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S TAY, P L AY, E AT, D R I N K , E X P L O R E T H E C E N T R A L C O A S T SUMMER 2018/19

CHEF PROFILES & DINING REVIEWS HOMES WITH STYLE HAPPENINGS & SHOPPING GUIDE PEOPLE OF THE COAST ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT BEST BUSHWALKS & GOLF COURSES


WE’ VE B EEN EXPECTI N G YOU LEXUS OF CENTRAL COAST stands proudly at the gateway to the Central Coast of NSW, high on the hills above Gosford. Our dealership is conveniently positioned at the interchange to the M1 motorway at Somersby. The founders of our family-owned and operated business, have been an integral part of the Central Coast community for over 65 years, serving the automotive industry for over 40 years.

O U R CO M M ITM ENT TO CUS TO M ER S ERVI CE AN D PRO FE SS I O NALI S M I S D RIVEN BY O U R E XPERI EN CE AN D LOVE FO R O U R CO M M U N IT Y LEXUS OF CENTRAL COAST | 13 Kangoo Road Somersby NSW | PH 02 4340 3500 | lexusofcentralcoast.com.au Photo: Murray McKean | ODD001


CONTENTS WELCOME 4 GREAT OUTDOORS DISCOVER THE CENTRAL COAST Map — Villages and Beaches

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8 of the Best Family Friendly Beaches

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SHOPPING Summer Shopping Guide

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4 of the Best Delis on the Coast

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MY COAST HOME STYLE Laura Washington and Brad Scott. Follow the Artists

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Patonga to Pearl Beach Walking Track

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Golf Courses on the Central Coast

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Glenworth Valley

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GARDENS•Holgate Tony and Mindy Carr. A Stroll into the Past

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WEDDINGS 18

HAPPENINGS

Kaysha and James Ross

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Sarah and Ben Potter

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Christmas Happenings

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Destination Wedding Venues

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LUXURY ACCOMMODATION REVIEW

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SUMMER MARKET GUIDE

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The White House

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ONCE UPON A TIME IN …

The Nest @ Killcare

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Spencer. The Quiet ‘Hub of the Universe’ 94 ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

HAPPENINGS Happenings on the Coast

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FOOD AND DINING The Savoy

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COASTING•with Susan Kurosawa

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CLASSES AND COURSES Summer

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Central Coast Craftsman Saddle-maker, Movie Horse Master, Entrepreneur

PEOPLE OF THE COAST Emily Caska. The Story of a Restaurant, a Heart, a Conscience and a Community 100 ARTISANS OF THE COAST Daniele Del Castillo. Sasà Sicilian Street Food

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WINE•HUNTER VALLEY Jeff Byrne, the Surfing Winemaker

FEATURE•Heath Harris.

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24 HOURS IN … 50

FOOD AND DINING New York’s Bright Lights to Woy Woy’s Bay Views

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7 of the Best Bars on the Coast

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Chef Profile — Dan Capper, The Springs

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PEOPLE OF THE COAST Glenn Mckimmin in Focus

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Vita Catanzariti — How to Look as Good as You Feel at Any Age

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Three Generations of Orange Men

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Long Jetty

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FUN FOR KIDS on the Coast

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EMERGENCY HELP INFORMATION

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© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

Liesl Tesch

On the Water: Boat Ramps Map — National Parks and State Forest Bushwalks


COAST PUBLISHER Catharine Retter editorial@coastpublishing.com.au ART DIRECTOR Jude Rowe, Agave Creative Group PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHERS Reed Plummer, Central Coast Drones Cassandra Ringstad, Urban Wonder Photography Brigid Arnott Photography Lisa Haymes Photography

© PATRICK KREJCIK

PRINCIPAL WRITERS Megan Arkinstall • Brenda Christian • Kim Cole • Brooke Doherty • Sarah Greenaway • Susan Kurosawa • Yasmin Newman • Catharine Retter • Katie Stokes • Sarah Tolmie • Paul Urquhart ILLUSTRATORS Maps: Guy Holt Lauren Merrick

Welcome S

ummer is the Central Coast’s bestloved time of year. When so many people around you are on holidays and in a relaxed, happy mood, it becomes contagious! Even since our last issue, exciting new cafes and cool bars have opened. Boats on their moorings have been spruced up, holiday houses painted, summer menus have been trialled in the restaurants. Boutiques have filled their racks with summer-fresh colours and local spring rains have rejuvenated our parks and gardens. We celebrate the festive season in this issue, even though some of you will only read the magazine after Hanukah which comes early this summer, or after Christmas and New Year — but how could we ignore the many fun things for families and children that are happening at

ADVERTISING Anissa Vineburg Jenna Nicholl advertising@coastpublishing.com.au ADMINISTRATION admin@coastpublishing.com.au

this time of year, not least of which is the return of our Surfing Santa. And last, but never least, a heartfelt thank you to the many people we’ve only met through their emails, Instagram and Facebook messages sent to us after our first issue to welcome the magazine so enthusiastically. We have to admit to also receiving a few comments that asked, ‘what on earth are you going to find to write about in the next issues?’ I think that’s been one of the joys of putting together this Summer issue. There’s so much on the Central Coast to surprise even the locals — places to take your breath away, people to inspire you — that we are already stockpiling stories and ideas for issues well into the future. c

Catharine Retter, Publisher

THANK YOU FOR ALL THE OUTSTANDING ENTRIES IN OUR READER COMPETITIONS IN COAST’S SPRING ISSUE. The winners are: Broken Bay Pearl earrings from AngelRock Jewellers: M S Hailer (see winning photo page 48) Degustation dinner for two with Peter Kuruvita’s favourites: Alison Robinson and her sister, Glenda. Peter Kuruvita’s book, ‘Lands of the Curry Leaf’: Prue Wyllie; Daijela Susa.

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COAST is published by Coast Publishing ABN 11 145 976 049 PO Box 6407 Kincumber NSW 2251 For more ‘What’s On for Kids’ information contact Katie Stokes at www.playinginpuddles.com.au COPYRIGHT AND WARRANTIES The editorial content, photographic content, design and graphic art (including design of any advertisements by Coast Publishing) are all subject to copyright and must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Coast Publishing. While we strive to ensure information contained in this magazine is correct and current at the time of printing, details may be subject to change and we recommend contacting venues or event organisers before planning your visit. The information contained in this magazine has been provided by contributors, interviewees and advertisers and their sources. No warranty is given by Coast Publishing as to the accuracy of this information nor any liability arising from any reliance upon the information contained herein. FIND US ON Facebook Instagram @coast_publishing www.coastpublishing.com.au View COAST online and subscribe (it’s free) to avoid missing future digital issues at www.coastpublishing.com.au We wish to acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land, the Awabal Darkinjung peoples and their Elders past and present. We recognise and respect their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationship with the land. ON THE COVER Wamberal by Reed Plummer, Central Coast Drones.


Here at Mumbo Jumbos, you’ll find an energetic blend of authentic Caribbean cocktails, Jamaican Fusion eats and Tropical Beach Shack stylings. We’ve just celebrated our 1st Birthday and throughly settled into the summer groove with weekly events, daily specials & cold drinks running constantly.

Our chef, Joel Adele blends authentic Jamaican flavours, and fresh local produce with passion and creativity. We are also keen hosts for functions in our popular Back Cabana with its own private bar. Mumbo’s was brought to life to share the sun, great food and cool drinks with everyone. Come experience the Caribbean on the Coast! Mumbo Jumbo’s Beach House 04 66888653 | bookings@mumbojumbos.com.au 92 Terrigal Esplanade, Terrigal, NSW, 2261

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DISCOVER • Central Coast

8of the best family beaches… with rockpools for tiny tots and coffee for adults WORDS KATIE STOKES PHOTOS KATIE STOKES, CASSANDRA RINGSTAD THE CENTRAL COAST IS HOME TO 41 BEACHES. SOME HAVE AWESOME SURF BREAKS, SOME ARE SECLUDED AND UNPATROLLED, SOME ARE BEAUTIFULLY ISOLATED AND REQUIRE A 20-MINUTE HIKE FROM CARPARK TO SAND. WE LOVE THESE SPACES, BUT THEY’RE NOT ALWAYS GREAT FOR FAMILIES WITH SMALL CHILDREN. WE’VE RAMBLED THE COASTLINE TO BRING YOU THIS LITTLE LIST OF BEACHES THAT WE BELIEVE ARE SOME OF THE BEST ON THE CENTRAL COAST FOR FAMILIES: FOR THEIR EASE OF ACCESS, THEIR BEAUTY AND THEIR COFFEE!

Macmasters Beach

Terrigal Haven

Macmasters Beach, or Macs as it’s locally known, is perfect for families. It’s a patrolled beach in summer and has a kid-friendly ocean pool. Large Norfolk pines provide shade across the sand and a welcome reprieve from the sun in the peak of summer. It’s also home to the Barefoot Café which serves coffee and an all-day breakfast menu from 8 am to 4.30 pm daily (dinner Friday and Sunday 5.30 pm to 9 pm). Free barbecue facilities are also available. Parking is limited but the plus side of this is that it never gets over-crowded.

When scuba divers and pelicans frequent a beach you know you’ve found a gentle shoreline and many babes have taken their first ocean dip at The Haven. The barbecues and picnic tables are popular for kids’ parties and family gatherings on weekends, but mid-week during the shoulder seasons you’ll find lots of fishermen and dog walkers. The Cove Café is a popular spot for brunch, but you can also grab a coffee and wagyu brisket burger from their kiosk to take to the beach.

Macmasters Beach


DISCOVER • Central Coast

Terrigal Haven

Avoca Beach

Ettalong Beach The protected shallows of the Ettalong foreshore make it an ideal space to introduce tiny tots to the ocean without risk of them being pummelled by a shore dumper. It has two playgrounds, public barbecues, a bike–scooter–stroller path and a view that takes in the Bouddi National Park and Lion Island in the distance. Let’s not forget the final gong: The Box on the Water Kiosk serves Fat Poppy coffee, T2 tea, bacon and egg rolls, and Moroccan chickpea salads.

Patonga Patonga is idyllic in its isolation with its only access road winding through Brisbane Water National Park. On one side, this barefoot, coastal village is hugged by the Hawkesbury River where it flows into Broken Bay and, on the other side, by Patonga Creek. You can take a plunge by the wharf (now that the Patonga Boathouse has re-opened following its extensive renovations, it’s even better), or in the waters surrounding the Patonga Camping Ground. The campground’s barbecues, play equipment and kiosk can be used by both over-nighters and day-trippers.

Ettalong Beach

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Patonga


Even at an idyllic beach, know what a rip looks like, and swim between the flags.

© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

DISCOVER • Central Coast

Avoca Beach One of the things we love about Avoca — and there are many — is that the rockpool, lifeguard flags, playground, cafés and carpark are all located within a 20-metre radius, so you’re never lugging umbrellas, wet towels and children long distances. The beach is patrolled in summer and the rockpool provides a safe space to splash. The fully fenced playground with flying fox, fishing boat and digger is a great space for kids, while The Avoca Surf House — with its coffee, Sydney rock oysters and enviable view — is a great space for adults.

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DISCOVER • Central Coast

Toowoon Bay

Norah Head (Cabbage Tree Harbour) The rockpool at Cabbage Tree Harbour (more widely known as Norah Head) is a favourite spot for swimming and exploring underwater ecosystems. Periwinkles, crabs, sea urchins and anemones can be spied, and myriad shells found. Take the short walk up the bush-lined steps and you’ll be rewarded with The Ark Café. Everything on their menu, from the granola bowl to the crunchy noodle salad, can be eaten-in or taken-away, which makes lunch in the adjacent park a breeze.

Toowoon Bay The calm waters of Toowoon Bay make it a popular beach for young families as well as paddle boarders and kite surfers. The Toowoon Bay Surf Club café serves everything from Nutella French toast and breakfast burritos to banana smoothies to Pure Pops iceblocks (their ginger-beer-and-lime flavour gets our tick for sweltering days). There’s a park with play equipment and barbecue facilities at the top of the hill. Add a visit here for a great day.

Killcare Beach (Putty Beach) Tucked beside the cliffs of Box Head, Killcare Beach is a bit of a local secret. This stretch of sand is undeveloped and the only building to dot its foreshore is the Killcare Surf Club and kiosk. The kiosk does a good trade in salads, burgers and milkshakes and adjoins a grassed area that invites kids to play. The percussion instruments made from vibrantly coloured pipes and accompanying rubber thongs are a favourite for budding young musicians. Just in front of the café you’ll find a small rockpool, which provides a safe spot for young children to take a dip and for parents to recharge.

Killcare Beach

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Norah Head


Iconic local photographer does it again! Ken Duncan’s World of Light All New Photographic Exhibition In his spectacular new exhibition, World of Light, Ken Duncan once again shows his tremendous talent and inimitable style.

Featuring images from across Australia and around the world, World of Light demonstrates this local artist’s extraordinary ability to capture the very essence of places exotic and familiar. Dazzling images of Aurora Borealis, captivating wildlife portraits, and sweeping panoramic shots of Venice and Cinque Terre, sit alongside photos from some of Ken’s favourite Australian locations. From the pre-dawn glow over Norah Head, to the glorious spectacle of Aurora Borealis, to magnificent wildlife portraits, Ken Duncan’s photographs will amaze and delight you. When you see these impressive images printed large and elegantly framed, it’s like a window directly onto the natural world.

Ask the Gallery staff to show you one of Ken’s inspiring audio-visual presentations - Free of charge.

414 The Entrance Road, Erina Heights Phone (02) 4367 6701 Open Daily – 10 am to 5 pm Free Admission


SHOPPING • Guide

SHOPPING GUIDE WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

WHETHER YOU’RE ON THE LOOK OUT FOR A PAIR OF BOARDIES OR A PAIR OF ANTIQUE LAMPS, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED WITH A ROUND-UP OF SOME OF THE COOLEST STORES ON THE COAST.

Ocean Haus, Terrigal Where boards and baristas converge, this sleek, spacious store in the heart of Terrigal is a coffee-loving surfers’ Shangri-La. It stocks an impressive selection of boards from performance short boards to handmade resin tinted longboards, and is also the only surf shop on the Coast to stock the Awayco brand, which you can rent or try before you buy. Beau Vanstrattan and Craig ‘Crusty’ Barrett, the boys behind Ocean Haus, were inspired by the surf shops they ‘grew up in’: a place for everyone from novice to experts to go for advice, but with a real community feel and a small café to boot. Its unique mixture of quality apparel and accessories, homewares and art, means even those not doing a daily surf check will be pleased with the offerings from Akubras to acai bowls. Shop 1/5-9 Campbell Crescent, Terrigal www.oceanhaus.com.au

Mister Bohemian The opening of Mister Bohemian in Erina means Coastie men have every reason to look effortlessly cool. Stocking classic European cuts, modern bohemian style, Mister Bohemian has a diverse range that will take you from work to the weekend. And from cool basics to eye-catching event-wear. So, men, you’re sure to find timeless pieces that will upgrade your wardrobe for years to come. Shop 2A, 490 Central Coast Highway, Erina Heights.

Cosy Home, Ettalong Beach Sarah Wade makes you feel at home as soon as you step into her store. She’ll even sit down for a cosy cuppa and a chat about the homewares and gifts that are special to her: Nicole Fendel jewellery, Peppermint Grove candles, Urban Ritual Body Care, Maileg childrens toys, Twigseed (Kate Knapp) stationery, Paloma Living homewares, Intartisan, Satara, My Walit and Vendula. Shop 7, 46 Picnic Parade, Ettalong Beach https://cosyhomeettalongbeach.business.site/

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A.T. & Co Rag Traders, The Entrance Their grandmother is a doyenne of the Coast’s fashion boutique scene – she was the original owner of Montaze, One Stop Fashion and Closet Essentials – so it’s no wonder twin sisters Tahlia and Annaliese Skinner have followed in her footsteps. Their light and bright store at The Entrance is the kind of place every generation of the family can find something they love, with a wide variety of fashion labels for women of all ages (from 15 to 70+) and shapes (sizes 6 to 24), with a relaxed, earthy colour palette and style. 139A The Entrance Rd, The Entrance

moochinside, Killcare After moving to Killcare from Sydney’s Drummoyne, Marg and Pete McFadyen saw a need for a store that showcased local and emerging artists and designers. And so in 2006, they opened moochinside, a cosy nook in the charming village of Killcare. The store has a thoughtfully curated collection of wares with a focus on fair trade, quality fabrics, art, design and coastal furniture that will add understated luxury and elegance to your home. 1/1 Killcare Rd, Killcare www.moochinside.com.au

Jachavela, Ettalong Sharing their love of natural, organic design, Yana McCarthy and her daughters Jasmine and Ella opened lifestyle store Jachavela in Ettalong in 2017. They work closely with small, family-owned businesses in Indonesia as well as Australian brands to ethically source a gorgeous range of homewares, linen, rattan baskets, custom and vintage furniture, clothing and accessories. Local artist Joy Rodier’s ceramics and art can also be found in store, as well as bespoke Leeloo Bird jewellery, and Beach Road Naturals, a Sydney-based bath and body company. They also offer an interior design service and specialise in custom orders for a boutique, personalised shopping experience. 233 Ocean View Rd, Ettalong www.jachavela.com

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SHOPPING • Guide

4 OF THE BEST DELIS ON THE COAST

WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

THE SEASON FOR OUR CELEBRATORY INDULGENCE IN FOOD, GLORIOUS FOOD IS UPON US. THIS YEAR, LEAVE THE CCS AND SALSA AT THE DOOR AND HEAD TO THESE FOUR EXQUISITE COASTAL DELIS TO STOCK UP ON TOP QUALITY ARTISANAL PRODUCE FROM ACROSS AUSTRALIA AND THE GLOBE. IT WILL INSPIRE SOME INCREDIBLE GRAZING PLATTERS THAT ARE SURE TO WIN OVER FAMILIES AND FRIENDS (AND PUT AN EXTRA NOTCH IN THEIR BELTS).

Salt Pig Deli, Erina

BamVino, Erina Heights

The newest kid on the block, Salt Pig Deli, opened just last year but already packs a punch on the gourmet scene. Owners Kev and Fiona Severn, who moved to the Central Coast eight years ago from Yorkshire in the UK, wanted to provide the area with some of the finest produce from around the world … and they have not disappointed. Charcuterie sourced from Spain, sheep’s milk Roquefort from France’s Rhone Valley, and Sicilian olive oil can be found among Australian delights such as fresh black truffles from Manjimup, salted butter from Tasmania, and homegrown Natural Hive coastal bush honey. Kev, who is a classically French trained chef (formerly of Bells at Killcare), hand-makes the pastries and bakes traditional sourdough and Italian ciabatta bread daily. Fresh-to-order deli sandwiches, antipasto boxes, cheese and salumi (that’s not a spelling error) tasting platters, and pre-ordered grazing platters are also available. Or simply stop by for a coffee (the beans are bought from coffee roasters Peaberry Coffee Roasters in Newcastle) or try a soft serve cone of the Coast’s very own Mr Goaty Gelato (Salt Pig Deli is the only bricks and mortar place on the Coast that sells the award-winning gelato).

Many a career change is dreamt about on the daily commute on the M1 from the Coast to Sydney. And while not all dreams come to fruition, Grant Spokes and Jan Rundle’s vision to create an intimate and informal restaurant, where locals could enjoy premium food and wine in good company, was realised in 2014. BamVino restaurant started with a seasonal menu and a focus on simple, well-made pizza, pastas and tapas, but soon after opening, the dream got a little bigger as they transformed the vacant shop next door into a deli. It stocks an array of gourmet foods from European cheeses to cured meats to olives and fresh bread, as well as a good selection of gluten free, vegan and dairy free products. Hampers are also available, which make the perfect gift for the gastronome in your life. The deli opens at 9 am and closes when the last diner leaves the restaurant at night (around 10 pm), so if you have a late night craving for a wheel of gooey truffle brie, this is the place to go. The deli is also available to hire for small functions; it makes for an atmospheric venue, with tables set up on wine barrels, and inviting displays of fine foods as your backdrop.

Shop 6/220 The Entrance Rd, Erina www.saltpigdeli.com

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1/488 The Entrance Rd, Erina Heights www.bamvino.com.au


SHOPPING • Guide

Empire’s D’lite, Empire Bay The Fake Italian, Point Clare For Lee and Nicole Shires it’s been an exciting ride since they opened This Little Piggy café at Point Clare in 2014. Describing their love of food as an obsession, they found themselves travelling to numerous food regions across the country — from the Barossa to Orange to Kangaroo Island — in search of the best produce, in particular cheeses. This passion led them to start Cheese to Meat You, a catering company specialising in bespoke (and aesthetically beautiful) cheese and meat boards for special events. But they weren’t done there. An opportunity to open a cheese and meat store next door to This Little Piggy arose and so, in 2017, The Fake Italian was born. At this little cave of epicurean wonders, you’ll find products such as Pepe Sayer cultured butter, Olsson’s hand-harvested macrobiotic sea salt, Cicada Artisan Chocolate, and Little Creek Cheese, the Central Coast’s own award-winning handmade cheese produced within the Old Wyong Milk Factory. Lee and Nicole’s ethos for the deli is purchasing handmade products direct from the farm, so the farmers get a fair price for their products and to create a more sustainable shopping experience. They also sell premium extra virgin olive oil by the refillable glass, in a quest to reduce waste. So your purchase won’t only taste good, it’ll feel good, too.

The old general store, tucked away in the quiet suburb of Empire Bay, has been given a new lease of life by Genevieve Page and Duncan Dalgleish who also own an espresso bar in Sydney but always dreamt of opening a shop on the Central Coast. So, when the opportunity came two years ago to share their passion for good quality food with their local community, just five minutes from home, they couldn’t resist, and Empire’s D’lite opened as an all-in-one general store, coffee bar and delicatessen. Their 30 years of combined experience in the retail food industry and their love of quality food has paid off. Empire’s D’lite has become a real local hub with people stopping by for a coffee sourced from artisanal Sydney roaster Black Drum Roasters, smallgoods from familyowned and operated Sunshine Meats, as well as a heap of local produce such as Little Creek Cheeses at Wyong, sweet treats from Sugar High Creations at Saratoga, and relishes and preserves from Jen’s Jams. But their main focus is helpful and friendly customer service, creating a welcoming vibe that’s, aptly, delightful. 1/1 Sorrento Rd, Empire Bay https://www.facebook.com/EBDlite/

3/51 Brisbane Water Drive, Point Clare www.thefakeitalian.com.au

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© KRISTY GARNER, BADABING PHOTOGRAPHY

LIESL TESCH, TRAVELLER, BEE KEEPER, EATER OF ROADKILL, PARALYMPIAN, POLLIE.


AngelRock Jewellers

W

hat would Liesl Tesch have achieved if a cycling accident hadn’t left her a partial paraplegic at the age of 19? She’d probably be a traveller, a bee keeper, an elite athlete and a politician. (Eating roadkill happened earlier as the child of an eccentric, alternative father but that’s a whole other story). After her accident, she took up wheelchair basketball as part of her rehabilitation and went on to compete in five Paralympic Games, winning three medals. She then took up competitive sailing and two years later won Gold in the London Paralympics and then again in Rio. As if that wasn’t enough, in 2017 she was elected to the NSW State Parliament. In between times, Liesl likes to travel the world, particularly where she can run basketball workshops. As she says, the people with disabilities she has met in developing countries remind her how lucky we are, and that a bad day for her doesn’t even rate compared to the circumstances of others. Liesl met her partner, Mark Thomson — a veteran of nine Sydney-to-Hobart yacht races — when she was invited to compete in the 2009 Sydney to Hobart with Sailors with Disabilities. After reconnecting with the sport she’d enjoyed during her youth, Liesl tried her hand at Paralympic sailing, then retired from basketball to concentrate on sailing. Liesl and her Paralympic Sailing partner, Dan Fitzgibbon, went on to win the SKUD 18 class in the 2015 World Championships and a Bronze medal in the 2016 World Championships. People talk of Liesl as being a positive and generous team player, heavily committed to giving back to the community — here on the Central Coast as well as internationally.

Liesl’s ‘fave’ places on the Coast include: SUNRISE: ‘Woy Woy bike path because it’s accessible, easy, beautiful. It has an abundance of black swans, pelicans, sea eagles, and keeps me fit and the dog happy!’ EARLY MORNING SWIMS: ‘Pearl Beach’ ‘SUNDOWNERS’: ‘At the Gosford Sailing Club’ GETAWAYS: ‘The Hawkesbury River for a sneaky, super-peaceful getaway’ CINEMAS: ‘If you live on the Coast, where else but Cinema Paradiso at Ettalong’

Treasures handmade on the Central Coast Featuring locally grown Broken Bay Pearls

‘Lucent Earrings’ handmade by AngelRock Jewellers. 9ct white gold, silver diamonds & Broken Bay Pearls in natural white-pink colour. Designer and jeweller, Celeste, invites you to fall in love with Broken Bay Pearls, as she did the first time she visited the Pearl Farm 5 years ago. After helping at oyster seeding and pearl harvest, Celeste then trained in seeding Akoya oysters to grow its world famous pearls with the Broken Bay Pearls team. Now, you can buy her designs inspired by our beautiful Central Coast, a journey from the genesis to the finished piece of jewellery. Celeste also welcomes you to collaborate with AngelRock Jewellers to create a bespoke treasure, and offers design consultations across the Central Coast. ANGELROCK JEWELLERS established 2003 Please contact us at www.angelrockjewellers.com.au for a consultation or small group showing. Find our jewellery in the retail shop of Gosford Regional Art Gallery, East Gosford

A GROOVY APERITIVO: ‘Frankies Roof Bar in Woy Woy’ ON THE WATER: ‘Anywhere on Brisbane Water in a kayak, on a boat…’ SUMMER DAYS: ‘Ocean Beach in the late afternoon’ TRAIN TRIP: ‘The magnificent train trip through the Hawkesbury heading back to the Coast.’

from Genesis to Jewel


FOLLOW THE ARTISTS WORDS SARAH GREENAWAY PHOTOS BRIGID ARNOTT

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HOME STYLE • Follow the Artists

and couches, and design books that, yes, are on the coffee table but unlike most, look thoroughly well read. Collectively, the balance it all strikes is spot on. When I ask Brad and Laura what they love about living on the Central Coast, their answers are the same — they love the community. Laura demonstrates this by choosing to collaborate wherever possible with local artisans through her co-owned business, The Beholder, an interior design and styling venture she shares with long-time friend and creative collaborator, Leah Fotofili. For Brad, it’s that the Coast is ever changing. He loves the diversity that every passing year brings, and with it a new breed of resident. ‘If you want to know where the next big property boom will be, follow the artists.’ Laura and Brad with Gabe (13) and Frankie (11).

WHEN YOU ENTER LAURA WASHINGTON AND BRAD SCOTT’S MACMASTERS BEACH HOME, YOU’RE IMMEDIATELY STRUCK BY THE BREEZINESS OF THE SPACE. IT EPITOMISES BEACHSIDE LIFE: WHITEWASHED FLOORBOARDS, LIGHT BRUSHEDGREY SURFACES, WOODEN BOWLS, SCULPTURES AND BOARDS, AND STREAMING SUNLIGHT THROUGHOUT. LAURA WELCOMES ME IN WITH A WARM SMILE. Laura, a fashion designer, fashion lecturer and stylist, is a career aesthete. Her eye for the beauty in the fine details of anything from jewellery and homewares to fashion and art have helped her carve out a reputation as an influential creative in any professional space she’s inhabited. She’s worked alongside acclaimed Japanese– Australian designer Akira Isogawa, created her own nationally-distributed label, headed up teaching at TAFE’s Fashion Design Studio (FDS) and has established herself as a coveted interior and event space designer. Laura’s view is that fashion and styling should reflect what a person appreciates and finds inspiration in, rather than act as an expression of faithfulness to passing trends. That she practises what she preaches is clearly evident in Brad and Laura’s home. You can see that in every item. Everything has been chosen with care and aligned with what they hold dear. There isn’t the faintest whiff of ostentation or faddish décor. There’s a consistent but subtle tribal theme to the soft furnishings, shocks of bright green indoor pot plants throughout the living spaces, plump cushions

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And he’s right. Think of Sydney’s Paddington or Melbourne’s Fitzroy — once blue-collar neighbourhoods that are now synonymous with all things cool and creative … and priced to match. Similarly, the Coast has been undergoing a slow change of its own. Creative types, like Laura and the craftspeople she aligns herself with, are looking for inspiration and revitalisation in our wide-open natural spaces, beautiful beaches and waterways, and picturesque bushland. Chatting around their marble-flecked tulip dining table, I discover that, in line with their love of the distinctive — rather than trendy — most of the showstoppers in Brad and Laura’s household are treasures they’ve owned for many years. One of their most conspicuous pieces is a captivating artwork that hangs above their cushion-laden bed. (This, I learn from Brad, is one of Laura’s few styling excesses — she can’t say no to a nice chubby cushion). The piece is by Mark Norval, a multi-award winning Kimberley artist. It’s a stunning cacophony of popping colours, neutrals and swirls that stands out against the overall crispness of the main bedroom. The introduction to Norval and his work came through Brad who, while working in financial markets, also has a keen interest in design and an appreciation of creative talent. He was working in Sydney’s central business district and Norval’s work was exhibited alongside prominent Indigenous artists in the atrium downstairs. Brad purchased his first piece from that exhibition, and he and Laura have been devotees ever since. Another of Brad’s contributions to their 1950s holiday shack turned airy beachside family home (he has completed a number of sweat-inducing extensions since he first bought the property as a one-bedroom Sydney escape in 1995) is a luscious garden. Brad’s green thumb and passion for hard graft are evident in the circular-shaped sweeping hedge (made up of 34 individual murraya plants), which takes pride of place beside a lawn that’s so green, it’s practically fluorescent. The sprawling garden is a haven of camellias, gardenias, birds of paradise and hydrangeas (to name just a few) that make you want to grab a picnic rug, a croquet set and a jug of Pimms, and settle in for the afternoon. Laura and Brad’s Macmasters Beach home is a celebration of creative expression, hard work, family and their shared love of the life on the Central Coast. www.thebeholder.com.au

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INDULGE YOUR SENSES AT D O L C E V I TA S K I N

SKIN HEALTH BY V I TA T H E S K I N W H I S P E R E R Achieving beautiful, healthy skin for life requires a treatment plan that is tailored especially for you to ensure your individual skin concerns are successfully identified and addressed. At Dolce Vita Skin, we support you at every stage of your skincare journey by curating a combination of treatments that will produce the best results for you. Vita, a Dermal Therapist with over 20 years of experience, and her team recognise the importance of inner health in promoting clear, glowing skin and combine this knowledge with our clinical approach to skincare to bring a sense of youthful radiance to the complexion, no matter what your stage of life.

OUR TREATMENT MENU INCLUDES: • Laser & light treatments Collagen facial, Laser Genesis, Photo facial, LED phototherapy

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HOME STYLE • Follow the Artists

LAURA’S TOP 10 LOCAL ARTISANS AND INDEPENDENT STORES Arafura Canvas, Killcare: beautiful leather and canvas products https://www.arafuracanvas.com Art Tank, North Avoca: community art projects https://www.arttank.com.au Feather, Kincumber: silk plants and so many feathers (largest supplier of feathers in southern hemisphere!) https://feather.com.au Focalpoint Home, Pretty Beach: fair trade textiles sourced in Tunisia http://www.focalpointhome.com.au Foundgarden, Avoca Beach: gorgeous succulent creations https://foundgarden.com.au Karen Bloomfield Fine Art, North Gosford: captivating paintings, predominantly using charcoal and oils https://karenbloomfieldart.com Lisa Carney Design, Avoca Beach: handcrafted jewellery https://www.lisacarneydesign.com Lisa Sanasi Ceramics, Killcare: bespoke ceramics and tableware www.instagram.com/lisasanasi Petal Sisters, Ettalong Beach: florists who do lovely arrangements and have recently combined this with a lifestyle store https://thepetalsisters.com.au When the North Wind Blows, Avoca Beach: importer and sourcer of ethnic treasures and textiles https://www.northwindblows.com.au

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HAPPENINGS • Christmas

CHRISTMAS HAPPENINGS WORDS KATIE STOKES

FAIRY LIGHTS HAVE BEEN STRUNG, PINE TREES ERECTED, MINCE PUDDINGS ARE ON SALE, AND THE ELF ON THE SHELF HAS COME OUT OF HIDING. THE SILLY SEASON IS UPON US AND THE CENTRAL COAST IS PLAYING HOST TO A HEAP OF FESTIVITIES. FROM SEASONAL MARKETS TO CAROLS EVENINGS, HERE ARE THE BEST-OF-THE-BEST CHRISTMAS EVENTS YOU SHOULD ATTEND THIS DECEMBER.

CHRISTMAS LIGHT SHOW AND CAROLS IN THE PARK, THE ENTRANCE A walk along The Entrance foreshore is a must this December with Central Coast Council installing some very special Christmas lights. For the first time on the Coast, a light show of Christmas tales will be projected onto large overhead panels that you can walk underneath. The 30day light show will kick off on December 1 with a special launch evening of live music, a visit from Santa and roving entertainment from some quirky festive folk, including walking candy canes, giant bouncy elves and a ballerina in a bubble! (5.30 pm to 8.30 pm). On Christmas Eve, bring your picnic rugs and glow sticks to Memorial Park for the annual Carols in the Park. A number of local school choirs and bands will lead everyone in singing ‘Silent Night’ and ‘Jingle Bells’, and the jolly man in red will pop in to wish all a merry Christmas. Christmas Light Show 1 to 30 December (lights go on at 8.30 pm each evening). The Entrance foreshore. Carols in the Park (free) 6 pm to 8 pm, 24 December. Waterfront Plaza, The Entrance. More info: www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/events

CHRISTMAS UNDER THE STARS, TUMBI UMBI Mingara’s Christmas Under the Stars is the Coast’s most popular carols night with more than 15,000 people attending last year. With headliner Damien Leith, former Hi-5 singer Nathan Foley and country singer Gina Jeffreys taking to the stage this December, it’s bound to draw a bumper crowd again. Hunger pangs will be well taken care of with the likes of woodfired pizza, burrito bowls, burgers and slushies available. BYO picnics are welcomed too. Carnival rides, a visit from Santa and a stunning fireworks display round out the fun. 23 December, 5.30 pm to 9.30 pm (gates open 4.30 pm; fireworks 9.15 pm). Mingara Recreation Club, Tumbi Umbi. Cost: Adults $5, children 12 years and under, free. Proceeds go to The Salvation Army, Books in Homes Project for The Entrance Public School and other local charities. More info and tickets: www.mingara.com.au

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HAPPENINGS • Christmas

THE CHRISTMAS FAIR, MOUNT PENANG GARDENS Now in its 11th year, and run by the successful team behind Avoca Beach markets, the annual Christmas Fair boasts more than 175 high-quality stalls that sell everything from local raw honey and Goose on the Loose Christmas meats to hand-crafted wooden toys and kids fashion. There will be live music from the likes of Grizzlee Train and Ellie Drennan, and STAR 104.5 Radio presenter and MasterChef winner, Julie Goodwin, will be available for book signings. The kids’ area is sure to keep tots amused with slot-car racing, lawn games, Christmas craft, carnival rides, Mungo the roving magician, Switcharoo Circus entertainers and, of course, Santa. You needn’t worry about bringing a packed lunch: Umina’s Sounds on West will be shredding barbecued brisket, the Really Stuffed Olive Company will be shucking oysters and Mr Goaty Gelato will be scooping ice-cream. There will be a licensed bar on site, too, with Six String Brewery and Firescreek wines on the pour. 2 December, 9 am to 2 pm. Mount Penang Gardens and Event Park, Kariong. Cost: Gold coin entry. More info: www.facebook.com/FixxEvents

CENTRAL COAST CAROLS, GOSFORD Hosted by radio presenters Rabbit and Julie Goodwin, Star 104.5’s Central Coast Carols are returning to Central Coast Stadium this year. Saint Nick, six-time Aria award-winner Wendy Matthews, and former yellow Wiggle Sam Moran will be hitting the stage. A jumping castle, slide and swing ride will be on site, as well as food trucks selling sno-cones, gozlemes and poffertjes. Fireworks will light up the sky at 9 pm to close the celebrations. 21 December, 5 pm to 9 pm (gates open at 4 pm). Central Coast Stadium, Gosford. Adults $10. Youths (5 to17 years) $5. Under 5, free. All proceeds donated to Cancer Council NSW, Central Coast. More info and tickets: www.centralcoastcarols.com.au

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HAPPENINGS • Christmas

SANTA, SNOW AND ENTERTAINMENT AT WESTFIELD TUGGERAH Santa’s making memories This year you can see Santa at Westfield Tuggerah in a brand new Santa setting. In the lead up to Christmas there’ll be free entertainment and activities to keep the kids occupied and happy while they wait their turn. To avoid the queue, you can book in for your Santa photography session online via www.westfield.com.au/tuggerah.

Sensitive Santa at Westfield Tuggerah

SURFING SANTA When you live on the Central Coast, Santa doesn’t travel by sleigh but on a long board. Every Christmas morning for the past six years John Gatt has donned a red suit and white beard and hit the waves of Soldiers Beach. John first grabbed the board in 2012 as a treat for his own kids, but the families who witnessed that first year of Surfing Santa encouraged him to do it again and soon enough the one-off event became a tradition. This Christmas morning Santa and Mrs Claus will be pulling into the Soldiers Beach car park aboard a fire truck at 10 am and families are invited to have their photo taken with Saint Nick before he takes to the waves. December 25, 10 am at Soldiers Beach, Norah Head 2263 https://www. facebook.com/johngatt01/

Sensitive Santa sessions will be available for children with sensory needs on Sunday mornings right through December until the 24th. The sessions run between 8 am and 9.30 am.

Don’t forget your pet’s photo this Christmas Westfield Tuggerah is hosting after-work, pet photography sessions on Monday evenings up until December 10, from 5.30 pm to 8.30 pm. So when your pet has finished work for the day, reward him with a photograph to frame for Christmas.

It’s snowing in Tuggerah! Westfield Tuggerah will be making it snow in centre court, every hour on the hour creating a magical experience for their littlest customers. The weather forecast says snow from 18 to 24 December. Westfield Tuggerah 50 Wyong Rd, Tuggerah 2259 www. westfield.com.au/tuggerah

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HAPPENINGS • Christmas

CHRISTMAS TREE FARM Choose your own tree where it grows The Central Coast Christmas Tree Farm at Kulnura is a 50-acre farm growing endless rows of Christmas trees that take up to around four to six years to reach the right height for your loungeroom. Visit the farm and stroll in amongst the trees, sneakily running your hands through the soft, green pine needles and breathing in wafts of fresh aromas. It quickly gets you in the Christmas spirit before choosing the tree that perfectly suits the shape and size and character you want while it’s still growing in the rich sandy loam soil of the mountain. The farm, run by the Thomas family, was originally an orange and lemon orchard when grandad, John Thomas, decided to buy 40,000 pine seedlings and grow Christmas trees. Today, he’s aided and abetted by daughter Mel and sons, Wayne and Steve. The numerous grandchildren also lend a hand, particularly if it involves driving the tractors. If you thought Christmas trees just grew to the right shape all by themselves, think again. Each mature tree needs to be handpruned every three months into the traditional Christmas tree shape, and each time it takes up to two months to prune them all. But the busiest time of the year comes at tree chopping time — through December and right up until Christmas Eve. You can even chop down your own tree if you wish. On your visit you are given a cattle-tag to fasten on the tree of your choice to ensure that you get ‘your’ tree when you come back to pick it up — or you can get it home delivered anywhere on the Central Coast. ‘The trees last up to three to four weeks after they’ve been cut,’ says Mel Thomas, ‘depending on how hot the weather gets. And I’ve been told some hairspray on the pine needles works wonders!’ Prices are $8 per foot of height (of the tree, not you) and delivery is $25. You can also buy a stand for $30. Next year’s trees are already growing like wild adolescents (unpruned). There’s also a huge paddock that looks fallow until you get up close and almost tread on the spindly saplings that stand one-metre apart. At that age, they need regular watering and the rabbits are busily digging holes in the freshly turned earth. Perhaps they should be put to work at Easter time to hide Easter eggs around the Christmas trees. https://www.facebook.com/ccxmastrees/

© JOY & SPARROW

Central Coast Christmas Tree Farm, 59 Yorky Waters Road, Kulnura 2250

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SHOPPING • Guide

WELCOME TO AT TUGGERAH

MIX ’N MATCH DINING FOR FOODIES AND FAMILIES What better way to spend a balmy summer evening than in a restaurant precinct with live music, fun for the kids, and the convenience of mix ‘n match dining. That means every family member can choose their favourite food whether it’s Thai, Italian, hamburgers, chips, noodles, ribs and steaks, self-serve yoghurt treats, and more —and then sit together at the one table. Choose your favourites from: • Nutrition Station • Absolute Thai • The Coffee Club • Grill’d • Yogurtland • Rashays • Hog’s Australia’s Steakhouse • Lone Star Rib House • Panarottis • Noodle Hut

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SHOPPING • Guide

CHILL OUT WITH SUMMER SOUNDS — ALIVE AND LOCAL There are Summer Sounds, live, every Saturday night from 5 January through to 23 February from 5 pm to 8 pm. That means live local music, lots of entertainment for the kids, and special dining offers. Summer Sounds is the essence of the Central Coast on Saturday nights.

PLAY, RELAX, BE ENTERTAINED There’s free water play in the fountains for the kids to cool off. Event Cinemas has an exciting summer line up with 7 cinemas and maximum wow factor. Raise your smile-o-metre at Timezone with state-of-the art video amusements and arcade games. Invite your friends, a special someone, or the whole family. Dance! Sing! Beat the high scorers! Kick butt! Westfield Tuggerah. 50 Wyong Road, Tuggerah 2259. https://www.westfield.com.au/tuggerah

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DeCapel Wines is a family run, boutique vineyard located in the Lovedale region of the Hunter Valley and is owned by David and Elisabeth Capel who planted the first vines with their daughters and friends. DeCapel Wines now grow and produce quality, single vineyard Shiraz and Semillon expertly crafted by winemaker, Dan Binet. We hand pick every grape to preserve the integrity of the fruit and deliver a wine that is pure and elegant. Our Josephine Semillon and Gabriela Shiraz are now available at selected outlets, online, or by contacting us direct.

DeCapel Wines decapelwines.com.au Call us on 0409 975 073 Enjoy wine in moderation Liquor Lic. LIQW880014594


LUXURY ACCOMMODATION

33o21’. 45 SOUTH, 151o30’. 0 EAST. BEACHSIDE RETREAT On the beach. Toowoon Bay NSW 2261 +61 2 4332 1566 kims@kims.com.au www.kims.com.au 31


ACCOMMODATION • The White House

THE WHITE HOUSE Grandeur and home comforts

D

iscreetly tucked away on the headland above Macmasters Beach, on 2.5 acres, the aptly named ‘The White House’, is accessed from a long, private driveway. When you first see the grandeur of the barrelvaulted roof architecture, the granite entrance way, reflection ponds and sandstone fountain, it takes your breath away. The double entrance doors, sourced from The Mount St Margaret’s chapel in Ryde, open onto rooms of majestic proportions with floor to ceiling windows and an abundance of natural light. The soaring domed ceilings, terrazzo underfloor heating and casual living areas lead to an upstairs games room. Outside, across a vista of rolling lawns, there’s a resort-style 12.5 metre

heated, mineral swimming pool, bocce court and a golf putting and pitching green. The four-bedroom property, 750 metres from Macmasters Beach, lends itself to weddings or small to large family functions with a choice of indoor or outdoor gathering areas. A covered cabana seats 12 with an adjacent sandstone table that seats another six. Both look towards a pergola with a ‘bridal’ walkway. The White House is the home of entertainer and businessman, Vaughan Lawrence, and is stylishly decorated with his personal art and artefacts, many collected over his years of travels. The White House, 30 South Pacific Drive, Macmasters Beach. Bookings at holidaysteam@rhcoastal.com www.centralcoastholidays.com.au

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4 3 8 510 0 0

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The Lion’s tail. Lion Island in the Hawkesbury River.


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ACCOMMODATION • The Nest

‘THE NEST’ at Killcare

holiday house heaven nestled above the beach T

he owner of this architect designed, luxury retreat is a talented artist who has carried the ‘nest’ theme into stylish and quirky bird sculptures inside the house and in the garden. Upstairs in the main living areas, floor to ceiling windows provide a panorama over the beach, the ocean and Bouddi National Park a little to the left. It’s just a couple of minutes’ stroll to the beach or, in winter, you can idly whale watch from the couch while cosily ensconced in front of the slow combustion fire. A long wooden dining table easily seats ten, and the house is dog friendly — something of a rarity in luxury holiday accommodation — and, although the garden is not fenced, it’s not much more than a ball’s throw to the off-leash dog beach at Killcare. The personalised check-in service includes a bottle of Bird in Hand champagne (continuing the ‘nest’ theme) and fresh flowers. For longer stays, there are also tasty touches from local producers. www.thenestatkillcare.com.au or bookings@beachretreatscentralcoast.com.au

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Dreaming of the perfect beach or bush holiday?

Frolick and surf in the waves in summer. Watch the whales splash by in winter and spring. Ride the miles of coastal and bush bike trails in autumn. Tear yourself away from a cosy fireplace to explore the best scenic coastal bushwalks in winter. Beach Retreats Central Coast meticulously prepare each exquisite abode with all the essentials you require. Our properties are thoroughly cleaned, and all your bed and bath linens are ready for your arrival. From the golf course to the tree tops, with beachfronts and poolside, you can turn your dream holiday into a reality with Beach Retreats Central Coast.

BEACH RETREATS CENTRAL COAST Email: bookings@beachretreatscentralcoast.com.au @beachretreatscentralcoast

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#thisisthelife

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Phone: 0418 262 454

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HAPPENINGS • Summer

HAPPENINGS ON THE COAST WORDS KATIE STOKES

CHALK THE WALK The Central Coast Council’s inaugural Chalk the Walk art festival was postponed because of October’s local drought-breaking rain so it’s been rescheduled for January. It’s set to transform The Entrance’s Waterfront Plaza into a community masterpiece these summer school holidays. Kids — and adults, too — are invited to contribute to the artwork, to be created over several days. Chalk the Walk, 17 to 21 January www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/events

Firefly Magic For a truly ethereal experience, book into The Forest of Tranquility to view their stunning nightly firefly display. It’s a seasonal event in December so it’s important to book. Arrive before twilight so you can choose a good, quiet spot to have a picnic dinner and wait for these enchanting rainforest creatures to emerge and flit about in their magical hour of glory. Bring a torch and good walking shoes. Adults $30 to $50. Children: $20 to $25. Book at www.forestoftranquility.com

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HAPPENINGS • Summer

CHEF MASTER SERIES @ The Box on the Water

The Box is presenting a series of monthly dining experiences with visiting chefs creating menus of contemporary and innovative cuisine. On 1 and 2 March, the guest chef is the ‘hatted’ modern Thai-master and author, Martin Boetz. Martin built his reputation in restaurants such as Faces, Rae’s on Wategos, Darley Street Thai, Longrain and now at Sailor’s Thai in the Rocks. His unique spin on Thai and Southern Chinese cooking has redefined modern Asian cuisine. www.theboxonthewater.com Phone 02 4339 3369 or email bookings@theboxonthewter.com

The Makers Studio Exhibition at the Re:Publik Café and Art Gallery An exhibition by members of The Makers Studio Central Coast Inc is on view at the Re:Publik art gallery and café with all works available for sale. 7 to 20 December, Re:Publik Café and Art Gallery,

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© TRENA LOWE

SCULPTURAL WORK BY CAROL VESPER

271 Ocean View Road, Ettalong Beach.


HAPPENINGS • Summer

Hats off to PEARLS ON THE BEACH At the Good Food Guide Awards 2019, the Central Coast’s only hatted restaurant did it again. Pearls on the Beach was awarded the coveted Hat, scoring 15.5/20. Here’s what one of the official reviewers had to say, ‘This pretty cottage, its toes virtually dangling in the sea, is about as close as you’ll get to a Hamptons beach shack on the coast of NSW. Inside, expect whitewashed weatherboards, and a calm, almost tidal ebb and flow to service. Scott Fox’s menu treads the line between simplicity and restraint with a few unexpected turns along the way. A seemingly simple dish of barbecued broccolini hits you with uncharacteristic depth of flavour ...’ Pearls on the Beach, 1 Tourmaline Ave, Pearl Beach 2256. Open Thursday to Sunday for lunch and dinner. (02) 4342 4400 or email info@pearlsonthebeach.com.au

FARM TOURS This is a hands-on tour in which children are invited to cuddle the hens, pat the sheep and sit on the tractor. Watch a cow being milked, collect eggs from the chooks, feed the sheep and pick produce on a Grace Springs Farm tour in Kulnura these school holidays. It’s fresh, wholesome fun and a great way to introduce your children to the concept of paddock to plate. Grace Springs Farm, 1128 George Downes Drive, Kulnura The two-hour tours run throughout the year. Check their website for dates. Cost: $16.50 per person; kids under 3 are free.

© KATIE STOKES

www.gracespringsfarm.net

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FOOD & DINING • Restaurants

THE SAVOY

THE COAST HAS A BRAND NEW DAME WORDS KATIE STOKES

T

he dame is sexy, has a penchant for retro films, shakes a damned fine espresso martini and is always up for a bit of fun. Meet The Savoy bar, home of Long Jetty’s long-awaited nightlife. Occupying the mezzanine level of Long Jetty’s long-forgotten theatre, The Savoy is a grown-up, retroinspired drinks and dining venue with a refreshing focus on service. The bar’s name pays homage to the site’s original Savoy Theatre, which opened to much acclaim in 1956, and the bar’s décor gives a nod to those post-war days. In the upstairs lounge the flooring is still tiered, but the cinema seating has been replaced with burgundy leather booths and velvet pouffes. The olive green walls have been retained and the original round sconces have been polished and re-lit. The space is still dominated by a floor-to-ceiling cinema screen framed by red velvet curtains, and the muted films that are projected serve

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as both entertainment and modern art installation. The Saturday we visit resident DJ Irina Shyshko spins the decks and patrons dance — martinis in hands — while Ferris Bueller’s Day Off plays on the screen. Downstairs, the bar melds retro décor with modern fittings. The back corner is the pick of the bar seating with its peacock-blue velvet couch, curved coffee table and much coveted leather-strapped Prizmic & Brill seats. The rest of the bar’s décor takes a leap towards the here and now: leather-backed stools line wooden drinks tables and the bar area is dressed in white subway tiles and Italian marble. Adorning the walls are staghorn ferns, vintage film posters and a small neon sign in honour of the American romance film that screened on the theatre’s opening night on 8 May 1956. The sign reads, ‘Love is a many Splendoured thing’. It’s fitting really, given the love that’s been poured into this site.


FOOD & DINING • Restaurants Built by Richard Wain after years of debate, The Savoy was once the Coast’s grandest theatres. After just 20 years it closed its doors and the upper levels of the theatre remained empty — apart from some squatting pigeons — for 40 years until Ben Pearce made a site inspection in September 2016. Today The Savoy is owned by four business partners: building owners Tyson and Matthew May, and brothers-in-law Guy Sullivan and Ben Pearce. Pearce is the managing director of the group and he’s well versed in late-night fun. Having formerly run popular establishments such as Kings Cross’s Kit & Kaboodle and Bondi’s Beach Road Hotel, it’s Pearce’s experience and industry contacts that have paved the way in creating this fabulous venue. The drinks list — curated by Pearce and specialist drinks-consultancy group Sweet & Chilli – runs the gamut from the classic to the crafty. Cocktails come on tap (Pimm’s and lemonade), frozen (margarita and rum punch) and shaken (espresso martini). They’ve also created their own in-house signature bottlings of Martinis and Negronis. There’s a generous list of craft beer and four beers on tap, which you can order by the schooner or 1.89-litre growler. We applaud their wine list, which favours low-sulphur Aussie drops. The casual dining menu has been designed by chef Cameron Hackney, whose former kitchens include Bells at Killcare and Darlinghurst’s Gastro Park. Drinks’ snacks come by way of a charcuterie board, cheese platter and retro dips plate, while Napoli-style pizzas provide more substantial options for sharing. The garlic-roasted funghi and truffle oil pizza is superb, but it’s the quattro formaggi pizza topped with parmesan, gorgonzola,

cheddar and fior di latte that begs a third slice. Salads are fittingly classic: a Rocket, Waldorf and Caesar, and we approve that they haven’t skimped on the anchovies with the last. Each Wednesday evening, the venue hosts Savoy ’n’ Chill Movie nights. They dim the lights, butter the popcorn and play old favourites such as Grease or Dirty Dancing. And here’s the brilliance, you enjoy the film with a craft beer in hand, a THE SAVOY cheese platter on the table and 391 The Entrance Rd, Long Jetty. Open seven days. Monday to Thursday with wait-staff in attendance. 2 pm to 11 pm; Friday 2 pm to 12 am; The Savoy offers a unique Saturday 12 pm to 12 am; bar-come-restaurant-comeSunday 12 pm to 10 pm. Bookings can be made for the cinema experience. There’s upstairs lounge. The bar is walk-in only. never been anything quite like it www.thesavoylongjetty.com.au or at before and its opening is a truly hello@thesavoylongjetty.com.au exciting coup for the Coast. c

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COASTING • Summer

with

SUSAN KUROSAWA

ONCE I WAS A MEMBER OF THE MIGRATORY SPECIES KNOWN AS ‘THE SUMMER PEOPLE’. MY VISITS TO THE SEASIDE, BOTH IN THE ENGLAND OF MY GIRLHOOD AND, AS A TEEN, ALONG SYDNEY’S NORTHERN BEACHES, USED TO BE DURING THE HOTTEST TIMES OF YEAR. WHEN I WAS YOUNG IT NEVER OCCURRED TO ME THAT PEOPLE LIVED BY THE OCEAN ALL YEAR ROUND OR NEVER NEEDED A WOOLLY HAT. IF I’D THOUGHT ABOUT IT PROPERLY, MY JEALOUSY WOULD HAVE KNOWN NO BOUNDS. MOTHER AND DAD BOOKED THE SAME BOARDING HOUSE YEAR AFTER YEAR AT BRIGHTON IN EAST SUSSEX AND LATER, WHEN WE LIVED IN CANBERRA, IT WOULD BE AN ANNUAL PILGRIMAGE TO A FIBRO COTTAGE SURROUNDED BY FRANGIPANI TREES AT MOLLYMOOK ON THE NSW SOUTH COAST. Anderson’s Boat Shed

T

here was a comfortable continuity to it all, except the year Dad was late with the annual booking when I was seven years old and the Brighton lady of the house gave our sea-view room away to interlopers. Mother declared the newcomers were foreigners. Amusingly, Mother was not English and the new arrivals were from Wiltshire, a mere few hours away across the South Downs. Nonetheless, both parents showed their displeasure in spades. Now a resident of the Central Coast for 21 years, the Christmas and New Year holiday season still fills me with anticipation. I imagine how today’s generation of summer people, especially younger family members,

44 COAST

must be thrilled with the idea of a beach escape and all the seemingly limitless pleasures it involves. Parents these days may not be so carefree but mine threw all caution and dental concerns to the salty breeze and I would be allowed ice cream cones and teeth-shattering sticks of Brighton rock candy at all hours. My curly hair was a matted tangle and bedtime was more a suggestion than a command. The Americans have a term, loosey-goosey, which means excessively relaxed. So let’s apply it to our coastal summer and look at lovely ways to unwind and, yes, show off our patch to guests. I adore old-style, paintpeeling signs that advertise: Boat Hire. Bait. Tackle.


COASTING • Summer So, rent a Barbecue Boat from Andersons Boat Shed at Booker Bay or a Barbecue Pontoon from Boat, Bike, Paddle Hire at Hardys Bay Marina. Either option holds 12 people and all the equipment you’d need is provided; just BYO steaks, snags, drinks and a mild sense of adventure. The latter operator also hires four-person tinnies, SUPs and kayaks. Then there’s The Entrance Boat Shed, a heritage operator that also has all the marine gear, including half-cabin motorboats by the hour and fishing gear to get out and about on Tuggerah Lake. If fishing is not your bag, then fish and chips might be the shot. Amid the hip new eateries, cocktail bars and cafés, there’s something wonderfully reassuring about an unreconstructed shop that batters its catch of the day, generously salts its chips and steadfastly believes in the merits of potato scallops. I recommend Skipper’s at Umina and Keron Irving’s Wagstaffe General Store for old-fashioned paper-wrapped serves, while The Box at Ettalong’s beach kiosk elevates proceedings to a burger or taco with barramundi fillet, rocket, slaw and tangy capsicum sauce. Of course, you’ll want something icy after that lot, so head to the little aquamarine-andwhite Costa Centrale Café in Woy Woy for housemade pistachio cones and tubs, or track down jersey cow and goat’s milk gelato and vegan sorbet from Mr Goaty Gelato’s retro white van, which pops up at markets and beachside parks, or head to Salt Pig Deli in Erina for its soft-serve swirl variety. A scoop of lemon myrtle and macadamia is the taste of an Aussie summer, no question. While on the topic of delicatessens, there’s no shortage of providores to visit and assemble a picnic, from the gloriously named Fake Italian Deli at Point Clare and Fresko Foods at Kincumber to Georges Fruit Barn in Terrigal with its continental and Asian selections and utterly delicious Lucky Dog Australian Honey produced in apiaries at Wyoming. Meantime, up at Cameron and Hayley Cansdell’s Saddles Mount White, the on-site bakehouse is the go-to takeaway spot for the likes of next-level pork and fennel sausage rolls, pickles and jams, Valrhona chocolate lamingtons and yuzu-infused vanilla slices. And if you can’t find a good spot to spread out an al fresco feast, you’re not trying hard enough. Consider the waterfront reserve at Patonga Beach, Crackneck Lookout (hike up from Bateau Bay if that picnic can be carried in a backpack) or the unambiguously named Picnic Point Reserve at The Entrance. You’ll need a big checked rug? So last season. Spread out a pretty tropical-motif sarong on the grass from Goddess of the Sea boutique at Ettalong Beach or a Tunisian supersoft fouta towel from Pretty Beach resident Jane Nafti, whose Focalpoint Home website is awash with blue and turquoise summery options. Oh, and as we’re being all loosey-goosey, a coffee fix is essential. So where

better than the appropriately titled Fat Goose Cafe at Hardys Bay, which will be as busy as ever with the holiday crowd. Cue the chicken, leek and white truffle gourmet pies and plump Portuguese egg tarts and line up with the summer people, who definitely are onto something. c Susan Kurosawa is the travel editor of The Australian newspaper. She moved to Hardys Bay in 1997 and now lives at Killcare. Her 1999 book, Coasting: A Year by the Bay, has had several reprints.

Costa Centrale

Mr Goaty Gelato

Focalpoint Home

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CLASSES & COURSES • Summer

CLASSES AND COURSES WORDS BROOKE DOHERTY

ART FOR ALL Central Coast Regional Gallery will be running school holiday art workshops. They also offer after-school classes during term-time for students. Term 1 adult art classes will begin in February at Central Coast Regional Gallery and cover mediums such as watercolour, oil-painting, drawing, pastels and genres like botanical art over an eight-week period. Morning and afternoon sessions will be available as well as evening courses. Central Coast Regional Art Gallery on 4304 7550 or email: gallery@gosford.nsw.gov.au

Christmas wreath-making workshop

CHRISTMAS WREATH-MAKING WORKSHOP If you’re worried about getting your tinsel in a tangle this Christmas, don’t. Karin Seal, one of the Central Coast’s premier theme decorators, runs Wreath-Making workshops for $69.95 each Monday night in December. Accommodating eight people per session, you’ll not only get personalized assistance with a choice of baubles and ribbons from her amazing store, but also nibblies, cupcakes and a glass of champagne to ease you into the Christmas spirit. Now that’s seriously posh! 3, 10 and 17 December. Register at the Facebook site: A Dash of Christmas in the ‘comments’ section.

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CLASSES & COURSES • Summer

LEARN TO SURF FOR 5 TO 55-YEAR-OLDS Learn to ride the waves at Umina and Ocean Beaches — whether you’re 5 or 55+. There are children’s classes (5–16 years), adult classes and women’s classes. Sals surf school is an ASI (Academy of Surfing Instructors) accredited school and all surf coaches hold their ASI Level 1 surfing instructor qualification as well as Senior First Aid, Bronze Medallion and Working with Children certificates. School holiday classes are available, as well as private weekday and weekend classes for small groups and individuals, and birthday party classes. There are one-off classes as well as 5- and 8-week classes and day camps. Wet suits, rashies, surfboards and sunscreen are supplied. Umina Beach classes meet in the Umina Beach Surf Club carpark. Ocean Beach classes meet in the Ocean Beach Surf Club carpark, far corner. www.salssurfschool.com.au

COURSE SMORGASBORD

JIGSAW COLLOGRAPH PRINTMAKING TO UNLEASH YOUR INNER CREATIVE Sara Ross-Thompson is a visiting UK printmaker who’ll be holding classes on creative ways with collograph printmaking to create your own jigsaw puzzle. No, it’s not calligraphy! A collograph is a collage of materials glued to a cardboard ‘printing plate’ which is later varnished and then painted. Paper is then pressed onto the surface to produce a print. All materials are supplied to cut, shape and colour. February 23 and 24 at The Makers Studio. Book online at www.themakersstudio.org.au or 0414 220 855.

The University of the Third Age (U3A) Central Coast regularly holds courses ranging across such diverse interests as the Arts, Literature, Science, Humanities and Current Affairs. They’re sure to whet your appetite with a niche topic (like Victorian jewellery) and offer oneoff and multiple session courses with excellent tutors. Check out their website at centralcoast.u3anet.org.au

INTRODUCTION TO WOODBLOCK PRINT-MAKING This is a members only workshop, so join The Makers Studio Central Coast for classes with Lisa MacArthur-Edwards. All materials are supplied. 9 February. Bookings www.themakersstudio.org.au or 0414 220 855.

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Winner of the AngelRock Broken Bay Pearls photo competition: Mitchell Shailer’s photo of his son, Lennox Shailer. Instagram: @Shailer

48 COAST


EE FR EN EV T

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Costa Centrale is a new family run and family friendly Italian cafe in Woy Woy serving up delicious food, Toby’s Estate Coffee and yummy sweets such as freshly piped cannoli and Italian gelato. Owned and operated by Head Chef, Andrea and his right hand in the kitchen, Rose, with a lifetime of experience in hospitality and a rich and proud southern Italian heritage, originating from Sicily and the Isole Eolie. We are family and we look forward to meeting yours. Stay tuned for pop-up dinners this summer! Open Mon, Wed, Thurs, Fri - 6.30am to 4pm. Sat and Sun - 7am to 4pm. 4/18-22 The Boulevarde, Woy Woy (02) 4309 3631

@costacentralecafe

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FEATURE • Heath Harris

‘You make [training] fun for the animal, … They don’t do it to please you, they do it because they want to, so you have to make it fun and rewarding.’

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FEATURE • Heath Harris

HEATH HARRIS

Central Coast craftsman saddle-maker, movie horse master, entrepreneur. WORDS CATHARINE RETTER PHOTOS REED PLUMMER

H

eath Harris was a horseman before he was a saddler. He started his working life as a ringer drafting mobs of cattle out in the bush where he found out the hard way that there were some saddles that helped you ‘stick’ to the horse and others where ‘you just knew if things went haywire, you’d end up in the dust.’ Then, a chance meeting with a saddler in Coonamble led to a fascination with saddle-making. Heath left the bush and headed for Sydney where he asked none other than the city’s most venerable saddle-maker, JP Talty, in the Haymarket for a job. Talty’s name was synonymous with saddlery and he was known as something of a delightful eccentric. In spite of his trade, he was an avid collector of motorcars, as well as rare books, death masks of famous people, and even Hirohito’s elaborate saddle on which he was seated when Japan surrendered to the Allies at the end of World War II. ‘Old Talty was nearly 90 years old at the time and I didn’t have any experience but he took me on. There were no TAFE courses, you learnt on the job and one of the first things they started a young ’un on was cutting and sewing stirrup leathers — lots and lots of them — and then I progressed to kneepads. They were made of sole leather, very tough to stitch. Talty taught me the art, the craft and the profession of saddle-making.’ Today, it’s Heath’s 50 years of saddle-making combined with his early background as a ringer, then a rodeo rider, before becoming Australia’s foremost trainer of horses for movies that make the difference in his saddles. Think, The Man from Snowy River, Phar Lap, the Legend of Zorro, Breaker Morant, Gallipoli, The Young Black Stallion and you’ll cover just some of Heath’s career as a trainer and horse master in Australia and Hollywood. ‘Every saddle I design and make, every prototype I develop, is based on all those years of practical experience, even if it means putting effectiveness before beautiful sometimes.’ Heath has also developed an ingenious way for his customers to be able to fine-tune the fit of their saddle for a particular horse and, if a horse has back irregularities, he can adjust the wool packing inside the saddle with the right tools to make an even contact. He’d love to use local leather for his saddles but, where Australia once had 38 tanneries, there are now two and they can’t specialise

in everything. Even different parts of the one saddle need different tanning processes: vegetable tanning for heavier, stronger, waterresistant leather; chrome tanning for less rigid areas. It’s for these sorts of reasons that the leather for Heath’s work saddles come from Mexico, the dressage saddle leather from the UK, and jumping saddles from Argentina.

Heath stitches a bridle cheek strap, kept in place on a wooden horse.

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The saddler at work on a multi- purpose stock saddle.

‘We get the leather delivered from where they are made best, wherever that is in the world. They come as flatpacks which we then shape around the saddle trees and sew and finish here at Mt White.’ Heath’s Hawkesbury River Saddlery is just up the road from one of the Central Coast’s sought-after restaurants, appropriately called ‘Saddles’, where saddles from Heath’s collection feature as barstools. Back at the saddlery, the wonderful aroma of leather wafts over to you as you walk into the storeroom. Here you can find up to 30 different types of trees — the skeleton of a saddle — made from hoop pine and covered with rawhide. Another area has shelves with layers of uncut and cut hides. It takes the equivalent of a complete cowhide to make one saddle, with different parts of the hide used for different parts of the saddle. Thick leather is used for critical, heavy wearing parts such as the fenders and stirrup leathers (fenders are the ‘mudguards’ of a saddle or, more correctly, ‘sweat guards’, protecting the rider’s legs from the horse’s sweat). Lighter-weight leather is used for areas that need to stretch around different shapes. Some parts of the saddle expose the rougher ‘flesh side’ of the hide — good for grip in the seat — other parts use the finished (and more slippery) outer side or ‘grain side’ of the hide. ‘The best part of the hide is the back leather, used for the seat,’ says Heath. Step into Heath’s main workroom and you’ll see flat awls, sewing awls, round awl blades, curved awls, tack pullers, groovers, hasps and hafts, punches, edge creasers, tack hammers, doorknob bouncers, stretching pliers, bleeders and trimmers — and you begin to get an idea of the craft involved in saddle-making. It’s difficult to talk to Heath without wanting to ask about his experiences in the movies. He has been the horse master, trainer, 52 COAST

stunt coordinator, and second unit director for over 40 feature films and around 120 commercials and television series. His partner in much of this has been wife, Krissy, who has also represented Australia internationally as a leading showjumper. Heath has done his fair share of stunt riding but he’s best known for his liberty horses — where a horse performs without a rider and without a harness of any sort. How do you train a horse to do that? ‘You make it fun for the animal,’ he says. ‘They don’t do it to please you, they do it because they want to, so you have to make it fun and rewarding.’ What’s the most challenging role you’ve had in the movies? ‘I did four films in Namibia. None of the Hollywood horse masters wanted to touch that. Namibia is desert. There are no horses there. They asked me could I do it. I said “sure” and then I had to figure out how.’ Each was a massive undertaking. For The Young Black Stallion movie, Heath had to find 40 Arabian endurance horses which he bought 1,000 km away in South Africa, as well as 10 camels. ‘We had to transport them, rest them along the way, then bring in stabling, veterinary care, horse yards, horse feed and water, the lot,’ Heath says. ‘Then I had six weeks to train them. The norm in Hollywood is six months! We trained them to run free over the desert sand as well as the famous race over Black Mountain that has a treacherous loose black rock surface. We had to make it safe even though it looked treacherous, and for the horses to run exactly how and where the director wanted them. ‘If you don’t get it right you have a crew and equipment and actors standing around costing a lot of money. You have to get it right. And, most importantly, you have to make sure no animal is injured or placed under stress.’


FEATURE • Heath Harris

‘Every saddle I design and make, every prototype I develop, is based on all those years of practical experience, even if it means putting effectiveness before beautiful sometimes.’

After their return to Australia, Heath and Krissy trained a new team of liberty horses for their own live shows in which Heath demonstrated how he trained horses to ‘lie down and die’, and how ‘wild stallion attacks’ were choreographed. So, has Heath slowed down at 71 years? Not likely. He and Krissy are developing a major international equestrian property at Mangrove Mountain because, he says, ‘There’s a shortage of international-standard competition equestrian arenas in Australia.’ The 90-acre property, named Stonewall (after Heath’s favourite drop of wine), has a kilometre of newly built drystone walls. When completed, they hope to have stabling for 250 horses, four 100 metre x 100 metre arenas and six pavilions. They’ve already removed 10-metre high lantana and privet and hauled away six semi-trailer loads of scrap metal found on the property. They’ve eradicated noxious week along Popran Creek and planted 3,000 shrubs and trees, with another 3,000 to come. They’ve built a sawmill on the property to cut their own ironbark timber to build fences and a bridge over the creek. Their aim is to stage an annual 5-day show, the first annual derby in the southern hemisphere — ‘the Melbourne Cup of show jumping’ — and to make the venue available for hire at a highly competitive rate. It’s been a long-term project, not yet halfway through, and not expected to be completed for another couple of years. ‘In some ways it’s my “Namibia challenge”,’ says Heath. ‘I like a challenge.’ To that, we’d have to add patience: it takes endless patience to make even one saddle, patience to train horses and, it seems, yet more years of patience to build his dream property. c Hawkesbury River Saddle Company

Leather edges are trimmed and styled with the help of a round knife.

Saddle trees made from hoop pine and covered in rawhide are the foundation of the saddle.

www.harrisentertainment.com.au

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NEW YORK’S BRIGHT LIGHTS TO WOY WOY’S BAY VIEWS WORDS YASMIN NEWMAN

WHENEVER SOMEONE HEARS THE LUCKY BEE BOYS’ STORY, INCREDULITY STEPS IN. THE COGS CAN’T QUITE TURN. WHO IN THEIR RIGHT MIND WOULD TRADE THE BRIGHT LIGHTS OF NEW YORK CITY AND A HIP LOWER EAST SIDE RESTAURANT FOR A ROOFTOP BAR ABOVE A PUB ON THE CENTRAL COAST?

M

atty Bennett and Rupert Noffs, partners in life and food, think everyone has got it wrong. Why wouldn’t you? ‘Australians don’t realise how beautiful Australia is,’ explains the exuberant Rupert, who runs front of house at Lucky Bee, while Matty oversees the on-point modern Thai kitchen. ‘I took it for granted as a kid. It only took seven years living in NYC to realise!’ But let’s start at the beginning, because it’s a good one, as is the whole tale of how Rupert and Matty have come to run one of the most-talked about venues on the Coast. Fresh out of school and on other sides of the world, the two snapped up posts on a P&O cruise ship. Rupert recalls their first day at port, ‘He carried my bags from the terminal to the ship cabin. I like to say it was love at first carry.’ The duo has been inseparable since.

54 COAST

After six blissful months sailing the seas, the two returned together to Australia. Matty had undergone his chef apprenticeship in the UK, so Rupert encouraged him to apply at Longrain, one of Sydney’s hottest restaurants and, over the next six years, he worked his way up to head chef of the lauded Thai food temple. Meanwhile, Rupert took over marketing, PR and events at Ted Noffs Foundation (the well-known philanthropist is Rupert’s grandfather), where he also co-founded Gideons Shoes, a new fund-raising arm. By 2010, the popular anti-sweatshop threads caught the eye of renowned New York publicist and television personality, Kelly Cutrone and, within months, she’d convinced Rupert and Matty to move to New York. Rupert recounts living with the reality TV star. ‘Here we were, in her six-storey loft, selling our little shoe


FOOD & DINING • Restaurants

label alongside designers like Jeremy Scott and Vivienne Westwood!’ He sounds shocked, even to this day. Matty, also living the New York dream, scored a post at The Fat Radish, the city’s leading farm-to-table restaurant. Rupert describes a distinct shift in his partner’s food, particularly the provenance-driven Thai he’d cook at home, his first and true food love. The chef did a few style-showcasing pop-ups on the side, the events sold out, and professional jealousy set in. Then, he’s fired. Rupert remembers the day vividly. ‘We went to Les Halles, the late Anthony Bourdain’s restaurant — and Matty’s hero — and started writing our business plan.’ For the duo, it was now or never, and a dream they’d had together since they met almost 15 years ago. In early 2016, Lucky Bee, a mod Thai bar-meetsrestaurant, opened its doors in downtown Manhattan. Rupert describes it as ‘one of the hottest places in town’ and I can personally attest. I visited a couple of time researching my cookbook The Desserts of New York and the slick venue pumped. ‘Jason Woo had a party there. The Zimmerman girls came, Chris Rock, Diane Kruger…’ recounts Rupert. ‘It was surreal. But with success comes tribulation.’ What follows next recalls a movie script, complete with an extortionist slumlord and demands for a Rolex and car to cover the ever-expanding rent. ‘New York is one of the world’s greatest cities, but it’s a hustle every day,’ says Rupert. ‘You have to be ruthless like Trump to survive and I just don’t have that in me.’ Images of Rupert’s family on the easy, breezy Central Coast began to haunt them daily. ‘When the family first moved, I thought they’d given up on life!’ he says tongue in cheek. ‘But each time we’d visit, we’d fall more in love. The Coast is heaven.’ Now, five months after re-opening Lucky Bee in the newly renovated The Bayview Hotel, with its striking views across Brisbane Water, the restaurateurs couldn’t be happier. The response from locals has been equally

overwhelming. Still, there’s always the question: ‘From New York … to Woy Woy?’ Rupert easily counters: ‘Everyone is moving up the Coast. People can’t afford Sydney rent and property. We’re at the tip of a boom here and we want to ride that wave.’ From the pair’s first Aussie pop-up at Woy Woy Fisherman’s Wharf in 2015, they’ve seen the quaint town explode with cool venues, including Young Barons and Tropicana Pizza Pizza. And there’s more to come from the boys. Rupert hints at a thriving partnership with The Bayview’s Jordan Harris and Gary Navro, whose six pubs can be found up and down the sun-kissed region. ‘There’s nothing like Matty’s Thai food here,’ says Rupert proudly. Paired with the Coast’s enviable setting, it’s a concept to rival even New York. c The Lucky Bee at Frankie’s Rooftop, 2 The Boulevard, Woy Woy www.frankiesrooftop.com.au Images courtesy of www.thisisthecentralcoast.com.au

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ESCAPE . UNWIND . RELAX . INDULGE

THE SPRINGS EXPERIENCE P E AT S R I D G E

TAKE THE TIME. TAKE THE DRIVE.

Sit on the deck and soak in the bushland views or play a game of outdoor chess while you sip on one of our mixologists bush inspired cocktails, taste a local craft beer or have a flirt with a local gin.

Escape to The Sitting Duck at The Springs in the hinterland of the Central Coast and experience Chef Dan’s locally sourced and creatively plated farm to plate menus.

Desserts created with fresh ingredients like local pecans, local honey, oranges and berries are best to savour inside on one of the chesterfields or cowhide lounges along with designer teas and indulgent coffees.

“Weekends with Chef Dan” is an indulgence not to miss. Innovative individual and share plates created from what Dan sources from local suppliers and our own garden to bring you the ultimate food experience.

Once you have escaped to a Springs Experience you will keep coming back. We will be waiting for you.

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(02) 4373 1522 1 0 8 0 P E AT S R I D G E R OA D W W W. T H E - S P R I N G S . C O M . A U


FOOD & DINING • Bars

7 OF THE BEST BARS ON THE COAST WORDS MEGAN ARKINSTALL

Margarita Daze, Umina Our balmy summer nights are sorted. Set on the shores of Ocean Beach, Margarita Daze is everything a beachfront bar should be: light and bright with rustic timber and white-wash walls, rattan furniture, lush greenery, festoon lighting and beach umbrellas, with crashing waves so close you can almost feel the salt spray. This social hang-out has large share tables and laidback couches, with a menu full of hearty meals such as nachos, chicken parmi, burgers and pizzas, as well as a few seafood favourites including fresh oysters. And don’t forget the margaritas… Try the jalepeno version for a spicy kick. margaritadaze.com.au

Pocket Bar, Terrigal This brooding bar set on Terrigal’s esplanade brings a dose of gritty cool to this seaside town. Drawing inspiration from its Darlinghurst counterpart of the same name, Pocket Bar feels like an urban speakeasy with dimly lit interiors, street art-adorned walls, exposed brick, vintage furniture and recycled industrial-style décor, and an impressive collection of liquor lining the back of the bar. The people behind the bar are just as impressive when it comes to creating bespoke cocktails such as Elegantly Wasted or Burning Man. They’re also known for their good banter. On the last Sunday of every month, Pocket hosts Locally Grown, an open-mic style evening helping local artists ‘get a leg up’. houseofpocket.com.au

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FOOD & DINING • Bars

Frankies Rooftop Bar, Woy Woy Set atop the refurbished Bayview Hotel in Woy Woy, Frankies Rooftop is a fab spot for a tipple overlooking Brisbane Water. And it’s recently been made even better with the arrival of The Lucky Bee, a lip-smacking Southeast Asian restaurant by Matty Bennett and Rupert Noffs, the boys behind the former New York City restaurant of the same name. The kitsch space is a riot of colour with plastic tablecloths sporting flower, cherry and chilli prints, neon flamingos, and pops of hot pink décor. It doesn’t take itself too seriously, but the food and drink offering is seriously good, and will take you on a trip to Bangkok without leaving Woy Woy. frankiesrooftop.com.au

Six Strings Tasting Room, Erina It’d be remiss not to include the Coast’s very first brewery on a list of the best watering holes. Not only because it’s homegrown, but because its brews are some of the best. Six Strings’ core range (Coastie lager, Dark Red IPA, Pale Ale and Tropical Pale Ale) is always on tap, along with an ever-changing selection of seasonal and limited-edition beers to sample. Lunch and dinner are available from Wednesday to Sunday, with a menu focused on Mexican and American comfort foods like burritos, fried chicken and chips, cheeseburgers and tacos. There’s live music on the weekends if you want to linger a little longer, or join a Saturday morning tour; at just $25 it includes a tasting paddle and beer and food matching. sixstringbrewing.com.au

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FOOD & DINING • Bars

Bar Toto, Ettalong Give us some good Italian antipasti and a delicious glass of red wine and we’re in paradiso (that’s Italian for heaven). Actually, that’s exactly where you’ll find Bar Toto, next to Ettalong’s Cinema Paradiso, that is. The trattoria menu features Sicilian antipasti and cicchetti (small bites) designed to share, a list of crafted cocktails (try Nonna’s Lemon Tea, aka naughty lemonade), global wines, and beers with an Italian flavour. And if you want to catch a flick after your feast, there are great movie deals including a drink and tickets from $18. bartoto.com.au

ReviveR, Gosford They do things a little differently in this cool bolthole set in a charming 1930s stone building in Gosford: the music is low enough for conversation, they don’t serve shots, and they don’t make their cocktails in blenders. A real class act, if you ask us. Inspired by US city New Orleans, the menu packs a punch with flavours from the Deep South – think Creole shrimp and grits, fried chicken and Cajun salt and pepper squid – and the drinks list is extensive, so settle in for a night in the Coast’s own Big Easy.

ReviveR

reviver.net.au

Mumbo Jumbo’s, Terrigal Is there such a thing as ramshackle cool? Because Mumbo Jumbo’s is just that. This rooftop bar in the heart of Terrigal is the type of place you head to straight from the beach, with salty skin and sandy toes. It’s a feel-good space with Jamaican vibes and Caribbean flavours. The menu features dishes such as jerk spiced chicken and rum and cinnamon spiced pork belly, while the Chocolate Bounty Colada has our name written all over it; a chocolatey twist on the tropical favourite. It’s the perfect spot to while away summer afternoons. mumbojumbos.com.au

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© CENTRAL COAST DRONES


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FOOD & DINING • Chef Profile

CHEF DAN CAPPER, The Springs DAN CAPPER REMEMBERS HIS FIRST JOB AS AN APPRENTICE WAS WORKING UNDER 40 CHEFS IN NONE OTHER THAN THE PRESTIGIOUS CLARIDGES AND THE INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL IN LONDON.

‘It was crowded, frantic and a bit manic,’ Dan recalls. ‘It ran like a brigade, with systems reaching back to the time of Escoffier. You’d spend three months prepping and cooking fish. Then three months on desserts or bread-making. It was a hard environment but they were fabulous foundations for building skills. If you put in the hard work you learnt a lot in return.’ The biggest culinary influence in his career, however, came from the world renowned, Vancouver-based chef, Robert Sulatycky, who imbued in him that the way to let the natural flavours to the fore was to keep food simple, and that it’s more about showcasing the produce than showing off the chef’s skills. ‘The older I get, the more I understand that less can be more and that lets the food flavours shine through … and then there’s nowhere to hide!’ Dan has been at The Springs since Day One of its opening in 2013 when he started as a sous chef. Today, he’s the executive chef with a staff of three other chefs and an apprentice. Guests at The Springs are mainly visitors from Sydney and the Coast, as well as local farmers. ‘I love the feeling when everyone eats and the room goes quiet and that’s always a good sign,’ Dan says. WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HIS OVERSEAS COOKING EXPERIENCES AND AUSTRALIAN FOOD STYLES? ‘Here, the Asian influences and the climate have led to lighter foods — less cream and butter,’ Dan says. ‘At The Springs we have lots of sharing foods. We do an amazing roast lamb shoulder cooked for 16 hours with Dijon and herbs.’ The menu tries to work with what’s in season and Dan prefers to source local produce where possible: Little Creek Cheeses from Wyong, Somersbee Honey (Somersby) and Rosco Park Honey (Murrays Run), pecans from The Pecan Lady (Somersby), locally grown avocados, and juices from East Coast Beverages, of course, just down the road. The Springs grows its own chillies and, inevitably, because the area is known for its oranges, they also grow citrus trees.

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FOOD & DINING • Chef Profile

‘We make our own aioli, our own pickles,’ says Dan. ‘We have our own herb garden too.’ In his spare time, Dan loves to spend time with his young daughters even if that means being a glorified taxi driver on the weekends. He likes to cook at home even after a full day in the kitchen. ‘One of the reasons my wife fell for me when we first met was that I cooked for her. I still like to do that because it’s nice to cook for people you love … but your family can also be your harshest critics, especially when it comes to spinach and zucchinis with the girls. One of his daughters is solely focused on her dancing classes but the other might be taking after dad. ‘She likes to whisk the eggs, put in the salt, or nick something off the chopping board to taste it. Whether that leads to anything further, who knows,’ Dan says. ‘Cooking at home lets me experiment with ingredients too. My favourite home dishes would be roasts, a curry, or anything slow-cooked. In winter it’s braised lamb shanks — I love to use lesser cuts and then get something really good out of it.’ WHAT DOES HE LIKE ABOUT LIVING ON THE CENTRAL COAST? ‘The contrasts, the diversity. You get everything from farmlands to forests to beaches.’ His sentimental favourite is Norah Head and its lighthouse. ‘It’s where we got married — The Springs wedding venue wasn’t open back then!’ WHAT WOULD HE LIKE TO CHANGE ABOUT THE INDUSTRY IN AUSTRALIA? ‘Apprenticeships for chefs are becoming shorter and shorter and I don’t think that’s good for the industry. You just don’t learn the same skill sets in a short period of time. Being a chef, it’s a job that never stands still. All the new equipment that once you only got in a lab — they can be a great tool for delivering tenderness and moisture content. But you need to know how to use the more traditional method as well as understand when and how to use equipment to deliver the best results.’ HIS BIGGEST WEAKNESS IN LIFE? ‘I have 250 cookbooks at home. If you have a great meal at a restaurant, I love to get to know about the chef, his or her style, and their attitude to ingredients.’ The Springs, 1080 Peats Ridge Road, Peats Ridge 2250. Booking essential. www.the-springs.com.au The Duck Inn Bar and Bistro, open Wednesday to Sunday. The Sitting Duck Restaurant, open Friday to Sunday

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PEOPLE OF THE COAST • Glen Mckimmin

GLENN MCKIMMIN IN FOCUS WORDS KATIE STOKES

IT’S MONDAY MORNING, AND GLENN MCKIMMIN IS DODGING SPLASHES FROM HIS STEPDAUGHTER, STEVIE-ROSE, WHO IS HAVING HER WEEKLY SWIMMING LESSON AT ERINA’S LOCAL POOL. ONLY THE DAY BEFORE, GLENN WAS ALSO AVOIDING SPLASHES BUT IT WAS FROM WILD ELEPHANTS BATHING IN SRI LANKA’S KANDALAMA LAKE.

‘The Pelican sit out here at The Entrance. I saw this while I was in a chopper, but the tide wasn’t right. And I needed it to be in the middle of the day otherwise the pelicans would have been in shadows. And then the tides needed to be right, because, to me, I see the same structure of a wing pattern in the sands.’

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G

lenn is a landscape photographer and travels the world for some three months each year, leading avid shutterbugs on photography expeditions with his touring company, Fotoworkshops. He dabbled in photography at high school, but it was only when his uncle, Ken Duncan, offered him a printing job at the age of 27 that he ‘fell back in love with photography’. Now, as well as being a landscape photographer, Glenn manages a multitude of businesses from a small office space on the mezzanine of his Erina printing and framing factory, Created For Life. Then, in 2018, Glenn decided to add another business when he self-funded and launched Aperture — a Ted-ex-style photography conference. He asked a good family friend, Ray Martin, to host, and pulled in speakers such as portrait photographer Gary Heery, whose subjects include Andy Warhol, Gough Whitlam, Pink, Robin Williams and Elvis Costello. The risk paid off and the same concept is now being rolled out in Hong Kong and North America. Much of Glenn’s drive comes from a place of great sadness and loss. Glenn’s sister Cherie committed suicide at the age of 37. ‘Cherie was my best friend, my confidant,’ he says. ‘I decided in the months after she died, no matter what happened in my life, I would never ever give up on anything.’ Also inspired by his sister, Glenn has been involved with the Save Our Kids (SOKS) charity since 2016 – a suicide prevention project run by North Gosford Rotary Club. When not working or taking snaps across the world, you’re likely to find Glenn playing soccer with his son, Xavier, ordering pizza from Bamvino for a family movie night, or starting to plan for his wedding to fiancé Harrie, this coming Spring. ‘I love living here on the Coast,’ he says. ‘It allows me to spend more time with my family and working on my business, because I’m not commuting to Sydney. My whole life now is photography and family. That’s my focus.’ For tickets to Aperture 2019: www.apertureaustralia.com.au www.fotoworkshops.com.au www.createdforlife.com https:// glennmckimmin.com/ https://centralcoastsanta.com.au/


How to look as good as you feel ... at any age.

FREE READER OFFER Handmade Broken Bay Pearl ‘orb’ style earrings

from AngelRock Jewellers at the Gosford Art Gallery shop

M

AngelRock has donated these classic Broken Bay Pearl earrings as a gift to a reader of the COAST Summer issue who submits the best reason for wanting a pair of Broken Bay Pearl akoya earrings. The earrings are set in 9 ct white gold with a 7.5 mm silver coloured akoya pearl. They are valued at a RRP $440. Please send your entry to admin@coastpublishing.com.au The winner will be published in the next issue of COAST. Relatives and employees of AngelRock Jewellery, Broken Bay Pearls and COAST Publishing are ineligible to enter. Entries close at 5 pm, January 15, 2019. Entries will be judged by two members of COAST Publishing management team. The prize cannot be exchanged or redeemed for cash. By entering, you agree that COAST Publishing may use your entry in the magazine and in any promotional material for the magazine without incurring any fees. You undertake that the words are yours and that there is no impediment to COAST publishing the words and that the publishers will not be held liable for any breach of these terms and conditions.

uch as we love the outdoor life, the sun has a lot to answer for with approximately 80 per cent of facial ageing being caused by the sun. Vita Catanzariti, a renowned Central Coast skincare professional and owner of Dolce Vita Skin clinic, treats a wide range of skin conditions including sun damage and pigmentation, melasma, wrinkles, tired, dull skin, rosacea, diffuse redness, capillaries, acne, scarring caused by trauma or surgery, enlarged pores, leg veins and pre- and post-operative care. She is a dermal therapist and laser safety officer and a member of the Australian Society of Dermal Clinicians. Her goal is to make sure your skin looks the best for your age and she believes simplicity is the key to success when it comes to skincare, with a holistic effort in the long run the most effective strategy. When you meet her, you immediately notice how her skin glows with health. You get the impression that she practises what she preaches. ‘If I were to recommend only one product for a client, it would be a sunscreen,’ she advises. ‘But you can’t reduce your antiageing regime to just sunscreen. While prevention is the best plan, sometimes we need to prevent further deterioration as well as treat the signs of photo-ageing,’ says Vita. ‘Invest in yourself to lift your skin to new heights by developing good habits. And what you use on your skin on a daily basis will pay off and deliver results.’ Vita works closely with nutritionist, Chiza Westcarr who has developed a deep understanding of the surprising connection between gut function and skin health. Dr Nik Davies, a skin specialist, GP and senior cosmetic injector is also part of the Dolce Vita team, performing anti-wrinkle injections and facial rejuvenation with dermal fillers. ‘Just as everyone’s skin is different, so too is each and every skincare approach tailored to the individual,’ says Vita. ‘You can continue to love the sun, the sea and the outdoor life on our beautiful Coast, but wear a sunscreen year round, and seek the advice of a professional team to maximise the condition of your skin to look as good as you feel. Elizabeth Court, shop 17/30 Karalta Rd, Erina 2250 vitatheskinwhisperer.com.au

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© ANDREW COONEY

PEOPLE OF THE COAST • The Orange Men

THREE GENERATIONS OF ORANGE MEN

© ANDREW COONEY

Grandfather Salvatore Lentini was a hard working, forward thinking man. Not only did he choose the premium citrus growing soil, the altitude and climate of Kulnura as the place to plant his orchards, he chose land blessed with a pure spring water source that is now bottled in his name. ‘It’s just as well my grandfather didn’t know that,’ says his grandson Samuel J. ‘He never drank water with meals (only wine). “Water is what you wash your hands with,” he’d always say.’ The fact that it is Salvatore’s own signature (taken from a copy of his will) on the label of Lentini Sparkling Water was done as a

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mark of love and respect by his children and grandchildren. They are characteristics that flow through to so many aspects of their family business: Eastcoast Beverages. It was never going to be good enough to source fruit and produce juices the easy way. The easy way to iron out the seasonal fluctuations in fruit supply would have been to use low cost imported reconstituted juice in their orange, lime and lemon products. The easy way would have been to ‘hot fill’, with the juice heated to eliminate the need for preservatives. But the downside is that it affects the taste and reduces the nutrients in the juice. Instead, the Lentinis cold fill and use a light preservative derived from natural citrus. And, as anyone who tastes it knows, their juice is the nearest you can get to that fresh orange-fromthe-tree taste. The family balances a blend of different varieties of oranges in their juices to create the perfect juice. ‘Some varieties, such as valencias, add the tanginess and others, such as navels, add a touch of natural sweetness,’ says Samuel J. The family is also passionate about recycling when producing the 45 products across their range of juices, smoothies and spring water. Not just the bottles (and the labels) but also all their waste products. The skins go back to some of their growers who mix it with grain to make a nutritious feed for their cattle. The perfectly good pulp left over from producing pulp-free juices, goes to yoghurt producers. The wash-down water used in the factory goes full circle: it is treated and pumped back into the orchard, and so the cycle starts again. On the production line, the juicing press takes a fraction of a second to squeeze each orange or lime or lemon. Imagine having that in your home kitchen! There are now three generations of Lentini men — and three called Sam — with the same passion about the family business. Grandfather Salvatore (called Sam for short) was known for his hard work ethic but also for being a staunch family man. All have inherited his passion and commitment. Add to that, three wives of the second generation, who are considered essential to the smooth running of the business … It’s little wonder that the vision for the business is ‘One Family’. But that doesn’t just apply to the three generations of Lentini, the One Family to them is: the customers–the suppliers–the employees. With those attitudes, you sense they’ll be around for a few more generations to come. www.eastcoastbeverages.com.au


“I can refocus after work … a run or swim at the waterfront, a walk through the bush, wine on the balcony and with great food & sports on my doorstep: Arcadia reenergised my life”

Register now for information on this boutique development ArcadiaGosford.com SMS ‘arcadia’ to 0488 826 806

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ON THE WATER • Boat Ramps

© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

ON THE WATER: Boat Ramps

WATERWAY Brisbane Water

Budgewoi Creek

BOAT RAMP

Lake Budgewoi

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LOCATION

WATER ACCESS

BBQ

KIOSK

LIGHTING

Pretty Beach Boat Ramp

Araluen Drive

All times

Ettalong Beach South Boat Ramp

The Esplanade

All times

Booker Bay Boat Ramp

Karu Ave

All times

4 4

Blackwall Boat Ramp

Orange Grove Rd

All times

Woy Woy South Boat Ramp

Woy Woy Rd

All times

St Huberts Island Boat Ramp

Luderick Ave

Shallow at times

Empire Bay Boat Ramp

Kendall Rd

All times

St Huberts Island Boat Ramp

Beachfront Pde

All times

Illoura Reserve Boat Ramp

Amy St, Davistown

All times

TOILETS

4 4

PONTOON RAMP

PARKING

4

0-10 cars

4

0-10 cars

0-10 cars

4

4

11-20 cars 21-50 cars

4

0-10 cars 4

4

0-10 cars

4

4

0-10 cars

unconfirmed

Davistown Boat Ramp

Restella Ave, Davistown

All times

4

4

4

11-20 cars

Lions Park Eastern Boat Ramp

North Burge Rd, Woy Woy

All times

4

4

4

21-50 cars

4

4

21-50 cars

Lintern Street Boat Ramp

Lintern St, Davistown

All times

4

Lions Park Western Boat Ramp

North Burge Rd, Woy Woy

All times

4

11-20 cars

Saratoga Boat Ramp

Centennial Ave

All times

4

4

0-10 cars

Koolewong South Boat Ramp

Brisbane Water Drive

All times

4

4

51+ cars

Koolewong North Boat Ramp

Brisbane Water Drive

All times

4

Tascott Boat Ramp

Brisbane Water Drive

High tide only

4 4

Green Point Boat Ramp

Orana St

High tide only

Erina Creek Boat Ramp

Central Coast Hwy

All times

Masons Parade, Gosford Main Boat Ramp

Masons Pde

All times

Gosford Breakwall (Iguana Joes) Boat Ramp

Dane Drive

All times

Budgewoi Bridge, East (Slade Reserve)

Central Coast Hwy

All times

Budgewoi Bridge, West

Diamond Head Drive

All times

Hawkesbury River Patonga Beach

Kincumber Broadwater

THE CENTRAL COAST IS SURELY BOATIES’ HEAVEN. WHETHER IT’S SAILING (OFF SHORE OR IN-SHORE), MOTOR CRUISING AND WATCHING THE SUNSET REFLECTED THROUGH A GLASS OF BUBBLY, GETTING CLOSE TO THE WATER IN A KAYAK, DRAGON-BOATING WITH A GROUP, FISHING FOR BREAM, WHITING AND FLATHEAD IN THE LAGOONS AND WATERWAYS, WATER SKIING, OR EVEN JET SKIING — AWAY FROM THE CROWDS OF COURSE — YOU ARE SPOILT FOR CHOICE. ONE OF THE MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS IS ‘WHERE ARE THE BOAT RAMPS?’ WITH THE HELP OF ROADS AND MARITIME SERVICES, HERE’S A LIST OF PLACES AND FACILITIES WHERE YOU CAN LAUNCH ONTO NATURE’S WATERY GIFT:

Patonga Drive

All times

Deerubbun Reserve

Peats Ferry Rd, Mooney Mooney

All times

Kincumber Boat Ramp

Hawke St

Shallow at times

Kincumber Boat Ramp, Kincumber Hotel

Carrack Rd

Shallow at times

4

4

51+ cars 21-50 cars

4

0-10 cars 4

0-10 cars

4

4

4

51+ cars

4

4

4

0-10 cars

4

unconfirmed

4

unconfirmed

4

4

4

4

21-50 cars

4

4

21-50 cars

0-10 cars 4

Buff Point Boat Ramp

Narambi Rd

Shallow at times

4

Wallarah Point Park (Fishermans Co Op)

Wallarah Rd, Gorokan

Shallow at times

4

4

4

0-10 cars

4

unconfirmed

4

unconfirmed

Peel Street Boat Ramp

Peel St, Toukley

Shallow at times

4

unconfirmed

San Remo Boat Ramp (Northlakes Oval)

Emu Drive

Shallow at times

4

unconfirmed


© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

HEADING • Subhead

Lake Macquarie

BOAT RAMP

LOCATION

WATER ACCESS

Chain Valley Bay Boat Ramp

Lloyd Ave

Shallow at times

Mulloway Road Boat Ramp

Mulloway Rd , Chain Valley

Shallow at times

BBQ 4

4

4

PONTOON RAMP

PARKING

4

0-10 cars

4

11-20 cars

Gamban Rd, Gwandalan

All times

4

4

4

4

11-20 cars

Peveril St, Mannering Park

Shallow at times

4

4

4

4

0-10 cars

4

4

11-20 cars

4

4

4

11-20 cars

4

4

Gwandalan North Boat Ramp

Koowong Rd

Shallow at times

4

Summerland Point Reserve Boat Ramp

Kullaroo Rd

All times

4 4

Summerland Point Reserve Boat Ramp

Kullaroo Rd

Shallow at times

Diamond Drill Point

Garema Rd, Gwandalan

All times

4

Noela Place

Shallow at times Shallow at times

Lake Munmorah Reserve Boat Ramp

Colongra Bay Rd

Shallow at times

Mangrove Creek

Spencer

Wisemans Ferry Rd

All times

Ourimbah Creek/ Tuggerah Lake

Sunshine Reserve Boat Ramp

Sunshine Ave, Chittaway Point

All times

Chittaway Bay (East) Boat Ramp

Kalua Drive

All times

Patonga Creek Boat Ramp

Bay St

Shallow at times

4

4

4

4

0-10 cars 0-10 cars

4

Elizabeth Bay Drive, Lake Munmorah

Tuggerah Lake

TOILETS

Gamban Road Boat Ramp

Budgewoi Sailing Club

Tasman Sea

LIGHTING

Vales Point

Elizabeth Bay Boat Ramp

Patonga Creek

KIOSK

4

0-10 cars

4

unconfirmed

4

4

unconfirmed

4

4

0-10 cars

unconfirmed

4

unconfirmed

11-20 cars

4

Terrigal Haven

Terrigal Esplanade

All times

4

4

51+ cars

Norah Head/Cabbage Tree Harbour

Bald St

Shallow at times

4

4

unconfirmed

Saltwater Creek Reserve (Aquatic Centre)

Tuggerah Pde, Long Jetty

Shallow at times

4

4

unconfirmed

4

4

Toowoon Bay (Surf Club)

Bay Rd, Toowoon Bay

Shallow at times

The Entrance

Marine Pde

Shallow at times

Bluebell Park Boat Ramp

Panorama Pde, Berkeley Vale

All times

The Entrance, C5 Picnic Point Boat Ramp

Tuggerah Pde

All times

4

4

unconfirmed unconfirmed

4

unconfirmed 4

4

4

unconfirmed

The Entrance North

Wilfred Barrett Drive

All times

Wyongah (behind fire station)

Oakland St

Shallow at times

unconfirmed

Wallarah Creek

Brundenell Avenue Boat Ramp

Brundenell Ave, San Remo

Shallow at times

unconfirmed

Wyong River

Tacoma

Wolseley Ave

All times

4

unconfirmed

4

4

unconfirmed

© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

WATERWAY

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© FORESTRY CORPORATION OF NSW


GREAT OUTDOORS • Best Coastal Walks

BEST COAST WALKS

Patonga to Pearl Beach Walking Track BRING YOUR SWIMMERS AND A TOWEL – THIS WALK BEGINS AND ENDS ON A BEACH SO YOU CAN REWARD YOURSELF WHICHEVER DIRECTION YOU TAKE THE TRACK. IT WILL ALSO LEAVE YOU FEELING ON TOP OF THE WORLD AS YOU LOOK DOWN ON THE MAGNIFICENT SEASCAPES FROM ON HIGH.

WORDS AND PHOTOS KIM COLE

P

atonga and Pearl Beach, though quite different in character, are sleepy hamlets each in their own way typical of many of the small villages that fringe the Hawkesbury and Broken Bay. Pearl is a favourite weekend and holiday retreat for Sydneysiders, and architect-designed homes are the norm. Locals regard it as the ‘gem’ of the Central Coast. Patonga, which translates as ‘oyster’ in the indigenous Guringai language, is the most southerly beach on the Central Coast and remains favoured by anglers and artists who love their laid-back holiday homes. The walking track follows part of the 250 km Great North Walk for 4.7 kilometres through the beautiful red gums and blue-grey eucalypts of the Brisbane Water National Park. It’s a moderately challenging 1½ to 2 hour walk and, starting from the Patonga end, we were instantly tested by a steep trail that suggested a rugged trek awaited us. As challenging as that 165 metre incline was, the rewards were spectacular.

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On top of the headland is a side track to Warrah Lookout, about the midway point of the walk, with views of the lower Hawkesbury River and Pacific Ocean (or Tasman Sea if you want to be technically correct). It’s by far my favourite lookout on the Central Coast and is, without a doubt, the biggest ‘aaahh!’ moment of the walk with its sweeping views of the Ku-ringgai Chase National Park, Palm Beach and Barrenjoey Headland, Lion Island, West Head, Juno Point and along the escarpment to Patonga, and of course sparkling blue water as far as the eyes can see. It makes you feel miles from the city and suburbs. The lookout is fenced but watch the kids as there are steep drop offs on each side. As always, I recommend wearing enclosed footwear, sunscreen and a hat. The sun can be unforgiving at times so take plenty of fluids with you and stay hydrated.


GREAT OUTDOORS • Best Coastal Walks

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After the lookout, and back on the fire trail, follow the Pearl Beach signs along the corridor of native plants and wildflowers, past sandstone caves — known locally as the Pearl Caves — with their natural hanging gardens of native ferns. One of the caves also has small stalagmites and stalactites towards the back of the overhang. Be sure to keep an eye open for the bush turkeys, wallabies (particularly early and late in the day), echidnas and goannas while listening for kookaburras overhead. The fire trail from Warrah Lookout meanders down a gradual track with views of the southern end of Pearl Beach. The descent is a welcome reprieve that allows the build-up of lactic acid in the legs to gently subside. It’s also a great spot for brilliant red splashes of waratahs in their season. Follow the sounds of gently crashing waves to a beautiful stretch of sand on the edge of the bush where the crystalclear water laps the shore. The beach is unpatrolled but there’s a rockpool at the northern end of Pearl Beach to entice and revitalise you. Have a picnic on the beach or spoil yourself with the choice of two beachside eateries: the Pearl Beach General Store (takeaways) and Café (for casual meals), or fine dining at Pearls on the Beach. If you’ve done the walk in the opposite direction, you’ll be greeted by the calm waterways of Patonga Beach and Patonga Creek. They’re kid friendly and lend themselves to a myriad of water sports including swimming, boating, kayaking, fishing etc. The Patonga Boathouse Hotel (now open after extensive renovations) will entice you with its water views across the veranda. Or you can picnic on the beach with the pelicans, or on one of the many grassy reserves. National Parks and Wildlife rate the walk as a grade 5 and ‘moderately challenging’, but we had children with us who managed the walk and there are plenty of places to stop and rest, so take your time and enjoy the views. c For more information: https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/ walking-tracks/patonga-to-pearl-beach-walking-track


Feel the freedom in our State Forests Enjoy what’s on offer in our local State Forests on the Central Coast. Go bushwalking and experience the diversity of Strickland State Forests brilliant wildflowers, woodlands and rainforests. Jump on a mountain bike and go for a ride at Ourimbah Mountain Bike Park, or take your horse for a forest ride in Ourimbah State Forest.

#VisitNSWForests www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit

Camp at Olney State Forest and explore the Watagan Mountains. Dogs are welcome in NSW State Forest. Please keep your four legged friend under control and do the right thing. Best of all….it’s free!

Olney State Forest

12/11/18 1:49

© FORESTRY CORPORATION OF NSW

Forestry Corp 1/2 Page Horizontal.indd 1


GREAT OUTDOORS • Golf Courses

GOLF COURSES ON THE CENTRAL COAST

THE SPRINGS

PARADISE FOR PROS AND PUTTERS

BREAKERS COUNTRY CLUB 9 holes, par 33 64 Dover Road, Wamberal 2260 Open: 7 days Bookings: yes Professionals: Nicky and Chas Henderson Cost to play: $24 for 9 holes, $27 for 18 holes Lessons: $50 for 40 minutes Dress: tailored shorts with ankle socks. No football attire, boardshorts or sleeveless shirts. Hardest hole: 5th Toughest green: 2nd Additional facilities: pull buggies Pro shop (02) 4384 5691 www.breakerscc.com

EVERGLADES COUNTRY CLUB 18 holes, par 67 men, par 70 women Dunban Road, Woy Woy 2256 Open: 7 days Bookings: yes, phone and online Professional: Darren Chivas Cost to play: $20–$29 Lessons: $50 outdoors; $80 indoors

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Dress: standard golf attire (smart casual) Hardest hole: 14th Toughest green: 2nd Additional facilities: carts, bowling green Lunch and dinner at the Altro Bristro, and coffee and cake from the Coffee Shop. Function rooms: ‘Weddings on the golf course’.

Office: (02) 4337 3300 Pro shop: (02) 4337 3333 www.gosfordgolfclub.com.au

Phone: (02) 4341 1866 Pro Shop (02) 4341 3399 www.everglades.net.au

18 holes: 9 greens and 18 tees. Front 9, par 34. Back 9, par 35 Hallards Road, Central Mangrove 2250

GOSFORD GOLF CLUB 18 holes, par 71 men, par 73 women 22 Racecourse Rd, Gosford Open: 7 days Bookings: yes Professional: Kieran Moran Cost to play: visitors $26 for 9 holes $36 for 18 holes Lessons: $50–60 per half hour, $90 per hour Dress: smart casual Hardest hole: 11th Toughest green: 9th Additional facilities: putting green, practice fairway, buggies, electric carts. Full clubhouse facilities.

MANGROVE MOUNTAIN MEMORIAL CLUB AND GOLF COURSE

Bookings: yes Professional: David Corbett Cost to play: Mon–Fri package $32 incl cart; $5.50–$24 plus cart Lessons: $25 half hour Dress: standard golf attire Hardest hole: 2nd (par 4, 380 metres) Toughest green: 16th Additional facilities: Foot Golf (the only one on the Central Coast). Full clubhouse facilities Club and bookings: (02) 4373 1129 Pro shop: (02) 4373 1075 office@mmmclub.com.au www.mmmclub.com.au


GREAT OUTDOORS • Golf Courses

KOOINDAH WATERS GOLF CLUB 18 holes, par 72 Kooindah Boulevarde, Wyong 2259 Designed by Ross Watson and champion Australian golfer Craig Parry and called the ‘thinking golfer’s course’. Built on natural wetlands in a tranquil bushland setting, Kooindah Waters boasts amazing wildlife. Open: 7 days Bookings: phone and online Professional: Mark Churcher Cost to play: $25–$85 Lessons: $50–$300 Dress: standard golfing attire Hardest hole: 18th Toughest green: 8th Additional facilities: putting green, chipping green, practice bunker area, practice nets, cart hire, wedge play area Full resort and spa facilities (02) 4351 0700 info@kooindahwatersgolf.com.au www.kooindahwatersgolf.com.au

MAGENTA SHORES GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB 1 Magenta Drive (off Wilfred Barrett Drive), Magenta 2261 18 holes, par 72 men, 73 women Designed by golf course architect, Ross Watson, it is the only private members golf course on the Central Coast and has magnificent ocean views from the front 9 holes; with the back 9 holes adjacent to the rainforest and National Park. Open to members and their guests, corporate groups and hotel guests of Pullman Magenta Shores Resort. Open: 7 days Bookings: essential Professional: Greg Lewis Cost to play: part of accommodation package, or $80 for 18 holes, $50 for 9 holes Lessons: $30–$140 Dress for men: collared polo preferred; shorts (not running, bike, or football shorts); dress denim trousers (but not torn denim) Women: collared polo shirts or golfing singlets preferred; shorts (not running, bike or football shorts); trousers, skirts, shorts, or leggings, dress denim (but not torn denim) Hardest hole: 9th

Toughest green: 9th Additional facilities: carts, practice fairway, chipping areas, putting greens, resort, pool, tennis courts, gymnasium, steam room Dining: Barretts Restaurant Pro shop: (02) 4336 0100 www.magentagolf.com.au

SHELLY BEACH GOLF CLUB 18 holes, par 71 men, 75 women Shelly Beach Rd, Shelly Beach 2261 Regarded as one of the premier golf courses on the Central Coast, with beautiful ocean views. Open: 7 days Bookings: yes Professionals: Jason Hart and Peter Cliff Cost to play: $45 for 18 holes Lessons: $50–$250 Dress: smart casual, appropriate golf attire Hardest hole: 2nd Toughest green: 9th Additional facilities: full clubhouse facilities open for lunch and dinner 7 days.

TOUKLEY GOLF CLUB 18 holes, par 72 men, 74 women Key Street, Toukley 2263 The front nine fairways are flanked by trees, while the back nine are open in a links-style course. Open: 7 days Bookings: required Sundays only Professionals: John Lewis, Trent Wieland Cost to play: $22 for 9 holes (visitors). After 3 pm $18 Lessons: $50 for half hour Dress: men – shirts with collars. Footwear – soft-spiked shoes only or rubber sole shoes. Thongs, scuffs, and leather sole shoes are not acceptable on the course. In the clubhouse: dress shoes, sandshoes/joggers, sandals. Hardest hole: For men 9th, women 15th Toughest green: 9th Additional facilities: buggies, electric carts, putting green, 2 nets, chipping green and bunker, 200 m practice fairway

Club house (02) 4332 3400 Golf shop (02) 4332 1103 www.shellybeachgolfclub.com.au

www.toukleygolfclub.com.au Office: 4396 5811 Pro Shop: 4397 2309 Dining: 4396 1500 admin@toukleygolfclub.com.au

THE SPRINGS

WYONG GOLF CLUB

18 holes, par 72 1080 Peats Ridge Rd, Peats Ridge 2250 Designed by Al Howard and Graham Papworth. Open: 6.30 am–5 pm weekdays, 6.00 am–5 pm weekends. Twilight golf 3pm–6pm Fri, Sat in summer Bookings: yes. Social and corporate groups welcome. Professional: Phillip Arthur Cost to play: 9 holes $25–$30. 18 holes $40–$50 Lessons: $50–$150 Dress: standard golf attire Hardest hole: 3rd Toughest green: 4th Additional facilities: club hire, buggy and cart hire with GPS course guide. Dining: Enjoy a craft beer or bush cocktail at the bar, or let Chef Dan Capper create a meal with local farm produce. Sitting Duck bistro Wed-Sun.

18 holes, par 71 319 Pacific Highway, Wyong 2259 Open: 7 days Bookings: yes Professional: Mitch Pryor Cost to play: 9 holes $22. 18 holes $33 Lessons: $20-$130 Dress: Smart casual – tailored trousers, shorts or skirt/short. Neat denim and cargo style pants/shorts. Collared shirts or polo shirts. Shoes must be worn at all times for safety reasons. Hardest hole: 12th Toughest green: 9th Additional facilities: carts, buggies Dining: Club restaurant 7 days, lunch and dinner Office: (02) 4352 1361 Bookings: (02) 4352 1361 Dining: (02) 4352 1999 www.wyonggolfclub.com.au

(02) 4373 1522 admin@the-springs.com.au www.the-springs.com.au

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COAST • Attractions

GLENWORTH VALLEY famous for its horse trails

It will thrill you with abseiling adventures Abseil down a rockface like a lizard to the forest floor 10 to 23 metres below, in a wilderness adventure that will have your exhilaration levels soaring whether you’re a first-timer or an experienced abseiler.

It will excite you with the most fun on four wheels Zip with the wind in your face on a quad bike along private bush trails and across creeks. It’s quadruple the excitement. Only the amazing scenery will stop you in your tracks.

It will unwind you with quiet paddles disturbed by birdsong Glide through nature at a leisurely pace, or challenge your fitness skimming along the 30 km Popran Creek with the gentle sound of paddles dipping (and maybe the relaxed laughter of your companions).

It will amaze you with bush camping and glamping under country-bright stars The stars are so much brighter away from city lights. Camp in 200 acres of riverfront grounds where you just might be kept awake by the sounds of a wallaby coming down to drink, or the night flutter of a tawny frogmouth owl. www.glenworth.com.au

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GARDENS • Holgate

A STROLL into the PAST WORDS PAUL URQUHART PHOTOS BRIGID ARNOTT

The entrance to the house is through an arbour of maples edged with irregularly shaped hedges. It makes arrival an experience.

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GARDENS • Holgate Close to the house, the lawn makes a statement but is also practical for family Christmas and birthday parties. They allow both guests and owners a chance to move freely. A gazebo provides a spot to sit and read or talk in small groups.

NESTLED IN THE LUSH GREEN HILLS OF HOLGATE, SITS AN HISTORIC HOUSE SURROUNDED BY A GARDEN THAT LOOKS FORMAL, BUT CLOSER EXAMINATION DEFIES THIS EASY DESCRIPTION.

T

he new owners, Tony and Mindy Carr, are recent arrivals from Sydney. When they purchased the property, they were transitioning into retirement but still actively engaged in their business activities. They decided to stage their move until the time came to live at the new house on a full time basis. They also decided that continuity was the best strategy for the garden. Well-known Central Coast landscaper – Andrew Noble whose company, Cornerstone Landscaping is based in Holgate – had been maintaining the gardens for the previous owner. So the Carrs retained Cornerstone and thus began a symbiotic partnership, one that has seen the garden flourishing amidst subtle changes and reconsideration of key features. The house and garden, taken together, are an interesting combination. The Carrs describe the house as the ‘first house in the Holgate area.’ While parts of the Central Coast were settled much earlier, Holgate was settled later than, say, Wyong or Gosford which both had the advantage of access to water transport. The original house dates from around 1910 and, architecturally, fits into a rural homestead style with wide verandas set high on a hill and views of the steeply sloping

hills capturing the breezes. Over the years, successive owners have added to the original cottage, all the while maintaining Federation-era features – leadlight windows, frames and doors – so the house now fits together as a seamless whole. ‘We see ourselves as custodians of the property. We want to ensure it survives and continues into the future,’ explains Tony. While we absorb this thought, Mindy adds, ‘The gardens are really very relaxing and a truly peaceful place to be. We are both garden novices so we needed to take advice and Andrew offers a very safe pair of hands.’

Formal or not formal? To maintain this peaceful oasis, Andrew has had to come to terms with a few characteristics of the garden which brings us back to the question of ‘what is a formal garden?’ On first glance, the overall impression is of a formal garden covering roughly two hectares, but it lacks the symmetry we normally associate with a formal style. It is also located on a steeply sloping site, even though the house precinct, with its pool, lawns and garden beds, sits on the sole level space.

TIPS TO CREATE A CALMING GARDEN NOT EVERYONE HAS ACREAGE BUT THESE IDEAS CAN BE USED EVEN IN A SMALL GARDEN. • Provide shade in summer and allow in much needed light in the cooler months with deciduous trees such as golden ash and maples in average sized gardens and liquidambars for larger spaces. • Go green. Green is the most calming colour of all and, by mixing various shades of foliage and leaf sizes and shapes, it still allows you to create a garden with textural interest. • Use formal elements such as hedges to line borders and garden beds. They help maintain a sense of order and even floppy and rangy plants look neat and tidy behind a hedge. • Topiary provides textural and sculptural form to a formal garden in the absence of colour. • Massed flowering colour can jar the mood. Minimise colour by restricting flowering plants to highlights. Here,

wisteria in spring, hydrangeas in summer and salvias in autumn provide ‘pops’ of colour. • Maximise the other senses using fragrance. Gardenias, Murraya Min-a-Min (a dwarf form of the ordinary murraya) and stephanotis work well to achieve this. Citrus is ideal for the Central Coast and there are several in the Carr’s kitchen garden. • Don’t ignore the wider landscape. Native eucalypt forests in the distance are a haven for birds, especially songbirds such as wrens, robins and fantails which enhance our appreciation of the garden. • The sound of running water is very relaxing but don’t go for gushing torrents close to the living areas of your house. Use water features sparingly, placing them carefully for maximum impact.

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In discussion with Andrew, we come up with a description that seems to fit. What is clear is that this is a ‘stroll’ garden punctuated by formal garden rooms – a gazebo here, a pétanque court there, all connected by passageways lined with prominent formal elements – predominantly buxus hedging and topiary. Among them, are formal statues and fountains that take their cue from classical Italian gardens of the Renaissance. These formal elements are the dominant feature of the garden and Andrew has been gradually simplifying and unifying the design.

A restrained palette Key to Andrew’s plans for the garden is simplifying and refining the existing design elements. The garden holds together because of its uncomplicated plant palette. The repetition of a few species is a time-honoured technique to give a sense of unity, one of the essential design elements for creating a sense of calm and tranquillity. There are no complicated planting schemes here. Green is the dominant colour, and shaping plants or selecting architectural plants such as agaves and masses of grasses keep our interest and attention. Colour is restricted to a few seasonal highlights with the most dramatic being the arbour covered in purple wisteria, a short but sensational spring highlight. Borders of hydrangeas provide colour from December and in the early summer months, with salvias providing pops of colour over summer and autumn. The alternative is a riot of colour and no one wants a riot in their garden. This is a garden that is continually evolving under careful stewardship both from Tony and Mindy Carr and from a sensitive landscape approach by professional Andrew Noble. Together they are creating a garden of note and one to be proud of. Cornerstone Horticulture Landscaping and Design 02 4365 4227 info@cornerstonelandscaping.com.au

TOP LEFT A pétanque court with a gazebo fringed with stephanotis is a great place for a slightly more active alternative to strolling. It is surrounded by formal elements such as statues, urns and hedging. LEFT Stephanotis is a graceful and elegant climber that keeps within its bounds. BELOW Seating is dotted throughout the garden. Even if you don’t stop and stay, they make a garden seem more calming, offering the opportunity if not the actuality of taking a breather.

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GARDENS • Holgate

A FEW GOOD PLANTS • Wisteria is a short-lived diva but everyone loves it. The Carr garden has the Chinese wisteria, the most common species but there are others, including the elegant Japanese wisteria, which has longer but slimmer racemes of flower. The downside is it can get out of hand if not pruned twice a year. • Stephanotis is a fragrant climber with waxy white flowers that have a refined, uncomplicated form. It is nowhere near as vigorous as wisteria. • Hydrangeas are old-fashioned favourites and no longer ‘nanna’ plants following a resurgence after the introduction of newer hybrids. They need good water to do well but an alternative is the oak-leaf hydrangea which stands up to heat much better than the commonly seen Hydrangea macrophylla. • Salvias are unstoppable and there are so many different forms around in an array of colours, that there is something for everyone. They don’t like wet feet as a rule but one stands out in defiance of this rule – the ungainly named bog sage (Salvia uliginosa) which sports beautiful blue flowers.

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WEDDINGS • Profile

Something old, something glamorous Kaysha and James Ross Fernbank Farm

THEY GREW UP IN THE COAST AND LAKE MACQUARIE REGIONS AND MET THE MODERN WAY, ONLINE, BUT WHEN IT CAME TO PLANNING THEIR WEDDING, KAYSHA AND JAMES CHANNELLED ALL THINGS CLASSIC TOGETHER WITH AN OLD-FASHIONED ELEGANCE INTO A COUNTRY-MEETS-COAST WEDDING.

WORDS SARAH TOLMIE

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I

n the beautiful mountain and farming hinterland, in the heart of the Yarramalong Valley, is the heritage homestead of Fernbank Farm, which offered Kaysha and James a timeless and elegant setting for an intimate, family gathering. ‘James loves all things old-fashioned and he pictured a day on an old farm or property,’ said Kaysha. ‘Whereas I wanted something glamorous and beautiful, and Fernbank delivered both.’ With several ceremony locations to choose from on the estate, Kaysha and James chose the tree-lined avenue, with the ceremony conducted by the one-time principal of Kaysha’s old primary school. ‘It was breathtaking seeing everything set up, especially our ceremony under the amazing arbour,’ said Kaysha. The one ‘must have’ for the bride was a backless dress and, as an ex-dancer, it had to be something she could dance in all night. Her gown from Allure Bridals was an elegantly beautiful figure-hugging dress with a sheath of beading and sequins that followed and accentuated a dramatic dip down the back. During the ceremony, the couple gave each other a white rose and promised to remember their vows with a white rose on each anniversary. ‘James has a heart of gold. I love the way he helps me look at situations in life, he will always think of the positive. He will always do his best to make me laugh or smile no matter the situation. And that he wants to start a family so eagerly is very touching.’ ‘I love that Kaysha is so over-the-top caring,’ said James. ‘She cares about everyone and everything. She is a major sook as well, which is cute and one of the things I love about her. However, she is also strong and stands up for what is right. And she loves me and puts up with me, so that’s a bonus, and of course she’s gorgeous.’ It was important to Kaysha and James that their wedding was a relaxed experience and, with a large number of family and friends staying on the property, to create a long weekend with ‘immersive’ time of connection and calm. This became even more important with the unexpected loss of Kaysha’s paternal grandfather in the week leading up to the wedding. It added to the already tender emotions of James’s family without his Mum whose absence, although she passed away many years ago, was still a raw grief at such an important time. The intimate and stress-free environment allowed the family to ease gently into the celebrations, staying joyful and together, and Kaysha’s father was able to proudly walk his youngest daughter down the aisle with a great smile of joy. ‘Walking down the aisle with my dad, seeing all of our beautiful families and friends together in the one place just for

us was incredible,’ said Kaysha. The emotions on both sides were evident. ‘I was so overwhelmed to see how proud James was for us to become husband and wife and how much this day meant to him. The way he was looking at me was beautiful — something I will never forget.’ Married life for Mr and Mrs Ross is all about continuing to grow together as a couple, seeing the world, and they have already started their parenting journey with a beautiful King Charles Cavalier puppy, Rufus. Ceremony and reception: Fernbank Farm Photography and video: Lisa Lent Photography and Bella Taylor Celebrant/officiant: Monica Baigent Musician: Gary Kite Dress: Allure Bridals Hair: Amy Rolsch Makeup: Alisha Gill Jeweller: Gary Adams Flowers: Flowers by Louise

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ELEGANT . RUSTIC . ROMANTIC . INDUSTRIAL

SPRINGS WEDDINGS P E AT S R I D G E Escape to the ultimate wedding experience at The Springs in the hinterland of The Central Coast.

dinners, grazing stations and rustic share plates, The Springs delivers the ultimate wedding food experience.

The 125 acre bushland property provides the perfect backdrop for your ceremony and wedding photos.

Our locally sourced and bush inspired cocktails designed just for you add that extra touch to your Springs wedding.

The elegant, industrial space can cater for small and cosy weddings or extravagant wedding parties up to 300 guests. Surrounded by the local farms and having access to our very own garden, Executive Chef Dan has access to fresh and fabulous produce to inspire his creative wedding menus. From the farm to plate travelling bites, sit down

With our very own stylist and Chef Dan’s homemade wedding favours, The Springs is the only choice for your perfect wedding day. With rustic, designer change and locker rooms you can spend the day just getting ready and sipping champagne before you say your “I Do”. Escape to your perfect wedding day at A Springs Wedding.

FOLLOW US thespringspeatsridge thesprings thespringsweddings

(02) 4373 1522 1 0 8 0 P E AT S R I D G E R OA D W W W. T H E - S P R I N G S . C O M . A U


WEDDINGS • Profile

California dreaming, Coast loving Sarah and Ben Potter Charlotte Chapel and Terrigal Crowne Plaza

WORDS SARAH TOLMIE

B

efore they met, and in spite of the best efforts of Ben’s former pastor at Ryde Baptist Church and Sarah’s current pastor at Berowra Baptist Church to introduce them, Sarah and Ben were each committed to staying single and focusing on study. Pastor Moore knew his friends would make a great match but, still unknown to each other, they both moved to California. Luckily, fate seemed determined to intervene, and Sarah and Ben found themselves in the ‘hilarious’ situation of finding love with someone from home after at last being introduced by another mutual friend in America. ‘Ben is the kindest man I have met. He makes me laugh every day. He is adventurous and passionate, but brings the right amount of realism into my optimistic mentality and is a determined person who can do anything he puts his mind to. We both share the same love for travel and creativity. I can’t see life with my husband as ever becoming stagnant. He dreams big and lives life with constant thankfulness.’

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WEDDINGS • Profile

From that unexpected beginning, within 12 months Sarah and Ben’s lives completely changed: from dating, to engagement and to marriage, creating a year of lightness and joy-filled celebration. They chose the Central Coast for their wedding to re-create a bit of Californian ‘good vibrations’. The white and light-filled serene space in the new Charlotte Chapel, adjacent to Kantara House in Kincumber, was the perfect venue for their 170 guests in a moving ceremony performed by Pastor Moore. After trying prophetically, but unsuccessfully, to introduce them, he was to marry them only a year later in a celebration of their love. The ceremony included heartfelt personal vows, musical performances — with Sarah and Ben delighting everyone with an original song — and friends offering their own insights into marriage for the couple. The day was a warm, blue sky day with the special local treat of that Central Coast tradition of gelato and donuts by Mr Goaty. ‘Sarah is delicate and bold all at the same time,’ said Ben. ‘She’s got a high sense of self and knows what she likes; this wild one does best when she’s free and running. Sarah is a go-getter, she’s beautiful in every way and when she looks at the future she sees it full of possibility. Doing life with her is a constant adventure.’ For Ben, the ceremony was his favourite memory of the day, ‘I cried my way through it. Seeing Sarah walk down the aisle is the beginning of the life-long promise “I’m yours”. I love the idea and constancy of waking up next to my best mate day after day, solving the mysteries and problems that come our way.’ Sarah wowed Ben in a beautiful dress bought only a couple of months before the day. It was the last in a ‘trying day’. ‘After a long day, feeling hungry and grumpy and not sure I would ever find a dress so close the wedding, we went to Final Touch Bridal at Somersby, and there it was. I just said … yes! It was perfect, I didn’t want to take it off and, on the day, I felt so good in it’. Sarah’s dress was a white summery creation of layers, ruffles and embroidered flowers, marrying elegance and boho inspirations. Photographer, Kendell Tyne, managed to sneak them some alone time on Terrigal Beach for photos. ‘The whole day felt like a dream and I loved every moment. I do however remember loving our alone-time with the photographer — just the three of us,’ said Sarah. It felt like the weight of the day hit me in that moment and I was able to properly breathe and take in the reality of the beautiful decision we had just made.’ For the reception at Terrigal Crowne Plaza, Sarah and Ben continued to celebrate their love of the beach in the Sea Salt ballroom, directly across from Terrigal Beach. ‘I also loved sitting at the reception and intentionally spending a few minutes just looking around the room and taking in the night,’ said Sarah. ‘It was so wonderful seeing that what we had planned across a busy few months had all come together more perfectly than we could have imagined. I remember tearing up in that moment with thankfulness.’

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Now, as Mr and Mrs Potter, they are back in the US continuing their ministry studies and embarking on life and love with the daily understanding of lifelong togetherness every step of the way. Ceremony: Charlotte Chapel, Kantara House Reception: Sea Salt at Crowne Plaza Terrigal Photographer: Kendell Tyne Celebrant/officiant: Dean Moore (Senior Pastor of Berowra Baptist Church) Musicians: Jon Sewell (acoustic and vocals), Lauren Petschack (vocals), Daniel Carrigy (banjo), Naomi Dodd (flute). Videographer: Isaac De Bruyn Dress: Final Touch Bridal, Somersby Hair: Liv For Style Hair & Fashion, Terrigal Makeup: Kristelle Zibara Jeweller: Zoe Pook Jewellery Flowers: Little Willow Floral Design Donuts and Gelato cart: Mr Goaty Gelato


ALISON HOMESTEAD MUSEUM TAKE A TRIP BACK IN TIME

Bespoke jewellery Designed & handcrafted on site Engagement & wedding ring specialist Full jewellery repair service

Set on Wyong’s first land grant, the homestead has extensive displays of memorabilia relating to the early settlers of Wyong and surrounds; an old school slab hut; farming equipment; a working blacksmith shed, and an historic scale model exhibition.

• Morning tea/lunch can be arranged for group visits • Covered outdoor area for functions and weddings • Picnic area with BBQs • Wheelchair access to Museum and grounds • Outdoor areas are dog friendly • Plant nursery • Men’s shed

Shop 1 1a Campbell Crescent Terrigal, NSW. 2260 4300 9148 www.ellisjewellers.com.au

Open: Sunday to Thursday 10 am to 2 pm Other times by appointment Entry: Adult $5, Child $2 1 Cape Rd, Wyong 2259 t: (02) 4352 1886 e: info@alisonhomestead.com.au w: www.alisonhomestead.com.au

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CHARLOTTE CHAPEL AND KANTARA HOUSE

EDOGAWA COMMEMORATIVE GARDEN

431 Avoca Drive, Green Point NSW 2251 www.kantarahouse.net.au

36 Webb Street, East Gosford NSW 2250

A romantic chapel set among the trees and now lovingly restored. Adjacent to Kantara House for receptions.

CROWNE PLAZA TERRIGAL PACIFIC Pine Tree Lane, Terrigal NSW 2260 https://terrigalpacific.crowneplaza. com/wedding Opposite beach with picturesque views, 4.5 star accommodation and cuisine, and a range of venues.

DISTILLERY BOTANICA (previously known as FRAGRANT GARDENS) 25 Portsmouth Road,

Erina NSW 2250 https://distillerybotanica.com Set in three acres of gardens where the herbs for the distillery are grown. The gardens remain natural rather than highly manicured and are complemented by the mudbrick buildings. Garden weddings or marquee.

The sheltered Koi Pavilion, overlooking the lake, is suitable for small intimate weddings with the surrounding outdoor space large enough to cater for 150 people. The beautiful Japanese Gardens make a picturesque backdrop.

FERNBANK FARM 756 Yarramalong Rd, Wyong Creek, NSW 2259 www.fernbankfarmstay.com Fernbank Farm was settled in 1904 and over the past 110 years has developed into a unique heritage location. It is also the home of the Santosa Clydesdales and 4-6 seater Landau wedding carriage.

GRACELANDS 25 Forresters Beach Rd, Forresters Beach NSW 2260 http://goingtogracelands.com/ 700 metres from the beach, function room, bar, large garden. Industrial style chic.

HARDYS BAY CLUB 14 Heath Rd, Hardys Bay NSW 2257 www.hardysbayclub.com.au With a background of a natural waterfall and Bouddi National Park, surrounded by birdlife, the club is a beautiful, old building with a long deck and outdoor pergola.

LINTON GARDENS 611 Wisemans Ferry Road, Somersby NSW 2250 www.lintongardens.com.au Set in five acres of heritage gardens and housing a quaint historic chapel.

MERCURE KOOINDAH WATERS RESORT 40 Kooindah Blvd, Wyong NSW 2259 www.mercurekooindahwaters.com. au/weddings/ A 4.5 star luxury golf and spa resort catering to outdoor and indoor weddings and receptions. Hotel and apartment accommodation.


NOONAWEENA

THE FOREST CHAPEL

THE STABLES OF SOMERSBY

1442 George Downes Drive, Kulnura NSW 2250 www.noonaweena.com.au

Wycombe Rd, Terrigal NSW 2260 www.theforestchapel.com

Lutana Rd, Somersby 2250 www.stablesofsomersby.com.au

A natural, relaxed outdoor leafy bushland wedding site with good photo locations.

Offers a choice of rural wedding aspects and wet weather options, a repurposed rustic barn, sprawling lawns, and a dam with boathouse and jetty framed by natural bushland.

PULLMAN MAGENTA SHORES RESORT 1 Magenta Drive, Magenta NSW 2261 www.pullmanmagentashores.com. au/en/weddings/ 5-star resort offering water views, golf course views, lakeside lawn ceremony. Large reception areas. Accommodation.

SOMERSBY GARDENS Somersby Falls Rd, Somersby NSW 2250 www.somersbygardens.com.au The 50-acre estate offers several wedding ceremony and reception locations in the beautiful gardens, horseshoe bridge, the pavilion and outdoor amphitheatre.

THE HILLVIEW 1376 Yarramalong Road, Yarramalong NSW 2259 www.thehillview.com.au The heritage listed homestead sits on a picturesque 117 acres with landscaped surrounds, flagstone terraced area, hidden gardens.

THE SPRINGS 1080 Peats Ridge Rd, Peats Ridge NSW 2250 www.the-springs.com.au Resident ducks, bushland, water features and rural landscape with an outside ceremony or indoors on the deck overlooking the bushlands. Small weddings, marquee weddings and large formal weddings. Your pets are welcome guests. Versatile, chef-designed menus.

WAGSTAFFE HALL 55 Wagstaffe Ave, Wagstaffe NSW 2257 www.wagstaffetokillcare.org.au/info. php?id=4 A charming waterfront hall for your BYO styling and decorations. At one end of the hall is a stage and, on the waterfront side, two sets of double glass doors which open onto a large veranda.

YARRAMALONG VALLEY FARMSTAY 798 Yarramalong Rd, Wyong Creek NSW 2259 www.yarramalongvalleyfarmstay.com.au Set on 50 acres, with an architect designed rural home that accommodates up to 15 people. Outdoor or marquee weddings and receptions.

Information has been sourced from the venues and public sites including the venues’ websites. Please check with them to confirm details.

PHOTO COURTESY OF VIBE PHOTOGRAPHY

An air of solitude and the natural beauty of manicured grounds. Four elegant lodges and extensive guest facilities. Disabled access and accommodation.


MARKET GUIDE • Summer

MARKET GUIDE COASTIES AND VISITORS SEEM TO LOVE A MARKET, WHETHER IT’S FARM-FRESH PRODUCE, ARTS AND CRAFTS DELIGHTS OR PRE-LOVED TREASURES. SO, EVERY WEEKEND, THERE ARE CANNY BUYERS, BARGAIN HUNTERS AND TREASURE SEEKERS STROLLING, SIPPING AND SHOPPING AROUND MARKET STALLS SOMEWHERE ON THE COAST. HERE’S A GUIDE TO THE POPULAR LOCAL MARKETS.

Avoca Beachside Markets

© LISA HAYMES

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MARKET GUIDE • Summer

UMINA BEACH MARKETS

AVOCA BEACHSIDE MARKETS The lakeside and beachside market in Heazlett Park now has more than 120 stalls offering local art, skincare, jewellery and international food, to name a few. Enjoy a coffee and listen to local artists, or dine at any of the local cafes. The chillout zone, known for its colourful flags, offers a respite to sit and enjoy a gluten-free donut, goat’s milk gelato or ginger beer. It’s a great day out for all, including the dog! Parking for this popular market can be at a premium so take advantage of the free shuttle bus from the Avoca Hotel and Resort. It runs from 9 am every 15 minutes until the markets close. 4th Sunday of the month, 9 am to 2 pm. Heazlett Park, Avoca.

AVOCA TWILIGHT MARKET A spin off from the Avoca Beachside Markets, this pop-up event will be held under lights at Avoca Village next to the tennis courts. It differs from its sibling in that it has 40 or so hand-picked, bespoke and vintage items, yummy foods and desserts, a Six String Brewery Bar offering local ales and Firescreek fruit wines. But wait, there’s more: live music, as well as a Raine & Horne jumping castle and living room. Bring the family or meet friends for Chrissy drinks and fare. 8 December, 5 pm to 9 pm. Avoca Village.

TERRIGAL BEACH MARKETS Once a month, the Terrigal Beach Markets showcase more than 30 local artists, designers, musicians, foodies and growers as well as stalls with fashion, homewares, jewels and blooms for sale. It’s hard to find a better place to potter about beside the seaside on a sunny Saturday, while also supporting our local talent. 1st Saturday of the month, 9 am to 3 pm Terrigal Esplanade, Terrigal.

GREEDY GUTS STREET FOOD MARKET Each month the Florida Beach Bar at the Crowne Plaza transforms into a street food market with local fare as well as food from afar. There’s Fillipino cuisine, paella, tacos, Peruvian street food, and more. The markets feature special themes and live music. Inside the Florida Beach Bar there are kids’ meals, pizza, chips and wedges, as well as drinks from the bar. 2nd Friday of the month, Florida Beach Bar, Crowne Plaza, 1 Kurrawyba Ave, Terrigal.

ORGANIC FOOD MARKET Every Saturday at The Entrance, you can do your weekly shopping in the open air. There’s seasonal organic produce, freshly baked artisanal bread and pastries, fresh fruit and vegetables, salami, cheeses and even truffles, as well as fashion, homewares and plants. You may even see a local pelican ‘holding in his beak more than his belly-can’. Every Saturday, 9 am to 2 pm. Memorial Park, Marine Parade, The Entrance.

GOSFORD FARMERS’ MARKET The Gosford Farmer’s Market is held at the Entertainment Grounds most Sundays from 8 am to 1 pm (except when it makes way for another event). As you’d expect from the name, there’s seasonal produce direct from the farmers and artisan producers. There are meats, fish, fruit and veg, pastries and pasta, cheeses from cows, sheep and goats, as well as chutneys and chillies, olive oils and organic breads making it a foodie’s delight. There are also handmade and handcrafted clothing, quilts and skincare products, and artisan blacksmiths, jewellery makers, painters, toy makers and more. And to satisfy the inner shopper: Chinese dumplings, gozleme, falafels and more.

A truly community event, with over 90 stalls filling the grassy areas from the surf club and Jasmine Green Café to the skate park, the markets offer an abundance of ‘plant based options’ (vegan) as well as a few non-vegan temptations. There’s everything from visual arts to tarts, candles to cupcakes, donuts to dog treats, and jam to jerky. 3rd Sunday of the month, 9 am to 2 pm. Peninsular Recreational Precinct, Sydney Ave, Umina Beach.

THE MARKET TERRIGAL Not to be confused with the beach market, ‘The Market’ is held on the second Sunday of the month. It’s a fashion-conscious market focused on pre-loved clothing and accessories, flowers, coffee and live music. 2nd Sunday of the month. 9 am to 2 pm. Terrigal Scout Hall, Willoughby Road, Terrigal.

SHELLY BEACH MARKETS The biggest covered markets on the Coast, with over 100 boutique stallholders inside, and another 50 outside, offering quality arts, craft, fashion, local and international food and live music — for the mind, body and soul. Look for the pink flamingos and you’ll know you’ve arrived. Last Saturday of the month. 9 am to 2 pm. Tuggerah Lakes Secondary College (The Entrance Campus),Yakalla St, Shelly Beach.

VINTAGE FAIR COLLECTIVE The Point Clare collective is an initiative of Fairhaven Services, which provides support, service and employment to people with a disability on the Coast. The quality and design of their handmade and up-cycled homewares is nothing short of enticing. You can also amble through the op shop and the preloved furniture barn, search second hand books, and discover treasures among the second-hand homewares, hardware and appliances. 2nd Saturday of each month. 9 am to 2 pm with the big annual Christmas fair

Weekly, 8 am to 1 pm. 4 Racecourse Road,

held on 8 December. 209 Brisbane Water

Gosford.

Drive, Point Clare.

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ONCE UPON A TIME • Spencer

ONCE UPON A TIME IN SPENCER

COURTESY NATIONAL ARCHIVES AUSTRALIA 7534142

THE QUIET ‘HUB OF THE UNIVERSE’

Spencer jetty post office and store, 1951

S

pencer, on the Central Coast side of the Hawkesbury River, is a quiet hamlet of stubborn contrasts. At first glance it looks like a peaceful retreat where time has almost stood still. Several beautifully restored, large old Queenslander houses rub shoulders with a splendid, architect-designed log-built house. But just around the bend stand abandoned (asbestos-riddled) cottages with only star-burst corners of glass remaining in their windows. Andrew Goodman, proud proprietor of the Spencer Village Store and Café has lived in Spencer for eight years and has seen the place gradually becoming ‘just a little gentrified’. ‘We’re the hub of the universe,’ he says, pointing to the self-proclaiming sign on the wharf across the road. ‘And we can lay claim to the Big Boom Box.’ And there it is, a caravan-sized stereo boom box formerly owned by a radio station and now, incongruously, residing in Spencer next to the ‘Hub of the Universe’ sign. Across the tranquil stretch of water, Triangle Island sits at the mouth of Mangrove Creek where it meets the Hawkesbury, ‘like a cork pushed into the neck of a bottle’.

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The little hamlet of Spencer has — with a population that tends to hover just above 500 — punched above its weight over the years, producing two world sculling champions who learnt to row, or trained, around the Spencer Broadwater and upstream on the Hawkesbury. According to locals, the village has more recently been popular with single mums looking for inexpensive accommodation. The winding road down to Spencer was also a favoured bikie route to Wiseman’s Ferry. But when the local school closed, the village’s young families had to move elsewhere and, in their place, came city folk escaping Sydney housing prices. Today, a few bikies still roar through, but a luxury car brand is just as likely to be holding a fundraising rally for charity with a pitstop at the village store and café for lunch. Andrew Goodman and his cook of seven years are particularly proud of the café’s hamburgers, and the tempura-battered fish and chips. ‘We only use Moi oil, and it’s changed daily,’ Andrew is quick to tell us. ‘And our freshly baked scones are second to none!’ If that’s not enough to tempt you, the road from Mangrove Mountain, through Lower Mangrove to Spencer is reason enough to visit. It has a changing vista of orange groves and farmlands, then winds along the Gymea Lilly-lined Wiseman’s Ferry Road. A few kilometres further, the road is canopied with tall, straight rainforest eucalypts where it wedges itself between Popran National Park and Dharug National Park. And the lower you go, the more prolific are the creeks: Popran Creek, Breakfast Creek, No Name Creek, until you motor alongside the wide Mangrove Creek. (Breakfast Creek is said to be named for the ‘first meal after Spencer’. And a few miles up Mangrove Creek was the early pioneer’s dinner camp on the tributary, Dinner Creek.) Anglers long ago discovered the joys of the Hawkesbury’s waters around Spencer, ‘the fulfillment of a fisherman’s dream,’ but it is the changing light that has led more than one visitor to eulogise in print. ‘The light changes radically throughout the day. In the morning, it is purple and lime green, and in the evenings an extraordinary orange that burns on the clouds in the distance.’ Spencer and the lands around it were first settled 1801 when Peter Hibbs, an able seaman with the First Fleet aboard HMS Sirius (and later commander of the first vessel to circumnavigate Tasmania) was given a grant of land at the mouth of Mangrove Creek.


ONCE UPON A TIME • Spencer

Assigned convicts and free settlers began to work the land as shingle-splitters, timber-getters, sawmillers, boatbuilders, and as farmers growing maize, wheat and even arrowroot. Other pioneers included the Woodbury family whose patriarch, Richard Woodbury, served with Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar. After having had much of his calf shot away, he moved to Australia and was made Chief Constable of Windsor in 1809. His son, William, settled on the shores of Mangrove Creek and became an owner and master of sailing vessels, probably a good business move as the community and economy of the Hawkesbury depended entirely on river transport. Vessels would leave Sydney just before daybreak to pick up the land breeze, clearing the Heads at around 4 am and reaching Mangrove ten hours later. It was the Woodburys who donated the land for the, now, historic church of the Holy Trinity, an unimposing building but one which is important in representing the construction methods of its era. Another early family,

the Kellys, received a grant of land in 1816 at Popran Creek and later purchased 300 acres under the name of Glenworth Valley. Fast-forward to 1900, where faded photos show a crowd of locals in their Sunday finery — the ladies in white ruffled skirts and black buttoned boots — dancing ring-o’-roses by Mangrove Creek. What happens to Spencer in the future is in the hands of its locals but, for now, a 1950s historian’s words remain true, ‘Spencer’s lovely waterways; its secluded nooks among the surrounding hills; its magnificence of changing lights on bold cliff-face, wooded foreshores and sweeping river reaches; its abundance of birdlife and springtime beauty of native flowers; are a concentration in one spot of all that appeals to the nature-lover and the artist.’ c Sources: Gosford Library ‘Here is Spencer on the Hawkesbury’ (author unknown), c. 1952. http://www.visitsydneyaustralia.com.au/spencer.html

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Summer

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT ON THE COAST BROOKE DOHERTY TAKES A LOOK AT WHAT’S GOING ON THIS SUMMER.

through the story, but expect a fusion of musical and dance styles: hip-hop, soul, explosive street dance, syncopated merengue and salsa. Before it plays at Sydney Opera House, the production will premiere here on the Coast so catch it at the Arthouse first! January 10, 11 and 12, The Arthouse, Wyong. www.thearthousewyong.com.au

BALLET Storytime Ballet: Coppelia

IN THE HEIGHTS

Designed for young audiences of 3 and up, and running for under an hour, this savvy re-telling of a life-sized doll that a village boy comically falls in love with — much to the ire of his sweetheart — is both enchanting and full of surprises. There are oodles of magic tricks, life-sized toys and mesmerizing costumes to enthrall and engage the kids as well as a narrator who keeps it all merrily on track. It’s a great way to introduce little ones to the theatricality of ballet.

THEATRE If you enjoyed the musical flavour of the hugely successful Moana, you may well like In The Heights. Lin-Manuel Miranda (who also wrote the musical Hamilton) created this little gem that focuses on the working-class ambitions and struggles of a community of Hispanic-Americans in Washington Heights, NYC. The refreshing difference between this and musicals like Rent and West Side Story is that it is more relatable to the experiences of 20-somethings: catching the eye of someone you have a crush on; paying for those uni fees; racist family members who are immovable, establishing your identity and a changing sense of ‘home.’ Our hugely talented and experienced local, Joe Kalou (of Hi-5 fame) plays the central protagonist who raps his way

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COPPELIA

In The Heights

January 8 and 9: 11 am, 2 pm, 4 pm. Laycock Street Community Theatre, North Gosford. www.gosford.nsw.gov. au/theatres


MORTALITY ‘DYING TO SEE’ ART EXHIBITION

ROSIE BATTY 2017 BY NIKKI TOOLE EXPRESS YOURSELF EXHIBITION

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Summer

ART Express Yourself exhibition from the National Portrait Gallery Both Shakespeare and the great Roman orator, Cicero, believed that ‘the eyes are the window to the soul.’ This exhibition from the National Portrait Gallery certainly confirms that: from Marcia Langton’s wary stare to Rosie Batty’s uncompromising and haunting sapphire eyes that compel you to look deeper into them, these images will fascinate you. Not all of them are photographic, but they each hold a symbolic value unique to that person. December 1 to February 3, Gosford Regional Gallery, East Gosford. www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/galleries

‘Dying to See’ art exhibition

December 1 to February 3, Gosford Regional Gallery, East Gosford. www.centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/galleries

s

It’s a powerful and sobering thing to look back on a person’s life through the lens of what they have created. Graeme Balchin, who taught classes for many years at the Gosford Regional Art Gallery,

was also a regular finalist in the Gosford Art Prize and a finalist in the 2007 Doug Moran Portrait Prize. He was inspired by European old masters, using glazing techniques that produced luminous images with luxurious surfaces. Graeme forged this collection following a terminal diagnosis, resulting in a very special, strongly autobiographical display of his final works. Beautiful, highly symbolic and deeply affecting, his work charts his emotional, spiritual and physical journey in all the fragility and wonderment of the human condition. As it is so very personal, the work can’t but help demand a reverence given its context, yet it has a vibrancy and life that is compelling and filled with hopeful curiosity. As Graeme would say, ‘never be afraid of the dark’. After viewing this, you, like Graeme, may rekindle your inner strength and passion for the natural world.

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MUSIC The Italian Tenors Ahhh, who doesn’t love to hear the dulcet tones of not one but three gorgeous, Italian operatic masters? Fabio La Mattina, Sabino Gaita and Evans Tonon have found the right mix of mellow favourites and energetic contemporary numbers to blissfully and expertly entertain a wide age range in their audience. It’s little wonder that they sold out their previous 2016 Australian tour and did the same more recently in Europe. It’s tipped to be one memorable night.

THE ITALIAN TENORS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • Summer

December 20, 8 pm, The Art House, Wyong. Tickets $62 to $69. www.thearthousewyong.com.au

Elixir jazz meets Leunig Katie Noonan’s folk jazz trio, Elixir, has teamed-up with cartoonist and poet, Michael Leunig (of SMH fame) to celebrate his poetry and explore the symbiotic relationship between text and sound. Leunig’s cartoons are famed Australia-wide for being delightfully quirky, pithy and poignant and, like many artists, challenging of the collective consciousness. Declared a Living Treasure by the National Trust in 1999, Leunig’s poetic observations and Noonan’s smooth and playful musical style should prove an amusing evening. February 21. Laycock Street Community Theatre, North Gosford. www.gosford.nsw.gov.au/theatres

Tales, Far From Home Symphony Central Coast will be performing a family-friendly concert featuring the New World Symphony by Dvorak in combination with Prokofiev’s ever-popular Peter and the Wolf and The Carnival of the Animals by Saint-Saens. A special guest will narrate the story and poetry works for the youngsters and the adults can enjoy sampling the wares of Tamburlaine Wines and other refreshments in the foyer. Why not gather the troops?

ELIXIR

TALES FAR FROM HOME

December 2, 2.30 pm. Adults: $40, children: $15. Central Coast Grammar School Performing Arts Centre, Arundel Road, Erina Heights. Tickets: CCGS Box Office on 4365 8497 or symphonycentralcoast.com.au

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PLEASE NOTE: SESSION TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CHECK WITH VENUE.


S E A S O N 2 0 1 9 THE SAPPHIRES 22 & 23 JUNE

SPOT 9 SEPTEMBER

THE WINE BLUFFS 15 JUNE

POSSUM MAGIC 30 & 31 AUGUST

See with emotion, feel in colour. T WO BY JIM CART W R IGHT 19 MARCH

E L I X I R F E AT U R I N G K AT I E N O O N A N 21 FEBRUARY

ROAL D DA HL’S RE VOLTING R HYMES & DIRT Y BEA STS 27 & 28 SE P TEMBER

THE WIZARD OF OZ 3 & 4 O C TO B E R

BOX OFFICE 4323 3233 centralcoast.nsw.gov.au/theatres

RAIN OR SHINE: THE JUDY G A R L A N D S TO RY 1 JUNE

laycockstreettheatre


PEOPLE OF THE COAST • Emily Caska

EMILY CASKA

THE STORY OF A RESTAURANT, A HEART, A CONSCIENCE AND A COMMUNITY

T

he style and personality of Emily Caska and her restaurant, Avoca Surf House, are entirely interchangeable. Both are chic, welcoming, love the beach, very community focused, and with deep roots in the Central Coast. (Her parents still live here, and Emily’s uncle was the doctor who delivered her in Gosford Hospital 35 years ago.) Avoca Surf House is very much a restaurant in normal restaurant hours — with one of the best up-close-andpersonal ocean views on the Coast. Outside restaurant hours, it doubles as a community venue for early morning yoga classes, a seniors’ book club, floral classes and children’s workshops. Most people ask Emily, ‘Why a community centre in your restaurant?’ But when you get to know her passion and focus, your first question becomes, ‘Why a restaurant?’ for you are left with no doubt it is the community that is dear to her heart. Emily saw a strategic gap on the Central Coast for an accessible, casual restaurant and bar that catered for the 28 to 40 year old demographic, and had live local music — somewhere that she and her friends wanted to go. ‘People naturally gather around food and wine. It brings people together. And one day I had a rare day off on Avoca Beach with my friends and saw that this place was vacant. I fell in love with it immediately. We painted everything white and added natural timbers. And its

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dual role came out of the strategic business need that the venue had to be fully utilised and multi-faceted in order to earn its keep. ‘I see my role as someone who enjoys bringing the not-for-profit ethos and the commercial mindset together,’ she says. As well as running Avoca Surf House, Emily holds down full time jobs as a single mum to her son, Otis, as well as a disability, child protection and strategy executive, and a weekend carer for her beloved sister. Before returning to her roots on the Central Coast, Emily had held senior career positions in Sydney and the Pilbara, Vietnam, Philippines and Hong Kong. She holds a Bachelor degree in Economic and Social Sciences as well as a Masters in International Politics. She also lectured at the University of Newcastle on the economic benefits to society of employing people with a disability. The extent of her hospitality experience dated back to university days when she worked in pubs and managed friends’ venues in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. ‘But most of all, I tried to shape the restaurant to reflect who we are and what we do differently to the traditional hospitality model,’ she says. Emily is proud that head chef, Josh Greenhill, and the 26 staff share her culture and values. In fact, it’s the reason most joined her. (Eight of the staff come from a special needs background but they are not identified or ‘labelled’ as such.)


The menu is as fresh, local and sustainable as they can make it and is justifiably popular for its irresistible crispy fish tacos with whiting, a pico de gallo (salsa) and black garlic aioli served in a crunchy iceberg lettuce. The seafood platter is a treat for the eyes and the taste buds, as is the house-made gnocchi. ‘You won’t find plastic straws in your drinks from the bar. Bottles are re-used to propagate plants on the restaurant tables. We host monthly beach clean ups. Our take away containers are cardboard not plastic. And we are about to install a herb garden and compost out the back.’ And, importantly, much of the furniture was made by the talented folk at Fairhaven with their dedicated team of people living with a disability. Emily’s dad, a doctor, partnered with her in the restaurant and is its most frequent diner. ‘It’s the way he gets to see me and his four-year-old grandson,’ Emily confesses. He has been her rock since she returned home to the Central Coast to escape from domestic violence — a subject she is prepared to talk about publicly to show that it’s something that can happen to anyone, no matter what their lifestyle or education or circumstances – something she herself took time to realise. For Emily, the local community became her extended family support but, in particular, she singles out the Central Coast Women’s Health Centre. ‘I’ve learnt so much from my life experiences,’ she says. ‘But paramount to anything I do and the hours I work, I will never compromise the bond and time I have with my son, Otis. That’s who I do this for.’ www.avocasurfhouse.com.au

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SASÀ SICILIAN STREET FOOD WORDS SARAH GREENAWAY PHOTOS LISA HAYMES

THE DAY I MET DANIELE DEL CASTILLO WAS A BIG DAY FOR HIM … THOUGH NOT BECAUSE HE’D JUST MET ME. AFTER WHAT DANIELE DESCRIBES AS A ‘MARATHON CLEANING EFFORT’, SASÀ SICILIAN STREET FOOD HAD JUST MOVED INTO LARGE, AIRY AND GLEAMING NEW PREMISES IN THE ITALIANATE, GALLERIA ETTALONG BEACH COMPLEX. IT IS A FITTING LOCALE FOR THIS SICILIAN PHOTOJOURNALIST TURNED STREET FOOD VENDOR AND BAKER, WITH THE NEW PREMISES BOASTING A GENEROUS DOSE OF MEDITERRANEAN APPEAL. THE LOCALE IS ALSO A SIGNIFICANT NOD TO THE FAIRLY SWIFT RECOGNITION HE AND HIS WIFE, ORLY PRIMOV, HAVE GAINED SINCE TURNING THEIR COMBINED TALENTS INTO CRAFTING SICILIAN DESSERTS AND MAKING SOME OF THE BEST ARTISANAL SOURDOUGH BREAD YOU COULD HOPE TO FIND ANYWHERE.


ARTISANS OF THE COAST • Daniele Del Castillo

D

aniele is an engaging character, gesticulating just as you’d expect an allegiant Sicilian to. But he also admits that he is attracted to professions that allow him to work alone and indulge his tireless desire for creative fulfilment. Before finding that fulfilment in food, it had led him into a career in photojournalism in which he shot news images with newspapers like Corriere della Sera, Italy’s most circulated newspaper. He continued as a photojournalist for more than nine years but Daniele felt that changes in the industry began to limit his ability to create the calibre of photographs he took pride in. It was around this time that fate stepped in to bring Daniele to Australia. He met Orly Primov, an Australian graphic designer. They fell in love and decided to relocate to Sydney together where they married. Daniele continued as a photographer in Australia but, here too, it became less gratifying as the years wore on. Orly continued in her graphic design career, but found that she was increasingly enjoying expressing her own creativity through food. Gradually, their graphic design and photography interests gave way to weekends spent cooking up a storm and conjuring up business ideas. Their shared love of Sicilian food crystallised into a creative desire coupled with a business plan to make and sell their delicious morsels — from arancini to panzerotti (a deep fried Italian turn-over made from a pizza-like dough and stuffed with a variety of fillings). That dream of giving Australia a taste of Sicily led them both to enrol in TAFE courses while still holding down their day jobs. Orly took on Retail Baking and Daniele turned his hand to a Commercial Cookery certificate. To gain the sort of work experience he knew he wanted, Daniele also returned to Italy to spend a month in Tuscany and Sicily with fourth generation bakers who generously shared their advice and skills with the young Sicilian-turned-Australian baker. Daniele and Orly’s fantasy became a reality early this year with the purchase of a trailer that Orly adorned

with vibrant branding using her design skills, and Sasà Sicilian Street Food was born. They began preparing traditional Sicilian cannoli and hit the circuit of local markets. In just a few short months word had spread about their handcrafted delicacies, and their popularly soared. They added new flavours to their menu, and continued to grow and develop an increasingly avid following. Then, through a happenstance encounter with a local event organiser, Cara Elliott from Meet Wine Meet Community, Daniele and Orly were invited to dinner at Cara’s house and — being good guests — took some of their famed cannoli for the dinner guests to enjoy. By the time the night was through, every morsel of the 30 cannoli had been devoured by the 10 guests! Cara quickly asked Daniele to supply Sasà cannoli for the next Meet Wine Meet Community event. Of course he agreed. ‘When I arrived at the event, Cara was rushing out because she had forgotten to buy bread’, says Daniele, ‘But, strange though it sounds, I just happened to have a large, freshly baked loaf in the car with me.’ At that time, Daniele was baking only for his friends and family and had intended taking the bread to a friend. ‘I’ve always loved bread’, he says. The secret to his sourdough lies in the starter he created to make the wild yeast for his Sasà sourdough. He also credits his mother for her light touch and timing. ‘As the youngest of three kids, I followed my mum everywhere. I watched her make bread and the process is special to me because it reminds me of my childhood.’ From that first event, where guests enthusiastically scoffed the one large sourdough loaf, Sasà Sicilian Street Food and Bakery has grown from a fond childhood reminiscence to become a commercial venture that sees Daniele baking daily while Orly manages the operations to keep their growing legions of eager customers satisfied. It’s a close partnership, based on their love of food, their business, and each other. Sasà Sicilian Street Food and Bakery now supplies Sicilian delicacies and fresh sourdough bread to some of the Central Coast’s best restaurants as well as directly to an ever-growing legion of local households. ‘Ultimately’, says Daniele, ‘we want to keep the artisan aspect of the business — we love to see people’s reactions when they eat our creations. They should feel like they’ve enjoyed a piece of Sicily and a taste of the two most important ingredients my mum taught me to add to food: love and time.’ If you’re a café owner or a retailer interested in Sasà, or a customer who’d like to try a loaf or two, or you’re planning an event and have a catering enquiry, email Daniele and Orly at sasastreetfood@gmail.com.

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WINE • Hunter Valley

The Audrey Wilkinson vineyard was planted in 1866, and young Audrey was only 15 years of age when he was forced to take over the running of the vineyard after the death of his father. Today, the museum at the vineyard reflects those pioneering roots, the innovative winemaking equipment of its day, and some of the aged wine, liqueur and port bottles dating back over a century.

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WINE • Hunter Valley

JEFF BYRNE

The surfing winemaker

WORDS BRENDA CHRISTIAN

A

udrey Wilkinson Vineyard, named after one of the pioneers of the Hunter Valley, is one of the most beautiful and historic in Pokolbin. It is nestled among the spectacular vistas of the Brokenback ranges, and its earliest vines, planted in 1866, were the first grown in Pokolbin. The vineyard, now owned by Agnew Wines, is also home to a charming cellar door perched on top of a hill, and a museum housed in the original winery now showcasing a curated collection of photos of the Wilkinson family, winemaking tools and the heritage-listed open cement vats that Audrey would have used in the 19th century. Jeff Byrne, the chief winemaker, stands at over six feet tall with an athletic build that sets him apart in a crowd. He counts himself lucky to call the vineyards ‘his office’. But his domain doesn’t stop here. He’s also the winemaker for Poole’s Rock, as well as Cockfighter’s Ghost, which also has its own historic back story. It’s said that in 1835, one of the explorers trying to open up routes in the Hunter Valley crossed a flooded creek on a horse called Cockfighter. Sadly, the horse lost his footing in the raging waters and drowned, but his ghost still gallops along the banks of what

became known as Cockfighter’s Creek where the vineyards for the wine brand were established in 1988. The striking cellar door on the historic Post Office Block Vineyard overlooks Shiraz vines, dating from the 1890s, and are used to make Poole’s Rock and Cockfighter’s Ghost wines. So, with the vineyards so close to each other, Jeff probably doesn’t have much of a commute to the office? Well, you’d be wrong there. He travels 50 minutes from Newcastle where he lives with his wife and their three daughters – Caitlin, 15, Lauren 12 and Bree 8. With three young girls and three wine brands to look after life must be busy. But Jeff thinks the drive to the winery each day is a small price to pay to be close to a surfing beach. He loves finding a wave at Newcastle’s Stockton Beach whenever he can but ... drumroll please … he’s from Halifax, Nova Scotia. A surfing Canadian? Canada, where temperatures regularly plunge to minus 20°C and ice hockey is the number one sport. Get outta here! ‘I learnt to skate as soon as I could walk and played ice hockey from the age of eight, playing competitively in Halifax until 1995, 105


WINE • Hunter Valley

but a good mate talked me into going surfing when I was about 17,’ Jeff explains. ‘I’ll be honest, the locals don’t think it’s that cold, but we do wear head-to-toe wetsuits.’ In 1995, the 21-year-old took a gap year from uni to go backpacking in Australia and chase waves. ‘I ended up in Surfers Paradise, met a girl named Bridgette … in the back of a maxi taxi. She travelled to Eastern Canada to have a beer during the last year of my degree, and the rest, as they say, is history. I was Australia bound, permanently.’ The move ended up being one of Jeff ’s career crossroads as well. ‘I got a cellar door job at Tower Estate and fell in love with the winemaking process. I remember while at Tower tasting a 1983 Lindeman’s Shiraz and was blown away that a wine could be that bright and fresh when it was 20 years old! So back to uni I went — part time at Charles Sturt University — and six years later got my degree. ‘In 2008, the Agnew family got in touch and asked if I was interested in the winemaker role at Audrey Wilkinson [which they had purchased in 2004]. The Agnews then bought neighbouring Poole’s Rock and Cockfighter’s Ghost in 2012, and suddenly I was head winemaker of all three brands.’ He’s now a self-confessed wine tragic. ‘I like the new style of chardonnay Australian producers are making where fruit and

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WINE • Hunter Valley

winemaking (oak) is in balance. My favourite French producer is Bouchard and we try to emulate that style as best we can in our chardonnays. My favourite we’ve made so far is the 2013 Audrey Wilkinson ‘Oakdale’ Chardonnay.’ What’s the wine he’s most proud of? ‘The 2009 Audrey Wilkinson ‘The Ridge’ Semillon. It’s a pretty tasty wine and obviously semillon is the flagship white in the Hunter and I made it while we finished building a winery. It was the first wine to come out of the new winery so it’s pretty special. ‘In 2013, after buying Poole’s Rock and Cockfighter’s Ghost, we decided to move the Audrey Wilkinson winemaking facility to Poole’s Rock and expanded from a 500 tonne winery to 3500 tonnes. You can imagine the logistics of all that.’ Jeff has been making waves (sorry, couldn’t help it) in the wine world since the get-go, winning a swag of awards over the years with the Audrey Wilkinson 2017 Winemakers Selection Semillon snagging a trophy for best One-Year-Old Dry Semillon at the 2018 Hunter Valley Wine Show. So what is he amped about right now? ‘Agnew Wines has five vineyards – the most recent acquisition was Marsh Estate and, in 2018, we made the first semillon and chardonnay from the old dry grown vineyards there. They’ll be released in 2019 and I think they will be cracking wines.’ No doubt about that. c

Audrey Wilkinson vineyards. Open daily at 750 DeBeyers Road, Pokolbin www.audreywilkinson.com.au Cockfighter’s Ghost vineyards. Open daily, cnr McDonalds & DeBeyers Roads, Pokolbin www.cockfightersghost.com.au

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24 HOURS IN… • Long Jetty

24 hours in…

LONG JETTY WORDS KATIE STOKES

‘THE JETTY’ IS IN THE THROES OF A SHAKEDOWN. MANY OF LONG JETTY’S MAIN PLAYERS HAVE CHANGED HANDS: THE ONION, DAPPER DARLINGS AND GREEN TANGERINE EACH CAME UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT IN 2018, AND NEW SHOPS SEEM TO BE OPENING EVERY WEEK. THE CHARACTER OF LONG JETTY THAT’S EMERGING IS EDGY AND INTERESTING, AND DIFFERENT TO ANY OTHER AREA OF THE COAST. TIME AND AGAIN WE’VE HEARD IT REFERRED TO AS ‘THE NEWTOWN OF THE CENTRAL COAST’.

Grant Malony’s Gallery

7 am Rise early and head for the lake. Not only is the light beautiful on the water, but so are the waterbirds: black swans, pelicans and much more, depending on the season. But first grab a coffee and pastry from Lucky Surf & Supply, a local gallery–coffee shop–surf store. You’ll find local artist Grant Malony’s Gallery out the back and out the front there’s a thoughtfully curated selection of surf- and casual-wear. Think Adelio wetsuits, Vans shoes, Patagonia tees.

7.30 am The lake foreshore is perfect for bike riders, bubs in prams and walkers as it’s flat, mostly tree-covered and has plenty of playgrounds and skate parks along the route. Bikes can be hired from Boomerang Bikes’ automatic stations at The Entrance’s Memorial Park and Pelican Plaza. There are two official tracks: the Tuggerah Lakes cycleway is a 12 km off-road pathway that circumnavigates the lake from Chittaway Bay to The Entrance; and the Coast to Lake Walk, a scenic 7.6 km loop that traverses the parklands, beaches and rock platforms of The Jetty and its neighbouring beachside suburbs.

9.30 am Plain Janes

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Sitting pretty next to the famed Long Jetty wall mural, The Green Tangerine makes for a perfect fuel stop. The café grinds The Little Marionette beans, brews Tippity tea and does a good trade in turmeric lattes.


© KATIE STOKES

24 HOURS IN… • Long Jetty

Page 1 Brunch runs the gamut from smashed pumpkin bruschetta on house-made sourdough to mushroom gnocchi with sage burnt butter and crisp kale. Don’t leave without a take out: the Portuguese tarts, caramel slices and pain au chocolat are all baked in-house by pastry chef Patricia.

11 am The Tiny Folk Collective

© KATIE STOKES

The Local Leaf

© KATIE STOKES

Time to once again hit the pavement, but this time with retail therapy in mind. Scott McGowen’s Sound Exchange Record Bar is a local institution that sells both new and second-hand records and turntables. Scott’s shop carries 7,500 records and his stored collection exceeds 65,000. Dapper Darlings is a treasure trove of rare finds. Vintage cowboy boots, denim short shorts, designer silk scarves and other threads are sourced from around the world by local creative and photographer Sarah-Kate McAleer. Next door, you’ll find former Dapper employee and now Page 1 business owner Virginia Clark, who opened her ‘thoughtfully made and responsible paper store’ last Summer. Here you’ll find new and vintage classics such as Oliver Twist and The Great Gatsby, original Little Golden Books, stationery, and framed book illustrations. Plain Janes has a little something for everyone. They stock Assembly Label linens and Nobody jeans, PONS Avarcas leather sandals and Superga casuals. Plus Spitfire sunnies, Salty Shadows beach umbrellas and hand-loomed Mayde towels. Adjoining the store you’ll find The Local Leaf, a blissful green space of staghorn ferns, fiddle-leaf figs and string of pearls succulents. The Tiny Folk Collective is next door, a beautifully styled children’s boutique that stocks June cotton dresses, Ceeda Cavity wooden caravans and Piper Finn newborn leather shoes. We especially love the framed Farrah’s Stone watercolour prints created by Terrigal artist, Alexandra Farrah.

Come Saturday afternoon, it’s time to head to The Riff. Opened by Brandin and Cassie in May, the Riff hosts open mic sessions in its courtyard cafe, and their nine-year-old son is a regular in the line-up. Taj picked up the electric guitar at seven after going to an AC/DC concert and he’s since pulled in sponsorship deals and performed at the Byron Bay Guitar Festival. Pull up a chair and check out this local talent.

© KATIE STOKES

3 pm

The Riff

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24 HOURS IN… • Long Jetty

The Glass Onion Society

5 pm No visit to The Jetty is complete without a stroll along its namesake, the 351-metre-long jetty. Built from the trunks of paper bark trees in 1915, the jetty is a treasured landmark of the Coast and an iconic capture on Instagram as the light changes over the lake. The Glass Onion Society

7 pm

The Glass Onion Society, better known as ‘The Onion’, has long been a favourite café for brunch with pancakes (topped with apple, rhubarb and rosewater syrup or perhaps a pistachio and praline crunch), or a vegan brekkie of field mushrooms, smashed avo and baked beans. Since October, they’ve extended their service to include dinner on Friday and Saturday evenings. BYO vino to pair with charcuterie boards, house-made ravioli stuffed with 12-hour braised beef cheek, and tiramisu.

The Savoy

9 pm

Head to the Jetty’s new bar, The Savoy, for the Coast’s coolest nightlife where staghorn ferns hang around with vintage film posters and a romantic neon sign that declares, ‘Love is a Many Splendoured Thing’. There’s craft beer and cocktails and casual dining as well as classic movie favourites that tip their hat to the Savoy’s origins.

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8.30 am

Vinyasa yoga

Rebalance last night’s antics and indulgences with a vinyasa yoga class at Modern Organic. You’ll stretch, breath and work up an appetite that you can contentedly satisfy later in their courtyard café. Their green matcha lattes*, and dairy-free smoothie bowls packed with raw acai, cacao, banana, dates and cashews, make a great start to the day. *Matcha lattes are made from stoneground Japanese tea leaves that are less processed than regular tea. It’s said not to give you ‘caffeine jitters’ but is coupled with a buzz that’s more energising and longer-lasting. They claim to retain 10 times the antioxidants of regular green tea and much more than coffee, and is fat-burning, reduces halitosis and bodily toxins — so Google it if you want to know more.

Modern Organic

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WHAT’S ON • For Kids

Aquasplash

FUN FOR KIDS

ON THE COAST WORDS KATIE STOKES

MAKE A SPLASH

Waterworld Central

Get set to slip, slide and splash your way through the heat with two water parks returning to the Central Coast this summer. Aquasplash is returning to Gosford Waterfront and this time they’re bringing the Sky Rocket, the biggest water swing in the world! Their on-water inflatable obstacle course also includes slides to slip down, pyramids to climb up, trampolines to bounce on, ‘icebergs’ to scurry across and much more. It’s sure to be wild. Waterworld Central, a mobile water park, is landing in Doyalson for much of January. The park includes a giant twin slide which shoots out of a dragon’s mouth and, for the very daring, a colossal longdrop to plummet down. Plus they have paddle boats, chill-out pools and some awesomely fun zorb balls that let you to walk on water!

Vera’s Water Garden

Waterworld Central

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Aquasplash, Gosford Waterfront (behind Gosford Swimming Pool). Open 17 November 2018 to 10 February 2019. Prices start at $15. Book online at https://aquasplash.com.au Waterworld Central, Doyalson RSL. Open 5 to 28 January 2019. Prices start at $15. Book online at www.waterworldcentral.com.au

FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH Vera’s Water Garden has reopened. The popular toddler pool and water fountain has been a feature of The Entrance’s foreshore for 23 years, but in recent months its had a facelift. The pool has been updated with new coloured lighting and softfall groundcover, and the brightly painted fountain statues now spout water in a range of patterns. Vera’s Water Garden, Pelican Plaza, The Entrance Rd, The Entrance (next to Memorial Park).


REACH NEW HEIGHTS Ever tried bouldering? You can at Gosford’s Pulse Climbing. This indoor facility provides kids and adults the opportunity to rock-climb without the hassle of managing ropes, harnesses and belay equipment (there are soft-fall mats to cushion any tumbles). Some 90 climbing routes are available and kids from as young as five years can join in the fun. Pulse Climbing: open daily. Adults $16, children (aged 5 to 12 years) $13.

Pulse Climbing

8 Grieve Road, West Gosford. https://pulseclimbing.com.au/gosford

ASH KIDS CLUB We’ve found a summer venue both you and your kids will love. The Avoca Beach Surf House has started the ASH Kids Club, a series of workshops and events running throughout the school holidays. The venue will be hosting kids cooking classes and workshops in plaster painting, flower-crown making and Christmas-card decorating. They’ve arranged for the team at Mandalong’s Fur & Feathers Rescue Farm to bring baby animals to the park next door for a day of petting and cuddles. And on Christmas Eve they’ll be hosting live music, a candy cane hunt as well as a Santa visit at 4 pm. And all the while parents can enjoy a coffee or mojito (we don’t mind if we do) and, of course, that unbeatable view.

‘Each session has a science theme that underpins the robots that we build,’ says Laurel Akra, the head facilitator of Robot Science and a teacher with a first degree in applied computer science as well as being a mum to four children. ‘The younger kids create, code and experiment while building structures like racing cars, buzzing bees, hopping frogs and earthquake simulators. The older kids complete challenges that include Robot Dance, Robot Relay and the ever popular Robot Sumo Battles!’ Akra admits that Robot Science was born out of her ‘desire to teach and equip my own kids — and all kids — with relevant 21st century skills in a fun, engaging environment.’

ASH Kids Club

Robot Science is running two-day workshops these summer holidays: 21 and 22 January 2019 in Erina for children in years K-6; 24 and 25 January 2019 at Bateau Bay for children in years 3 to 8. During the school term, they run weekly after-school classes in Erina and Bateau Bay and conduct school excursions across the region. Check their website for details: https://robotscience.com.au.

See their website for dates of all events: www.avocasurfhouse.com.au

CODING ROBOTS Robots are way too cool; building your own robot is cooler! Robot Science launched on the Central Coast in early 2018 and its classes are proving to be crazy popular. This educational service provides children — from preschoolers through to high school students — the opportunity to learn about robotics.

Robot Science

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EMERGENCY INFORMATION • Coast

CENTRAL COAST EMERGENCY HELP EMERGENCY

000

Police Fire Ambulance Deaf or speech impaired, phone 106 from a mobile

Hospital Emergency Departments Gosford Hospital Wyong Hospital

Holden Street, Gosford 2250 Pacific Highway, Hamlyn Terrace 2263

Dental New Leaf Dentists

Shop 2, Erina Plaza 210 Central Coast Hwy, Erina 02 4367 6222 Mon to Fri 8 am to 6 pm Saturdays, 8 am to 1 pm Closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day only

Bushfire information

Police stations

Terrigal The Entrance Toukley Woy Woy

(02) 4323 5599 (02) 4384 4822 (02) 4333 2999 (02) 4390 1299 (02) 4379 7399

www.ses.nsw.gov.au

Electricity Energy Australia 13 13 88 AUSGRID power lines 13 13 88 or www.ausgrid.com.au

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13 34 46 13 12 45

NRMA Roadside assistance Lifeline

13 11 22

13 11 14 (24 hours)

Beyond Blue

1300 22 4636

National Dementia Australia Helpline 1800 100 500 (Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm) (for information, emotional support, services, risk reduction)

Dementia Support Australia Helpline 1800 699 799 (24 hours) (for behaviour/environment management)

Wildlife Emergencies WIRES 1300 094 737 Marine Rescue (02) 4325 7929

(02) 4356 6099

State Emergency Services

13 19 09

Energy Australia AGL

For disabled access points and services around the Central Coast, please contact the All Abilities Foundation website at www.allabilities.foundation

1800 679 737 www.rfs.nsw.gov.au A handy app: ‘Fires near me NSW’

Wyong Gosford

Gas emergency

13 25 00


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© CENTRAL COAST DRONES

Profile for Coast Publishing

COAST Summer 2018/19  

Stay, Eat, Play, Drink, Explore the Central Coast NSW Australia

COAST Summer 2018/19  

Stay, Eat, Play, Drink, Explore the Central Coast NSW Australia