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PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID SAN DIEGO, CA PERMIT NO. 835

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VOL. 11, N0. 20

MAKING WAVES IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

OCT. 2, 2015

Derek Miller, Dophie Post, and former Tennis Club President Dave Van Den Berg earlier this year. The club recently sent out a survey to its members over the posibility of the tennis club becoming a site for the Covenant Club. File photo by Christina Macone-Greene

Arabian Days The Tierra Del Norte Arabian Horse Association present “The Versatile Arabian” at the San Diego Polo Club on Sept. 20. A total of 13 Arabian horses were presented demonstrating Arabian Native Costume, Trail, Western Pleasure, Hunter Pleasure, and Show Hack. Pictured above is a crowd favorite: a rider and horse dressed in Arabian native costume, as was worn by the sheiks in the desert regions of Arabia. Photo by Lisa Peck

Vibing in the Village From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday residents and friends gather in the heart of the Rancho Santa Fe Village to enjoy the first-ever Village Gathering championed by Village Vibe. There were games and activities for the kids. Clockwise from top: Cub Scout Webelos Bear Golden posing with Oliver the dog. Greta Pennock creating a masterpiece. Heidi Arni, Kirsten Kessler, and Ron Troyano taking part in the day. Photos by Christina Macone-Greene

RSF Tennis Club survey critiqued By Christina Macone-Greene with the way some of the

RANCHO SANTA FE — A recent independent survey sent to RSF Tennis Club members was done in an effort to determine if members were in agreement to the proposed Covenant Club location: the Tennis Club and Golf Club campus. Despite the intent, it has faced criticism from some. According to Dave Van Den Berg, former president of the Tennis Club, the impetus of The Rancho Santa Fe Tennis Club’s Covenant Club Survey was sent after receiving a recent presentation of the conceptual site options. “Most of the Covenant Club designs had a very major impact on the Tennis Club, either taking out courts or over the footprint of the Tennis Club. As a result, we went to our membership to find out how they felt because it was an important thing to get this feedback,” Van Den Berg said. The survey creation, he said, was Tennis Club board approved. “The survey shows that 80 percent of our membership does not want our footprint used for the development of the Covenant Club,” he said. Tennis Club Board President Barbara McClanahan said that she felt very confident that the Board was representing the majority of its membership due to the results of the survey. Conversely, fellow Tennis Club Board member Scott DeGoler had another opinion regarding the survey. “While close to 50 percent of tennis respondents said they favored the concept of adding a health club, I was disappointed

other survey questions were worded,” he said. “For instance, the survey noted the health club could be built ‘over the current footprint of tennis club’ resulting in the ‘destruction, replacement and relocation’ of up to six courts,” he said. “Obviously, most tennis members were not in favor of ‘destruction’ of their courts but perhaps didn’t understand that they would always have 12 courts and the ‘footprint’ impact may be minimal. As a Tennis Board member, I would have like to have seen and had input to the survey so that it was not misleading. However, I was not permitted to review it prior to distribution.” Van Den Berg said he is well aware of those who are questioning the survey. “The process we used in the survey is the exact same process being used by the Design Committee,” he said. “We set up a survey committee. The Board approved the survey and distributed it. So, I guess it depends on whether you like the answers or not or whether you agreed with the process.” McClanahan admits she initially voted for the Covenant Club feasibility study. “But at that time I was envisioning a smaller workout facility and a pool,” she said, adding she was not expecting a 15,000 to 17,000 square foot resort. McClanahan pointed out that most of the designs have a pool very close to the Tennis Club. She added that this noise factor does not fare well within the tennis culture. According to Van Den TURN TO SURVEY ON 20


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T he R ancho S anta F e News

Request for proposals for polo field lease extended By Bianca Kaplanek

REGION — A request for proposals for a potential new tenant on land best known as the polo fields was extended for 30 days after an interested party requested additional time. The proposer said a site visit raised “many previously unconsidered questions,” resulting in a need for more information to “assemble a viable proposal.” The new deadline is 4 p.m. Oct. 14. After that the city will convene a five-member review panel to assess all submissions. The final decision will be made by the San Diego City Council. The San Diego Polo Club, the current tenant, has submitted a proposal. “Polo would certainly like to be there,” said Steve Lewandowski, community relations director for the club and match announcer for the past 25 years. “We’ve been there for 29 years. This would give us a lot more ability to plan ahead.” A 120-acre site on the corner of Via de la Valle and El Camino Real was deeded in 1982 to the city of San Diego as mitigation for open space lost when increased residential development was allowed in the river valley. In October 1984 it was divided into two usable parcels. Sixty acres were designated for a polo facility and 20 were authorized

Association inches closer to broadband decision By Christina Macone-Greene gage both the Association

As the city of San Diego considers who should use the polo fields, its request for proposals was recently extended for 30 days. The new deadline is 4 p.m. Oct. 14. File photo by Bianca Kaplanek

for an equestrian center. The other 40 acres were to remain open space. In 1986 the San Diego Polo Club entered into a 26year lease, which expired on March 31, 2012. Because the property hadn’t been out to bid for more than two decades, city officials felt doing so was appropriate. But an RFP was never issued, primarily because of an ongoing project to widen El Camino Real. Since then the polo club has occupied the prop-

erty on a month-to-month basis. Polo classes, charity fundraisers, soccer and lacrosse tournaments, sporting games for college recruitment, seasonal sales, horse boarding and youth soccer practice also take place at the site. Those activities have come under fire from environmental groups such as the Friends of the San Dieguito River Valley. They say the current uses, along with the traffic and noise they generate, are negatively impacting the river

valley. According to the RFP, San Diego’s Real Estate Assets Department is seeking proposals to lease the property for activities, programs and operations in accordance with the deed. Each proposal should reflect the city’s goal to have an operator who provides a high level of service to the public and provides related activities in a fiscally responsible manner that preserves and improves TURN TO POLO FIELD ON 20

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RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Association gave center stage to John Honker, president of Magellan Advisors, to provide his comprehensive fiber optic feasibility study. Following an in-depth presentation, the Association agreed that the “partnership model” approach was the most optimal which triggered the unanimous approval for a RFQP (request for qualifications and proposals). The Association is readying to seek bids. Among the Association’s roster of tasks to tackle, bringing broadband services through fiber-optics to the Ranch has been a top-shelf priority for better Internet services. Honker wanted the Association and members in attendance to know that Magellan Advisors has helped communities across the country and developers both plan and implement broadband strategies. Over the past few months, Magellan has evaluated different options for Rancho Santa Fe. Reviewing different options, it was the partnership model which Honker encouraged. “Many communities across the country are moving to this,” he said, adding how it would en-

and the provider. He described it as a public private partnership. Honker went on to say that this co-investment would offer a “sharing of the returns in the network.” While a provider would receive their required rate of return, he said, royalties would also be generated back to Ranch Santa Fe. According to Honker, the partnership model created the greatest value for the community. “It does give you some buy-in and some stake in the network that the provider is bringing to the table depending on how much you decide to invest in,” he said. “Whether you decided to invest a very small amount to a very large amount, it will commensurate the amount of control and commensurate the amount of returns in revenue shares with that partner that you bring to the table.” Honker added that their company has seen communities across the nation taking part in this model. And in addition to getting better rates and services, communities are also receiving better control with the provider they ultimately choose. Honker said finding a TURN TO BROADBAND ON 20

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

OCT. 2, 2015

Opinion&Editorial

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of The Coast News

Community Commentary

The importance of completing the Coast to Crest Trail By Trish Boaz

Arnold helped pave the way for ‘the Donald’ California Focus By Thomas D. Elias Parallels between current presidential candidate Donald Trump and ex-California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger are myriad and obvious to anyone who cares to look. Both are celebrities with no need to spend money on getting-to-knowyou TV commercials like ordinary candidates for high office. Both went after political offices after pursuing lucrative careers not even slightly related to running a government. Each claimed not to need special interest money, since both are rolling in dough. Neither has shown the slightest worry about the rumors or reality of his womanizing past and (maybe) present. Voters male and female have never shown signs of worry about their personal indiscretions. Trump’s flashy campaign style, featuring his blue-painted personal jumbo jet and occasional rides for kids in his personal helicopter apes Schwarzenegger’s practice of constantly surrounding himself with klieg lights and aides attired in expensive leather jackets festooned with Arnold-related logos. Because he campaigned only in California, Schwarzenegger never needed a jumbo like Trump’s Boeing 757, but could make do with a mere private jet he kept at the Santa Monica Airport, not far from his home in Brentwood’s Mandeville Canyon. The similarities go on and on, the largest of them being that their support levels are never diminished by their errors, ignorance or sins. It’s almost as if both were Kardashians, members of a dynasty founded by a lawyer pal of accused and acquitted wife-killer O.J. Simpson, Robert Kardashian, who was long suspected of de-

stroying or hiding key evidence sought by police. That background has never held back any member of his clan. Nor has the way Arnold and The Donald ignore the old caution to “be sure brain is engaged before putting mouth into gear.” Several months into the campaign for next year’s Republican presidential nomination, Trump continues to lead the GOP field, where the No. 2 spot in the polls fluctuates unpredictably. As with Schwarzenegger, and decades earlier with actor Ronald Reagan, Democrats don’t yet see Trump as a serious threat. He puts foot in mouth at least once a week, rarely apologizing and never backing off what would be serious gaffes for any non-celebrity. Consistency also doesn’t matter, as Trump has changed positions on everything from abortion to immigration. When he entered politics, the muscleman actor Schwarzenegger didn’t have prior positions he could contradict. But he frequently broke promises, including the first one he made as a recall election candidate in 2003. Starting his run on NBC-TV’s Tonight Show, Schwarzenegger vowed never to accept “special interest” money. Then he immediately began accepting campaign contributions from oil companies, car dealers and almost any interest willing to write a check. He also promised to order an independent investigation into allegations he groped and otherwise sexually harassed women. It never happened. There were many others. Once he became governor, it quickly became clear Schwarzenegger had little notion of how to run America’s largest state government. He began by threatening public employee unions, who famously

whipped him in every ballot initiative contest they fought. He gave orders to the state attorney general, only to be reminded that independently-elected official did not work for him. He appointed a former utility company president to regulate that company as president of the California Public Utilities Commission. Would Trump, who has bragged about taking advantage of federal bankruptcy laws because “everyone else in my position does,” display similar desires to be a kind of strongman? There’s little doubt he would bring at least as much bombast to the office. Democrats who now belittle Trump’s White House chances because he doesn’t pepper his speeches with many facts or pay much heed to what he could do by himself if elected should remember Reagan, who as a campaigner also did not bother much with facts. When faced with tough questions in the early months of his winning 1980 campaign, he often turned toward the wings offstage, saying “I’ll let Ed (Meese) answer that one,” referring to a top aide he later appointed U.S. attorney general. When an opponent rattled off facts and pointed out his contradictions during debates, he grinned wryly into the camera and said, “There he goes again.” And he always won easily. So might Trump if Democrats keep taking him lightly. That’s the lesson for them from Reagan and Schwarzenegger, the only other big-time celebrities to seek the highest office they possibly could. Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated third edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com

Big ideas are born when people share their dreams and pull together to make things happen! A perfect example of this is the creation of an amazing river park in the center of the county, called the San Dieguito River Park. A small group of friends gathered around a dinner table in Del Mar to express their concerns about the alarming loss of wildlife habitat, sensitive plants and open space near their homes, due to the residential and commercial development boom of the ‘80s. Talk led to action and in 1986, this passionate crew formed the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy. Along with their predecessors, the San Dieguito Lagoon Committee and the Friends of the San Dieguito River Valley, they gained the attention of their local elected officials and other leaders who realized that the need for housing, public facilities and infrastructure for a growing population needed to be balanced with conservation of our natural and cultural resources. And so, the San Dieguito

River Park Joint Powers Authority was created to develop and implement the vision of the 55-mile-long San Dieguito River Park and the Coast to Crest Trail that stretches from the Del Mar shoreline to the Julian mountains. During the last 29 years, a lot of sweat equity has gone into planning and constructing the 35 miles of the Coast to Crest Trail that are now open to the public, along with an additional 20 miles of trails that connect local communities to the Coast to Crest Trail. The Coast to Crest Trail provides the community with access to our beautiful parks and open spaces including the San Dieguito Lagoon, a state marine- conservation area, and a popular spot for birds along the Pacific Flyway. The trek from Santa Fe Valley, through Del Dios Gorge to Lake Hodges, over the David Kretizer Pedestrian Bicycle Bridge (the longest stress-ribbon bridge in the world!), past historic Sikes Adobe, and through San Pasqual Valley are 23 continuous miles of pure heaven right in our own backyard. Trails at Volcan Moun-

tain lead to the summit, rewarding hikers with amazing views of the Anza Borrego State Park, Cuyamaca State Park, Cleveland National Forest and the San Dieguito and San Diego River watersheds, including downtown San Diego and the Pacific Ocean. Along with our partners, we are making huge strides in completing key linkages of the Coast to Crest Trail at Lusardi Creek, Pamo Valley and Santa Ysabel. We are fortunate to have a trail that traverses urban, rural and remote areas of the county, providing us with an array of scenic vistas, sights of beautiful plants and wildlife, smells of nature and great exercise. The momentum to complete the Coast to Crest Trail continues to build and support for the trail grows as people become more aware of its existence and experience it for themselves. You really do feel a sense of place —and peace—when you are on the Coast to Crest Trail. But don’t take our word for it—come see for yourself! Trish Boaz is executive director of the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy.

Letters to the Editor Violated by settlement Am I the only citizen in our county who feels violated by this settlement? If I understand it correctly the taxpayers will fork out nearly a third of $1 million to avoid greater exposure caused as a result of the misuse of our tax dollars by Supervisor Dave Roberts. And he is still in office! Aren’t there ethics that govern behavior of our supervisors? Aren’t there laws in place that might protect

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER Jim Kydd MANAGING EDITOR Tony Cagala ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Chris Kydd ACCOUNTING BeCKy roland

the Carlsbad City Council is not only endorsing the Caruso project without going through proper channels, but lending their sanction to Caruso’s propaganda to discouraging citizens from voting on the matter. This is not the forward thinking city I moved to 39 years ago, and certainly not the City Council memJeff Tuttle, bers I intend to vote for Oceanside again.

the taxpayer from “inappropriate” use of county funds? I realize that only a moronic electorate would re-elect this man but I am skeptical about our future if there is nothing in place as a deterrent save the possibility of not staying in office while, once again, a docile, dumbstruck electorate picks up the tab!

Council endorses Caruso How is it possible that

Kathryn Casler Parker, Carlsbad

Rancho Santa Fe newS P.O. Box 232550, Encinitas, CA 92023-2550 • 760-436-9737 theranchosantafenews.com • Fax: 760-943-0850

THE RANCH’S BEST SOURCE FOR LOCALNEWS

COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR Jean gilleTTe STAFF REPORTER aaron Burgin ellen WrighT DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER savannah lang GRAPHIC ARTIST Phyllis miTChell ADVERTISING SALES KrisTa Confer sue oTTo CIRCULATION MANAGER BreT Wise

Contributing writers ChrisTina maCone-greene BianCa KaPlaneK bkaplanek@coastnewsgroup.com Promise yee Pyee@coastnewsgroup.com david Boylan e’louise ondash

franK mangio Jay Paris Photographer Bill reilly info@billreillyphotography.com Contact the Editor Tony Cagala tcagala@coastnewsgroup.com


OCT. 2, 2015

5

T he R ancho S anta F e News

Eco kits bring environmental awareness into the classrooms By Tony Cagala

ESCONDIDO — The half-dozen or so fish swam blissfully unaware that they’ve been intertwined in a symbiotic relationship with the rows of small leafy green plants sprouting just above them. But for anyone observing the aquarium, one of nature’s cycles was on full display — the swimming fish and their waste providing nutrients enough for the seeds to sprout and grow, and the plants’ roots filtering the water, providing oxygen enough for the fish to breathe. Apart from fish food and electricity, nothing else was needed for the process to occur in this way. “It’s a self-sufficient little loop,” said Morgan Bailey, Ph.D., operations director at ECOLIFE, the Escondido-based nonprofit that has been putting together these aquaponics kits they’re calling the ECO-CYCLE. The idea behind the kits initially was to try and reach as many people as possible, explained Mike Ready, ECOLIFE’s aquaponics program manager. Even as aquaponics has been around for a very long time, Ready said they realized it would be difficult to convert people that were already involved in the traditional methods of farming. Aquaponics is a way of showing a different model of doing things, said Bailey.

Students at a San Diego County school observe one of nature’s cycles through an ECO-CYCLE kit. The kits are from the Escondido-based nonprofit ECOLIFE. Photo by Mike Ready

And so the nonprofit turned to students around the nation with the idea that the younger minds could view the world and their interactions with the environment differently to form a new foundation of solutions to some of the larger issues facing the next generations.

So far, more than 400 kits have been installed in classrooms around the country, with about 375 of them in San Diego County schools, according to Bailey. ECOLIFE is donating some of the kits to local schools, including within the Vista Unified School District and in Escondido.

Starting next week, Vista will receive teacher training and 15 kits for use in classrooms around the district. And later in the year 15 more kits will go into Escondido school classrooms. Monte Vista Elementary received a kit last year. Their school was the first

in Vista’s school district to receive one of the kits, according to the Monte Vista Elementary’s Principal Charlene Smith. Smith applied for the kit as part of a fifth-grade classroom service-learning project in conjunction with Solutions Farms, also based in Vista.

“The students were investigating different solutions for repurposing fish sediment that collects in the pump,” she said. “And the children actually got to see the plants growing and the fish growing and feeding off of the plants and they got to see the whole cycle.” The classroom is using the kit once again this year, Smith said. “It’s real-life experience,” she added. “This brought it right into the classroom and they got to live it everyday…it was practical experience for them.” Kait Cole, outreach coordinator at ECOLIFE, said, from the teacher’s perspective, the kit is a new tool for them to use. It’s a way to visually learn complex science standards such as the nitrogen cycle and photosynthesis, beyond the textbooks, she added. Apart from the scientific components being taught is the side benefit of kids learning about healthy eating. If a student watches kale grow, for instance, Cole explained, they might be more eager to try it, rather than have it show up on a plate in front of them. “A lot of kids, they don’t necessarily know where their food comes from, especially in urban San Diego areas…and this TURN TO KITS ON 20

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6

T he R ancho S anta F e News

OCT. 2, 2015

Building a community of music lovers Voices from the Village

F

By Gail Kendall

Retired broadcast news anchor Susan Taylor visits with the Rancho Santa Fe Senior Center. Photo by Christina Macone-Greene

Former news anchor visits RSF Senior Center By Christina Macone-Greene her father’s doctor was

RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Senior Center was filled to hear Susan Taylor, a former news anchor for NBC San Diego. After retiring from broadcast journalism a few years ago, Taylor decided to embark on a new career venture with Scripps Health as their executive director and external affairs. “I was in the TV news business for more than 30 years,” she said. “I came to work at Scripps because of a very complicated open heart surgery that my father had back in 2008. He was in a coma for almost two months,” she said. During this time, Taylor was dividing her time between being with her father at the hospital, spending time with her husband and son, and anchoring morning and evening shows for NBC San Diego. Taylor said she would sometimes return to Scripps at midnight and

also there trying to figure out the right combination of things to save her dad’s life. “And he did,” she said. Taylor said the people in CCU worked 24 hours a day, around the clock, to keep her father alive. During that time, Taylor was impressed with the culture and how the hospital truly treated everyone like family. It was an exclusive environment to work in, she said. As that realization emerged, Taylor admitted that she wasn’t home as much as she wanted to be in her current line of work. “I had a small window of opportunity left to be with my family before our son went off to college,” she said. Taylor continued, “I thought perhaps I should stop talking about car chases, murders, rapes and fires and talk about creating things. And that’s TURN TO TAYLOR ON 20

or the past 16 years, one of the best tickets in town has been a subscription to Community Concerts of Rancho Santa Fe. Ticket holders enjoy an eclectic variety of musicians from across the word with the added benefits of wine (compliments of Northern Trust), hors d’oeuvres, a coffee and dessert bar plus free parking with no need to travel downtown. This easy-going approach to top-tier entertainment has kept subscribers coming back year after year. And the new season starting Oct. 9 promises to be the best ever featuring award-winning Canadian vocalists Vivace followed in the coming months by big band performers, country rock artists and a famed Celtic music troupe. Community Concerts started with classical mu-

Gail Kendall

sic troupes and pre-concert gatherings featuring potluck suppers at the Rancho Santa Fe Garden Club. The increasing number of patrons and festive atmosphere eventually outgrew this venue and the music expanded to include rock, folk, R&B and big-band headliners. The resulting concert series now held at the Village Church Fellowship Hall has been a resounding hit. Thanks to a partnership with Live on Stage, a professional representative of outstanding musical talent, Community Concerts is able to bring exciting talent to North County each fall

and spring. Attendees continue to rave about the performers and they continue to donate thousands of dollars to help Community Concerts with its extensive outreach efforts. This concert series really does emphasize the community by hosting free mini-concerts for local school children. On a regular basis, scheduled artists meet with grade school or high school students, encouraging young people to learn more about music. The musicians regale the students with stories about how they got started, enlighten them about their musical genre and instruments, and answer lots and lots of questions. Over the past several years several Community Concerts musical artists have spent afternoons at Roger Rowe Middle School, La Jolla Country Day, Camp Pendleton Middle School, The Cambridge School, The Preuss School UCSD, and Canyon Crest High School. This year country rock band Savannah Jack will bring their tight harmonies

and incredible musicianship to a very lucky local school. Thanks to generous donors, Community Concerts will extend its reach in the coming years by awarding grants to fund school musical programs which may include paying for instruments, band uniforms or trips to musical competitions all in an effort toward fostering the next generation of San Diego musical talent. This season’s concert line-up is already generating a great deal of excitement with ticket sales at a steady pace. Plans are in the works for a special 2016 springtime concert featuring a 10-piece band and vocalists in a dinner-theater format. It will be the perfect way to cap off another great season for Community Concerts of Rancho Santa Fe. For more information on the current season or to order tickets, please visit ccrsf.org. Gail Kendall is president of the board of directors, Community Concerts of Rancho Santa Fe.

Rancho Santa Fe homeowners form group RANCHO SANTA FE — In June 2015, a group of Rancho Santa Fe homeowners got together to discuss the proposed Covenant Club (CC) and to trade any information they had regarding the site, the financing, and the scope. It became quite clear that there were so many unsubstantiated rumors floating around the room that the group decided they needed to unravel the facts and to form an educated opinion regarding the proposed project — thus the RSF Homeowners Group was formed. The information and opinions may be accessed by anyone through their website at rsfhomeownersgroup.com. The group felt that the process of the Covenant Club Committee was flawed. The information was

not being disseminated in a clear and easy way that the community could follow. No one was sure that the proposed Covenant Club was going to be built with the understated elegance that is in keeping with the Rancho Santa Fe way of life. Tom Ault, chairman of the group, said, “The homeowners in the room decided to create a formal group with a steering committee which would and does meet once a week. Our goals and objectives are to ensure that any pool/fitness center is designed in keeping with the unique ambience of the Ranch. “Many of us are golf and tennis club members and we felt a need to protect the RSF Golf Club and RSF Tennis Club from any changes that might jeopardize their mission and vision. As all of

us are homeowners, we wanted to ensure that in keeping with Covenant precedents, any new club in RSF, including the proposed pool/fitness center, is paid for and financially sustained by its own membership.” The RSF Homeowners Group started with 20 Covenant homeowners, and is currently around 300 homeowners and growing daily. “It’s a testament to the hunger for information that is not easily or clearly obtained,” Ault said. The steering committee gathers information from the Association, The CC Design Review Committee, The CC Membership/Marketing Committee, The CC Financial Committee and all public presentations. They read all information relevant to the project, and share what they learn

with members. Important dates are posted as well so the members can participate in any open meetings. Bill Johnson, chairman in charge of communications, said, “We will analyze the facts and based on that information, we will determine if the project aligns with our mission and objectives. If not, we will oppose it. “If we decide to oppose the project, we will coordinate a campaign to inform all RSF residents why we oppose it and ask for their support and vote. We feel it is imperative that all homeowners have an informed and educated opinion on how the CC project will affect the Ranch before they vote. For more information visit rsfhomeownersgroup.com

Community Center’s golf classic is Oct. 19 RANCHO SANTA FE — The Board of Directors of the The Rancho Santa Fe Community Center has announced it will hold its 22nd Annual “All Fore the Community” Golf Classic Oct. 19, at the exclusive Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club. The tournament is open to the public and will feature

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an 18-hole scramble and include a putting contest, buffet lunch, tee prizes and an “All Fore Fun” After Party featuring a cocktail reception, gourmet dinner, hosted bar, awards ceremony and silent and live auctions. The tournament will feature an exciting Holein-One opportunity to win a Hoehn Motors 2015 Cadillac CTS. Major sponsors include: Hoehn Motors, Denise Phillips and James Tone, The Kim Family, The Moran Family, Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch LLP, Rancho Valencia Resort, The Seltzer Family, and The Wohlford Family. Tee Sponsors include: Beautiful Smiles of La Jolla, Carlsbad Golf Center, Rancho Santa Fe Insurance,

Carlsbad Golf Center and Watersedge Landscape. Registration begins at 10 a.m. followed by a buffet lunch and a shotgun start at noon. Player fee is $350 per player and includes admission to the “All Fore Fun” After Party. Additional after party tickets are $100 per guest. All proceeds from the tournament benefit the RSF Community Center, a nonprofit, 501(C)3 organization serving the community through youth-after-school classes, sports leagues and a variety of activities for all ages. For player and sponsorship information contact the Community Center at (858) 756-2461, by email at events@rsfcc.org or visit rsfcc.org.


OCT. 2, 2015

Crafting North County: Local Brewers Selling Out? crafting north county vince vasquez

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arlier this month, international conglomerate MillerCoors announced it was purchasing majority control of St. Archer Brewing Company, a craft brewer based in Mira Mesa. While some criticized the move as selling out to Big Beer, it opens a key industry leadership opportunity for North County. Unlike prior acquisitions of American craft brewers, few details were disclosed about the St. Archer-MillerCoors agreement. The financial condition and management status of St. Archer have not been disclosed, nor at this point are they likely to be. There is some evidence to suggest that this sale may be providing some sorely needed debt relief and personnel restructuring. On a positive note, pay, benefits and hours are likely to increase for workers. Product quality will also certainly improve with the professional guidance and vast resources of one of the world’s largest breweries. Historically, most corporate acquisitions in San Diego have ended up with the local company closing up shop and shipping good-paying jobs to the headquarters of the new parent company, all for cost-saving purposes. It’s clear that that won’t happen with St. Archer and MillerCoors. St. Archer has announced it is staying in San Diego, and MillerCoors has been in the midst of a strategic corporate reorganization, relying more on their “craft” portfolio and producing less beer overall. Long term, it will be leaning on St. Archer and other acquisitions like it for growth and profitability. Over the coming years, we can reasonably expect more craft brewers to be partnering with, or be purchased by, international beverage conglomerates, including those based in San Diego. For North County’s 30-plus breweries and brewpubs, such a move would be a major shake-up in a community that prides itself on a strong reputation for independent, artisan, high-quality brews. Lucrative offers will certainly be forthcoming. Would a Big Beer acquisition in North County be bad for local business? It depends on who you ask. Complicating matters is that craft brewers nationwide have struggled to define what it means to be “craft.” When a craft brewer sells their business or partners with a macro brewer,

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there is also no formal process to determine whether they’re still part of the craft community. Perhaps there should be one — starting in North County. An accredited certifying agent that certifies craft breweries and brewpubs in the United States could provide both the industry and consumers some needed guidance. A rigorous review process could determine whether a brewer is craft — and when it ceases to be. Distinctive product seals could identify certified craft beers, providing important information in a marketplace distorted by “crafty” marketing and million dollar ad campaigns. It’s important to note that one of the world’s most prominent organic food certification agencies, Quality Assurance International, has been based in San Diego for more than 25 years. A craft beer certification agency based in North County would complement the presence of major craft brewers in our backyard, including Stone Brewing Company based in Escondido, and Mother Earth Brewing in Vista. I don’t begrudge St. Archer for selling control of their business to SABMiller. There is no singular path to success in the brewing industry. Still, the craft brewing community needs to come to terms with their rapid pace of growth, and the need to seize control of their collective craft “brand.” Otherwise, marketing dollars from their competitors will do it for them. Vince Vasquez is a policy analyst at an economic think tank based in Torrey Pines. He is a Carlsbad resident.  

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A peek into the Vibrancy Committee By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — Rancho Santa Fe Association board President Ann Boon, shared with members and fellow board directors updates about the Village Planning Task Force. Since the official announcement, she said, several meetings have taken place and an “active subcommittee” named the Vibrancy Committee has emerged. In an effort to revitalize the Village, Boon wanted everyone to know that SLP Urban Planning, owned by covenant resident Stacey Pennington, would help navigate the creation of some revitalizing experiences. Along with Pennington, co-chairs of the Vibrancy Committee also coined as the “Village Vibe” are Sarah Neal and Janet Lawless Christ. Boon then turned the topic over to Pennington whose Power Point presentation highlighted future events for the Village. Pennington grew up in RSF and wanted to help reinvigorate the Village she once knew.

I’ve become an urban planner where much of my professional focus has been in the efforts to revitalize Downtown San Diego, but they’ve also been frankly all over the world.” Ann Boon RSF Association Board President

Now having returned to the Ranch with her own family, her professional expertise can help assist with the Association’s goals. “I’ve become an urban planner where much of my professional focus has been in the efforts to revitalize Downtown San Diego, but they’ve also been frankly all over the world,” she said. After speaking up at a couple of board meetings, she said, it occurred to Pennington that her experience and expertise could assist the Village. Pennington wanted everyone to know that the purpose of this committee

was to work with the community, stakeholders and the existing entities in town to truly create a renewed energy within the Village. And not only just day-to-day, she said, but a more community charged level with long-term planning efforts. “One of the best ways to gather community engagement is through the activation of the Village,” she said. “So it’s basically community gatherings that form the future of Rancho Santa Fe Village.” She went on to say that Village Vibe intends to organize a series of gatherings to bring the community togeth-

er and a forum to reengage. Pennington outlined how one layer would be on a casual rotating biweekly basis. The other layer, she said, would be seasonal events where they would collaborate with the Inn, school, and community center. These bi-weekly Village events will be held on Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. This timeframe compliments the RSF Secret Car Club’s weekend car show. “We refer to it as a popup event, but that basically just means that for a few hours you’d see activities, lawn games, seats, tables and chairs and, maybe a fashion vendor or two,” she said, noting that these were the examples to add a little more fun in the dynamics of the Village. Events are slated to begin in late September. Seasonal family events include Oktoberfest on Sept. 27 at the Inn as well as Halloween. The Inn will be creating their Haunted House which Pennington called a TURN TO VIBRANCY ON 20

Everyone coming has been here before small talk jean gillette These things seem so obvious, once I‘m up to my neck in them, but it appears I will breath my last still learning things the hard way. What I learned today is, don’t ignore all your home maintenance projects until the week before your daughter’s wedding at said home. Yeah, I know. Duh. And presume that at least one major appliance or fixture will break, leak or die. The thing is, they seem important until now when everyone will be marching through my backyard and house noticing things. What? They won’t notice? I can never be convinced of that. And yes, fixtures have leaked and died, so the last several days have included calling the plumber and buying a new printer. Then I set about taking

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down the old, tired vertical blinds that have been ignored for 20 years. Once down, nail holes had to be spackled, matching paint had to be dug up in the garage and then, of course, a

fast facelift to the stained walls above the window. The exciting news is it actually worked and looks pretty good. Oh, did I mention I tried to touch up my living

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OCT. 2, 2015

St. Roch springs back to life 10 years after Katrina hit the road e’louise ondash

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his month marks 10 years since Hurricane Katrina smashed into the Gulf Coast, and we all remember the horrific images of New Orleans’ residents hanging on for dear life in so many ways. Recent media coverage has demonstrated how the Crescent City has been resurrected in some areas but is struggling in others. The historic St. Roch neighborhood took its hits, but is springing back to life. Never heard of St. Roch? “We are located be- A historic park in New Orleans’ French Quarter, Jackson Square is a National Historic Landmark. It is named tween the Ninth Ward and after President Andrew Jackson who proved himself a hero at the Battle of New Orleans, the final major the French Quarter — a battle of the War of 1812. Jackson prevented the British from taking the city. Photo by Jeff Anding few blocks from the river,” explains Myron Clark, recently promoted to manager at St. Roch Market, an old building enjoying an incarnation as a new restaurant — or perhaps more accurately, as 13 new Learn about these important Social Security facts, including: businesses. • What is the current status of Social Security? ank you, This gloriously re• When is the optimal time for you to start collecting Social Security? As a special th ceive re stored building, which beall guests will l • How can you maximize benefits for yourself and your spouse? a FREE Socia gan as an open-air market e: • What are delayed retirement credits? Security Guid in 1875, has been through • How can you coordinate Social Security benefits several incarnations. with other retirement assets to maximize your retirement? It was closed during the Depression and slated Join Us for our Special Workshops on the following dates: for demolition, but residents came to its rescue. October 13, 14, 15 & 17 Call For More Details Their protests were heard, We are expecting a capacity audience and seating is limited, and in 1937, the market so please guarantee your reservations was restored by the Works Today by calling Serena at 760-642-2678. Progress Administration (WPA), one of President Brett Gottlieb, Investment Advisor Representative, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s California Insurance License #OC68886 Advisory services offered through Legacy Road, LLC, programs that put despera Registered Investment Advisor. ate people to work. Comprehensive Advisor and Legacy Road, LLC are unaffiliated. The market was a sea(We do not provide specific legal or tax advice, nor promote, market or recommend any tax plan or arrangement. Please consult a tax and/or legal professional for guidance with your own individual situation.) food restaurant during the

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Royal Street in New Orleans’ French Quarter dates to the French colonial era and is considered to be the epicenter for local art and high-end shops, galleries, hotels and restaurants. Photo by Jeff Anding

‘60s and ‘70s, then was nearly destroyed by Katrina. After the hurricane, St. Roch Market sat idle for a decade, “then renovation started in 2010 and lasted until 2014,” explained co-owner Will Donaldson. “It’s been opened for about six months and we have a full complement of vendors.” Which means that all 13 “stalls” in the gorgeous, elegant interior are occupied and offering a diverse menu of produce and foods from the world over. The offerings include local produce (this vendor supplies other vendors in the market); an oyster bar; exotic waffles; fresh sea-

food and seafood dishes; Nigerian cuisine; gourmet baked goods (gluten-free and vegan selections available daily); and something called Koreole, “a little bit of Creole flavor with traditional Korean dishes.” The St. Roch neighborhood, named after the patron saint of good health, earned its moniker from the saint considered to be the patron of good health. A German priest who immigrated to New Orleans promised during the yellow fever epidemics of 1867 and 1878 that if no one died in his parish, he would build a chapel in honor of St. Roch. No one died in either TURN TO HIT THE ROAD ON 20


OCT. 2, 2015

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Conquering arthritis: From herbs to stem cells Living in ‘no This article is the fourth in a series of educational pieces by Alexandra R. Bunyak, MD; she is the founder of the innovative regenerative medicine practice BOUNDLESS, a sports, spine, and arthritis care clinic in Encinitas. Arthritis is an ancient degenerative condition — evidence of its ravages can be found in all animals dating back to the dinosaurs — but the most modern of scientific knowledge and techniques are being used to manage and even conquer its effects. Strategies from herbal therapies to the latest stem cell treatment are helping people decrease symptoms, improve function, and delay or avoid joint replacement surgery. What follows are answers to questions patients are asking in my clinic. What is arthritis and what are the different types? Arthritis is defined as pain, stiffness, and inflammation of the joints. There are two main categories of arthritis: 1. Inflammatory arthritis (ex: rheumatoid arthritis): a set of less common conditions causing severe inflammation of multiple joints at once and associated with systemic autoimmune disease, and 2. Degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis): charac-

3. There are a multitude of anti-inflammatory supplements on the market, including tumeric, ginger, boswellia, glucosamine, and flavocoxids, that help reduce inflammation without the side effects of pharmaceutical anti-inflammatories such as Advil.

Join Dr. Alexandra R. Bunyak at Carlsbad’s Dove Library Oct. 13 at 12:30 p.m. to learn more about the scientific advances in regenerative medicine. Courtesy photo

terized by damage to the cartilage, instability of the joint, milder inflammation, and bony overgrowth of one or a few of joints. The majority of my patients have this more common type of arthritis. Is surgery the only option for osteoarthritis? Today we are no longer limited to passively waiting for the arthritis to reach severe enough proportions to require joint replacement. Additionally, many joints do not have an effective replacement option at this time. Recent advances in arthritis treatment allow us to help stabilize the joints, decrease inflammation, and stimulate regrowth of

cartilage, potentially slowing arthritis progression and improving pain and function for years. What are the best natural/ holistic approaches for arthritis? There are many things you can do yourself to improve your arthritis symptoms: 1. Engage in physical activity: shown to improve joint stability, decrease abnormal stresses by improving muscular control, improve nutritional supply to the joints, and control weight and inflammation. 2. Diet plays a key role: make sure you eat an anti-inflammatory diet rich in necessary nutrients for joint health.

tion. Research has shown that these treatments can regrow cartilage and increase the stability of a joint. Of these, fat-derived stem cell therapies appear to be the most effective in moderate to severe arthritis, helping over 90 percent of arthritis sufferers appreciate relief of pain and In addition, there are improvement of function many natural/holistic ap- for years. proaches that are available to you with the help of your How do I know which reintegrative/regenerative generative approach I musculoskeletal physician: should choose? Each regenerative 1. Conservative options, including heel wedg- treatment has strengths es and bracing, biome- and weaknesses, and each chanical evaluation and patient needs to be evalucorrection, mind/body ated individually to craft approaches, therapeutic the best treatment plan. laser therapy, topical an- At BOUNDLESS, we offer ti-inflammatories, and nu- multiple regenerative optritional testing/optimiza- tions, including both bone marrow and fat-derived tion 2. Minimally invasive stem cell treatments, altherapies and regenerative lowing us to help each painjections, including your tient achieve their best own growth factors and result. adult stem cells to boost the health and stability of How can I learn more? Join Dr. Bunyak at your joints. 12:30 p.m. Oct. 13, at the What are regenerative in- Dove main branch library jections and how do they in Carlsbad as she discusses scientific advancements work? Regenerative injec- in regenerative medicine tions, including prolother- as they relate to arthritis. The free talk will last apy, platelet rich plasma injections, and adult stem for about 40 minutes, folcell therapies, are thought lowed by a Q&A session. to work by naturally stim- For more information, visit ulating your own systems feelboundless.com or call of healing and regenera- (760) 632-1090.

Solar’s economic benefit to run out up to a year early San Diego County homeowners are taking advantage of the economic benefits of installing solar systems at higher rate than other counties, so much that the benefits will soon be gone. One of the two main economic drivers behind the stellar growth of solar, over $4 billion in the last three years, is on track to expire up to a year early. The Net Energy Meter policy, which allows early adopters to sell their surplus energy to SDG&E at full retail price, will be exhausted early. The expiration date of the tariff states the end of 2016, but a clause also capped the benefit to consumers at just 5 percent, and this trigger could be enacted as soon as the beginning of 2016. The other primary economic driver, the IRS 30 percent Investors Tax Credit (ITC) Tax Credit, in which you get a tax credit for almost one-third of the system’s price against your tax liabilities, will expire at the end of 2016. Together, these policies bring the cost of delivered power down to less than 6 cents a KiloWatt, which is about the wholesale price that the State’s Electric Utilities pay on the wholesale market, known as CA ISO, or Cali-

Solar’s Smart business focus is on installing large solar systems that are elegant and modeled on the timeless architectural elements such as pergolas and ramadas. Courtesy image

fornia Independent System Operator. The latest analysis of the amount of solar deployed, conducted by the energy firm, Solar’s Smart, using SDG&E’s interconnection data, states that the solar reserve is already 75 percent exhausted. The firm is introducing the Solar Ramada tm that is a dual use solar structure that also provides an elegant, upscale outdoor entertainment space for large estates. By designing a pergola like structure that architecturally blends into the estates design line homeowners can avoid the unsightly look of solar modules stuck all over the roof. The Solar Ramadatm costs

the same as roof mounted or industrial-looking ground mount systems but serves as an architectural complement to the estate instead of a net negative, which some aesthetically perceive the retrofitted systems to be. Solar’s Smart is focused on large energy consumers who have tasteful, large estates by designing and installing elegant, upscale solar structures that are modeled on the timeless architectural elements of pergolas and ramadas in the tradition of noted architects Irving J. Gill and Lillian Rice, who supplemented their outstanding San Diego estate designs with these structures that also provided shade, outside en-

tertainment space and a focal point off the courtyards and rear yard areas which were elegant in their simplicity and beautiful. Solar’s Smart repurposing of these structures for hidden solar arrays, designed to harvest the sun for you day after day, attest to the firm’s sensitivity to high-end architectural residences in the Rancho Santa Fe area and inland coastal areas. Many owners who have invested millions in their estates don’t like the look of solar panels scattered all over the roofs of their residences, for those owners, Solar’s Smart has an integrated property enhancement solution that is a double-duty, upscale element

that not only is structured to save you money but also provide you energy independence for the next 25 years, as well as a great outdoor entertainment space. The firm’s analysis of the solar deployment rate indicates that once the information about the expiration of the NEM economic benefits become widely known that an accelerated market reaction will absorb remaining CAP percentage quickly. The California Law makes the NEM contract available, “On a FirstCome-First-Served basis” until the 5 percent cap is reached, afterwards SDG&E is not obligated to offer the NEM contract to additional customers, which directly affects the investments rate of return and payoff schedule, according to Mark Miller, CEO of Solar’s Smart, who is a certified NABCEP energy professional. For those early adopters, independent researchers have found that a purchase of a solar system for your home is a better investment than the stock market, according to the report, “Forget Stocks, Invest In Solar Panels,” from the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center, which is available at SolarsSmart.com

man’s land’: Supportive cancer treatments

Many cancer patients find themselves in the place that we have come to call, “No Man’s Land.” They are patients who have: 1) Received treatment for their cancer, usually surgical removal, or 2) They have decided to decline conventional treatment for their cancer. In either of these cases, their question is: “What’s next?” Although no one can guarantee what the next step should be, many are discovering that the key is found in secondary prevention and testing to ensure that the original tumor is gone. There is an emerging science developing

In either of these cases, their question is: “What’s next?” to assist in determining the likelihood of a person’s cancer returning and whether they should still seek some form of treatment when they find themselves in the “No Man’s Land.” For example, recent scientific literature shows that the existence and the amount of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood can help to predict recurrences. This has been a useful marker in monitoring cancer for treatment. The aim is to reduce this value to as close to zero as possible, and then continue to monitor it over the next several years. With the rates of cancer continually increasing, as well as the rates of cancer recurrence, more and more people are striving to improve their lifestyles and seeking treatments that will help them to lower the risk of cancer and its reoccurrence. Whether you’re in the battle, or living in the post cancer treatment stage Quantum Functional Medicine in Carlsbad, Calif. offers multiple treatment modalities designed to reduce the CTC count and nutritional support plans to assist you in maintaining your quality of life, so that cancer will be less likely to reoccur. For more information on the services offered, or to book a consult please contact them at (760) 585-4616 or qfmed.com.


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Equestrians have the opportunity to take part in a horse lecture series presented by Castle in the Sky Productions. Courtesy photo

OCT. 2, 2015

Holistic lifestyle and exercise coach Kate Deering was the guest speaker for her book, “How To Heal Your Metabolism.” Photo by Christina Macone-Greene

Alessandra Deerinck talks equine Having a healthy By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — During the month of September, equestrians had the opportunity to take part in a horse lecture series, The Equestrian Life, championed by international horse trainer, Alessandra Deerinck. The weekly lectures were divided into two categories: adults and families. While the Rancho Santa Fe Library was the venue, the series was presented by Castle in the Sky Productions. A native of Italy, Deerinck discovered her desire for horses 40 years ago. “Horses are my passion,” she said. Deerinck relayed that her parents were worried about her riding horses for fear she would get injured. But she followed her goals and was an equestrian in elementary school, high school and in college. Then race horses caught her attention. “I raced as a jockey for 12 years,” she said. “Later on, I got seriously hurt and stopped racing, and I moved to this country.”

The Equestrian Life, horse lecture series is championed by international horse trainer Alessandra Deerinck. Photo by Christina Macone-Greene

And that’s when a new chapter of equine knowledge emerged for her. Deerinck rode dressage and hunter jumper. Also a doctor of veterinary medicine, she studied horses from every vantage point and found a way to communicate with them with the unspoken language of a human code. Deerinck developed a code called Human Horse Sensing also known as HH Sensing. The mission of HH Sensing is to teach horse owners how to interact with their equines so that the animals participate freely.

“I want people to learn that when they are with horses, they can actually communicate with them,” she said. “I’m teaching them a code that they can use.” Deerinck teaches students locally, and also globally, online. “There are ways to actually communicate with horses without having to train them,” she said. For both the adult and family lecture series, Deerinck was able to tailor her message to those who had no background with horses to those who did despite

whatever equine discipline they were involved in. Attendee of the lecture series, Jane Fraser, said she has taken part in all of them. “On the property where I live we have a couple of new ponies and I wanted to learn more about horses and Alessandra talks about the body language of horses and that has been a tremendous help to me in learning how to approach the ponies,” she said. Fraser continued, “It has been great fun and reading her magazine articles in the Elite Equestrian Magazine has been helpful.” Fraser went on to say that attending the consecutive lectures has been a wonderful experience. The mission of HH Sensing is to have a pure relationship between humans and horses. Deerinck wants people to know that if they are interested in exploring this new approach to their equestrian experience that she would be happy to hear from them. To learn more visit hhsensing.com.

metabolism paves the way to weight loss By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — At RSF Library’s integrative health lecture series, holistic lifestyle and exercise coach Kate Deering was the guest speaker for her book, “How To Heal Your Metabolism.” For Deering, one has to become healthy to lose weight and not lose weight to become healthy. Deering, a Del Mar resident, offered a fresh perspective for those in attendance. She presented her own personal story. “I’ve been in the health and fitness industry for probably 25 years, and quite honestly, my journey through that industry created a lot of bad habits and a lot of damage to my own metabolism unknowingly,” she said. Deering added that she was unaware of the severe damage that was being done either through a trendy diet program or excessive exercise. Through the research for her book, she learned that metabolism is the sum of every metabolic or chemical process occurring in a person’s body. Metabolism converts and utilizes food as energy. However, in-

creasing it through exercise may not be the desired approach. “In a sense we are utilizing more energy, but we’re taking away from some of the systems in our body to give to the other parts of our body,” said Deering, noting how the digestive system, immune system, and detox systems may be suffering. Doing this in the long term, bodies learn to be efficient. “And ultimately we don’t want to teach our bodies to be efficient. We want them to be able to utilize lots of energy so they can support all the systems of your body so that you can actually live a healthier, longer life,” she said. Deering also believes that for those who are 50 and above, they do not need to resign themselves to a slow metabolism. According to Deering, she wants people to stop blaming age on a sluggish metabolism. “It’s more of a matter of probably how many years you’ve been damaging your metabolic rate, and so a lot of people, the longer they’re alive, the more damage they’ve done with chronic dieting,” she said. “They’ve been eating the wrong foods, and they’ve basically put themselves in a place where metabolically things aren’t working very well anymore. So weight loss becomes challenging.” Before people try to lose weight again, Deering pointed out, they need to become healthier. Individuals need to increase their metabolic TURN TO WEIGHT LOSS ON 20

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CALENDAR

den Road, San Marcos.

OCT. 4 Know something that’s going HOMELESS HAND on? Send it to calendar@ UP The Alliance for Recoastnewsgroup.com gional Solutions Oct. 10 Homeless Connect event, still needs volunOCT. 2 TREASURE HUNT- teers and resources. This ING You can drop off event designed to reach items for the Ocean Knoll out to the homeless comElementary School’s Oct. munity. If you can offer 3 Rummage Sale between services or would like to 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 2, volunteer, contact Steve at the school, 910 Mel- Bassett at (760) 521-8722 ba Road, Encinitas. The or pstrsteve7777@gmail. sale runs from 7:30 a.m. com. Services still needto noon Oct. 3, to benefit ed include haircuts, dencosts for its sixth-grade tal exams, veterinarian camp. For more informa- services representative, tion, contact jodie.pax- local VA programs, legal assistance and help with ton@genesys.com. SCREAM ZONE Hal- job applications. Services loween season’s Scream will include flu shots, Zone at the Del Mar Fair- medical screenings, Cal grounds will be open Oct. Fresh sign-ups and ser2 to Oct. 4, Oct. 8 to Oct. vice point assessments. ART WITH TASTE 11, Oct. 15 to Oct. 18, Oct. 21 to Nov. 1. For tickets Get tickets now for the and more information, Del Mar Village Taste & visit thescreamzone.com/. Art Stroll with Artisan stroll 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Winston School, OCT. 3 STEM VOLUNTEERS 215 9th St., Del Mar, with Civic Light Projects and taste and sip stops from Oceanside Unified School noon to 3 p.m. Visit taste. District are in need of delmarmainstreet.com or STEM workshop present- the Del Mar Village Assoers, expo exhibitors and ciation, 1104 Camino Del conference volunteers for Mar Suite 1, Del Mar. the Girl Tech Conference, to be held Nov. 14, target- OCT. 5 ALL THAT JAZZ Jazz ing girls grades 5–8 in Oceanside Unified School musicians turn North District. This interactive Coast Rep into a nightclub conference will be from 9 for four Monday nights a.m. to 2 p.m. at MiraCos- this season. At 7:30 p.m. ta Oceanside Campus, 1 Oct. 5, pianist, songwritBarnard Drive. For more er, composer, and author information, contact Le- Kevin Toney, will perform ticia Chavarria, at leti- with his band. PFLAG MEETS A chavarria1@gmail.com or call (951) meeting of PFLAG will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. 704-4389. HIT THE TRAIL The Oct. 5 at the North Councity of San Marcos will ty LGBTQ Resource Cenhost a seven-mile hike ter, 510 N. Coast Highway, from 9 a.m. to noon Oct. 3. Oceanside. For more inThis hike will explore the formation, contact northsecond San Diego Aque- countycoastal@pflag.com. duct. A three-mile interpretive hike will also be MARK THE CALENDAR TASTE OF THE offered. Registration at 8:30 a.m. at Cerro de Las RANCH Rancho Santa Fe Posas Park, 1387 W. Bor- Rotary Club will host the

Art, animals, music all part of paws & paint expo SOLANA BEACH — The Paws & Paint Expo is a family and pet-friendly event, designed to bring the community together through art, entertainment and animal education. The free event Oct. 10 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Civic Center in Solana Beach, will feature an art exhibit, artists, pet portraits, raffle prizes, kid-friendly art sessions, advice from pet care professionals, and more! Funds to benefit Art for Barks. Professional Baseball Player Travis Lee and his therapy dog Bella will be on site as will Surf Dog Ricochet. A first-of-its-kind animal charity, Art for Barks couples art and technology to support sophisticated animal care, thereby helping curb pet abandonment on the front-end. The 501(c)(3) organization mobilizes artists and authors to help support rescue animals and service dogs.

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Art for Barks provides the essential tools and resources to support pet guardians, such as an innovative veterinary records Drop Data Box, an Emergency Contact Card, a daily Pet Care Registry, and state-of-the art pet parenting information. For more information, visit artforbarks.org

Taste of Rancho Santa Fe from 4 to 7 p.m. Oct. 11, on the lawn of Tahe Inn at Rancho Santa Fe Inn at 5951 Linea De Lillo in Rancho Santa Fe. Funds raised from the event will benefit ten San Diego based charities. Tickets are $100 per person at tastetofrsf.org SAVE SKATEPARKS The Tony Hawk Foundation hosts its 12th annual Tony Hawk's Stand Up For Skateparks benefit, Oct. 11 at Green Acres Estate, Beverly Hills. Tickets at standupforskatepa rks.org / t ic kets/. BONFIRE BOO The Del Mar Foundation’s annual “Spooktacular Beach Bonfire,” organized by the Young Del Mar Committee, is set for 6 p.m. Oct. 16 at Powerhouse Park and Beach. The night features spooky tales and music for all ages, and S'mores with marshmallow roasting sticks.  Registration for 92014 residents and donors is now open. Registration for non92014 residents opens Sept. 30. Registration closes Oct. 14. This event is free, but space is limited. Reservations are required. STEM VOLUNTEERS Civic Light Projects and Oceanside Unified School District are in need of STEM workshop presenters, expo exhibitors and conference volunteers for the Girl Tech Conference, to be held Nov. 14, targeting girls grades 5–8 in Oceanside Unified School District. This interactive conference will be from 9 a.m.to 2 p.m. at MiraCosta Oceanside Campus, 1 Barnard Drive. For more information, contact Leticia Chavarria, at letichavarria1@gmail.com  or call (951) 704-4389.

Who’s

NEWS?

Business news and special achievements for North San Diego County. Send information via email to community@ coastnewsgroup.com. TOP ATTORNEYS Law firm Higgs Fletcher & Mack announced four North County attorneys who have been named to the 2016 “Best Lawyers” list and recognized as “Lawyer of the Year” in their various specialties. The honors include: — Rancho Santa Fe resident Steven J. Cologne, an award-winning attorney practicing in the areas of complex tort and business litigation, Cologne was included in the coveted annual report for the 9th consecutive year. • Solana Beach resident Peter S. Doody know for his extensive jury trial experience and is a member of the American Board of Trial Advocates • Carmel Valley resident William M. Low, an expert in complex tort and business litigation with an emphasis on information security, product liability and healthcare • Del Mar resident Paul J. Pfingst, representing clients in complex litigation, white-collar crime and professional licensing matters. COASTKEEPER SEEKS NEW LEADER

San Diego Coastkeeper announced that Executive Director Megan Baehrens will end her leadership role with the organization on Oct. 2. After more than six years with the water quality watchdog, Baehrens will assume her new job as senior director of collaborative philanthropy at San Diego Grantmakers. The organization's board of directors has formed an executive director search committee and is reviewing applications on a rolling basis through Oct. 30, 2015. See the job description at sdcoastkeeper. org. ALUM BRINGS BOOKS MiraCosta College alumnus Chris Barter and the MiraCosta College Foundation have helped secure a $10,000 grant from the Datron World Communications, Inc. to purchase new textbooks for the Oceanside and San Elijo Campus libraries. The textbooks will be used for courses in economics, biology, chemistry and history. All textbooks are available for use at both the Oceanside and San Elijo Campus libraries and are expected to circulate about 8,500 times per year. For more information about the Textbook Reserves Loan Program, visit library.miracosta.edu or call Michelle Ohnstad at (760) 795-6709.

brating the grand opening of its new Quantity Discount shop in Carlsbad with a night filled with candy and refreshments! Come join the open house event from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 8 and a ribbon-cutting at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 9 at the new shop, 1830 Marron Road, Carlsbad. Kids will also receive free lollypops and hats! BOCCE BALL RAISES FUNDS Saint James Academy, 623 S. Nardo St., Solana Beach, held its annual Bocce Ball tournament where parents and parishioners dressed in Italian colors ready to play and were welcomed by the emcee Mary McGuinness who announced the rules of the game followed by a prayer from Father Ricky. The festivities ended with four team winners with first place going to Mr. and Mrs. Bandemer. The event raised over $20,000 for Saint James Academy.

INSPIRATIONAL POETRY Oceanside author, AC Levenson, announces the nationwide release of her new religious, inspirational poetry book, “The Silent Wind.” Her latest work will be available in both paperback and hardback copies this week. Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the books are available through bookstores nationwide, from the publisher at tatepublishing.com/bookstore, or by visSEE’S OPENS DISCOUNT iting barnesandnoble.com SHOP See’s Candies is cele- or amazon.com.

SAVANNAH LANG Digital Media Manager

Call Savannah for all your digital media needs.

Call 760.436.9737 x109 slang@coastnewsgroup.com

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VISTA,

SAN MARCOS,

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE ENCINITAS,PRSRTPAID STD U.S. CA 92025 PERMITPOSTAGE ENCINITAS, NO. 94 PAID PERMIT CA 92025 NO. 94

INLAND EDITION

.com

ESCONDIDO

JUNE 20,

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Council

By Jared

closer

Yee

to finalizin g Pacific

2014

Two commercial be demolished structures of retail at Carlsbad’s to make above, and apartment way for a revampLa Costa buildings. retail. would include Towne that includes Courtesy Center 48 The larger renderings apartments, will the addition new building, a courtyard shown for residents, and

Four city egg hunts

Carlsbad revampedretail center to be with apartment s

By Rachel

Stine

Whitlock are CARLSBAD ENCINITAS for five another — With years, — The the corner cific Viewstep toward the 33-year-old it’s primary council last gettingof El Camino acquiring storefront Councilsite on Wednesday thetook a revamp. Real La Costa Towne favor PaThe empty members and La of a $50,000 night. molish owner of Center conditions Costa voted the property Avenue at ter and two commercial 3-2 in spelled deposit dum of 2.3 times is at gained out in and other and halfreplace them structures that price.” ty. That understanding a memoranCouncilman sion on apartments with buildingsin theapproval to document final purchase Eddington for vocate April from Carlsbad’s that shopping depaves the properTony council million of the purchase, Planning 16. Kranz, said. the way cenagreement, are coming an adfor the end majority Planninghalf retail erty’s figure was forwardCommissioners which a hopes current of ping center based said the $4.3 Commiswas only to approve the with plans But theMay. on the public praised sign, and that intended long debate propby agenda Additionally, as zoning. And a main they said to redevelop the owners item should a first ed in over “(La Costa currently tenant. the it sparked for offer. favor wall. Kranz million have evenwhether the ing that lacks dated shopof upping You have Towne a said he signage, said Planning EUSD Encinitasto acquire agreed to council case, which no ideaCenter is) votdehad a the price knowpay ter has the what’s just this Union Commissioner strong much Resident been long big School site from $10 inside, more would have rezoning excited Commissioner District. the it’s not long white Jeff Eddington overdue.” Hap L’Heureux. The cityvaluable. made the mall an inviting,” owning at the prospect the district’s land could eyesore. Aurthur said the site, “This cil is getting would Neil Black rezonehave tried of the he’s cenbut worried city pensivelikely have request, to fight “bamboozled.” called “The the counresulted but that court city offered the little the property battle, Last Pacific past, $4.3 million Kranz in an exauction month, View and is in the added. TURN EUSD TO TOWNE not-too-distant bid set Pacific View for cade ago. TheElementary, now offering was due dum of CENTER which council ticking,at $9.5 million.with a understanding to ON A15 more approved closed a minimum the than meeting, bringing Mosaic, de- just With the a memoranat Wednesday the site. before city submitted part 2 the clock Artist delayed Photo the deadline. by Jared city closer Mark night’s an the auction has plans to acquiring a safeguard, Whitlock Patterson EUSDoffer for a up to in case by two monthshas follow the deal donna his Surfing By Promise as mosaic. Mawith the Yee A5 OCEANSIDE Message TURN announcement TO DEAL The final remains — ON A15 Kay’s banLIFT that an The Parker husband installment on ow to building grant Urhelped tells Eden Gardens A&E..................... Family the Kaywill fund grant at the accept Dick (760) reacH us 436-9737 nity’s of the commu- OUSD Resource the Parker meeting City the planned Classifieds.......... A10 Calendar takes Center the honor April 16. Council to youth. commitment to affordable Calendar@coastnews Mission at reduce the pledge Food He of A6 & Wine....... B21 form Cove source centernaming thesaid bought housing waste and Legals.................. B12 aimed “green reasons. applause project wife was well after his regroup.com Community teams” Opinion................A4 at recycling. for two deserved. late The A18 Community@coastne News Community affordable Mission B1 Sports.................. were glad resource to have members mixed-use housing Cove wsgroup.com Letters A20 the city’s center a family sion Avenueproject on and Letters@coastnewsgr as part oped throughis being Mislow-income ing project, of develhous- between the a partnership pleased oup.com and city and center the name equally tional Community will honor of the sance nonprofit NaKay Parker, Renaisthe late The developer. housing a beloved, ground project advocate. will break fair this summer. GradTURN

Two Sections 48 pages

View deal

Center to be of housing part project

THE C

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VOL. 28,

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Sophia planned Ceja, 3, of for April Oceanside, 19. See shows the full off story on a handful page A9. of eggs she Photo by Promise found.

Counc By Jared

SAN MARCO

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Center of hous to be part ing proje ct

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PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE ENCINITAS,PRSRTPAID STD U.S. CA 92025 PERMITPOSTAGE ENCINITAS, NO. 94 PAID PERMIT CA 92025 NO. 94

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JUNE 20,

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Council Four city closer egg hunts to fina lizing Pacific View dea l Yee

By Jared

The Coast News Group - Media Kit 2015-2016 - 760.436.9737

Two commercial be demolished structures of retail at Carlsbad’s to make above, and apartment way for a revampLa Costa Towne buildings. retail. would include that Courtesy Center 48 renderings apartmentsThe larger includes the will new building, addition , a courtyard shown for residents, and

Carlsbad revampedretail center with apar to be tments

By Rachel

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Four city egg hunts

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Two Sections 48 pages

Yee

to finaliz ing Pacific

Two Sections 48 pages

Carlsbad revampedretail center with apartmto be ents

Council Four city closer egg hunts to final izing Pacifi c View deal

By Jared

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE ENCINITAS,PRSRTPAID STD U.S. CA 92025 PERMITPOSTAGE ENCINITAS, NO. 94 PAID PERMIT CA 92025 NO. 94

Two commercial be demolished structures of retail at Carlsbad’s to make above, and apartment way for a revampLa Costa buildings. retail. would include Towne that includes Courtesy Center 48 The larger renderings apartments, will the addition new building, a courtyard shown for residents, and

Sophia planned Ceja, 3, of for April Oceanside 19. See , shows the full off story on a handful page A9. of eggs she Photo by Promise found.

il closer

Whitlock are CARLSBAD ENCINITAS for five another — With years, — The the corner cific Viewstep toward the 33-year-old it’s primary council last gettingof El Camino acquiring storefront Councilsite on Wednesday thetook a revamp. Real La Costa Towne favor PaThe e members and La of a $50,000 night. molish owner of Cent conditions Costa voted the property Avenue ter and two commercial 3-2 in spelled deposit dum of 2.3 times gained out in and other and halfreplace them structures that price.” ty. That understanding a memoranCouncilman sion on apartments with buildingsin theapproval to document final purchase Eddington for vocate April from Carlsbad’s that shopping paves the properTony council million of the purchase, Planning 16. Kranz, said. the way ce agreement, are coming an adfor the end majority Planninghalf reta erty’s figure was forwardCommissioners which a hopes current of ping center based said the $4.3 Commi was only to approve the with plans But theMay. on the public praised sign, and that intended long debate propby agenda Additionally, as zoning. And a main they said to redevelop the owners item should a first ed in over “(La Costa currently tenant. the it sparked fo offer. favor wall. Kranz million have evenwhether the ing that lacks dated shopof upping You have Towne a said he signage, said Planning EUSD Encinitasto acquire agreed to council case, which no ideaCenter is) votdehad a the price knowpay ter has the what’s just this Union Commissioner strong much Resident been long big School site from $10 inside, more would have rezoning excited Commissioner District. the it’s not long white Jeff Eddington overdue.” Hap L’Heureux. The cityvaluable. made the mall an inviting,” owning at the prospect land the district’s could eyesore. Aurthur said the site, “This cil is getting would Neil Black rezonehave tried of the he’s cenbut worried city pensivelikely have request, to fight “bamboozled.” called “The the counresulted but that court city offered the little the property battle, Last Pacific past, $4.3 million Kranz in an exauction month, View and is in the added. TURN EUSD TO TOWNE not-too-distant bid set Pacific View for cade ago. TheElementary, now offering was due dum of CENTER which council ticking,at $9.5 million.with a to understanding ON A15 more approved closed a minimum the than meeting, bringing Mosaic, de- just With the a memoranat Wednesday the site. before city submitted part 2 the clock Artist delayed Photo the deadline. by Jared city closer Mark night’s an the auction has plans to acquiring a safeguard, Whitlock Patterson EUSDoffer for a up to in case by two monthshas follow the deal donna his Surfing By Promise as mosaic. Mawith the Yee A5 OCEANSIDE Message TURN announcement TO DEAL The final remains — ON A15 Kay’s banLIFT that an The Parker husband installment on ow to building grant Urhelped tells Eden Gardens the Kaywill fund grant at A&E.................. Family accept Dick (760) reacH us 436-9737 nity’s of the commu- OUSD Resource the Parker meeting the City Council the planned Classifieds....... ... A10 Calendar takes Center the honor April 16. to youth. commitment to affordable the Calendar@coas Mission at reduce He Food of ... pledge A6 & Wine....... B21 form Cove source centernaming thesaid bought housing waste tnewsgroup.com and Legals............... B12 aimed “green reasons. applause project wife was well after his reCommunity teams” Opinion............ ... at recycling. for two deserved. late The A18 Community@co News Community affordable Mission B1 Sports............... ....A4 were glad astnewsgroup.c resource to have members mixed-use housing Cove Letters ... A20 the city’s center a family sion Avenueproject on and om Letters@coastn as part oped throughis being Mislow-income ing project, of develewsgroup.com hous- between the a partnership pleased and city and center the name equally tional Community will honor of the sance nonprofit NaKay Parker, Renaisthe late The developer. housing a beloved, ground project advocate. will break fair this summer. GradTURN

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Sports Walton’s hoops heaven will have a North County slant sports talk jay paris

B

ill Walton was making his U-turn at Swami’s and maybe that’s where he had his self-realization. “I’m excited and proud that we will be celebrating so much more than basketball,’’ he said. Walton loves many

things and riding his bike along Highway 101 and hoops are high on that list. That’s why he lent his name, energy and enthusiasm to the Bill Walton Basketball Festival at Petco Park. This basketball lollapalooza will feature San Diego State and the University of San Diego squaring off Dec. 5. But that’s just icing on a hoops cake that Walton is ecstatic to help bake. “This weeklong festival of life is basically the second-biggest, no-brainer in the history of the world,’’ Walton said. “We

have all these things coming together and an opportunity to do things for students, athletes, children and the economy. It’s going to be an absolutely thrilling week.’’ Which promises to have a North County flavor throughout its Nov. 30 through Dec. 5 run. “I’ve heard from a lot of schools and club teams already,’’ Padres President Mike Dee said. While the college game fills the marquee, prep squads and other youth programs are included. That’s what makes the event so cool, as kids

will play on the same hard court as the college sharpshooters. Dee should know. It was on his watch in Boston that the 2010 Frozen Fenway was born. Leading up to the collegiate doubleheader, the rink was overrun with tykes, adults and anyone else with blades wanting to experience athletics in a big-time setting. That’s also the vision for the Bill Walton Basketball Festival. “Even before plans for the college basketball game were finalized, we TURN TO WALTON ON 13

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EAGLE SPONSOR The Wohlford Family

BIRDIE SPONSORS Denise Phillips & James Tone Donovan’s Steak & Chop House Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch, LLC Rancho Valencia Resort Sun.Flowers The Kim Family The Rene Family The Seltzer Family BEVERAGE CART SPONSORS The Moran Family Toyota of El Cajon

Only a few foursomes left! RSF COMMUNITY CENTER GOLF CLASSIC

Monday, October 19, 2015 Enjoy a fantastic 18-hole scramble at the beautiful Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club. This exclusive course is rarely open to the public. The event features a putting contest, lunch, tee prizes and a Hole-in-One opportunity to win a 2016 Cadillac SRX from Hoehn Motors. An “All Fore Fun” After Party wraps up the day with appetizers, dinner, hosted bar and an awards ceremony. We hope you’ll join us in supporting this important fundraiser that benefits your RSF Community Center, a non-profit, 501(C)3 organization.

HOLE IN ONE SPONSOR Hoehn Motors COMMUNITY PARTNER Latham & Watkins, LLP TEE SPONSORS Beautiful Smiles of La Jolla Carlsbad Golf Center Mossy Automotive K. Ann Brizolis and Associates: Jennifer J. Janzen-Botts Rancho Santa Fe Insurance South Coast Copy Systems The Rababy Family Watersedge Landscape PUT TING CONTEST SPONSOR Terra Bella Landscape Development MEDIA SPONSORS 92067 Magazine Ranch & Coast Magazine Rancho Santa Fe Review

I N D I V I D UA L P L AY E R: $350 A F T E R PA RT Y (Non-Player Fee): $100

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Registration/Putting Contest Buffet Lunch Provided Shotgun Start Scramble Format After Party, Dinner & Awards Ceremony ALL FORE THE COMMUNITY BENEFITTING THE RANCHO SANTA FE COMMUNITY CENTER

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT OR SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES PLEASE CONTACT Katelyn Kidd, Events Coordinator • Phone: 858.756.2461 • E-mail: Events@RSFCC.org • Web: www.RSFCC.org

OCT. 2, 2015 Contact us at sports@coastnewsgroup.com with story ideas, photos or suggestions

The Encinitas Lions Club and the Swami’s Surfing Association host their 20th annual surf event on Sunday giving blind and visually impaired people a chance to surf and experience the waves. Photo by Tony Cagala

Blind surfers get to experience the feeling of waves By Tony Cagala

ENCINITAS — The third time was the charm for Larry Graff to get his idea off the ground — or in the water — as it were. More than 20 years ago, Graff, then a member of the Lions Club, was watching TV when he saw members of the blind community water skiing. “I thought, because I’ve water skied, ‘if they can water ski, they can surf,’ so I was in the water and I paddled up to Bruce King (then president of the Swami’s Surfing Association) and I said, ‘Bruce, I’d like to take blind people surfing,’” Graff said. As Graff and King tell the story, it would take another two times for Graff to paddle out with King and try to sell the idea.

On the third try, Graff was adamant about bringing the idea to fruition and wouldn’t take no for an answer. King relented and they agreed that they could take blind people surfing, forging a partnership for the past 20 years. The partnership continued on Sunday at South Ponto beach where some 50 to 75 blind surfers got to experience catching waves. “They’re courageous, because I wouldn’t do this,” said King, who, 20 years later continues to be a part of the experience. “I wouldn’t go out there and blind surf. No way. But those people are something else. “And you can feel this TURN TO SURFERS ON 13


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of their blind surfing event, two other Lions Clubs, one in Hawaii and in Australia, have started similar events. There are about 42 members of the Encinitas Lions Club, which is part of the Lions Clubs International that began in 1917 with the intent on helping and improving the communities they serve. Some of Encinitas Lions Clubs’ notable community improvement projects include the installation of audible crosswalk signals in downtown Encinitas and the offering of sight clinics where they provide eye exJuan Briceno, 17, surfs for the first time ever. He may have ended up with the wave count of the day, catching ams and distribute prescripat least 30 waves. Photo by Tony Cagala tion eyeglasses. The nonprofit club rethe highlight of the year Bob Mangini, Encinitas with surfers and surfboards. “It makes us feel good, for many of the participants Lions Club treasurer and it’s something we all enjoy who have surfed in previous chairman of the event. Every mid-September doing,” Mangini said. events or are doing it for the Mangini said because very first time, explained the club fills up the beach

CONTINUED FROM 12

when they do it. You can feel the emotion and you feel everything that’s good about this whole thing. And the only way to really feel that is to do it. You can’t convey it in words,” he said. Juan Briceno, 17, had never surfed before and possibly ended up with the wave count of the day, catching at least 30 waves. It felt pretty good out there, he said. Another of the surfers, Levi Bressan, 16, likened the experience of surfing to swimming with dolphins. Bressan has surfed in a couple of the Lions’ previous surf events and enjoys the waves. “I like catching the big ones,” he said. The event has become

WALTON

CONTINUED FROM 12

envisioned the court setup being utilized for more than just one day,’’ Dee said. “This is going to be a week full of unique opportunities for groups throughout the community. “We plan on having practices, club teams, adult leagues, really it’s basketball 24-7.’’ In North County, where high school hoops is performed at the highest levels, that’s an invitation to contact Dee. Don’t tell him your source, but he can be reached at mdee@padres.

com. Or just tug Walton’s arm when you spot him cycling on North County’s coast. He makes the trek to Swami’s on weekdays from his home hugging Balboa Park, proudly declaring it among the most beautiful rides in the world. “We’re going to make it fun,’’ Walton promised. “That’s the goal of sports.’’ Walton had a blast en route to two CIF-San Diego Section titles at Helix High, two NCAA titles at UCLA and one each with the Trail Blazers and Celtics. But the 1977 NBA MVP’s ever-present smile beams brightest when ex-

tolling the impact athletics has on youth. Maybe that’s because Walton never really grew up, despite being 6-foot-11. “Our mission is to have the most fantastic event ever and have all these young children involved say, ’Yeah, I want to play sports,’’’ Walton said. Maybe they’ll meet a future coach at a Bill Walton Basketball Festival clinic. That’s how Walton was introduced to UCLA’s John Wooden, hanging on his every word as a kid at a USD event in the early 1960s. “I am proud, privileged, honored and humbled to be a volunteer for

ceives money for its projects through donations and fundraising. The Lions are one of the few clubs, Mangini said, that 100 percent of the income for charity goes out. Graff said when he first started the event it would be just helping blind people surf and experience the waves. “But as it turns out, we have a profound impact on the volunteers and the surfers,” he said. “This helps people who are living with disabilities experiencing something that they haven’t experienced before. It helps create an awareness in everybody about overcoming challenges,” he said.

this incredible situation where people are going to come together in our city and play basketball in Petco Park,’’ Walton said. Like Walton preaches, it the second-biggest, no-brainer ever. The first? “Solar energy,’’ he said. Combine that with the Bill Walton Basketball Festival and it’s a sunshine daydream for this devoted Deadhead. “The Padres have done their job,’’ Walton said. “The rest is up to me.’’ Contact Jay Paris at jparis8@aol.com. Follow him on Twitter at jparis_sports.

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Take a taste of Rancho Santa Fe this weekend RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Rotary Club invites the community to its third annual Taste Of Rancho Santa Fe, a Food &Wine Festival and

Auction, 4 to 7 p.m., Oct. 11, at The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe. Tickets for the event are $100 at tasteofrsf. org. For more information,

than 20 wineries from Napa Valley and local regions. The RSF Rotary Club will host this gourmet event on the lawns of The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe. Guests will have the opportunity to taste bites from the Chefs of Mille Fleurs, Rancho Valencia's Veladora, RSF Bistro, The Bridges, The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe and Dolce Pane E Vino and more. Taste of RSF’s 2015 Sommelier, wine educator and event planner James King will offer 22 one-of-akind tastings. Some of the  Napa wineries featured are: 2 Plank, Aloft, Cairdean, Manzoni and Oakville Ranch.   You will also enjoy amazing grapes from our local region like: Coomber Wines, Climbing Moneys and Navarro. The Rotary Club will be spicing up the late afternoon with live entertainment, a raffle and a live and silent auction. The net proceeds from the event will be shared by the 12 selected 2015 beneficiaries: San Diego Children’s Discovery Museum, Women’s Empowerment International, ConnectMed International, Hands United for Children, Miracle Babies, The Vision for Children Foundation, Voices for Children, STEP Support The Enlisted Project, JC Cooley Foundation, RSF Community Center, and RSF Rotary Club. 

The Rancho Santa Fe Rotary Club invites the community to the 2015 Taste Of Rancho Santa Fe, Food &Wine Festival and Auction, from 4 to 7 p.m., Oct. 11, at The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe. For more information, contact “Taste of Rancho Santa Fe” maitre d’ Uschi Crouch at uschi.crouch@gmail.com.  Courtesy photo

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It’s a colorful success at The Garden Club Art Expo By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Garden Club Art Expo was a community affair, attracting numerous residents to the Sept. 13 event. While the Garden Club honored its “members only” artistic inspired creations, there was an outpouring of support. “Over 150 members of the local community turned out enthusiastically to take in the exquisite displays of the 22 participating artists in a festive atmosphere of live music and elegant refreshments,” said Erin Browne, RSF Garden Club executive director. According to Browne, the feedback they received throughout the day was highly positive. Many in attendance, she said, reminisced of how it reminded them of the events the Garden Club used to have in the past. “They are looking forward to more events in the

arts CALENDAR Know something that’s going on? Send it to calendar@ coastnewsgroup.com

OCT. 2 FOREIGN FILM FRIDAYS The city of Carlsbad presents Foreign Film Fridays. The Oct. 2 film, “Mr. Kaplan,” (Uruguay, not rated, 2014, 98 min.), will be screened at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. at 1775 Dove Lane. Admission is free. For more information, call Vincent Kitch at (760) 434-2921, or email vincent.kitch@carlsbadca.gov.

future,” she said. While the Art Expo event was a success, Browne is quick to extend appreciation to its Art Expo Committee members whose dedication made the event a seamless enjoyment for all who attended. Browne gave thanks to Susan Glass, Irene Perry, Andrea Kessler and Jane Larsen. Caffe Positano was also on hand for providing gourmet coffee which was freshly roasted by Tim Cusac. The artists who took part in the day included Andrea Kessler, Barbara Bray, Barbara Pearson, Bill Schlosser, Bruce Warden, Carre Ridgeway, Connie McCoy, Francesca Filanc, Ginger Bord, Helen DiZio, Jack Queen, Joan Voelz, Julie Monroe, Kathy & John Giovenco, MaryAnn Wolf, Maryam Parto, Pat Beck, Roger Lindland, Ruth Evans, Sandy Yayanos and Teresa White.

A CAPPELLA HARMONY The a cappella group, Singchronicity, will perform from 2 to 3 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive. TASTE & STROLL Get tickets now for the Del Mar Village Taste & Art Stroll with Artisan stroll 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Winston School, 215 9th St., Del Mar, with taste and sip stops from noon to 3 p.m. Visit taste.delmarmainstreet.com or the Del Mar Village Association, 1104 Camino Del Mar Suite 1, Del Mar. FINE FILMS On Oct. 4, the San Diego Film Foundation Festival will feature “Life Me Up” at 6 p.m. at Reading Cinemas Theater 9, and “Short Track: When World’s Collide” at 5 p.m. at Reading Cinemas Theater 1, 701 5th St., San Diego presented by Harrah’s Resort So Cal. Tickets are $45. The SDFF is headquartered in Del Mar.

OCT. 3 ART ON THE GREEN Every Saturday and Sunday (weather permitting), Carlsbad-Oceansice Arts League (COAL) Gallery member artists display their artwork for sale at Art on the Green, on the lawn in front of the Carlsbad Inn Beach Resort, OCT. 5 3075 Carlsbad Blvd., CarlsFAMILIES MAKE HISbad. TORY Every weekend, enjoy fun activities that revolve OCT. 4 around a historical theme. FIBER ARTS The Vis- September is lima bean ta Fiber Arts Fiesta will be month, celebrate with a lima from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. craft encompassing accesso4 at the Antique Gas and ries, jewelry and more. LatSteam Engine Museum, er in the month, Weidner’s 2040 North Santa Fe, Vis- Gardens should have baby ta. Admission is free, park- lima plants ready to take ing is $5. Visit VistaFiber- home and plant in your own ArtsFiesta.com. yard.   

Pat Beck next to some of her work on display at the Rancho Santa Fe Garden Club Art Expo on Sept. 13. Courtesy photo

“Exhibited artwork included oil and watercolor paintings, abstract art, sculptures, jewelry, needle-

work clothes and handbags, she said. hand sewn doll clothes, “The Garden Club was painted gourds, mosaic art, electrified with the diverse etchings, and limericks,” representation of artistic

MUSIC BY THE SEA As part of the Music by the Sea Concert Series, Violinist Annelle Gregory and pianist Katherine Dvoskin will perform at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Encinitas Library, 540 OCT. 6 LOVETT AND Cornish Drive, Encinitas. FRIENDS Get tickets now MURDER MYSTERY for “An Acoustic Evening with Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt Nov. 8 at the California Center for the Arts, Escondido, 340 N. Escondido Blvd, Escondido. Visit BoxOfficeCenter.com or call (760) 8394138. Every Saturday & Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. San Dieguito Heritage Museum, 450 Quail Gardens Drive. Free. 760-632-9711.

Get tickets now for the murder mystery “Par for the Corpse,” at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16 and Oct. 17 and at 2 p.m. Oct. 18 at the Lake San Marcos Conference Center, 1105 La Bonita Drive. Tickets are $14 at sanmarcosplayers.com or call (760) 290-4252.

talent that is here in the Ranch.” Also there were The Pizarro Brothers who entertained guests with jazz and pop piano duets. Browne said the music infused amazing energy during the artistic showcase. “At times some Garden Club members broke into a dance or two. Brothers, Dominic and Angelo Pizarro performed with gusto and included a special number sung by younger sister Aryana,” she said “With all event artists and attendees standing at the stage in awe of their talent, the brothers concluded their repertoire with an original composition which rocked the room and touched the souls of all.” The intent of the Art Expo was not to raise proceeds. Instead, it was an opportunity to bring the community together for an afternoon of art appreciation and a special place to gather.

‘SHREK’ ON STAGE Carlsbad Community Theatre will be presenting “Shrek: The Musical Jr.” 7 p.m. Oct. 24, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., and 2 p.m. Oct. 25 at the AVO Playhouse in Vista. For more information, visit carlsbadcommunity theatre.com.

OCT. 8 SINGING THE BLUES Local guitarist Robin Henkel plays solo blues from 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 8, Wine Steals Cardiff, 1953 San Elijo, Cardiff. For more information, call (760) 230-2657. OCT. 9 MEN IN TIGHTS The city of San Marcos Theatre West Youth Theater presents the musical production, “Robin Hood,” at Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 6 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. on Oct. 9 through Oct. 11 at the San Marcos Community Center, 3 Civic Center Drive. Tickets are $10 at the Community Center or may be purchased at the door. For more information, go to san-marcos.net/theatrewest or call (760) 744‐9000. MARK THE CALENDAR

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OCT. 2, 2015

Educational Opportunities Cotillion students make spectacular first impressions They stand out as respectful and expressive leaders amongst others, and learn how to handle a wide variety of social situations with proper etiquette while learning to ballroom dance. The San Dieguito Cotillion has been improving children's lives for 60 years. The etiquette program addresses many social skills including table manners, introductions, the hand shake, communication, and personal decorum. The San Dieguito Cotillion students are able to acquire better scholarships due to interactive social skills enhanced with politeness, articulation and

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being comfortable speak- ations. The San Dieguito Coing with people they are tillion also teaches the not familiar with. Learning and retain- manners that go along with the technological devices. The dancing curriculum improves physical balance, control, posture, poise and body alignment thorough a variety of ballroom, Latin and swing dancing. Dancing is a dignified and joyful activity. Classes are taught to children between fifth and twelfth grade. All classes are held at the Del Mar ing etiquette and then Fairgrounds, classes begin practicing it to build one’s Oct. 3. To reserve a spot for mannerisms takes time. Cotillion may seem old your child, please go to the fashioned to some, but so San Dieguito Cotillion webmuch has been lost over site sandieguitocotillion. the last two or three gener- com or call (760) 215-2548.

Learning and retaining etiquette and then practicing it to build one’s mannerisms takes time.

Beachgoers use sinks, fountains to rinse sand By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — In an effort to comply with a state mandate to reduce water use, Del Mar officials turned off the showers at all but one city beach and encouraged people to “stay sandy.” To help alleviate some of the mess they installed sand brushes at all locations where showers once flowed. But beachgoers at Powerhouse Park would have none of that, opting instead to use drinking fountains and restroom sinks to rinse off.

After turning off the showers at most beaches, Del Mar installed sand brushes and encouraged people to “stay sandy.” Some people used restroom sinks and water fountains at the Powerhouse Community Center instead. The resulting maintenance costs caused city officials to turn the showers back on in that location. Courtesy photo

The resulting maintenance and plumbing issues caused an increase in the cost of repairs, prompting the city to reactivate the showers in front of the Powerhouse Community Center. On a more compliant note, by adhering to a requirement to limit outdoor irrigation to no more than

two days a week with potable water the city has reduced its water purchases nearly 34 percent compared to 2013. The reduction is in spite of an 8.5 percent increase caused by a major water main break in July on San Dieguito Drive. “We applaud the community’s efforts,” said Kristen Krane, management services director. “It’s not easy to get to these high reduction amounts. We want to encourage them to keep up the good work.” Earlier this year the governor imposed water restrictions to deal with a severe statewide drought. Del Mar had the option to limit outdoor irrigation to two days a week or implement other measures to achieve a 25 percent reduction. The county’s smallest city chose the former but still exceeded the 25 percent decrease thanks to aggressive outreach and education programs such as utility bill inserts, coordination with the Del Mar Village Association to inform businesses, signage and an email address and mobile app to report water waste. “We are aiming to do our part to reduce our water use by 25 percent … even though technically we’re not required to do so,” Krane said.

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Noise the only major problem at KAABOO By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — With the inaugural KAABOO Del Mar in the books, organizers and officials in Del Mar and at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, where the threeday music event was held, are in debrief mode, determining what should be done to improve the “mixperience” next year. One of the first recommendations from residents as far away as Del Mar Heights and Carmel Valley will likely be to turn down the volume and work with Mother Nature to ensure wind, heat and humidity are at a minimum. Beginning with an evening VIP gathering on Sept. 17, KAABOO featured more than 100 performers on seven stages with music by No Doubt, the Killers, Snoop Dogg, Foster the People, Neon Trees, Train and Counting Crows, to name a few. Upscale dining in restaurant areas, complete with chandeliers, offered everything from lobster rolls and shrimp and grits to meatballs and gourmet hot dogs from local eateries. There were dozens of craft breweries and wine tastings, an art fair, a swimming pool and beach and an area called Indulgences that offered massages, henna tattoos and hair and nail services. The target audience was 25 to 55 years old, with the average ticket buyer around 38. Attendees seemed predominantly on the younger end of that spectrum, and there were plenty of families with younger children, some in strollers. Representatives from the organizer, HorsePower LLC, worked with the community to address their concerns, which mainly focused on activities that could potentially take place offsite, such as traffic, disturbing the peace late at night, trash, lighting and noise. For the most part the organizers lived up to their promise to be good neighbors, with few if any reported traffic and parking problems or illegal activities in

The Counting Crows performs during the 2015 KAABOO Del Mar at the Del Mar Fairgorunds on Sept.19. Photo by Brian Spady/WireImage

the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Sheriff’s deputies onsite said the California Highway Patrol had a driving-u nder-t he -inf luence “saturation” and for the size of the crowd, problems were minimal. Deputy John Cannon said there were a handful of minor arrests on the fairgrounds property Sept. 18, the first official day of the festival, for drunk in public. Mayor Al Corti said he can’t remember the last time he saw so many law enforcement officers in one place. A hot line to report problems was manned throughout the event. While many said it was answered by a machine, Kristen Krane, Del Mar’s management services director, said someone was “actively returning calls all weekend.” “They were sincere in that,” Krane said. The city received about 50 phone calls, emails, voice messages and online comments, mostly between Sunday and Monday. All were noise complaints,

some from people in Carmel Valley and Del Mar Heights. Councilman Don Mosier noted high winds, temperatures and humidity on Sunday likely contributed to sound transmission patterns that are difficult to control. Krane said many callers wanted to know why the city would allow such a loud event. She stressed that Del Mar has no control over what happens at the

Louise Kemp, 89 Encinitas September 22, 2015

Betty Billuni, 93 San Marcos September 21, 2015

Kim Joanna Hampton, 79 Carlsbad September 22, 2015

Roy Thomas, 69 Vista September 21, 2015

Iva V. Bledsoe, 102 Carlsbad September 21, 2015

Judith Lynn Rupe, 71 San Marcos September 20, 2015

Katherine L. Geisler, 95 Encinitas September 20, 2015

Betty Louise Kuehl, 83 Oceanside September 20, 2015

pleasantly surprised by the lack of problems other than noise. “The luxury buses were taking people back and forth,” she said. “They directed traffic to I-5 away from the residential areas. They were incredibly organized. All in all it was nowhere what we thought it would be. “But this was only the first year and attendance was less than half of what they expected,” Crabtree added. “We just have to be diligent. It could be a little crazy when they get to 40,000.” KAABOO organizers have not yet released attendance numbers, and a representative said they might not as that information is rarely disclosed. They were hoping for 40,000 people a day. Unconfirmed rumors have put the average daily attendance at about 20,000. Next year’s event is scheduled for Sept. 16 through Sept. 18.

Friday night she could hear word-for-word the song lyrics. She said she called the hot line, got a recording, left a message and received a quick response. She said Saturday was “significantly better,” with the music more of a hum similar to what she hears during the annual county fair. Sunday was back to loud. Crabtree said she heard few complaints from her neighbors and she was

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fairgrounds, a state-owned facility governed by a separate board of directors. “The fairgrounds are a completely separate government entity,” she said. “They regulate their own events. The city has no jurisdiction to permit or regulate what takes place on their property.” Robin Crabtree, who lives in the beach area of Del Mar and was vocal when sharing concerns about KAABOO, said on

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OCT. 2, 2015

La Jolla Art & Wine Festival begins Oct. 10 REGION — The La Jolla Art & Wine Festival ushers in the works of 150 juried artists from around the globe, a dedicated late-night beer fest, a weekend full of live entertainment and more than 40 world-class wineries from California, Baja and beyond. Thanks to Wells Fargo’s generous support, this charitable festival is open to the public and is free to attend. In celebration of the festival’s seventh year, the La Jolla Art & Wine Festival has also unveiled a new look and logo

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WAVE CHAMP Sept. 13, more than 5,000 beach, surf and dog-loving fans celebrated the winners of Helen Woodward Animal Center’s 10th Anniversary Surf Dog Surf-A-thon, presented by Blue Buffalo. The Sept. 13 festivities saw American Eskimo Surf Dog Ziggy coasting into first place overall and included a very special ceremony inducting Surf Dogs Ricochet, Bodie, Dozer and Louie into the Surf Dog Hall of Fame. Courtesy photo

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rate and support their metabolism before their next weight loss journey. Restoring one’s metabolic rate can take up to year and then the weight loss can begin. Deering admits that her book is quite different than what many are being told today. For example, she is a

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the site as a community resource. Only terms of 10 years or more will be considered, although a longer lease may be available depending on

BROADBAND CONTINUED FROM 3

partner who is well aligned with a community’s mission was the next step: RFQP. Honker told the board that there would be about a 60-day timeline for the solicitation of a proposal process. Once the Association was comfortable with the language in the proposal document it was recommended to leave the RFQP “out there” for 45 days.

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phenomenal experience for the kids last year which will be run Oct. 29 and Oct. 30. Village Vibe will team up with the Inn on the 29th to continue town activity with the merchants. Brainstorming ideas include trick or treating, and on

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is giving them the opportunity to grow their own food and actually want to try it and eat it,” she said. Also at hand comes the lesson of learning how people use their resources, Bailey explained.

promoter of saturated fat, healthy sugars and salt. “When you really look at how the human body works and you understand the history of why they were given these negative aspects to them, you start to understand that maybe we’ve been told the wrong thing. So it gives you a different perspective on how these things actually are healthy for you and that if you’ve been avoiding them

that you might be causing some damage,” she said. In her research, one of Deering’s biggest influences was Dr. Ray Peat, a private researcher on nutrition, biology, and chemistry. From there, the data she compiled was the springboard for her book. To learn more about Deering and her book, “How To Heal You Metabolism,” visit KateDeering.com.

the proposal and potential capital improvements. “Now it seems the Friends and the public must depend on the City’s Proposal Selection Committee to stand behind their written intent to pick a proposal that will ‘serve the

needs of the local and regional community’ without jeopardizing public open space and its value to the San Dieguito River Valley habitat and local families,” the Friends of the San Dieguito River Valley states on its website.

In this timeline, proposals would be due by the end of October, he said. When asked by the board and members if Magellan would take part in the RFQP, Honker said they would like to be. They provided a waiver for this option since they are in the industry, he said, and they have done this before. “We have the partners. We have the expertise. We think we can bring a solution to the table that would

be competitive,” Honker said. If the Association allowed Magellan to take part in the bid, he said, they asked to be treated fairly just like any other proposer out there and wanted to be judged equally according to the requirements. Once a partner was chosen, estimated on Magellan’s conceptual fiber optic network feasibility study, services would be completed in roughly 18 months.

the Village Green, a pumpkin patch and carving stations. “And then the final one would be the holiday celebration on Dec. 5 with the old-fashioned Christmas that was started last year at the Inn,” she said, noting how the ice rink would return. In addition to Santa and the Christmas tree

decorations, Pennington said adding to the holiday revitalization efforts would be handpicking various artisans, offering a giftwrapping station, having holiday carolers and perhaps a reading of the Grinch. “This is really in a conceptual kind of framework, but we’re starting to work on the details to get it moving,” she said.

“We have to successfully live within our means, particularly within California and with hitting limitations in California with the drought,” he added. “Using our resources wisely goes far beyond agriculture,” Bailey said. “It goes to our agriculture, it goes to our energy produc-

tion, it goes to our transportation. If we can get students to think differently about how we utilize and work with our natural systems, I think that can bring a holistic approach to sustainability. We can’t just target agriculture, or transportation, or energy, we have to think differently about all of them.”

Berg, the Covenant Club is proposing a couple of pools, a café, child care area and yoga pavilion. “The Covenant Club Committee (which is made up of three subcommittees) has members from all stakeholder groups within the community. “The Design Subcommittee has a Tennis Club Board member as our tennis liaison as well as several tennis club members,” said Jerry Yahr, Association Board Member and Chair of the Design Subcommittee.” He continued, “With regard to the planning process, we are considering a

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what we’re doing at Scripps — we’re creating patient centric, compassionate cutting edge care.” According to Taylor, they treat more than 500,000 patients a year. And within the Scripps culture, she said there is a heart and soul to everything they do. While Taylor spoke to attendees about her tele-

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epidemic and the chapel was built. Today, the church and adjacent cemetery continue to be a highly visited site. St. Roch Market and other new homes and establishments continue to appear in post-Katrina New Orleans neighborhoods but not without controversy. Longtime residents — typically black, working-class and low-income — say that gentrification is causing property values to rise and this is pricing them out of their neighborhoods. Whatever happens, visitors are sure to continue coming to New Orleans to see and enjoy the rich fabric of the city created by its people, food, neighborhoods

SMALL TALK CONTINUED FROM 7

that predate our arrival. I went after them with solvent and a knife and they are at least less obvious. It seems paint gets rather set after 20 years. Imagine. I then spotted dirt runoff to clear from around my patio and bailed out the rainwater from the hot tub. This required every rag towel I owned (I own a

designed by award winning design firm Buchanan Design. To date, the La Jolla Art & Wine Festival, a nonprofit 501c4 organization, has raised more than $500,000 for local area public schools. With crowds of nearly 45,000 expected to attend, 2015 promises to be another groundbreaking year. For more information about the festival, its artists, public and valet parking, transportation, andmore visit online at ljawf.com.

number of site plan alternatives, including some that do not impact or touch the current Tennis Club building. While we understand the Tennis Club is very concerned about the impact of the proposed Covenant Club on the Tennis Club we have explained that if a plan was recommended that integrated the Tennis Club building, the costs to upgrade the tennis facility would be the responsibility of the Covenant Club not the tennis club members.” Van Den Berg said he hopes the Design Committee understands and respects how major construction from the conceptual options presented to them could negatively affect their sought after tennis

programs, impact the pros that work there, and perhaps adversely influence the membership numbers they worked so hard to increase. “As it relates to the process of approving the Covenant Club, all residents of the Covenant will have an opportunity to vote on the Covenant Club,” said Heather Slosar, Association Board member and chair of the Covenant Club Executive Committee. “This process was developed to take into consideration the input from all property owners, not just the 10 percent of residents who are Tennis Club members or the 25 percent of residents who are Golf Club members,” she added.

vision career, why she left and how she ended up at Scripps, she also spoke about Scripps’ advanced clinical trials and how they have harnessed digital technology. For Taylor, it’s also about bringing healthcare closer to where a person lives and works. Over the years, Scripps Health has received numerous accolades. Recently, U.S. News recognized Scripps nationally as one

of the Best Hospitals in eight specialties and regionally for 13 specialties. U.S. News rated Scripps Health in 2015-16 as one of the Best Hospitals for cardiology and heart surgery, while Fortune 100 rated them as best companies to work for, and Truven Health Analytics as 100 Top Hospitals. “At Scripps, we have world class healthcare right here in your own backyard,” Taylor said.

and history. Visitors to “NOLA” (popular acronym for New Orleans, Louisiana) this fall will have plenty to see and do. • New Orleans Film Festival (Oct. 15-22) — What began as a local production has developed into a premier, Oscar-qualifying, film festival that attracts thousands of producers, directors, writers and actors from across the globe. Films are shown throughout the city. neworleansonline.com • Crescent City Blues and BBQ Festival (Oct. 1618) — Lots of great food; lots of great music. Held in the Central Business District. jazzandheritage.org/ blues-fest/. • Tremé Creole Gumbo Fest (Nov. 14-15) — Come hungry to take on the eighth

annual celebration of New Orleans’ signature dish. Features a smorgasbord of gumbos in every variety — including vegan — complete with a side of the city’s finest brass, jazz and R&B bands. jazzandheritage.org/ treme-gumbo. • Oak Street Po’Boy Festival (Nov. 22) — Celebrate the famous New Orleans sandwich with this annual street party. Features traditional roast beef and oyster, as well as fried lobster and softshell crab. poboyfest.com/. • For more information, visitneworleansonline.com and gonola.com/.

lot), which then led to several loads of laundry. Next, should I weed the patio bricks, and spray in a lame effort to discourage spiders from making webs for the next seven days? I have already sprayed twice. The spiders keep rebuilding. I think they are the same indestructible ones that bit Spiderman. I believe I will stop now and go scrape the paint off my fingers.

I’m going to have some iced tea and repeat my mantra, “Everyone coming has been here before and knows what my yard/house is like. They still speak to me. It will be fine.” Jean Gillette is a freelance writer soundly stricken with pre-party “oh-my-gosh-wouldyou-look-at-this” OCD. Contact her at jgillette@ coastnewsgroup.com.

E’Louise Ondash is a freelance writer living in North County. Tell her about your travels at eondash@ coastnewsgroup.com


OCT. 2, 2015

 

 

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

Food &Wine

A football and plate licking Sunday at a Charger’s game 



the Tiger Stadium dog I enjoyed growing up — which was, by far, the best ever hands down — the Charger dog or whatever it was called was lukewarm and served on a dry bun. It was almost inedible but of course we ate it anyway and shortly after that of course, we noticed a whole row of food trucks and our sporting event, beer-fueled munchies kicked in again. Ironically, I had just seen a feature in Thrillist about the “must have� food

         

I

will admit up front that I was at the Charger’s game a few weeks ago because they were playing my hometown team the Detroit Lions. The Detroit Lions, at the time, had not played a game and had the prom   ise of a winning season in front of them. They have since dropped to 0-3 and that promise has faded as it always does. I’ve also become a Charger fan over the years so this game really was a win-win scenario for me. Besides all that, I heard that the pre-game tailgating was taken very seriously and sure enough, we arrived two hours early and the parking lot was already full with pop-up tents, RVs, grills, smokers and full-on portable kitchen setups. We were lucky to find a place to park at all.  The crowd was also full of Detroit fans so that was a treat and everywhere we walked showing our Detroit colors folks were eager to invite us in to sample their food. But it was the crew from Oceanside next to us that had one of the more impressive setups I’ve seen anywhere. They were Pacific Islanders and turns out one of them owns a restaurant in Oceanside called Guahan Grill that features the cuisine of Guam. I’ll be following up with them for a future Lick

 



  

 An Iowa pork cutlet sandwich was one of the odd, but delicious offerings at the Charger game. Photo by David Boylan

the Plate column for sure. They had a grill going where they were finishing baby back ribs, chicken thighs and much to my delight, big fat oysters. I simply went over to inquire about the oysters on the grill and was welcomed like family and given a heaping plate that included all of what I just mentioned. Everything on that plate including a big heaping scoop of macaroni salad was amazing. I must say they were all huge Charger’s fan but welcomed me anyway — even with my Detroit jersey on. This was not your stereotypical beer and brats tailgate action happening. The variety of the food being consumed reflected the diverse ethnic melting pot that made up the crowd. In fact, I heard a lot of folks just came down for the

pre-game party and did not even attend the game. Some of those folks were so loaded at noon I’m not sure how they could make it through a full game anyway. Finally it was time to leave the party and make our way into the stadium. This was the most uncomfortable part of the day as it was just before kickoff and thousands of folks had the same idea, with very limited entry points. The wait in the sun packed liked sardines in a line that did not move almost had me to the point of going back out to enjoy the party for a while longer. Once in, our seats were in the shade, which I was thankful for. Our first stop for food was the traditional stadium hot dog and while it is really not fair to judge any stadium hot dog against

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from every state. For Iowa it was the pork cutlet sandwich that sounded so delicious I wanted to hop on a plane to Iowa just to have one. Much to my delight, one of the food trucks was called the “Iowa Breaded,� which translates into pork cutlet sandwiches.  This simple breaded and fried pork cutlet on a bun with a couple of pickles and nothing else hit the spot like little else in my sporting event foodie memory. Not sure why it

was there, but it was, and it was delightful. There were plenty of other food truck choices and next time the Lions are in town, I will have to check them out, that is if we still have a football team in San Diego. David Boylan is founder of Artichoke Creative and Artichoke Apparel, an Encinitas based marketing firm and clothing line. Reach him at david@ artichoke-creative.com or (858) 395-6905.


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Sophia planned Ceja, 3, of for April Oceanside, 19. See shows the full off story on a handful page A9. of eggs she Photo by Promise found.

Counci l closer

By Jared

Yee

to finalizi ng Pacific

2014

Two commercial be demolished structures of retail at Carlsbad’s to make above, and apartment way for a revampLa Costa Towne buildings. retail. would include that includes Center Courtesy 48 The larger renderings apartments, will the addition new building, a courtyard shown for residents, and

Four city egg hunts

Carlsbad revampe retail center d with apartmeto be nts

By Rachel

Stine

Whitlock are CARLSBAD ENCINITAS for five another — With years, — The the corner cific Viewstep toward the 33-year-old it’s primary council last gettingof El Camino acquiring storefront Councilsite on Wednesday thetook a revamp. Real La Costa Towne favor PaThe empty members and La of a $50,000 night. molish owner of Center conditions Costa voted the property Avenue at ter and two commercial 3-2 in spelled deposit dum of 2.3 times is at gained out in and other and halfreplace them structures that price.” ty. That understanding a memoranCouncilman sion on apartments with buildingsin theapproval to document final purchase Eddington for vocate April from Carlsbad’s that shopping depaves the properTony council million of the purchase, Planning 16. Kranz, said. the way cenagreement, are coming an adfor the end majority Planninghalf retail erty’s figure was forwardCommissioners which a hopes current of ping center based said the $4.3 Commiswas only to approve the with plans But theMay. on the public praised sign, and that intended long debate propby agenda Additionally, as zoning. And a main they said to redevelop the owners item should a first ed in over “(La Costa currently tenant. the it sparked for offer. favor wall. Kranz million have evenwhether the lacks dated shoping that of upping You have Towne a said he signage, said Planning EUSD Encinitasto acquire agreed to council case, which no ideaCenter is) votdehad a the price knowpay ter has the what’s just this Union Commissioner strong much Resident been long big School site from $10 inside, more would have rezoning excited Commissioner District. the it’s not long white Jeff Eddington overdue.” Hap L’Heureux. The cityvaluable. made the mall an inviting,” owning at the prospect the district’s land could eyesore. Aurthur said the site, “This cil is getting would Neil Black rezonehave tried cenof the he’s but worried city pensivelikely have request, to fight “bamboozled.” called “The the counresulted but that court city offered the little the property battle, Last Pacific past, $4.3 million Kranz in an exauction month, View and is in the added. TURN EUSD TO TOWNE not-too-distant bid set Pacific View for cade ago. TheElementary, now offering was due dum of CENTER which council ticking,at $9.5 million.with a to understanding ON A15 more approved closed a minimum the than meeting, bringing Mosaic, de- just With the a memoranat Wednesday the site. before city submitted part 2 the clock Artist delayed Photo the deadline. by Jared city closer Mark night’s an the auction has plans to acquiring a safeguard, Whitlock Patterson EUSDoffer for a up to in case by two monthshas follow the deal donna his Surfing By Promise as mosaic. Mawith the Yee A5 OCEANSIDE Message TURN announcement TO DEAL The final remains — ON A15 Kay’s banLIFT that an The Parker husband installment on ow to building grant Urhelped tells Eden Gardens A&E..................... Family the Kaywill fund grant at the accept Dick (760) reacH us 436-9737 nity’s of the commu- OUSD Resource the Parker meeting City the planned Classifieds.......... A10 Calendar takes Center the honor April 16. Council to youth. commitment to affordable Calendar@coastn Mission at reduce the pledge Food He of A6 & Wine....... B21 form Cove source centernaming thesaid bought housing waste and Legals.................. B12 ewsgroup.com aimed “green reasons. applause project wife was well after his reCommunity teams” Opinion................ at recycling. for two deserved. late The A18 Community@coa News Community affordable Mission B1 Sports.................. A4 were glad stnewsgroup.com resource to have members mixed-use housing Cove Letters A20 the city’s center a family sion Avenueproject on and Letters@coastne as part oped throughis being Mislow-income ing project, of between develwsgroup.com a partnership houspleased and the city center the name equally tional Community and Nawill honor of the sance nonprofit Kay Parker, Renaisthe late The developer. housing a beloved, ground project advocate. will break fair this summer. GradTURN

Two Sections 48 pages

View deal

Center to be of housin part g project

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ADVERTORIAL - This advertising feature is a way to purchase a story about your business that looks like real news.Your article can be published in the Rancho Santa Fe News, the Coast News, Inland Edition or all three! JUNE 20,

Sophia planned Ceja, 3, of for April Oceanside 19. See , shows the full off story on a handful page A9. of eggs she Photo by Promise found.

Council Four city closer egg hunts are to finali zing Pacifi c View deal

By Jared

THE C

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Two Sections 48 pages

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OS, ESCON

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JUNE 20,

Stine

2014

Center of hous to be part ing proje ct

H

TO CENTER

Sophia planned Ceja, 3, of for April Oceansi 19. See de, shows the full off story on a handful page A9. of eggs she Photo by Promise found.

2014

Carlsbad revampedretail center with apartmto be ents

By Rachel

CARLSBAD ENCINITAS for five another — With years, — The the corner cific Viewstep toward the 33-year-old it’s primary council last gettingof El Camino acquiring storefront Councilsite on Wednesday thetook a revamp. Real La Costa Towne favor PaThe empty members and La of a $50,000 night. molish owner of Center conditions Costa voted the property Avenue at ter and two commercial 3-2 in spelled deposit dum of 2.3 times is at and other gained and halfreplace them structures that price.” ty. That understandiout in a memoranCouncilman sion on apartments with buildingsin theapproval to document ng for final purchase Eddington vocate April from Carlsbad’s that shopping depaves the properTony council million of the purchase, Planning 16. Kranz, said. the way cenagreement, are coming an adfor the end majority Planninghalf retail erty’s figure was forwardCommission which a hopes current of ping center based said the $4.3 Commiswas only to approve the with plans ers praised But theMay. on the public sign, and that intended long debate propby agenda Additionally as zoning. And a main they said to redevelop the owners item should a ed in over “(La Costa currently tenant. the it sparked for , Kranzfirst offer. favor wall. million have evenwhether the ing that lacks dated shopof upping You have Towne a said he signage, said Planning EUSD Encinitasto acquire agreed to council case, which no ideaCenter is) votdehad a the price knowpay ter has the what’s just this Union Commission strong much Resident been long big School site from $10 inside, more would have rezoning excited Commission District. the it’s not long white Jeff Eddington overdue.”er Hap L’Heureux. The cityvaluable. made the mall an inviting,” owning at the prospect land the district’s could eyesore. er Aurthur said the site, “This cil is getting would Neil Black rezonehave tried cenof the he’s but worried city pensivelikely have request, to fight “bamboozle called “The the counresulted but that court city offered the little the property d.” battle, Last Pacific past, $4.3 million Kranz in an exauction month, View and is in the added. TURN EUSD TO TOWNE not-too-distafor cade ago. Elementary, bid set Pacific View now offering was due The council dum of CENTER which ticking,at $9.5 million.with a nt to understanding ON A15 more approved closed a minimum the than meeting, bringing Mosaic, de- just With the a memoranat Wednesday the site. before city submitted part 2 the clock Artist delayed Photo the deadline. by Jared city closer Mark night’s an the auction has plans to acquiring a safeguard, Whitlock Patterson EUSDoffer for a up to in case by two monthshas follow the deal donna his Surfing By Promise as mosaic. Mawith the Yee A5 OCEANSIDE Message TURN announceme TO DEAL The final remains ON A15 Kay’s banLIFT nt that — The Parker husband installment on an Urow to building grant will fund grant helped accept Dick tells Eden Gardens reacH the A&E............. Family (760) at Kay 436-9737 us nity’s of the commu- OUSD Resource the Parker meeting the City Council the planned Classifieds.. ........ A10 Calendar takes Center the honor April 16. to youth. commitment to affordable Mission Calendar@c ........ at reduce the pledge Food He of A6 & Wine....... B21 form Cove source centernaming thesaid bought housing waste oastnewsgro and Legals.......... aimed “green B12 reasons. applause project wife was well after his reCommunity up.com teams” Opinion....... ........ at recycling. for two deserved. late The A18 Community@News Community affordable Mission B1 Sports.......... .........A4 were coastnewsgr glad resource to have members mixed-use housing Cove ........ A20 Letters oup.com the city’s center a family sion Avenueproject on and Letters@coa as part oped throughis being Mislow-income ing project, of stnewsgroup develhous- between the a partnership pleased and .com city and center the name equally tional Community will honor of the sance nonprofit NaKay Parker, Renaisthe late The developer. housing a beloved, ground project will advocate. fair this summer. break GradTURN

NEWS

N0. 25

Yee

Whitlock

Two commercial be demolished structures of retail at Carlsbad’s to make above, and apartment way for a revampLa Costa buildings. retail. would include Towne that includes Courtesy Center 48 The larger renderings apartments, will the addition new building, a courtyard shown for residents, and

ON A17

Two commercial be demolished structures of retail at Carlsbad’s to make above, and apartment way for a revampLa Costa Towne buildings. retail. would include that Courtesy Center 48 renderings apartmentsThe larger includes the will new building, addition , a courtyard shown for residents, and

Carlsbad revampedretail center with apar to be tments

TWO SIZES AVAILABLE Council Four city closer egg hunts to fina lizing Pacific View dea l Yee

By Jared

By Rachel

Stine

Whitlock are CARLSB ENCINIT for five another AS — years, AD — With the corner The council cific Viewstep toward the 33-year-oit’s primary last gettingof El Camino acquiring took ld storefron Councilsite on Wednesd the a revamp. Real La Costa Towne t empty favor The members ay night.Paand La of a $50,000 molish owner of Center condition Costa voted the property Avenue at ter and two commerc 3-2 in dum of s spelled deposit 2.3 times is at and other and halfreplace them ial structuregained that ty. That understan out in a Councilm price.” sion on apartmen with buildings documen ding for memoran s in theapproval to final purchase vocate an TonyEddingto ts from April shopping det paves the proper-council Carlsbad’ that are million of the purchase Planning 16. Kranz, n said. cenagreementhe way coming an ads Planninghalf retail for the end majority erty’s figure was , forwardCommissioners hopes t, which a current of ping center based said the $4.3 Commiswas only to approve the with plans But theMay. on public praised sign, and that intended long debate zoning.the propby agenda Additiona a main they said to redevelop the owners as a first And it item should ed in over “(La Costa currently tenant. the lly, Kranz sparked for offer. favor wall. million have evenwhether the lacks dated shoping that of upping You have Towne a said he signage, said Planning EUSD Encinitasto acquire agreed to council case, which no ideaCenter is) votdehad a the price knowpay ter has the what’s just Union strong much Resident been Commissioner inside, this big long School site from $10 more would have rezoning excited Commisslong overdue.” District. the it’s not white Jeff Eddingto Hap L’Heureu The cityvaluable. made the mall an inviting,” ioner owning at the prospect the district’s land could eyesore. Aurthur n said x. “This the site, cil is getting would Neil Black rezonehave tried of the he’s cenbut worried city pensivelikely have request, to fight “bamboo called “The the resulted but that court city offered zled.” counthe little the property battle, Last Pacific past, $4.3 million Kranz in an exauction month, View and is in the added. TURN EUSD TO TOWNE not-too-di for cade ago. Elementary bid set Pacific View now offering was due The council , which dum of CENTER ticking,at $9.5 million.with a to understand ON A15 more stant meeting, approved closed a minimum the than Mosaic, de- just With the a memoranthe site. bringing ing at Wednesday before city submitted part 2 the clock Artist delayed Photo the deadline. by Jared city closer Mark night’s an offer the auction has plans to acquiring a safeguard Whitlock Patterson EUSD for a up to , in case by two monthshas follow the deal donna his Surfing By Promise as mosaic. Mawith the Yee A5 OCEANS Messag TURN announce TO DEAL IDE The finale remains ON A15 Kay’s banLIFT ment that — The husband installme on an Ur- Parker helped ow to building grant nt tells Eden Gardens A&E........ Family the Kaywill fund grant at the accept Dick (760) reacH us 436-9737 nity’s of the commu- OUSD Resource the Parker meeting City the planned Classified ............. A10 Calendar takes Center the honor April 16. Council to youth. commitm affordable Calendar Mission at He ent to reduce the pledge Food & s.......... B21 of A6 form Cove source centernaming thesaid bought housing Wine....... @coastne waste and Legals..... wsgroup.c aimed “green B12 reasons. applause project wife was well after his reCommuni at recyclingteams” Opinion.. ............. for two om deserved. late The A18 Communi ty News Communi affordable Mission . B1 Sports..... ..............A were ty@coastn ty glad ............. 4 resource to have members mixed-use housing Cove ewsgroup Letters A20 .com the city’s center a family sion Avenueproject on and Letters@ as part oped throughis being Mislow-incom ing project, coastnew of devele hous- between a partnersh sgroup.co pleased and the city m ip center the name equally tional Communi will honor of the sance nonprofit ty and NaKay Parker, Renaisthe late The developer housing a beloved, ground project advocate. . will break fair this summer. GradTURN

Two Section 48 pages s

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Two commerc be

Sophia planne Ceja, 3, of d for April Ocean 19. See side, shows the full off story on a handfu page A9. l of eggs she Photo by Promise found.

Counci l closer

By Jared

Yee

to fina lizing Pac

demolish ial structures ed to of retail at Carlsbad make above, and apartmen way for ’s a revampLa Costa retail. would include t buildings. Towne that Courtesy Center 48 renderings apartmen The larger includes the will new building, addition ts, a courtyard for residentsshown , and

Four city egg hunts

Carlsba d revampe retail center d with apar to be tments

By Rachel

Stine

Whitlock are CARLS ENCINI for five BAD — another TAS — years, With the corner The council cific Viewstep toward the 33-year it’s primary last gettingof El Camino acquirin took -old La storefro Councilsite on Wednes g the Paa revamp Real andCosta Towne nt empty favor The member day of a $50,000 . molish owner of La Costa Center s voted night. conditio Avenue at ter and two commerthe propert 3-2 in dum of ns spelled deposit 2.3 times is at y gained out in and other and halfreplace themcial structur that ty. That understanding a memora approva Council price.” es with sion on apartme docume final purchas vocate man TonyEddingt nnts from building in the shoppinl to deApril nt pavesfor the propercouncil Carlsba s that are million of the purchas Plannin 16. g cene agreem the way Kranz, on said. coming d’s Plannin half retail g an adfor the end majority e, erty’s figure was forwardCommissioners hopes ent, which a current of ping center g Commis based said the $4.3 was only to approve the with plans But theMay. on praised sign, and that intendepublic zoning.the proplong debate by agenda Additio a main they said to redevelop the owners d as a And it item should ed in over “(La Costa current tenant. the sparked for favor nally, Kranzfirst offer. wall. ly lacks dated shopmillion have evenwhether the ing that of upping You have Towne a said he signage said Plannin EUSD Encinit to acquire agreed to council case, which no ideaCenter is) vot, dehad a the price knowas Union ter has the site pay $10 g what’s just strong much Residen been Commissioner inside, this big long School from more would have rezonin excited t Jeff Commis long overdue District the it’s not white Hap L’Heure g The cityvaluable. made the Eddingt mall an sioner . inviting owning at the prospec .” land the district could on said eyesore Aurthur ux. “This ,” the site, cil is getting would ’s rezonehave tried . t of the he’s Neil Black cenbut city pensivelikely have request to fight “bamboworried called “The resulted , but that court city offeredozled.” the counthe the propert little battle, Last Pacific past, $4.3 million Kranz in an exauction month, View and is y in the added. TURN EUSD TO TOWNE not-toobid set Pacific View for cade ago. Elementa now offering was due distant dum of The council ry, which CENTER ticking,at $9.5 million.with a understan closed ON A15 more minimu to the a de- just than meeting, bringing ding approved a Mosai With the m at Wednesd memoran the site. before city submitt the clock Artist c, part 2 Photo the deadlin ed ay night’s- delayed by Jared city closer Mark an has plans to acquiring a safeguathe auction Whitlock Patterso e. EUSDoffer by n rd, in for a up to case the two monthshas follow donna his Surfing By Promise deal with as mosaic. MaYee the A5 OCEAN Messa TURN announc SIDE TO DEAL ge The final remain ON A15 Kay’s banLIF ement that — The husband installm s on an Ur- Parker helped ow to buildingT grant ent tells Eden Garden A&E..... Family the Kaywill fund grant at the accept Dick (760) reacH us 436-973 ............. nity’s of the commu-s OUSD Resourc the Parker meeting City the planned Classifi Calenda ... A10 7 e Center takes the honor April 16. Council to youth. commit affordab Mission Calenda r at ment to reduce the pledge Food eds.......... B21 He of A6 & Wine.... form r@coast Cove source centernaming thesaid bought le housing waste newsgro ... B12 and Legals.. aimed “green reasons. applause project wife was well after his reCommu up.com at recyclin teams” Opinion ................ for two deserve late The A18 Commu nity News Commu g. B1 affordab Mission d. nity@co Sports.. ................A4 were le glad nity astnews ............. resource to have members mixed-use housing Cove Letters ... A20 group.c the city’s center a family sion Avenueproject on and om Letters @coastn low-incoas part of oped throughis being Mising project, develme hous- between ewsgrou a pleased and p.com the partner center the name equally tional Commucity and ship will honor of the sance nonprofi nity NaKay Parker, Renaisthe late t develop The housing a advocatbeloved, fair ground project will er. this summer break e. . GradTURN

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

OCT. 2, 2015

Food &Wine

Hospitality baked to perfection at the Oak Room taste of wine frank mangio

P

ala Casino Spa & Resort has brought the art of fine dining and wine tasting to its highest level, with the sweeping success of its Oak Room. Sure, there are still the slot machines and card games in the common areas

and lots of entertainment in this high-rise resort just east of Interstate 15, and the buffet is the best of the casino locations in San Diego. But Pala mastered all these rules of casino management before it could break the rules of casino fine dining, by presenting a four-diamond world class steakhouse with prime streaks and chops as well as fish, lobster and other delicious entrees at its Oak Room. The executive chef is Robert Camerota, who is

in charge of the 11 restaurants at the Casino, including CAVE, the new sensation at Pala. Camerota gained fame when he was chef for Steve Wynn and his many hotels in Las Vegas, Atlantic City and overseas. In 2008 he found the perfect home for his “Chef to the Stars” reputation, at the Oak Room. At the Oak Room, everyone’s a star. “Fabulous, amazing and perfect” are comments that I heard from the dining guests who savored the luscious entrees, a culinary Robert Camerota, a top executive chef, creates the culinary special- adventure found only in ties at Pala Casino’s 11 restaurants, including the Oak Room. Cour- the finest dining capitals of tesy photo the world. The assembled professionals know how to serve. George Myers, our table attendant, confidently detailed the special offerings, while placing a bread ensemble at our table with a variety of dipping sauces and my favorite Riesling, the Chateau St. Michele Eroica. Some choices selected included the Prime beef, bone-in Filet Mignon steak, and dry aged for 21 days and double cut. Perfect with sides like roasted sweet corn, spinach or asparagus steamed or grilled. The Chilean Sea Bass was TURN TO TASTE OF WINE ON 26

WINE OF THE MONTH By Frank Mangio

Wiens Family Cellars Sampler Pack About the Wines: Thanks to the creative Wiens Family of Temecula, the wine buyer can now enjoy 18 glasses of three distinctly Italian style as yet unreleased red wines, in a stylistic boxed package: 2014 Barbera with racy notes and bright red fruit; a 2013 Refugio (Cabernet Sauvignon) with toasted oak notes of dark red fruit with herb and chocolate hints; and 2014 Sangiovese with notes of strawberry preserves, black tea leaves and textured tannins, the home varietal of Tuscany Italy. This decorator package makes a perfect gift or a talking highlight at your next dinner party. About the Winery: Wiens Family Cellars in Temecula is the home of the “Big Reds.” In 2005, the winery began in the present location with a temporary tasting room, with the new facility in place in 2006. A tasting room, barrel room, cellar room, event pavilion and outdoor patio are kept busy presenting a large array of reds. The Cost: The Red Wine Sampler Pack is a limited production, three half-bottle item at Wiens Winery for $62.50; $50 for club members. Call (888) 989-4367, or visit wienscellars.com.


OCT. 2, 2015

25

T he R ancho S anta F e News

new approach to an old problem will bring amazing results. An older friend or family member will come to you for help.

SOUP TO NUTS by Rick Stromoski

By Eugenia Last FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2015

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

Dreaming about the future may be entertaining, but in order to get results, you must take action. Stop waiting for others to take you where you want to go. Consider what is best for you and your loved ones and make your move.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Get serious and put your personal affairs in order. Delays can be costly when it comes to legal or financial contracts. Talk to a trusted adviser.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If you aren’t making any progress, ask yourself if your LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Follow your plans are realistic and solid. If not, plan a intuition. If there is someone from your workable strategy and keep moving forpast who you think could help you out, ward. Strive for perfection. contact him or her. A new partnership or GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Boredom joint venture looks promising. will leave you having trouble focusing. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Minor health matters must be addressed be- Take on a new project, hobby or sport fore they escalate. Don’t let others dictate to keep your mind sharp. Check out your what you should be doing. Act on your community center for upcoming events, own instincts when faced with an unex- courses and activities. pected choice.

THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You may be looking for a miracle, but don’t fall for a smooth sales pitch. Get credentials before you open your wallet to a questionable party. An emotional whim will lead to a costly loss.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You may want to consider a move or an alteration to your living space to increase your comfort and reduce your stress level. Delays with travel or communication can be expected.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- An employer or colleague will be the source of a troubling situation. Don’t trust anyone else’s version of the facts. Look for the truth and use discretion.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t give anything away. You will end up regretting it if CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Invest you act too quickly. Take a break and do in you and your attributes. Brainstorming something that you enjoy to prevent makwith friends, neighbors or colleagues will ing a mistake. pave the way to a new source of income. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Realize that Love and romance will play in your favor not everyone will agree with you. Being and encourage unity. pushy is not an option. You will get further

BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce

MONTY by Jim Meddick

ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

ALLEY OOP byJack & Carole Bender

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Let oth- ahead if you look out for your interests ers in on some of your innovative ideas. A and let others do the same.


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TASTE OF WINE CONTINUED FROM 24

also a favorite, moist and lightly seared. I left the wine choice up to General Manager Steven Whisler, whose depth of wine knowledge left me listening to what he had to say, especially his choice: A 2006 Feather Cabernet from Walla Walla Washington, made by Randy Dunn, a renowned maker of Cab from Howell Mountain in the Napa Valley of California. Feather is part of a group of wines, orchestrated by Long Shadows Vintners of Washington and founder Allen Shoup, 20 years with Chateau Ste. Michelle. He is considered the founding father of modern Washington wines.

To learn more about the Long Shadows wine collection, visit longshadows.com. Whisler also revealed that he stocked close to 500 wines, showcasing the best of Napa Valley with a best effort to create value in the list. Speaking of my favorite subjects, a wine and dinner event is planned in Pala’s underground CAVE, Oct. 7, when Napa Valley’s Trefethen Family Vineyards comes to the resort, complimenting a four-course dinner. From Trefethen Riesling to a finely crafted “Double T” blend, all Trefethen wines are of the highest quality. The price per person is a reasonable $68. Pala’s Oak Room wine choice was the 2006 Feather Cabernet, made Reservations must be by the Napa Valley wine legend Randy Dunn. Photo by Frank Mangio made at (877) 946-7252. Ask

OCT. 2, 2015 to “book the wine dinner on Oct.7.” A note that the Oak Room is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. I have just returned from a historic journey to Sonoma and the Napa Valley for the harvest, covering 16 wineries and resorts. A three part series will follow over a two-month period, for your interest and education. Wine Bytes Tuscany Italian Restaurant and Lounge in La Costa is bringing back the talents of Jazz and Soul singer Rebecca Jade, Oct. 4 in the lounge from 6 to 8 p.m. She will do a tribute to the international singer Sade; $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Tuscany will also be doing a wine tasting event Oct. 7. For details, call (760) 929-8111. MiraCosta College in Cardiff presents a Napa Valley Wine Class Oct. 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. This is the first class of a three-week Wednesday VIP class tour, tasting such wines as Rombauer, Chateau Montelena, and Silver Oak. Tuition is $60; materials $50. Enroll by calling (619) 9802135.

Seasalt Restaurant in Del Mar has a Ferrari Carano Wine Dinner Oct. 7 at 6 p.m. Special five-course dinner menu paired with award winning wines. The main course is Beef Tenderloin served with Ferrari Carano Tresor blend; $55. Call (858) 755-7100 to RSVP. A Napa Valley Vintners Grand Tasting will be presented by Meritage Wine Market in Encinitas, and the Encinitas Chamber of Commerce, Oct. 10 from 6 to 9 p.m. Pre-purchase tickets at Meritage for $65. Reductions for multiple tickets. Details at (760) 753-6041. Monte De Oro Winery in Temecula brings in a concert by The Blues Travelers, Oct. 17. Doors open at 6 p.m., concert at 7 p.m. Seats start at $65. Added pricing for VIP features. Details at (951) 491-6551. Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. He is one of the leading wine commentators on the web. View and link up with his columns at tasteofwinetv.com, and reach him at mangiompc@aol.com. Follow him on Facebook.

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OCT. 2, 2015

27

T he R ancho S anta F e News

RESIDENCE 2 MODEL

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EXCLUSIVE LUXURY RESIDENCES set BEHIND PRIVATE GATES Expansive homesites, breathtaking views from the low $1,700,000s Located at the pinnacle of Del Sur and adjacent to Santaluz 4,396 to 7,384 square feet with up to 6 bedrooms & 6.5 baths Exquisite architectural details, magnificent outdoor living spaces Optional guest suite, wine room, caterer’s kitchen, separate cabana (select homesites)

14914 RIVAWILL COURT / SAN DIEGO, CA 92127 / 619.546.5070 THEESTATES@STANPAC.COM / STANDARDPACIFICHOMES.COM

2015 GOLD NUGGET AWARD WINNER COMMUNITY OF THE YEAR

Prices, plans, and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Square footage/acreage shown is only an estimate and actual square footage/acreage will differ. Buyer should rely on his or her own evaluation of useable area. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape, and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary. No view is promised. Views may also be altered by subsequent development, construction, and landscaping growth. This ad contains general information about a new home community in California and it is not an offer or the solicitation of an offer for the purchase of a new home. This information is not directed to residents of any other state that requires registration or permit issuance prior to the publication of such information. Plans to build out this neighborhood as proposed are subject to change without notice. Standard Pacific Corp. California Real Estate License No. 01138346. 8/31


28

T he R ancho S anta F e News

OCT. 2, 2015

5 at this payment (Standard 2.0i Prem CVT model, code FRC-12). $0 due at lease signing. $0 security deposit. Tax, title and registration fees extra. Cannot be combined with any other incentives. Special lease rates extended to well-qualified buyers and are subject to credit approval, vehicle insurance approval and vehicle availability. Lessee pays personal property and, insurance, maintenance repairs not covered by warranty, excessive wear and tear and a mileage charge of 15 cents per mile for mileage over 12,000 miles per year. Must take delivery from retailer stock by October 2, 2015.

Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations. Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2015 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.

Car Country Drive

5500 Paseo Del Norte Car Country Carlsbad

Car Country Drive

760-438-2200

www.bobbakersubaru.com ** EPA-estimated fuel economy. Actual mileage may vary. Subaru Tribeca, Forester, Impreza & Outback are registered trademarks. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, $80 dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 10/2/2015.

ar Country Drive

179

$

Car Country Drive

2015 Volkswagen Passat Limited Edition per month lease 36 Months $2499 Due at Signing

JEEP • CHRYSLER • MITSUBISHI

JEEPCHRYSLER MITS

760-438-2200 VOLKSWAGEN

5500 Paseo Del Norte Car Country Carlsbad

BobBakerVW.com

All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, $80 dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 10-4 -2015.

ar Country Drive

ar Country Drive

5 at this payment. Based on MSRP of $24,815 (including destination charges) for a new, unused 2015 Passat Limited Edition 4 Door with automatic transmission, excluding title, tax, options and dealer fees. Excludes TDI® Clean Diesel models. Monthly payments total $6,444. Acquisition fee of $625 included in amount due at signing. No security deposit required. Requires dealer contribution of $3,536, which could affect final negotiated transaction. Purchase option at lease end for $13,152. At lease end lessees responsible for $0.20/mile over 30,000 miles and excessive wear and tear. Dealer sets actual prices. Lessee responsible for insurance. Closed-end lease offered to highly qualified lessees on approved credit by Volkswagen Credit through participating dealers. U.S. cars only. Excludes Puerto Rico. Additional charges may apply at lease end, including a disposition fee ($350) Offers end October 4, 2015

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The rancho santa fe news, october 2, 2015  

The rancho santa fe news, october 2, 2015