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CONTENTS

December 2018

FEATURES 14

The Cattle Are Lowing

72

Healthy Soil, Healthy Cattle

Vocalization in Cattle Might Matter More Than You Think

Cover Crops Add Benefits for Cattle, Soil

MEMBER NEWS 6 22 31 52

Association Update

COLUMNS

Beef Checkoff News Convention Preview County News

The Cattle Are Lowing

14

8

MCA President’s Perspective Time Flies

10

CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House

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See You at Convention

Tittles & Crossbars

American Horseman Challenge at the Beef House

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

DECEMBER 2018

The Reindeer Flu

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Junior Spotlight

96

Cowboy Poetry

98

Capitol Update

MJCA at Convention

Cecil and the CAT

Holiday Optimism

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 7 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office

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Healthy Soil, Healthy Cattle

DEPARTMENTS 7 24 86 102

2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Maria Washburn • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Maria@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

New MCA Members Charolais News Obituaries: Don Hankins, Hugh Copenhaver Advertisers Index

ON THE COVER:

Photo courtesy of KJM Photography, Kelly Massey

Find us on Facebook:

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

2018 MCA Officers

Greg Buckman, President 573-696-3911 • 14601 N Rt U, Hallsville, MO 65255 Bobby Simpson, President-Elect 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, Vice President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ , Cole Camp, MO 65325 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2018 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Tony Washburn, 4912 457th Street King City, MO 64463 • 660-483-0038 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

DECEMBER 2018

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

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Nicholas Althoff, Althoff Farms, California, MO Hannah Anderson, Ionia, MO Mark Fellwock, Fellwock Dairy, Monett, MO Klair Hartzold, 2 Dahlstorms Land & Livestock, Pierce City, MO Briana Isakson, Isakson Farms, Rolla, MO Gregg Jaecques, Carro, MO Justin Ogle, Ogle Farms, LLC, Nevada, MO Raleigh Ritter, Seneca, MO Lucas Schellen, Aurora, MO Adrian Viebrock, Cole Camp, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 93.

See pages 31-49.

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DECEMBER 2018


Is Your Risk Management Plan Adequate for Your Livestock and Pasture?

Richard Hallock • Risk Management Agent • 660-425-2261 Office 660-947-2474 Office • 641-442-5222 Cellphone

DECEMBER 2018

The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Program protects livestock producers from losses to productivity caused by poor forage conditions due to lack of rainfall. The Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) Program protects against a decline in the CME Feeders Cattle Price Index. Farmers Risk Management LLC can assist you in the Risk Management of your cattle operation with a loan and or insurance to assist you in running your operation.

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Beef Quality Assurance Certification and Consumer Confidence – Why it Matters Source: By Ashley Kohls, Executive Director – Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association Now, more than ever, beef consumers are asking how the beef they are purchasing was raised1. As a direct result, companies are seeking to answer this question. Over the past year, cattlemen and women have been asked to complete the Beef Quality Assurance, or BQA program, in order to market their cattle to certain processors. However, BQA certification is still voluntary. Specific companies have chosen to extend their own quality assurance protocol requirements to cattlemen who are a part of their supply chain.

DECEMBER 2018

What does this mean for you? To date, the following companies have put out official statements regarding their plans to require cattle suppliers to become BQA certified. The requirements of these companies represent their policy, not that of BQA or checkoff programs.

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• Wendy’s2: By 2019, will only source beef from cattle feeders who are Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certified. • Cargill3: Will source 90% of their cattle needs from Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certified feed yards by 2018. • Tyson4: Will source 100% of their cattle needs from feed yards that are Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certified by Jan. 1, 2019. Tyson Foods will also begin requiring BQAT Certification for 100% of the livestock haulers that deliver cattle to their plants by Jan. 1, 2020. o All Tyson Foods cattle suppliers, including sale barns, will need to be BQA or equivalent certified by January 1st, 2019. In order for a Tyson cattle buyer to bid on cattle sold through a sale barn, the auction market will need to verify the cattle seller’s BQA certification, according to Tyson Foods. • National Beef5: BQA Certification is required by National Beef for all direct beef suppliers as of January 1, 2019. o After careful consideration, National Beef has chosen to align itself with Beef Quality Assurance Transportation program (BQAT) as the certification entity for our cattle transporters. BQAT Certification is required by National beef for all cattle transporters delivering to our facilities as of January 1, 2020. • U.S. Premium Beef6: Starting on December 31, 2018, the first day of delivery year 2019, all cattle must come from Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certified feedlots.

Another reason to become Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Certified. Has a consumer, family member or friend ever asked you how you care for or raise your cattle? The BQA program was developed to ensure that beef and dairy cattle are raised in a manner that will result in safe and wholesome beef products for the consumer. Specifically, BQA is designed to enhance quality by preventing drug residues, injection-site blemishes and bruises. BQA is valuable to all beef and dairy producers because it demonstrates a commitment to food safety and quality while safeguarding the public image of the beef and dairy industry. Additionally, voluntarily participating in the BQA program protects the beef industry from additional and burdensome government regulation by demonstrating a commitment to adopt up-to-date and scientifically sound cattle management practices7. Take the time to become BQA certified. Beef Quality Assurance is a common sense educational program that is offered to cattle producers to share up-to-date and scientifically sound cattle management practices that ensure a safe, wholesome and healthy beef supply. As a beef producer, you should ask yourself three questions about your production practices: 1) Will this decision affect eating satisfaction? 2) Does this decision impact product integrity and customer trust? and 3) Will I be proud to make this a part of telling beef industry’s story? BQA helps you answer these questions with gold standard practices! BQA certification opportunities are offered throughout the year in Minnesota (and Missouri) through local inperson training opportunities and through an interactive online learning system. 1. https://www.bqa.org/Media/BQA/Docs/2016nbqa_es.pdf 2. https://www.wendys.com/en-us/about-wendys/antibiotic-use-policy-andguidelines 3. https://www.cargill.com/news/releases/2016/NA31934263.jsp 4. https://www.tysonfoods.com/sustainability/animal-well-being/ farmcheck-program 5. http://www.nationalbeef.com/Resources/Links/CattleProcureInfo/ BQACertificationLetter.pdf#search=BQA 6. http://www.uspremiumbeef.com/DocumentItem.aspx?ID=131 7. http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/dtopics/antibioticresistance/ animal/index.html#Example3

You can become BQA certified at the Missouri Cattle Industry Convention. See pages 31-49 for more details. January 4-6, 2019 Columbia, Missouri


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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Tittles & Crossbars Staff meetings with Mike Deering remind many of the hit television sitcom, “The Office.” Maybe it’s because I hate boredom. Perhaps it’s because I do not believe life should ever be taken so seriously that you forget how to laugh. Whatever the case, we could probably have a pretty successful reality show right here in Columbia. At a recent staff meeting, I commented to an employee that we were missing a tittle and needed to find it. A blank stare followed. You see, that little dot hanging out above an “i” or a “j” is a tittle and the cross on a “t” is called a crossbar. If you knew this little fun fact, welcome to a very elite club of nerds. We must put the tittle on the “i’s” and the crossbar on the “t’s”. More commonly said, “Dot your ‘i’s’ and cross your ‘t’s.’” I say it a lot, and I mean it. Staff are entrusted by the dues-paying members of this association to use resources wisely to successfully carry out member-driven priorities and goals. We must leave no rock unturned and strategically address every issue with a sensible and pragmatic approach. That’s why every three years, the president appoints a strategic planning task force to spend a full day analyzing the association and its direction. The plan then goes before the Board and the entire membership. Our current plan has general goals and very specific objectives. We were tasked with increasing non-dues revenue by $300,000. We brought your magazine, the Missouri Beef Cattleman, inhouse; put renewed emphasis on industry partnerships; created a position within the association to focus on non-dues revenue; and completely revamped our President’s Council program into something more meaningful. These efforts resulted in an increase well over the goal, allowing MCA to avoid a dues increase that many other associations are going through. You tasked the staff with increasing convention attendance to 25 percent of total membership. We haven’t succeeded. We would need to increase this year’s convention attendance by 400 compared to last year. This would mean attendance exceeding 1,000 people. Can we do this? Please make plans to attend the 51st annual event and encourage your neighbors to do the same.

Executive Vice President Looking for a Christmas gift? Surprise someone with a convention package. We have an amazing trade show ready to go, dynamic speakers for this year’s Cattlemen’s College and a governor eager to speak to cattlemen. We were challenged with bringing membership retention to no less than 70 percent year-over-year and to increase new membership by a net of 5 percent annually. We’ve done this and will continue to do so with your help. It is our members who tell the story of what MCA means to them and actively recruit new members that allow this kind of growth to be possible. This year, we increased membership by 9.7 percent with 78 percent retention. We were also charged with continuing our emphasis on political advocacy. This is certainly continuing with the annual increase in participation in the Cowboys at the Capitol program. This grassroots advocacy resulted in four veto overrides in 2016 and three bills passed this year on top of a reduction in property taxes. We were also charged with raising $50,000 annually for the MCA Political Action Committee, which was surpassed every single year since 2016. Your staff and elected leadership are doing their level best to turn goals into reality. We are putting the tittle on the “i’s” and the crossbar on the “t’s.” We’ve had great success the last three years and will continue delivering on your member-driven goals and priorities. We aren’t perfect and have plenty of room to improve, but we are not losing focus of our mission. Have a very blessed Christmas and bring on 2019. Thank you for what you do to ensure this association delivers for Missouri’s beef industry.


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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Sustainability, a Word We All Need to Know Well With Mark Russell, Executive Director, MBIC ENGAGING NUTRITION INFLUENCERS — NCBA, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, recently attended the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE) in Washington, DC, a conference that draws more than 10,000 nutrition professionals each year. In tandem with the conference, the NCBA nutrition team hosted a networking event, and, also supported an educational session focused on the role of animal agriculture in sustainable food systems with speakers. Both the influencer event and educational session were well-received and garnered positive feedback during the conference and on social media.

DECEMBER 2018

Where Does Animal Agriculture Fit in Today’s Sustainable Food System? Ensuring a sustainable food system is one of the greatest social challenges today. The agricultural community, including cattle farmers and ranchers, recognize their important role in contributing to a more sustainable food supply. A sustainable food system must pay attention to three pillars of sustainability (social, economic and environmental), which means balancing issues as important as food access, nutritional quality and environmental impacts. Current discussions of

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

sustainability and diet often focus narrowly on single environmental metrics or footprints such as the carbon footprints of individual food items. Consequently, there is a need for assessments of the whole food system that account for the relationships between the three pillars of sustainability and the integration across agricultural production systems that provide individual food items to consumers’ plates. Many times, how farmers and ranchers optimize land use is under fire. Some assumptions are: • Calories used by livestock can be equally used by humans (grains: corn, soybeans and oats) • Land used for livestock should be used to cultivate crops Science has shown that greater than 85% of “feed” consumed by cattle is not digestible by humans. Also, cattle convert .6g of poor-quality plant proteins into 1 gram of high-quality protein. This could then be shown that it is a 40% “upcycling” of food quality. Removing all animals from the U.S. diet may only save 2.6% on green house gas emissions if we replace all the calories with plant-based alternatives. In addition, this removal would reduce nutrient density and diet quality. When looking at dairy, in 1950, there were 25 million dairy cows in the U.S. Today, there are 9 million. Even though cow numbers have decreased dramatically, national milk production has increased by 60%. The carbon footprint of a glass of milk is 2/3 smaller today than it was 70 years ago. Beef is similar. In 1970, the U.S. had 140 million head of beef. Today there are roughly 90 million head of beef. In 1970 and in 2010, 24 million tons of beef were produced; even with 50 million fewer cattle, again reducing the carbon footprint.


Clearly, production intensity enhances biological efficiency. Production intensity and emission intensity, then are inversely related. Questions to Consider as the impact of sustainability continues to be important to the food chain. • What is a sustainable diet? • What are benefits, trade-offs, or unintended consequences of sustainable diets? • What role does animal protein play in sustainable diets? • What impact does sourcing have on sustainable diets? • What impact does food waste have on sustainable diets? • What are practical applications of this information we can share with patients, clients, and consumers?

MBIC wishes Taylor Tuttle, former director of education and marketing for the beef council, the best in her new position with the Agriculture Business Development division of the Missouri Department of Agriculture in Jefferson City. On that note, we are excited to welcome Samantha Riley, formerly of Salem, Missouri, to the MBIC team to fill Taylor’s boots. Samantha worked with the beef council this summer as an intern and is graduating this semester from MSU Springfield with a Master’s in Agriculture Communications. Introduce yourself to Samantha and welcome her.

Bringing the industry and its customers to the defining moments of sustainability will become more important than ever before. Many large corporations are bringing these discussions to food producers in order to see a future for food production that is understandable and believable. Recognition and happenings closer to home MBIC, in concert with the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and other agriculture organizations, are encouraging beef producers state-wide to become Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certified. National beef processors and packers will be requiring producers, owners, feedlots and transportation providers, to have certification’s in-place within the next 12 months. Elsewhere in this magazine, more details will be outlined to get producers on board.

DECEMBER 2018

Be looking for MBIC at several large agriculture gatherings in the coming months and stop by our booths for current up-todate checkoff activities, locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.

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Upcoming Events for 2019

Jan. 4-6 - Missouri Cattlemen’s Convention, Columbia March 2 - Mead Farms Bull Sale, Versailles March 2 - Peterson Farms Bull Sale, Mountain Grove March 9 - Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney March 15 - MBS Charolais Bull Sale, Bowling Green March 16 - Aschermann Charolais Bull Sale, Carthage March 31 - Gast Charolais & Bradley Cattle - Bull and Bred Heifer Sale, Springfield, MO April 13 - Renaissance Sale, Strafford

DECEMBER 2018

2018-19 Officers and Directors

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President:............Jeannine Doughty Vice President:................ Tad Owings Secretary:........................ Judy Shaffer Treasurer:.............Annette Bonacker Past President:.............Derry Wright

Directors: Nick Curtis; Donnie Gast; Jim Husz; Jason Hankins; Chris Peuster; Derek Ridder

AICA Ex-Officio: Bill Nottke AICA Area 8 Director: Mike Schumacher


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American-International Junior Charolais Foundation Awards more than $45,000 Source: AICA Many AIJCA members will be welcomed back for the semester by AIJCF scholarships. During the 2018 AIJCA Junior National in Des Moines, Iowa, more than $45,000 worth of scholarships were awarded to deserving members to reward them for their accomplishments and assist in further education. Congratulations to all recipients. Visit www.charolaisusa.com to view more AIJCA News.

DECEMBER 2018

$3,000 Walker/Phillips — Hadley Schotte, Marysville, Kansas $2,000 American International Junior Charolais Foundation— Madison Andrade, San Juan Bautista, Calif.; Kiera Leddy, Stockholm, S.D.; Matthew Owings, Potosi, Missouri $2,000 Charlie and Jean Smith—— Molly Smith, Lockhart, Texas $2,000 Wesson Memorial — Teanna Simpson, Thayer, Missouri $1,500 American International Junior Charolais Foundation— Rylee Derrer, Milan, Ill.; Mitchell Duer, Onaga, Kan.; Jenna Harrod, Frankfort, Ky.; Kadon Leddy, Stockholm, S.D. $1,500 Chance Clifton Live Big Foundation — Annaleigh Hobbs, Overland Park, Kan.; Devin Koester, Elizabeth, Ill. $1,500 Charlie & Jean Smith — Cagney Effling, Highmore, S.D.

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$1,500 Joe & Carolynne Garrett — Kallie Anne Knott, LaOtto, Ind. $1,500 Taylor Thomas Memorial — Cagney Effling, Highmore, S.D. $1,500 Walker/Phillips— Kendra Elder, Blum, Texas; Sydney Zehnder, Stanchfield, Minn. $1,000 American International Junior Charolais Foundation— TyAnn Tellefson, Warden, Wash.; Madison Voet, Home, Kan.; Josie Woodcock, Clovis, Calif. $1,000 Chance Clifton Live Big Foundation— Kallie Mattison, Lamberton, Minnesota; Tara Tellefson, Warden, Washington $1,000 Charlie & Jean Smith — Abbee Carnes, Richland, S.C.; Katherine Moller, Princeton, Minnesota; $1,000 Cross Family— Trent Bertsche, Flanagan, Illinois $1,000 Everett Shepherd Memorial — Ashley Eisenbraun, Paynesville, Minnesota $1,000 Missouri Junior Charolais Breeders Association— Teanna Simpson, Thayer, Missouri $1,000 Pete and Wendy Stamer— Alex Creasey, Macomb, Ill. $1,000 Stauffer Memorial— Abigail Spindle, Moriarty, N.M. $1,000 Tex Jedlicka Memorial— Mason Runft, Scandia, Kan. $1,000 Cliff and Lynn Orley, Champion Owned Female– Sydney Johnson, Orlando, Okla. $1,000 Larry and Robbie Lehman, Champion Percentage Heifer– Kendra Elder, Blum, Texas $500 Carol Doughty Memorial, Big Creek Charolais, Champion Bred and Owned Female— Sydney Johnson, Orlando, Okla. $500 AIJCA Premier Challenge, Sponsored by Zehnder– Waage Partnership— Beth Moller, Princeton, Minn. $250 Gold Elite National Junior Merit Award Sponsored by Gibson Family of Clear Creek Farm— Kelley Koester, Elizabeth, Ill.


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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Pat & Patty Wood, MCA Beef House Managers American Horsemen Challenge at the Beef House On Thursday, October 18, 2018, the Missouri Beef House was opened to serve our delicious beef burgers to 110 competitors and guests in the 7th Annual American Horseman Challenge (AHCA) held this year at the Missouri State Fairgrounds in Sedalia, Missouri. AHCA members from North America had the opportunity to compete with individuals from outside their local competition area in an obstacle course event, perfect for all riders, all disciplines and every skill level. The four-day event included a barbecue on Thursday evening at the Missouri Beef House hosted by the Sedalia Chamber & Convention & Visitors Bureau for the fifth consecutive year. Executive Director Carolyn Crooker said, “An area of tourism some people may

overlook is private events that bring in new visitors on the fairgrounds, and the economic impact for our community.” The speaker for the evening was Corry Key, DVM, author of Hedgehogs and Hand Grenades (and more stories of the “The Other Family Doctor”) and Horses Who Eat Potatoes (and more stories of “The Other Family Doctor”). Ms. Key, who is also a participant of AHCA, shared, “Being a veterinarian is the dream of many people, but not many achieve it. Its challenges and successes will make you laugh, cry, and hug your dog or cat or parrot or snake or possum. The truth of the human-animal bond is that they teach us to grow, to laugh, to love.”

DECEMBER 2018

The camaraderie experienced and friendships made are invaluable. “Great Horses, Great People and Great Times… What more could you ask for… Life is good!!!” according to AHCA website. Visist www. americanhorsemanchallenge.com if you want to learn more.

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BIG thanks goes out to MCA volunteers: Suetta Carter, Marvin Dieckman, Eric Kraus, and Pat & Patty Wood who graciously accepted the MCA challenge to cook and serve this delicious meal. Thought for the month: “Executive Vice President Mike Deering sat in the corner eating his Christmas dinner. He picked up his fork and pulled up a steak and said, “What a good life we have!”


Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Ray County Saline County

Russellville FFA Southwest Cattlemen

Warren County

Vernon County

Windsor FFA

DECEMBER 2018

Tri-County

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

St. Charles County Sullivan County

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St. Clair County

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Tipton FFA


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See page 50 for related story.

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Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday:

DECEMBER 2018

Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

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1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633


DECEMBER 2018

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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The November meeting of the Southwest Missouri Cattlemen was held at Joplin Regional Stockyards. The last few years this meeting has been a team effort with University of Missouri Extension, the Stockyards, Missouri Department of Agriculture and SW Missouri Cattlemen. The brisket meal was served by the JRS Restaurant compliments of the Yards and the Cattlemen’s Association. After supper, president Russell Marion conducted a brief business meeting that mainly consisted of reports from the last month’s ribeye grilling efforts. The next one will be at Mt. Vernon for their Veterans Day event on November 10. He also gave an update on the annual meeting and the fund raiser auction on December 1 at Mt. Vernon.

Steve Jones, Mt. Vernon steers were one of the popular groups in the audience participation event.

The evening’s program involved the evaluation of 139 steers that will be sent to southwest Iowa as part of the Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity. Fifteen different owners entered form 5 to 15 steers and they’ll receive complete feedlot and carcass data on each individual steer. The information can be used to develop a resume’ for your herd’s genetics. Hopefully that helps marketing your cattle in the future. The critique panel included USDA and Missouri Ag Department personnel Jodie Pitcock, St. Joseph and Dan Hill, West Plains. Two order buyers, Matt Thompson, Columbia and West Spinks, Jerico Springs along with JRS representatives Jackie Moore and Mark Harmon. Twenty degree weather didn’t stop Jeff Kaal, Russell Marion, Rob and Christine Lewis from grilling ribeyes and beef dogs for the Veterans.

DECEMBER 2018

Jim and Scott Cape…

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57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840

In addition to their comments on each set of steers, the 125 persons in the audience were given a chance to select their top three groups in these categories: premium Choice carcass; daily gain and feed conversion. The results won’t be known until next June after the cattle are evaluated on-the-rail. Based on the audience response the groups receiving the most support were: Steve Jones, Mt. Vernon; Norman Garton, Nevada; Goodnight Angus, Carthage; and Keith Hankins, Stockton.


MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 4/22/15 3:48 PM Page 62

Lafayette County The Lafayette County Cattlemen board of directors met October 23 at the Lafayette County extension office. Hannah Copenhaver, secretary presented minutes from the July 2 meeting and they were approved. Sasha Hull, treasurer, gave a recap of summer and fall events. The 2018 scholarship auction netted $10,009 and the board set July 11, 2019, as next year’s auction date. Marsha Corbin provided a recap of the LCCA bus trip to Illinois and Indiana. The 2019 trip dates will be July 21-25 to Cheyenne, Wyoming for Cheyenne Frontier Days and ranch stops in Nebraska. The group reviewed cookouts for Equity Bank customer appreciation, Higginsville Country Fair and Wood & Huston grand opening of their new Higginsville location. It was agreed product quality and food safety were of the highest priority to the organization. In new business, the group agreed to grill at Kleinschmidt’s Western Store on Black Friday, with Johnson County Cattlemen grilling on Saturday.

Beef Quality Assurance training in Lafayette County with Dr. Craig Payne brought a full house.

On October 23, members and other local producers attended the BQA training and certification at the Extension Office in Higginsville, hosted by Ag Business Specialist Katie Neuner. Dr. Craig Payne DVM of the University of Missouri presented to a standing room only crowd. Following the certification training, a question and answer session was held.

Lafayette County’s representative in the Beef Queen contest will be Abigail Oelrichs of Higginsville, and the board approved her sponsorship for convention. A motion was made to make ground beef donations to area food pantries in December. Members were reminded of the upcoming BQA training and a deadline was established for sweatshirt orders of November 1.

10' Feed Bunk Featuring our THREE TON PORTABLE FEED BIN

Dealer Inquiries Welcome www.greenswelding.com

Made from all 14 gauge steel 22" high and 8" deep

Green’s Welding and Sales 1464 S.E. County Road 15305 Appleton City, MO 64724

(660) 476-5598 Fax: (660) 476-2801

DECEMBER 2018

• Ground Opening Lid • Sight Glass • Pin Hitch • Spout just right for a five gallon bucket

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Taney County It was certainly a busy summer for our Taney County members. Due to the drought, the first cutting of hay was sorely lacking but thanks to good rains in August, most everyone was able to get a second cut and some are even got a third cutting. In August, Taney County Cattleman affiliate president Tammy Holder and students from College of the Ozarks volunteered at the Missouri Beef House at the Missouri State Fair to serve lunch to fair goers over a two-day period. Holder said, “We all enjoyed meeting and working alongside other Missouri Cattlemen members from across the state.” Now that haying is behind everyone, we are now back to our monthly meetings and activities. Our October meeting was held on October 17 at Taneyville School. We all enjoyed a potluck dinner and a presentation by Brad Jump, USDA SW District Supervisor, about vulture management. We also discussed topics of interest for our monthly meeting presentations as well as planned activities for the next several months.

DECEMBER 2018

Taney County Cattleman’s Association and Animal Clinic of Forsyth sponsored a heifer test clinic November 7at the Dees farm in Kirbyville. Dr. Mike Peters offered pelvic measurement and scoring as well as reproductive maturity assessment to our association members and Taney County community. About 57 heifers were run through the chute and tested by Dr. Peters with the assistance of MU vet student Sarah Sawayanahi and vet tech Lorna Wine.

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Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Performance Tested Bulls

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Steve Miller and Family 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 (660) 582-1334 E-mail: bigmilr@grm.net

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

WEIKER

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Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke Kevin Lennon

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DECEMBER 2018

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Dallas County keep people away from the annual meeting of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association (DCCA). A crowd of 225 gathered at Prairie Grove School south of Buffalo on November 13 for great food, fellowship, and to promote the cattle industry. President Bobby Stewart welcomed members and guests to start off the evening. Everyone enjoyed a delicious roast beef dinner prepared by Ruby Hostetler, Gloria Miller, and their crew. We greatly thank all the ladies for all the time and effort they put into feeding us many times a year.

Other business included recognition of our scholarship winners Lauren Stewart and Madison Turner. Both girls are currently attending Southwest Missouri State University and pursuing degrees in agriculture. Elected to the DCCA board of directors were James Henderson and Russ Weeks. All other officers will remain the same for the upcoming year. We will not be holding a membership meeting in December but will resume again in January. Many of our members are looking forward to attending the MCA Convention in January. We hope everyone has a blessed and joyous holiday season!

Entertaining us after dinner was award-winning cowboy poet Danny McCurry. We enjoyed hearing a few of his poems, many based on real life happenings. A crowd favorite was “Thin, Clean Air,” an entry which won him the National Cowboy Poetry Contest. As always, we look forward each year to hearing Executive VicePresident Mike Deering speak to us. He talked about the successful year MCA has had and issues affecting us in the cattle business. He noted that of particular importance in the legislature was the passage of the “fake meat” bill spearheaded by DCCA members State Senator Sandy Crawford and State Representative Jeff Knight. We are especially proud of both and know they work hard to support us and all of agriculture.

Mike Deering.

We want to thank other special MCA guests for their attendance that evening including President Elect Bobby Simpson, Vice-President Marvin Dieckman, Region 6 Vice-President Clay Doeden, and Past President Keith Stevens.

Clay Doeden.

DECEMBER 2018

Bobby Simpson.

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Danny McCurry.


Cole County The September Cole County Cattlemen’s General Membership Meeting convened at 6 p.m. on Tuesday the 18th at Calvary Lutheran High School when President Travis Roling called the meeting to order. All officers were in attendance as well as 26 members and guests and 19 children. Old business covered included T-shirt sales occurring during the meeting, last meeting’s minutes presented by Staci Hurst, the treasurer’s report presented by Ed Ehrhardt, and the budget report and internal audit presented by our vice president Vic Lovell, all of which were approved. There was a recap of the Missouri Beef House trip with 12 Cole County Cattlemen’s volunteers, and the Cole County Fair 4-H and FFA Livestock Auction, with winners being awarded at the upcoming banquet. Secretary Staci Hurst announced the new Member Spotlight program led by the CCCA reporter, Macey Hurst, where members will be recognized for their involvement through social media with any potential spotlights to be submitted to Macey. CCCA sponsored junior member Emma Eiken to attend the MJCA Beef Tour, and she spoke of her experience on the MCAconducted event. With the help of an MBIC grant, CCCA sponsored a brisket meal for Area FFA Teacher

Meeting, and it was catered by secretary Staci Hurst. LAG Enterprises sponsored the beef roast meal but did not have a representative available to speak. Drew Parmley, Executive Director of Cole and Miller County FSA spoke and distributed information on the Livestock Forage Disaster Program and the Livestock Indemnity Program and answered member questions. The meeting was concluded with a 50/50 drawing and adjournment. During the membership meeting, CCCA Juniors Youth Group was holding their meeting where they elected officers Emma Eiken, President; William Gardner, Vice President; Morgan Forck, Secretary; Wyatt Carrender, Treasurer; Abe Carrender, Historian; and Madden Hunt; Sergeant of Arms.The meeting continued with a game of trivia. They plan to have a bowling night in the future.

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DECEMBER 2018 57


St. Clair County St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association hosted their 25th Annual Meeting on November 10 at the Assembly of God Church. St. Clair County Cattlemen would like to extend a sincere thank you to Taber Angus and Wheeler Livestock Auction for sponsoring their event, Clint Johnson and Lakeland FFA for cooking the meat and to the Assembly of God Church for serving the meal. The cattlemen were honored to host Rep. Warren Love, Robert Salmon, and Rhonda Shelby as elected officials from their county who came to share in the evening with them. Appleton City FFA, Lakeland FFA, and Osceola FFA Chapters were present to share with the cattlemen about what the youth in agriculture are doing at the county, state and national levels. The speaker for the evening was Greg Buckman, Missouri Cattlemen’s Association’s president. Greg is a Boone County cattle producer and enjoys raising cattle. He challenged all present to be involved and if you are involved, get more involved as he is optimistic about the future of the cattle industry. Clay Doeden, our regional state vice president, was also present for the evening.

DECEMBER 2018

Since it was the 25th annual meeting of the cattlemen, they recognized all members by their years of service from the bottom to the top of 25 years who started the organization. Of the St. Clair County Cattlemen’s 13 presidents, eight were present to be recognized and four who have since passed away. The past presidents are as follows: The late R.A. Flowers (1994-1995), the late Bert McFadden (1996-1997), Robert Salmon (1998-1999), Jason Mott (2000-2001), the late Larry Moore (2002-2003), Wilbur Slocum (2004-2005), Alan Haverland (2006-2007), Bill Creek (2008-2009), the late David Barger (2010), Warren Love (2011-2012), Mike Nance (2013-2014), Austin Shelby (2015-2016), and Josh Salmon (2017-2018). The cattlemen were also honored to have four generations of the Joe Shelby Family present for the evening.

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St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association presented three $2,000 scholarships this year to three St. Clair County students who are pursuing a degree in agriculture. This year’s scholarship recipients were Blake Murray, Hannah Wheeler, and Garret Brower. The cattlemen’s association wishes them the best of luck as they pursue their agriculture degrees.

Osceola FFA.

President Josh Salmon presents Garret Brower with Scholarship.

Appleton City FFA.

Lakeland FFA.

Clay Doeden, MCA Regional Vice President.

MCA President Greg Buckman.

Four Generations of the Joe Shelby Family - Larry Shelby, Joe Shelby, Cord Shelby, and Austin Shelby. St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Past Presidents, Left to right, Robert Salmon, Jason Mott, Alan Haverland, Bill Creek, Warren Love, Mike Nance, Austin Shelby, and Josh Salmon.


Douglas / Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri at Club 60 Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a steak dinner sponsored by GeneTrust. President Karla Besson opened the meeting and brought us up-to-speed with current news, bylaws and the status of the board positions coming up for re-election in January 2019. Upcoming events include our yearend meeting sponsored by our own county cattlemen’s association in December, where a live auction will be held to sell the steer calf born from the Red Angus heifer that was donated by Gourley Red Angus in 2017. Proceeds will be split 50/50 between the cattlemen’s association for future heifer projects with our youth and first heifer essay winner Caleb Higgins. Karla then asked the blessing before the meal. After dinner, time was given to our sponsor for the evening. Cody Gariss of GeneTrust gave a brief presentation on upcoming cattle sales around the area featuring Brangus and UltraBlack bulls as well as females. GeneTrust is a very data driven group; Cody stressed the fact that if you cannot measure

performance, you cannot improve upon it. GeneTrust also offers semen sales, and cuts a break to commercial producers at $20/straw. The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their December meeting on Monday, December 3, 2018, at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove, Missouri. To close the year out, the group will enjoy fellowship and a meal as well as drawings and giveaways. Cattlemen in the area are always welcome to attend.

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DECEMBER 2018 59


Newton-McDonald County The September meeting was held at Crowder College with over 60 members in attendance for the association’s Second Annual Chili Cook-off. Following the blessing by Warren Townsend, the members enjoyed the variety of wonderful Chili offerings along with homemade ice cream and heard from Democratic nominee for State Representative for the 160th District, Angela Thomas. Thomas shared her farm background and her views on farm and social issues. She particularly voiced concern with teen suicide rates and the damage to citizens across the nation from prescription drug abuse. Members asked many questions and voiced concerns affecting their lives and ranching. The association had invited all two-county area nominees for this important role in state government to take part in the discussion. The meeting then turned to an excellent program presented by Wes Tucker of the MU Extension program from Bolivar. In introducing Wes, President Ruhl noted that he and Nick Neece had reached out to state agriculture leaders to learn who the state expert on userfriendly and effective farm accounting might be and that is how Wes was selected. Wes’s program was entitled, “How to Calculate the True Cost of Farm and Ranch Production,” and he did not disappoint. This was the second in a series designed by the Executive Committee to address the financial side of ranch planning. It followed the presentation at the previous meeting from FCS Financial regarding record keeping and accessing capital as well as supports for ranchers such as pasture insurance. The November meeting will close this series with a focus on using the new federal tax law to advantage.

DECEMBER 2018

The association was happy to welcome Maria Washburn, Manager of Membership for the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association to provide a state update. Maria answered many questions and encouraged involvement in various state activities. Maria’s remarks were greatly appreciated by the membership, as has been her constant support for our activities from this important role with the MCA.

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Further reports included Estella Osborn with an update on the soon to be published two-year update to our Association Directory, including outlining the many new advertisers participating this time around. This program is becoming a staple of funding of our association and leadership in this effort by Estella and Larry is greatly appreciated. Jorge Zapata of the Crowder Agriculture Division reported on an upcoming November Ag. Contest date when he is requesting association members grill and serve at the Crowder campus. Members signed up to participate. President

Ruhl then handed out a briefing paper developed by the local USDA office outlining processes to apply for support from the federal drought program and answered questions. Finally, a large contingent of Crowder Aggies outlined the “judging” reasons for their ranking of the Chili competition. Top honors went to Wendy Jones, with Larry Haflich’s BBQ Chili coming in second. All participants were thanked and received prizes for their efforts. Prizes were provided courtesy of Longview Mill in Longview, Missouri. The wonderful ice cream creations were also greatly appreciated. Discussions concluded with an invitation to the November annual meeting of the two-county association (November 13, 6:30 p.m.), to be held at the Tatum Center, in Jane and sponsored by Whitehead Farm Supply and Kent Feeds. Also presenting will be Jennifer Lutes with a summary of implications of the new tax law.


Barton County

Moniteau County

The Barton County Cattlemen met November 13 in Lamar, Missouri. A brisket dinner was sponsored by Maneval Feed and Grain in Jasper, Missouri, and enjoyed by all.

On October 30, over 175 people attended the 2018 Moniteau County Cattleman’s annual meeting and scholarship fundraiser. John Halsey, Kenny Jones and Jennifer Huhmann were recognized as retiring board members and Chuck Inglish, Gina Kuda, Heater Martin and Toby Niemeier were voted in as new board members. The 2018 Outstanding Cattleman for Moniteau County was Dr. Norman Rohrbach, he has served on the board for many years, always willing to help at any events and activities. Over $15,500 was raised for the local scholarship fund through cash donations and live auction, by Petree Auction. Every year, the Moniteau County Cattleman’s awards $1,000 scholarships to seniors from California, Jamestown and Tipton Schools with $20,000 awarded to 2018 graduating seniors.

Members were asked to sign up to ring bells for the Salvation Army during the upcoming season. A program was presented by Dr. Jared Decker from the University of Missouri. The program was titled “Genomic Predictions in Beef Cattle.” EPDs (Expected Progeny Differences) do matter but, to be useful, must have a comparison. A new EPD they are working on is winter hair loss. Cows in the fescue belt that lose their winter hair within the first two weeks of May have a higher calf weaning weight. The weaning weight may be as much as 40 pounds more than those who lose their winter hair later in spring or early summer. Two pounds of increase gain a year may not seem like much, but over the years the increase adds up. They are also studying milk production. Beef cows, bred to increase milk production similar to dairy cows, internal organs grow larger taking a lot more energy year around to maintain the cow. There is an optimum point beyond which an increase in milk production causes an increase in cost to maintain the cow. The next meeting is December 11 at 7 p.m. at Memorial Hall in Lamar, Missouri.

Editorial Note:

Please send County News items via email to: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Deadline for the January 2019 issue is December 15th.

Dr. Norman Rohrbach and Moniteau County Cattleman’s President Blue Gieir

DECEMBER 2018 61


Bates County The October meeting of the Bates County Cattleman was held at the Union Restaurant with Logan Kennedy of Livestock Nutrition serving as the speaker. Logan highlighted the company’s history and shared details on the expansion into the area. Livestock Nutrition offers a variety of minerals formulated for fescue environments. Due to bad weather, the cooking event sponsored by Thrivent Financial was rescheduled for October 20 at the Family Center parking lot. The cattlemen cooked hamburgers for a free will donation, which will be invested back into the community through non-profit organizations.

Bates County officer team for 2019 (L-R) David Warfield, Ryan Grimes, Ivan Fischer and Austin Black.

Rod Morris announced that the Ballard school district was interested in the Mo Beef for Mo Kids program and already had a cow donated. Powell Meat Processing agreed to provide the slaughter service at a discounted rate. The cattlemen cooked for the Child Advocacy Center in Butler on October 4. This venue provides after-school meals to kids on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The group received very positive feedback and plans to do it again later this month. Our annual meeting was a great night. The weather kept some folks at home, but everyone enjoyed a delicious prime rib dinner. Maria Washburn spoke on behalf of the state office and shared program updates for the junior programs and legislative work. President Ivan Fischer gave an overview of activities the group had participated in throughout the year, including cooking burgers at Family Center and donating the proceeds to area non-profits.

DECEMBER 2018

Ivan started the awards ceremony by announcing the Cattlemen and CattleWomen scholarship winners. Two Cattleman’s scholarships were presented to Casinda Smith and Michael Scrivener. The CattleWoman’s scholarship was given to Riley Mareth.

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Amanda Kagarice presented the Junior Cattleman of the Year and Gonna Be Great awards to Isaac Kagarice. The Gonna Be Great award is for a junior member that goes above and beyond, showing a commitment to helping others and potential to be a strong leader in the future. The Mike Grimes Memorial Scholarship, presented by Ryan Grimes, was awarded to Allison Jenkins. The final awards for the evening included the CattleWoman of the Year, presented by Susie Hockett and awarded to Anita Fischer. Harlan Hockett presented the Cattleman

Members enjoyed a prime rib dinner and the announcement of awards at the annual meeting.

Members served burgers at Family Center in Butler in October. The event was sponsored by Thrivent Financial and a free will donations were collected which will be distributed back into the community.

of the Year to Mike Moore and Ivan Fischer awarded JL Jennings with the Pioneer award. Both men have shown a tremendous commitment to the cattleman’s group, their communities and the beef industry. Moore is active across the country as a BBQ judge and volunteer for Operation BBQ Relief. JL Jennings is a longtime supporter of the cattleman’s association and is always present at cooking events. Ivan Fischer wrapped up the evening with the officer election. The officer slate was voted in for a second term to include Ivan Fischer, President; Ryan Grimes, VicePresident; Austin Black, Secretary-Reporter; and David Warfield, Treasurer.


SEMO Cattlemen The SEMO Cattlemen met October 23 at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Leopold. Brad Pobst, Private Land Conservationist with MDC and Jonathan Fox, Wildlife Specialist with USDA delivered the program. The topic was Missouri Wildlife Management and included information on feral hogs, black bears, mountain lions, whitetail deer, and black vultures. Over 7,400 feral hogs have been caught in Missouri this year. There are 15 trappers in southeast Missouri to help trap hogs if you have trouble. Trapping is important to catch the entire sounder. Feral swine populations have been identified in most counties in southeastern Missouri. It is estimated there are 300-350 black bears in Missouri. If the population reaches around 500, there will be discussion of bear hunting season. The season will target males and will likely be after deer season as males tend to den up the first part of December, while the females species den earlier. Mountain lions are migrating from South Dakota and Nebraska and can easily travel 100 miles in a day. There has only been one confirmed female, which occurred in January 2017. Deer are their preferred prey. Mountain lions target the throat of prey, eat intestines, and often cover up the carcass. Proof is necessary to confirm a sighting.

wasting disease is a slow progressing disease that doesn’t always appear as CWD symptoms because it takes so long to manifest. Sampling stations are mandatory this year on opening weekend. Stations are set up in counties with a 25 mile radius from a positive case. A CWD positive deer was identified in Perry County. The head/ neck area is required because the sample is obtained from the lymph nodes. The ban on feeding and mineral licks for deer is to slow the transfer of this non-treatable disease in deer. Jonathan Fox discussed black vultures. Black vultures have been a real issue to livestock producers in both Cape Girardeau and Bollinger counties. These vultures target easily available soft tissue—eyes and placenta as described by producers who have encountered these viscous pests. The accompanying pictures show the damage caused by black vultures. Black vultures are a migratory bird and therefore protected. A deprivation permit can be obtained through fish & wildlife if you are experiencing trouble. The permit requires a letter from USDA describing the damage. Contact your local USDA office to find someone who can help identify and assess a black vulture problem. The permit costs $100.

Pobst discussed a multi-year study looking at the migratory pattern of deer using GPS monitoring. He also discussed chronic wasting disease in deer. Chronic

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CattleTrace Participants Meet With USDA Under Secretary Greg Ibach Source: Cattle Trace, Inc. MANHATTAN, Kan. – U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach was welcomed to Great Bend, Kansas, on Monday, November 19, by beef industry leaders participating in the CattleTrace pilot project for disease traceability. USDA is a partner in the pilot project that will develop and test an end-to-end disease traceability system. Approximately 40 producer participants, including ranchers, livestock markets, cattle feeders and packers, as well as other CattleTrace partners, participated in the meeting that provided an update on the pilot project as well as allowed for discussion about disease traceability priorities at USDA. CattleTrace is being implemented by a cooperative public-private partnership including the Kansas Livestock Association, Kansas State University, Kansas Department of Agriculture, USDA and private producers. “Without the partnership from beef producers across the state, CattleTrace wouldn’t have gotten off the ground. It is exciting to see enthusiasm from producers who are willing to step up and help lead the development of a disease traceability system that can work in and for our industry,” said Brandon Depenbusch, CattleTrace, Inc., Board of Directors chairman. “USDA is an important partner in CattleTrace and plays an integral role in disease traceability across the country. We are grateful that Under Secretary Ibach traveled to Kansas to meet with CattleTrace participants and share his vision for disease traceability.”

DECEMBER 2018

CattleTrace was launched in late June 2018 and will conclude in spring 2020. During the pilot, 55,000 Kansas-based calves will be tagged with an ultra-high frequency ear tag. As the calves move through the

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supply chain, minimal data, including an individual animal identification number, GPS location, and the date and time, will be captured and maintained in a secure, third-party database. The CattleTrace team will use the database to conduct mock traces to test the infrastructure in order to determine its effectiveness in tracing animal movements in the event of a disease outbreak. Depenbusch noted that more than 31,500 tags have been distributed and the rest will be distributed in the coming months. He also highlighted tag readers are installed at all partner feedyards and livestock markets. In September 2018, USDA outlined four overarching goals for advancing animal disease traceability. USDA will begin implementing the traceability goals starting in fiscal year 2019. CattleTrace will be playing an important role in USDA’s traceability initiatives. Each of the USDA goals aligns with the basic infrastructure and implementation protocol of the CattleTrace Pilot Project. “The landscape surrounding animal disease traceability has changed dramatically in the past decade, and producers across the nation recognize that a comprehensive system is the best protection against a devastating disease outbreak like foot-and-mouth disease,” Under Secretary Ibach said in September. “We have a responsibility to these producers and American agriculture as a whole to make animal disease traceability what it should be—a modern system that tracks animals from birth to slaughter using affordable technology that allows USDA to quickly trace sick and exposed animals to stop disease spread.” To learn more about CattleTrace, visit www. CattleTrace.org or follow CattleTrace on Facebook or Twitter.

Ron McBee 221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517 E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com Website: McBeeCattleCompany.com


DECEMBER 2018

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Beef Farmers Learn from 50 Feedouts Source: University of Missouri Extension JOPLIN, Mo. – Missouri beef herd owners learn profits and risks of sending their calves to a feedlot. They’ve entered 50 Missouri Steer Feedouts run by University of Missouri Extension. To cut risks in learning, they enter samples of five to 20 head, said Eldon Cole, MU Extension livestock specialist. The Missouri Steer Feedout for winterspring born calves began Nov. 6 at the Joplin Regional Stockyards in Carthage. The program teaches cow-calf farmers to keep a sampling of their steer calves through harvest. The steers go to Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity in southwestern Iowa. Throughout the process, their weight gain, feedlot performance and herd health are noted. The feedlot manages them until they are harvested by Tyson Foods in Nebraska in the spring. Cole, from Mount Vernon, has done this since 1981 with lots of help. Over the years, 365 owners have entered 7,557 steers in the Missouri Steer Feedout. Participants come from Arkansas, Kansas, Illinois, Oklahoma and Missouri.

Producers enter a minimum of five steers. Most herds consign 10-20 head to allow them to compare sires. MU Extension livestock specialists, Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association members, and employees of USDA and Missouri Department of Agriculture sorted, tagged, weighed, graded and priced 139 steers from 15 groups. They weighed an average of 639 pounds. An average set-in price of $151.73 will be used to calculate feedlot performance. Farmers hear comments as a panel views the steers. The panel included Jodie Pitcock, USDA, St. Joseph; Dan Hill, Missouri Department of Agriculture, West Plains; Jackie Moore, Joplin Regional Stockyards; Matt Thompson, Crossroads Cattle Co., Columbia; Wes Spinks, order buyer, Jerico Springs; and Mark Harmon, Joplin Regional Stockyards. They discussed strengths and weaknesses of the steers, including frame, muscle score and body condition. “The 15 lots of steers gave the audience a great chance to see the diversity of cattle in southwest Missouri,” says Cole. There were mostly Angus and Angus crosses. There were some Brahman crosses, straight Charolais and Red Angus. Body conditions ranged from 4 to 7. Calves were born late December to April. Harmon gave tips on how to help the auctioneer get more bids on the cattle. Write down vaccination types and date and weaning dates on a recipe card to take to the auction barn, Harmon says. “Once you get information, put it to work,” Cole says. Through the years, Missouri cattle producers learned “you can’t tell a steer’s post-weaning performance by its cover,” says Cole. “The only way you’ll learn your herd’s genetics for overall performance is to feed them at least two or three times.”

DECEMBER 2018

(Continued on page 70)

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Cole says feedouts don’t guarantee more money. Since 1981, the average profit per head has been less than $50. The payoff comes when producers use results to adjust their genetics and management. Cole says most producers enter five to 15 head of cattle. This is a lowrisk way to find strengths and weaknesses, he says. The program helps small herd owners gain data to improve their herd’s genetic reputation.

program the last 16 years. His profit per head averaged $39.96, ranging from $328 to minus $185. He also weighs calves and operates the chute at the feedout weigh-in.

Cole urges participants to set reasonable goals and realize “there are lots of average cattle.” A goal is to have 70 to 80 percent of carcasses grade USDA choice or higher.

Marion says he uses the feedout to learn about his own herd. He usually brings oddly colored calves that would not bring as much money at a livestock auction. For feeding, hair color does not matter. Judges put emphasis on carcass grades and yield. Marion has a 400-head operation and 200 acres of hay. He rents his row crop acres.

Steers are ranked on temperament when they are worked. Disposition matters. Graders also check for bad eyes, primarily pinkeye. Steers with eye problems generally weigh 34 pounds less at weaning and gain less in finishing. Cole tells participants to track steer performance back to the sire and dam and use this data to market herd mates as feeders or breeding stock. He teaches producers about the feedlot and packer’s desired grid. Results should arrive in late May to early June.

DECEMBER 2018

Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association President Russell Marion of Pierce City has enrolled in the

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Cole urged Marion to enter calves several years ago. “I wanted to see what they would do in the feedlot,” he says. “This is another whole segment of our industry.”

For more information, contact any MU Extension livestock specialist in southwestern Missouri: Eldon Cole, Mt. Vernon, 417-466-3102. Andy McCorkill, Dallas County, 417-345-7551. Patrick Davis, Cedar County, 417-276-3313. Randall Wiedmeier, Ozark County, 417-679-3525. Daniel Mallory, Ralls County, 573-985-3911. Zac Erwin, Adair County, 660-665-9866. Learn more at extension.missouri.edu/lawrence/ documents/FOBrochure2018-19.pdf and www. swmobcia.com.


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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black The Reindeer Flu You remember that Christmas a few years ago,when you waited all night for ol’ Santy to show Well, I heard the reason and it just might be true, the whole bunch came down with the dang reindeer flu! The cowboy elves had been busy all day a doctorin’ Donner and scatterin’ hay Dancer and Prancer were febrile and snotty, Comet and Cupid went constantly potty Hallucinatory dementia was rampant, why, Blitzen imagined that he was Jed Clampett Dasher got schizo and thought he was Trigger, while Vixen’s obsessions got bigger and bigger By noon Santy knew they should find substitutes. So the cowboy elves went out searching recruits

DECEMBER 2018

They scoured the Artic for suitable prey, and bought them together to hook to the sleigh.

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When Santy climbed up it was like a bad dream! A bull moose as old as the planks on the ark With a head as big as a hammerhead shark stood hitched by a cow, Mrs. Santy’s of course. Then next in the tugs was a Clydesdale horse, He was pared with an elk whose antlers were crossed An ostrich, a walrus and an old albatross were harnessed in line, but the last volunteer Was a blue heeler dog with only one ear. The cowboy elves gave a push to the sled as Santy reared back, cracked his whip, then he said


“On Cleo, on Leo, on Lefty and Jake, On Murphus, Redondo, on Lupe and Snake...” Smoke from the runners cut tracks in the snow. The team headed south, but, where else could they go? They started back East ‘cause it got dark there first, and their luck which was bad, got progressively worse By the time they hit Kansas the tugs had gone slack and all but the dog was now ridin’ in back

Of how, on that Christmas they stayed on the trail A man in Alaska said right after dawn, a low flying object passed over his lawn He ran to the window and threw up the sash and heard someone shouting, “Fer Pete’s sake, don’t crash! On Budget, on Thrifty, look out Alamo, I didn’t take out the insurance, you know.

Santy was desperate. What on earth could he do?

And you, Number Two, try harder, yer Avis! On Dollar, On Hertz, Rent-a-Wreck, you can save us

Then the lights of an airport hove into his view! Did they make it? You betcha, but here hangs the tale

An extra day’s charge if we make it by nine, though the drop off will cost us a bundle this time Merry Christmas,” yelled Santy, but he was all smiles ‘cause at least he’d signed up for unlimited miles. So that’s how it happened as best I recall, when it looked like that Christmas might not come at all And the truth of the matter, we all owe a cheer to the Wichita office of Rent-a-Reindeer.

DECEMBER 2018

David Igo 660-631-2310 Marshall, MO

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U.S. Beef Exports Remain Solid; Pork Exports Still Facing Headwinds Source: USMEF U.S. beef exports remained very strong in September while pork exports continued to be impacted by retaliatory duties in China and Mexico, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Beef exports cooled from the record results posted in August, but were still significantly higher year-over-year. Pork muscle cut exports improved over last September’s volume, but were offset by sharply lower shipments of pork variety meat. September beef exports totaled 110,160 metric tons (mt), up 6 percent from a year ago, valued at $687.1 million – up 11 percent. For January through September, beef exports were just over 1 million mt, up 9 percent from a year ago, while value surged 18 percent to $6.2 billion. For beef muscle cuts only, the year-over-year increases were even more impressive, jumping 13 percent in volume (777,740 mt) and 20 percent in value ($5.54 billion).

DECEMBER 2018

Exports accounted for 13.7 percent of total beef production in September and 11.4 percent for muscle cuts only, up from 12.5 percent and 10.4 percent, respectively, a year ago. For the first three quarters of 2018, exports accounted for 13.5 percent of total production (up from 12.8 percent) and 11.1 percent for muscle cuts – up one full percentage point from last year. Beef export value equated to $334.63 per head of fed slaughter in September and $320.85 for January through September, each up 16 percent from a year ago.

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September pork export volume was down 2 percent from a year ago to 179,423 mt, while export value fell 7 percent to $470.2 million. Pork muscle cuts were 2 percent higher than a year ago at 146,542 mt, but value still declined 3 percent to $397.6 million. September variety meat exports dropped significantly in both volume (32,881 mt, down 18 percent) and value ($72.6 million, down 21 percent). For January through September, combined pork and pork variety meat exports were 1 percent above last year’s record pace at 1.81 million mt and 2 percent higher in value at $4.79 billion. For pork muscle cuts only, exports increased 6 percent from a year ago in volume (1.46 million mt), valued at just under $4 billion (up 3 percent). September exports accounted for 24.8 percent of total pork production, up from 23.6 percent a year ago. For muscle cuts only, the percentage exported was

21.8 percent – up two full percentage points from last September. For January through September, pork exports accounted for 26.1 percent of total production, down from 26.5 percent last year, but the percentage of muscle cuts exported increased from 22.1 to 22.7 percent. Export value per head slaughtered was down 1 percent from a year ago in September ($48.72) and for January through September ($52.46). “With a full quarter still to be reported, beef export value records are already being surpassed in some markets and global value is on track for $8 billion by year’s end,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “Pork exports have also held up relatively well, but unfortunately the obstacles U.S. pork faces in China and Mexico are putting a lot of pressure on export value.” New value record in Korea tops beef export highlights South Korea has been the growth pacesetter for U.S. beef exports in 2018, and September was no exception. Exports to Korea were up 22 percent from a year ago in volume (19,116 mt) and were 29 percent higher in value ($143.1 million). January-September exports reached 180,495 mt, up 37 percent from a year ago, while export value soared 51 percent to $1.29 billion, already breaking last year’s full-year value record. These results included a 28 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 40,372 mt, valued at $391 million (up 38 percent). U.S. share of Korea’s total beef imports has increased sharply this year, from 44.7 to 48.7 percent, as U.S. beef underpins Korea’s growing beef consumption. Korea, Latin America continue to shine for U.S. pork September pork exports to South Korea increased 33 percent from a year ago in volume (12,486 mt) and 30 percent in value ($33.6 million). Through September, exports increased 43 percent in volume (172,022 mt) while export value climbed 48 percent to $489.2 million – already topping the 2017 year-end total of $475 million. U.S. share of Korea’s total pork imports has increased dramatically this year, from 31 to 35 percent, even as imports also trended higher from most of Korea’s main suppliers. Complete January-September export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics web page www.usmef.org. Monthly charts for U.S. pork and beef exports are also available online. If you have questions, please contact Joe Schuele at jschuele@usmef.org or call 303-226-7309.


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Donald Ross Hankins Donald Ross Hankins was born December 5, 1953 in Springfield, Missouri to Ross Hankins, Jr. and Twillia Hodges Hankins. He married Karen Neely on January 16, 1978, and was blessed with two children, Laura Dawn Hankins Gaddy and Jason Ross Hankins. He passed away at his family farm near Willard on November 3, 2018, following a brief illness. Don was preceded in death by his mother and his sonin-law, Grayson Gaddy. He is survived by his father, of Springfield, his wife of the home; his daughter, Laura and her children, Anna, Drew, and Alex Gaddy of Republic; and his son’s family, Jason, Pam, Emma, and Jessi Hankins of Republic; all of whom were his great pride and joy. Don graduated from Willard High School and briefly attended MSU before enlisting into the navy. He greatly enjoyed his time of service in the Philippines and Bermuda, but felt the need to leave the service to help on the family farm. He continued serving in the Naval Reserves for several years, and continued his education at Columbia College, earning a B.S. degree in Agriculture Education from MSU in 1986. He taught Ag Ed at Liberal, Carl Junction, Walnut Grove, Buffalo, and Willard; retiring after 20 years to farm, full time. He raised commercial cattle and registered Charolais and Braunvieh cattle.

He impacted the lives of many students during and after his teaching career. He was totally devoted to his students and took them all over the nation, competing in FFA contests and livestock shows. While training his students, he would work seven days a week, long into the evening hours, traveling anywhere there was an opportunity for them to learn. He pushed them hard, but made it fun, and they loved him dearly. He was much more than just a teacher to them. He was a friend and a second dad to many. Always the teacher, Don continued impacting the lives of many by working with young people who showed cattle. He helped everyone that wanted to learn, even if they were competing against his own family. He helped his children and grandchildren earn many National Grand Champion awards for their cattle, but was also recognized for his support of other youth in the Simmental, Charolais, and Braunvieh Associations. Besides his family, showing cattle and helping others were his great passions in life. He will be missed by people throughout the USA. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital or to the Jr. Braunvieh Association Scholarship Fund.

Hugh Delbert Copenhaver Apr 24, 1928 - Oct 29, 2018 Hugh Delbert Copenhaver, 90, of Lexington, passed away October 29, 2018 at his home. Funeral service was Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 11:00 am at First Baptist Church, Lexington. Burial at Lexington Memory Gardens. Memorial may be made to First Baptist Church, Lexington.

DECEMBER 2018

Delbert was born April 24, 1928 in Iconium, Missouri to Clyde and Corda Lee Copenhaver. He married Joan Adelle Truitt on December 25, 1947 in Collins, Missouri. He was a farmer and a Deacon and member of the First Baptist Church.

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Delbert is survived by his wife, of the home; two sons, Gary Copenhaver and wife Barb of Lexington and Bruce Copenhaver and wife Gayle of Lexington; three grandchildren and six great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents and two brothers, Elbert and Allen.


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48th Missouri Governor’s Conference on Agriculture Announced Forward-thinking, thought-provoking agriculture conference to be held Jan. 10-11, 2019 Source: Missouri Department of Agriculture ( JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.) – The Missouri Governor’s Conference on Agriculture is coming back to Tan-Tar-A Resort in Osage Beach, Mo., this winter for its 48th celebration of agriculture. The Missouri Department of

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

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DECEMBER 2018

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

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Agriculture announced the conference dates have been set for Jan. 10-11, 2019. “Agriculture is Missouri’s No. 1 industry, with nearly 100,000 family farms,” said Governor Mike Parson. “To prepare the next generation of Missourians who will be a part of this industry, we must unite and focus on important issues that matter to all of us, including agriculture workforce development and rural infrastructure.” Missouri farmers, ranchers, agribusiness leaders and aspiring agriculturalists are invited to enjoy the jampacked program that is complete with a commodity outlook, awards luncheon and nationally-recognized speaker line-up that builds on the Department’s MORE Strategic Vision. The much-anticipated Best of Missouri Grown reception will return; the event proceeds will go to support Missouri 4-H, Missouri FFA and the Agricultural Leadership of Tomorrow (ALOT) program. “Hosting our friends in Missouri agriculture for this forward-thinking conference is truly an honor,” said


Director of Agriculture Chris Chinn. “We hope this conference will inspire many farmers, ranchers, agribusiness leaders and aspiring agriculturists to return home energized to make a positive difference in their communities. We’ve been very focused on ensuring the content will be valuable to those who will commit to be away from the farm for a night.” The Missouri Agriculture Awards will honor six individuals that strive to innovate their farm or ranch, give back to their communities, commit to land stewardship or stand as a great example for future generations. To nominate a leader for one of the Missouri agriculture awards, visit Agriculture.Mo.Gov/ awards/. The conference is open to the public; however, registration is required. Anyone interested in receiving updates on the upcoming Missouri Governor’s Conference on Agriculture can sign up online. Members of the media planning to cover the Missouri Governor’s Conference on Agriculture should contact Sami Jo Freeman for additional information and media registration. For more information about the Missouri Department of Agriculture, visit the Department online at Agriculture.Mo.Gov.

See Page 64 For More Information.

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon • Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

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Producers Focused on Staying Ahead of the Curve to Produce High-Quality Beef Source: Red Angus Association of America DENVER – The theme for the Red Angus Association of America’s annual Commercial Cattlemen’s Symposium was “Ahead of the Curve” and the speakers and overall program delivered an immense package of business information to attendees. The symposium, which served as the kickoff to the 65th annual National Red Angus Convention, held Sept. 1214 in Watertown, South Dakota, was attended by more than 300 cattlemen and women seeking to increase their understanding of various aspects of the beef industry, including DNA technology, feedyard management, animal welfare and the production of high-quality beef. Additionally, the program featured a producer panel and a live DNA tissue collection demonstration sponsored by Allflex and GeneSeek.

DECEMBER 2018

The day began with a keynote lecture from Dr. Stewart Bauck of Neogen, who spoke about applying DNA technology to commercial cattle production. Bauck explained the history of DNA testing, its development in beef cattle and discussed how the industry is making genetic progress at a faster rate than ever before. Bauck

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stressed the importance of selecting bulls that have been genomically tested on economically important traits. He also spoke about the importance of gathering genetic data from calves and how that can reap benefits further down the line. “A day-old calf’s genomic data is equivalent to a lifetime of data. Furthermore, the quality of your calves is a direct reflection of the genetics you utilize,” said Bauck. In closing, Bauck explained the last 15 years of DNA technology have been a whirlwind of development; prediction accuracy and processing speed have increased, cost has decreased and the process is more robust. He predicted the future of DNA technology will be widely adopted by feedyards, which may alter cattle management practices according to DNA profiles. Continuing the discussion regarding feedyards, John Schroeder of Darr Feedlot in Cozad, Nebraska, shared with producers his goals and objectives for producing high-quality beef. “Our goal is to produce quality beef that is cost effective in order to feed a hungry world. Quality, in this setting,


means beef that is safe, from a humanely handled animal, that grades upper 2/3 Choice,” said Schroeder.

greatly stressed the importance of providing high-quality beef to consumers.

However, Schroeder maintained that “Upper 2/3 Choice isn’t unique anymore, it’s actually the minimum, and low Choice is the new Select grade beef.”

“Low-quality beef is still higher priced that other competing proteins. It’s already a luxury item so we need it to provide a great eating experience,” Bertelsen expounded, “and the industry is finding great ways to reach increased amounts of quality beef using current technology.”

Schroeder advised cow-calf producers that wish to earn premiums on their cattle to pay attention to important management tactics such as well-planned nutrition, topnotch animal welfare and a good health and vaccination program. Additionally, taking advantage of traceability programs and ensuring a proper weaning protocol can set up cattle for success in the feedlot, which translates to success for the producer.

Additionally, he advised that producers should be prepared for verification processes to take informationbacked beef to the next level including BQA requirements, traceability implementation and animal welfare verification.

“By thinking like a buyer instead of a seller, producers can begin to understand what practices and steps they should be implementing to garner premiums.”

Interwoven through the program was a producer panel composed of Bob Yackley, Wade Moser and Nolan Stone.

The final speaker on the agenda, Brian Bertelsen, vice president of field operations for U.S. Premium Beef, discussed premiums for quality beef and the necessity of paying attention to genetics for feeding cattle to Choice and Prime. Bertelsen attested that he would love to see an oversupply of premium beef and it would be a problem he would welcome.

These experienced cattlemen offered their insight on the topics of the day and how each speaker’s message affected the cow-calf segment and, more specifically, their own operation.

“The fact of the matter is that the better your genetics are for marbling, the more you should consider feeding your cattle longer,” Bertelsen said, a piece of advice that resonated with the crowd. Bertelson explained there will be continued rewards for beef that has significant marbling, is marketed through a branded program, has better genetics or incorporates traceability and source verification. Furthermore, he

The annual Red Angus Association of America Commercial Cattlemen’s Symposium is highly anticipated feature of the National Red Angus Convention and attracts producers from multiple states who wish to hear the industry’s latest updates in the areas of genetics, nutrition, management and other educational business management topics. The 2019 National Red Angus Convention and Commercial Cattlemen’s Symposium will be in Dubuque, Iowa, September 11-13, 2019.

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Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com


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Kingsville Livestock Auction

DECEMBER 2018

Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

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Special Cow/Bull Sale Saturday, December 15 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net


SALE REPORTS Gast Charolais & Friends Bull & Female Sale 10.7.18 – Nevada, MO 40 Bulls.............................. Avg. $2,668 18 Char. Bred Hfrs............ Avg. $2,319 16 Comm. Bred Hfrs........ Avg. $1,963 8 Cows............................... Avg. $1,850

Spur Ranch 10.26.18 – Vinita, OK 124 Older Bulls................. Avg. $4,027 49 Comm. Open Heifers... Avg. $1,200 19 Comm. Bred Heifers.... Avg. $1,600 4 Commercial Bulls........... Avg. $2,500 210 Comm. Pairs.............. Avg. $1,938

S.E. Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale 10.19.18 – Farmington, MO 21 Bulls.............................. Avg. $2,950

Mead Farms 10.27.18 – Versailles, MO 4 Older Bulls..................... Avg. $3,325 151 Yrlg. Bulls................... Avg. $3,594 30 Open Heifers................ Avg. $1,281 21 Bred Heifers................. Avg. $2,492 39 Bred Cows.................... Avg. $2,126 59 Fall Pairs....................... Avg. $2,681

Circle A Angus Ranch 10.20.18 – Iberia, MO 56 Registered Bulls....... Avg. $3,817.05 29 CAPB Bulls............. Avg. $3,940.00 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Assoc. 10.20.18 – West Plains, MO 19 Registered Bulls............ Avg. $2,800 9 Open Heifers.................. Avg. $1,983 7 Bred Heifers................... Avg. $2,092 7 Bred Cows...................... Avg. $1,578 11 Fall Pairs....................... Avg. $2,727 4 Spring Pairs.................... Avg. $2,625 3 Embryos............................ Avg. $350 Reynolds Herefords 10.21.18 – Huntsville, MO 9 Yearling Bulls................. Avg. $2,916 5 ½ Bull Calves................. Avg. $1,541 6 Spring Female Splits...... Avg. $4,558 7 Fall Calving Pairs........... Avg. $2,243 6 Fall Yearling Females...... Avg. $2,141 8 Spring Heifer Calves...... Avg. $1,656

Baker Angus Farms 65th Anniversary Sale 10.28.18 – Butler, MO 27 Older Bulls................... Avg. $4,250 18 Yrlg. Bulls..................... Avg. $3,783 10 Bred Heifers................. Avg. $1,830 3 Bred Cows...................... Avg. $1,666 1 Open Cow...................... Avg. $1,100 28 Fall Pairs....................... Avg. $2,494 19 Spring Pairs.................. Avg. $3,716 Lacy’s Red Angus Bull & Female Sale 10.28.18 – Drexel, MO 18 Month Old Bulls.......... Avg. $5,125 14 Month Old Bulls.......... Avg. $4,031 Reg. Bred Heifers.............. Avg. $3,306 Reg. Open Heifers............. Avg. $2,411 Comm. Bred Heifers......... Avg. $1,756 Comm. Open Heifers........ Avg. $1,134

GENETRUST – Chimney Rock Cattle Co. 11.2.18 and 11.3.18 – Concord, AR 35 Coming 2 y/o Bulls....... Avg. $4,743 90 Yearling Bulls............... Avg. $4,728 59 Reg. Open Heifers........ Avg. $8,856 24 Reg. 3-N-1.................... Avg. $7,760 15 Reg. Bred Heifers......... Avg. $9,117 2 Donors......................... Avg. $22,500 169 Comm. Bred Heifers.. Avg. $1,720 83 Comm. Open Heifers... Avg. $1,259 S.W. Show-Me Select Heifer Sale 11.16.18 - Carthage, MO 4 Tier II A.I. Bred Hfrs..... Avg. $1,700 3 Tier II N.S. Bred Hfrs.... Avg. $1,700 186 Tier I A.I. Bred Hfrs.. Avg. $1,630 118 Tier I N.S. Bred Hfrs. Avg. $1,511 Show-Me Select Rep. Heifer Sale 11.16.18 - Kirksville, MO 79 Tier 1 A.I. Bred Hfrs.... Avg. $1,728 54 Tier 1 N.S. Bred Hfrs... Avg. $1,698 Sydenstricker Genetics Production Sale 11.17.18 – Mexico, MO 70 Older Bulls................... Avg. $5,941 62 Yrlg. Bulls..................... Avg. $5,008 137 Open Heifers.............. Avg. $5,521 34 Bred Heifers................. Avg. $3,105 25 Bred Cows.................... Avg. $3,396 59 Fall Pairs....................... Avg. $4,806 2 Steers.............................. Avg. $1,175 Dalebanks Angus 11.17.18 – Eureka, KS 68 Older Bulls................... Avg. $6,933 63 Yrlg. Bulls..................... Avg. $4,785 DECEMBER 2018

Frank/Hazelrigg Cattle Co., LLC. 10.21.18 – Fulton, MO 20 Older Bulls................... Avg. $3,435 32 Yrlg. Bulls..................... Avg. $2,975 21 Open Heifers................ Avg. $2,095 5 Bred Heifers................... Avg. $1,940 5 Bred Cows...................... Avg. $1,360 1 Open Cow...................... Avg. $8,000 18 Fall Pairs....................... Avg. $3,391 9 Embryos............................ Avg. $800

McBee Cattle Company Fall Selection Day Sale 10.27.18 – Fayette, MO 7 Purebred Braunvieh Bulls.............................. Avg. $4,265 10 McBeef Builder Hybrid Bulls................. Avg. $4,358 8 Purebred Braunvieh Spring Bred Hfrs.......... Avg. $2,610 18 McBeef Builder Hybrid Spring Bred Hfrs.......... Avg. $1,965 22 BU Influence Half-blood Spring Bred Hfrs.......... Avg. $2,165

S.W. MO Performance Tested Bull Sale 10.29.18 – Springfield, MO 15 Older Bulls................... Avg. $3,226 22 Yrlg. Bulls..................... Avg. $3,036

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SALE CALENDAR December 7 December 7 December 8

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Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Farmington, MO Simon Cattle Co Female Sale, Farley, IA Northeast Missouri Show-MeSelect Replacement Heifer Sale, Palmyra, MO

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

December 15 Huge Used Equipment Sale, Sydenstrickers, Palmyra, MO January 9 Deer Creek Cattle Co. Heifer Sale Bowling Green, MO January 26 Nichols Farms Sale, Bridgewater, IA January 27 Jauer Dependable Genetics Sale, Hinton, IA February 2 Loonan Stock Farm Sale, Corning, IA February 5 Hoover Angus Production Sale, Creston, IA February 9 J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS February 9 Crooked Creek Angus Sale, Clarinda, IA February 10-17 Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA February 15 Galaxy Beef Sale, Macon, MO February 16 Byergo Angus Sale, Savannah, MO February 22 Jamison Hereford Bull Sale, Quinter, KS March 2 Mead Farms Spring Sale, Versailles, MO March 2 Peterson Farms Bull Sale, Mountain Grove, MO March 9 Valley Oaks Spring Sale, Lone Jack, MO March 9 Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney, MO March 10 Sampson Annual Bull Sale, Kirksville, MO March 15 MBS Charolais Bull Sale, Bowling Green, MO March 16 Circle A Spring Production Sale, Iberia, MO March 16 Pinegar Annual Herdbuilder XXV Sale, Springfield, MO March 16 Falling Timber Farm Sale, Marthasville, MO March 16 Aschermann Charolais Bull Sale, Carthage, MO March 17 Briarwood Angus Annual Production Sale, Butler, MO March 23 Maplewood Acres Sale, Sedalia, MO March 31 Gast Charolais and Bradley Cattle Co. Sale, Springfield, MO April 9 Sydenstricker Influence Sale, Mexico, MO April 23 Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 STEEL OIL FIELD PIPE AND SUCKER RODS. Call 573-578-2687 or 573-422-3735. COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164. PUREBRED CHAROLAIS BULLS: Good Selection, Serviceable Age, Reasonable Price. Carl Speight. Dadeville, MO. 417-995-3120 or 417-298-7307. RED ANGUS BRED HEIFERS Consistent Uniform Load Lots Top Commercial Replacements Quality! In Volume! Proven Development Program. Contact Verl Brorsen, Perry, OK 580-336-4148 View heifers via www.bluestemcattle.com FOR SALE – 100 Head Co-graze goats with cattle. Bucket/Dog Trained. Kiko Genetics. Goats eat what cattle won’t. Highland Ranch. 314-276-6126. Perryville, MO.

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Advertiser Index

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A-1 Cattle Feeders......................................................... 76 ADM Animal Nutrition.................................................51 AMEC...........................................................................71 American Angus Association........................................ 88 Bayer Clean Up II..........................................................13 BQA Ad......................................................................... 84 Briarwood Angus.......................................................... 89 Buffalo Livestock Market.............................................. 89 Callaway Livestock Center Inc..................................... 50 Cattle Visions................................................................ 27 Central Missouri Sales Co............................................ 88 Circle 5 Cattle Co..........................................................57 Circle A Angus Ranch.................................................. 55 Classified......................................................................101 Clearwater Farm........................................................... 55 Durham Simmental Farms........................................... 65 Eastern Missouri Commission Company..................... 63 Farmers Risk Management LLC...................................11 FCS of Missouri.......................................................... 104 Feed Train LLC............................................................ 30 Finney County Feedyard, LLC.................................... 70 Galaxy Beef LLC.......................................................... 55 Gallagher.....................................................................101 Gast Charolais.............................................................. 25 Gerloff Farms................................................................ 55 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick...................... 55 Green’s Welding & Sales............................................... 53 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus............................................ 55 HRC Feed Yards........................................................... 67 Hy-Plains Feedyard, LLC............................................. 68 Innovative livestock Services.......................................103 Irsik & Doll..................................................................... 2 Jim’s Motors.................................................................. 52 JJ Skyline Angus........................................................... 55 Joplin Regional Stockyards............................................. 3 Kingsville Livestock Auction........................................ 98 Kinsley Feeders, LLC................................................... 69 Loonan Stock Farms Sale..............................................21 Lucas Cattle Co............................................................ 65 Marshall & Fenner Farms............................................. 55 MCA Brand Wall Page................................................. 97 MCA Convention Preview....................................... 31-49 MCA Convention Registration................................ 40-41 MCA Convention Trade Show Form........................... 43 MCA Directory ad........................................................ 64 MCA Gun Raffle.......................................................... 90

MCA Member Benefits................................................. 79 MCA Membership Form.............................................. 93 MCA Presidents Council.........................................94-95 McBee Cattle Co.......................................................... 66 MCLC Announcement................................................. 85 McPherson Concrete Products....................................101 Mead Cattle Co.............................................................57 Mead Farms.................................................................. 55 Merry Meadows Simmental......................................... 65 MFA Fair Share.............................................................81 Missouri Angus Association.......................................... 55 Missouri Angus Breeders.............................................. 55 Missouri Beef Industry Council.................................... 23 Missouri Charolais Breeders........................................ 24 Missouri Simmental Association.................................. 65 Missouri Simmental Breeders....................................... 65 Missouri Valley Commission Company....................... 63 Native Grass Ad............................................................ 80 Naught-Naught Agency.................................................91 NCBA Convention................................................... 82-83 Oval F Ranch............................................................... 65 Ozark Farm & Neighbor............................................... 87 Prefert............................................................................ 35 Ragland Mills................................................................19 Richardson Ranch........................................................ 55 RLE Simmental............................................................ 65 Salt Fork - NDE............................................................ 77 Sellers Feedlot............................................................... 68 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle.......................................... 65 South Central Regional Stockyards............................. 22 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef...................................... 55 Superior Steel Sales....................................................... 75 Sydenstricker Genetics.................................................. 55 Sydenstricker Implements - Used Auction...................... 7 Tiger Country Charolais.............................................. 26 Triple C, Inc.................................................................. 63 Ultralyx..........................................................................61 Valley Oaks Angus........................................................ 55 Valley Oaks Angus Sale................................................ 59 Weiker Angus Ranch.................................................... 55 Westway Feed.................................................................. 9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate................................... 92 Wheeler Livestock Market............................................ 53 Mike Williams.............................................................. 92 Windsor Livestock Auction........................................... 59 Zeitlow Distributing.................................................... 100


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Profile for Coby Wilson

December 2018 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

December 2018 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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