryos and foundation stock available at the ranch P.O. Box 3832 • Joplin, MO 64803 Phone: 417-437-0911 • Fax: 316-856-2338 E-mail: scorsej@steaksalive.com Web Page: http://www.steaksalive.com

LUCAS CATTLE CO. Forrest & Charolotte Lucas Owners

Cleo Fields 417-399-7124 Jeff Reed 417-399-1241 Brandon Atkins 417-399-7142

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Oval F Ranch

Don Fischer • Matt Fischer 816-392-8771 • 816-383 0630 ovalfranch.com • Winston MO

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JANUARY 2019

Bulls for Sale!

Quality Simmentals for 40 years

merrymoomoos@live.com

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5

Cattle Co. Red Angus

Registered/Commercial Bulls Available

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SALE REPORTS Show-Me Polled Hereford Classic 11.17.18 - Windsor, MO 5 Bulls............................................ Avg. $2,910 78 Females..................................... Avg. $3,038 Butch’s Angus 11.24.18 - Jackson, MO 3 Older Bulls................................. Avg. $3,183 25 Yearling Bulls........................... Avg. $2,528 1 Bred Heifer................................. Avg. $3,000 5 Bred Cows.................................. Avg. $1,400 33 Fall Pairs................................... Avg. $2,180 West Central Show-Me Select Heifer Sale 11.24.18 - Kingsville, MO 11 Tier II A.I. Bred Heifers.......... Avg. $1,827 0 Tier II N.S. Bred Heifers.................. Avg. $0 159 Tier I A.I. Bred Heifers.......... Avg. $1,878 67 Tier I N.S. Bred Heifers........... Avg. $1,724 S.E. Show-Me Select Heifer Sale 12.1.18 - Fruitland, MO 15 Tier II A.I. Bred Heifers.......... Avg. $2,223 14 Tier II N.S. Bred Heifers......... Avg. $1,879 16 Tier I A.I. Bred Heifers............ Avg. $2,238 19 Tier I N.S. Bred Heifers........... Avg. $2,047 Show-Me Select Rep. Heifers Sale 12.7.18 - Farmington, MO 5 Tier II A.I. Bred Heifers............ Avg. $2,730 2 Tier II N.S. Bred Heifers........... Avg. $2,100 41 Tier I A.I. Bred Heifers............ Avg. $2,550 26 Tier I N.S. Bred Heifers........... Avg. $1,937 N.E. Show-Me Select Heifer Sale 12.8.18 - Palmyra 21 Tier II A.I. Bred Heifers.......... Avg. $2,058 10 Tier II N.S. Bred Heifers......... Avg. $1,808 137 Tier I A.I. Bred Heifers.......... Avg. $1,918 71 Tier I N.S. Bred Heifers........... Avg. $1,762

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SALE CALENDAR January 9 January 26 January 26 January 26 February 2 February 5

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Deer Creek Cattle Co. Heifer Sale Bowling Green, MO Nichols Farms Sale, Bridgewater, IA Jauer Dependable Genetics Sale, Hinton, IA Tweedy Cattle Co. Sale, Pocahontas, AR Loonan Stock Farm Sale, Corning, IA Hoover Angus Production Sale, Creston, IA

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

February 9 J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS February 9 Crooked Creek Angus Sale, Clarinda, IA February 10-17 Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA February 15 Galaxy Beef Sale (part 1), Macon, MO February 16 Byergo Angus Sale, Savannah, MO February 18 Ade Polled Herefords Presidents Day Sale, Amsterdam, MO February 22 Jamison Hereford Bull Sale, Quinter, KS February 23 Seedstock Plus North Missouri Bull Sale, Kingsville, MO February 23 Triple T Black Hereford Sale, Bowling Green, KY February 24 62nd Missouri Angus Breeders Futurity Sale, Columbia, MO March 1 Express Ranches Spring Bull Sale, Yukon, OK March 2 Mead Farms Spring Sale, Versailles, MO March 2 Peterson Farms Bull Sale, Mountain Grove, MO March 2 Seedstock Plus Arkansas Bull & Female Sale, Hope, AR March 8 Schlager Angus Production Sale, Palmyra, MO March 9 Valley Oaks Spring Sale, Lone Jack, MO March 9 Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney, MO March 9 Express Honor Roll Sale, Yukon, OK March 9 Flickerwood Angus LLC Sale, Jackson, MO March 9 Galaxy Beef Sale (part 2), Macon, MO March 9 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale, West Plains, MO March 9 Seedstock Plus Red Reward Bull & Female Sale, Humansville, MO March 10 Sampson Annual Bull Sale, Kirksville, MO March 12 Cooper Hereford Ranch Sale, Willow Creek, MT March 15 Marshall & Fenner Farms Sale, Marshall, MO March 15 MBS Charolais Bull Sale, Bowling Green, MO March 15 THM Land & Cattle Sale, Vienna, MO March 16 Circle A Spring Production Sale, Iberia, MO March 16 Pinegar Annual Herdbuilder XXV Sale, Springfield, MO March 16 Falling Timber Farm Sale, Marthasville, MO March 16 Aschermann Charolais Bull Sale, Carthage, MO March 16 Brinkley Angus Ranch Sale, Green City, MO


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 STEEL OIL FIELD PIPE AND SUCKER RODS. Call 573-578-2687 or 573-422-3735. COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164. PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS: Good Selection, Serviceable Age, Reasonable Price. Carl Speight. Dadeville, MO. 417-995-3120 or 417-298-7307. RED ANGUS BRED HEIFERS Consistent Uniform Load Lots Top Commercial Replacements Quality! In Volume! Proven Development Program. Contact Verl Brorsen, Perry, OK 580-336-4148 View heifers via www.bluestemcattle.com

JANUARY 2019

March 16 Mississippi Valley Angus Sale, Palmyra, MO March 17 Briarwood Angus Annual Production Sale, Butler, MO March 18 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO March 23 Worthington Angus Sale, Dadeville, MO March 23 Maplewood Acres Sale, Sedalia, MO March 23 Arkansas Bull Sale and Commercial Female Sale, Heber Springs, AR March 23 Seedstock Plus South Missouri Bull Sale, Carthage, MO March 24 C/S Cattle Sale, Pomona, MO March 25 Southwest MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, MO March 31 Gast Charolais and Bradley Cattle Co. Sale, Springfield,MO April 1 Brockmere Farms Inc. Sale, New Cambria, MO April 4 Hunter Angus Sale Fair Grove, MO April 5 Meyer Cattle Co. Sale Curryville, MO April 6 Four State Angus Association Sale Springfield, MO April 9 Sydenstricker Genetic Influence Sale New Cambria, MO April 12 Gerloff Enhanced Female Sale, Cuba, MO April 13 Frank/Hazelrigg Cattle Co. Open House Sale Fulton, MO April 13 Howard County Angus Association Sale Fayette, MO April 20 East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO April 23 Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO May 11 Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO

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Advertiser Index American Angus Association.........................................47 American Gelbvieh Associaiton.............................. 37-40 BQA.............................................................................. 26 Buffalo Livestock Market.............................................. 48 Callaway Livestock Center Inc..................................... 43 Central Missouri Sales Co............................................ 42 Circle 5 Cattle Co......................................................... 70 Circle A Angus Ranch.................................................. 33 Classified Ads................................................................ 73 Clearwater Farm........................................................... 33 Cooper Hereford Ranch Sale....................................... 35 Crooked Creek Sale...................................................... 53 Crystalyx........................................................................41 Durham Simmental Farms........................................... 55 Eastern Missouri Commission Company......................19 Farmers Risk Management LLC.................................... 7 FCS of Missouri............................................................ 76 Galaxy Beef LLC.......................................................... 33 Gerloff Farms................................................................ 33 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick...................... 33 Green’s Welding & Sales............................................... 45 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus............................................ 33 Hoover Angus Sale....................................................... 59 Iowa Beef Expo............................................................. 20 J&N Black Hereford Sale.............................................. 29 Jamison Hereford Sale...................................................31 Jauer Dependable Genetics........................................... 12 Jim’s Motors...................................................................74 JJ Skyline Angus........................................................... 33 Joplin Regional Stockyards............................................11 Kingsville Livestock Auction........................................ 26 Loonan Stock Farms Sale..............................................51 Lucas Cattle Co............................................................ 55 Marshall & Fenner Farms............................................. 33 MCA Brand Wall Page................................................. 69 MCA Directory ad........................................................ 28 MCA Member Benefits................................................. 24

Jim and Scott Cape…

JANUARY 2019

57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

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www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840

MCA Membership Form.............................................. 65 MCA President’s Council........................................66-67 McBee Cattle Co.......................................................... 34 McPherson Concrete Products..................................... 73 Mead Cattle Co............................................................ 43 Mead Farms.................................................................. 33 Merry Meadows Simmental......................................... 55 Missouri Angus Association.......................................... 33 Missouri Angus Breeders.............................................. 33 Missouri Beef Industry Council.................................... 23 Missouri Simmental Association.................................. 55 Missouri Simmental Breeders....................................... 55 Missouri Valley Commission Company........................19 MLS Tubs..................................................................... 36 MultiMIN USA.............................................................13 Naught-Naught Agency................................................ 54 Nichols Farms Sale....................................................... 75 Oval F Ranch............................................................... 55 Ozark Farm & Neighbor................................................61 Performance Challenge...........................................63-64 Pinegar Limousin...........................................................21 Richardson Ranch........................................................ 33 RLE Simmental............................................................ 55 Sampson Cattle Co....................................................... 58 Seedstock Plus Sales...................................................... 27 Sellers Feedlot................................................................. 7 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle.......................................... 55 South Central Regional Stockyards............................. 32 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef...................................... 33 Superior Steel Sales....................................................... 15 Sydenstricker Genetics.................................................. 33 Triple C, Inc.................................................................. 55 Triple T Farms...............................................................71 Tweedy Cattle Co. Sale................................................. 49 Valley Oaks Angus........................................................ 33 Valley Oaks Angus Sale................................................ 25 Weiker Angus Ranch.................................................... 33 Westway Feed.................................................................. 9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate................................... 12 Wheeler Livestock Market............................................ 46 Mike Williams.............................................................. 12 Windsor Livestock Auction........................................... 44 Wright Charolais Sale..................................................... 3 Y-Tex............................................................................... 2 Zeitlow Distributing...................................................... 72


Profile for Coby Wilson

January 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

January 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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