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CONTENTS

February 2020

FEATURES 18

First Steps Can Lead to More

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Convention Highlights

Getting Involved in the Missouri CattleWomen’s Association Brings New Opportunity, Growth

Missouri Cattle Industry Convention and Trade Show Review

MEMBER NEWS 6 16 54

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Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

First Steps Can Lead to More

COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective Coming Together

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House

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Intern Perspective

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Value-Driven Membership

Big

Thank You

Looking Back and Moving Forward

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

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Carol’s Story

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Cowboy Poetry

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Capitol Update

Confessions of a Cowman

Fast and Furious Start

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 49 - Issue 2 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

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Convention Highlights

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

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NCBA News

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USMEF Update

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Obituaries: Bob Richter, Jerry Thompson, Blue Geier

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Advertisers Index

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2020 MCA Officers

Marvin Dieckman, President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, President-Elect 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Bruce Mershon, Vice President 816-525-1954 • 10015 Windsor Drive, Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2020 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: John Shipman, 34266 Hwy KK Mora, MO 65345 • 660-221-1013 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

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Allena Allen, Trenton, MO Kristin Benne, BW Cattle Co., Kingdom City, MO Tim Bertram, Bertram Farms, Kahoka, MO Creek Clinkenbeard, Rafter 3 C, Kissee Mills, MO Robert Dorsey, D&R Farm, Sarcoxie, MO Shanda Nichols, First State Community Bank, Columbia, MO Linda Hickam, Dave Fountain, Fountain Charolais, Thompson, MO Chris & Linda Van O’Linda, Hewitt Ranch, Rogersville, MO Wilmer Hoover, Versailles, MO

Cole Judy, Hale, MO Ely Judy, Hale, MO Aiden Mayfield, Patton, MO Kevin & Valerie Peavler, Elmer, MO Shane & Jayme Clinkenbeard, Rafter 3 C, Kissee Mills, MO Andrea Reed, Rolling Shoals Far, Williamsville, MO Chris Roberts, California, MO Steve Strubberg, New Haven, MO Matt Thieret, Perryville, MO Kimber Woodworth, Chillicothe, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 93.

Offering 50 Head, 12-18 Month Old Purebred Gelbvieh & Balancer Bulls All Bulls Semen & Trich Tested Genomic Enhanced EPDs & Ultrasound Data Performance Tested Blacks & Reds with Several DNA Tested Homo Black & Homo Polled

Hilltop Farms

Committed to Raising Quality Seedstock www.hilltop-farms.com

Select Group of Open Purebred Gelbvieh & Balancer Heifers

Elmer, Brenda, Brad, Katie, Kinsley, Benny, Sarah & Taegan McWilliams

All Heifers Will be Pelvic Measured Prior to Sale

Videos of sale bulls & heifers will be on dvauction.com

Call or Email to Receive Sale Catalog 417-842-3225 hilltop-farms@hotmail.com

417-529-0081 417-529-7556 417-529-6436

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27720 Barton Co Blvd. Asbury, MO

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FEBRUARY 2020 See page 95 for more details.

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Trade Deal With China a “Game Changer” for American Beef Producers WASHINGTON ( Jan. 15, 2020) — The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association today applauded the signing of a Phase-One trade agreement with China, saying this agreement will lay the groundwork for American-produced beef to be highly competitive in the world’s most populous market. “The Phase-One Agreement with China will be a game changer for the U.S. beef industry,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston, who joined President Trump at the White House for today’s event. “For many years, Chinese consumers have been denied access to high-quality U.S. beef—the same U.S. beef we feed to our families. Non-scientific trade barriers like the ban on production technologies, the extensive traceability requirements, and the 30-month BSE restriction have greatly limited our ability to tap into growing beef demand in China. The removal of these massive trade barriers gives Chinese consumers access to the U.S. beef they desire, and it gives America’s cattlemen and cattlewomen the opportunity to provide U.S. beef to a growing consumer-base that represents one-fifth of the global population and a middle-class that is greater than the entire U.S. population.

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“We cannot begin to express our thanks to President Trump for fighting for America’s cattle producers,” Houston continued. “Restoring U.S. beef access to China was the top agenda item resulting from the

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Mar-a-Lago summit in 2017, and our negotiators have never stopped working to reopen the Chinese market for U.S. beef. The Trump Administration did not allow the odds to dictate the outcome, and because of their hard work and dedication, America’s cattle producers and Chinese consumers will have a stronger relationship that will benefit both countries for generations. Today is a great day for the U.S. beef industry and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.” When American-produced beef was banned from China for 14 years, NCBA worked with the U.S. government for more than a decade to reopen access to the market of nearly 1.4 billion consumers. American producers scored an initial victory in June 2017, when the Chinese market was reopened for the first time since 2003. NCBA joined U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and American Ambassador to China Terry Branstad in Beijing to celebrate and mark the official reopening of the Chinese market. However, many non-science-based, non-tariff trade barriers remained in place, which limited the amount of American-produced beef that qualified for China. NCBA says that this Phase-One Agreement will begin knocking down those trade barriers and significantly improve access to what is potentially a top export market for U.S. beef producers.


Governor Parson Congratulates U.S. Trade Representatives on Back-to-Back Wins ( JEFFERSON CITY, MO) – Today, Missouri Governor Mike Parson joined with Lieutenant Governor Mike Kehoe, Director of Agriculture Chris Chinn, and Director of Economic Development Director Rob Dixon to applaud the passage of the United States-MexicoCanada Agreement (USMCA), which comes one day after the landmark phase one trade deal with China. “President Trump, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, and Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue have locked-in two historic trade deals that will benefit American farmers, workers, and small business owners,” Governor Parson said.“Mexico and Canada are our top two trading partners, and as a farmer and small business owner, I know the importance of expanding trade while also ensuring that you’re getting the best deal possible. The USMCA has something for everyone, from manufacturing to agriculture. I applaud the Senate on completing their work on this agreement in such a short window of time.” The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement promises to inject $68 billion into the American economy while also creating an additional 176,000 jobs through economic growth in many industries, specifically manufacturing and agriculture. For the first time in history, small and medium-sized enterprises are included in the agreement with the hope for additional trade and investment opportunities. According to the Office of the United States Trade Representative, thousands of small and medium-sized businesses exported a combined $126 billion to Canada and Mexico in 2016.

businesses, and manufacturers,” Lieutenant Governor Mike Kehoe said. “I am grateful to President Trump and members of Missouri’s federal delegation who worked diligently to make this a reality.” History has shown that when trade agreements favor agriculture and create a level playing field for buyers and sellers, agriculture thrives. The USMCA will also maintain zero tariffs on agriculture products traded between the United States and Mexico and will open new opportunities for dairy, poultry, egg, and wheat producers in the Canadian market. “In a short two-day time span, Missouri agriculture has a path forward with three of our top five trading partners,” Director of Agriculture Chris Chinn said. “For those of us in agriculture, these trade deals bring with them so much more than just the purchase agreements. Agriculture is stronger today because of the consistent commitment to provisions that protect agriculture technology, grow our market access, and provide regulatory consistency moving forward.” “The passage of USMCA is positive news for Missouri businesses,” Director of Economic Development Rob Dixon said. “Canada and Mexico are Missouri’s top two trade partners, and strengthening those relationships helps grow Missouri exports.” Missouri agriculture is an $88.4 billion industry and remains the No. 1 economic driver in the Show-Me State. To learn more, visit agriculture.mo.gov.

“The bi-partisan passage of the USMCA is great news for Missouri farmers, small

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Beef Quality Assurance Program Continues Impressive Growth More than 100,000 Now Certified Online in Beef Checkoff-funded Program CENTENNIAL, CO ( Jan. 13, 2020) – The Beef Quality Assurance program continues to grow significantly, with more than 100,000 cattle producers now certified through its online learning system. The online option was introduced by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, in early 2017. Since the BQA program was initiated in the early 1990s hundreds of thousands have become BQA-certified through in-person and online training, with an estimated 85 percent of the U.S. fed beef supply now touched by BQA-certified operations. The Beef Checkoff-funded BQA program is a nationally coordinated, state implemented program that provides systematic information to U.S. beef producers and beef consumers of how commonsense husbandry techniques can be coupled with accepted scientific knowledge to raise cattle under optimum management and environmental conditions. BQA guidelines are designed to make certain all beef consumers can take pride in what they purchase – and can trust and have confidence in the entire beef industry. Online BQA training provides 24/7 access to the program through a series of videos and animations. While in-person training is still available through numerous sessions conducted by in-state BQA coordinators throughout the country, online certification provides a chance for certification at any time. Three courses are available (cow/calf, stocker/backgrounder and feedyard) to deliver a program that most closely aligns with the individual’s operation. The tools are also available in Spanish. BQA Transportation training for professional cattle haulers and farmers and ranchers is also available through the platform.

FEBRUARY 2020

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION

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“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

“Over the past year we’ve doubled our online certifications, which is a tremendous accomplishment,” according to Bob Smith, DVM, chair of the BQA Advisory Board. “This demonstrates that U.S. beef producers and transporters continue to embrace this tool for optimizing quality in their operations. Those participating in the BQA program can be proud of their work, which gives consumers more confidence in the beef they’re buying.” For information on completing online BQA training, go to https://www.bqa.org/certification. For more information on the BQA program, contact Chase DeCoite at cdecoite@beef.org.

CattleFax Cow-Calf Survey Released Source: CattleFax CENTENNIAL, CO — January 20, 2020 — CattleFax has introduced its annual Cow-Calf Survey sponsored by Crystalyx. Information requested in the survey provides participants and the rest of the industry with valuable data regarding industry benchmarks and trends. Survey participants will receive a results summary packet, with useful informaiton that will allow managers and owners to evaluate their own operations. Items such as cow-calf profitability, tendencies of high and low return producers, regional data and other valuable materials are included. To receive the summary packet, a valid email address must be submitted. Individual results will be confidential and remain anonymous. By completing the survey and submitting a valid email address, participants will also be entered in a drawing to win a $700 CattleFax voucher. The credit can be used for any CattleFax memberships, registration fees for education seminars (Corporate College and Risk Management Seminar), and/or registration fees for the annual Outlook and Strategies Session. The survey can be accessed by going to cattlefax.com, selecting the About tab at the top of the page, and then clicking on 2019 Cow-Calf Survey on the sidebar. The deadline to complete the survey is February 21, 2020. For questions or concerns please contact Tanner Aherin, Analyst, at 800-825-7525, or taherin@cattlefax.com.


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In the real world of beef production, making a profit is the bottom line, not maximum EPDs.

85th ANNIVERSARY PRODUCTION SALE Monday, February 24, 2020

1291 N. Stroudsville Rd., Adams, TN 37010

Selling 52 Fall Yearling Bulls and 30 Fall 3-in-1s Visit our website for an in-depth look at our breeding and management philosophy! www.robertelliottandsonsfarm.com

“form follows function… think about it” Since 1935

254-413-2420

Joe Elliott (615) 969-2205 William B. Elliott (615) 505-9234 Lake Elliott (615) 483-2444 resjoe@bellsouth.net reswbe@outlook.com resdubman@gmail.com Catalogs online at Angus.org or upon request, Videos on dvauction.com

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Robert Elliott & Sons Angus

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“W oper e’ve mo ation ved o I-44 to ex across th ur sales i e t 22, hig Co west unty Ro then sou hway” a t ½m ile o d 100 the h on n Bla n ckbe rry.

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Missouri Cattle Industry Directory Coming Soon In Columbia we are gearing up for an exciting year full of events and opportunities to meet and visit with producers across the state. With a new year brings new projects, and this year we have something we think everyone will be excited about. This spring the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association will distribute the first ever Missouri Cattle Industry Directory. This publication will be filled with Seedstock breeders from across the state of Missouri, references to multiple allied industry companies that support our organization as well as multiple contacts for state and national organizations.

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

This publication will feature every breed from Angus to Highlander and everything in between. This publication is designed to keep with you throughout the year, throw it up on the dash and reference it all year long. Inside you will find vaccine and treatment record pages, multiple pages to write notes as well as trailer density and synchronization protocols. This project is designed to assist the industry in building contacts across the board as well as having the contact information for breeders across the state should the need arise. If you would like to advertise your sale or company in the 2020 Missouri Cattle Industry Directory, contact Coby Wilson at (573) 499-9162 ext. 235 or coby@ mocattle.com.

Cowboys at the Capitol on Wednesdays See Schedule on Page 72

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday:

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Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

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1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633


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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Big The mere size of something doesn’t define it’s worth. In essence, size is usually irrelevant. A 200-pound treadmill collecting dust in the garage is a big waste of space. You actually have to use it to make it valuable. An association is the same. It is of no value without the right people, purpose and pursuit of meaningful work that will advance the stated mission of the respective organization. That was the point of the 52nd Annual Missouri Cattle Industry Convention in January.

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Members gathered to honor some of those people who bring value to this association. Whether it’s Morris Westfall, 2019 Pioneer; Butch Meier, 2019 Cattleman of the Year; Donnia Besher, 2019 Cattle Woman of the Year; or honoring the memory of Carl Messner with the first-ever MCA Leadership Development Award, these people have a history of bringing excellence to this association. It’s not just the top award winners who make it happen. It’s also the individual who recruited new members in 2019 and county affiliates that went above and beyond.

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The impact one single member can have on this association and on the industry is big. It’s always been that way. You likely knew or heard of Bob Richter, who passed away in November of last year, but many are unaware of the overwhelming impact this smaller statured man had on this association and the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation. He wanted it that way. He didn’t want the spotlight, but he quietly moved mountains. On the other end of the size spectrum was Blue Geier, who passed away earlier this year. Blue was a big, big man and his dedication to this association was even bigger – much bigger. There are many other examples of

Executive Vice President individuals who have left their mark on this association. The list is long, and they will never be given the credit they truly deserve, but they did it anyway and would do it again if given the chance. At the annual past president’s dinner at convention, I sat in awe as I listened to these leaders reminiscence about their time as president. They also shared stories about past presidents who are no longer with us like Allen Henry, who served as president in 1994. Whether it’s Bobby Simpson who led the association this past year, his father, Junior Simpson, who led it in 1976, or Marvin Dieckman who was just elected to serve as the 2020 president, these individuals stepped up to serve and aren’t thanked enough. We have great people who make a big impact. Many of those leaders are past presidents of this association, but most aren’t. You don’t have to have a title to make a difference. Our success sincerely boils down to people. It boils down to you. Individuals paying $70 every single year without hesitation. You are part of something bigger. Without you, this association is no different than that 200-pound treadmill collecting dust in the garage, which reminds me I have a treadmill for sale.


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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Pat & Patty Wood, MCA Beef House Managers Thank You! WOW! Thanks to the generosity and sponsorship of LAG Industries, the MCA Beef House Patio Entrance will continue to have new custom metal art signs on display on a yearly basis. “Since we share a common vision and a continuing commitment to work together for the good of agriculture, we appreciate the opportunity to partner with the cattlemen.” The Brackmans of LAG Industries in La Monte, Missouri have partnered with the Beef House to bring a unique opportunity to the highest bidder the chance to put your name or business on a 9” x 48” metal sign. Guidelines include the custom metal art signs will be on display for a year and will become the buyer’s possession at the end of the year, buyer cannot be a competitor of the MCA Beef House or LAG Industries, and design details will be worked out by the buyer in cooperation with LAG Industries and the Beef House. We auction the patio entrance/northside sign at each convention with the proceeds to benefit the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation (MCF) whose mission is to promote the educational development of rural youth by aiding injured children, providing farm safety training, leadership programs,

Kingsville Livestock Auction

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Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

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Special Cow/Bull & Cow/Calf Sale Saturday, February 29 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

and scholarships. Our winning bidder at this year’s 2020 convention in Columbia, Missouri was Rick, Jeremy, and Jared Anstine of Kingsville Livestock Auction in Kingsville, Missouri. Thank you for your bid and support for the MCF auction! We will auction the Beef House patio entrance/southside sign opportunity at the MCA Steak Fry held in June. The proceeds will benefit the MCA’s Political Action Committee (PAC) whose purpose is to be involved in the political process by supporting those elected officials who support the beef industry as well as those issues that directly impact the nature of the beef business. So, mark your calendar now for June 13, 2020, and be ready to make a bid on this unique opportunity for a custom metal art sign with your name or business to be displayed June to June at the MCA Beef House Patio entrance! Did you know that LAG Industries also designed and made MCA Lifetime Members metal art signs? A BIG THANKS to Bart & Brenda Brackman, Brad & Nicole Brackman & family and employees for time, energy, talents, and partnership! If you want to know more about LAG Industries, go to lagind.com, LAG Industries on Facebook, or call (660) 347-5413. Thought for the Month: “Roses are red, violets are blue; the steaks are on the grill, waiting for you!”


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Marketing Cattle Weekly for Cattlemen

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“Across Missouri”

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“Sales each TUESDAY” “Sales each FRIDAY” O:660-882-7413 O:573-324-2295 www.movalleylivestock.com www.emcclivestock.com Justin Angell Mike VanMaanen Jon Angell 573-819-8000 573-881-0402 573-682-4656


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April Valley Farms

21st Annual Performance-Tested

Angus Bull & Female Sale Sunday, March 18th, 2018 Complimentary Lunch Served at Noon • Sale 1:00 p.m.

St. Joseph Stockyards • St. Joseph, MO Selling: 70 Fall & Spring Yearling Bulls 20 Cow/Calf Pairs • 25 Bred & Open Heifers

April Valley Farms • Sunday, March 15, 2020 1097Sale – 23rd Annual Performance-Tested Angus BullAVF &EMBLAZON Female He sells.

St. Joseph Stockyards, St. Joseph, Sire: MOLD Emblazon 999

sire: SAV Complimentary Lunch Served at Noon • Sale Dam’s at 1:00 PMBismarck 5682

SELLING: 70 Fall and Spring Yearling Bulls, 20 Cow/Calf Pairs,

CED +9, BW +1.5, WW +63, YW +110, Milk +19, MB I+.31, 25 Bred & Open Heifers RE I+.50

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Manager, TOM BURKE, KURT SCHAFF, JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME, at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, PO Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone: (816) 532-0811 Fax: (816) 532-0851 E-Mail: angushall@angushall.com

Edmund J Theis, Jr. • Mark Theis Larry Theis • Jerry Theis 18432 Mt. Olivet Road Leavenworth, KS 66048 www.aprilvalleyfarms.com

Jerry (913) 683-0775 Larry (913) 775-2130 Edmund (913) 682-4376 Fax (913) 682-8978 e-mail: avfarms@dishmail.net

For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Manager: Tom Burke, Kurt Schaff, Jeremy Haag, American Angus Hall of Fame, at the World Angus Headquarters, Box 660, Smithville, Mo. 640890660. Phone: (816) 532-0811 • Fax: (816) 532-0851 • E-mail: angushall@earthlink.net

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AVF RESOURCE 3476 – He sells. Sire: SAV Resource 1441 Dam’s sire: SAV Angus Valley 1867 CED -1, BW +3.4, WW +65, YW +122, Milk +21, AVF PRESIDENT 6269 – He sells. AVF 3449 – He sells. MB +.27, RE CAPITALIST +.65 Sire: SAV President 6847, BW 70, BW+2.6, Sire: LD Capitalist 316, BW 80, BW+1.8, WW+70, WW+73, YW+128, Milk+27 YW+119, Milk+29

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Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Vernon County The Vernon County Cattlemen met December 19 at the Vernon County Fairgrounds. Members enjoyed a steak dinner provided by Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus, prepared by Fred and Katie Pettibon of Treeline BBQ, and served by Nevada FFA students. Cassie Kniebel, the program manager for CattleTrace, was the evening’s guest speaker. Cassie presented information concerning animal traceability and the efforts of CattleTrace, a cattle disease traceability infrastructure. Good discussion was had, and Cassie answered several questions from the group. More information can be found at www.cattletrace.org.

VCC served by Nevada FFA.

VCC served by Nevada FFA. VCC group.

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

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Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

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Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

VCC Cassie Kniebel.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Bulls are our Business! Spring Sale March 16

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Russel and Randy Miller 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 660-254-0137 • 660-415-6339 E-mail: galaxybeef@hotmail.com

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

February 21 Production Sale

GERLOFF FARMS

WEIKER

Angus Ranch

AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

Connealy Power Surge

660-248-3640

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker Fred: 660-248-3765

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible”

For All Your Angus Needs!

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

March 18 Bull and Female Sale

15th Annual SydGen Influence Sale, April 14, 2020

Spring Sale March 7

CIRCLE A RANCH

41 Hwy K Iberia, MO 65486 1-800-CIRCLE-A

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke • Kevin Lennon

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

March 21 Production Sale

For your ANGUS Cattle Needs Contact:

Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

Russell & Susan Coon

1318 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6518 h • 660-341-2705 c ruscatsol@gmail.com

Larry Coon

1284 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6473 h • 660-342-3889 c

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MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION

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Newton McDonald County There has been quite a bit going on with our affiliate over the last couple months, so here is a roundup of the highlights!

organization is to review the cost these young men will be responsible for during the next year and discuss a donation at the November meeting.

New MJCA Board Members: Carson Hoth and Tyler Sprenkle represented the MJCA Board members. They are the first MJCA Board members from our area. Both gentlemen have shown cattle for serval years. Our

Crowder Aggie’s Scotland Trip: The agriculture department chair and students of Crowder College gave a recap of their trip to Scotland. The group of 27 students made 28 stops in Scotland to increase exposure to agriculture processes in that country. There are 860 government-owned farms there. The government subsidizes the sheep industry, and the Angus breed was actually founded in Scotland. Jody Young, agriculture student from Purdy, spoke on egg production and free-range chicken production. The agriculture department will be taking a trip to Costa Rico in January for 10 days and 24 stops spreading more information about beef. New Leadership Elected: The membership elected new officers. A total of 56 ballots were distributed. • President-elect: Nick Neece • Vice-President: Gary Sanny • Secretary: Warren Townsend • Treasurer: John Hobbs

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Fundraiser for MJCA: Estella Osborn made a motion that the association sell 200 tickets at a donation of $10 per ticket or 3 tickets for $25 for a chainsaw that was to be purchased from Casey’s Road and Range to raise money for the MJCA activities. Funds will be donated to the two MJCA Board members selected from our association to defer travel costs to cattlemen functions.

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See page 94 for order form.


Lafayette County Sixteen members of the Lafayette County Cattlemen attended the 2020 Convention in Columbia. Members participated in the Friday board meeting for MCA and MCW and the awards reception on Friday evening. Marsha and Kent Corbin received a farm sign for member recruitment in 2019. It’s never too early to get started recruiting new members so you can be recognized next year! Danielle Wildschutz of Bates City, a senior at Odessa High School received the Tom Broderick memorial Scholarship at the Saturday dinner. LCCA donated a laser-cut cowhide sign to the silent auction benefitting PAC. The Governor and First Lady visited with members during the banquet, prior to his keynote

Members participated in the Cattlewomen Create event.

speech. Educational sessions on current issues attended included black vultures, using data in your operation, and Corbitt Wall speaking on marketing issues. Following the Cowboy Church service on Sunday morning, members participated in the annual meeting, establishing policy issues for the upcoming year and electing the Executive Board.

Danielle Wildschutz received the Tom Broderick scholarship at convention.

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Douglas / Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, January 14, 2020, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri, at Club 60 Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a steak dinner with sides sponsored by Joplin Regional Stockyards. President Ernie Ehlers welcomed the group and gave a treasury report. He proceeded with a blessing before the meal, and 85 members in attendance enjoyed fellowship during dinner. Following dinner, Joplin Regional Stockyards’ Prime Time livestock rep, Colby Flatt disgussed the process of selling video cattle. Joplin’s Rick Aspegren then gave a quick overview of Joplin’s scheduled sales and answered questions from the group after the meeting. The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their next meeting on Tuesday, February 11, 2020, at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove, Missouri. Farmers Ag Center will sponsor our February meeting. Cattlemen in the area are always welcome and encouraged to attend.

Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s group enjoying dinner sponsored by Joplin Regional Stockyards.

Franklin County The Franklin County Cattlemen’s Association held their annual banquet on December 6 at Union KC hall. A delicious 10 oz. ribeye steak dinner was served by the men on the board cooking the steaks and women whom prepared all the fixings. We served 135 members and guests. MCA executive vice president Mike Deering gave a presentation to all on the past year’s goals and accomplishments with the MCA. Financial reports were reviewed and approved and board members were elected. All were encouraged to attend the upcoming convention in Columbia.

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Joplin Regional Stockyards’ Colby Flatt and Rick Aspegren speaking to the group.

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Our queen candidate Anna Elbert participated at the convention and won first runner-up. She is the daughter of Jerome and Bridgette Elbert of Krakow. They are involved with farming the Elbert farm for several generations. Anna has shown a market steer at the Washington Town and Country Fair since age 8. She has also been involved in local 4-H and several high school activities. She will graduate from SFBRHS this May and will be attending college at Mizzou. We wish her a big congratulations!


Barton County

St. Clair County

The Barton County Cattlemen met January 21, 2020, in Lamar, Missouri. A large number attended the meeting which began with a delicious brisket dinner prepared by Scott Noting. The meal was sponsored by Lamar Bank and Trust. The program was presented by Patrick Davis, regional livestock specialist and Jordan Thomas, state beef reproduction specialist.

St. Clair County Cattlemen have worked hard this year to ensure that the Mo Beef for Mo Kids Program gets off to a good start. The cattlemen sent their third round of Mo Beef for Mo Kids donations right before Christmas, so the county schools would have beef to start back after their break. Thanks to Robert Salmon, Willie Davis, and Howard Taber who all donated beef, and also thanks to Don Payton, Philip Johnston, Raysha Tate, and Joe Shelby for their monetary donation for the purchase of our fourth beef donation to send. We greatly appreciate all our donors and their efforts to make sure we support marketing our product and healthy meals for the kids.

Davis discussed target weights and feeding programs recommended for developing heifers for breeding. A body condition score for breeding a heifer should be a score of 5 or 6. Heifer development during the seven months from weaning should be at a rate of 1.5 pounds ADG (65% TDN and more than 12.5% CP). He recommended having hay tested for feed value and to monitor pasture forage. Less than a height of 4 inches is inadequate forage to support adequate consumption. Supplement needs to be fed based on quality of forage. Feed 1% of bodyweight per day if TDN is less than 55%; 0.5% of bodyweight per day if TDN is 55 to 65%. When calves are born late in the calving season, or you move a cow from fall to spring breeding season or vice versa, the calf will seldom pay for the expenses of feeding and caring for the cow. The goal is to have the calf born early and the cow rebred in 82 days, this is the optimum operation of the herd. Thomas presented on the selection of replacement heifers. Production metrics that relate to profitability of commercial cows include: number of calves weaned over lifetime, age and weight of calves weaned, quality of calves weaned. The better choice for replacement heifers include those in good health, with a good disposition, adequate pelvic area, bred to a calvingease bull, conceive early in first breeding season, high genetic merit for profitable traits, visual phenotype and conformation. Heifers that calved in the first 21 days of their first calving season weaned a heavier calf in each of their first six calving seasons (Cushman et al., 2013). It is recommended to perform pre-breeding exams 30 to 60 days before breeding. The pelvic measurement at this time needs to be at least 150 cm². Our next meeting will be February 10, 2020, at Memorial Hall, Lamar, Missouri.

St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association attended the Missouri Cattlemen’s Convention second weekend of January and was awarded the Overall Affiliate Award of Excellence.

St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association attended the Missouri Cattlemen’s Convention second weekend of January and was awarded the Overall Affiliate Award of Excellence. The Overall Affiliate receives a certificate and a Gallagher TW-3 Weigh Scale and Alleyway Loadbar Set. Congratulations St. Clair County Cattlemen’s! You have each contributed to this affiliate’s success, and we are proud to be doing the best work we can for MCA and the cattle industry.

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Carol’s Story Carol’s story is just another glamorous tale of a city girl who married a romantic Nebraska Sandhills rancher years ago and became a ‘vocational COW assistant’ for life. “So what exactly do you want me to do?” she asked. “Take the pickup (she didn’t learn to drive till she was twenty-nine) then go out there to the Big Pasture (the dreaded Big Pasture where one grass covered hill looks like the next one to her). Start way back there at the gate in the Middle Pasture where we have the heifers now and honk. They’ll come follow you and we’ll just run’em up through the Big Pasture and put’em where they used to be. (she lost him right after ‘you take the pickup’). “Don’t get too close to that gate if it’s surrounded by water because even in 4-wheel drive you could bury this thing up to the hubcaps (she made a mental note to check behind the seat for a life jacket).

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“On second thought, go through the Middle Pasture past the old school-house to the windmill with the green gate panels. Then bring the heifers out that gate with the staple in it into the Big Pasture (Oh, no. The Staple Gate! Wonder Woman herself couldn’t open that gate with her Golden lasso and a come-a-long). Then you’ll have a straight shot to the last gate where Gene bucked off the roan colt (in 2012) which leads to where the heifers used to be.

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“I’m gonna take the four-wheeler and go through the other gate where the heifers were ‘cause it’s closer to the mineral feeder and I can check that windmill while I’m there and fill the feeder. See ya in a bit.” A bit passes. “Where were you?” he asked, “I moved the heifers by

myself and fixed another windmill. When you didn’t show up I started lookin’. What are you doin’ back here anyway? You could have come out the other gate. You were closer to it, ya know.” She took a deep breath and replied bravely, “I got the heifers through the Staple Gate but it took so long to close it I turned the wrong way. I followed the road to the windmill we’d checked and realized I’d gone too far (not to mention the heifers disappeared). So I remembered what you’d told me, “If you ever get lost in the Big Pasture get up high, then you can see fence. Go to the fence and follow it to a gate.” (Which is as useless a piece of information to someone like her as finding your way home by looking for moss growing on the north side of trees when you’re lost in the woods). “So I climbed this hill and dropped into a bull hole (buffalo waller for you okies). The truck made ‘that noise’ and stopped (‘that noise’ that causes anyone who doesn’t like hiking to break out in a cold sweat). I managed to back the truck out and come back the way I came till I found the Staple Gate where I’ve been waiting for you to find me.” “Hmm,” he says and loads the four wheeler in the pickup and they start back to the house. He drives. As they bounce along the sandy track he puts his hand on her knee and she rests her hand on his shoulder. The truck is still making ‘that noise’ but it doesn’t bother them. They’re pardners. Together they can handle anything.


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New Fescue Belt Certified Program Announced The Missouri Red Angus Associations Board of Directors recently approved the “Missouri Red Angus Association Fescue Belt Certified” program as an initiative designed to promote Missouri Red Angus members genetics. Many of us who live in the “fescue belt” have experienced the problems associated with importing newly purchased cattle into our environment. What we’ve seen is a significant percentage of cattle that have not been raised on fescue struggle to perform after being imported onto this “grass we love to hate”. Some animals eventually overcome this issue, but many will not and will eventually be culled from the herd. Fescue toxicity results from toxins called ergot alkaloids, which are produced by a fungus called endophyte that grows within the fescue plant. Cattle experiencing fescue toxicosis may exhibit rough hair coats, heat stress, suppressed appetite, poor growth rates, reduced reproductive performance, and in some cases lost tail switches or even hooves. The decreased animal performance seen during the “summer slump” of coolseason pastures is made even worse by these toxic effects of fescue. Research on the subject of fescue management has been done for years. Several strategies can be used to mitigate the toxic effects of fescue, including removal or suppression of seedheads, overseeding of pastures with legumes or other forages, and good mineral

supplementation programs. However, fescue remains a serious challenge. The USDA estimates fescue toxicosis costs the U.S. beef industry an estimated $600 million to $1 billion annually in lost revenue because of reduced reproductive and growth rates in cattle herds. Missouri beef producers recognize the value of selecting cattle that are adapted to fescue. In 2016, University of Missouri Extension Geneticist, Dr. Jared Decker, was awarded a $3 million grant from the USDA to evaluate genetic differences in cattle among regions. Decker and his colleagues are utilizing DNA markers to study the interactions between cattle DNA and the environment. The study is focused on DNA, hair shedding, and tall fescue forage. When complete, the data will be used to design region-specific EPDs. The entire state of Missouri is situated within the fescue belt. Since fescue was introduced into our region, Missourians have built their herds retaining only genetics that have proven to be “fescue tolerant.” This is one of the great advantages that the vast majority of our members have over breeders from outside the fescue belt: our cattle have been selected to have “Bred-in Fescue Tolerance.”

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Matt, Boatright David Matt & Jennifer Jennifer Boatright David&&Mariah Mariah Boatright Boatright Hannah&&Zach ZachShull Shull 660-620-9052 Hannah 660-826-1800/660-287-1341 maplewoodredangus@gmail.com 660-826-1880/660-287-1341 maplewoodredangus@gmail.com mboatrig@gmail.com • www.maplewoodacresfarm.com mboatrig@gmail.com • www.maplewoodacresfarm.com Bob & Susan Felton • 660-834-3445/660-621-2083 • refelten@iland.net Bob & Susan Felten Ron & Donna McNaughton • 918-625-5501 • springhillsranch@gmail.com • refelten@iland.net 660-834-3445/660-621-2083

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Missouri Red Angus Breeders

K Farms Red Angus K Bulls and Heifers Ken & Brenda Keesaman 816-675-2503 • C: 816-390-4988 Kody Keesaman 816-724-1432 Kolten Keesaman 816-808-2846 3803 SW Rogers Rd. • Osborn, MO 64474 Ken@kkfarmsredangus.com www.kkfarmsredangus.com Visit us on Facebook at KK Farms Red Angus Cattle

Balancing Performance with Maternal

Mike and Stephanie Smith Columbia, Missouri 573-881-0395 • 573-449-1809

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Jerry Ellis 660-909-6110

660-287-1341 www.maplewoodacresfarm.com Mo. Fescue Seedstock

Centerview, MO ellisjerryd@hotmail.com

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November Pork Exports Shatter Previous Records - Beef Exports Trail 2018 Source: U.S. Meat Export Federation U.S. pork exports posted the best month on record in November, easily reaching new highs in both volume and value, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). November exports of U.S. beef were below the previous year’s large totals. Pork exports surged to 259,812 metric tons (mt) in November, up 26% year-over-year and 11% above the previous high set in July 2019. Export value was $712.7 million, up 32% from a year ago and breaking the previous record (also from July 2019) by 14%. These results pushed January-November exports 7% above the previous year’s pace in volume (2.39 million mt) and 6% higher in value ($6.19 billion). Pork exports are now on pace to exceed previous records for both volume (2.45 million mt in 2017) and value ($6.65 billion in 2014). Pork export value per head slaughtered was $62.90 in November, up 29% from a year ago and the highest in five years. Through the first 11 months of 2019, per-head value averaged $52.24, up 2% year-overyear. November exports accounted for 29.7% of total pork production and 26.8% for muscle cuts only, up substantially from a year ago (24.5% and 22%, respectively). For January through November, exports accounted for 26.4% of total pork production and 23% for muscle cuts, up from 22.4% and 25.7%, respectively, a year ago.

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November beef exports totaled 108,662 mt, down 4% from a year ago, valued at $658.1 million (down 7%). For January through November, beef exports trailed 2018’s record pace by 3% in both volume (1.21 million mt) and value ($7.4 billion). However, 2019 is already the second-highest year for beef export value, trailing only the 2018 record of $8.33 billion.

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Beef export value per head of fed slaughter was $307.55 in November, down 15% from a year ago. Through November, per-head export value averaged $308.74, down 4%. November exports accounted for 13.7% of total beef production and 11% for muscle cuts only, down from 14.1% and 11.8%, respectively, a year ago. For January through November, exports accounted for 14.1% of total beef production and 11.4% for muscle cuts, down from 14.5% and 12%, respectively, a year ago.

Pork surge to China/Hong Kong continues; export value to Mexico rebounds Demand from China/Hong Kong continued to drive U.S. pork export growth in November, with volume climbing to 86,213 mt— up 284% from a year ago — valued at $204.9 million (up 240%). For January through November, exports to the region were up 71% to 554,789 mt, valued at $1.18 billion (up 49%). Although November pork export volume to Mexico was lower than a year ago at 57,537 mt (down 6%), export value surged 28% to $124.3 million, the highest since July. For January through November, exports to Mexico were down 11% from a year ago in volume (641,952 mt) and 6% lower in value $1.14 billion. Competition from Canadian pork was especially strong in the Mexican market while Canada was suspended from China (late June to early November). From January through November, Canada’s exports to Mexico increased 8% from a year ago to 128,100 mt, valued at $185 million (up 14%). “While the surge in pork shipments to China will capture most of the headlines this month, it is equally encouraging to see export value to Mexico make such a strong recovery,” said Dan Halstrom, USMEF president and CEO. “Getting exports to Mexico back to the record levels of 2017 and early 2018 is a top priority for the U.S. pork industry, because demand from Mexico is such an important driver of profitability for everyone in the supply chain. The same is true in Japan, so it’s very important to reclaim lost share in these longtime mainstay markets. “ November exports to Japan trailed the previous year by 3% at 32,594 mt, while value was down 1% to $136.5 million. Through the first 11 months of the year, exports to Japan were down 6% from a year ago in volume (340,568 mt) and 7% lower in value ($1.4 billion). Japanese import data show imports of U.S. pork decreased by $121 million with much of the decline being in ground seasoned pork, which fell by $73 million due to the wide tariff rate discrepancy. Beginning Jan. 1, Japan’s tariff rates on U.S. pork and pork products were lowered to match those imposed on European, Canadian and Mexican pork, eliminating a significant price disadvantage that slowed U.S. exports in 2019. The rate for U.S. ground seasoned pork fell from 20 to 13.3%. (Continued on page 60)


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January-November highlights for U.S. pork exports include: Exports to Colombia rebounded in November to pull 9% ahead of the previous year’s pace in volume (92,280 mt) and 7% higher in value ($203.6 million). Also bolstered by strong growth in Chile and Peru, exports to South America already surpassed previous full-year records in both volume (141,657 mt, up 18% year-over-year) and value ($356.2 million, up 22%). Led by strong growth in Panama, Guatemala, Honduras and Costa Rica, exports to Central America also set new annual records for volume (86,794 mt, up 16%) and value ($211.8 million, up 20%). Surging demand in Australia and New Zealand pushed exports to Oceania to new heights. Exports to the region jumped 36% from a year ago in both volume (105,399 mt) and value ($304.5 million). Exports to Canada increased 6% from a year ago in both volume (197,847 mt) and value ($738.2 million). Beef exports to Korea, Taiwan headed for new records Although November beef exports to South Korea were lower than a year ago in volume (19,116 mt, down 5%) and value ($139 million, down 11%), the market remained on pace to break the 2018 records. Through November, exports to Korea were up 6% in both volume (234,310 mt) and value ($1.69 billion). U.S. share of Korea’s chilled beef imports reached 62%, up from 58% in 2018. U.S. beef accounted for 51% of Korea’s total beef and beef variety meat imports and more than onethird of Korea’s total beef consumption.

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Beef exports to Taiwan will be record-large for the fourth consecutive year in 2019. November exports were 4,869 mt (up 8% from a year ago) valued at $43 million (up 7%). This pushed January-November results 8% ahead of the previous year’s pace at 57,837 mt, valued at $513.3 million (up 4%).

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The gains in Korea and Taiwan have been offset by a decline in Japan, which is still the largest destination for U.S. beef exports but one in which the U.S. industry has faced a steep tariff rate disadvantage compared to imports from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Mexico. Through November, exports to Japan were down 6% from a year ago in volume (287,090 mt) and dropped 7% in value ($1.8 billion). But on Jan. 1, U.S. beef gained tariff relief in Japan that brings rates in line with key competitors, so the outlook is very positive for 2020. “The Japanese market performed extremely well for U.S. beef in 2018, even though we were already facing a tariff rate disadvantage versus Australia,” Halstrom

explained. “More competitors saw tariff rate cuts in 2019 under the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), which further tilted the playing field against U.S. beef. For example, Canada’s beef exports to Japan increased 57% last year. So the rate cuts Japan recently implemented for U.S. beef are long overdue, and USMEF is working aggressively with U.S. exporters and the Japanese trade to capitalize.” January-November highlights for U.S. beef exports include: In Mexico, the third-largest market for U.S. beef behind Japan and Korea, exports increased 4% from a year ago in value to just over $1 billion despite a 2% decline in volume (214,963 mt). This was largely due to a strong value increase for tripe, one of the top U.S. beef variety meat export items to Mexico. Variety meat exports were up 2% year-over-year in volume (89,667 mt) but jumped an impressive 18% in value to $244.5 million. This included $88 million in tripe exports, up 28%. Led by strong demand in Indonesia and steady growth in the Philippines, beef exports to the ASEAN region increased 23% from a year ago in volume (55,583 mt) and were 7% higher in value ($270.6 million). Exports to the Dominican Republic already surpassed the 2018 record, increasing 24% in volume to 7,523 mt valued at $61.4 million (up 19%). In Central America, strong demand in Guatemala and Panama helped push exports 4% higher than a year ago in volume (14,044 mt) and 9% higher in value ($79.9 million). Export value to Guatemala and Panama jumped 9% and 25%, respectively. Mexico and Japan have led a very strong year for global exports of U.S. beef variety meat, which were up 4% from a year ago in volume (295,527 mt) and 9% higher in value ($885.9 million). Exports to Japan, which largely consist of tongues and skirts, were up 20% from a year ago to 58,278 mt, valued at $355.5 million (up 13%). Egypt, the largest destination for U.S. beef livers, saw a 4% increase in volume (59,203 mt) while export value climbed 17% to $69 million. Led by strong demand in Indonesia, variety meat exports to the ASEAN increased 39% in volume (16,595 mt) and 43% in value ($37.3 million). Strong growth in the Dominican Republic and Trinidad and Tobago pushed variety meat exports to the Caribbean 17% higher in volume (6,814 mt) while value surged 61% to $14.2 million. Complete January-November export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb are available from USMEF’s statistics Web page.


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Farmers Need to Maintain Their Health as Well as Their Equipment Source: University of Missouri Extension COLUMBIA, Mo. – Farmers know that wellmaintained equipment is key to success. Yet they often do not listen to the “check engine” warning signs of stress, says Sean Brotherson, family science specialist for North Dakota State University. Brotherson was the keynote speaker at the recent University of Missouri Crop Management Conference. “Ag has its own rhythms. It has its own culture,” Brotherson said. When those rhythms go awry, stress can result. “Health is the most important asset to any operation. If it is the most important asset, it also needs to be the most important priority,” he said. Many sources of stress, such as weather and prices, are beyond the control of farmers. “You are at the mercy of things,” Brotherson said. Research from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration ranks farming as one of the top 10 stressful occupations. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the suicide rate for farmers is 1.5 times the national average. MU Extension farm health and safety specialist Karen Funkenbusch said that in 2019 farmers faced flood, rains, late planting and uncertainty about commodity prices. Issues beyond a farmer’s control can weigh heavily and lead to depression, anxiety and suicide even in a typical farm season, Funkenbusch said. Debt, illness and injury also add to pressures.

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“Farmers, because of their strong and independent nature, often are reluctant to talk about these issues,” she said. “Fortunately, resources are available. If you

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need help or know of someone who needs help, reach out.” Funkenbusch leads the Missouri AgrAbility Project, an MU Extension program that works with partner organizations to provide practical education and direct assistance that promotes rural independence. Funkenbusch offers these suggestions for farmers, ranchers and their families: • Know the warning signs of stress. Physical signs include headaches, aches of the back and neck muscles, fatigue, labored breathing, weight gain, rising blood pressure, sweating, stomach issues, and sweating. Emotional signs include anger, restlessness, irritability, inability to sleep and relax, increased alcohol or drug use, and withdrawal from other people. • Slow down. • Get a physical checkup. • Seek local resources, including clergy and medical professionals. Talk with other farm families and neighbors. • Exercise daily. Take regular breaks throughout the day. Additional resources: • Missouri AgrAbility Project, AgrAbility.missouri.edu. • MU Extension Show-Me Strong Farm Families, on Facebook at ShowMeStrongFarmFamilies. • MU Extension Mental Health First Aid classes help people learn to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders in communities. Visit extension.missouri.edu/hes/ families. • Farm and Ranch Stress, North Dakota State University, www.ag.ndsu.edu/farmranchstress. • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-8255. Contact Funkenbusch at FunkenbuschK@missouri.edu or AgrAbility@missouri.edu.

Ron McBee

221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248

(573) 228-2517 mcbcattle@aol.com

McBeeCattleCompany.com


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Cattlemen Honored The Southwest Missouri Beef Cattle Improvement Association honored two operations at their annual meeting in Springfield, November 20. Annually, since 1976, the association recognizes an outstanding scedstock and commercial producer. This year’s recipients were Dale Kunkel, Neosho as seedstock and SC Ranch, El Dorado Springs as commercial awardees. Kunkel runs a Red Angus purebred herd since 2007 has steadily been making genetic progress. He uses the Missouri Show-Me-Select program for heifers and the Missouri Steer Feedout to evaluate post-weaning growth and carcass merit. He also utilizes genomic (DNA) testing to develop more accurate expected progeny difference (EPD) values.

SC Ranch, El Dorado Springs - commercial producers.

Five C Ranch, was established in 2012 with owners Dr. Rick Casey and son Scott. The original farm dates to 1984. They run 300 commercial black/black whitefaced cows. Approximately three-fourths of the base cow herd was purchased through the Show-Me-Select beef program. They utilize Top Dollar Angus and MFA Health Track to market calves. DNA genomic data helps them determine replacement heifer selection. The Southwest Missouri Beef Cattle Improvement Association works with University of Missouri Extension on such programs as the all-breed performance tested bull sale, Missouri Steer Feedout, and the Show-MeSelect Heifer program. For details on those programs. contact the Extension field specialist in livestock in your area.

Eldon Cole left presenting Dale Kunkel with the Seedstock producer of year.

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See page 23 for more details.

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Open To The Public…

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation

25th Annual Fundraiser

Cattlemen’s Roundup Come and have fun to benefit… MCF Scholarships • Farm Safety Programs Disabled Children 2020 Cattlemen’s Roundup Saturday Evening, March 14, 2020

Timber Ridge Event Center 14618 State Hwy K Amazonia, Missouri 64421

For more information contact: Andrea Fischer (816) 390-6115 or Matt Fischer (816) 383-0630

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Open To The Public!

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“A Night on the Town” 4:30-6:00 Cattlemen’s Social Get together and fellowship 6:00 Steak Fry • Auction of donated items to support the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation $50.00/Couple $30.00/Individuals

All area cattlemen and cattlewomen are invited to attend and participate in this evening of fun and activities!


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Legumes – Don’t Overlook Annual Lespedeza Source: Keith Carmichael Legumes Pay Their Own Way Legumes added to the pasture or hayfield produce nitrogen which eventually becomes available to grasses as well and they are a very important protein source. Without legumes in the mix you really don’t have your very best pasture or hay… you really don’t have your best intake, performance or gain. Over-seeding pastures and hay fields with legumes is basic, common sense management. No single legume can do it all. Soil fertility, pH, texture, and drainage all help determine which legume is best for your operation. If you believe in having diversity like the professionals, use several types of clover and perhaps alfalfa if your soil pH will support it. If not, perhaps you should take a look at annual lespedeza. The taller, more productive Legend lespedeza MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 be 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62 has proven to a very productive summer forage for almost two decades. Annual Lespedeza Annual Lespedeza is well known for its unique tolerance to drought and low pH soils. It is also one of the few legumes that does not cause bloat. Adding annual lespedeza with other legumes into cool-season grass pastures can mean extra forage and therefore extra pounds because many grasses often leave a significant forage gap in summer months. Milk production, weaning weights and reproductive efficiency are all closely tied to the animal nutrition during this period. So, if you want cows to milk and breed, and calves to gain during the summer make sure you have annual lespedeza in your plan. Legend Lespedeza - Now in its 20th Year From northern Missouri and southeast Kansas to

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

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Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

Legend lespedeza, right, next to the once popular Marion variety, now in its 20th year of commercial production.

Georgia there has been renewed interest in annual lespedeza mostly because of the success of Legend lespedeza. This annual-striate lespedeza that has been grown effectively for both pasture and hay all over the lower Midwest and throughout the South is now in its 20th year of commercial production. Compared to other types, the taller Legend exhibits a greater leaf to stem ratio. In some tests the advantage in dry-matter yield has proved to be 2 to 1. Producers who have grown a variety of lespedezas over the years characterize Legend as a “very leafy lespedeza that grows taller and reseeds itself very well”. Annual lespedeza should not be confused with its perennial cousin – Sericea which is a serious weed problem in many areas. Spring, Summer and Fall When planting the newer, safer types of fescue, or other cool-season grasses, lespedeza is the one legume that can be recommended as a companion the first season because it does not compete aggressively with the new grass early in the spring. The effects of endophyte toxicity in some fescue pastures during the summer are hard to measure, but well documented. This fungus affects all of animal performance –especially reproduction. Annual lespedeza in pastures can ‘dilute’ and significantly reduce its effect. With annual lespedeza, it’s all about ‘timing’! Fall stockpiling of fescue pasture is very important in many operations and the management required to stockpile this forage fits very well in allowing annual lespedeza to re-seed itself. For More information visit www.Legendlespedeza.com.


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Livestock Marketeers 2020 Hall of Fame Induction Source: The Livestock Marketeers DENVER — The Livestock Marketeers — An informal fraternity of livestock fieldmen, auctioneers, sale managers and related livestock business leaders met for their 55th Annual Banquet at the National Western Club on January 18th. The 2020 inductees into the Hall of Fame were Hoover Case, Marshfield, Missouri, Alan Sears, Eaton, Colorado and Jerry Gliko (Posthumous), Belt, Montana. Hoover Case Hoover Case, of Marshfield, Missouri, has dedicated most of his life to auctioneering purebred cattle and helping youth in agriculture. In 1966, 16-yearold Hoover Case stepped into the sale ring with his Charolais heifer at the American Royal Charolais Sale. Case remembers, “George Morse was the auctioneer on the block. I listened to him and decided that was what I wanted to do.” For the last 36 years Hoover has been heavily involved with Santa Gertrudis, Beefmaster, Brangus, Simbrah and other “Eared” breeds, auctioneering purebred sales from Texas to Florida. Highlights of his career include selling the King Ranch 150th Anniversary sale in 2003, as well as continuing to this day selling Registered Livestock around the country after a devastating onset of bacterial meningitis left him paralyzed in 1993. Hoover and his wife Susan reside in Marshfield, Missouri. They have 3 children, 6 Grandchildren and another on the way in March. Case stated “It is truly an honor to be a member of the Livestock Marketeers. The privilege of working with so many great people in the purebred Livestock business is an honor I shall cherish forever. Thank You.”

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Jim and Scott Cape…

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57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840

From Left to Right: J. Neil Orth, Jeff Aegerter, Bruce Brooks, John Goggins, Alan Sears, Hoover Case, Bruce Bradley, Don Birk.

Alan Sears Alan Sears resides in Eaton, Colorado with his wife Diane, daughter Abby Kate and son James. Alan has dedicated his life to the livestock marketing industry with jobs in both production agriculture and media publication. His vast knowledge of all thing’s cattle makes him an invaluable resource for purebred and commercial cattlemen across the country. After graduating from Purdue University with a degree in Animal Science he began his career with the Shorthorn Country, a position he held for 10 years. From then until now he has held positions at the: Drovers Journal, North American Limousin Foundation and The Western Ag Reporter. Alan also had another stint with the Shorthorn Country as well as Dieter Brothers in South Dakota and Five Star Cattle Systems. Sears currently works for The Western Ag Reporter as well as owning and operating Sears Marketing Service. You can see Alan working the ring at numerous production, feeder calf or horse sales across America. When not serving as a ringman he is either managing the sale or helping buyers make selection decisions. Alan said, “I am truly humbled to be inducted into this great fraternity along side so many other talented individuals.’’ Jerry Gliko (Posthumous) Jerry Gliko was a lifelong member of the livestock marketing fraternity. From his first job with the American Hereford Association to his ultimate position at the Western Livestock Journal, Jerry was one of the most well liked and vibrant personalities on sale day. Many breeders commented on his warm demeanor and professional attitude while serving those positions. His presence at the sale and in the industry is missed by many people.


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FCS Financial Returns More Than $27.5 Million to Members Source: FCS FCS Financial has been helping farmers, ranchers, agribusinesses, and rural communities in Missouri succeed for more than 100 years. Recently, the Board of Directors announced the cooperative is returning more than $27.5 million to their member-owners in cash patronage for the 2019 calendar year. “As a member-owned cooperative, FCS Financial is committed to the success of agriculture, our rural communities, and our members through all economic cycles,” says David Janish, FCS Financial CEO. “FCS Financial had another strong year in 2019 and our patronage program allows us to share that success with our member-owners. In a year of adversity from flooding, prices and trade concerns, we are especially pleased to be able to offer this benefit to our members.” Each FCS Financial office will host Customer Appreciation Day on March 24 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Refreshments will be available. Patronage checks

can be picked up at Customer Appreciation Day but attendance is not required for FCS Financial members to receive their check. Checks that are not distributed by the end of business on April 6 will be mailed. Since 2006, FCS Financial has returned nearly $147.5 million to members. Patronage payments are based on a member’s loan business activity with the association. All eligible members will receive a minimum of $20. Each eligible member’s patronage check will be available March 24 through April 6 at the FCS Financial office where their loan is serviced. For more information, contact your local FCS Financial office at 1-800-444-3276 or visit www.myfcsfinancial. com where you will find a link to the 2019 Patronage Program under “About Us.”

Scholarships Available Through FCS Financial Source: FCS Since 2004, FCS Financial has provided more than $615 million to Missouri high school seniors seeking higher education. Up to 35 scholarships, each at $1,500 will be awarded to children or grandchildren of FCS Financial members. The scholarship deadline is March 1 and recipients will be notified in April. Applicants must be a graduating senior at a Missouri high school and a child or grandchild of an FCS Financial member. Additionally, the student must attain a grade point average of 2.5 or higher, an ACT score of at least 26 or rank in the top 20 percent of their senior class. The scholarship applicants are then judged by a non-partisan committee on leadership roles, work experience, community involvement and essays.

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Apply online at www.myfcsfinancial.com. Click on About Us at the top of the web page and choose the Scholarships link. Relatives of FCS Financial board members or employees are not eligible.

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FCS Financial serves 102 counties through 21 offices in Missouri. FCS Financial is a member of the Farm Credit System. The system is a nationwide network of cooperative lending institutions that provides credit and financial services to farmers, ranchers, rural residents and agribusinesses.


Cattle Disease Traceability Continues Advancing Cattle Organizations from Major Beef Producing Regions Launch U.S. CattleTrace MANHATTAN, Kan. – Multiple state cattlemen’s organizations from major beef producing regions have partnered together to form U.S. CattleTrace, a disease traceability initiative. The goal is to develop a national infrastructure for disease traceability and encourage private industry’s use of the infrastructure for individualized management practices. The new U.S. CattleTrace initiative combines the efforts of CattleTrace, which includes multiple partners, including the Kansas Livestock Association and others in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Oregon and Washington, as well as traceability pilot projects underway in Florida and Texas. Those projects are facilitated by Florida Cattlemen’s Association, Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association and Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association. “With producers and industry stakeholders working together from across the country, the U.S. CattleTrace partnership will be a catalyst to build upon the CattleTrace foundation we established the past few years,” said Brandon Depenbusch, CattleTrace board of directors chairman. “We encourage other state organizations and individual producers to join our efforts in building a nationally significant animal disease traceability system for the United States. By working together, we will build something that works for the industry.” Volunteer leaders from each of the partner organizations have agreed to a set of guiding principles for U.S. CattleTrace, including the following statements: • In order to protect the producers’ share of the protein market from the potential impact of a disease event, cattle identification and traceability needs to be enacted, enhanced and further developed using electronic I.D. and electronic transfer of data.

• U.S. CattleTrace is focused on developing a voluntary national traceability system to include all cattle and complement the current USDA regulations. • The goal is to build a system that is recognized as nationally significant to all domestic and foreign markets. • The U.S. CattleTrace disease traceability system strives to be equitable to all industry segments, and must be industry-driven and managed by a producer board of directors to ensure data privacy and protection. • U.S. CattleTrace supports the use of one technology for a United States cattle industry disease traceability system to maximize the value of technology investment. Since multiple RFID technologies are in use today, U.S. CattleTrace will accept data in a standardized electronic format from available technologies but supports a transition to ultra-high frequency technology by Dec. 31, 2023. “Cattle disease traceability is a top priority in the beef cattle industry, and this partnership will continue to help guide the development of an enhanced traceability system in the United States,” said Jim Lovell, past TCFA chairman. “Our different state projects have always had a similar goal in mind – to develop a disease traceability system that works across the country. Combining our efforts makes this initiative stronger on a national level.” In late August 2018, CattleTrace Inc. was formally established as a private, not-for-profit corporation to securely maintain and manage the data collected as part of the disease traceability pilot project. A board of directors with representatives from cow-calf, livestock market and cattle feeding sectors was named to lead CattleTrace Inc. In January 2020, the board voted to change the name to U.S. CattleTrace Inc. to formally establish the multi-state initiative to advance disease traceability.

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Purdy Producer Sees Success in First-Year Warm-Season Crop Source: University of Missouri Extension Linda Geist - Writer

productive, adaptive species that could be used for either pasture or hay,” Schnakenberg says.

PURDY, Missouri – The sea of native warm-season grass on Gene Cowherd’s Barry County farm is a reminder of a time when buffalo grazed tall prairie grasses.

The project provides support for some producers to plant a few acres of warm-season grasses. Cowherd planted a mix of 60% big bluestem, 30% Indian grass and 10% little bluestem. Because of his success, Cowherd plans to plant another 40 acres in warm-season grasses. He grazes two cattle herds now.

Cowherd’s first-year grasses stand more than 6 feet high with thick, green undergrowth. The grasses are part of a diverse grazing system that also includes alfalfa, Bermuda grass, orchardgrass, red clover and novel fescue.

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“It’s a super stand,” says Tim Schnakenberg, University of Missouri Extension agronomist and a NRCS + MU Grasslands Project team member. The project is a collaboration between the Natural Resources Conservation Service and MU Extension that provides technical advice and education to improve grassland sustainability in Missouri.

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Due to the initial investment to establish and manage warm-season grasses, Schnakenberg recommends that producers make the transition in small increments. Seed cost can be more than six times the cost of fescue. However, natives have a lower long-term cost of production, he says. Initial costs are offset by lower nutrient needs, extended grazing seasons and less reliance on hay and feed. Producers also should see fewer problems with endophyte toxins.

Cowherd’s success dispels the notion that warm-season grasses need three seasons to establish and produce well. “Though train wrecks do happen with native grass establishment, if a producer pays attention to details and the weather cooperates, we can expect a very high success rate the first year,” Schnakenberg says.

Heat- and drought-tolerant warm-season grasses flourish during the summer slump when temperatures rise, rainfall diminishes and cool-season pastures decline. Including warm-season grasses in grazing systems may allow 300 or more days of grazing, Schnakenberg says. This reduces Cowherd’s reliance on other forage sources in winter and drought.

Cowherd is one of three Barry County producers who worked with Schnakenberg to establish warm-season grass pastures in 2019. “These producers wanted to broaden forage availability with a more highly

Cowherd sprayed out a wheat crop last April using glyphosate and at least two imazapic herbicides, Panoramic and Plateau. He seeded 11 pounds per acre of native grasses with a loaner drill from the county


soil and water conservation district. This drill was set specifically for drilling native warm-season grasses.

family dairy operation earned the Holstein Progressive Breeder Award four times.

Some seeds are light and fluffy, which makes it difficult to calibrate the drill properly. Cowherd made three trips over the field to insure the correct rate and get good seed-to-soil contact for a strong stand.

Cowherd remembers when the field where the demonstration took place became eroded and unproductive due to past tillage and cropping practices. Cowherd hopes to restore pasture diversity and good soil health through research-based methods from his alma mater, the University of Missouri.

He applied imazapic again in July with methylated seed oil (MSO) as a surfactant. It was the first time he used the oil-based adjuvant, which boosts the performance of certain herbicides. Despite record rainfall, grasses established well and cattle will graze there next year. NRCS + MU Grasslands Project recommends delaying of grazing until the second year. This lets grasses establish strong, deep root systems before being subjected to the pressures of grazing and production.

He earned a bachelor’s in dairy husbandry in 1971 and a master’s in reproductive endocrinology in 1973. However, his education did not stop there. “I just keep learning,” he says. Learn more about the NRCS + MU Grasslands Project at extension2.missouri.edu/programs/nrcs-mugrasslands-project.

Cowherd and Schnakenberg note that warm-season grass pastures need minimal fertilizer. Cowherd plans to add 60 pounds of nitrogen per acre and little to no phosphorus or potash. By contrast, his Bermuda grass pastures typically need 150 pounds of nitrogen per acre. Warm-season grasses are gaining popularity in part because of new technology for effective in-season control of broadleaf weeds, foxtail and crabgrass. In addition to providing summer forage, warm-season grasses offer cover for wildlife such as quail and other ground-nesting birds.

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Diversity and innovation are not new at the Cowherd farm, which his great-great-grandfather bought in 1892. At one time, the family’s Windymonte Vineyard grew 70 acres of grapes for Missouri wineries. They have also raised hogs, dairy cows and poultry. The

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Bob W. Richter Bob W. Richter, 93, died Saturday, Nov. 23, 2019. Bob was born in Quincy, a son of Herbert J. and Viola E. Klusmeier Richter. Bob married Georgia Logsdon Green on Nov. 9, 1978. They were married 41 years and lived in LaGrange, Missouri. They raised three daughters, Penny Norton ( Jeff Norton), Shirley Green (Steven Kaylor) and Becky Briddle (Dan Briddle). Bob cherished his three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Bob is also survived by extended family. Private services will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation or Shriners Hospital for Children in care of Davis Funeral Home, LaGrange, Missouri. You may sign the guestbook or leave a condolences at www.davis-fh.com

Jerry D. Thompson SAVANNAH, Mo. - Jerry Dean Thompson, 86, passed away Monday, September 30, 2019 in Savannah. Born in a farm house in Fulton, Kansas, on February 28, 1933, to William and Mary Howard Thompson. He grew up in Fort Scott, Kansas, where he graduated from high school in 1951. On June 3, 1956, he married Millicent Schultz Thompson, at Pawnee Rock, Kansas. They celebrated 63 years together. She survives at their home.

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Other survivors include: Randall D. Thompson (Christine), of St Louis, Missouri, Dewey W. Thompson, of Columbia, Missouri, and Jeffery D. Thompson (Kristie), of Lone Tree, Iowa; grandchildren: Greer, Madelyn, Bryce, Grant and Kyle.

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Jerry was a member of the Savannah United Methodist Church, serving on various committees, a 20 year member of the choir and a participant in Tuesday afternoon Bible studies.

A proud member of the K-State Alumni Association. He was also a member of various livestock and Extension organizations. Jerry obtained his bachelor of science, in agriculture education, from Kansas State University in January 1956. After serving in the Army, he earned his masters degree, in animal nutrition, from the University of Idaho Moscow, in 1960. Thompson was involved in co-operative extension service in Kansas and Missouri for 44 years. He was a 4-H agent in 1956. From 1960-1966 he was a county agent, in Cherokee County, Kansas. He moved to become an area livestock extension agent, for the University of Missouri, serving numerous counties in Northwest Missouri. This was a new program for Extension in Missouri, and he was a leader in his field. Through the 1970’s, he was instrumental in building the first producer owned swine test station in Missouri. He also started Missouri’s first area performance tested bull sale. He established a central test that measured production and carcass value of commercial swine producers. He also introduced the use of san-o-probe in pregnancy testing and measuring back fat of bulls coming off farm feed tests. He was instrumental in planning the annual 4-state Beef Conference with Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. He was proud of bringing education to area livestock producers. He enjoyed serving as superintendent of the beef show, at the American Royal, and put on the livestock judging contests. He was heavily involved in all aspects of 4-H livestock, including judging shows and leading youth in top livestock judging teams, sending three teams each to the national livestock and horse judging contests. Upon retiring in 2000, his joy was raising pure bred Simental cattle. He got to practice all the education that he learned and taught over the years. Memorials may be given to: Andrew County Extension, and the Savannah United Methodist Church music department.


Charles David “Blue” Geier Charles David “Blue” Geier, age 60, of California, Missouri, passed away on January 3, 2020, Capital Region Medical Center, in Jefferson City, MO, surrounded by his family. Blue was born on November 28, 1959, in Jefferson City, Missouri to Glenn Geier and Lilly (Kendrick) Geier. He graduated from Jamestown High School in 1978. He worked at ABB in Jefferson City. In 1992, he started working for Ratcliff Farms near California, Missouri and worked seasonally for Clennin Meats both of California, Missouri. Later, Blue worked at Putnam Chevrolet in California and Woods Supermarket in Sedalia. He was a proud member of the Moniteau County Cattleman’s Association and Past President of the Missouri Cattleman’s Association and a honorary member of the FFA. Blue was a long-time member and trustee of Pilot Grove Baptist Church near California, Missouri. For many years, Blue was a volunteer firefighter with the California Rural Fire Association. He was a member of the Twenty Club. Blue loved playing pinochle, attending races at Double X Speedway, and many sporting events. He was preceded in death by his father Glenn Geier in 2005. Blue is survived by his mother Lilly Geier of the home; his only child, Laura Geier of Jefferson City; and cousins, Linda, Gerald, Billy and Russ along with many friends.

Blue in front of the Capitol in Washington D.C. during the YCC tour.

Visitation was held Monday, January 6, 2020, at Windmill Ridge Funeral Service in California, Missouri. Funeral Services were held Tuesday, January 7, 2020, with Rev. Ken Mathes officiating. Interment followed at California City Cemetery. Memorials are to the Blue Geier Scholarship Fund c/o Moniteau County Cattleman’s Association 26855 HWY 87, California, MO 65018, Online messages to the family may be contributed at www.windmillridgefuneral.com.

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Blue with Katie Allen and Merrel Breyer promoting beef in Jefferson City at a Taste of Missouri event.

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Cowboys at

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the Capitol

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on Wednesdays See Schedule on Page 72


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Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com


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SALE CALENDAR

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February 1 Loonan Stock Farm Sale, Corning, IA February 4 Hoover Angus Production Sale, Creston, IA February 7 Cow Camp Ranch Annual Spring Bull Sale, Lost Springs, KS February 8 J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS February 8 Crooked Creek Angus Sale, Clarinda, IA February 9-16 Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA February 15 Byergo Angus Sale, Savannah, MO February 21 Galaxy Beef Production Sale, Macon, MO February 22 Seedstock Plus North Missouri Bull Sale, Kingsville, MO February 23 63rd Missouri Angus Breeders Futurity Sale, Columbia, MO February 24 Robert Elliot & Sons Production Sale Adams, TN February 28 Jamison Hereford Bull Sale, Quinter, KS March 6 Express Ranches Spring Bull Sale, Yukon, OK March 7 Mead Farms Spring Sale, Versailles, MO March 7 Peterson Farms Bull Sale, Mountain Grove, MO March 7 Seedstock Plus Arkansas Bull & Female Sale, Hope, AR March 7 Hilltop Farms Annual Gelbvieh & Balancer Bull & Female Sale Carthage, MO March 7 4 Brands Gathering Angus Sale, Paragould, Arkansas March 8 Sampson Annual Bull Sale, Kirksville, MO

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March 12 March 12 March 13 March 14 March 14 March 14 March 14 March 14 March 15 March 15 March 16 March 18 March 19 March 20 March 20 March 21 March 21 March 21 March 21

Henke Farms Sale, Salisbury, MO BJ Angus Genetics Sale, Manhattan, Kansas Schlager Angus Production Sale, Palmyra, MO Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney, MO Express Honor Roll Sale, Yukon, OK Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale, West Plains, MO Seedstock Plus Red Reward Bull & Female Sale, Osceola, MO Genetic Power Gelbvieh & Balancer Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Briarwood Angus Annual Production Sale, Butler, MO April Valley Bull & Female Sale, St. Joseph, MO Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO Valley Oaks Spring Sale, Lone Jack, MO Benoit Angus Ranch Sale, Esbon, Kansas Marshall & Fenner Farms Sale, Marshall, MO THM Land & Cattle Sale, Vienna, MO Circle A Spring Production Sale, Iberia, MO Pinegar Annual Herdbuilder XXVI Sale, Springfield, MO Falling Timber Farm Sale, Marthasville, MO Aschermann Charolais Bull Sale, Carthage, MO

See page 23 for more details.


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164.

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March 21 Brinkley Angus Ranch Sale, Green City, MO March 21 Mississippi Valley Angus Sale, Palmyra, MO March 28 Maplewood Acres Sale, Sedalia, MO March 28 Worthington Angus Sale, Dadeville, MO March 28 Arkansas Bull Sale and Commercial Female Sale, Heber Springs, AR March 28 Seedstock Plus South Missouri Bull Sale, Carthage, MO March 29 Post Rock Cowman’s Kind Bull & Female Sale, Barnard, Kansas March 30 Southwest MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, MO April 2 Hunter Angus Sale, Fair Grove, MO April 3 Meyer Cattle Co. Sale Curryville, MO April 4 Four State Angus Association Sale Springfield, MO April 4 B/F Cattle Co. Spring Maternal Integrity Gelbvieh & Balancer Bull Sale, Butler, MO April 6 Brockmere Farms Inc. Sale, New Cambria, MO April 10 Howard County Angus Association Sale, Fayette, MO April 11 Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO April 14 Sydenstricker Genetic Influence Sale New Cambria, MO April 18 East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO May 9 Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO

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Advertiser Index

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4-Brands Sale................................................................65 A-1 Cattle Feeders.........................................................70 American Angus Association .......................................67 April Valley Angus Sale................................................51 Benoit Angus Sale.........................................................77 BJ Angus Sale...............................................................79 Brickhouse Farms Red Angus......................................63 Buffalo Livestock Market..............................................78 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.....................................22 Central Missouri Sales Co............................................54 Circle A Angus Ranch..................................................55 Circle A Angus Ranch Sale..........................................31 Classified.......................................................................97 Clearwater Farm...........................................................55 Coon Angus Ranch......................................................55 Double A Land & Cattle...............................................63 Eastern Missouri Commission Company.....................48 Ellis Cattle Company Red Angus.................................63 Express Ranch Sale......................................................99 F&T Livestock Market..................................................58 FCS of Missouri..........................................................100 Galaxy Beef LLC..........................................................55 Galaxy Beef LLC Sale .................................................61 Genetic Power Sale.......................................................45 Gerloff Farms................................................................55 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick......................55 Green’s Welding & Sales...............................................84 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale...................................47 Henke Sale....................................................................69 Hilltop Farms Sale Ad....................................................7 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus............................................55 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale....................................43 HydraBed......................................................................56 Jim’s Motors................................................................. 80 JRS ...............................................................................35 Kingsville Livestock Auction........................................28 KK Farms Red Angus..................................................63 Lacy’s Red Angus.........................................................63 Legend Lespedeza.........................................................13 Maple Oaks Red Angus................................................63 Maplewood Acres Farm................................................63 Maplewood Acres Farm Sale........................................62 Marshall & Fenner Farms.............................................55 MC Livestock Red Angus.............................................63 MCA Convention Coverage................................... 29-44 MCA County Leadership Conference..........................95 MCA Cowboys at the Capitol.......................................72 MCA Directory Ad.......................................................23 MCA Member Benefits................................................ 90

MCA Membership Form..............................................93 MCA Presidents Council..............................................91 MCA Proud Member Signs..........................................94 McBee Cattle Co..........................................................68 MCF Cattlemen’s Roundup..........................................74 McPherson Concrete Products.....................................97 Mead Cattle Co............................................................53 Mead Farms..................................................................55 Mead Farms Sale............................................................3 Merck Animal Health...................................................71 Missouri Angus Association..........................................55 Missouri Angus Breeders..............................................55 Missouri Angus Futurity Sale.......................................73 Missouri Beef Industry Council...............................16-17 Missouri Red Angus Association..................................63 Missouri Red Angus Breeders .....................................63 Missouri Valley Commission Company.......................48 MultiMin USA..............................................................25 Naught-Naught Agency................................................12 Ozark Hills Genetics.....................................................63 Ozarks Farm & Neighbor.............................................75 Peterson Farms Sale......................................................49 Pinegar Limousin..........................................................37 Post Rock Cowman’s Kind Sale...................................81 Richardson Ranch........................................................55 Robert Elliott & Sons Angus Sale.................................19 Rogers Cattle Co. and Lile Farms Red Angus.............63 Sampson Angus Sale.....................................................82 Seedstock Plus...............................................................39 Sellers Feedlot...............................................................52 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle..........................................63 SNPartners RotoMix....................................................85 South Central Regional Stockyards.............................59 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef......................................55 Superior Steel Sales.......................................................21 Sydenstricker Genetics..................................................55 UltraLyx.......................................................................57 Valley Oaks Angus........................................................55 Valley Oaks Angus Sale................................................15 Weiker Angus Ranch....................................................55 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate...................................92 Wheeler Livestock Market............................................57 Mike Williams..............................................................92 Windrush Farm Red Angus..........................................63 Windsor Livestock Auction...........................................14 Wright Charolais Sale.....................................................9 Y-Tex...............................................................................2 Zeitlow Distributing......................................................22


Profile for Coby Wilson

February 2020 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

February 2020 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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