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CONTENTS

April 2019

FEATURES 18 40

Flex for the Future

Bigger May Not Always Be Better in Tight Forage Conditions

Burger Bliss

Glendenning Family Balances Better Beef and Resort Life with Limousins

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MEMBER NEWS 6 12 26

Flex for the Future

Association Update Beef Checkoff News

COLUMNS

County News

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MCA President’s Perspective New Faces

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Flipping the Bird to Science

The Romantic Cowboy

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Burger Bliss

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Junior Spotlight

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Capitol Update

Future Beef Producers of America

Our Purpose

Long Weeks Ahead

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 48 - Issue 11 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

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NCBA News

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Missouri Limousin Breeders Association News

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Angus News University of Missouri Extension News Advertisers Index

www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2019 MCA Officers

Bobby Simpson, President 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560 Marvin Dieckman, President-Elect 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, Vice President 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2019 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Adam Kuebler, 202 N. 6th St. Edina, MO 63537 309-706-4410 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation

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Eli Backman, DC Hay & Cattle, Chamois, MO Bobby & Shelia Barnett, Barnett Farms Success, AK Kenneth Baxter, Humphreys, MO Mason Bell. DVM, Bell Veterinary Services, LLC, Poplar Bluff, MO Chris Bordner, Bordner Farms, Lone Jack, MO Dan Bush, Hannibal, MO David & Kim Buxton, Lazy B, Doniphan, MO Dr. Gray Buxton, Doniphan, MO Marshall Coffelt, Ag Risk Solutions, Maryville, MO Gretchen Ecton, Montgomery City, MO Heath Garrison, Quarter Circle 7 Livestock, Boss, MO Kaden Garrison, Quarter Circle 7 Livestock, Boss, MO Alex Gerlemann, 4A Angus, Beaufort, MO Beau Graves, Chillicothe, MO Adam Hecht, Hecht Farms, Sullivan, MO Heather Henderson, Wellsville, MO Rod Hoefer, Hoefer Cattle, Doniphan, MO Doug & Teresa Hoeter, Doniphan, MO Shane Jackson, Triple H Acres, Miller, MO Kevin Johnson, Elkland, MO Travis & Tina Johnson, Marshall, MO Dale Leuschen, Leuschen Cattle Operation, Crane, MO Ellen Mason, Miller, MO

Mattie Ann McKee, Koshkonong, MO Nicholas & Christine Meyer, C-N-N & Sons Farm, Washington, MO Carl & Nora Mosley, Cuba, MO Myron Neth, Stockdale Cattle, Liberty, MO Matthew O’Neal, MOJO Farms, Doniphan, MO Keith Pierson, Warsaw, MO Kolton Pinkly, Verona, MO Nicole Plenge, Plenge Grain, Luray, MO Carl Proehl, Doniphan, MO Reid Ragsdale, Holliday, MO Ryan Ragsdale, Holl, MO James Smith, Gatewood, MO Travis Smith, Twin Ridge Farms, Clinton, MO Tom Spriggs, Marshfield, MO Brandon & Christina Taylor, Taylor Cattle Co., Doniphan, MO Ellie TenEyck, Lewistown, MO Michael & Jennifer Thornton, Thornton Farms Gatewood, MO Bryce Wassmann, Boonville, MO Robert Wies, Wies Limousin Ranch, St. Charles, MO

See the MCA Membership Form on page 75

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Flipping the Bird to Science Why are you who you are? It’s the experiences. It’s the good times, the failures, the pain and everything along the way that mold us into who we are. I’ve been blessed with many opportunities in my life. My career journey took me to places I wouldn’t have gone to otherwise. God had a plan to open my eyes and he did. I’ve worked alongside cattle producers in Egypt trying to be more efficient and modernize the way they feed cattle and water buffalo for beef consumption. I’ve worked with farmers in Morocco thirsty for knowledge and eager to learn. I’ve been to a lot of countries that want what we have when it comes to food production. These farmers embrace technology and desperately want access to it.

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I’ve also seen what food insecurity looks like. I’ve watched helplessly as children in Cambodia fought in the middle of the street over a piece of bread. I opened my backpack and grabbed a Snickers to give to a little girl who had blood running down her face from fighting. My host grabbed me aggressively. He told me to let the girl be or they would kill her for that candy bar. I walked away.

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Most of us don’t know what hunger feels like. We are blessed to have the most productive agricultural network in the world because of innovative farm and ranch families. Yet, we have groups like the Missouri Rural Crisis Center who want to roll Missouri agriculture backwards and flip the bird to sound science. They want us to stand still and somehow produce food for the world the same way we farmed decades ago. They hate progress and expect the next generation to ignore advancements in agriculture and simply buy a mule and a plow.

Executive Vice President This hate does more than put farmers out of business. This is about food security. We will need to produce more food in the next 40 years than we have in the last 10,000 combined. If our farm and ranch families are going to meet this challenge, we must be innovative and embrace sound science and technology that allow us to do more with less. This includes feeding cattle under roof in a controlled environment. This association is a leader in a coalition of nearly 30 groups supporting Senate Bill 391. This legislation, sponsored by Sen. Mike Bernskoetter, stops counties from passing scientifically unfounded rules and regulations more stringent than or inconsistent with the science-based regulations promulgated by the Department of Natural Resources and other agencies. Let’s quit gut punching progress. Call your legislators, send them an e-mail or show up on Wednesday for our weekly “Cowboys at the Capitol” program. The Missouri Rural Crisis Center, Humane Society Legislative Fund and Sierra Club are working hard to kill the bill. Little do they know, we have something they don’t have. We have you. Cattlemen fight like they don’t know how to lose. We will not back down.


Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Never a Dull Moment in the World of Driving Beef Demand! With Mark Russell, Executive Director

Chuck Knows Beef For Retailers With the full launch of Chuck Knows Beef, the Beef Checkoff has embarked on a campaign to share Chuck with the retail grocery community. As part of this campaign, a page was added on BIWFD.com titled “Chuck Knows Beef for Retailers.”

Closer to home, MBIC hosted a media training and advocacy training for registered dieticians in midMissouri. Guest presenter, Ryan Goodman, NCBA worked with attendees to understand the industry better and to understand the importance of beef in a healthy diet.

The page offers a brief overview of Chuck and the benefits it offers to retailers, as well as a contact form for retailers which enables the beef checkoff to direct requests to the states which are home to smaller retailers.

Enjoy Beef In A Heart Healthy Lifestyle NCBA’s Nutrition Program recently revised and reprinted a popular consumer brochure highlighting several American Heart Association® certified recipes and beef’s role in heart-healthy diet patterns. SBCs utilized more than 30,000 copies to promote heart month, which is celebrated every February. AHA certification of beef cuts and recipes was made possible as a result of the checkoff’s recent Nutrient Database Improvement (NDI) initiative, which supplied the USDA National Nutrient Database with accurate and contemporary beef nutrient information, demonstrating the increasing leanness of the beef supply.

How Do We Feed the Future Without Eating the Planet? Examining the Human and Environmental Impacts of Beef Production NCBA recently hosted a webinar educating and informing health professional audiences on how, environmentally, cattle play a unique role in our food system, and how beef farmers and ranchers are contributing to a more sustainable food supply. Speakers were Sara Place, PhD and Amy Myrdal Miller, MS, RDN, FAND. Registered dieticians from many states, including Missouri participated.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: APRIL 2019

6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

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David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

Chuck Knows Beef Makes His Official Debut! Chuck, the beef industry’s artificial intelligence, learned a lot during the early launch and made its official debut on March 1st! Nationally, Google Director Mix ads are launching, which respond to consumers searches on YouTube and offer a relevant response from Chuck. Along with paid search, ads on Pandora, new social ads on Facebook and Instagram, Pinterest extensions, and Meat-ia kits are increasing Chuck’s awareness. The kits will be sent to influencers across the country. Sonic Puts an Egg on it with the All-New Brunch Burger SONIC® Drive-In now brings brunch on-demand any time with a new limited-time Brunch Burger. The supply chain team has partnered with Sonic for a social shout out on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram with Nicely Done, Beef.


Watch for weekly posts during the March promotion to highlight this innovative burger. Like, share, repost, and head to SONIC try the burger with melty cheese, crispy bacon, and a perfectly fried egg, served on a brioche bun. SONIC is the nation’s largest drive-in restaurant chain serving approximately 3 million customers every day.

Missouri is host to the spring meeting of the U.S. Meat Export Federation in Kansas City in May. Beef importers, exporters, ag organizations, buyers and officials from throughout the world will converge in Kansas City for the three-day conference. MBIC is represented on this international body on a board of directors.

Spring Has Sprung! April begins a busy month for MBIC.

Contact our office for any May is Beef Month needs as soon as possible. We want to spread the word about Beef throughout the year, but especially in May!

Kicking it off is the annual GO St. Louis Marathon and Fitness events. The sponsorship role for the checkoff includes a health expo, in addition to providing healthy eating and fitness information to youth throughout the St. Louis public school system. Later this spring, the checkoff will head to Kansas City to participate in the largest running event in Kansas City, the Hospital Hill Run. A unique addition to this year’s event will be the 100% beef hotdog waiting for all runners at the end of their runs. We continue to work with KSDK in St. Louis to share television cooking segments and Dierbergs supermarkets to sponsor cooking classes for shoppers in the St. Louis market. Content videos begin production in April for an educational series addressing topics like sustainability, cattle handling and management, beef safety and beef quality.

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April also is highlighted by the sponsorship of the Missouri Association of Nutrition and Dietetics convention and meeting. MBIC works closely to provide current nutrition research to dietetic influencers attending the event. A first for this year is a educational and welcome reception for collegiate dietician students attending the event.

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Lab-Grown Fake Meat Agreement is “What Consumers Deserve” WASHINGTON (March 7, 2019) – Today National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Jennifer Houston released the following statement in response to the formal agreement announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on lab-grown fake meat oversight: “The formal agreement announced today solidifies USDA’s lead oversight role in the production and labeling of lab-grown fake meat products. This is what NCBA has been asking for, and it is what consumers deserve. Under the terms of the agreement, USDA will be responsible for inspecting all facilities that harvest, process, package, or label cell-cultured products derived from livestock or poultry. All product labels will also be subject to USDA’s pre-approval and verification process. We look forward to working collaboratively with the USDA and FDA on next steps, including the development of a more detailed framework concerning the cell harvest stage. Ensuring that all lab-grown fake meat products are safe and accurately labeled remains NCBA’s top priority.”

Oregon Cattleman to Congress: Livestock Producers Serve as Conservation Allies WASHINGTON (March 12, 2019) – Today Oregon cattleman Rodger Huffman told a Congressional hearing that livestock producers across the country serve as stewards of the environment and allies in conservation. Despite the efforts of some in Congress to vilify livestock producers, effective wildlife conservation depends on strengthening the partnership between government agencies and ranchers. In fact, livestock producers maintain over 660 million acres of open spaces and landscapes, about a third of the U.S. landmass and home to many species of wildlife. “Federal and state wildlife managers have no greater ally in the effort to conserve America’s species than ranchers,” Huffman said in prepared testimony. “Ranchers steward these landscapes for generations – in most cases spanning centuries – and provide a myriad of benefits to wildlife from the iconic big game species to migratory birds.” Without stable ranching operations, wildlife and rural communities suffer. For example, urban development and wildfire pose grave threats to sensitive species like the Greater Sage-grouse. Keeping working ranch land intact helps maintain open space that Greater-sage grouse need to survive. Meanwhile, early and late season grazing helps to reduce the buildup of invasive grasses that fuel devastating wildfires, which threaten the bird and rural residents alike.

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Unfortunately, many federal regulations crafted by personnel in Washington, D.C. are not responsive to the unique conservation needs of local landscapes. Furthermore, top-down mandates undermine the public-private conservation partnerships that wildlife and rural communities depend on.

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“A partnership only works if it benefits both parties involved and there is mutual respect,” Huffman said. “It is critical that conservation plans work for both the landowner and the species involved because the alternative is far worse for the wildlife.”


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Mid-Missouri Cattlemen’s Association Mid-Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and Miller County Regional Stockyards hosted a Beef Quality Assurance certification training program Tuesday Feb. 12, 2019, at 6 p.m. at the stockyards near Eldon. Wendy Cantrell, stockyards owner, addressed the group of nearly 300 cattle producers mostly from Mid Missouri counties, but there were attendees that came from as far as Chamois, Blackwater, Boonville and Marshall. Wendy informed the crowd that Animal ID is being discussed in the cattle industry and wanted to make those in attendance aware that this discussion is being had. She strongly encouraged producers to be part of the conversation and make their voices heard on the matter. The voluntary BQA certification course was conducted by Dr. Craig Payne, University of Missouri Extension veterinarian. The program was established in 1987 by beef checkoff program and provides producers information on cattle handling, preconditioning and other techniques. BQA principles are developed for the industry to help guide elements of cattle farming such

Wendy Cantrell, stockyards owner, addressed the group of nearly 300 cattle producers mostly from Mid Missouri counties

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The BQA certification course was conducted by Dr. Craig Payne, University of Missouri Extension veterinarian.

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A big crowd was on hand a Miller Regional Stockyards for the BQA training session in February.

as storage and feed lots, feed quality, and vaccination programs. Dr. Payne told the group that the program was “designed for cattlemen by cattlemen.” Coby Wilson, Missouri Cattlemen’s Association Manager of Strategic Solutions, stressed that some processors and retailers are starting to require certification from feeders.


Polk County The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association held it’s March meeting at Smiths Restaurant in Bolivar. The meeting was sponsored by Missouri Livestock Supplements. We were honored to have Representative Mike Stevens along with Representative Bruce Franks Jr. from St. Louis. Rep. Franks updated us on some of the things that are going in the capitol. He also graciously donated $100 to the Polk County Cattlemen’s scholarship fund. Mike Richner from Missouri Livestock Supplements discussed some of the products that they offer for beef producers. Mike then introduced Tom Mcbeth from Central Life Sciences. Tom gave a very educational presentation discussing fly control for cattle, and how some of their products work to control flies. Our next meeting will be on April 11, at Smiths Restaurant, and it will be sponsored by Springfield Livestock Market. We would also like to invite everybody to the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association Scholarship Auction, which will be held May 11, at the Rockin R Auction Company. Tom Mcbeth from Central Life Sciences giving a presentation.

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St. Clair County St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, March 12 at 7 p.m. at the Boy Scout Building in Lowry City. There were 38 members present at the meeting. Burch and Liles spoke to the group about Liability Insurance and making sure you have your farm covered adequately. Larry Burch, Will Burch, Jamie Liles and Jared Liles spoke on how they have resources to reach out so that they can help save the cattlemen money and get them more coverage. So, they have the peace of mind that they will be okay if something was to happen. Larry Burch also spoke to the group on the MO Beef for MO Kids program. Larry was the first one in Bates County to donate beef for the school. He couldn’t stress enough how important it is to get good beef in our schools and to help our kids see how good it is. St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association is selling Chainsaw Raffle Tickets on a Stihl MS 250 Chainsaw with 18” bar. Cattlemen will sell 200 tickets at $10.

Jim and Scott Cape…

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57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

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www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840

each. The drawing will be held at the monthly meeting following the last ticket sold. All proceeds will go to support the St. Clair County Cattlemen’s scholarship fund. The next St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association meeting is scheduled for April 9, 2019, at 7 p.m. at Farmhouse Kitchen, sponsored by Appleton City Feed Service.


Barton County The Barton County Cattlemen met March 7, 2019, at Memorial Hall in Lamar, Missouri. Over 80 cattlemen and cattlewomen attended the meeting. A beef brisket dinner, catered by Scott Noting, was sponsored by Danny Little of Red Neck hunting blinds. Danny also gave out samples of a new product he has developed, Red Neck beef jerky, thus helping to expand the beef market. The program, Beef Quality Assurance training, was presented by Dr. Craig Payne from the University of Missouri. He explained the history and purpose of this program. Among other benefits, the certification training includes cattle production standards, importance of record-keeping, and education on industry practices. The program included biosecurity, preventing the entry of and spreading of disease in the cattle herd. Standards for administering vaccines and other medications were discussed. Commitment to raising cattle with these standards is key to the success of BQA. Some large packers, as of January 2019, are purchasing only BQA-certified beef and at several feed yards they are asking the drivers of cattle delivery trucks if they have the BQA trucking training. Attending this meeting and completing the course requirements allowed those at the meeting to become BQA certified. More information may be obtained at bqa.org. Our next meeting will be April 4, 2019, at 7 p.m. at Memorial Hall in Lamar.

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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen The March 5 meeting was hosted by Worthington Angus, Dadeville. They provided strip steaks, Angus of course, that were grilled by Rod and Christine Lewis, Jeff Kaal with an assist from Jim McCann. Sides were provided by the Russell Marion extended family. Josh provided a thoughtful talk that challenged the 90 or so folks in attendance to develop objectives and a plan that is predictable, measureable and repeatable for their beef cattle operations. He said successful cattle breeders need verifiable information that only comes from putting herd mates in the feedlot and on the rail. Worthington Angus will help bull purchasers retrieve performance data that can be used when you market your feeder calves. He stressed that sellers of the calves must tell their market contacts their story and to do it well ahead of sale date. A question was raised about DNA testing. Josh replied, “Just because they’ve been DNA (genomic) tested doesn’t mean they are good.” You need to learn about the genomic tests your breed utilizes and see what the strengths and weaknesses are then, match them with your breeding objectives.

The Worthington Family provided the steaks for the March meeting of the Southwest Missouri Cattlemen meeting.

In closing, Josh said beef producers should like and believe what consumers have to say. During the business meeting, Jeff reminded them that the college scholarship applications are due by the end of the week. Scynthia Schnake told the audience that the Facebook page was being liked by an increasing number of persons. Eldon Cole, MU Extension field specialist – livestock reviewed a number of coming educational events such as steer feedout signup, bull breeding soundness days, BQA training, novel fescue meeting, grazing school in May at Mt. Vernon and the regional tested bull sale at Springfield. Russell reported a number of thank you’s were received from students in the early grades at Southwest Elementary at Washburn for the beef sticks. They were given them for the backpack food program. A number of letters were passed around. The association will have 7,000 beef sticks prepared this year for distribution to 22 schools in Barry, Dade, Lawrence and Stone counties.

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Jeff closed the meeting by urging members to attend the upcoming Cowboys at the Capitol event.

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Editorial Note: Please send County News items via email to: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Deadline for the May 2019 issue is April 15th.


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Lafayette County The Lafayette County Cattlemen held the annual business meeting Saturday, March 2 at the American Legion Hall in Higginsville. Randy Hinck and staff from Plowboys at Marshall catered a delicious prime rib dinner. Lafayette County Truck & Tractor again sponsored the social hour, with proceeds benefiting the LCCA scholarship program.

Details regarding the LCCA scholarship were presented by Hannah Copenhaver with applications due back in April 1 and interviews to be held April 8.

President Bill Oelrich welcomed the crowd and presided over the business meeting. Sasha Hull presented the treasurer’s report, and the membership approved annual donations to Lafayette County MU Extension and the Lafayette County 4-H and FFA Fair. Abigail Oelrich spoke to the group about her experience as Lafayette County’s candidate for Missouri Beef Queen at the annual convention.

Representatives from Valley Oaks Steak Company spoke about the upcoming BQA training and their spring sale.

Sponsors of the evening meal, Valley Oaks Angus, provided information regarding the BQA training to be held at their location and their upcoming production sale. Mike Deering, MCA Executive Vice President shared the importance of membership participating in the Cowboys at the Capitol on Wednesdays during the legislative session and briefed those in attendance on current legislative efforts. Marsha Corbin gave details on the 2019 bus trip to Cheyenne, Wyoming.

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Mike Deering was the keynote speaker and encouraged members to become active in issues facing MO Cattlemen.

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Bates County The February meeting of the Bates County Cattlemen was held at the Adrian Methodist Church. Mike Ferguson, with Chr.Hansen, shared about probiotics offered to improve cattle gut health in the feedyard. March 8 is the Area FFA contest, held at the Adrian High School. The group will be sponsoring the concession stand by cooking and serving 325 hamburgers throughout the day. In January, the Ballard PTO dinner, also known as the “Cattleman’s Dinner” was held to raise money for school trips and teacher supplies. The group donated several trays of smoked meat, and the event helped raise $3,000 through a dinner, auction and general store for baked goods. Our group is proud to have Annette Jenkins managing our new Facebook page! We would appreciate your “Like” for the “Bates County Mo Cattleman’s” page to follow our activities and engage with the local group. We hope this will allow us to connect with younger producers and consumers of all ages to promote our efforts and our beef. Speaking of which, we were very happy to bring Mo Beef to Mo Kids to the Butler school district and want to thank Burch & Liles Insurance for donating the first cow! Larry Burch and his family have been longtime supporters of the cattleman’s, Butler school and Bates

Cooking burgers for Briarwood Angus Farm sale on Mar 17

County communities. To celebrate the program’s launch, the Missouri Beef Industry Council sponsored a dinner with the Butler School Board on February 13. We are looking forward to continuing this effort in schools throughout Bates County and providing more beef for school lunches. Our March meeting was held at the Butler Methodist Church and sponsored by Briarwood Angus Farm. Doc Long and manager David Warfield invited everyone to their upcoming sale on March 17. They highlighted some of the bulls offered in the sale and thanked everyone for their support over the year. Ivan reported on the recent Cowboys at the Capitol visits and commented on the impressive attendance by the collegiate and junior cattlemen. The group is scheduled again for April 3 and 24.

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Suzie Hockett announced a 4-H trivia night on March 30 as a fundraiser for meeting administrative budgets. There will be a dinner from 5-6:45 p.m. (or until food runs out) with trivia following. Teams are $100 for 5-10 people and each round is sponsored for $100, with teams playing 10 rounds. The group voted to sponsor five rounds, and Duckworth Farms and Backroad Productions each volunteered to sponsor a team.

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As beef month approaches, the group plans to cook burgers for a free will donation again. The past two events have produced amazing results and the group has been able to donate to at least four other non-profit organizations in the county as a result. Our next meeting will be April 9 at MoKan Livestock Market.


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Dallas County The Buffalo Livestock Market provided the setting for the March 12 meeting of the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association. The 160 members and guests in attendance enjoyed a roast beef dinner sponsored by Zoetis, Buffalo Veterinary Clinic, and Buffalo Livestock Market. Thank you to market owners Lyle and Leon Caselman and families and Howard Miller for hosting the event and to all sponsors for the evening. Leon Caselman welcomed the group and talked about how his business works to get the most money for our cattle. He said that he is seeing more weaned-vac cattle than ever before. He strongly urged everyone to consider utilizing Buffalo Livestock Market’s “Pre-Vac Program” to get that premium for cattle. Representing Zoetis at the meeting was their senior territory business manager, Ed Trotter. He talked about the many products his company offers and the benefits of using them. He also explained how the Zoetis Selectvac program works on different types of cattle. It was reported by Buffalo FFA member Devyn Rackley that the chapter’s pulled pork luncheon was highly successful as the group served 400 meals. He thanked DCCA members for the support received by the chapter. DCCA President Bobby Stewart informed the group about his recent trip to Columbia to attend the MCA Leadership Conference. He brought home a lot of great ideas and especially enjoyed getting to visit the capitol and talk to many legislators.

Leon Caselman welcomed the group.

DCCA members will travel to Jefferson City on April 3 for Cattlemen at the Capitol. Our April 9 meeting will be held at Prairie Grove School with Headings Bros. Feeds as our sponsor. Director of Agriculture Chris Chinn will be our guest speaker that evening, so we anticipate another great turnout at the school.

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Representing Zoetis at the meeting was the senior territory business manager, Ed Trotter. Photos by Jim Hamilton.

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Pettis County Pettis County Cattlemen’s served ribeyes, beef burgers, and beef dogs during the Ag Expo Friday, February 1 – Saturday February 2, 2019, held at the Missouri State Fairgrounds in Sedalia. The Ag Expo is sponsored by the Central Missouri Agriculture Club which supports, promotes, and recruits agriculture and youth in Central Missouri. Annually, this event fills the Mathewson Center with vendors to showcase agriculture goods and services as well as seminars such as BQA certification, applicator certification, gardening and more.

On Friday, February 22, 2019, Pettis County Cattlemen’s members and State Fair Community College Ag students traveled to tour Valley Oaks Steak Company in Lone Jack area. The tour included the feedlot and processing plant which provided a true farm-to-table experience.

Marketing Cattle Weekly for Cattlemen

“Across Missouri”

“Sales each TUESDAY” “Sales each FRIDAY” O:660-882-7413 O:573-324-2295 Pettis County Cattlemen & SFCC Ag students travel by bus for tour of Valley Oaks Steak Company

www.movalleylivestock.com www.emcclivestock.com Justin Angell Mike VanMaanen Jon Angell 573-819-8000 573-881-0402 573-682-4656

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Hall Selected for Saddle and Sirloin Club, Livestock Industry’s Highest Honor Recognized for a lifetime of exceptional service for animal agriculture Source: PM Advertising Robert Hall Jr., who has been dedicated to animal agriculture for more than 70 years and is the longtime owner and president of Central Kentucky’s Farmers Feed Mill and its Hallway Feeds brand, will be the 2019 inductee into the Saddle and Sirloin Club, widely considered the highest honor in the livestock industry. This elite club of influential figures in the livestock industry was originally housed on the top floor of the Purebred Livestock Records Building in Chicago, Illinois, in the early 1900s. Livestock men would gather on the top floor over a sirloin steak or a saddle of lamb in the banquet, leading to the name “Saddle and Sirloin Club.” Chosen by their peers, the club continues the heritage of its founders to pay homage to those who have made the greatest contributions to the livestock industry. Hall’s portrait will be added to the exclusive club gallery, recognizing a lifetime of exceptional service to the livestock business. Fittingly, the oil portrait collection is displayed in the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, which has hosted the North American International Livestock Exposition for 45 years. Hall was instrumental in the formation and continued growth of the show as he served on the executive committee from 1974 to 2012. He will be honored in an induction program and portrait unveiling Nov. 17, 2019, during the North American International Livestock Exposition. The portrait gallery is believed to be the largest collection of quality portraits by noted artists in the world devoted to a single industry.

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Hall was unaware of a devoted effort from friends and colleagues championing his candidacy. The selection committee received letters of recommendation from 94 individuals supporting Hall for the award.

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“It is extremely humbling,” Hall said. “I have known quite a few members of the club. I worked for one of them, W.P. Garrigus, at the University of Kentucky, and I was close personal friends with Henry Besuden. I can name a bunch of them that come to mind. This is a mountain peak that you always look at and never think you are going to reach. To get to the top of it, it is something special.” After growing up on a family farm in Central Kentucky and graduating from the University of Kentucky, Hall

lived in New York and managed a purebred Angus Farm, served in the U.S. Army as a veterinary meat inspector and was the beef cattle herdsman at the University of Kentucky’s Coldstream Farm. He and his wife, Bonnie, purchased Farmers Feed Mill, a small feed business in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1964. Farmers Feed Mill serviced the area’s dairy and beef cattle farms for nearly 30 years and eventually introduced the Hallway Feeds brand to supply Thoroughbred farms and racing stables with custom feeds. Hallway Feeds has fueled 12 of the last 21 Kentucky Derby winners, including Triple Crown heroes American Pharoah and Justify, and at least one winner of every North American Grade 1 race, the highest echelon of the sport. A longtime Suffolk sheep breeder, Hall served a term as president of the National Suffolk Sheep Association. “Bob is one of the rare individuals who understand and know all types of animal agriculture,” wrote Mike Hancock, a current NAILE Executive Board Member. “Whether it’s cattle, swine, sheep, goats or horses, he understands all phases of production, from securing genetics to formulating rations to maximizing production. He has the capability of assisting a breeder of any species to select their next sire or a foundation female.” Known far and wide as “Mr. Bob,” Hall lives on the family farm in Scott County, Kentucky, and is a regular presence at the feed mill with his son, Lee, and daughter, Julia, now running the day-to-day operation. More information will follow on the induction ceremony during the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville on Nov. 17, 2019. Immediate inquiries can be made to Anthony Koch at anthony@ hallwayfeeds.com or (859) 255-7602.


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MLBA News

please let myself, or a board member know ahead of time and it will be put on the agenda.

Source: MLBA Newsletter February 2019

This year Missouri has the opportunity to host the Junior National Show and All American Futurity in Springfield June 30 through July 5. This will bring breeders from across the country to our state for an opportunity to showcase their best. As a bonus, check out an opportunity to win a FREE truck lease!

Presidents Comments Missouri Limousin Breeders and Family, I hope this newsletter finds you all well. With springcalving season in full swing, and Missouri weather not cooperating as well as we like, I would like to remind you that the warmth of spring is coming, and greener pastures are just around the corner. This year holds lots of opportunities within our state to showcase our breeders and what we have to offer to the rest of the cattle industry. As we move forward, I encourage each of you to either participate and/ or attend some of our events happening over the next year. These events are a great opportunity to meet new breeders and to continue to build relationships with those of us who share a love for Limousin cattle. The first event is the annual banquet and sale, April 1213. I want to bring your attention to the new schedule of events this year outlined below. Consignment information can be found on the MLBA Facebook page and the website. The field day show will be held at the Missouri State Fairgrounds, June 7-9, in conjunction with the Missouri Cattlemen’s All Breed Junior show. Lunch will be provided during the shows on Saturday and we invite ALL to come and enjoy food, fellowship and good cattle. The board will also conduct a meeting immediately following the open show Saturday afternoon. We encourage any of you who have any questions or suggestions for us to attend the meeting and address us. If you have anything specific you would like discussed,

Kingsville Livestock Auction Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

APRIL 2019

Special Cow/Bull & Cow/Calf Sale Saturday, April 27 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.

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For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

These three events all take the hard work of volunteers to make them successful. If you are interested in assisting in any way, please contact any of the board members, as it would be greatly appreciated. Respectfully, Shaun Edwards - MLBA President

Recent Limousin Sale Reports

Pinegar Limousin HerdBuilder Twenty-Five March 16, 2019 • Springfield, MO 29 Bulls...........................................................Avg. $5,150 43 Spring Breds..............................................Avg. $4,527 6 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $3,833 78 Lots Grossed $427,000..............................Avg. $5,474 Stockman’s Classic Annual Production Sale March 10, 2019 • Lebanon, Missouri 16.75 Bulls......................................................Avg. $3,418 14 Females......................................................Avg. $2,100 30.75 Lots Grossed $85,050...........................Avg. $2,766 Heart of Missouri Limousin Sale October 1, 2018 • Lebanon, Missouri 11 Bull Lots....................................................Avg. $2,927 29 Fall bred females/pairs...............................Avg. $2,479 19 Spring bred females/pairs..........................Avg. $2,179 9 Open heifers................................................Avg. $2,138 68 Lots Grossed..................................................$164,750

Upcoming Limousin Events

April 12 Annual meeting and banquet in Lebanon, Missouri 7:00 pm April 13 American Pie Sale Lebanon, Missouri 1:00 pm April 27 “Road to Springfield” Sale, Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, Missouri May 15- Entry deadline for Junior Nationals June 8 - 9 Limousin Field Day, Sedalia, Missouri June 28 to July 5- Junior Nationals and Limousin Show and Congress, Springfield, Missouri at the Ozark Empire Fairgrounds


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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black The Romantic Cowboy There’s nothing like an evening of calving to promote the romantic image of the cowboy. Right, ladies? Don invited a nice woman out to his ranch in Alberta for an evening of candlelight, wine and canned bean dip. This dinner date coincided with calving season. After an hour of civilized conversation about French painting, Brexit and the condition of the rodeo arena in Ponoka, Don invited his date to go with him to check the cows.

“Dedicated to Producing”

No Excuse Herefords

She didn’t exactly squeal with delight but he explained how scientific livestock raising had become. “Almost like visiting a human hospital maternity ward,” he said, authoritatively. They drove his F-250 out into the calving pasture and immediately spotted a braymer cross cow tryin’ to calve. “We’ll watch her for a few minutes to see if everything comes out okay,” suggested Don sliding an arm around her shoulders. They sat in the warm cab, moonlight mixing with Don’s elaborate discourse of bovine parturition. After half an hour he decided to assist the cow. Partly for the cow and partly to show off.

Offering One of the Area’s Largest Selection of Breed Leading EPD Hereford Bull Prospects at the Farm!

APRIL 2019

J. D. Bellis Family Herefords

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Jim D. and Carla Bellis 19264 Lawrence 2170 Aurora, MO 65605 Cell: 417-466-8679 E-mail: jimbellis@missouristate.edu

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”


The calf appeared to be hip locked. His date prepared to see her date save the day. Don drove up to the head end of the cow and left the headlights shining in her eyes. Sneaking out, he slipped around behind her. He slid the O.B. chains over the calf’s protruding front feet. At first tug the cow arose like a bee stung buffalo! She whirled to mash Don. He was jerked off his feet but clung to the straps as the cow chased him like a dog chasin’ it tail! He was alternately upright, flat out, levitating, scooting, skiing, sliding, screaming and squirreling as the three of them circled like a shaky ceiling fan. His only hope of survival was to hang on and stay behind the helicoptering cow. She managed to land enough blows to win the round and tromp his fallen hat to a pulp.

On one mighty jerk, the calf popped out. Don executed a complete cartwheel and landed on his back. The cow rolled him once and headed off into the darkness. His date, who had watched Don’s calving technique from the cab was not impressed. “Less than professional,” she had commented as he climbed in his cab after giving the departed cow a four alarm cussing. Don tried to regain his composure and recapture the mood by explaining that he had been in control the whole time. However it was not very convincing what with the big glob of manure plastered on the side of his neck and the piece of placenta dangling from his ear.

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

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THE REAL DEAL. McBee Cattle Company

Bull and Female SELECTION DAY April 20, 2019 • 10:00 to 2:00 at the Ranch, Fayette, Missouri Join Us For Lunch! • 40 Braunvieh and Braunvieh Angus Hybrid bred heifers. • 45 Braunvieh and Braunvieh Angus Hybrid bulls that have been developed for a long and productive life, evaluated on performance and efficiency and carcass trait measured by ultrasound. Largest Selection in the Midwest!

The McBee Customer Bonus

E-mail: mcbcattle@aol.com website: McBeeCattleCompany.com

APRIL 2019

Any bull purchase qualifies the buyer for participation in the McBee Calf Roundup. Grouping and Marketing Customers’ Calves since 1992.

Ron & Teri McBee 221 State Rt. H Fayette, MO 65248 (573) 228-2517

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The Skinny on Cow Weight Maintenance and Forage Intake, Courtesy of OSU Animal Scientists Source: By Donald Stotts - OSU News and Information Weight gain is almost a national obsession the first few months after the new year, and while humans may be most interested in dropping pounds, cattle breeders are more concerned with helping cows maintain a good body weight at a reasonable cost. Animal scientists with Oklahoma State University’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources have long been paying attention to factors that affect cattle efficiency, and this past year decided to take a closer look at total calories a cow consumes relative to her calf’s weaning weight.

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“In this experiment, we set out to determine if we could potentially reduce annual cow maintenance costs with Hereford-sired black baldy cows compared to straight bred Angus cows,” said Dave Lalman, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service beef cattle specialist with DASNR’s department of animal and food sciences.

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Oklahoma State study showed the black baldy cows averaged a better body condition score than the straight Angus cows. (Photo by the Department of Animal & Food Sciences)

Research Center showed an average improvement in weaning weight per cow when a simple two-breed rotation was used with bos Taurus breeds such as Hereford and Angus. This advantage is known as heterosis or hybrid vigor.

“While there is substantial older data available on the question of heterosis, there is not much data available on the influence of crossing a breed known for lower feed intake – the Hereford breed – with the popular Angus breed,” he said.

Another potential benefit of crossbreeding, and one often overlooked, is to select the second breed in the crossbreeding system based on inherent characteristics that might reduce costs or improve income in the operation. The idea of selecting breeds that “complement” one another in this way is known as “breed complementarity” in the animal breeding world.

First, a bit of background: Considerable research exists indicating that a simple crossbreeding system can result in improved cow longevity and fertility compared to a purebred or straight bred system. In fact, years of crossbreeding studies conducted at the Meat Animal

The OSU researchers broke the study into two phases: Maintenance energy requirements and voluntary feed intake. How well do black baldy cows retain body condition compared to Angus cows? What is the forage


intake difference between the black baldy cows and the straight Angus cows?

available forage by livestock per acre. Do the math: 25 percent of 3,000 pounds is 750 pounds.

“As cattle producers know, cow-calf operations need to have pregnant cows that are able to maintain a good body condition through the relatively harsher winter months while also providing needed nutrients to the as-yet-unborn calf inside them,” Lalman said. “If the cows can do that while consuming fewer nutrients, the reduction in input costs provides an advantage in annual cow costs.”

“By using the crossbred female and taking advantage of lower feed intake and maintenance requirements of Hereford cattle in our crossbreeding system, we should be able to increase stocking rate or reduce the number of acres required by about one acre per cow-calf unit,” Lalman said.

The OSU study showed the black baldy cows averaged a better body condition score than the straight Angus cows. In fact, the crossbred cows maintained better body condition throughout both phases of the experiment. “On average, we measured just under 2 pounds per day less moderate quality forage intake in the crossbred cows,” Lalman said. “On an annual basis, the black baldy cows would be expected to consume about 725 pounds less forage.” And that has led to an interesting consideration for cow-calf producers: Some of the more productive native range in Oklahoma produces about 3,000 pounds of forage per acre. However, studies by rangeland ecologists have led to recommendations that cattle producers should aim for only about 25 percent consumption of

The OSU animal scientist stressed nobody is saying that raising purebred animals is a bad thing as there are many reasons to do so. However, simple, planned crossbreeding systems using breeds that complement one another can reduce the cost of maintaining a cow herd and increase ranch output through improved longevity and fertility. “Raising livestock is not, nor has it ever been, a one-sizefits-all solution,” Lalman said. “Cow efficiency is one more important feature in the cattle producer’s toolbox, relative to the decision-making process.” The Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service and the statewide Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station system are state agencies administered by DASNR, and are key aspects of OSU’s state and federally mandated teaching, research and Extension land-grant mission.

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Raising Really Good Cattle Source: C.A.B. - Black Ink - Miranda Reiman Young kids often have a misplaced sense of confidence. “Wook, how high I jump.” As a toddler, one of my girls used to love to show off that skill. She’d squat down, chubby thighs almost touching the ground and she’d give it her all. Her jump would maybe clear all of two inches. She was always thrilled.

We get phone calls, emails and Facebook messages, people stop by after a speaking engagement. The venue, medium and producer may vary, but the tone is often the same: “I have good cattle. How can I get paid more for them?” Of course running a long-standing ranch business is well beyond toddling, but consistently earning value-added premiums takes a lot of proof.

“I’m w-eally good at that, w-ight, Mom?”

I’m not one to dodge a question, and my career is pretty much built on how to earn more with cattle. I believe market signals work—you know, the ones sent back through the beef supply chain from cattle buyers and their beef buyers.

At two, that sureness is endearing. A few decades older, not always.

Once you take out seasonal factors and unpredictable swings, in the end and on average, the open market

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(Continued on page 54)

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Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Performance Tested Bulls

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Steve Miller and Family 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 (660) 582-1334 E-mail: bigmilr@grm.net

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

WEIKER

GERLOFF FARMS Connealy Power Surge

Angus Ranch

AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

660-248-3640

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Fred: 660-248-3765

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248

“Where the Extraordinary are Availible” Thanks to all the buyers and bidders at our sale!

For All Your Angus Needs!

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

35004 E. McQuerry Rd • Oak Grove, MO 64075 www.valleyoaksangus.com The Ward Family David Ward– 816-229-8115 Tony Ward – 816-365-5930 tony@valleyoaksangus.com Kyle Lynn – 573-721-6382 – Herdsman kyle@valleyoaksangus.com

Spring Female Sale May 11th 2019

April 9 Sydenstricker Influence Sale

CIRCLE A RANCH

41 Hwy K Iberia, MO 65486 1-800-CIRCLE-A

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke Kevin Lennon

For your ANGUS Cattle Needs Contact:

JJ Skyline Angus

MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION 734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

John A Jones • 573-680-5151

21320 Hwy 179 • Jamestown, MO 65046 Lifetime Member of the American Angus Association Since 1957

APRIL 2019

Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

AHIR and ultrasound information available on all bulls. Herd sires are selected based on a combination of traits and not on any single trait.

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usually comes out so that better cattle bring better prices.

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But when I detect the claim “I have good cattle” is more of an opinion than fact, I start off as a skeptic. Like any buyer would.

Several years ago, word of mouth was the best data you had as a cow-calf producer who sells at weaning. If that farmer-feeder in Iowa bought your dad’s cattle and kept buying yours, they must be alright. If a packer-buyer said the cattle were good, you could go home assured you’d done your job well.

How do you know they’re good?

Today, it’s a different world.

Before I even ask the question, some go on to list possible evidence that they do indeed have good cattle. • “I buy expensive bulls.” • “They look good.” • “It’s a completely closed herd.” • “They always top the auction market.” • “We’ve had repeat buyers year after year.”

The days of, “you can’t tell if they’re good until you take that hide off” have given way to new tools.

Some of those indicators are more valid than others. Bulls bought on price alone, don’t tell the same story as what expected progeny differences (EPDs) you’ve focused on. We know buyers are keeping track of the cattle that hit it out of the park, and conversely, those that strike out. If they want them back, the cattle probably did work to some degree. But there’s no way to tell if they were the best in the yard or just average.

Once you’ve found out how your cattle stand up to the competition, then you’ll be able to weigh value-added marketing options. You can form relationships and communicate with buyers. You can use that data to help earn more.

How can you be sure that your cattle are making money for the next person who buys them?

It’s a pretty satisfying statement when you have the data to prove it’s true.

Now we have DNA tests that give you a sneak peek. Now we have feeder calf programs that help assign a number to predict later performance and give you a benchmark to track from year to year.

With the enthusiasm of an unbridled 2-year-old you can say, “I have good cattle.”


Top Dollar Angus and Method Genetics Form Partnership to Benefit Beef Producers Source: Top Dollar Denver, CO. Top Dollar Angus, Inc. and Method Genetics, LLC have reached an agreement whereby they will work together to benefit their commercial and seedstock customers. Both companies serve producers with superior genetics that are focused on making further improvements in all aspects of their herds. “We both support genetic improvement and work hard to make sure ranchers with top-shelf genetics are rewarded on sale day,” said Jared Wareham, General Manager for Top Dollar Angus. “Plus, our business activities are complementary. Method Genetics collaborates with beef herds to help them understand and quantify where they rank genetically and how they can improve, while Top Dollar Angus is focused on the marketing side, assisting producers with top 25% growth and carcass genetics in the Angus and Red Angus breed. We’re also committed to cattle feeders winning with these genetics.” As part of the partnership, threshold levels for Top Dollar Angus qualification will be established using metrics calculated by Method Genetics for cowherds already in the Method Genetics system. “This will help our customers by providing enhanced marketing opportunities and greater premium price potential,” according to Bill Bowman, Manager of Method Genetics. Additionally, Top Dollar Angus customers will now have the opportunity to work directly with Method Genetics for herd evaluation, DNA testing and for assistance in developing plans for further genetic improvement. “Our customers have made great progress in the genetic capability of their herds as they aim at a consumerfocused target, and Top Dollar Angus provides an excellent opportunity for participants to capture added value through multiple marketing channels,” said Bowman.

Both companies are an active part of what could be termed a genetic revolution that is taking place in the U.S. beef industry. Top producers are actively selecting for improved genetics through the use of EPDs, selection indexes and DNA testing---with excellent success. In doing so they are also creating a foundation for even greater financial rewards in the years ahead. Top Dollar Angus, Inc. is the industry’s leading genetic verification and marketing assistance company, serving commercial and seedstock producers with top 25% growth and carcass genetics in the Angus and Red Angus breed. Top Dollar Angus conducted business in 20 states and Canada during 2018, and is experiencing a continued rapid growth rate in 2019. Method Genetics, LLC provides genetic selection tools that enhance decision making for commercial Angus cow-calf producers. Using genetic evaluation methodology with performance records, pedigree and genomic information, Method Genetics indexes provide customized solutions to assist producers in creating and implementing genetic values into their individual breeding programs. Contact: Jared Wareham, Top Dollar Angus®, 660-4922777, jared@topdollarangus.com Contact: Bill Bowman, Method Genetics®, 816-7520079, billbowman57@gmail.com

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

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High Nitrate in Hay Killing Beef Cows in Complex Ways, MU Specialists Say Source: Duane Dailey, Writer, PUniversity of Missouri Extension COLUMBIA, Mo. – Two years of abnormal weather changed plant growth, which changes livestock digestion. In the end cows die. The words “it’s very complex” kept popping up in a University of Missouri emergency teleconference of state and regional MU Extension specialists. This winter farmers find groups of cows dead, often falling on newly unrolled baled hay. In the worst cases, half the herd dies. Often the first sign of trouble is 10 dead cows. MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62

The MU Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory in Columbia diagnosed more than 200 deaths from nitrate poisoning in the last month. The lab’s toxicology section head, Tim Evans, said it first: “It’s very complex.” A bit later, MU Extension beef nutritionist Eric Bailey told of first aid to help nitrate-stricken cattle. Feed shelled corn to cows normally fed hay. “It’s very complex,” he adds. Unusual weather the last couple of years set up this problem. Too much rain turned to too much drought. Hot weather turned very cold. Such extremes affect the biology of plant growth. Also, lots of pastures didn’t grow. That led to the hay shortages. Fertilizer and poultry litter make grass grow. Nitrogen enters the plant as nitrate. That adds growth and protein

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

APRIL 2019

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

for hay fed to cattle. Nitrogen fuels a cow’s rumen, the first stomach in digestion. In the end, nitrogen creates protein, making meat. Normally, more nitrogen on hayfields helps. More protein-rich hay grows healthy cattle. When rains turn to drought, biology stops working. When plant juices stop flowing from roots to leaves, the raw nitrate stays in grass stems. When farmers bale nitrate-rich grass, the hay turns toxic. What is normally a good practice of fertilizing grass becomes a bad practice. Who knew? As specialists said, “It’s very complex.” Many variables come into play. The cow rumen needs nitrates to digest hay and make protein. Too much nitrate in hay stems overwhelms the digestive system. Toxins spill over into the blood. This is where it gets more complex. An oversupply of nitrate ends up as nitrite. Nitrites prevent oxygen from binding with red blood cells. Without oxygen, animals die. That’s how nitrate-rich hay kills cows quickly. All a farmer sees of that complexity are dead cows beside hay just unrolled. Nutritionist Eric Bailey spoke up with a fix. Adding starch to the cow’s diet absorbs much of that extra nitrate in the rumen. Normally, farmers are advised to go slow adding corn to a rumen on a hay diet. At first, starch upsets rumen microbes. In this unusual year, plain corn gives an answer. But adding a protein-rich supplement worsens the problem. Protein adds unneeded nitrogen. At first sign of trouble, take away any protein supplement. Corn, a starch, speeds up digestion in the rumen. That moves toxic hay right on down the digestive tract. At first sign of nitrate poisoning, which often can be death, remove bad hay. As a first step, farmers should test suspect hay for nitrates, says Craig Roberts, MU Extension forage specialist. “Know your hay,” Roberts said. Know where it came from and whether fertilizer or poultry manure was used. Risks rise in hay made in drought. Hay detective work doesn’t come easy.


Farmers face a serious problem now. After two years of drought, not much hay was baled. Buying good hay becomes almost impossible. It’s hard to find. County MU Extension centers may have quick-test kits left over from last summer’s droughts. A few drops of the acid turn dark blue on split stems of high-nitrate grass. Blue indicates a quantitative test is needed. Evans says quantitative nitrate tests report parts per million. Less than 2,500 ppm seems safe. More than 5,000 ppm means danger. At 10,000, watch out! Regional MU agronomists and livestock specialists gear up to help farmers sort complex issues. Evans says added problems come when cold fronts descend from the Arctic. Cattle sense weather changes in advance, and then they overeat, filling the rumen with forage for the cold spell. Even borderline toxic hay not causing trouble becomes potentially toxic in an overloaded rumen. Pregnant cows near calving are vulnerable. Unborn calves die of nitrate poison. They lack oxygen. Cows in poor condition suffer most. With low hay supplies and bad weather, cows started winter in lower body condition. Thin cows with less fat reserves are more vulnerable. Roberts says toxin management includes watching each cow. Some may show early signs of poisoning by their weakness. That warns of complex problems ahead. Ask for help from veterinarians or extension specialists early rather than later. The MU Extension guide “Nitrate Problems in Livestock Feed and Water” is available for free download at extension.missouri.edu/p/g9800.

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION “FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

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APRIL 2019

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon

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Add Legumes to Fescue Pastures for Better Profits Source: Patrick Davis, Ph. D., Regional Livestock Specialist, University of Missouri Extension Center STOCKTON, Mo. - Cattle producers see more profit when they add legumes to fescue pastures and manage grazing systems properly, says Patrick Davis, University of Missouri Extension specialist in livestock. Fescue remains the hardy mainstay of southwest Missouri pastures. Adding legumes gives fescue fields more nutritional punch and profit. Davis says proper management is key to making grasses and legumes work well together. This begins with a management intensive grazing system (MIG).

APRIL 2019

Under MIG, cattle graze on forage between 3 to 8 inches tall. Cattle begin grazing at 8 inches and eat forage to 3 inches followed by paddock rest until the forage reaches original height. This strategy promotes stronger roots and cattle graze best quality forage. Forage in this range also contains less ergovaline, a toxic

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ergot alkaloid. The highest concentrations of ergovaline are in the bottom two inches of the plant and seed heads. Add legumes into fescue pastures for other benefits. Pasture quality improves and the amount of toxic fescue is diluted when mixed. “Proper incorporation and management of legume species, including red and white clover, or lespedeza is important for their persistence into your fescue sod,� says Davis. Two seeding options are frost seeding or no-till drilling. Contact your local MU Extension agronomy field specialist for advice on seeding methods or download MU Guide G4652 from https://extension2.missouri.edu/ g4652. To persist, legumes need time to grow without fescue competition and time to delay grazing pressure. Proper MIG allows both, says Davis. After grazing, allow a 4 to


5 – week rest period for young legume plants to improve chances of persistence.

• Provide poloxalene to cattle through bloat blocks or other ways of supplementation

Before planting, test soil. Make sure soil pH is greater than 6.0 for red and white clover and over 5.5 for lespedeza plantings. The local MU Extension Center and agronomy field specialist can advise on proper soil testing procedures and fertility for growing these legumes.

Contact the MU Extension livestock or agronomy field specialist in your area for more information. You may also find more information on how to improve your grasslands at https://extension2.missouri.edu/programs/ nrcs-mu-grasslands-project

“Legumes are higher quality than grasses because of the lower stem to leaf ratio. This results in lower neutral detergent fiber and increased protein concentrations. This combination improves forage intake, cattle performance and operation profit potential,” says Davis. Total pasture legume coverage should be approximately 30%. If coverage is above 50% then cattle bloat potential increases. Davis gives these tips to reduce cattle bloat potential: • Restrict grazing and allow cattle time to adapt to the legume field • Provide cattle dry hay before turning them out to legume pasture to reduce legume intake

3390 Winbrook Dr., Memphis, TN 38116

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LMA Tips Hats to Livestock Marketers Leading NCBA and ASI Source: Livestock Marketing Association KANSAS CITY, MO (FEBRUARY 27, 2019) - The Livestock Marketing Association (LMA) is grateful for the dedication and vision of livestock marketing business leaders that represent the livestock marketing industry as well as the livestock industry as a whole. A noteworthy accomplishment was recently made as two LMA members and auction market influencers both were consecutively elected president of two different national livestock associations – National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and American Sheep Industry Association. “I congratulate both Jennifer Houston and Benny Cox on their new roles,” Tom Frey, Livestock Marketing Association President, said. “I have no doubt the auction markets will be at the forefront of many conversations.” In January, Jennifer Houston, East Tennessee Livestock Center, was named president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) at the

organization’s annual meeting. As president, Houston will work with executive officers and leadership team to advocate for the US beef industry throughout her term. Houston has been an NCBA board member since 1996. Houston and her husband, Mark, own and operate East Tennessee Livestock Center Inc., Sweetwater, Tenn. The market has been an LMA member since 1978. Also in January, Benny Cox, Producers Livestock Auction, was named president of the American Sheep Industry Association. Cox began working at Producers Livestock Auction Co., Inc.; San Angelo, Texas when he was in high school and now manages the sheep and goat sales each week. The market has been an LMA member since 2015. Cox has also held many other leadership roles and is a past president of the Texas Sheep and Goat Raisers Association. Frey said, “I’m honored to serve my term as LMA President alongside two great colleagues and with many other outstanding leaders apart of the LMA. Many of our folks hold leadership positions on the local, state and national level in a diversified group of organizations. My hats off to each and every one of them for their time and commitments.”

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Frey also expressed his appreciation for the LMA members serving in leadership roles on the LMA board and committees as well as state livestock organizations and beef councils.

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Aside from elected roles, LMA members exercise their leadership every day as business leaders in their local communities. A 2017 Economic Impact Study of Livestock Auction Markets sites the average market provides nearly 30 jobs, generating $600,000 in labor income to the community’s economy. This is something all LMA members can hang their hat on.


The Texas Junior Charolais Association is hosting the 2019 American-International Junior Charolais Association (AIJCA) Junior National Show & Leadership Conference in Fort Worth, Texas from June 16-21, 2019. For more information go to: https://charolaisusa.com/members/jr_national.html

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6th Annual Calf Sale Fundraiser for Crowder Aggies The Crowder College Agriculture department became the beneficiary of an Angus calf that will be sold at 11 am, Wednesday, April 3rd, at the Joplin Regional Stockyards. This is the sixth year the Newton-McDonald County Cattlemen’s Association has joined forces with the Crowder Aggies to sell a calf. One hundred percent of the funds donated are used to assist Crowder Agriculture and Veterinary Technology students off

set the cost related to competitions at the State and National level along with travel opportunities while attending Crowder College. This year’s calf is a purebred Limousin heifer donated by Flying E Ranch, Gary and Linda Emmert. Other community sponsors contributing to the success of this auction include: Joplin Regional Stockyards, Animal Clinic of Diamond, Liberty Utilities - Empire District Electric, New Mac Electric, Hunke Spraying, Whitehead Farm Supply, B&M Tire, FarmTalk, CornerStone Bank, Haggard Excavation LLC, Fred HarrisState Farm Insurance, Purina, Opal Foods, and many individuals. The calf will be auctioned multiple times with the final buyer taking the calf home to show or add to their herd. Donations will be tax-deductible through the Crowder College Foundation.

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For more information please contact Jorge Zapata at 417.455.5496 or e-mail: JorgeZapata@ Crowder.edu.

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Tiara Ward Joins BioZyme® Inc. Source: BioZyme (SAINT JOSEPH, Mo., March 14, 2019) Tiara Ward has been named the Additive Brand Manager at BioZyme® Inc. In her role, she will work to grow additive brand awareness and support through marketing efforts both domestically and globally. “I’m so excited to brainstorm and see what we can do with Amaferm® and our other additive brands to help grow their awareness. I offer a fresh, new perspective to BioZyme and with fresh ideas, we can come up with some creative ways to grow and expand Amaferm as a brand, while creating awareness for our other additives,” Ward said. Ward earned her bachelor’s degree in Business from Northwest Missouri State University where she had a dual-major in management and marketing. She has gained valuable marketing experiences through an internship at Harrison County Community Hospital and most recently as the marketing director for a local gun shop and range.

“We are extremely pleased that Tiara has joined the BioZyme team. She will focus on our additive business both domestically and abroad. With the growth we are experiencing with Amaferm it was important we add an internal champion for our partners and international sales team,” said Kevin Hayes, Director of Outreach at BioZyme Inc. “Tiara has a successful track record of helping local, small businesses grow, and her experience will transfer very well to BioZyme’s additive business.” “I really love the fact that BioZyme is a leader in the industry. The company makes top-of-the-line products that are all backed by research. I’m proud to tell people about where I’m working and about the products we make,” Ward said. Ward is a native of Bethany, Mo., and comes from a farming family. She was involved in competitive dance while at NWMSU. She continues to enjoy working out and exercising. She works out of the St. Joseph, Mo., office. BioZyme is known for its supplement brands VitaFerm®, Sure Champ®, Vita Charge®, DuraFerm® and Vitalize®. The company also manufactures and markets Amaferm®, the key additive in all its supplements. To learn more visit www.biozymeinc.com.

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Are Killed Vaccines a Good Fit for Your Beef Operation?

Killed vaccines offer benefits for all ages and stages of cattle Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health DULUTH, Georgia (March 1, 2019) — You can’t always know the pregnancy status of every animal or have the time to separate pregnant cows from the herd. But with killed vaccines, you can usually vaccinate any animal — regardless of age or production stage — with confidence. Killed vs. modified-live-virus vaccines Vaccines generally fall into two categories: modified-live virus (MLV) and killed virus. Both types of vaccines contain a form of the viruses that help “prime” the immune system, so the next time the animal comes in contact with those organisms, it will recognize them and mount an immune response. MLV vaccines contain live viruses that have been attenuated, or weakened, so they usually can’t cause disease in the animal. However, in rare cases, an animal might develop disease. Some MLV vaccines, if administered to pregnant cows, can lead to abortion. Killed vaccines, on the other hand, contain viruses that have been killed, or chemically inactivated. While they cannot cause disease or abortion in an animal, they do require adjuvants or special vaccine additives that help enhance the immune response. Any age, any stage The biggest advantage of using a killed vaccine is it can generally be administered to animals of any age at any stage of production — even pregnant and immunocompromised animals.

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“If you purchased a cow, and you’re not sure if she’s pregnant or not, or you don’t know her vaccine history,

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killed vaccines are very safe,” asserted Peggy Thompson, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim. “They’re also a good choice when you’re not sure which vaccines your own cattle have had in the past,” she added. With killed vaccines, you have the flexibility to vaccinate an entire herd without separating out the pregnant animals. Boosting calf immunity Vaccinating a pregnant cow also helps to protect her future calf and to make antibodies to pass onto the calf. “When we vaccinate a pregnant cow, we’re really trying to enhance the colostrum that she’s going to make for that calf,” said Dr. Thompson. Fitting killed vaccines into your protocol It’s important to work with your veterinarian to develop the best vaccine protocol tailored to your operation. At the same time, it’s essential to read and follow label directions. “Three to four weeks after killed vaccines are first administered to an animal, a booster vaccine is usually required,” noted Thompson. “That booster is necessary if producers want optimum immune protection for their animals.” Choosing the right killed vaccine “Producers should look for a vaccine that’s easy to use,” Thompson advised. “Vaccines that can be administered subcutaneously in low doses in the neck can help support Beef Quality Assurance standards.” Good vaccines also have research and data to support their efficacy. “In the industry today, there’s been a lot more interest in killed vaccines as they relate to animal safety,” Dr. Thompson concluded. “We’re learning they have more of a place in operations than what we may have thought in the past.”


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SALE REPORTS Galaxy Beef – Spring Production Sale 2.15.19 – Macon, MO 50 Bulls...........................................................Avg. $4,045 20 Females......................................................Avg. $3,066 Missouri Angus Breeders’ Futurity 2.24.19 – Columbia, MO 14 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,457 36 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $3,280 9 Bred Heifers................................................Avg. $2,900 1 Bred Cow....................................................Avg. $2,400 1 Open Cow...................................................Avg. $5,000 1 Fall Pair.....................................................Avg. $28,000 4 Spring Pairs.................................................Avg. $5,475 1 Pregnancy...................................................Avg. $3,800 37 Embryos.......................................................Avg. $620 Express Ranches - Spring Bull Sale 3.1.19 – Yukon, OK 123 Older Bulls..............................................Avg. $5,365 301 Yearling Bulls..........................................Avg. $6,381 Mead Farms 3.2.19 – Versailles, MO 136 Registered Bulls.......................................Avg. $3,449 4 Brands Gathering Angus Sale 3.2.19 – Paragould, AR 30 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $2,666 40 Total Registered Females..........................Avg. $2,653 Galaxy Beef – Spring Production Sale 3.9.19 – Maryville, MO 36 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,887 Jac’s Ranch 3.9.19 – Bentonville, AR 68 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,725 3 Registered Females......................................Avg. $7,583 2 Pregnancies.................................................Avg. $9,500 48 Comm. Bred Heifers.................................Avg. $1,191 58 Comm. Pairs.............................................Avg. $1,746

The Prime Choice – Spring Bull & Female Sale 3.9.19 – Lone Jack, MO 40 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,583

Stucky Ranch Angus Production Sale 3.13.19 – Kingman, KS 137 Fall Bulls..................................................Avg. $5,357 11 Spring Bulls...............................................Avg. $3,977 7 Fall Bred Heifers.........................................Avg. $2,342 7 Yearling Heifers...........................................Avg. $1,857 24 Embryos.......................................................Avg. $642 Henke Farms – Annual Production Sale 3.14.19 – Salisbury, MO 24 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $5,083 33 Yearling Bulls............................................Avg. $4,548 5 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $2,120 7 Bred Heifers................................................Avg. $2,714 1 Spring Pair................................................Avg. $24,000 Marshall & Fenner Farms 3.15.19 – Marshall Junction, MO 49 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $3,169 2 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $1,650 21 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $2,140 9 Bred Cows...................................................Avg. $2,811 2 Open Cows.................................................Avg. $9,500 10 Spring Pairs...............................................Avg. $2,195 2 Pregnancies.................................................Avg. $4,000 11 Embryos.......................................................Avg. $422 April Valley Farms 3.17.19 – St. Joseph, MO 66 Yearling Bulls............................................Avg. $3,370 23 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $1,547 6 Bred Heifers................................................Avg. $3,050 5 Fall Pairs......................................................Avg. $3,720 13 Spring Pairs...............................................Avg. $2,907 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus 3.18.19 – Nevada, MO 87 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $5,218 29 Yearling Bulls............................................Avg. $4,586 18 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $4,250 52 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $5,269 13 Bred Cows...............................................Avg. $13,115 9 Open Cows.................................................Avg. $9.055

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Heart of the Ozarks Angus Association 3.9.19 – West Plains, MO 23 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $2,371 13 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $1,461 10 Bred Heifers..............................................Avg. $1,705 9 Bred Cows...................................................Avg. $1,422 12 Fall Pairs....................................................Avg. $2,287 6 Spring Pairs.................................................Avg. $2,125

Lilac Hill Farm Dispersion Sale 3.10.19 – Boonville, MO 11 Bulls............................................................Avg. $2672 7 Open Heifers................................................Avg. $1457 12 Bred Heifers...............................................Avg. $2117 42 Cows...........................................................Avg. $2631 72 Total Lots...................................................Avg. $2439

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SALE CALENDAR April 1 April 3 April 4 April 5 April 6

Brockmere Farms Sale, New Cambria, MO Crowder College 6th Annual Calf Auction, at JRS, Carthage, MO Hunter Angus Sale Fair Grove, MO Meyer Cattle Co. Sale Bowling Green, MO Show-Me Classic Bull and Female Sale, Windsor, MO

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

April 6 April 6 April 6 April 6 April 6 April 9 April 11 April 12 April 13 April 13 April 13 April 13 April 13 April 13 April 20 April 20 April 20 April 27 April 27 April 27

Four State Angus Association Sale, Springfield, MO Gardiners Spring Production Sale, Ashland, KS B/F Cattle Co. Sale with Cleland Cattle Co., Butler, MO Magness Land & Cattle Co. Bull Sale, Loma, CO The Gathering at Shoal Creek Sale, Excelsior Springs, MO Sydenstricker Genetic Influence Sale, New Cambria, MO Smith Valley Angus Sale, Salem, MO Gerloff Enhanced Female Sale, Cuba, MO Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO Great American Pie Limousin Sale, Lebanon, MO Frank/Hazelrigg Cattle Co. Sale, Fulton, MO Howard County Angus Association Sale Fayette, MO Ozark & HOA Beefmaster Sale, Springfield, MO New Day Genetics Sale, Butler, MO McBee Selection Day Sale, Fayette MO East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO Bradley Cattle Co. Bred Heifer & Bull Sale, Springfield, MO 8th Annual Highland Sale, Lebanon, MO Pinegar Limousin Road to Springfield Sale, Springfield, MO Windy Hill 22nd Annual Gateway Getaway Sale, Cedar Hill, MO

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m. APRIL 2019

Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

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660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048


April 27 April 27 May 3 May 11 May 11 May 13 May 18

14th Annual Central Kentucky Classic Charolais Sale, Bowling Green, KY Ogden Sale, Lockwood, MO Southeast Missouri Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Fruitland, MO Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO Harriman Santa Fe Complete Female Dispersal Sale, Windsor, MO Gardiner Angus Ranch 4th Annual “Meating Demand” Bull Sale, Ashland, KS WMC Cattle Co. Ladies of the Ozarks Sale, Wasola, MO

Cowboys

MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue. “REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. SUPERIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION Video Sale Via Satellite. Your area representative is Bob Walker, 417-777-0949. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164.

at the Capitol on Wednesdays See Schedule on Page 16

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Advertiser Index

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A-1 Cattle Feeders....................... 55 AgPower John Deere................... 43 AgriLabs Vet Gun ...................... 29 American Angus Association......54 American Food Groups............... 37 Bayer Ear Tags............................84 Bellis Family Farm......................48 BIVI Alpha................................. 33 BIVI Merial Long Range...... 14-15 BQA............................................ 74 Bradley Cattle Co. Sale............... 51 Buffalo Livestock Market............ 56 Callaway Livestock Center Inc... 12 Cargill Beef................................. 21 Central Kentucky Classic Charolais Sale......................... 83 Central Missouri Sales Co..........80 Circle A Angus Ranch................ 53 Classified..................................... 73 Clearwater Farm......................... 53 Cowboys at the Capitol............... 16 Crowder College Calf Auction.... 62 East Central Missouri Angus Sale.............................. 52 Eastern Missouri Commission Company................................ 37 Feed Train................................... 32 Galaxy Beef LLC........................ 53 Gallagher Fence.......................... 57 Gardiner Angus Sale................... 31 GDI............................................. 24 Gerloff Farms.............................. 53

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Gleonda Farms Angus Traves Merrick........................ 53 Green’s Welding & Sales............. 50 Harriman Santa Fe Complete Female Dispersal Sale............. 25 Heartland Highland Cattle Association.............................. 82 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.......... 53 HydraBed....................................30 Jim’s Motors................................ 28 JJ Skyline Angus......................... 53 Joplin Regional Stockyards......... 27 Kingsville Livestock Auction......46 Marshall & Fenner Farms........... 53 MCA Junior Show...................71-73 MCA Membership Form............ 75 MCA Presidents Council............ 69 MCA Steak Fry..................... 65-66 McBee Cattle Co......................... 49 McPherson Concrete Products.... 81 Mead Cattle Co........................... 58 Mead Farms................................ 53 Mead Farms Angus Sale............. 17 Merck.......................................... 39 Missouri Angus Association........ 53 Missouri Angus Breeders............ 53 Missouri Beef Industry Council.................................... 13 Missouri Limousin Breeders Association GAP Sale............. 45 Missouri Limousin Breeders Association Raffle...................44

Missouri Valley Commission Company................................ 37 Naught-Naught Agency.................7 P.H. White ..................................60 Performance Challenge..........67-68 Pinegar Limousin........................ 47 ProServe...................................... 59 Richardson Ranch...................... 53 Sellers Feedlot............................. 49 South Central Regional Stockyards...............................48 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef.... 53 Superior Steel Sales..................... 59 Sydenstricker Genetics................ 53 Sydenstricker Genetics Sale ........ 23 Sydenstricker Implement TubeLine.................................34 TBarS Cattle Co.........................64 Valley Oaks Angus...................... 53 Weiker Angus Ranch.................. 53 Westway Feed................................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate....................................... 55 Wheeler Livestock Market..........64 Mike Williams............................. 55 Windsor Livestock Auction......... 57 Windy Hill Charolais Sale.......... 61 WMC Cattle Co. Ladies of the Ozarks Sale....................... 35 Y-Tex..........................................2-3 Zeitlow Distributing....................80


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Profile for Macey Hurst

April 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

April 2019 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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