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SPRING 2019

LOCAL SOFT CORALS DISCOVERED DOG-FRIENDLY CAFÉS LUXURY ESCAPES & SHOPPING GUIDE PEOPLE OF THE COAST ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EVENTS CALENDAR LIFTOUT


CONTENTS WELCOME 6

HAPPENINGS 67

DISCOVER THE CENTRAL COAST

Ray Martin Photographic Exhibition

Map — Villages and beaches Spectacular Soft Corals in Brisbane Water

8 10

SHOPPING GUIDE 15 MY COAST David Fellows

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FOOD AND DINING 6 of the best dog-friendly cafés

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ARTISTS OF THE COAST Jordan Richardson: the Archibalds come to Gosford

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT 70 CLASSES AND COURSES 77 GREAT OUTDOORS Map — National Parks and State Forests The bronze explorers of Rumbalara Reserve FEATURE Tim Faulkner aka ‘Noah’ Australian Reptile Park and Aussie Ark

80 82

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GARDENS 24

A shared passion: Peats Ridge

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DESTINATION WEDDINGS

HOME STYLE Renovating: tips from the professionals

28

Delusha and Rahul

When old is new again

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Dani and Ben

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ONCE UPON A TIME IN Bateau Bay

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PEOPLE OF THE COAST Dr Marc Coughlin: simple outdoor pleasures and a high-tech career Jill Bough of Matcham has a PhD in donkeys

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LUXURY ESCAPES Terrigal Pacific Coastal Retreat

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Oskar’s

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The Hideaway

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Trinity Point Marina

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FOOD AND DINING Chef profile: Scott Fox at Pearls on the Beach 8 Delicious high tea experiences on the coast

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HUNTER VALLEY 50 56

COASTING 60 HEALTH AND WELL-BEING 62 WHAT’S ON CALENDAR LIFTOUT 66

Chef profile: Cameron Matthews, Éremo 108 24 HOURS IN East Gosford

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FUN FOR KIDS on the Coast

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PEOPLE OF THE COAST Pauly Mac the man who gave a local park life

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COAST PUBLISHER Catharine Retter editorial@coastpublishing.com.au ART DIRECTOR Jude Rowe, Agave Creative Group PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHERS Reed Plummer, Central Coast Drones Lisa Haymes Photography Dr David Harasti Merrillie Redden Photography

© CHRIS BURNS

PRINCIPAL WRITERS Megan Arkinstall • Kim Cole • Brooke Doherty • Suzy Jarratt • Susan Kurosawa • Yasmin Newman • Catharine Retter • Katie Stokes • Sarah Tolmie • Paul Urquhart ILLUSTRATORS Maps: Guy Holt Lauren Merrick

Welcome W

ho doesn’t love our local pelis, especially one getting a bit of cheeky competition from a fallen tree? (And we defy you not to smile at the other pelican photo in this issue!) It was just 12 months ago, on September 1, that the first issue of COAST hit the cafés, resort hotels, retail outlets, event venues and much more, all around the Central Coast. People’s biggest question then was, ‘but what else is there to write about in future issues?’ How attitudes have changed, even in a year. Today, we are inundated with interesting story ideas from people all over the Coast, and it’s little wonder. We always knew the Central Coast was a secret waiting to be fully uncovered … for visitors and even to longtime Coasties. We continue to be surprised too, that’s one of the joys of working at COAST.

ADVERTISING Anissa Vineburg 0408 692 129 Diane Dunlea 0425 279 707 advertising@coastpublishing.com.au

A new feature we’ve added this issue is in response to all those people renovating, building, redecorating or maybe still dreaming of doing up that holiday house, or mum and dad’s old house, or building the place that’s been on your wish list for so long. Over the next few issues we’ll be bringing you advice from building, designing and decorating experts from across the coast. And in every issue, there’s always a beautiful garden feature to inspire you. We also explore another unique — newly discovered — aspect to our region: colonies of beautiful soft corals in our coastal estuaries, not to mention the colourful marine creatures that call soft corals ‘home’. We’re also proud to share with you the home-grown talent of triple Archibald finalist, Jordan Richardson, a young artist that those in-the-know say will go a long long way in the art world. c

Catharine Retter, Publisher THANK YOU FOR ALL THE OUTSTANDING ENTRIES IN OUR READER COMPETITIONS IN COAST’S WINTER ISSUE. The winner of the relaxation voucher at Glow Beauty Space is Sharon Ross for her sister. The winner of the handmade Broken Bay Pearl necklace from AngelRock Jewellers is Madeline Mellor for her daughter, Georgina.

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DISTRIBUTION Alex Tkachenko admin@coastpublishing.com.au ADMINISTRATION admin@coastpublishing.com.au COAST is published by Coast Publishing ABN 11 145 976 049 PO Box 6407 Kincumber NSW 2251 For more ‘What’s On for Kids’ information contact Katie Stokes at www.playinginpuddles.com.au COPYRIGHT AND WARRANTIES The editorial content, photographic content, design and graphic art (including design of any advertisements by Coast Publishing) are all subject to copyright and must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Coast Publishing. While we strive to ensure information contained in this magazine is correct and current at the time of printing, details may be subject to change and we recommend contacting venues or event organisers before planning your visit. The information contained in this magazine has been provided by contributors, interviewees and advertisers and their sources. No warranty is given by Coast Publishing as to the accuracy of this information nor any liability arising from any reliance upon the information contained herein. FIND US ON Facebook Instagram @coast_publishing www.coastpublishing.com.au View COAST online and subscribe (it’s free) to avoid missing future digital issues at www.coastpublishing.com.au We wish to acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land, the Awabal Darkinjung peoples and their Elders past and present. We recognise and respect their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationship with the land. ON THE COVER Soft corals have been discovered in Brisbane Water. Photograph: Dr David Harasti


PART O F YOU R FAM I LY FO R OVER 4 0 YE ARS Our founders, the Worthington family have been an integral part of the Central Coast community for over 65 years, serving the automotive industry for over 40 years. We are proud to be a family owned and operated business.

O U R CO M M ITM ENT TO CU S TO M ER S ERVI CE AN D PRO FE SS I O N AL I S M I S D R IVEN BY O U R E XPER I EN CE AN D LOVE FO R O U R CO M M U N IT Y

Our culture is based on one simple phrase, “experience amazing”. For us, it is a promise that extends far beyond the experience of driving a superior vehicle, it’s encapsulated in every element of ownership. LEXUS OF CENTRAL COAST | 13 Kangoo Road Somersby NSW | PH 02 4340 3500 | lexusofcentralcoast.com.au ODD004


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Ken Duncan Gallery Presents GALLERIES

A New Exhibition by Ray Martin Ray’s Other World November 1 st - 10 th, 2019

You probably know that Ray Martin is a legend in Australian journalism. But here’s something you may not know … Ray is also a gifted photographer. Although he’s best-known for his award-winning reporting and interviewing skills, Ray has spent almost as much time taking photographs. Ray’s Other World will be on display in the Gallery from November 1 to 10. You will have the opportunity to meet Ray on both weekend of the exhibition. Ray will also be presenting some talks during his exhibition. For further information or to book one of Ray’s talks go to: www.kenduncan.com/whats-on

2020 CALENDARS NOW IN STOCK! Your 2020 calendars are now available at the Ken Duncan Gallery, Erina Heights. Ken’s large, extravagant wall calendar is back by popular demand. Plus there are two versions of Ken’s compact, A4 calendars, which are perfect for mailing to your friends and relatives overseas. You can also order online at www.kenduncan.com

WHAT’S ON IN THE GALLERY Half-Day Photography Seminar 28 September 2019 @ 11am

Photography Explained Seminar 5 October 2019 @ 9am to 5pm

Digital Asset Management Seminars 12 October 2019 @ 10:00am & 1:30pm

Books are essential for all seminars and places are limited. Phone the Gallery on 4367 6701 to reserve your place.

GET IN TOUCH

GALLERIES

Ken Duncan Galleries 414 The Entrance Road, Erina Heights Open 10am to 5pm daily

Phone 4367 6701 or visit www.kenduncan.com


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DISCOVER • Central Coast

WORDS CATHARINE RETTER PHOTOS DR DAVID HARASTI

FIRST IT WAS WORLD-QUALITY AKOYA PEARLS FOUND IN BRISBANE WATER AND UP TO BROKEN BAY, NOW MARINE SCIENTISTS HAVE DISCOVERED STUNNINGLY BEAUTIFUL SOFT CORALS (DENDRONEPHTHYA AUSTRALIS) AND RARE, WHITE’S SEAHORSES THERE. WHAT NEXT ON OUR DOORSTEP!

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oft corals were known to have existed in Sydney Harbour around Balmoral and Watsons Bay from the 1900s, but water quality and urbanisation have taken their toll. Until recently, their existence in any abundance was thought to have been restricted to the Port Stephens estuary. However, there were anecdotal reports of soft corals around Ettalong and Umina and, in 2018, as part of a project funded by the Protection of the Environmental Trust from the Central Coast Council, marine scientists from the University of Newcastle were able to confirm multiple colonies in Brisbane Water. ‘We were very excited to find them,’ says Dr Troy Gaston, the research leader on soft corals at the university. ‘The discovery met with surprise and some disbelief at first but, so far, our mapping has found them from the Rip Bridge down to the mouth of the estuary at Broken Bay, and a study is underway to explore further. It’s still too early to know whether the colonies in Port Stephens and Brisbane Water are closely related and, if so, which is the parent colony. A genetic analysis is the next stage.’ Soft corals are a critical habitat for species that live, feed and hide around them, like the rare White’s Seahorse (seahorse habitats are among the most threatened in the world), as well as a diverse range of fish species and small shrimp-like creatures. A decline in soft coral populations is likely to mean a decline in seahorses which need the structure of the corals to ‘hold onto’ and to hide in. Soft corals use their tendrils to anchor themselves into the sediment (but too much sediment movement can smother them). Seagrasses are also thought to be important to the soft corals’ habitat.

Above Soft corals are a critical habitat for seahorses. Right An endangered juvenile Hippocampus whitei or White’s Seahorse.

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A wobbegong shark camouflaged among soft coral.

Allied Egg Cowrie feeds on the soft corals.

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But they are not just benign, pretty little creatures. They are mainly carnivorous, feeding on zooplankton (their tropical cousins are mainly vegetarian, feeding largely on plant or phytoplankton). Unlike hard corals, soft corals inflate and deflate their many branches with the ebb and flow of the tides, making them look like heaving, breathing creatures, with thousands of polyps which they wave in the currents to sting and capture their tiny food. Fortunately — unlike sea sponges, which are loved to death by turtles, starfish and fishes — their only natural predator is thought to be nudibranchs (exotically beautiful molluscs). The biggest danger to these magnificent soft corals is from boat anchors, entangling fishing lines or, in shallow water, being damaged by passing boats. Once uprooted, most corals are unable to re-attach themselves to the seabed. Being covered by shifting sand is also a threat. So far, the corals in Brisbane Water have only been found in relatively shallow areas — with the biggest colony around Lobster Beach — but soft coral species also exist in deeper water and, elsewhere in the world, are known to grow to two metres tall. ‘There are likely to be other soft corals in our waters and mapping of the deeper waters in the Brisbane Water estuary is something we’d like to address in the near future,’ say Dr Troy Gaston. ‘There is so much biodiversity beneath the waves but there are also many stressors on our estuaries because of urban development and agriculture, and if we want to conserve our waterways and the biodiversity for future generations, we really need to understand and mitigate those stressors.’


DISCOVER • Central Coast

Volva volva or Shuttlecock Cowrie on soft coral. The University of Newcastle (Dr Troy Gaston) is working in collaboration with NSW DPI and Fisheries (Dr David Harasti), Macquarie University (A/Prof Jane Williamson) and University of New South Wales (A/Prof Tracy Ainsworth). For anyone interested in pursuing environmental science studies at the University of Newcastle, Ourimbah Campus, see: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/degrees/bachelor-of-coastal-and-marinescience https://www.newcastle.edu.au/degrees/bachelor-of-environmental-scienceand-management https://www.newcastle.edu.au/degrees/bachelor-of-environmental-scienceand-management

Soft coral is seahorse habitat.

Armina cyganaea nudibranch.


ENJOY DELICIOUS MEALS MADE WITH FRESH, LOCAL PRODUCE AND BREATHTAKING VIEWS AT SEASALT RESTAURANT. For a dining experience with a difference, you can’t go past Seasalt Restaurant with spectacular views over Terrigal Beach. Seasalt Restaurant is known for fresh seasonal menus with a coastal influence and is famous amongst locals for the buffet breakfast. Award-winning chef Dana Chantler has created a menu to suit all tastes with favourites including the best-selling seafood platter, halloumi fries and a dessert share plate that makes lovers of sweets rejoice.

OPEN 7 DAYS FOR BREAKFAST AND DINNER | OPEN SATURDAY AND SUNDAY FOR LUNCH First Floor, Crowne Plaza Terrigal Pacific, Pine Tree Lane, Terrigal W: terrigalpacific.crowneplaza.com P: (02) 4384 9133

/SeasaltRestaurantTerrigal


SHOPPING • Guide

Spring SHOPPING GUIDE

WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

WITH SPRING IN THE AIR, WE’VE ROUNDED UP THE BEST SHOPS TO SPRING-CLEAN YOUR BODY, UPDATE YOUR BEACHWEAR, BRIGHTEN UP YOUR HOME AND LOOK FABULOUS FOR ALL THOSE SPRING EVENTS.

Love & Tonic, Terrigal You may be thinking of spring-cleaning your house, but what about your body? Start spring off on the right foot and check in to Love & Tonic at Terrigal. This beautiful store stocks all things health and wellness, from dietary supplements to paleo and keto foods to aromatherapy and beauty items. The clever wellness gurus here make organic homemade bone broth and therapeutic smoothies, and can customize teas and essences for you on the spot at the herbal dispensary. If you need a little guidance, make an appointment with the on-site naturopath, herbalist or kinesiologist, or pamper yourself with a facial, massage or reflexology (available on selected days). Shop 14A/10 Church Street, Terrigal loveandtonic.com.au

Lucky Surf & Supply, Long Jetty Are you an art lover in need of a new pair of boardies and some caffeine? Look no further than this cool surf store located on the main road of Long Jetty. Stocking the best brands for surf and beach apparel — Adelio, Vans, Rhythm, Captain Fin Co, to name a few — this unassuming store also has a small café to its side where you can pick up a coffee made from a special house blend as well as a quick snack. There’s also a gallery space out the back, home to local talent Grant Molony, and is open for people to enjoy their coffee, work remotely, or to hire for an event or independent exhibition. 3/417 The Entrance Rd, Long Jetty luckysurfsupply.co

Bouddi Gallery, Killcare Here’s a way to add brilliant, quality art to your home and feel good about it. Exclusively trading in unique and vibrant arts and crafts produced by Aboriginal art centres in remote areas across the country, Bouddi Gallery is an incredible social enterprise that works to ensure Indigenous artists directly benefit from all sales. You’ll find a constantly updated collection of paintings and wall art by established and emerging artists, as well as woodwork, glass and ceramics, weaving and beadwork. There’s also a gorgeous range of homewares and lifestyle items such as cushion covers and scarves, native-based skincare, books and music. 5/1 Killcare Road, Killcare bouddigallery.com.au

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SHOPPING • Guide

Kel K Styling, Wyong Sometimes a girl needs a little help with her look. Located at The Gallery Precinct in Wyong, Kel K Styling is not your average fashion boutique. Owner Kellyanne Kent is a qualified stylist and hosts one-on-one styling sessions, in which she will suggest you try on many pieces that you never realised would look so good on you. Grab a few capsule pieces, a special occasion outfit or have a whole wardrobe overhaul! You can also get together with your friends and book a girls’ night — bring your own bubbles and nibbles — and enjoy a relaxed evening of fashion styling with your favourite gal pals. Kel’s store is also open throughout the week to come and simply browse the beautiful clothing, with help from the style guru always on hand. 7A Alison Rd, Wyong kelkstyling.com.au

Tribe Living, Umina Beach This exotic store in Umina Beach, owned by global traveller Jacquelyn Knight, is dedicated to fair-trade and ethically made products from brands such as Boom Shankar, Cotton Diva and Mandala Traders. You’ll find a range of eclectic items here: clothing created from natural fibres, bohemian-style jewellery featuring raw crystals, hammered copper tableware, and a whole range of vibrant prints and patterns in both homewares and fashion from all ends of the earth. You might even pick up a piece from local designer Meg Woodhead (mixed-media artist) or some jewellery from locals, Lisa Carney Designs or Jenni Riley. 352 West Street, Umina Beach tribeliving.com.au

Montaze, Erina In operation for the past 10 years, Montaze has become one of the Coast’s most iconic fashion stores. Owner Kate Brand describes the store as a world of fashion, lifestyle, homewares and interior decorating. They stock premium products, many Australian made, from labels such as Camilla, Auguste the Label, Glasshouse Fragrances and jewellery from Temple of the Sun. Located at the Fountain Plaza in Erina, this spacious store has a warm and friendly vibe and is a one-stop shop to find a new piece of quality clothing, a special gift (they stock a beautiful baby range, too), décor or furniture for your home, or simply to browse the beautiful books, handbags, accessories and more. If you can’t make it in store, they have also just launched an online outlet. Shop 8, Fountain Plaza 148 The Entrance Road, Erina montazestores.com

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BOTTOMLESS BRUNCH AT

KICK KICKBACK BACKRELAX RELAX&&ENJOY ENJOYTHE THEWEEKEND WEEKENDWITH WITH OUR OUR BOTTOMLESS BOOZY BOTTOMLESS BRUNCH ATBRUNCH THE BON. ATSERVED THE BON. ALONG SIDE SERVED OUR NEW ALONG SEVEN SIDE DAYS OUR A WEEK NEW SEVEN HOT BREAKFAST DAYS A WEEK MENU. HOT BREAKFAST MENU Bonython Tower 159 Mann Street, Gosford @thebonpavilion thebonpavilion.com.au


DAVID FELLOWS, LIFELONG TRAVELLER, REGULAR SURF SWIMMER, OVER-THE-HORIZON THINKER. DAVID’S CAREER TRAJECTORY IN TOURISM AND TRAVEL GOT OFF TO A FLYING START IN SPITE OF A SCHOOL CAREERS ADVISOR TELLING HIM HE SHOULD BECOME A PHYSIOTHERAPIST APPARENTLY BECAUSE HE HAD A PASSION FOR SPORT OF ALL KINDS.

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MY COAST • David Fellows

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HP, CSR and Qantas were offering trainee scholarships when David left school and, lured by the possibility of travel, he chose Qantas and went on to gain experience in eight different commercial departments while also studying at Sydney University four nights a week. His scholarship decision led to a 40-year international corporate career that included Qantas and British Airways during the period when 747 jumbo jets were introduced and the cost of air fares to London halved, opening up the possibility of travel to the broad population. He was posted to London, Egypt, Jordan and Scotland before moving to the Hong Kong Tourist Board for almost two decades. During this time the British colony returned to Chinese sovereignty and tourism became the territory’s number one industry. ‘I love that my career has allowed me to follow my passion, and my experiences have let me develop an ability to see beyond the horizon — both literally and figuratively. You need to get a helicopter view of any situation, any problem confronting you, in order to see the big picture and the range of solutions rather than just the obstacles in front of you.’ Whenever they were back in Australia, David and his family loved holidaying at Avoca Beach, so when the time came to return permanently, the decision to move to Avoca Beach seemed the obvious dream-choice. ‘Where else in the world would you choose to live,’ says David. ‘It has a scenic beauty wherever you turn. It’s easy to stay in touch with family, friends and interests in Sydney. And, importantly, we knew Avoca offered a unique sense of community.’ 18 years later, David still feels the same. ‘It’s a diverse, caring and welcoming community,’ he says and we sense David returns those values in abundance. He has a strong ethos and faith that believes in the core goodness of people. ‘Everyone starts out with a clean slate. And unless you have walked in a person’s shoes you can’t know their circumstances and how that may have impacted on them. So all you can do is listen and learn, and to treat them as you would like them to treat you.’ David and wife Jan, a Masters qualified counsellor, met as teenagers, married, and raised two sons, one a career diplomat currently in Canberra after his latest overseas posting, the other an accomplished actor. ‘As with any Australian actor, it is part of the journey to become a great barista and cook,’ says David with a smile but hastens to add proudly, ‘He’s currently on Let Down on the ABC and is also filming a series for Channel 7. ‘Between them, they have given us three beautiful granddaughters — half a netball team!’ David’s interest in sport of all kinds has not waned since his school days and he remains a regular swimmer in the surf at Avoca Beach and a member of the local surfing community. He is also Chair of Destination Sydney Surrounds North (which includes the Central Coast), a government-funded

entity responsible for building the tourism economy through infrastructure, jobs and events. ‘You can’t underestimate the importance of tourism when you live in such a special area,’ he says. ‘It generates five percent of all jobs in the region — that’s 28,000 directly in tourism, and a further 12,000 indirectly. And visitors to the wider region account for $11 million in expenditure each and every day!’ David feels blessed to continue to work in one of the best places on earth and ‘outside the frenetic tourism cauldron of Asia and Europe’ while still being able to enjoy visiting those areas with Jan whenever they can. Some of David’s favourites: WEEKENDS: Lunch with friends on our balcony overlooking Avoca Beach is unbeatable. RESTAURANT: Bistro Molines at Tallavera Grove Vineyard in the Hunter Valley, where chef Robert Molines is regarded as ‘the godfather of Hunter Valley dining.’ AUSTRALIAN PLACES: Avoca Beach, Scone, Orange, Hunter Valley, Blue Mountains. INTERNATIONAL PLACES: Italy, France, Spain. EVENTS: 5 Lands Walk, Stockman’s Challenge at Murrurundi, Harvest in the Hunter.

Purveyor of unique Homewares & special one off pieces of furniture for Styling your home. Operating for 10 years and now incorporating great coffee at Drift Coffee Kazbah. 1/15-17 FORRESTERS BEACH RD FORRESTERS BEACH 4385 9996

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FOOD & DINING • Dog-friendly Cafés

6 OF THE BEST DOG-FRIENDLY CAFÉS ON THE COAST WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

Jasmine Greens, Umina A place where the kids can run wild and parents can have a coffee is a very good place indeed. But a place that also allows your four-legged friends to come along is even better. Jasmine Greens at Umina is just that, with one of the best playgrounds on the Coast at its doorstep and a dog-friendly beach directly opposite. The café menu is Mediterranean-inspired and created with locally grown, free-range and chemical-free food — burgers, fish, salads and an all-day brunch. There’s also a takeaway kiosk for a munch on the run. Dogs are welcome outside the café and on the deck (on leash). Owner Gabby says they have one regular greyhound visitor who comes for a vanilla ice-cream in a waffle cone every Sunday. Now that’s a treat, whether you’re canine or human. Peninsula Recreation Precinct, Sydney Ave, Umina www.jasminegreens.com.au

Like Minds, Avoca This former general store transformed into a café in 2014 but it’s much more than just a place to get great coffee and delicious wholesome food. With almost zero waste (all of the food and coffee waste is composted), a menu featuring local ingredients (some very local, straight from the on-site garden with all condiments and pickles made by owner, Melissa Morgan), a regular produce swap, and the occasional pop-up shop touting locally made goods, Like Minds has a huge sustainability and community focus. You can bring your furry friend along with you and sit in the shaded garden or, if you’re grabbing a takeaway, their leads can be clipped to the wall while you duck inside. If you’re a regular, no doubt owners Melissa and Jimmy will know your dog (and you) by name, such is the warm vibe here at Like Minds. 352 The Round Drive, Avoca facebook.com/likemindsavoca

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FOOD & DINING • Dog-friendly Cafés

Impact Plants Nursery & Café, Empire Bay Tucked behind the Impact Plants Nursery at Empire Bay, this lovely café opened in 2006 and has been the locals’ favourite ever since. The café has a beautiful koi pond and resident waterdragons, and is surrounded by lush tropical gardens — evidence of the plant nursery’s green thumb — with rare and exotic plants. There’s an expansive deck for dining, not to mention great, hearty food. Dogs are welcome to join you but need to be on a leash, and may make the acquaintance of resident dog Ted. He’s a friendly 10-year-old Bichoodle often seen lazing about in the sun on the deck. 9 Poole Close, Empire Bay impactplants.com.au

Wyong Milk Factory, Wyong Established in 1906, The Wyong Milk Factory closed in 1994 but was then lovingly restored, opening again in 2014 as a multi-purpose space housing a café and tavern, the gourmet cheese factory Little Creek Cheese, Central Coast Woodturners, Luka artisanal chocolates, as well as a boutique, fitness centre, kids playground and hair studio. The Wyong Milk Factory Café (located in the old factory’s lab area) and Wyong Milk Factory Tavern both have dog-friendly outdoor areas so you can bring along your best friend while you enjoy a coffee or beer. You can also take your pooch down to the creek for a walk, which is equipped with ‘doggy doodoo’ stations, and pamper them at the TruBlu K9 dog wash afterwards. 141 Alison Road, Wyong www.wyongmilkfactory.com.au

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FOOD & DINING • Dog-friendly Cafés

The Anchor Coffee House, Budgewoi Self-professed pet lover, Melissa Stafford, has owned The Anchor Coffee House with her husband Paul since 2013 and it’s become quite the favourite for locals who want to enjoy a coffee with their beloved Rover. Located a short walk from dog-friendly Mackenzie Reserve and Budgewoi Beach, an off-leash exercise area, it’s a great spot to come after your dog has had a good runaround. Sit in the outdoor area under wisteria. During the cooler months, blankets are provided and heaters are switched on, and you can enjoy a meal from the made-fresh-to-order menu (serving breakfast and lunch) while your pet enjoys a treat from Melissa’s never-ending jar of liver snacks. There are water bowls around the café, and kitchen staff has, in the past, cooked up some bacon or chicken for some very pampered customers. 10A Ocean Street, Budgewoi facebook.com/TheAnchorBudgewoi

Bamboo Buddha, Holgate A leafy sanctuary in Holgate, the Bamboo Buddha is much loved for its Bali-style garden, on-site yoga and wellness activities, and its vegetarian and vegan menu made, where possible, with local and organic produce. Think, spicy tofu scramble, vegetable and coconut curry, and mixed mushroom pie. But another reason to visit, other than the ever-so-friendly atmosphere, is that your pets are most welcome to join you as you enjoy the nourishing food and tranquillity. Owner Tanya says some customers bring not only their dogs but also their chickens, parrots, even pet possums! The café is also home to several koi and goldfish ponds, regular exhibitions by local artists, and a boutique nursery is coming soon. 221 Wattle Tree Road, Holgate www.bamboobuddha.com.au

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ARTISTS OF THE COAST • Jordan Richardson

Jordan Richardson The Archibalds come to Gosford

WORDS CATHARINE RETTER AT THE RIPE OLD AGE OF 26, LOCAL KINCUMBER ARTIST JORDAN RICHARDSON HAS BEEN AN ARCHIBALD FINALIST THREE TIMES WITH HIS PORTRAITS OF JOHN BELL (2017), DAVID WENHAM (2018) AND, THIS YEAR, ANNABEL CRABB.

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hat makes him so exceptional at a young age? ‘Jordan paints with the obsession of someone who is passionate about painting, and his gestures, whilst studied, maintain a lightness and ineffability that set him apart from his peers.’ says Toby Meagher of Michael Reid Gallery in Sydney, which represents Jordan. Which Archibald entry is Jordan’s favourite? ‘The John Bell was my first, so that can’t help but always be special. But beyond that, I don’t think an artist is ever completely satisfied with what they’ve done,’ he admits. ‘I like the collaboration in portraiture,’ he says. ‘A lot of the work is about narrative, the whole identity. With the Annabel Crabb portrait we first talked for a few hours, and we discussed how I wanted to portray her. It was not about her TV image or just the physical likeness. I didn’t want it to be a stiff and formal portrait so, for a bit of fun, I had her holding up a bay leaf. She talked about how she is portrayed in the media so I wanted to strip away her glasses, her rings, and the idea that people in the media are not allowed to age.’

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Jordan is already planning his entry for next year’s Archibald Prize. ‘One of the best things about the Archibalds for a young painter is the opportunity to meet so many other painters from far away. You work alone and this is an opportunity to be asking people about their work.’ Jordan has been painting in oils for about 11 or 12 years, but he has always drawn. ‘My mum was a pre-school teacher and she always gave me playdough and paints. I was always drawing something. In primary school I remember the excitement of getting coloured pencils and adding them to my collection one by one. And eventually I had a big box of them. ‘I had a wonderful teacher at Pretty Beach Primary School and through her I met a local artist working in abstract. Once a week, after school, she gave me the opportunity to play with paints, very open ended, very free and experimental, and gave me lots of knowledge including art history too.’ In 2012 and 2014, Jordan received grants from the Bouddi Foundation for the Arts and went on to the National Art School


ARTISTS OF THE COAST • Jordan Richardson

where he graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours). ‘It was more than just monetary grants, they mentored me and also taught me the value of giving back.’ Jordan is now a judge on Bouddi’s Visual Arts committee and, in turn, has become a mentor to young students. In spite of his early successes, he can’t yet work full time in his art. ‘But I’m getting close! Michael Reid Gallery saw something in me, and they don’t pressure me to produce only work that sells, sells, sells,’ acknowledges Jordan. ‘I work with my Dad some of the time. He’s a window cleaner and has always been one of my biggest supporters.’ ‘Jordan is incredibly talented but he is also young to be represented by a major Australian gallery,’ says Toby Meagher, the gallery’s director. ‘Talent like Jordan’s has the capacity to take him almost anywhere as an artist, so to represent him early in his career was an obvious decision. I have no idea what sort of painter he will be, and I want to give him the chance to find out. I have confidence that with time he will develop into a major force in Australian painting and he needs space to be able to grow.’ Jordan’s fiancée is studying psychology at Macquarie University and when she graduates their ambition is to travel together. ‘I want to be able to see the old masters “in the flesh”,’ says Jordan, ‘to see what the colours really look like, and the way they’ve applied their paint, the nuances you can’t see in photographs of their work.’ ‘It is immediately obvious that Jordan is a painter enamoured with the history of painting,’ says Toby. ‘You can see centuries of European painting informing the process in any one of his works. However, it is worth noting that it’s one thing to be interested in the Old Masters, it’s another thing entirely to have the capacity to paint like them.’ Peter Godwin, of the Bouddi Foundation for the Arts, first encountered Jordan and his work in 2011. ‘Jordan has been an excellent ambassador for the BFA, he and many other grant recipients are a reflection of the Foundation’s

past and ongoing objectives and ethos. His artistic achievements in the short term have been more than admirable and he will extend himself especially when he experiences the artistic reality beyond our shores.’ We can’t wait to see how Jordan’s travels and his wider experience will add to his talent.

2019 Archibald Prize Exhibition 15 November to 12 January, Gosford Regional Art Gallery. 36 Webb St, East Gosford. Jordan Richardson’s work is available through Michael Reid Gallery. Standard House, 105 Kippax Street, Surry Hills. michaelreid.com.au/sydney/

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Explore

CENTRAL COAST NSW Ettalong Diggers and Ettalong Diggers Visitor Information Centre proudly working with Peninsula Tourism Partners, Tourism Central Coast, Central Coast Council and fellow coastie tourism operators to ensure that EXPLORE CENTRAL COAST works for tourism across our beautiful area. WWW.ETTALONGDIGGERS.COM | (02) 4343 0111 | 51-52 THE ESPLANADE ETTALONG BEACH 2257

© MERRILLIE REDDEN

rrigal The Skillion, Te


Discover the

Luxaflex

Difference

Window fashions as individual as you If you’re looking to make an individual style statement, it’s time to discover the inspiring range of blinds, shutters and awnings from Luxaflex® Window Fashions. For a tailor made solution to suit your lifestyle, visit the friendly and expert team at Luxaflex Shades in Gosford and discover a new standard in style and service.

Visit the Luxaflex Window Fashions Gallery at: Shades in Gosford Shop 2/202 The Entrance Road, Erina NSW 2250 T: (02) 4367 5603 | E: sales@luxaflexgosford.com.au

luxaflex.com.au 08/2018

13 58 92

|


HOME STYLE • Building Tips

TIPS FROM THE PROFESSIONALS FOR

RENOVATING, BUILDING OR DESIGNING YOUR DREAM HOME WHETHER YOU’VE JUST BOUGHT A SEASIDE COTTAGE THAT’S TUGGING AT YOUR SLEEVE BEGGING TO BE UPDATED, OR BUILDING YOUR DREAM HOME, OR JUST PLANNING A RE-STYLING MAKE-OVER, WHERE DO YOU START? We spoke to architects, builders and interior designers on the Coast, and they were unanimous in their overall advice: bring them in early into your planning process — after all, building or renovating a house can be one of the largest investments you make; communication and collaboration are the keys to a good working relationship; and be timely with decision-making throughout the whole process. Delays in making decisions can have a big impact on the flow and cost of the project.

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T S E B E H T T E G O T HOW R E D IL U B R U O Y M O R F 1. T  ake the time to research a builder. Ask to speak to past clients and, if possible, visit past projects to look at the level of quality. A good builder can help work with your designer and architect to achieve a home that fits both your brief and your budget. 2. C  heck that your builder is licensed and has the appropriate insurances needed. You can check builders’ licence details on www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au.


HOME STYLE • Building Tips

3. A  n initial site visit is a great chance to get to know your builder. Take your time to ask questions as you’ll be working closely with them throughout the entire building process. 4. P  roviding a detailed finishing and fixtures schedule allows the builder and their tradies to give you a detailed breakdown of cost, and minimises any need for variations throughout the build. 5. E  nsure the quote provided is clear, detailed and transparent. You should have a good understanding of what is included and what is NOT. This is one of the most important stages of your build and one that can determine the emotional and financial outcome of the entire process. 6. A  ll building contracts are not alike. Research what best suits your situation and read through with your builder to understand exactly what you are agreeing to. The two main contracts are Cost Plus and Fixed Price. The Fair Trading website also has detailed information on types of building contracts.

CALL DANIEL TODAY

0412 503 2 33 9/8 Gibbens Road, West Gosford NSW 2250

7. U  nderstand that you may have to sacrifice some things throughout the build, but quality should never be one of them! Daniel Syddall, Construct Central Coast constructcentralcoast.com.au/

www.co n st r uc tce n t ral co ast .com . a u

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HOME STYLE • Flooring Tips

CHOOSING THE RIGHT TIMBER FLOOR

W

hether you are ripping up carpet, or laying a new floor on a concrete slab, timber floors are a great way to breathe life and warmth into your home. What type of floorboards should you choose? And what are the benefits of using engineered timber flooring over traditional hardwood floors? Hardwood floors are solid timber all the way through and will need to be nailed or glued to a subfloor – they can’t be placed directly over concrete or other existing flooring without substantial preparation. With the right maintenance and care, hardwood floors can easily be sanded and treated when they are looking worn or tired, and should last for generations.

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HOME STYLE • Flooring Tips

Engineered hardwood flooring has been designed to minimise expansion and contraction that can cause bowing and cupping in timber floors. They’re also easier to install and are usually less expensive than solid hardwood. They have a top layer of natural hardwood beneath several layers of protective coatings which gives it the same luxurious look and feel of solid timber floorboards. They’re a good solution for high traffic areas such as the kitchen or living room. They’re available in Australian species like Spotted Gum or Blackbutt and European species including Limed Washed Oaks, giving you ample choice. Variations include wide board styles, herringbone and chevron patterns. These floors add a definite wow factor to top end homes. Planks are shorter and narrower so work well in rooms that might not suit long, wide boards. proflooring.com.au

PREMIUM ARCHITECTURAL WINDOWS & DOORS COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL

4340 1000 sublimealuminium.com.au

Quality Timber, Oak and Laminate flooring

258 West St, Umina Beach. 4342 6666

www.proflooring.com.au 31


California Dreaming

Indoor-outdoor living ideas that will excite and inspire you for spring.

ADAIRS


Shop the look

1.

How to create a staycation in your home.. 2.

3.

5.

4.

6.

FANTASTIC FURNITURE

7. 8.

9.

15.

10.

14.

11.

12. 13.

1. Bunnings Brilliant Harbour DIY Plug In Rattan Pendant $149 2. Spotlight Ombre Home Desert Rose Macrame Cushion $30 3. Adairs Jasper Timber Pot Medium $49.99 4. Adairs Red Earth Tufted Cushion $59.99 5. Adairs Abbey 3 Tier Natural Hanging Collection $39.99 6. Eureka Street Furniture Areca Palm With Pot 160cm $119.25 7. Adairs Congo Pot $29.99 8. Eureka Street Furniture Solar White Wash Daybed $1,599  9. Spotlight Ombre Home Desert Rose Cotton Slub Throw $33 10. James Lane Girona Polished Concrete Shallow Dish From $14.50 11. James Lane Somara Dining Table $699 12. James Lane Dewi Belly Basket $129 13. Bunnings Jumbuck Rustic Iron Fire Bowl With Stand $159  14. James Lane Somara Dining Chair $159 15. James Lane Arden Stool $179 Products and prices are recommended retail at time of printing and may vary - please see in store for any discounts or special offers that may apply.


5 TIPS ON GETTING THAT

SPRING STYLING ‘WOW’

THE CHANGE OF SEASON MARKS A GREAT REASON FOR A CHANGE OF INTERIORS.THE GIRLS AT THE BEHOLDER STYLING + DESIGN SHOW HOW TO STEP STRAIGHT INTO THE SPRING VIBE AND REGENERATE YOUR LIVING SPACES. Tip #1 — Remove the layers It’s time to swap out heavier woollen and fleece throws and blankets with textured linen and cotton throws. Replace your heavier curtains with light airy drapes that let the natural light rays in. When you wash and pack away your heavier blankets be sure to sprinkle them with a few drops of essential oil. You’ll thank yourself next winter. Tip #2 — Inject some living colour Spring is the time for blooms, and this is a perfect opportunity to either purchase a new indoor plant or fill your house with fresh spring flowers — they last a long time as the weather is still cool in the morning and evening — and flowers enhance any space. Consider investing in a selection of new vases to house your blooms. A trio of ceramics always looks like the perfect number. Tip #3 — White it out After the shorter winter days everyone is craving the longer lighter days and this is a perfect time to refresh your spaces with a lick of paint. We love Elusive White as it really is the perfect white. Whether it’s changing

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a tired feature wall or freshening up an existing white wall, the whiteout is the great fresh backdrop for some new art. Tip #4 — Accessorise with seasonal items The change of season is a great time to change-up your accessories to lighten and refresh your spaces. Swap heavier art with light, brighter visuals. Bring in key cushions with lighter, more neutral tones. And be brave: bring in some key accent colours to brighten the mood. Change your dark lamp shades for lighter coloured ones and put those plush thicker winter rugs in the dry cleaners and have the coolness of floorboards underneath for those warmer months. Tip #5 — De-clutter Give your bookshelves the once-over and get rid of the tired magazines and all papers. Store away half of your kitchen appliances and crockery to give breathing space to your shelving and counters. Remove all the unnecessary bits from bedside tables and replace with a few selected reading items and a plant – that’s all! thebeholder.com.au

In ter i or Sty li n g | H om e Stag i n g | Even t Sty l i n g w w w.th e be ho ld e r.co m. au


TH E HE ART OF HOME

and lifestyle

You should love where you live... So head to the website, sign up to our eDM and be inspired by the refreshingly simple interior ideas that’ll spark joy every day.

BUNNINGS TUGGERAH

TUGGERAH SUPER CENTRE RETAILERS

Stay connected @TuggerahSuperCentre

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For centre and store information visit www.tuggerahsupercentre.com.au

TD

Tuggerah Super Centre | Corner Wyong Road and Bryant Drive, Tuggerah, NSW 2259

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WYONG

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Wamberal locals Roy, Jo and their Three Donkeys, Sienna, Hunter and Elijah are very proud to own and operate Three Donkeys Wholefood Café & Three Donkeys Home. Offering a lifestyle of eating well, living well and feeling well.

Wholefood Café

Home

Our menu caters to dietary requirements, specialising in gluten, dairy and refined sugar free options. Enjoy a Turmeric, Charcoal and Beetroot latte or get a stellar drop of coffee on any one of our range of milks.

The Home shop offers a unique range of décor, fashion, furniture and flowers, not seen elsewhere on the coast. We are passionate about providing every customer a warm and welcoming experience.

WHOLEFOOD C A F É Open 7 days from 7am 15/6 Ghersi Ave Wamberal NSW 2260 I 02 4339 8052

H O ME Open 7 days from 10am 1/2 Ghersi Ave Wamberal NSW 2260 I 02 4309 5440

g n i v i l ss e l d Boun SUMMER 19-20

PARCHMENT 3 seater sofa in cascade fabric RITA coffee table in mindi/rattan/glass

ATING

CE L

E

40 BR

SINCE 1979

GO SFO RD PH: 8834 4700, R I V E R SI D E PA R K HO MEMAKER CENTRE, 6/ 37 6 MA N NS ROA D

TUGGERAH PH: 8834 4750, BU I L D I NG C /9 BRYA N T D R I V E *Furniture featured in outdoor photography is for interior use only.


HOME STYLE • Scott Smith

When old is new again WHEN WE WERE CHILDREN, THE CENTRAL COAST WAS THE PLACE WE CAME FOR SCHOOL HOLIDAYS. OFTEN, SEVERAL FAMILIES RENTED ONE OF THE OLD FIBRO SHACKS (NO MOD CONS) THAT CLUSTERED AROUND THE BEACHES WHERE THERE WAS NOTHING TO DO EXCEPT PLAY AND SWIM, OR SIT FOR ENDLESS HOURS ON THE JETTY HOPING TO CATCH A FISH.

A

bout 20 years ago that started to change. Many of the little shacks in the beachside villages were pulled down and replaced with glamorous architect-designed weekenders. Add to this, new apartments that are emerging on the skyline, many with stunning views, and still half the price of Sydney living. But, at least for now, you can still find a solid old house on the edge of the water just waiting to be done up, or acreage where the kids can have a pony, but where the grassy slopes are not so big that you to have to spend the whole weekend sitting on the ride-on mower. And chances are, you’ll also be near a good café, and just 10 minutes from a major shopping centre. Recently, I caught up with born-and-bred Central Coaster, Scott Smith, a trained horticulturalist, turned real estate agent, who bought one such house — a very solid but very ‘boring’ bungalow right on the edge of the water in Green Point. His ‘work in progress’ started about seven years ago.

His first thought was to pull the house down. He gave it a quick coat of paint inside and out, and made a few cosmetic changes to get it liveable so that he’d have time to carefully plan the new residence and sort out the costs. It wasn’t long before he realised just how good the old house was — an ugly duckling on the outside but so solid and spacious on the inside. With Scott’s eye for plants, he knew the garden was going to have a major impact on the look of the house. Cleverly, he designed the landscape plan before anything else, and very quickly set about planting sculptural masses of succulents and fast-growing sub-tropical specimens. He also developed a clear idea of the way the interior would work, taking advantage of the amazing views and at the same time functioning for a family. The slow build gave him the ability to be flexible as his needs changed. ‘I’ve always been used to an open-plan concept,’ says Scott. ‘And this house was the opposite when I bought it. So the

The lounge now opens up to the kitchen, spectacular views and outdoor living area.

37


HOME STYLE • Scott Smith

importance, for me, was to create openness without destroying the intimacy of the house.’ ‘There was a closed-in kitchen, so we opened it up and used a “smart beam” that’s light in weight but was able to replace a load-bearing wall.’ Now, the open plan kitchen is the ‘centre of the universe’ where everyone gathers around the big island bench. In the loungeroom, daughter Sophia wanders among the inviting settings of big white sofas which seem miraculously devoid of Vegemite smudges (thank you Napisan!), and takes me to look at her bedroom. It is wonderful. Horticulturist Dad has used daringly huge transfers of pink blooms on the walls — no little babyish prints here! Originally there must have been an open veranda around the building which was covered in years ago. It’s now opened up to the ever-changing views and play of light over Brisbane Water. You can follow the sun around as you move from a comfy sofa to the little dining setting, then on to sun-lounges, or back to the big dining table, or yet another lounging about area. ‘I feel really connected to this house,’ says Scott. ‘It reflects my artistic side and that creates a sense of relaxation for me, and a belonging. And with the 180 degree views, and almost on top of the water’s edge, you can feel like you’re floating. It’s a strange sensation.’ It’s a bit like being on a beautiful ocean liner, every day. All without having to leave home … or the Central Coast.

Planning your dream home?

A daringly huge transfer of pink blooms means the baby’s room will continue to be suitable beyond babyhood.

GOT A SMART HOME? WE DO SMART BLINDS!

kitchens • bathrooms • alfresco • living • WIR • laundry

Book a FREE 30-minute design consultation with one of our award-winning designers The Central Coast’s most awarded kitchen and bathroom renovator

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Finished Dec 2019 A variety of 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom luxury apartments.

REGISTER BayviewGosford.com SMS “Bayview” to 0488 826 806

“All the Elements for a Life Well-Lived”


© ROB KLEIN

nga Pelicans at Pato


Central Coast Holiday Escapes

Your Beach, Bay & Bush accommodation specialists KILLCARE PENINSULA

Properties to suit all your holiday needs from budget to luxury accommodation

02 4360 2222

centralcoastholidayescapes.com.au raywhitekillcare.com

Central Coast Holiday Escapes beach bay bush


LUXURY ESCAPES

TERRIGAL PACIFIC COASTAL RETREAT Ideally located, resort-style apartments

Terrigal Pacific Coastal Retreat is just the place if you’re looking for the next much-needed getaway, or a break with family or friends. It couldn’t be more perfectly located — across the road from Terrigal Lagoon, and a short stroll to the beach, boutiques, cafés and bars. It’s also conveniently opposite the refurbished Marine Discovery Centre and Park Life café. The apartments are light and airy with a calming aqua and white colour scheme. The spacious studios with kitchenettes open out onto either balconies or patios with views of the subtropical gardens and heated pool. You can choose from studios, 1-bedroom 2-storey lofts, or fully self-contained 2-bedroom apartments There is an open aired rooftop moondeck which also has a romantically appointed studio attached to it for special occasions. The four side by side ground-floor studios are ideal if you want to book with a group of friends or extended family who want to spend time together. These units open onto a large grassy area directly in front of the pool and spa. Terrigal Pacific Coastal Retreat is a resort-styled, friendly environment designed for you to simply relax, unwind and enjoy. Terrigal Pacific Coastal Retreat 224 Terrigal Drive, Terrigal. terrigalpacific.net.au

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Pacific Rattan Entertainment Unit

Crafted for life Bombo Shelf Vanity, Ballina Mirror, Eden Round Basin

loughlinfurniture.com.au


LUXURY ESCAPES

One of Killcare’s most iconic homes … and views Holding an historical landmark position, on over 3200m2 of terraced, landscaped gardens and located high on the hilltop with expansive views over the Pacific Ocean and Brisbane Water, sits Oskars, a magnificent Tuscan-style retreat and one of Killcare’s most iconic homes. Oskars is ideally positioned to capture year-round sunlight and the most spectacular sunsets, just a few short minutes from Bells at Killcare, the restaurants of Hardys Bay and the area’s best beach, Killcare Beach. Expertly extended and remodelled into a luxury coastal estate from the original cottage which was hand-built by German adventurer Oskar Speck in the 1950s, this substantial residence is a testimony to artistic craftsmanship and offers complete privacy in the most serene and beautiful environment.

www.centralcoastholidayescapes.com.au

STUNNING VIEWS AND A CLIFF-TOP HOLIDAY HIDEAWAY The perfectly named, ‘Hideaway’, is a modern cliff-top home, with views that take your breath away wherever you look — from an oceanfront deck, or from the infinity pool across the beautiful sweep of Copacabana beach, or from the cosy comfort of the main living space with its the floor-to-ceiling windows. It’s the perfect family getaway, ideal for up to 10 guests, with five bedrooms and three bathrooms. The master suite has a king bed, two more bedrooms have queen beds, and two others have king single beds plus trundles. You’ll begin to relax the minute you enter the tranquil courtyard with its tropical greenery, fishpond and water feature. In the evening, dine with a spectacular view from the dining room or deck. And in the morning, the sunrise greets you over the ocean to start another day away from the hustle and bustle of city beaches, traffic and high-rises. Cockrone Lagoon, which divides Copacabana beach from Macmasters beach, backs onto beautiful Bouddi National Park. There are walking tracks and places to paddle a kayak. It’s no wonder Copacabana has been voted one of the most relaxing holiday locations on the Central Coast. Hideaway, 123 Del Monte Place, Copacabana www.centralcoastholidays.com.au

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LUXURY ESCAPES

An idyllic boating resort and high performance marina at Lake Macquarie

One of the largest and newest marinas in NSW opened this year,

power and amenities on the docks are all things that are putting

the Trinity Point Marina, on the western side of Lake Macquarie

Trinity Point on the map,’ says Bellingham’s president, John Spragg.

at Morisset Park with 88 berths (and another 100 planned).

And it’s not only the boats — from 7-metre craft to 30-metre

The sweeping lines and terracotta-coloured concrete docks and

cruisers — that are superbly looked after. Boaters have the comforts

architectural details, help make the marina quite a showcase, as well

of a customer lounge, private en-suite bathrooms, ample carparking,

as being able to boast environmental responsibility.

wifi to every berth, and a chandlery that is surely a boater’s heaven.

‘It has deepwater berths, wave protection and fully serviced

The marina is all part of Keith Johnson’s vision for the 23 hectare

berths,’ says managing director, Keith Johnson of the Johnson

waterfront resort, hospitality, retail, and residential community,

Property Group.

with the marina the jewel in its crown. With a brand new restaurant

International marina builders, Bellingham Marine, are proud of the marina’s high performance capabilities as well as its aesthetics. ‘The marina layout, ease of access from entrance to berths, ample

opening this summer, Trinity Point will no doubt be a sought after waterfront destination in the region.

trinitypointmarina.com.au

45


© FORESTRY CORPORATION OF NSW


Relax & unwind in this hidden gem in Terrigal

Heated pool & spa email admin@terrigalpacific.net.au or phone 4385 1555 direct for great rates

This fabulous resort with its modern beautifully appointed Studios, 1 bedroom 2 storey Lofts and 2 bedroom apartments is such a peaceful property. The rooms are well equipped with kitchenettes giving you the option to cook, BBQ by the pool or BBQ on their newly finished rooftop area. A perfect space for meetings and chilling. There’s also a romance suite attached to it for couples wanting a special weekend or even honeymoon night.


Saltwater Bar and Bistro at Avoca Beach Hotel serves up pub meals alongside contemporary and seafood classics. Come and enjoy a meal al fresco style on the deck in the sunshine.

326-360 Avoca Drive, Avoca Beach | 02 4382 2322 www.avocabeachhotel.com.au

© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

Open 7 days a week Lunch & Dinner


"Journey through the peaceful and serene Yarramalong Valley, where Angel's Whispers take you to a place where your burdens will be lighter, Coffee Stronger and Less is More" Bottle Shop & Beer Garden Monday to Saturday 10am-8pm Sunday 10am-6pm

Good times. Great friends. Better beer.

Café, Florist and Gift Shop 7 days 9am-4pm Restaurant Breakfast and Lunch Wednesday - Sunday 9am - 3.30pm Dinner Friday and Saturday 6pm till late Private Functions and Special events on request Boutique Accommodation: phone 4356 1066 1-4 Linga Longa Road, Yarramalong www.angelsussurri.com

Operating for more than 70 years

HIRE BOATS KAYAKS • SUPS bayrdbrewing.com.au @bayrdbrewing #bayrdbrewing

(02) 4322 3024 • info@bayrdbrewing.com.au

• 7 days a week all year round • Boat hire fee includes fuel, safety gear, map, demo and fishing licence exemption. • Bait, tackle, drinks and more available.

(02) 4341 3219 andersonsmarina.com.au

Petit St. Booker Bay


FOOD & DINING • Chef Profile

Rare Gem Scott Fox at

Pearls on the Beach

WORDS YASMIN NEWMAN PHOTOS LISA HAYMES

50 COAST


FOOD & DINING • Chef Profile

At this point, Melissa actively joined the business, bringing her experience in hotels to front-of-house, while Scott slowly steered Pearls towards the casual fine-dining experience it is today. ‘We modelled ourselves on the type of restaurant we wanted to go to: service but not stuffy, great quality ingredients and full of flavour.’ When David Dale, then restaurant critic for The Sydney Morning Herald, bestowed Pearls with a glowing review and four out of five stars, they knew they were on the right track. ‘It really accelerated our confidence to do things a bit differently,’ says Scott. Now, Pearls on the Beach has been a one-hatted restaurant for four consecutive years, and the only venue on the Coast currently with this accolade. ‘We don’t define ourselves by this award, but it’s industry-renowned and helps people find us when they’ve come to the Coast on holiday and are looking for somewhere to dine,’ says Scott. Far from being competitive, the chef hopes for other hatted restaurants in the region as a sign of the quality we have here, as well as providing more local opportunities for work.

T

his year, the iconic Central Coast restaurant Pearls on the Beach celebrates its 19th anniversary. It’s a sun-swept Sunday when we drop by, the red and yellow stone cliffs enclosing the bay on either side shimmering in the afternoon light and the grand conifer out the front swaying peacefully in the sea breeze. With a spectacular location like this you’d expect success is a given, but few restaurants anywhere in Australia can claim almost two decades of life and service – and even fewer in a regional area. Owners Scott and Melissa Fox moved up to the area in the late nineties, fresh-faced, recently married and charged-up for Scott to take on the head chef role for the new owners at Pearls. Another Coast institution, The Cowrie, had been operating out of the site since the 1960s before moving to Terrigal, but the new owners had a more casual vision in mind, and for the first couple of years Pearls ran as a cafe-cum-bistro. ‘There are around 650 houses in Pearl Beach and, back then, most were permanent residents,’ recalls Scott. ‘Now, it’s flipped. Permanent residents account for only 100 properties, while weekend and holiday homes make up the rest.’ This local history is fascinating given the recent seismic shifts in population happening in other areas of the region. ‘Pearl Beach is a bit isolated, which makes it less attractive to young families,’ explains Scott. ‘Properties can also be pretty pricey, so it has always attracted a certain demographic.’ When the owners decided to sell the business, the chef was offered first dibs, then dived in. ‘With my, now, 45-year-old head, I would never have taken that risk. But you think you’re bulletproof when you’re young!’ he says laughing. Scott and Melissa put their house on the line to get a loan and both sets of parents chipped in too. Suffice it to say, a lot was riding on their decision to go all in. ‘I’d always envisaged doing something of my own, just not then, but we’ve ended up reaping the benefit of that youthful naiveté and energy.’

51


FOOD & DINING • Chef Profile So what’s their secret to success and longevity? ‘We make sure we give an amazing experience,’ he says. ‘We’re not shooting the shotgun to get everyone; it’s about quality over quantity.’ Pearls is the special occasion restaurant for Central Coast locals or the intimate choice for holidayers and day-trippers, who return each time they’re in town. Their secret likely also lies in shutting down each year for some personal R & R (and R & D). Last year, the pair spent a month eating their way through Italy and, this year, they’re taking on Queensland. ‘Part of how we inspire ourselves and stay current is dining at the best restaurants in the world,’ says Scott. With dishes like kung pao king prawns, celeriac puree with celery leaf pangrattato, and wagyu braised short rib with pickled wakame, the influences from their travels weave through the menu along with prime seasonal produce, another guiding force for Pearls. ‘We’re constantly changing, so even if you come once a week, there’s always something new to try,’ he says. By the time this issue comes out, the seaside restaurant will be celebrating its 100th menu – and countless stories in between – and Scott and Melissa show no signs of stopping anytime soon. Pearls on the Beach 1 Tourmaline Avenue, Pearl Beach. www.pearlsonthebeach.com.au

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FOOD & DINING • Restaurants

8 DELICIOUS HIGH TEA EXPERIENCES ON THE COAST WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

WHETHER IT’S FOR A SPECIAL OCCASION OR A SIMPLE MID-WEEK TREAT, HERE ARE SOME LOVELY HIGH TEA EXPERIENCES TO ENJOY ON A SUNNY SPRING AFTERNOON.

Lord Ashley Lounge, Terrigal If high tea by the sea tickles your fancy, then the Lord Ashley Lounge on Level 1 of the Crowne Plaza Terrigal Pacific is the perfect spot, with a number of options to suit all tastes. The traditional high tea comprises sweet treats (scones, macarons, petite eclairs) and savoury bites (mini pies, quiche and finger sandwiches) with bottomless tea, coffee or hot chocolate, or you can add a glass of sparkling or a cocktail. Chocoholics will love the special chocolate-focused high tea that includes a mini Toblerone cocktail and espresso martini. And even the little lords and ladies in your life are catered for: they get a milkshake, meat pies and sausage rolls, finger sandwiches, cakes and fairy bread. Gluten free, vegetarian and pregnancy options are available, too. Offered daily from 12pm to 4pm, bookings essential. Crowne Plaza Terrigal Pacific, Pinetree Lane, Terrigal terrigalpacific.crowneplaza.com

Higher Grounds Café, Kincumber Set in the lush, leafy surrounds of Picketts Valley, Higher Grounds Café is a fairly new dining experience to the Coast, serving casual breakfast and lunch, house-made pastries and bakery items, and good coffee. It’s a familiar spot for locals, housed in the former entertainment venue that was Lizottes, but Higher Grounds has given this space a new lease on life, including a deck extension that takes advantage of the beautiful bush outlook. A traditional high tea is available daily and served on vintage-style crockery with a large selection of loose-leaf tea, and a coffee or glass of bubbly. There is also a lower level available for larger groups and private functions; it’s a lovely space with French doors that open up onto a tranquil courtyard and garden area. Offered daily, bookings in advance essential. 263 Avoca Dr, Kincumber highergroundscafe.com.au

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The Entrance Lake House, The Entrance A former 1900s guesthouse that was once the toast of the town, it underwent an extensive restoration in 2012 to become The Entrance Lake House. This buzzy restaurant offers a modern Australian menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner, with high tea, available on the weekend, served in the main dining area downstairs or in the garden. The upper floor, a room with heritage character that boasts views out to the lake, is used for larger groups. The classic high tea comes with a number of looseleaf tea options served in pretty teacups and saucers. There’s a mix of sweet and savoury morsels, but the freshly made scones, still hot from the oven, are an absolute highlight with delicious clotted cream and a hint of vanilla bean. Add a glass of bubbly or cocktail to your high tea for an additional cost. Offered Saturday and Sundays, 2pm to 4pm, bookings essential. 1 Oakland Avenue, The Entrance theentrancelakehouse.com.au

Cove Café, Terrigal Perched on the foreshore at The Haven in Terrigal, Cove Café is a relaxing setting to enjoy a meal or coffee with the sound of waves lapping at the shore. High tea is available from Wednesday to Saturday, with a menu of traditional high tea (all savoury bites are made in-house and sweet items sourced from local bakeries) with the options of a glass of sparkling, Champagne, a cocktail of your choice, or sangria. Tea lovers will delight in the 24-strong premium tea selection and there’s even bottomless coffee. Zing! The offering is almost too pretty to eat and is served on the café’s wraparound veranda with the best views in Terrigal. Available Wednesday to Sunday, 10am to 2pm The Haven, Terrigal covecafe.com.au

Pullman Magenta Shores, Magenta Guests and locals alike can experience the lovely traditional high tea at Pullman Magenta Shores. Held each weekend in the contemporary setting of Barretts Restaurant with views out over the vast golf course, there are the usual delicious suspects with sweet and savoury options, and the choice of bottomless tea or a glass of sparkling wine. Pullman’s high tea is a popular option for girls’ weekends, hens’ parties, special birthdays, or even just a weekend treat. And if you really want to indulge, there are spa packages available that include high tea in the alfresco area of Shallows Bar after your treatment. Available weekends, 12:30pm to 3pm 1 Magenta Drive, Magenta pullmanmagentashores.com.au

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Re:Publik Café, Ettalong Beach The high teas at the Re:Publik Café were born out of a wish to raise funds for local charities and are therefore available only for group bookings. The café also houses the Waterline Art Gallery with a changing exhibition of paintings on the café walls that will tempt you almost as much as the high tea classics such as chicken and cucumber sandwiches, petit fours, as well as a selection of savoury and sweet morsels such as bite size Danishes and fruit tartlets. Because the high teas help local charities, the Coast’s shopkeepers with big hearts have been known to donate prizes, and Broken Bay Pearls and the café’s coffee roasters, Terrys Coffee, have also acted as guest speakers to help raise charity funds. High teas available for group bookings only. 271 Ocean View Road, Ettalong Beach republikcafe.co

Kew Dining, Erina Heights After a recent cosmetic makeover, the former Sanctuary Café at Ken Duncan Gallery has become the very refined Kew Dining. The café’s design is beautifully restrained and provides a very relaxing dining space. A sage green and neutral colour palette with natural timber and wicker furniture complement the lush bush landscape outside, enjoyed through floor-to-ceiling windows. But while the café has a new look and new menu, one thing hasn’t changed: it still offers its fabulous high tea menu. From freshly baked scones to house-made arancini balls, the high tea is served on fine china and is available with tea, coffee or sparkling wine. Available daily, bookings essential. 414 Central Coast Highway, Erina Heights kewdining.com.au

L’isle de France, Terrigal For high tea with a French twist, you need only head down to Terrigal. L’isle de France, located on Terrigal Drive, offers le gouter, France’s version of the traditional British high tea. Complete with French champagne, French desserts, gourmet sandwiches, savoury bites, and scones with jam and fresh cream, high tea at L’isle de France is a decadent affair with views out to Terrigal Beach. Groups of six or more can have exclusive use of the alfresco courtyard, a delightful spot to enjoy the warmer spring weather, or there’s also the option to be seated indoors in the contemporary restaurant (during winter months, the open fire keeps things cosy). Offered daily, bookings essential 48 hours prior 1 Ena Street, Terrigal lisledefranceterrigal.com.au

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ESCAPE . UNWIND . RELAX . INDULGE

THE SPRINGS EXPERIENCE P E AT S R I D G E

TAKE THE TIME. TAKE THE DRIVE.

Sit on the deck and soak in the bushland views or play a game of outdoor chess while you sip on one of our mixologists bush inspired cocktails, taste a local craft beer or have a flirt with a local gin.

Escape to The Sitting Duck at The Springs in the hinterland of the Central Coast and experience Chef Dan’s locally sourced and creatively plated farm to plate menus.

Desserts created with fresh ingredients like local pecans, local honey, oranges and berries are best to savour inside on one of the chesterfields or cowhide lounges along with designer teas and indulgent coffees.

“Weekends with Chef Dan” is an indulgence not to miss. Innovative individual and share plates created from what Dan sources from local suppliers and our own garden to bring you the ultimate food experience.

Once you have escaped to a Springs Experience you will keep coming back. We will be waiting for you.

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COASTING • Spring

with

SUSAN KUROSAWA

Plant Lovers’ Fair

T

Jazz Sundays at The Lucky Bee

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here’s a much-used term in the tourism industry to describe the minor and ‘in-between’ seasons, spring and autumn. Across the world, summer and winter, it seems, are the heavy hitters, with the former meaning higher airfares, more expensive hotels and, inevitably, crowds. Winter, unless you have skiing in your sights, typically comes with lower costs and fewer travellers. Spring and autumn are shoulder seasons, perched on the slopes, sliding between the two-star turns, but dependable times of year across the world. I like to think of spring as the off-the-shoulder season, when Coasties refresh the wardrobe, watch bulbs shooting through winter’s bleak mantle, and roll up sleeves to deal with months of accumulated spiderwebs and barbecue grease. It’s not so much spring-cleaning as cleansing, when we tentatively try on last summer’s swimwear (ouch) and start the early countdown to Christmas (yikes). Spring means time to bare winter-pale skin so it’s off for a rejuvenating Hawaiian lomi lomi treatment with Ellen McCall at Killcare Massage. What to wear? Time to try on floaty frocks, or beachy cover-ups from Mooch Inside at Hardys Bay. The windows of fashion stores at Erina Fair will be full of winter-spring and spring-summer outfits and I’m just waiting for the signs to announce ‘sprinter’ and ‘sprummer’, the newly chic hybrid terms that acknowledge unreliable weather forecasts and merge winter to spring and spring to summer. There has been a call from some quarters, apparently, to adjust the calendar to add these two and create six seasons. Just don’t tell Vivaldi or a certain North American hotel and resort group. But all such diversions aside, days will be longer, winter-dulled spirits lifted and gardens ready to be renewed. So let’s all get out and about. My checklist is simple but far from plain. So, up to the garden nursery for potting mix, fertilisers, mulches and plants. The weekend of September 28-29 is already firmly marked on the calendar for the Plant Lovers’ Fair at Kariong. My haul from last year will literally be bearing fruit this spring. You’ll find me at Jazz Sundays down at The Lucky Bee on the Hardys Bay waterfront tucking into chef Matty Bennett’s superbly spiced curries. For bookworm presents, I’ll be whiling away hours at Book Face in Erina Fair, where titles, some signed by authors, are beautifully displayed. There are glossy coffee-


COASTING • Spring

table tomes galore, and stylish greeting cards and wrapping paper. Book Face also has quirky little gifts, from clip-on reading lights to divine Olieve & Olie hand and body washes made with Australian olive oil and scented with the likes of lavender and rose geranium. On the Christmas countdown, I’ll be at Avoca Beach Market, held on the last Sunday of each month and at its liveliest when the sun is out. Or join the queue behind me at Salmon & Co Ettalong for quirky planter pots by Jones & Co and planters in cacti shapes from White Moose Design. Linda Jeney, formerly of Swoon Ettalong, has teamed with florist Leanne Salmon and their expanded store also stocks unstructured (and shoulder-shielding) linens by Kloth that successfully cover all those ‘sprinter’ and ‘sprummer’ lumps and rolls that just won’t shift no how many beach walks and salute-the-sun sessions you take. c

Book Face

Susan Kurosawa is Associate Editor [Travel] at The Australian newspaper. She moved to Hardys Bay in 1997 with her husband, actor and TV presenter Graeme Blundell, and now lives on a bush block at Killcare. Her 1999 book,

Salmon & Co

Coasting: A Year by the Bay, has had several reprints.

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HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

SPRINGTIME CREATES A SENSE OF RENEWAL IN NATURE AND AN ENERGY THAT CAN MAKE US RETHINK THE SHAPE WE’RE IN AND OUR SENSE OF WELLNESS. WORDS DR MICHELLE REISS

T

here is a strong focus these days on food choices and gut health, and information comes from all directions on keto diets, gluten free products and protein shakes. I want to help simplify the latest evidence to it make it easier to understand food as your energy source, and how it can have a major impact on your sense of wellbeing. Your digestive tract is like a long tube from your mouth to your bottom. Inside are millions of living chemical processes taking place to change the food and drinks you ingest into molecules that fuel your energy and metabolism. Not only do our bodies’ own enzymes assist in these chemical processes, but so do approximately 2 to 3 kg of micro-organisms called the microbiota. The microbiota consists of bacteria, viruses, yeasts and parasites that occur mostly in our large intestine and literally are the ‘zoo in our poo’1. Ongoing research has revealed that this zoo needs to be well fed, just as we do. And to maintain the natural chemical processes that are their mission in life, the zoo relies on the nutrients in real food that are too often missing in processed products. We now know that if there is breakdown in these chemical processes, harmful particles enter our blood system and migrate to all parts of our bodies. Our bodies’ natural defensive mechanisms are then activated, and this can lead to a chronic metabolic inflammation called ‘metaflammation’. Metaflammation is the link to compromising your wellness and reducing the ‘life to your years’.

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Processed food — in other words, food that has been engineered, packaged and marketed as ‘time saving’, ‘drivethrough meals’, or ‘ready-to-go meals’ — has unfortunately upset our internal chemical processes and the zoo inside. The resulting metaflammation has helped drive the surge in conditions such as depression, anxiety, obesity, type 2 Diabetes, heart disease and cancers, to name only a few. But there’s good news, despite the dire chronic disease forecasts. The large majority of these diseases, and their effect on our wellbeing, can be prevented and reversed. Other lifestyle choices come into play too, but the message for diet-based vitality and wellbeing is simple: eat real food; not too much; and more plant than animal2. It does not mean that you should become vegan or vegetarian. It simply means that you could focus on eating food that comes from a living source, has not been processed or refined (like white flour and sugar), and for most meals, contains a ‘rainbow’ of fruit and vegetables. You don’t need to view food as ‘good’ or ‘bad’, and you can avoid telling yourself ‘I shouldn’t eat that’. That only leads to pressure and guilt, and who needs that. No one expects you to be a saint all the time (just most of the time). Rather view food as ‘real’ or ‘processed’. It’s that simple. Just eat real food to feed yourself and the zoo within! Dr Michelle Reiss MBChB, LMCC, CCFP, FRACGP, FASLM Founder, Lifestyle Medicine Centre 1 Professor Felice Jacka 2 Dr Michael Pollan


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HAPPENINGS • Spring

HAPPENINGS ON THE COAST PLANT LOVERS FAIR KARIONG If you are looking for hard to find, rare and unusual plants, then head to the Plant Lovers Fair this September — the place to uncover plants not generally available in nurseries or garden centres. With over 40 exhibitors, the fair caters to keen gardeners, novices and collectors alike. Here you can select from a wide range of succulents, perennials, bamboos, roses, bulbs, herbs and deciduous trees. The speakers program features expert growers — all exhibitors at the fair — providing specific, detailed knowledge and ‘trade secrets’ about the plants they grow and love. On Saturday, Linda Ross from the Garden Clinic will be speaking in the main marquee and, on Sunday, Costa Georgiades host of ABC’s Gardening Australia will be in attendance encouraging everyone, young and old, to have a go at gardening. The Plant Drop Off is one of the fair’s most popular places with friendly volunteers ready to look after your plant treasures safely, leaving you free to browse further, listen to a talk or have a cuppa and a bite to eat from one of the food and beverage stalls. Saturday 28 September (8am to 4pm) and Sunday 29 September (9am to 3pm) at Festival Drive, Kariong. Entry is $14 per person (under 18s free). Online ticket $12 per person or Two-Day Pass $20 per person. plantloversfair.com.au

Come and meet your future four-legged fur child The Street Paws Festival is collaborating with the non-profit organisation, Peggy’s Promise, to rehabilitate and rehome abandoned, unwanted or surrendered animals. Come along to share some muchneeded love with pets that are awaiting adoption, fostering or rehoming. There will be pet stalls, competitions, kids’ activities, and much more. Saturday 9 November at Mt Penang Gardens. Sponsored by PETstock, Beach & Bay Vet, Somersby Animal Hospital

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HAPPENINGS • Spring

GOSFORD OPEN GARDEN SCHEME Visit around 10 spectacular gardens on the Central Coast showcasing a selection of gardening styles, water-wise concepts in practice, unusual plantings, and a chance to speak with the garden owners. You’re bound to come away with new ideas for your own garden. 28 and 29 September. For participating gardens see gosfordopengardens.org Entry is $5 each garden with the Open Garden Scheme supporting Elsie’s Retreat, a palliative care facility to be built locally.

THE SPRINGS Long Lunch To welcome in spring at The Springs, chef Dan Capper has gone all out to source fresh organic produce for this very special, ‘Long Lunch’ menu on Sunday, 15 September. There’s a choice of damper with Little Creek Goats Fetta, crisp duck leg with apple, radish and raspberry, or baked brie with fig jam and pickle pear — and that’s just for starters. Dan’s speciality, slow-cooked lamb shoulder with Dijon mustard and a herb crust, is reason enough to book your seat at the table. Or if pescetarian delights are more your dish, you won’t be able to resist the whole roasted flathead with fennel and caramelised lemon! The Springs 1080 Peats Ridge Road, Peats Ridge. Bookings are essential: 02 4373 1522. Arrive for a glass of sparkling at 12.30, lunch at 1pm. the-springs.com.au

PHOENIX COLLECTIVE The Phoenix Quartet is the Central Coast’s premier string quartet with Yuki Mayne, Dan Russell, Andrew Wilson and Ella Brinch playing Jennifer Higdon’s cutting edge composition, alongside master composers Haydn, Shostakovich and Tchaikovsky. Music to free the soul. Tickets $35. Where: Greenway Memorial Chapel, 460 Avoca Drive, Green Point When: 22 September at 2.30 pm. Also Ye Olde England concert on 24 November at 2.30pm. More info: centralcoastconservatorium.com.au/events-calendar-2019

For more of what’s on around the Central Coast, visitcentralcoast.com.au, and check out the pullout section in this issue.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Ray Martin

RAY MARTIN

Photographic Exhibition, Ken Duncan Gallery

R

ay Martin has spent over 50 years of his life travelling, some of those years, famously, for 60 Minutes with some of the best camera crews in the business and certainly to some of the most exciting and exotic places in the world. ‘Photography is my favourite job, pastime and therapy,’ says Ray. ‘These days I photograph anything and everything: portraits, landscapes, street photography, action and still-life, shapes and patterns but especially my daughter’s handsome dog, Jed, and my beautiful grandson, Arlo. They haven’t yet worked out a way to make me put the camera away. (They will.)’ His friend and photographic buddy, Ken Duncan, calls Ray ‘the Eveready Bunny’ of photography. ‘I take a dozen photos while most other people we travel with are deciding which lens they should use before putting their camera on a tripod. I shoot from the hip – often,’ admits Ray. His first exhibition in 2017 at Ken Duncan’s gallery was a phenomenal success. ‘We are thrilled to be hosting him again because he is a very gifted photographer,’ says Ken. ‘Now we’ll be featuring the best of Ray’s work including many new images. I will also be exhibiting several new images at the same time, so it will be a very exciting exhibition.’ Ray continues, ‘I know many people are surprised to find that I have this love of photography and that I take pretty good shots. That’s nice. But, I also honestly believe that people who come to see my photographs — or buy my books — are enthused or inspired to have a go themselves. (Mind you, it helps if you’re as obsessive as I am.)’

Predominantly new images will be featured in the exhibition, as well as a few of Ray’s older, on-the-road photos that people have favoured before. There’ll be images from less-trodden spots like Bangladesh (which Ray says he only discovered a year or so ago and really loves), Myanmar and especially travelling down the Irrawaddy River, the “Shangrila” that is Bhutan, Nepal to Paris, St Petersburg to New York, across the Andes all the way to the Aussie Outback. ‘I’ll select a couple of hundred limited-edition photos for the exhibition and then trim it down to something “a bit more manageable”. (That’s code for “as many as Pam Duncan will allow me to have”.), says Ray with that familiar smile. ‘I pay special attention to Ken’s impeccable judgement, because he knows better than anyone what is a good picture and what people are looking for. Besides, he and Pam own the best gallery in Australia!’

Most of my newest photos have been taken with Panasonic’s newest, heaviest (and best) camera, the remarkable Lumix S1R. It was only released this year as a 49 Mb, mirror-less, full-frame marvel of a camera. I now have no excuses. As well, there will be a number of images taken with the extraordinary, small but powerful Lumix G9, my favourite bridge camera the Lumix FZ2500, the Fuji GFX and the Canon 5D. Cameras are my favourite toy and weapon of choice. Ray Martin Exhibition, November 2 to 10 Ken Duncan Gallery 414 The Entrance Road Erina Heights Meet Ray on the weekends of November 2 and 3, as well as 9 and 10. www.kenduncan.com/whats-on

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Spring

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT ON THE COAST BROOKE DOHERTY TAKES A LOOK AT WHAT’S GOING ON THIS SPRING.

DANCE Cheek to Cheek: Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers There’s no denying that Amy Berrisford and Ross Hannaford are a tour de force with serious choreography, performance, and directing credits amassed in tours of Cats, We Will Rock You, Chicago and Wicked. These two not only beautifully perform the dance sequences that made Astaire and Rogers famous, but also sing their way through the show — and how! It’s a lovely homage to the iconic 1930s where chivalry, glamour and elegance ruled supreme.

STRICKLY BALLROOM

Laycock Street Theatre, 5 Laycock Street, North Gosford Wednesday 16 October, 11am. Tickets $19. Bookings centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/theatres

CHEECK TO CHEEK: FRED ASTAIRE AND GINGER ROGERS

Broadway to Ballroom

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If you missed the recent production of Strictly Ballroom, don’t despair. This show features the real McCoy: the 2015 World Dance Council Champions, Emma and Rhett Salmon. Resplendent with feathers and sequins, gowns and tuxedos, Emma and Rett jive, tango, quickstep and waltz their way through an array of Broadway, operatic, and pop showstoppers sung by opera vocalists, Liza Beamish and Lachlan Baker. Given the tantalising musical smorgasbord and atmospheric mirror ball and smoke effects, it makes for a sensory treat. Laycock Street Theatre, 5 Laycock Street, North Gosford Wednesday 13 November, 11am. Tickets $19, Members $16. Bookings centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/theatres


JANE RUTTER AND PETER COUSENS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Spring

Coastal Twist Festival Bold, adventurous, unorthodox and showcasing the diversity of being human. Fringe-cabaret artists, nationally acclaimed exhibitions, a film and dance party for all ages, free events including Life’s a Beach with surf comps, volleyball, drag-on-the-beach and guest judges. Coastal Twist is the very first Central Coast LGBTIQ Arts & Culture Festival, with six events across three days. The program increases exposure to a greater range of LGBTIQA+, voices and perspectives including First Nations, the culturally and linguistically diverse, all genders, abilities, classes and ages. The festival culminates on Sunday at the Peninsula Recreation Precinct in Umina with a Fair Day exploring community and artisan stalls, an all-day entertainment stage, Puparazzi pooch competitions, a rainbow family area, bespoke food and even Drag storytime. Everyone is welcomed.

ENTERTAINMENT

Coastal Twist Festival: Peninsula-based LGBTIQ Arts & Culture Festival 4 to 6 October, 2019 Supported by Central Coast Council, Woolworths and Uniting, SeaFM, Diggers Ettalong. www.coastaltwist.org.au and www.naughtynoodle.com.au

Who wouldn’t swoon at the combined talents of musical maestros Peter Cousens and Jane Rutter? Quite aside from the individual musical prowess both are renowned for, they have a delightful ability to engage with their audiences and recount a slew of entertaining anecdotes. Here they have created a romance-themed cocktail of popular songs from Les Miserables, Phantom of the Opera, Camelot and West Side Story (to name a few). Add to this, intoxicating tunes from Ravel, Massenet, Gershwin and Bernstein, and you have a heady mix that’s guaranteed to delight.

u

COASTAL TWIST FESTIVAL

Jane Rutter and Peter Cousens in Concert

The Art House, 19-21 Margaret Street, Wyong Friday 13 September 8.00pm. Adults $49, Conc. $45, Members $42, children $25. Bookings thearthousewyong.com.au

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Spring

ART From mid-November, Coasties can savour the best of the best of the NSW Art Gallery’s prestigious Archibald Prize Exhibition as it tours only a handful of regional centres. This year’s finalists number 51 and include an impressive interpretation of personalities from Del Kathryn Barton and Leigh Sales to David Wenham and even Greg Inglis. Mediums vary from aerosol, wax and shell to enamel, mixed-media and metal – with one painting inventively using surplus army camouflage material as its canvas. Of note is Angus McDonald’s striking portrait of lawyer and inclusion advocate, Mariam Veiszadeh, harking back to Dutch master Johannes Vermeer and his Girl With A Pearl Earring. Other works such as Kid Congo on the Island of the Pink Monkey Birds evokes the bygone era of the 18th century. Anh Do’s work is featured here too. And, there’s our own Central Coast finalist, the very talented Jordan Richardson (read his story on page 24). This exhibition is a must for anyone who loves art and a good controversy. 15 November to 12 January. Gosford Regional Art Gallery, Webb Street, East Gosford. centralcoast.nsw.au/galleries

Gosford Art Prize The short-listed works for the Gosford Art Prize will be on display from mid-September and include awards for Indigenous and ceramic artworks. Last year’s winner, Stephanie Monteith, took out the coveted prize with her thought-provoking and intricate painting, Dinner-Time. This year’s award is sure to attract comparable talent and competition. 14 September to 3 November. Gosford Regional Art Gallery, Webb Street, East Gosford. centralcoast.nsw.au/galleries

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RAINBOW’S END

The Archibald Prize Exhibition

THEATRE Rainbow’s End What truly binds us to each other: is it culture, place, love or fear? Rainbow’s End is a thought-provoking play that holds a mirror up to 1950s’ Australian society to explore the cynicism and hopes of different generations, not only in terms of one family’s destiny but in the broader terms of our nation. Humorously told through the microcosm of one matriarchal family, complex issues of connection within and, externally, to culture are raised — as is the grit and enormous grace of First Nation’s people in weathering fickle circumstances. Full of cheeky moments and high drama, it’s a play that will leave you feeling satisfied with the dramatic ride. The Art House, 19-21 Margaret Street, Wyong Tuesday 10 September 7.30pm; Wednesday 11 September, 10.00am. Adults $30, Conc. $25, Under 30 $20. Bookings thearthousewyong.com.au


The Art House and David M. Hawkins in association with the Sydney Opera House, HOTA, IPAC, GPAC and the Perth Theatre Trust present

HAIR HUGH SHERIDAN

PAULINI

THE ORIGINAL TRIBAL ROCK MUSICAL TOURING AUSTRALIA IN 2019

HAIR | SEPTEMBER 19–21 Book and Lyrics by Gerome Ragni and James Rado, Music by Galt MacDermot. Originally produced on the New York stage by Michael Butler.

ROFLSHALBOWCO | OCTOBER 28-29 Hilarious, ridiculous fun for your kids that will have the whole family in stitches!

BOOKINGS THEARTHOUSEWYONG.COM.AU | 02 4335 1485 19-21 MARGARET ST, WYONG


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Spring

MUSICALS If you can still remember — or have been living in another universe and haven’t heard — the hippy, feel-good tunes, Age of Aquarius and Let the Sun Shine In, it’s time you booked a seat. This iconic production marks the 50th anniversary of the show’s Australian opening in Kings Cross. It is faithful to the countercultural youth angst that spurred the original while cleverly integrating contemporary concerns such as identity, gender equality, LGBTIQA+ rights and climate change feature. How has society changed or, perhaps progressed, since 1969? Hugh Sheridan, Paulini and Prinnie Stevens share top billing, with our own local talent, Joe Kalou (of ‘High-5’ fame). Ever edgy, the production features strobe lighting, smoke and haze effects, drug references, full frontal nudity, racial slurs and offensive language so patrons need to be over 15 years. Directed by Declan Greene and produced by David M. Hawkins, it’s sure to prove a cut above many former revivals. The Art House, 19-21 Margaret Street, Wyong Thursday 19 September 7.30pm; Friday 20 September 7.30pm; Saturday 21 September, 2.00pm and 7.30pm. Adults $72, Conc. $65, Member $60, under 30 $48. Bookings thearthousewyong.com.au

SOLOISTS KARINA MOSS-HOLLANDS AND CAROLINE OTTO

Hair

MUSIC German Masters of Fate with the CSO This compelling trio of classics charts the fortunes and emotions of historical figures. Schumann’s Julius Caesar Overture reflects the pomp, power and high drama of the Roman Empire’s height to the violent downfall of its greatest leader. Beethoven’s commanding 5th Symphony explores his anger at the betrayal and destruction of his homeland by Napoleonic despotism given his support of French Revolutionary ideals. Brahms’ reconciliatory Double Concerto for Violin and Cello, by contrast, is both playful and thematically triumphant. Concert Master Karina MossHollands and cellist Caroline Otto feature as soloists. Symphony Central Coast Sunday 22 September, 2.30pm at the Central Coast Grammar School Performing Arts Centre, Arundel Road, Erina Heights. Adult tickets $40 + booking fee. Book at symphonycentralcoast.com.au Cakes, tea and coffee provided by CWA members. Wines from Tamburlaine Wines.

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GOSFORD REGIONAL GALLERY &

E D O G AW A C O M M E M O R AT I V E G A R D E N

16 NOVEMBER 2019 - 12 JANUARY 2020 Awarded to the best painting of a notable Australian, the Archibald Prize is a who’s who of Australian culture, from politicians to celebrities and from sporting heroes to artists. Visit the exhibition to vote for your favourite portrait in the ANZ People’s Choice award.

Tickets • $7.50 / $5 Concession • Members free Check out our website for associated Archibald Prize public programs and events. centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/galleries

AN ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES TOURING EXHIBITION TOP LEFT: Tony Costa, Lindy Lee, oil on canvas, 182.5 x 152 cm. © the artist. Winner: Archibald Prize 2019. TOP RIGHT: Tessa MacKay, Through the looking glass, oil on linen, 210 x 330.5 cm. © the artist. Winner: Packing Room Prize 2019. BOTTOM: Jordan Richardson, Annabel, oil on aluminium composite panel, 76.5 x 63 cm. © the artist

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PHOENIX

  

COLLECTIVE



Concert #3 - Freedom & Equality 15th Sep - Sydney Hunter Baillie Church, Annandale - 2.30pm

19th Sep - Canberra

Wesley Music Centre, Forrest - 7pm

22nd Sep - Central Coast

HAYDN SHOSTAKOVICH HIGDON TCHAIKOVSKY Info : PCMUSIC.NET

Greenway Chapel, Green Point - 2.30pm

Creation Haydn's Creation  The

Immerse yourself in the wonder of this extraordinary work

eaturin soloists Elke Hook Nathan Bryon Christopher Richardson



    

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CLASSES & COURSES • Spring

CLASSES AND COURSES

WORDS BROOKE DOHERTY

BEEKEEPING The allure and appreciation of the many health benefits of honey has seen a surge in urban beekeeping with eco-friendly processes. Our local Central Coast Amateur Beekeepers Association has the distinction of scooping national awards at the prestigious Royal Easter Show – so if you’re interested in setting-up a hive, they are the experts. Guests are welcome at their meetings where seminars are run by stalwarts such as Barbara Elkins — whose knowledge of bee behaviour, flow-hives and by-products including mead production, tonics and lip balms ­— guarantee to thoroughly amuse and intrigue. As further learning is hands-on, you’ll then need to join the Association. Central Coast Amateur Beekeepers Association of NSW Club meetings: third Wednesday of each month, The Old Tote Trust Rooms, Gosford Showground. Beginning in Bees session 6.15pm to 7pm. General meeting starts at 7pm sharp. Club Membership less than $50 pa.

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CLASSES & COURSES • Spring

ART COURSES Kids’ beach art and adult waterlily workshops The multi-talented and awarded local artist, Robyn Pedley, will run her ever-popular watercolour and ink workshop for kids as we head into spring. For adults, there’s a full-day workshop of Monet-inspired techniques to produce their own impressionistic masterpiece. Bobbie P Gallery Level 1/7 Hudson Lane, Terrigal. Bookings: 0490 061 949 or www.bobbiepgallery.com Morning tea and lunch will be provided. Kids Beach Fun Workshop: Wednesday, 2 October, 10.30am to 11.45am. $30 Waterlily Workshop in Acrylics: Saturday, 12 October, 10am to 3pm. $175

COOKING Central Coast Cooking School Learn to make mouth-watering ravioli and agnolotti using an extrusion pasta machine. Two-course lunch and glass of wine included. Hand-made Ravioli, Sunday, 22 September, 10am to 1pm. $100

Discover the secrets of filleting, slicing, chopping and panfrying seafood to perfection. Indulge in the spoils! Dessert is complimentary. Seafood Masterclass, Sunday, 13 October, 10am to 1pm. $100

Master the perfect dough, sauce and fresh, flavoursome food combinations. Dessert provided. Must be 16 years+ to participate. Authentic Wood-Fired Pizza, Saturday, 2 November, 10am to 1pm. $80 All courses at: Bombini, 366 Avoca Drive, Avoca Beach. Inquiries: 02 4381 1436 or bombini.com.au/reservations

MUSIC THEORY, SONG-WRITING, STAGE-CRAFT AND VOCAL COURSES Chris and Madeline Stratford have developed their funky business over the last decade, producing an aesthetically-pleasing space that boasts an in-house concert stage, band room, and sizeable tuition rooms. They welcome students of all ages and even teach the ukulele. The next intake for their Theory 101 course is in October. Stratford Music Shop 8, 81 Blackwall Rd, Woy Woy. Bookings: 02 4344 5809 or stratfordmusic.com.au/courses

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CLASSES & COURSES • Spring

THE GROVE STUDIOS ACADEMY IN NARARA Based at the internationally renowned Grove Studios, purpose-built recording studios, first created by Garry Gary of INXS.

A

rtists from Silverchair and Courtney Barnett, to Alison Wonderland and The Presets, to Birds of Tokyo, and Ocean Alley have all used the studios and owner, Scott Horscroft, is an award-winning producer who has been involved in the production and mixing of numerous ARIA award-winning albums for The Presets, Paul Kelly, Silverchair and Birds of Tokyo, to name a few. The Grove Studios team has built a reputation for developing leading artists, engineers, producers and industry entrepreneurs, and The Grove Studios Academy was developed to deliver this wealth of knowledge, industry contacts, skills and experience to the next generation of talented participants. The Academy is an RTO (Registered Training Organisation) delivering accredited Diploma of Music Industry and Advanced Diploma of Music Industry on the Central Coast, with the next intake for both courses commencing January 2020. The Grove Studios Academy’s campus is unique in that the classroom is a functioning state of the art recording studio with 20 individual workstations located within the control room of the studio, giving students a real-life experience, surrounded by industry experts, enthusiastic young studio assistants and interns. Students are also given the opportunity to connect further with the industry through the guest lecture and intern program. CUA50815 Diploma of Music Industry (Sound Production) CUA60515 Advanced Diploma of Music Industry (Sound Production) thegrovestudios.com thegrovestudiosacademy.com Registered Training Organisation 45327

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GREAT OUTDOORS • Rumbalara Reserve

GREAT OUTDOORS

Edward John Eyre

Sir Charles Kingsford Smith

The bronze explorers of the

RUMBALARA RESERVE RUMBALARA, MEANING ‘RAINBOW’S END’, IS A FITTING NAME FOR THIS ‘POT OF GOLD’ THAT IS THE RUMBALARA RESERVE, A TRANQUIL 600 HECTARES OF BUSHLAND IN GOSFORD, JUST MINUTES FROM THE CBD. WORDS KIM COLE

T

here are several tracks within the reserve and the adjacent Coastal Open Space System. And to experience the best of what this amazing area has to offer, we suggest a hike along a network of several trails known on the Wildwalks website as Rumbalara ‘Explorer’ (see wildwalks.com). The tracks zig-zag their way through lush fern-covered forests and native bush that look over some of the finest panoramic views of Brisbane Water. But the most surprising sights to come across on these tracks are the bronze statues of famous explorers in amongst the eucalypts. In 1987, four bronze sculptures were commissioned by Sara Lee Kitchens (Australia) Pty Ltd and the (then) Gosford City Council as a ‘salute to famous Australians’ for the Bicentennial celebrations of 1988. The four sculptures of Charles Sturt, Matthew Flinders, Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and Edward John Eyre are still shown on the walking track information boards within the reserve but Sturt, Kingsford Smith and Eyre are currently away having repair work

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done on them — for corrosion and, in the case of Eyre, damage from vandalism. We hope they’ll be back soon. Flinders, on the Iron Bark Loop, is found by walking through the Nurrunga picnic area. The track is approximately 500 metres long, has a gravel surface and remains on a relatively even grade along its length. The sculpture was designed to be approachable so let the kids get up close and personal for a great photo opportunity. As we immersed ourselves in the surrounding beauty we felt a little like explorers ourselves, stumbling across undiscovered lands. That is, until we were brought back to reality with the sounds of car horns, and trains departing Gosford station, reminding us just how close to Gosford city we were. The Rumbalara bushwalking tracks are as individual as they are breathtaking. Each track showcases different local flora. The Flannel Flower walk, the Red Gum, Iron Bark and Rainforest walks are all fairly moderate and enjoyable walks, while the


GREAT OUTDOORS • Rumbalara Reserve

Casuarina Walk is a bit tougher with a steep incline. The total 6.1 km, grade 4 circuit hike should take approximately 2¾ hours to complete. The shorter tracks range from 600 metres to 3 km. Another highlight is The Cappers Gully Quarry, a sandstone quarry operated by Gosford Quarries between 1922 and the 1950s. The site is now very overgrown but does still offer some interesting artefacts. The old quarry site can be reached from the White Street fire trail in East Gosford, and is also accessible from John Whiteway Drive in Gosford. Our favourite part of the walk was the Rainforest Walk. We found ourselves being drawn down into a green vortex of trees and ferns as we descended the metal staircase into the rainforest and Cappers Gully. The Rumbalara ‘Explorer’ tracks are well maintained with all walks recently upgraded by Central Coast Council. There are stairs over the difficult areas, dirt tracks, floating metal walkways and local sandstone. As you walk past mature eucalyptus trees and wildflowers, keep a lookout for the local wallabies, goannas, echidnas and birdlife that provide added enjoyment, especially for the kids. There are picturesque areas for picnickers with free barbecues and toilet amenities. Yaruga picnic area has free electric barbecues, toilets, picnic tables, nearby lookouts and proximity to walking tracks. The picnic areas can be accessed from Dolly Ave in Springfield. The best time of year to visit has to be spring with the wildflowers in bloom. The white-petalled flannel flowers, in particular, are simply beautiful. Mountain bikers are permitted on roads and managed trails within the reserve. Domesticated animals are prohibited. Although challenging in sections, Rumbalara is a great free day out with the kids, and rewards the walker in a variety of ways from a historical point of view to immersing yourself in nature and the splendour of the amazing views. Overall an enjoyable experience in the heart of suburbia.

Charles Sturt

HOW TO GET THERE A 1 km walk from Gosford station, or drive to the end of Donnison Street and park in the Rumbalara Environmental Education Centre carpark for good access points to the walking tracks in the lower section of the reserve. The picnic areas are accessed from Dolly Avenue, Springfield, with the gate open from 9 am to 5 pm.

Matthew Flinders

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FEATURE • Tim Faulkner

TIM FAULKNER aka ‘Noah’ AUSTRALIAN REPTILE PARK AND AUSSIE ARK WORDS CATHARINE RETTER

Tim with a Mountain Pygmy Possum.

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FEATURE • Tim Faulkner

‘We’re proud to concentrate on four major endangered species here — Tasmanian Devils, Yellow-footed Rock Wallabies, Komodo Dragons, and Koalas — and one of the ways we’re doing this is through educating people, and especially kids, on the importance of wildlife in our environment.’

A Tasmanian Devil joey, successfully bred at Aussie Ark.

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im Faulkner is not afraid to make bold statements when it comes to preserving Australia’s treasured wildlife. ‘We are very good at researching and monitoring endangered species,’ he says, his voice rising slightly behind the passion of his words. ‘But what are we, as a country, doing with that information? And, important though research is, too often it means we are only watching and monitoring those species into extinction. We have to “do”, not just “watch”.’ It’s those very words that are behind his philosophy as General Manager of Australian Reptile Park at Somersby and as CEO of Aussie Ark in the Barrington Tops. Tim grew up in western Sydney catching turtles and snakes in the local bushland, and holidaying with his family at South West Rocks and the Murrumbidgee River. ‘I was lucky,’ he says, ‘to grow up in a family that was into nature.’ While he was still at school, he talked his way into work experience at Featherdale Wildlife Park at Doonside and immediately knew he’d found his vocation. He couldn’t wait to start work and, as soon as he turned 15, Featherdale took him on as a fulltime employee. He was there for nine years until he made the move north to the Australian Reptile Park where owners, John and Robyn Weigel, recognised the talent and the knowledge he’d developed. Although Tim left school early to pursue his passion, he knew he had to formally expand his career knowledge and went on to not only achieve diplomas in business management, auditing and accounting but became the only student in TAFE’s history to achieve a clean sweep of Distinctions in all Zoology subjects. Although the Reptile Park today is very different to the organisation founded by Eric Worrell in 1948, Tim is proud of the continued emphasis on collecting snake and spider venoms to make antivenoms, and calculates that the Park’s work has probably saved around 20,000 people’s lives to date. ‘It’s from those beginnings that the heart and soul of the park has developed,’ he says. ‘And although milking the snakes and spiders has always been done behind the scenes, we’d like the public to see how it’s done. So we’re working on how visitors can get to see that.’ The Reptile Park has grown to be home to around 2,000 reptiles, mammals, marsupials, and birds. But there are aspects of the Reptile Park that won’t change. ‘It’s about Australian wildlife and the conservation of threatened Australian species. That’s why the bush setting is important too. And it’s why you won’t see lions, tigers or bears here,’ says Tim. ‘We’re proud to concentrate on four major endangered species here — Tasmanian Devils, Yellow-footed Rock Wallabies, Komodo Dragons, and Koalas — and one of the ways we’re doing this is

through educating people, and especially kids, on the importance of wildlife in our environment. We do this by making it fun and, where practical, by letting people interact with the friendlier wildlife.’ In the future, Tim and his team have big plans to extend the interaction with wildlife, even Tasmanian Devils. ‘We bottle feed the baby Devils, so why not open this experience to children as well,’ he says. Another endangered species, the Komodo Dragon, is housed in the just-finished Komodo House. There’s an authentic Balinese temple feel about it as you walk through the portal into the ‘dragons’ den.’ The two Komodos, Kraken and Daenerys, are walked (on a leash) in the Park every day to keep them interested and socialised. It lets them test the air for all the smells of their surroundings, and helps in their training and interaction with their keepers to stop them developing any aggressive tendencies. Tree Kangaroos from northern Queensland will be arriving later this year. All of Australia and New Guinea’s 14 species of Tree Kangaroos are endangered to some extent, with some so critically endangered it’s thought they may be extinct in the wild. 85


FEATURE • Tim Faulkner

Tim and the team’s plans don’t stop there, ’We are also developing plans for a major aquatic centre representing the geographic wetlands,’ he confides. ‘Watch this space!’ There’s also romance in the air at the Reptile Park. ‘It’s taken us ten years to find the right mate for Hugo, our always-popular giant Galapagos Tortoise, and he will be getting his first girlfriend this year. He’s now 68 years old and it’s not before time, even though he’s barely into the prime of his life.’ Possibly less lucky in love is the giant Reticulated Python, the ironically named Cuddles, from South-Eastern Asia, whose species is the longest snake in the world, growing to around 10 metres in length. These pythons have backward curving teeth to bite and hold their prey before squeezing them to death ... and swallowing them whole. Romantic hugs between this species must depend on a high level of trust! And as Reticulated Pythons mate in the first two to four years of their life, Cuddles may have missed his big opportunity. Tim’s other passion is Aussie Ark, a not-for-profit, 400-hectare, fenced wild sanctuary in the Barrington Tops that was established to breed a robust ‘insurance’ population of Tasmanian Devils to help save them from extinction. Its success, on land donated by the Packer family, has led to expansion, with the long-term aim of creating a sustainable future for Australia’s threatened wildlife. There are now 250 endangered animals, including Eastern Quolls, Parma Wallabies, Brush-tailed Rock Wallabies, Rufous Betongs, Longnosed Potoroos and Manning River Turtles who call Aussie Ark their safe haven. Some species, such as the Eastern Quolls — extinct on

Hugo, the giant Galapagos Tortoise, is hoping for a mate this year.

mainland Australia since 1963 — are breeding so successfully that 30 will be released into National Parks during 2019. ‘Australian Reptile Park and Aussie Ark have very similar aims,’ says Tim. ‘They represent two ways to help Australian wildlife: one is through the general public, by education and interaction; the other is by creating sanctuaries for them to live and breed in safety.’ c For more information https://reptilepark.com.au/ For information and donations https://www.aussieark.org.au/ Guided visits and overnight accommodation are available in limited numbers. Sponsorship and public funding goes towards fencing, allowing the safe area to be expanded. The Australian Reptile Park donates food, water, wages, motor vehicle

© DAVID STOWE

expenses, etc.

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A breeding Tasmanian Devil is released into the Aussie Ark sanctuary.


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GARDENS • Peats Ridge

The veranda is a tour de force with hanging rhipsalis, Medinilla, rhapis palm and begonias in a changing display. The tall plant in the foreground is a rare dwarf taxodium.

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GARDENS • Peats Ridge

LIVING EDGE GARDEN AND NURSERY

A SHARED PASSION WHEN YOU COMBINE THE TALENTS OF AN EXPERT GARDENER WHO HAS AN INNATE SENSE OF DESIGN, AND A METICULOUS NURSERYMAN WITH A PASSION FOR THE RARE AND UNUSUAL, YOU HAVE A RECIPE FOR A HIGHLY ORIGINAL GARDEN FILLED WITH PLANTS RARELY SEEN OUTSIDE A BOTANICAL GARDEN.

WORDS PAUL URQUHART

PHOTOS LISA HAYMES

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GARDENS • Peats Ridge

The rusting implements hanging on the wall are a signature part of Blake’s style and form a backdrop for the unusual plants from David’s nursery.

C

Two rare and beautiful streptocarpus.

David Fripp

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ollectors’ gardens are often nondescript affairs full of benches and make-do structures built purely to house plants but never to look at. Living Edge is different. Here, we find unusual plants like Sinningia bullata, usually seen only as a house plant used as a bedding plant. They might be mixed with giant Alcantareas, the big bromeliads that have had a rapid rise in popularity in recent years or with hard to come by tibouchinas, shrubby delights with tiny white or purple flowers, a world away from the gaudy purple trees we see in many suburbs in autumn. This is where the synergy between gardener and grower comes in at Living Edge, their combined garden and nursery at Peats Ridge. David Fripp is an extraordinary plantsman, a member of the Gesneriad Society [the gesneriad family has over 3,400 species, of which the best-known is the African violet] and is a collector of plants only the most avid plant lover would know about. Blake Jolley is the design wizard. He’ll take a plant that most of us would think is a show bench specimen and make it work in a landscape in ways that stun most gardeners. Blake is constantly pushing the envelope to see what works in a new context and, what’s more, which plants will look good in combo. Often, these too, are rare or unusual specimens that you’ll never find at a conventional nursery. I have visited the garden many times and every time, there is something new or previously unnoticed to spark interest. Blake is also an experimenter par excellence. If something is not working for him, he will change it. This applies to the unusual and the commonplace in equal measure. Salvias, for instance, that are common to many gardens abound here but they are mixed with sub-tropical shrubs and groundcovers from many parts of the world. South America is home to many (tibouchinas and salvias for instance) but African aloes and the yellow bauhinia from southern Africa and India, all form a botanical United Nations,


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GARDENS • Peats Ridge

all happily coexisting under a canopy of Australian eucalypts with our own Gymea lilies sending up their spikes of skyscraper blooms in the background, while waratahs and old man banksia add texture and seasonal interest. So many have tried to create the blend between exotic plants and Australian plants, but Blake seems to have cracked it. His garden style blends the bush surrounds and the made-garden seamlessly. The soil at Peats Ridge is Hawkesbury sandstone, low in nutrients and so free-draining it is almost impossible to retain moisture naturally. Blake’s secret is to start beds with heavy lashings of eucalypt mulch laid thickly on bare ground and allowed to decompose to a rich, friable compost which keeps moisture in and provides an excellent growing medium. It’s unconventional and often time-consuming, but he starts with really tough plants to provide interest while the process works its magic. David and Blake’s passion for plants has broadened into the community sphere as well. For the past few years, this dynamic duo has spearheaded the annual event, the Plant Lovers Fair at Kariong and, in the process, attracting a team of like-minded volunteer plantaholics. The event brings dedicated plantsmen both local and from interstate, to showcase and present their wares each September. Often, it’s the only way to find something out of the ordinary. Its impact has been widespread as many local nurseries have seen the need to extend their horticultural range to include the subtropical, succulent or native species and cultivars. The garden itself is a classic stroll garden, with paths weaving through beds filled with mass planted shrubs and groundcovers.

Along the main entrance path, you follow a snaking hedge of shaggy box, Buxus bodinieri, a rare species from China, backed with Panicum ‘Heavy Metal’, a greyish, upright American prairie grass leading to an open area dominated by a spreading gumtree festooned with rusting plough disks. Below it, large agaves give a dramatic and architectural introduction to the garden. To the right, a magnificent silk floss tree, Ceiba speciosa, the national tree of Argentina, spreads its horizontal branches over a myriad of different groundcovers. The tree is unusual in that its trunk is lined with thorns, and flowering occurs in late summer, often on bare branches. Further on, a collection of bamboos, Nepalese blue and Timor Black, lead to a kiosk by the dam, which in summer is a symphony of multicoloured water lilies enhanced by sight of tiny diver ducks and skimming kingfishers. The wildlife is as much a feature of Blake’s style as the plants with finches, king parrots, eastern rosellas and yellow robins sharing the space. Living Edge Garden is different to most gardens. Here you can see just how uncommon plants can be used in an integrated design and common plants used in an uncommon way. There is so much to learn from Blake Jolley’s masterful combinations and David Fripp’s exquisite plants. It’s a must see. The garden is only open to the public by appointment on selected dates in autumn when plants from the nursery are also available for purchase. Check the website www.livingedgegarden.com for details. In the meantime, visit the Plant Lovers Fair at Kariong on 28 and 29 September. See www.plantloversfair.com.au for details. They will be there.

Above: Blake Jolley Top left: A hard-to-come-by pink Hippeastrum reticulatum striatifolium. Left: This magnificent species of agave, among Cotyledon with small orange flowers, greets visitors to the garden.

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heaven on earth 2017

2018 BEN HOWLAND PHOTOGRAPHY

A timeless, unique wedding rendezvous

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Imagine a place that is simply heaven on earth. A moment in time, where there is no time. A pause. A heartbeat.


WEDDINGS • Profile

‘EAST’ MEETS ‘FARM’ Delusha Anderson and Rahul Sardana FOR RAHUL AND DELUSHA, THEIR EPIC HINDU TRADITIONAL CEREMONY AND LUSH CELEBRATIONS ON A CENTRAL COAST FARM WAS A PARED BACK, SMALL AFFAIR BY INDIAN AND SRI LANKAN STANDARDS. NONETHELESS, THE DAY CALLED FOR STAMINA FOR ALL THE MAGIC MOMENTS OF FOOD AND ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC AND DANCING, FIRE AND FLOWERS, COLOUR AND COMMUNITY.

WORDS SARAH TOLMIE

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or Rahul, being Indian and Hindu, and Delusha, a Sri Lankan Catholic, it was important to appreciate both cultures on their wedding day. Or should we say, ‘days’. Their modern Hindu Vedic celebration was a joyful and colourful culmination of a week of ceremony, ritual and celebration, which began with a mid-week Catholic ceremony for family in Sydney. ‘The venue was our biggest decision. We have always wanted an outdoor wedding that created a homely yet beautiful look. When we visited Fernbank for the first time, it ticked all our boxes. The venue, the service, and having accommodation on the property just made life easier. We had 150 guests, all travelling from Sydney, all on the same day, and we wanted to ensure that people were entertained, relaxed and fed well,’ said Delusha. Rahul and Delusha met eight years ago when they were both studying at Macquarie University. It was the ‘classic eyes meeting across a busy Uni bar’ scenario, but they were ‘mates only’ for many years, until they couldn’t deny any longer that there was something special between them. ‘I love the fact that Rahul is so patient, calm and accommodating. I am super organised and can sometimes stress over the smallest things whereas Rahul is able to be more realistic about things and ensure that I am okay. Rahul always calls me from work and wishes me good morning and, no matter how tired he is, he will always show me as much energy as he can,’ said Delusha.

‘Delusha is a caring, kind, nurturing and truly selfless soul, yet still strong, fiery and has immense passion. These qualities attracted me to her and they are why I have so much love, respect and admiration for her. She encourages me to be myself and find more of myself each day, and we share numerous interests, but are different at the same time. That’s what makes us fit and work so perfectly together,’ said Rahul. ‘Our marriage has created a meaningful bond. We are now one, and life wouldn’t be complete without each other,’ said Delusha. A Hindu wedding is a long, full day and Fernback Farm was the perfect venue. Rahul and Delusha used all of the many amazing spaces on the property: the avenue of trees, the lake and fields, the marquee reception space, as well as the two residential dwellings to accommodate the bride and groom families separately. It allowed the couple to create a sense of movement, different looks and unique moments for themselves and their guests as their day progressed. Delusha chose to wear a skirt and top in pastels and gold for the Hindu ceremony, called a Lenga, and Rahul was also in traditional dress in cream and gold. Both with lots of fabulous bling too. The couple changed for the reception with Delusha slipping into a second gold Lenga which was more comfortable for dancing, and Rahul into a smart suit. Guests enjoyed many food and rest stations throughout the day, including grazing tables, various picnic installations and later a fully catered Indian feast.

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© ESTHER SPARKES - FERNBANK STYLING

WEDDINGS • Profile

A number of rituals and traditions took place, beginning with games that are played before the bride arrives. One such was the bride’s side of the family trying to steal the groom’s shoes for which he has to pay money to have them returned. Rahul then arrived on horseback and was received with music, dancing and celebration. After the arrival games and initial drinks and canapés, the groom and guests moved to the ceremony location, centred around the ceremonial canopy, ‘Mandap’, which was lushly adorned with flowers. Delusha then had her own dramatic arrival walking under a canopy of flowers carried by four brothers. Along with their parents, Delusha and Rahul were led through a modernised version of a Vedic marriage ceremony by a Hindu priest with traditional Hindu vows and four circumambulations of the sacred fire that honours the four goals of human life: Dharma (virtue), Artha (prosperity), Kama (pleasure) and Moksha (liberation). ‘In this moment, I felt a deep sense of connection: just pure comfort, happiness, warmth and peace with the commitment we were making to one another,’ Rahul said. It was his favourite moment of the day. For Delusha, after a week of family rituals and dinners, two ceremonies and three gown changes, her favourite time was entering the reception, where she could finally let her hair down, relax and party! Ceremony locations: The Catholic ceremony was in Sydney at St Patricks Church in Mortlake. The Hindu ceremony took place at Fernbank Farm in Wyong. Reception: Fernbank Farm Photographer: Baqdrop Media Celebrant/officiant: Ram Sivan (ordained as Sri Rama Ramanuja Achan) Musicians: Keitha and Sa (Central Coast) Videographer: Baqdrop Media Bridal Dress: Payal and Pasand. Reception outfit: Walia Jones Suits: Abhishek_n_Radhika. Reception outfit: Farage Hair and Makeup: Gather and Stitch Jeweller: Rings from MIDAS in Bondi Flowers: Gai Hyde Flowers (Central Coast) Stylist: Esther Sparkes and Megs from Fernbank Farm DJ: Dj Vinny

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Welcome

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your wedding is planned to perfection, so that the most important day of your life is spectacular and stress free. We work closely with you so that your dream wedding in our beautiful gardens is superb. The estate offers several locations for your wedding ceremony, reception and photographs.

This privately owned estate is vast, offering several picture-perfect locations for your ceremony, reception and wedding photography. From the horseshoe bridge leading to a timber arbour adorned with a crystal chandelier, to the intimate Wisteria Amphitheatre or the expansive Garden Green - we can cater for small or large weddings, special events and corporate retreats. At Somersby Gardens we ensure that every detail of

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TUSCAN Long Love Lunch Dani Hosiosky and Ben Filler

WORDS SARAH TOLMIE

I

taly may be Dani and Ben’s favourite-ever place but more important to them on their wedding day was to be surrounded by family and, especially, to be able to include their grandparents. So the next best thing to getting married in the Tuscan hills was to create their long love lunch in the climbing vines and the clay-coloured landscapes of the beautiful Redleaf in Wollombi. ‘We wanted everyone to feel included, comfortable and festive. We wanted a fiesta similar to the opening scene of The Godfather with music playing, people dancing, eating and basking in the sun, kids running around having fun, and food and drinks overflowing. ‘We wanted to be natural and to let ourselves and guests feel comfortable and festive.

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WEDDINGS • Profile

‘We wanted it to feel organic and we did so by creating a long lunch which turned into a party,’ said Dani. And what a party it was, more long weekend than long lunch. Dani and Ben created a familial and festive experience that led people through the weekend, beginning with a family dinner on the Friday night, then a day of rest and relaxing on Saturday, the Sabbath. Sunday was wedding day, with an early 1pm ceremony so guests could enjoy a full day and, for those who could stay, an ‘after-party’ complete with DJ, fire pits and cheese toasties to refuel for the dancing into the wee hours. Their Jewish ceremony, held in the grounds under a dramatic tree, was intimate and warm. It included the traditions of the Horah, the breaking of the glass, and dancing. The wedding canopy, the ‘chuppah’ — made by Ben — was walked down the aisle by Ben and Dani’s brothers. Both Ben and Dani’s grandmothers were their official witnesses to the marriage and Ben also had his beloved grandfather as a groomsman. Dani was supported by her sister and sister-in-law, all wearing white. But there was no mistaking the bride with Dani wearing an edgy, modern corset-dress with lace and floral features, and a very long train. Dani (25) and Ben (29) have been together six years. ‘I had a crush on Ben for quite a while and it took chasing him down at a club in Sydney to get his attention.’ Both Dani and Ben are in the design industry and are creatively fuelled by one another. ‘We’re constantly discussing creative ideas. We’re just completely and authentically ourselves with one another, and inspire each other to be the best version of ourselves. ‘Typically, when people think “marriage”, they think, “settle down and start a family together”. We just want to enjoy this time together and be a young and free married couple. We like to push each other to grow spiritually, mentally, physically and professionally,’ said Dani. Ben and Dani knew they could trust the beauty of Redleaf Wollombi and its grounds to carry the sensuous simplicity they wanted to create, and pared back on doing too much else, other than a few simple touches of fresh rosemary and minimal flowers, just in whites.

‘When we found Redleaf, we were instantly transported back to Italy and all the guests felt it too.’ The long lunch was a family-style feast in front of the house. There was Italian-themed live music and rustic shared plates of simple, hearty Italian food. It was all that was needed to create a relaxed, beautiful and celebratory setting. That, and the most amazing balmy, sun-shiny day. Ceremony location and reception: Redleaf, Wollombi Photographer: Blumenthal Photography Officiant: Rabbi Gourarie Musicians: Ilan Kidron and The Glass Breakers, DJ was David Goode Videographer: Soda Films Dress: Corston Couture Suits: Belance Hair and makeup: Jo Luhrs Wedding planner: Glenda Graff

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ONCE UPON A TIME • Bateau Bay

ONCE UPON A TIME IN BATEAU BAY

© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

‘IDYLLIC DAYS IN THE SURF AND SUN AND ENJOYING THE HAPPIEST OF TIMES’ PRETTY WELL SUMS UP HOW BATEAU BAY, THEN KNOWN AS BOAT HARBOUR, WAS REGARDED FROM ITS EARLIEST DAYS.

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he area was officially designated as a ‘bay 1 km north of Upright Point’, but the post office kept getting letters for other Boat Harbours in NSW so the name was gentrified to Bateau Bay in 1975. One of the area’s earliest residents was a Dutch seaman, Yan (Harry) Doodson, who chose the area for its crystal clear fresh water spring which is said to still flow onto the beach today. He built a shelter on the foreshore and enjoyed the isolation of the bush and the beach. In 1890, he was granted a 90-year lease on land to erect cabins just above the high water mark. It was accommodation for men only, a fishing camp, which he named ‘Elonara Holiday Camp for Gentlemen’, which later became Bateau Bay Lodge.

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There was no direct road from Wyong to The Entrance and traffic was by ferry from Wyong, or by bush track from Gosford. Gradually, local dirt tracks were carved through the bush by local cows, fishermen and the occasional brave soul who ventured to the beach. Bateau Bay Lodge changed ownership several times. Gaston de Renaude took it over in 1956 and converted the existing cabins to self-catered accommodation. Sue K remembered the drive in from the main road from Gosford to the cabins. ‘There was absolutely nothing ... The road that came in was a bush track down by where the high school is now … On the corner, where the playing fields are, was an airstrip.’


COURTESY OF CENTRAL COAST COUNCIL, CENTRAL COAST MEMORIES

‘[I remember] the excitement of arriving, the smell of the ocean as you clambered out .. unloading the car and loading up the flying fox with all your supplies … rushing down the path to your home for the next week or two.’ In 1974, a storm wiped out the kiosk and some of the cabins when 8-metre waves pounded the beach for several days. Lollies, ice-creams and pies were spread all over the beach, and Darrin Coleman remembered having a pie fight on the sand in the aftermath. By 1985, the cabins had fallen into disrepair, and were destroyed by fire the following year, the end of an era. Bill Perry and his wife Ada, who started coming to Boat Harbour in 1944, recalled ‘there were plenty of cattle running around the Crackneck.’ Cattle were known to fall over the cliff face at Crackneck — called Upright Point until the 1940s — and local lore has it that’s how the point was given its name. Fishermen also used to follow a precarious track down to the rocks and they liked to tell you it was their track that gave rise to the name.

© MERRILLIE REDDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

ONCE UPON A TIME • Bateau Bay

‘We knew there was a mob of horses running around too. They broke through our fence one night and destroyed Mum’s garden. The swamp ran right through from Bateau Bay Road — Doodson Ave then — which used to finish somewhere near Boomerang Street.’ In 2017, National Parks & Wildlife named a bush path through Wyrrabalong National Park, opposite Bill and Ada’s old home, ‘Perrys Walk’. Reg Ruff caught rabbits where the Crackneck carpark is now. A grassy area remains where vegetables were grown during the Depression, though more often than not, the rabbits got there first. ‘In those days, anybody that built a shack could live there fulltime, for no money or rent. It was marvellous really. You could camp there, do as you liked. ‘All our bunks were forks, just sticks in the ground with a couple of rails and sugar bags. We used to drive the horse and sulky through the water to tighten the wheels, the spokes … well that was the excuse Dad gave.’ The original corner store — ‘a godsend to those who lived there then’ — on the corner of Bateau Bay Road and Point Street was run by Mrs Holden when only a couple of blocks had dwellings built on them. By 1954 it also incorporated the Bateau Bay Post Office. Most of the suburb was developed in the 1960s and 1970s. Street plantings were popular thanks to two locals: Naomi Honey who had a licence to collect seeds on Crown Land, and retired Professor Neville White, a plant pathologist. There is a stone memorial to Naomi at Shelly Beach, and a small area of land is officially designated, ‘Naomi Honey Reserve.’ Bateau Bay has always had a strong village spirit and community attitude and the beach has always been a big part of the essence of Bateau Bay. c Source: Lee Mowbray, Bateau Bay Voices facebook.com/BBVoices

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PEOPLE OF THE COAST • Dr Marc Coughlan

DR MARC COUGHLAN Simple outdoor pleasures balance a high-tech, ground-breaking career. IT WAS THANKS TO THE GREAT LIFESTYLE THE CENTRAL COAST OFFERS FAMILIES THAT NEUROSURGEON MARC COUGHLAN AND HIS WIFE, NICOLE, DECIDED THIS WAS THE BEST PLACE FOR THEM TO RAISE THEIR FAMILY OF FIVE CHILDREN. AND IT WAS BECAUSE GOSFORD PRIVATE HOSPITAL HAD BEEN PREPARED TO INVEST IN HIGH-TECH FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT THAT MADE IT THE PERFECT PLACE FOR HIM TO FOLLOW THE OTHER GREAT LOVE OF HIS LIFE: NEUROSURGERY.

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ven as a young doctor in South Africa, Marc had always been interested in the brain and spinal cord but he also loves the technological side, and being in theatre. At Gosford Private Hospital, Marc uses the technology of intraoperative CT scanning to implant artificial spacers into the spine to help patients with an array of spinal problems. ‘What’s exciting is that we are combining navigation technology with traditional operative technology,’ he says. In some cases, we can use 3D printing to tailor implants unique to the anatomy of the patient. And we also use a novel technique called “lateral access surgery” which means the surgeon goes through a keyhole in the side of the body so it’s much less invasive. It has massively reduced the recovery time for complex spinal conditions which, in turn, means we can operate more safely on patients who may previously have been considered unsuitable for surgery.’ Marc also performs other surgeries such as disc replacements which allow mobility of the affected region of the spine to be maintained. When he competes in the annual Bay to Bay Half Marathon from the Woy Woy waterfront to Gosford, Marc finds it very gratifying to compete against patients he has operated on and to witness their improved quality of life. Before moving here, Marc and his family had been coming to the Coast on weekends since arriving in Australia in 2005 from South Africa. Even though he’d done his medical training and neurosurgical specialisiation in Cape Town, he had to sit the medical exams in Australia, after which he started working with Dr Charlie

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Teo whom he had met at a medical conference years earlier. ‘I learnt a lot from him,’ says Marc. ‘Surgery is a humbling profession. You start out thinking you know a lot and then you realise it’s a continual learning curve. I still talk regularly to people overseas to discuss their techniques and experiences, and you never stop learning because technology is changing so much.’ But as Marc says, ‘It’s more than high-tech equipment. In a large hospital you get different sets of people coming and going in your operating team. But here, in a smaller place, we not only have a really good team but it’s the same team every day and this allows us to take on more complex cases.’ Marc has taken each of his older children on weekend ward rounds with him ‘so they would know what dad does.’ He thinks at least a couple of his children show traits that would make them good surgeons but, more importantly, ‘I want them to be happy and grow up to follow their dreams.’ Weekends away from work involve family outdoor activities: sports, bushwalking — ‘we have wild deer coming through our property in Avoca’ — kayaking, camping down by the Hawkesbury, horse-riding, or down at the beach. ‘I feel blessed to live and work on the Coast,’ he says. ‘The future here has so much potential. Right now I’m in the process of setting up an outreach program so that people in lessdeveloped countries can have access to neurosurgery that can, hopefully, have a positive impact on their lives. ‘… But I also want to focus on maintaining that elusive balance between family and work that challenges our profession!’


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PEOPLE OF THE COAST • Jill Bough

JILL BOUGH

of Matcham has a PhD in donkeys Jill and Chocolate

WORDS SUZY JARRATT

T

he first donkeys Jill Bough came across lived in luxury and had underfloor heating. ‘As a child growing up in Cornwall, one of my favourite haunts was The Donkey Sanctuary where I learned what wonderful animals they are. It was founded 50 years ago and is based in Sidmouth, a coastal town in Devon. It raises more money than any other charity in England!’ Ever since, donkeys have been part of Jill’s life and career, even though the first job she applied for after leaving school was at London Zoo where she hoped to become a polar bear keeper. ‘I suspect my mother had telephoned ahead and I was told there were no jobs available,’ Jill says. She became an English teacher instead. Fast forward to Australia where she headed in her forties. Here, she met her second husband Bruce and, after a stint of living in suburban and inner-city Sydney, they decided to look for somewhere out of town. ‘I’d heard the Central Coast was lovely so we went for a drive and the beaches reminded me of Cornwall. We asked an estate agent, “could you please take us to the worst house on the nicest piece of land you have?” And he drove us to these seven beautiful acres in Matcham. ‘For several years we didn’t have a kitchen, nor any running water, but slowly the house came together.’

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PEOPLE OF THEHEADING COAST ••Jill Subhead Bough It has evolved into a comfortable, welcoming home overlooking a beautiful valley. Well-stocked bookcases reach from floor to ceiling, and the walls are almost hidden with prints and original paintings, some of which have been created by Jill. Needless to say, many of the compositions feature donkeys. In Matcham, Jill was able to indulge her passion for animals, keeping not just donkeys but horses, goats, geese, chickens, ducks and cockatiels. Their numbers have dwindled over the years until she now just has three dogs, and three donkeys: Bonnie, Chocolate and Blue Boy. ‘My husband died recently but I’m determined to continue staying here,’ says Jill, who is now in her early seventies. When Jill retired at 60, she embarked on a PhD into the history of the donkey in Australia. ‘Some of my professional friends said donkeys weren’t really part of the Australian story. I said they were. I travelled to Western Australia, the Northern Territory and South Australia to research my doctorate. And, in local museums and libraries, I saw pictures of bullocks, horses and camels which all appeared on stock records. But the donkeys in the photos weren’t registered — they were considered unimportant.’ ‘On the stations, donkeys were ridden mainly by the Aboriginal stockmen and many went with them when these men were put into the missions,’ says Jill. ‘And there were massive teams of 100 donkeys that would pull goods along all the trade routes.’ Jill met some of the old teamsters during her research journey. ‘They remembered their donkeys with great affection. Slow but loyal, and reliable when camping overnight. Whereas, the men who had horses and camels would spend half the following day looking for their wandering animals.’ Donkeys would appear to have something of an image problem. They are regarded by some people as slow and stubborn. Yet those who know them well tell a different story. Donkeys don’t have the same fright-and-flight response that horses display. Their reactions are more considered, and therefore not as quick or as startled. They’re more inclined to stare down a threat — perhaps because they know they can’t run all that fast. In fact, domesticated donkeys enjoy being around people and like pats and hugs and belly rubs. But, as Christine Berry, who heads up Donkey Welfare with Heart, points out, ‘Not everyone is au fait with their wellness and tend to handle them like dogs or horses when, in fact, they have a different psychology, physiology and pathology. We often spend hours on the road attending to donkey needs.’ Shortly after gaining her PhD, Jill began to again research and write about her favourite subject. The result was Donkey, a book that documents and illustrates the animal’s role in world history, mythology, religion, literature, art and war. There have been a number of famous donkeys in history. Think of the biblical donkey Mary travelled on with Joseph. And Simpson’s donkey at Gallipoli which helped carry wounded soldiers to safety. In literature, there is the beloved Eeyore. And Don Quixote’s faithful companion, Sancho, travelled on a donkey in quest of windmills. In ancient Egypt, donkeys were even worshipped.

Matcham property

Feeding time at Matcham

Donkeys can live to around 40 years and, across those years, an owner’s circumstances can change and that’s often the reason donkeys are surrendered to a donkey shelter. All of Jill’s donkeys were rescue animals from Donkey Welfare with Heart, a 40-acre sanctuary at Morpeth, a registered charity, established in 1977. The sanctuary presently houses 52 donkeys. ‘We foster them out,’ explains Christine Berry, who has a band of 40 rostered volunteers working with her on the property. ‘One of our major joys is finding a donkey which needs our help, making it well, and leaving it with an owner we have educated in caring for a donkey.’ ‘If we, the donkeys or the carers aren’t happy with the foster arrangement, we take the animals back.’

Donkey Welfare with Heart annual Open Day is on Sunday 22 September at 410 Duckenfield Road, Berry Park, near Morpeth. It’s important to text or phone 0497 580 598 first if you’re interested in coming.

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HUNTER VALLEY • Chef profile

CAMERON MATTHEWS ‘Don’t expect traditional Italian food, but do expect Italian tradition at heart at Éremo.’

WORDS CATHARINE RETTER

There were no chefs or foodies in Cameron Matthews’ family. ‘Mum had four kids, and Dad was always working,’ he remembers. ‘My childhood memories are of carbon being scraped off the lamb chops, packets of Deb Mashed Potato, and frozen vegetables. But, somehow, I always knew I wanted to be a chef.’ So who was the person who first taught this 6’8” (203 cm), 2-hatted executive chef to cook? ‘She was a typical Italian nonna,’ says Cam. ‘I think I was probably closer to her than my own grandmother. What makes so many nonnas such special cooks, I think, is that they cook with great care, love, and attention to detail. Then add to that, their food is garden fresh or that-day market fresh.’ She taught him to cook gnocchi by the broom-handle method. ‘She’d give me a tap with the broom handle if I was doing something wrong. And my extended family was always quick to tell me if I was not cooking it the way Nonna did.’ The first dish Cam remembers cooking at home used Golden Circle Pineapple Chunks from a recipe on the can.

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‘I must have been six or seven at the time, certainly under eight,’ he says. ‘There was custard, pineapple chunks, all covered in meringue and then baked. I loved it, but I’d be horrified to cook it today!’ When the current owners of Spicers Retreat purchased the extensive retreat and restaurant at Pokolbin in the Hunter Valley, they closed it for two and a half years to refurbish it. Cam, as executive chef, was able to plan the kitchen from the ground up. ‘For the restaurant, I wanted it to be a different experience to a city restaurant. In the city there’s often “get them in, get them out” pressure, but in the country, it’s more relaxed. There’s time to chill out and enjoy the experience. There’s a beautiful view of the Broke Back Range outside, and in winter there’s a fire and the waft of woodsmoke. ‘Éremo in Italian means hermitage. We don’t try to duplicate Italy, but by adding local flavours and a local twist, it is inspired by Italy. It’s a thought process, the way we prepare the food, and


HUNTER VALLEY • Chef profile

the way it is eaten in a relaxed environment.’ Everything possible is made on site: bread, pizza bases, icecream, and Cam plans to expand this into charcuteries and cheeses. ‘I’d love to have more of a kitchen garden here, growing tomatoes and basil. I’d love to have chickens, and even pigs that we could feed the food scraps to.’ This leads to Cam’s other passion: sustainability. In 2016, he was awarded a Churchill Fellowship to study some of the top-ranked restaurants around the world that were making a difference to the industry. ‘Sustainability in our lives leads to sustainability in everything else,’ says Cam. ‘It’s about what you do with your rubbish, where your seafood comes from, farmed fish, recycling ... ‘It’s also important in our industry. Chefs are too much like battery-hen chefs. They drink coffee all day, they sit on a crate to grab a bite to eat, and they often work in a room with no windows, and work too much and for too long. ‘My kitchen staff sit at a table to eat, and they eat the same food that is served to our guests. ‘Here, we wash carrots instead of peeling them. Watermelon rind is pickled. Lemons — we use the zest and the juice, and the husk we toast and dehydrate, then grind it up to make a fantastic spice. ‘What we do have left over is donated to Oz Harvest and to the City Mission. All our compostable waste is composted. Plastic bottles and cardboard are separated. Where we send our plastic, they make carpark bumpers, so that’s really satisfying to know. Cans go to the local Scouts to recycle for their fund-raising.’ Before coming to the Hunter Valley, Cam was the executive chef at Spicers’ The Long Apron restaurant in Montville, Queensland — a two-hatted restaurant. ‘We were half a point off three hats, but who’s counting!’ says Cam with a grin that splits his face. ‘Hats are fantastic for a chef’s ego, and healthy for the restaurant, but I don’t go chasing hats. I never have. I prefer to listen to local food producers, to guests, and to reap the rewards that way.’

The bar at Éremo is a favourite Friday night gathering place for local winemakers. ‘Just the other week, a wine made by one of the winemakers sitting at the bar was requested in the restaurant, and he couldn’t help himself. He took the bottle from the wine waiter and went into the restaurant to serve it himself and tell the table how, a week ago, it came out of his winery. ‘That’s what Éremo is about: expect pride in what we do. Don’t expect traditional Italian food but do expect Italian tradition at heart, and the conviviality that’s always there, like you’d find in an Italian household.’ Éremo Restaurant, Spicers Retreat, 57 Ekerts Road, Pokolbin spicersretreats.com/restaurants/eremo/

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To book your flight contact 1300 723 279 www.balloonaloft.com

Available for Hunter Valley Flights only. Not available in conjunction with any other offer.


DAVID HOOK planted the Pothana Vineyard on the family’s Hunter Valley property over 30 years ago with visions of growing grapes with distinct style, veracity and character. His accumulated knowledge and experience result in wines of outstanding regional and varietal appeal, reflective of their terrior and vintage. The David Hook Wines cellar is a rare find in the Hunter Valley. Specialising in single vineyard wines of the regions signature varieties, semillon, chardonnay and shiraz as well as authentic examples of the much-loved Italian varieties barbera and pinot grigio. One of the regions unique boutique cellars. David Hook Wines operates seven days a week.

Open daily I Corner Ekerts & Broke Roads, Pokolbin, Hunter Valley I (02) 4998 7121 www.davidhookwines.com.au


Inspired by the great winemaking traditions of Europe, Iron Gate Estate is a boutique, family-run winery in Pokolbin, producing unique, handcrafted wines that capture the true essence of the Hunter Valley.

Open 7 days 10am 4pm Corner of Ingles Lane & Oakey Creek Rd Pokolbin 2320 Phone 4998 6570 IronGateEstate.com

Terrigal Endodontics Providing quality root canal treatments on the Central Coast

• • • • •

Same day pain relief & emergency service Safe, gentle & effective root canal solutions Pain-free treatments completed quickly Referrals or direct bookings welcome Thousands of teeth successfully saved

Terrigal Endodontics

Gunyah Dental Centre

33 years experience providing endodontic care Same day appointments for pain relief Most treatments completed in one visit

General and complex dentistry One-visit CEREC crowns Full emergency service

4385 1838 terrigalendodontics.com.au

4385 1838 gunyahdental.com.au

Dr Tony Appleton BDS, DPDS


There is no better setting on earth than Australia’s oldest wine region for Éremo’s distinctive brand of modern Italian dining. In true Italian style, Éremo is the heart of Spicers Guesthouse. Generous and warm, it epitomises our approach to food and wine - that they go spectacularly well together, and that they are infinitely better when shared. Dine a la carte or ‘Avido’, where our chefs choose a selection of dishes from the menu for you. Come and discover the Hunter’s newest destination - Éremo at Spicers Guesthouse.

OPEN 7 DAYS - BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER 57 EKERTS RD, POKOLBIN PHONE 1300 590 075 TO BOOK SPICERSGUESTHOUSE.COM


24 HOURS IN… • East Gosford

24 hours in…

EAST GOSFORD

WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

WITH GOSFORD TO ITS WEST, ERINA TO ITS EAST, AND THE CENTRAL COAST HIGHWAY CUTTING THROUGH ITS CENTRE, LOCALS AND VISITORS ALIKE OFTEN BYPASS EAST GOSFORD. BUT MAKE TIME TO STOP AND YOU’LL FIND THIS LITTLE VILLAGE PACKS A PUNCH WHEN IT COMES TO PLACES TO EAT, DRINK, SHOP AND PLAY. WE DISCOVER THIS HIDDEN GEM IN 24 HOURS.

8.30 am

Start your day at Ooomph Café on Gumtree Lane. This cool bolt-hole combines a café, patisserie, bakery and teeny tiny foodstore where you can pick up preserves, oils, vinegars, herbs and the like. All dishes on the menu are made using local, organic produce where possible and the bread is baked in-house every day. Brekky options include ricotta hotcakes, eggs bennie and a breakfast bowl with a difference: chilli kale, avocado, pumpkin hommus, and pink sauerkraut. Now that’s sure to add a bit of oomph to your morning. Ooomph Café

9.30 am

Heirloom on Victoria

Piccolo Pear

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Wander through to Victoria Street where you’ll find a delightful collection of boutique stores, such as Piccolo Pear — a whimsical cavern that is part florist, part vintage-style wares and gifts store. A little further down, Magnolia Home & Gift is resplendent in Hamptonsstyle furniture and décor, premium gifts and fashion accessories. Meander on to Tandem which stocks a range of fun fashion pieces, while Heirloom on Victoria specialises in beautiful baby wares and gifts, as well as clothing and women’s fashion, sleepwear and accessories. If you’re in the midst of a new build or renovation and need some inspiration, consider dropping by interior and exterior design studio Serenity Interiors — they also sell quality homewares and furniture in store.


24 HOURS IN… • East Gosford

GOSFORD

R E G I O N A L

G A L L E R Y

Gosford Regional Gallery

JUNE - DEC ‘19

EXHIBITIONS

EVENTS

CAFE

GARDEN

11 am

Take the 10-minute walk to Gosford Regional Gallery, which is jam-packed with fabulous exhibitions over spring. The Gosford Art Prize is held from 14 September to 3 November and incorporates a variety of art forms from painting to textiles to photography, as well as a Ceramics Prize and an Aboriginal Art Prize. Following this, Tales of a Modern Blackfulla will be held from 9 November and is the first solo exhibition by local artist Garry Purchase; then from 16 November the entire 51 finalists of the inimitable Archibald Prize will be on display.

12 pm

Find your zen at Edogawa Commemorative Garden, located behind the art gallery. At almost an acre in size, this tranquil garden is modeled on a traditional Japanese ‘shuyu’ garden (a ‘strolling garden’). It incorporates a Japanese pavilion, koi pond, raked dry stone garden and traditional Japanese teahouse. If you have small kids who are less zen, more zing, head to the nearby Elizabeth Ross Park, which has a fabulous playground equipped with slides, swings, a climbing net, flying fox and more.

Edogawa Commemorative Garden

Mesa By Ministry

1 pm Tummy rumbling? Head back into town to friendly café Mesa By Ministry on York Street and enjoy lunch in the sunny courtyard. The menu features burgers, pides, freshly made sandwiches and more. They also bake their own breads and some delicious pastries on site.

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24 HOURS IN… • East Gosford

2 pm

Interiorwise

After lunch, take the short walk to Henry Parry Drive where you’ll find Cinta Collections, a fabulous local fashion label for women owned by longtime friends and fashionistas Mel and Lisa. Their unique pieces range in sizes from 12 to 30, most of which are designed and made in the East Gosford studio. Just around the corner, on Webb Street, drop in and say hi to lovely couple Daniel and Sandra Burckhardt at Interiorwise, who stock a huge range of eclectic oneoff pieces for the home. It’s total nostalgia heaven in here. You can pick up anything from a vintage Arnott’s biscuit tin, to an Art Deco drinks trolley, to modern pieces such as industrial-style furniture and coastalinspired art. They also offer a custom painting service to restore worn furniture.

Goodness Cakes

3.30 pm

Beat that afternoon slump at Goodness Cakes. This small bakery specialises in gluten-free, sugar-free, dairyfree, keto and vegan sweets that taste naughty but aren’t! Grab an afternoon treat – the raw Bounty Slice is amazing. Or if you have an event coming up and need to cater to dietary needs, make a special order with owner and head sweet-maker Chantal Bakker.

5 pm

Fancy an aperitivo? Stop by BamVino Cellars on Victoria Street, run by the same guys behind the fab BamVino deli at Erina Heights. There’s a large range of small-brewery beers, boutique wines and quality spirits from across the globe. They offer regular tastings, too.

6.30 pm

Finish your day with a good, hearty meal at Michael’s Italian Family Restaurant. This iconic East Gosford establishment has been operating since 1994 and is still popular for its delicious, authentic Italian cuisine featuring generous servings of veal saltimbocca, Italian squid and chicken Gorgonzola, as well as pizza and pasta of course. Cheers with a glass of Chianti or prosecco (limoncello, perhaps?) to discovering this surprising little pocket of the Central Coast. It was worth the stop, yes?

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NOT A RETI RE M E NT VI L L AGE J US T A G RE AT PL AC E TO RE TIRE

Proudly family-owned and operated, Pine Needles Village offers an independent, low-maintenance lifestyle with a genuine focus on community. Surround yourself with like-minded people and start enjoying life within this 5 star gated development. Boasting a host of resort style facilities such as an elegant clubhouse, heated swimming pool, putting green, tennis court, croquet lawn and bowling green, Pine Needles Village presents as the perfect environment to sit back and reap the rewards of years of hard work.

61 Karalta Road Erina NSW 2250 Phone: +61 2 4365 1766 Email: info@pineneedles.com.au www.pineneedles.com.au

Offering a selection of two and three bedroom properties, we pride ourselves on delivering tailored accommodation solutions for each resident’s everyday needs and budget. Discover the value, integrity and natural beauty of Pine Needles Village nestled at the foot of Kincumba Mountain upon 40 acres of manicured gardens and lush greenery with unrivalled convenience to shopping centres, medical facilities and local attractions - all within one hour of Sydney by car or train.


WHAT’S ON • For Kids

FUN FOR KIDS

ON THE COAST WORDS KATIE STOKES

MANGROVE MOUNTAIN AND DISTRICTS COUNTRY FAIR Enjoy country hospitality and community at its very best at The Mangrove Mountain and Districts Country Fair with cows to pat, ponies to ride and alpacas to cuddle. Learn how to handle a python at the Snake Man show, watch a sheepshearing demonstration, enter a homemade cart in the Mountain Mayhem Billy Cart Derby and have a laugh at the Great Chicken Race. They’ll have farming and machinery displays, horse demonstrations and authentic Dark Ages re-enactors as well as clowns, face painting and carnival rides (including a new horizontal bungee racer and mechanical bucking bull!).

The Mangrove Mountain Country Fair has been running every year since 1965 as a community fundraiser for local community groups. Saturday 19 October (10am to 4pm) cnr Wisemans Ferry and Waratah Roads, Mangrove Mountain. mangrovemountaincountryfair.org.au

LASERBLAST – A KIDS ENTERTAINMENT HUB Did you know you can now experience putt putt golf, an escape room and lasertag under one roof? Laserblast at Charmhaven has expanded this year and added a family escape room and indoor ultra-violet putt putt course. It’s now a full-blown kids entertainment hub compete with the largest lasertag centre on the Central Coast. If you’re looking for a rainy-day activity, kids party venue, or school holiday activity, this is the place to head. Open daily from 10am. 132 Chelmsford Rd, Charmhaven. laserblast.com.au

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TWO YEARS OF SERVICE TO OUR COMMUNITY

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happiness, education to book a tour their best in everything they do. St Peter's welcomes enrolment 4384 9000 www.alkiraelc.com.au /alkiraearlylearningcentrewamberal Alkira_elc applications for male and female students in Years 7 to 12. and belonging. 1 Reads Road, Wamberal Alkira_elc

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OBSTACOOL COMES TO MINGARA

The best part about this event is that adults can have a go too — after all, why should the kids have all the fun?

© KATIE STOKES

Get set to run, jump, bounce, climb and crawl. Obstacool is visiting the Central Coast and they’re bringing a heap of awesome challenges for you to tackle. They’ll have walls to scale, pyramids to climb, tunnels to crawl through, balance beams to walk along and a 40-metre inflatable. This year they’ll also be setting up a new giant inflatable maze and foam canon.

120 COAST

swing set and play structure, plus barbecue facilities and picnic tables, so you can settle in for the day.

Saturday 12 October (9am to1.45pm with five waves of races, each starting on the hour); Mingara Recreation Club, Tumbi Umbi. $19 per person for a 45-minute session. obstacool.com.au/central-coast

NEW LOCAL PARKS

© KATIE STOKES

Wendy Drive Park Point Clare

Macmasters Beach

bike track, dolphin rocker, double

Dinosaurs, crabs and dolphins have been popping up across the Coast over the past couple of months as Central Coast Council has upgraded a host of local play spaces. Here are a few of our favourites: Opposite Macmasters Beach you’ll find a new playground where kids can serve ice-cream from a wooden shop, scramble over large red soft-fall rubber crabs, and test their acrobatic skills on the raised play structure. Mini palaeontologists, grab your rock-hammer and brush: a dinosaur skeleton has been discovered at Point Clare. The new fully fenced park at Wendy Drive features a wooden tepee and dino skeleton to climb on, a double slippery dip to slide down, a spinning dome to whirl in and multiple ‘fossils’ to investigate. The newly upgraded Lions Park on Gosford waterfront is one of the Coast’s most picturesque playgrounds. It includes a toddler

CENTRAL COAST KIDS DAY OUT Get ready to part-ay! The Central Coast Kids Day Out is back this spring. This annual festival is one of our region’s longest running community-organised events, and this year they’re celebrating the big 2-0. They’re bringing Paw Patrol and a preview of Gosford Musical Society’s production of Madagascar to the stage, plus there’s the opportunity to meet Disney and Harry Potter characters throughout the grounds. Kids can pat reptiles, wander through an inclusive sensory wonderland and visit the new party rooms to meet with their favourite super heroes. The festival offers local families a wonderful combination of both entertainment and information. Meet with Healthy Harold, share in a Girri Girra Aboriginal experience, say ‘hi’ to the local fire brigade and ask advice of the many early childhood educationalists and therapists available on the day. Sunday 3 November (10am to 3pm); Narara Valley High School. Adults $8, kids $4, family (2 adults + up to 4 children) $22, kids under 12 months free. ckdo.org


PEOPLE OF THE COAST • Pauly Mac

PAULY MAC

THE MAN WHO GAVE A LOCAL PARK LIFE WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

A FORGETFUL DAD-MOMENT AT THE PARK FOR LOCAL CHEF PAUL MCDONALD TURNED INTO A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY WHEN A ‘EUREKA MOMENT’ STRUCK — HE’D BROUGHT THE KIDS BUT HAD FORGOTTEN THE WATER, LUNCH, SUNSCREEN … AND WAS HANGING FOR A COFFEE.

I

t’s an unusually quiet day when I sit down with Paul McDonald (aka Pauly Mac) at the quaint kiosk that is Parklife at Terrigal. It has been raining heavily for days, but Paul tells me he has just pulled some fresh muffins from the oven. Looking around at the soggy ground and soaked play equipment, I presume that there will be very few customers today and am impressed that the kiosk is open, ‘funky beats’, muffins and all. Slowly but steadily, customers with and without kids trickle in — ordering coffee, grabbing a bite to eat, some little ones playing in puddles. It seems the wet weather can’t dampen the spirit of Parklife or the infectious energy of its founder Pauly Mac who has given this park life again. Paul’s journey to Parklife was a serendipitous one. The Englishborn chef has almost three decades of global cooking experience behind him, working in kitchens ‘in around 20 countries.’ Ten years ago Paul moved to the Central Coast, where he started to consult with restaurants and large corporations (most recently as culinary director for Guzman Y Gomez), helping to retrain staff and recalibrate businesses.

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PEOPLE OF THE COAST • Pauly Mac

‘It’s those little things that make a difference … all of our food scraps go back into the ground, we don’t use any plastic, we offer wooden “boomerang” trays, and cookies are handed straight to the kids because why do they need a paper bag?’ It was December 2017 when Paul took his two young children to the new Rotary Park at Terrigal that had just undergone a $325,000 upgrade complete with new play equipment and furniture. He recalls that he had forgotten to bring everything for the kids, ‘and I was hanging for a coffee,’ he says, when he noticed the adjoining Marine Discovery Centre had a somewhat run-down hole-in-the-wall kiosk – but it was closed. ‘I saw an opportunity, so I knocked on the door.’ With the brief set by the Marine Discovery Centre to create something clean, sustainable and educational for kids, Paul opened Parklife just two months later, initially as a pop-up. But in his own words, ‘it went bananas’. Parklife quickly became a permanent fixture — a thriving kiosk, playground and community space that caters to kids and parents alike. ‘As a chef, but mostly as a dad, I have been constantly disappointed in food available for kids. I want parents to be able to come up and buy anything off the menu for their kids and know that’s it’s a good choice,’ he says. For a kitchen that’s the ‘size of a shoebox’, the food offering is extraordinary. The menu is based on ingredients that can be locally sourced, some straight from the on-site garden. One week it may be orecchiette with activated almond pesto and spiced pumpkin, the next a caramelised onion and swiss cheese toastie. Of course, not all kids will enjoy that kind of thing, so the $5 kids’ snack pack with healthy bites such as carrot sticks, crackers and hommus is a huge hit (especially with parents). Sweets such as cookies, muffins and ice-cream are all made from scratch in the tiny kitchen. Since moving in, Paul has headed a campaign for more shade and free sunscreen. More trees were planted, and the Cancer Council now provides sunscreen. And the Marine Discovery Centre, which Paul works closely with, has been given a $2 million grant towards upgrading the centre, the marine displays and extending the kiosk’s deck. Parklife was also the first café on the Coast to use plant-based coffee cups. Made from fermented cornstarch, children are encouraged to ‘squash the used coffee cups and lids and whack them in the bin.’ The cups are taken to the Lake Macquarie area where they are physically turned back into soil. ‘It’s those little things that make a difference,’ Paul says. ‘All of our food scraps go back into the ground, we don’t use any plastic, we offer wooden “boomerang” trays, and cookies are handed straight to the kids because why do they need a paper bag?’ Paul and his staff frequently walk through the park, taking and delivering orders so parents don’t have to leave their kids. They

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have a trike stocked with drinks and sunscreen that they cycle over to nearby Banjo’s Skate Park. And they also take phone orders and offer car delivery — a small gesture that can be a lifesaver to parents with sleeping babies on board. For a business that was born from a moment of forgetfulness, they sure have thought of everything. 11 Terrigal Drive, Terrigal. Saturday to Thursday 8am to 2pm. Friday 8am to 8pm (subject to weather) For evening hours; check their Facebook page for updates). Call ahead with your order on 0410 843 383 or 4385 5027 facebook.com/parklifecoffee/


EXPLORE THE OPULENCE OF THE NEWEST WORLD CL A SS MARINA O N L A K E M A C Q UA R I E Trinity Point Marina sits at the heart of the award-winning Trinity Point development on the tranquil waters of Lake Macquarie; just 60 nautical miles north of Sydney. •

Bellingham-Marine built floating concrete marina

Free, safe and conveniently located carpark

Up to 30m berths for effortless docking

Convenient onsite marine chandlery

Lake Macquarie’s newest, state-of-the-art, water fueling facility with high flow distillate and PULP fuel

Fully services berths with: •

Power including 3 phase where needed

Wave protection to the harbour

Potable water

Advanced long-range wi-fi extending to berths

Black water pump out

Docks provisioned with MTEC service units and CCTV security monitored by staff

Dock carts available

Ice and GAS as required

Luxurious marina lounge

Five-star private ensuites with shower facilities

Visit us at Trinity Point Marina, 72 Trinity Point Drive, Morisset Park

0474 012 888

I

TRINITYPOINTMARINA.COM.AU


This is the Central Coast Grant Molony, on location at his studio in Long Jetty. One of the many makers, creators and innovators re-shaping the Central Coast‌

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Profile for Coast Publishing

COAST Spring 2019  

Stay, play, eat, drink, explore the Central Coast, NSW Australia.

COAST Spring 2019  

Stay, play, eat, drink, explore the Central Coast, NSW Australia.