The Rancho Santa Fe News, Oct. 19, 2012

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OUTSTANDING YOUTH

Rancho Santa Fe teen Malia Rappaport is chosen as the Outstanding Youth Volunteer for her B1 charitable efforts.

5 FOR 3

Five candidates for the Rancho Santa Fe School Board talk about why they should be elected to fill three of the Board’s open A2 seats.

CELEBRATING 5-0 RSF Tennis Club turns 50 The Rancho Santa Fe Tennis Club 50th anniversary celebration Oct. 7 features a barbeque and clinic for all ages, culminating in an exhibition with club pros and Tracy Austin, a two-time U.S. Open champion and Wimbledon mixed doubles champion who was a special guest at the celebration. Clockwise from left,Tracy Austin readies herself for a serve. Club pro Derek Miller hits a scorcher as doubles partner Allie Denike waits to see if the opposing side will answer back. Club pro James Conda tries to defend Derek Miller’s shot. Photos by Jared Whitlock

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These students got a perfect score on all or part of their state required STAR testing helping the school get the highest Academic Performance Index scores in the school's history. Photo by Patty McCormac

Rancho Santa Fe School Board celebrates students’ API test score results By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe School Board meeting on Oct. 11 was all about celebrating, first the highest Academic Performance Index scores in

the history of the school and then those students who scored perfectly on their state-required STAR testing. “Thank you for doing a great job on the STAR test,”

said Lindy Delaney, district superintendent. “You gave it your best shot. You have the gift of intelligence and you used it to the best of your ability.” Each of the students

shook the hands of the school board and received a certificate and a pin. “It’s why we do what we do,” said Jim Depolo, board president. “It’s our pay,” said

Marti Ritto, board member. Students who achieved a perfect score for the STAR math test for the 2011-2012 for second grade were TURN TO RESULTS ON A14


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School board race heats up Burdge hopes to return as senior member By Patty McCormac

S

takes are high in the Rancho Santa Fe School Board race. Five people are running for three spots. This is the first time in several years that voters can have their say, because over the years, a number of the spots on the board were appointed when an elected member left mid-term. The major issue, of course, is how to maintain programs with ever-shrinking school funding. Things are bad and could get worse. In light of the loss of school funding, some of the candidates say the school’s budget needs a closer look at how money is being spent. Test scores loom as another issue. School officials say the scores are better than fine, but some of the candidates feel students could do better. Below meet the candidates for the school board:

Candidate puts focus on school finances Continuing to turn out well-rounded graduates from R. Roger Rowe School should be the first responsibility of the school board, said candidate Todd Buchner. He said test scores are important, but not the most important thing. “Too much of a good thing is not a good thing,� he said. It is important for children to get involved with other activities such as sports, or drama or robotics.

set that has been put “These are all together. I would focus terrific opportunion the financial side of ties for our children the equation. I want to to have at the school make sure we are getand they are really ting a good return on out of this world,� our investment.� he said. New to Rancho Besides, he Santa Fe from said, there is “a Colorado, he views huge financial crisis TODD BUCHER serving as a way to way looming� and that needs to be addressed as well. to give to the community, plus “We are blessed with a he has four children. He and his family moved great facility,� he said. “We have terrific vision and a value to Rancho Santa Fe in 2010. “I have four young kids and there is a huge benefit of living in such a special community,� he said. “Since we have moved here we have been struck by the quality of people and the importance of the school to the community and it is exciting.� He said he thinks he can bring something special to the board. “At this point in my career,

Burdge said he believes Richard Burdge is running for his third term on the state funding will be “a big and Rancho Santa Fe School Board. continuous challenge,� during He wants to offer four more the next four years. He said school officials are years of history and experience, having served on the waiting to see how voting goes board during the battleground in November on a couple of years of the polarizing issue of propositions that could aid a new school for the district and school funding. “If that does not the current chalpass, there will be furlenge of the drastic ther cuts in dollars in cuts in school fundRancho Santa Fe in ing. substantial amounts of “I have been money in the hunon the board for dreds of thousands of eight years and have dollars,� he said. a good background “There is about to be about where we are potential major financoming from and where we are,� he RICHARD BURDGE cial impacts going forsaid. “I want to continue as the ward.� He said the decrease in senior member on the board to give guidance for the next four funding for schools in recent years has already had a major years, which will be my last.�

impact on funding and that it will be a challenge for school officials to continue to offer students the programs currently offered. “I am offering the community continuance in the board’s policy and actions,� he said. Having children in the district is the reason he originally got involved. In 1993, he and his wife moved the family to Rancho Santa Fe and here they have stayed sending their children through the local school district.He now has a second-grader attending R. Roger Rowe. It has not always been easy being a board member, like during the tumultuous years of trying to either build TURN TO BURDGE ON A14

Brovick-Kent seeks to involve parents

Lorraine Brovick-Kent is Standard Testing, or CST. “It reflects how a secondrunning for Rancho Santa Fe School Board not because she is grader is doing in Rancho all about test scores, but also Santa Fe,� she said.“How a secbecause she wants more trans- ond-grader is doing in San parency between the adminis- Francisco.How a second-grader tration and parents. Another is doing everywhere else.� “Every parent should be reason is that she wants to make sure the money allotted concerned with test scores,� she said. “School offito the school is cials have a tendency spent wisely, but to tell parents only test scores are also about the good things very important to that happen, but you her. need to get a realistic She said that snapshot about where the Academic we are.� Performance Index, She said parents or API, is an imporcan go to cde.ca.gov tant way to compare LORRAINE to read the results for the progress of stu- BROVICK-KENT themselves. dents in similar “What you really need to schools, but a more realistic TURN TO BUCHAR ON A14 way to see a student’s progress tell parents is ‘this is what we is the results of the California are good at,this is where we are

at and this is where we need to grow,’� she said. Brovick-Kent said the children at R. Roger Rowe School are getting a good education. “But,I think for the money we are spending we should being doing better than the school next door,� she said. “It’s not a contest to be No. 1, but I have to ask myself, why aren’t we?� She has had children continually in the district since 1996. She still has an 11-yearold at the school. If elected, she said, she would also like to take a close look at the budget. “I am reading between the bottom line,� she said. “I look at the budget, at spending, TURN TO BROVICK-KENT ON A14

Candidate looks to individualized education

Experience Extraordinary.

A person who grew up in (Rowe). I still call it Rancho. Rancho Santa Fe and who We then went to Torrey Pines attended R. Roger Rowe all High School.� “I have a unique perspecthe way through eighth grade would certainly have a unique tive that no other candidate perspective on the community has,� he said. Now he and his wife have and the school. Tyler Seltzer believes he does and that is three children — ages 8, 6 and 4 — and have one of the reasons returned to Rancho he is running for Santa Fe so that the school board. kids can take away the “When I was 1 same fond memories year old my family of their elementary moved to Rancho school as their parSanta Fe,� he said. ents. “I went to the “We had great Village Preschool, so did my wife Liz TYLER SELTZER experiences at the school,“he said.“If my (McElhinney). We both went all the way K kids 20 years from now view through eight at Rancho their time here as we have, we

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have done our job.� Seltzer was appointed to the school board last year when Jim Cimino was transferred to Texas with his job. Seltzer said he wants to stay the course of the current board. “I am a proven, productive and effective member of the school board,� he said. “If you ask (the others), they say I am a positive addition to the school board.� “I think the school is doing great,� he said.“I see the test scores are going up and are extremely high. I do think test scores matter, of course they TURN TO SELTZER ON A14

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“I believe our school Heather Slosar says she has five very good reasons to needs to get a bigger bang for run for the Rancho Santa Fe the buck,� she said. She said R. Roger Rowe School Board — her five chilin the past had been rated the dren. No. 1 school in the “I will have county. children at Roger “Year after year Rowe until 2025. I we were No. 1 until have an interest in 2002. What hapthe long-term sucpened?� she asked. cess of our school,� She said Rancho she said. Santa Fe is spending If elected, she 60 percent more per said she would student than other work toward having the school HEATHER SLOSAR schools in the county. “I feel we should again being ranked No. 1 in test scores in the be in the top 10 for API Performance county, getting foreign lan- (Academic guage back into the elemen- Index) scores and we are not,� tary school curriculum and she said.� She said the school keeps pumping up the retention of students who leave Rowe creeping away from the top when they hit middle school. spot in the county.

“We have some of the best staff and parents and I really feel like perhaps we need to refocus,� she said. She said test scores are important for many reasons. “Our children will be taking tests throughout their academic life,� she said. She does not agree with those who say that test scores are not that important. “It is a great measure of what our children have learned,� she said. Test scores and school ranking are also things people look at when they are considering buying a home in a particular district. She said if elected she would also look at the retenTURN TO SLOSAR ON A14


Association OKs funds for repairs to Osuna By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Anyone who has ever undergone a remodel project on an older house can identify with the Osuna Committee, which is stripping the plaster off the original adobe as part of a restoration process. When the plaster was removed it was revealed that three window headers and two door headers had rotted. “The rotted condition of the headers is a substantial structural risk that could result in failure of the wall above the windows and doors,” Arnold Keene, field operations manager, told the Association at its Oct. 4 meeting. “You can literally stick your finger into that rotted wood,” he said. This latest discovery made it necessary for the Osuna Committee to ask the Association for more money in the amount of $24,720 of Open Space Funds for the structural repairs. Before giving the OK to the funds, director Ann Boon said, “I have two words for you: ‘money pit.’” Director Larry Spitcaufsky asked the Association staff to put together a long-range plan for the completion of the adobe. “I don’t want to give any more money out of the fund without an overall plan,” he said. “I am comforted by that,” Boon said. On the subject of Open Space Funds, the Association gave the final approval to updating the name and uses for Open Space Funds. It was decided by the Association at its Oct. 4 meeting that it will now be known as the Covenant Enhancement Policy and Fund to better describe for what the funds

are being used. The fund was originally established to purchase passive open space to protect the Covenant’s rural ambiance, but has since been used to purchase ball parks, parking lots and the Osuna Adobe. At the meeting resident Mark Holmlund told the Association it should consider using some of the money for fire mitigation, noting that his neighbor has numerous dead and dying eucalyptus trees, which add to the fire danger of his home. Member John Dodds also had an opinion. “I don’t think it is the responsibility of the board to buy real estate for the members,” Dodds said. The fund will have about $4 million after the sale of the single-family home on the Osuna Ranch. After the vote, the money can be used for the purchase of critical parcels for use as open space; for the purchase of parcels, which would allow the removal of existing development; the purchase of buildings, land, easements or development rights to preserve the uniqueness of Rancho Santa Fe; to contribute to partnership acquisition of open space by others such as the county, the Rancho Santa Fe Foundation and the Coastal Conservancy; for recreational needs such as parks, playgrounds and sports fields; and to renovate, enhance or improve Covenant resources or the safety of the community. In other news, the Association voted to set the Association’s Assessment rate at 14 cents per $100 of property valuation with the allocation of 11.5 cents for general services and 2.5 cents for Open Space.

Fusion of food and wine benefits charity RANCHO SANTA FE — The Equinox Center is hosting an evening of gourmet food and rare vintage wines from 6 p.m. until the wine is gone Nov. 10 at The Bridges at Rancho Santa Fe, 18378 Calle Stellina. The event is planned to raise awareness and funds for Equinox Center to help maintain and preserve quality of life in the San Diego region. San Diego chefs and sommeliers will prepare food and wine for the guests. The evening will also host live entertainment and a small private auction. Tickets start at $250 and will increase to $300 after Nov. 5. To purchase tickets, visit equinoxcenter.org/donate/eve nt.html or call (760) 230-2960. Equinox Center is an independent, non-partisan, not for profit policy and research center that turns research into action to help the San Diego region achieve a more prosperous economy,

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OCT. 19, 2012

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Land-use plan available for public review By Bianca Kaplanek

Hoping to submit an approved Local Coastal Program Land Use Plan to the California Coastal Commission before the end of the year, the city has released the revised document for a six-week public review. Most recently, at the Sept. 26 meeting, council voted 3-2 to continue work on the plan rather than adopt it as it was presented, reject it or adopt it with changes. The Coastal Commission had made more than 150 recommended changes to a plan council adopted earlier this year. An LCP is the basic planning tool used by cities to guide development in the

coastal zone. It is required by the California Coastal Act of 1976 to ensure coastal areas are used and developed according to statewide public objectives. Each LCP contains ground rules for future development and protection of coastal resources. It includes a land-use plan and zoning ordinances to implement that plan. Solana Beach is unique in that the entire city falls within the coastal zone. It is one of a handful of cities statewide — and the only one in San Diego County — without an approved LCP. The city has submitted six drafts to the Coastal Commission since 2001. The most problematic

issue in Solana Beach’s efforts to obtain a certified LCP is sea walls. Bluff-top property owners say they should have the right to build the structures to protect their homes. Environmentalists say the shoreline protection devices prevent the natural creation of a beach and will eventually eliminate land that belongs to the public. City Manager David Ott said the revised plan includes a request from blufftop owners that would extend by a year or two the 20-year permit for a sea wall. Under the new plan most bluff-top owners would also have an opportunity to remodel their homes or expand them when outside

the geological setback line. The document is available at City Hall, 635. S. Coast Hwy. 101, or on the city website at ci.solanabeach.ca.us. The public comment period will end at 1 p.m. on Nov. 26. Staff will then organize all comments received and present them to the council during a public meeting. Ott said bluff-top owners have made a “strong request” for the current council “to make a decision on this.” “We really want to make this work,” Councilman Mike Nichols said. “We want this to be our plan, the city of Solana Beach’s plan, and not the state of California’s plan.”


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O PINION &EDITORIAL

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of the Rancho Santa Fe News

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS OCT. 19, 2012

COMMUNITY COMMENTARIES The Community Commentary section is open to everyone. Opinions expressed in the Community Commentary section are in no way representative of The Coast News Group. Send submissions no longer than 700 words to news@coastnewsgroup.com. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Will Romney push Libya issue or opt for caution? By Byron York

COMMUNITY COMMENTARIES The Community Commentary section is open to everyone. Opinions expressed in the Community Commentary section are in no way representative of The Coast News Group. Send submissions, no longer than 700 words, to editor@coastnewsgroup.com with “Commentary” in the subject line. Submission does not guarantee publication. If published, please wait one month for next submission.

Politics takes back seat to fight against cancer By Stuart Rickerson

The media is ablaze with stories on how Congress is partisan and that gridlock stalls the Nation’s leaders. This letter tells a different story. The House of Representatives took a huge step in the fight against deadly cancers last month when it unanimously passed the Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act (H.R.733). My Congressman Brian Bilbray (50th), along with other local representatives, co-sponsored the bill and worked to get it to this historic vote. The legislation requires the National Cancer Institute to establish a long-term plan, or “scientific framework,” aimed at defeating cancers with exceptionally low survival rates, including pancreatic cancer. The bill is both essential and timely. According to a new report by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, pancreatic cancer is expected to move from the fourth to the second leading cause of cancer death as early as 2015 and surely by 2020 — unless the deadly trajectory of its mortality figures can be changed. Pancreatic cancer is a ruthless disease. It has a five-year survival rate of just 6 percent. That makes it the only major cancer killer in America with singledigit 5-year figures. This year nearly 44,000 Americans will be diagnosed with the disease and more than 37,000 will die within 12 months. The disease attacks women and men, the elderly and those in the prime of their lives, the successful and the disadvantaged, and it cuts across ethnic and racial lines in the US. As a pancreatic cancer patient, I know what it is

like to face these statistics and how it affects families. I’m here today only through a series of lucky accidents. But luck shouldn’t determine who lives and who dies in the greatest medical technology society in the world. That’s where the bill comes in: it begins to replace luck with science. The Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act will help reverse the trends, taking us closer towards developing a reliable early detection method and more effective treatment options for pancreatic cancer. I thank Congressman Bilbray for his support along with other San Diego Representatives and their colleagues across the country. Congressman Bilbray worked hard as a Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee to ensure that this bill was voted favorably out of committee and then continued his tireless work to see its passage on the house floor. In all, 294 House Members, Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives, put their differences aside to create hope for so many Americans — and their families, friends and co-workers. I call on the Senate to follow the House’s lead and vote on the companion bill (S.362) very soon after Election Day, so it can go to the President to be signed into law during this 112th Congress. Then we can start to put this deadly disease behind us. To thank your Representative for their vote, to urge Senators to get S.362 to a floor vote in 2012, or to learn more about the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s, to visit knowitfightitendit.org. Yours sincerely, Stuart Rickerson is a Rancho Santa Fe resident.

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In the closing days of the 2004 presidential campaign, The New York Times and “60 Minutes” reported that U.S. forces had lost track of hundreds of tons of dangerous munitions in Iraq. The story quickly dominated media coverage, and Democratic candidate John Kerry decided to devote the final stretch of his campaign to slamming President George W. Bush over the issue. “Our country and our troops are less safe because this president failed to do the basics,” Kerry said on the stump, citing “incredible incompetence” in the Bush White House. “My fellow Americans, we can’t afford to risk four more years of George Bush’s miscalculations.” If Kerry hoped the Iraq weapons issue would put him over the top, he was mistaken. He went on to lose by more than a million votes. The Democrats had lots of other problems that year, but perhaps one lesson of the missing-weapons episode is that seizing on a last-minute event probably doesn’t change the longestablished dynamics of a race. That’s something Mitt Romney’s supporters are keeping in mind as they consider new and damaging information about the Obama administration’s handling of the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, that left ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans dead. Evidence is mounting daily that the Obama administration not only mishandled the security issue in Libya, but that top administration figures — from the secretary of state to the U.N. ambassador to the president himself — pushed a version of events that the administration knew was untrue. Given all that, there are those in Romney’s extended circle of aides and advisers who want to see the candidate come out swinging against Obama on the Libya issue. And then there are those who counsel holding back. With the exception of a brief moment around the vice presidential debate, when Obama officials accused Romney of politicizing the issue and Romney hit back, the advocates of restraint are winning. The case for coming out swinging: The scandal is both significant and revealing. Obama’s top aides have wanted the public to believe that the fight against al-Qaida pretty much ended with the death of Osama bin Laden. And in their desire to present the chaotic, dangerous situation in Libya as “normal,” they dangerously underemphasized security for Ambassador Stevens and his staff. Then they misled the public about it. The case for holding back:

The Libya story is moving forward on its own, pressed by Republican Rep. Darrell Issa and Rep. Jason Chaffetz (an active Romney surrogate), who are running the House investigation. The recent House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing put some of the basic facts of the story into wide circulation. It’s bad news for the Obama administration, and it doesn’t need a push from the Romney campaign. And besides, the race is still fundamentally about the economy. That’s all true, but it’s also true that there are still many details that might well seize the public imagination, if only the public knew them. For example, Pennsylvania Republican Rep. Mike Kelly, a member of the House committee, wrote recently that just days after the State Department denied funding for the Libya embassy to continue using an airplane for security, it approved a request from U.S. diplomats in Vienna to spend $108,000 to buy a charging station for their new fleet of Chevy Volts — part of what the Obama administration calls the “greening of the embassy.” If a skilled politician can’t make something out of those misplaced priorities, he probably shouldn’t be running for high office. Then there is the fact that the Benghazi attack was just part of ongoing violence in the region. For example, on Oct. 11, a Yemeni expert providing security for Americans was assassinated just before the anniversary of the attack on the USS Cole in that country. “The threat is still out there, and the Obama administration has not responded to it,” says a Republican foreign policy expert who supports Romney. “That is a lack of leadership. Why not go to town on it?” The advocates of a more aggressive stance make a compelling case. But right now that compelling case is knocking up against the innate caution of the Romney campaign. And maybe the voices of caution are right. When congressional investigators (and reporters) go after a story, as they’re doing in Libya, it’s always possible to get caught up in the chase and lose sight of the bigger picture. It’s up to Mitt Romney to step back, to remember cases like those missing Iraqi munitions in 2004, and decide what course is best for the presidential campaign. At the moment, the cautious position is winning the day.

Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.


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Poverty in Carlsbad highlighted in annual CPI report Oceanside have taken part in It’s in the Bags Food Collection. McBride describes the food collection program as a simple, yet powerful way to give along with their friends and co-workers. For McBride, the CPI report meant that the face of hunger is not stereotypical. “One in six means that person who is food-insecure could be your neighbor, a coworker, a friendly senior at your church or the child who plays with your child in

By Christina Macone-Greene

In the picturesque coastal town of Carlsbad, it’s hard to believe that some families are stricken with poverty. But a recent Center on Policy Initiatives, or CPI, report on “Poverty, Earnings, and Income in San Diego” highlighted poverty levels in San Diego, including Carlsbad. CPI is a nonprofit research company and action institute based in San Diego. “Every year, the Census Bureau releases data collected through the American Community Survey,” said Corinne Wilson, CPI research and policy lead. “CPI analyzes and reports on the data from San Diego County that impacts working families.” In this CPI report, 12.4 percent of Carlsbad residents were living in poverty in 2011. Wilson pointed out that this percentage was substantially higher than at the peak of the business cycle in 2007, when the poverty rate in Carlsbad was at 5.9 percent. “While Carlsbad is generally doing better than the region as a whole, one in eight residents was living in poverty in 2011. For those 25 and older without a college degree, the poverty rate was much higher, with one in five living in poverty,” she said. Wilson continued, “Keep in mind that this counts only people living below the federal poverty level, which varies by family size, an extremely low level compared to the cost of living.” What CPI noticed was that while major industries did create more jobs in San Diego, the pay did not reflect the cost of living. Full-time, year-round employees in most of the region’s biggest industries, Wilson said, earned less or roughly the same as five years before. “As the economy rebuilds for the future, we need real earnings to start to

school,” she said. “By giving the most basic necessity, food, people can get in touch with the fact that people going hungry in our community is a terrible shame and unacceptable.”

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Carlsbad resident, Gina McBride, established “IT’S IN THE BAGS” food collection program to address the needy and hungry in San Diego County. Pictured here is a collection at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Del Mar. Courtesy photo

increase and employees need to be able to make ends meet through wages and benefits,” Wilson said. The federal poverty level in 2011 was listed at $11,484 for a single person and $22,811 for a family consisting of two adults and two children. And San Diego is considered a high-cost region. “Imagine trying to live on that amount of money,” she said. “For example, approximately one in five or 8,000 Carlsbad households made less than $25,000 in 2011.” Carlsbad resident Gina McBride gave herself a “call to action” when she discovered the percentage of those living in San Diego County who were food-insecure. McBride established “It’s in the Bags” food collection program. McBride kicked off this program in September 2009 to coincide with National Hunger Action Month. It’s in the Bags offers an

opportunity for all businesses, organizations or faith centers to take part in. It’s ideal for a team-building group project, McBride said, because everyone participates by helping people in their own community. “We want to provide a turn-key experience that can help them determine the nonprofit organization that provides food assistance in their community and develop the list of the most needed items for that organization they want to benefit,” McBride said. “Materials can also be included with the bags regarding hunger action education and advocacy as well as the joys of helping your neighbors in need.” To date, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Del Mar, Del Mar Rotary, and St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in

Still time to support schools RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Education Foundation will honor Cap & Gown contributors to the R. Roger Rowe School with a Polynesian Soiree Nov. 3. It’s not too late to contribute today and join the party. The event is to be held at a private residence in the Ranch from 6 to 8 p.m. The celebration follows the recent Red Envelope Friday campaign, a school-wide effort to collect contributions supporting the Foundation’s Five-Star

Education programs. The Cap & Gown Reception is an annual event honoring contributors at the Cap & Gown level and above. This event is sponsored by our Community Partner Wells Fargo Bank. The Polynesian Soiree is by invitation only. If you would like to join contributors at the Cap & Gown ($2,000 per child), contact Allison in the RSF Education Foundation Office at (858) 756-1141, ext. 208, or visit rsfef.org.

858 793 8884


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OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Contract awarded for Highland improvements By Bianca Kaplanek

After approximately four years of discussions and more than a year of planning, a project aimed at slowing traffic and improving pedestrian and bicyclist safety at the eastern gateway to the city is moving forward. City Council at the Oct. 10 meeting awarded a $285,780 contract to PAL General Engineering Inc. for improvements on Highland and Lomas Santa Fe drives. “It’s a great project,” Councilman Mike Nichols said. “This project has had a pretty long history. It started off with a much more comprehensive traffic-calming program. “(The residents) didn’t quite want that much work done so we listened,” he said. “We got a project together here that I think truly is going to calm traffic, add parking and get that sidewalk on Highland that everybody’s wanted.” For years area residents expressed concerns about speeding cars and a lack of sidewalks along the roads. Council began to address

Area residents have long complained about the lack of a sidewalk along the west side of Highland Drive, next to the golf course. Council members recently awarded a contract for an improvement project that will add a curb, gutter and sidewalk to this section of the roadway. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

the project in 2008 and iden- ing a consultant in October 2010 to develop design altertified funding in 2010. City staff developed natives. In April 2011 plans were conceptual plans before hir-

presented that included temporarily restriping Lomas Santa Fe to reduce it from four lanes to two from Las Banderas Drive to Highland. “We took the project to the homeowner association in the east side of the city,” City Engineer Mo Sammak said. “It was very clear to us that the community did not want to see any work on Lomas Santa Fe so we removed the work on Lomas Santa Fe.” Although council members supported the lane reduction, they unanimously approved a revised plan at the March 14 meeting that eliminated that traffic-calming element. The project was advertised for one month beginning this past August and 11 bids ranging from $285,780 to $461,034.90 were received, with PAL’s being the lowest. Plans on Highland from Sun Valley Road to Lomas Santa Fe include adding a curb, gutter and sidewalk along the west side next to the golf course; widening the east side to add a bike

lane south of the San Dieguito Park entrance; replacing an asphalt berm on the east side with a concrete curb; and restriping to add a two-way left-turn median lane. Painted medians and bike lanes will be added on Highland from Lomas Santa Fe to Via La Senda. A raised median island and curb ramp pop-outs will be built on Lomas Santa Fe west of Highland. Ladder-type crosswalks will be added on Highland at the intersections of Sun Valley, Lomas Santa Fe and Via La Senda. If funding allows, a retaining wall may be built west of the proposed sidewalk on Highland. Pavement slurry sealing and raised medians on Highland between Uno Verde Court and Via La Senda may also be added. With a 15 percent contingency of $43,000 and $29,000 for inspections and testing the total estimated project cost is $357,780. The city has $403,100 available from stimulus, state and TransNet funds.

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RideFACT helps seniors get mobile COAST CITIES — Facilitating Access to C o o r d i n a t e d Transportation (FACT) inaugurated RideFACT, a regional transportation service for seniors Oct. 11. FACT is a non-profit formed in 2005 to meet the transportation needs of seniors, persons with disabilities, and low-income individuals. RideFACT was implemented as a pilot project in January 2012 in a limited service area, and in July 2012 it was expanded to all cities in the county, as well as Ramona and Spring Valley. It is a service that enables seniors to travel between any of the cities for affordable fares ranging from $2.50 to $10, for the first time in the county’s history. FACT operates the service through its transportation brokerage, which uses nonprofit and for profit transportation services; the brokerage allows FACT to shop for the lowest prices available before selecting vendors for each trip. FACT is using County TransNet Senior Mini-Grants to administer RideFACT. In the next year the service will be expanded beyond the cities to non-urban and some rural communities. RideFACT operates seven days a week; reservations are accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Trips must be requested one to seven days ahead of the travel date. To schedule a ride or inquire about transportation options, please call FACT at (760) 754-1252 or (888) 924-3228. FACT operates as a mobility management center that assists callers with finding existing transportation services in their communities. When existing services are not available or appropriate, FACT will book the trip through RideFACT. For more information on FACT, visit factsd.org.

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In the Lumberyard Shopping Center


RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

Science to uplift us all KYLE STOCK Coastal Cosmos It unites, heals, excites, perplexes, amazes, inspires, motivates and most importantly, teaches. Science is everywhere, all the time. It drives economies, technologies and cultures. We are born scientists; we begin exploring the world around us and learn through experimentation. “What are these things attached to my body? Fingers!� “What happens when I push this off the couch? Gravity!� As we grow up, many of us stop asking questions, stop hypothesizing and stop learning. I have said it before; we are very fortunate in San Diego. The dynamism of our geology, oceanography and ecology provide ample opportunities to explore and cultivate inquisitiveness. We live in a beautiful region with world-class science research institutions and an abundance of technology innovation. San Diego science is also making a mark on a national level. Over the past few months, former President Bill Clinton has made the political talk show rounds promoting San Diego as a model for how

The author's telescope sits waiting for a night of observing in AnzaBorrego Desert State Park. Science is everywhere and everyone can contribute and make discoveries. Photo by Kyle Stock

cities can grow by fostering science and innovation. Clinton says, “What's working in America are these cooperative clusters like San Diego. San Diego has become the human genome research capital of America.� He goes on to say, ‘Qualcomm, the largest computer company there has stimulated 700 computer companies in the region. Why? Because they're all working together.�

Throughout the United States there is much malaise and discontent. Horrific tragedies, rebellion and riots, economic turmoil, joblessness, political drivel, extreme weather disasters etc. Where can society find positivity and hope? Science. In the midst of all the negativity, recent scientific achievements inspire and excite us. Discoveries TURN TO COASTAL COSMOS ON A14

NO

W

Arch Health Partners is Proud OPEN to Serve the 4S Ranch Community.

Arch Health Partners (AHP) is proud to announce the opening of our new 4S Ranch medical center. For the ďŹ rst time, residents have primary medical services available in the community — including personalized family medicine, x-ray and laboratory. Nasrin Arbabi, M.D.

Camille Santos, M.D.

Stuart Graham, M.D.

AHP 4S Ranch is led by board-certiďŹ ed family medicine physicians Nasrin Arbabi, M.D. and Camille Santos, M.D. Stuart Graham, M.D., a board-certiďŹ ed AHP pediatrician since 1994, has moved his practice from the Poway ofďŹ ce. He provides care for children from birth to 18 years of age. All three physicians are accepting new patients. When it comes to your health, ďŹ nding the right physician is essential. Choose Arch Health Partners – named a Top Performing Medical Group for its achievement in quality measures and use of technology by the Integrated Healthcare Association for three consecutive years. Centrally located on the corner of Camino del Norte and Dove Canyon Road — the ďŹ nest care available is now even closer to home.

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OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

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SELLING BILLIONS IN LUXURY REAL ESTATE

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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

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6024 Paseo Delicias, Ste. A, P.O. Box 2813, Rancho Santa Fe • 858.756.4024 • Fax: 858.756.9553 • barryestates.com


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OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Dr. Adventure: Taking the roads less traveled seeker Brad Grant of Del Mar and globetrotter and author Patricia Schultz. Grant, aka Dr. E’LOUISE Adventure, has been to spots ONDASH on the globe that most of us don’t know exist. Hit the Road And Schultz, a If you think you’re a sea- Manhattan resident, just soned traveler, consider the completed the second ediitineraries of adventure- tion of “1,000 Places To See

Before You Die” (Workman Publishing). Writing both editions has taken her to “approximately 80 percent of the places listed in the book,” she said in a recent phone interview just after returning from Taiwan. “I’ve never kept track of the miles I’ve traveled, nor have I ever counted how many countries I’ve been to. As for frequent flier miles, I spend them as soon as I accumulate them.” The first edition of “1,000 Places … ” required eight years of travel, research and networking to document the destinations listed in the book. “A lot of people think that’s enough time,” Schultz said, “but the reality is that you can only scratch the surface in that time.” Already a veteran traveler when hired in 1995 to write the first edition of “1,000 Places … ,” (she also had lived in Italy, France and Spain and written for Frommers and Berlitz), Schultz decided not to revisit those places where “I already felt comfortable, like the Louvre and the Grand Canyon, though they still belonged in the book. So as

Writer Patricia Schultz discovered at age 15 what travel can do for the soul. A trip to the Dominican Republic “turned my life around.” She also loves coming home to her Midtown Manhattan apartment where she is five minutes from the theater district. Courtesy photos

soon as the ink was dry on the contract, I went off on an eight-year odyssey to areas of the world I didn’t know.” As a kid growing up in a small town on the Hudson River, Schultz’ adventures were limited to summer trips to the Jersey Shore. “It seemed like high adventure at the time,” she recalled. “My parents held sacred the family vacation. You would think we were going to the

Del Mar resident Brad Grant, aka Dr. Adventure, took a group to Borneo where this photo was taken. “My travel business is unlike any out there,” he said. Among the expeditions in recent years are trips to Antarctica, the North Pole, far-eastern Russia and Mozambique.

moon for as excited as we got.” Then, at age 15, Schultz visited a classmate who lived in the Dominican Republic. “My parents worked double, triple shifts to buy me that plane ticket. It was two weeks that turned my life around.” When asked about her favorite destinations, she said, “I often feel that my most recent trip is my favorite. I just returned from Japan and I’m a newborn fan. Tokyo has about 14 million people but it’s an incredible city that’s very organized and easy to navigate. People are remarkably kind, patient and respectful.” When it comes to adventure travel, you’d be hardpressed to find something that Brad Grant hasn’t done. The Del Mar resident was a family practice/sports medicine physician, marathoner and triathlete who for years

Brad Grant, a retired family and sports medicine physician, swings from a vine in the Amazon jungle. The Del Mar resident designs and executes trips in exotic places for the highly competitive athletes with whom he once competed.

also competed on extremesport teams. “Then my wear-and-tear caught up with me,” said the 58-year-old, aka Dr. Adventure. “I had a hip replacement and lost vision in one eye, so I was thrust out of the competitive realms. So I thought it through, and after many years of helping other people get involved, I sold everything and took a leap and created a new business.” Grant’s “niche” enterprise consists of offering adventure travel to all his past associates and friends with whom he once competed. He designs the expedition, puts together transportation, accommodations and local guides, then puts the word out. “I have a large database from my years of involvement,” said Grant, who also served as a doctor and drug tester for the U.S. Olympic team. “I always go unusual places and never repeat trips. And I also act as videographer and doctor — a value-added approach.” Grant offers up to a dozen trips a year and participants number two to 14; most are Europeans and South Americans in their 40s and 50s. “The trips are pretty challenging so I want to have a good handle on who I’m taking,” he said, but as his customers age, “we’re starting to run some softer trips that the average person can do.” Grant gave no definition of “average,” but consider past destinations and activities: climbing the highest mountain in Antarctica; skiing the North Pole; horseback riding in Kamchatka, a peninsula in extreme-eastern Russia where it rains 110 inches a year, and 29 of the 160 area volcanoes are still active; and diving for whale sharks in Mozambique. “We go to areas where there is plenty of food so they aren’t looking to us for food.” Adventures run from three weeks to three months and cost between $2,000 and $80,000, “depending on where we go and how long we stay,” Grant explained. Checkout Grant’s adventures on YouTube.

E’Louise Ondash is a freelance writer living in North County. Tell her about your travels at eondash@coastnewsgroup.com.


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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

Artist has modern and vintage twist on green art ARTS CALENDAR TGot an item for Arts calendar? Send the details via email to calendar@coastnewsgroup.com. TICKET TIME *The UltraStar Mission Market Place Theater, offers “Much Ado About Nothing” at 7 p.m. Oct. 23 and Oct. 29, and “Doctor Faustus” at 7 p.m. Nov. 8 and Nov. 13, 431 College Blvd., Oceanside. Tickets are $12.50. E-mail jenn@ultrastarmovies.com or visit ncfilmclub@gmail.com for more information. * Feeding the Soul Foundation is hosting a holiday concert featuring Steve Poltz and Bushwalla & Friends benefiting Canine Companions for Independence at 6 p.m. Dec. 1 at the Star Theatre 402 N. Coast Highway, Oceanside. Tickets are $100 with Italian dinner , $30 for concert only.

OCT. 19 CLASSIC

CINEMA The French film “Of Gods and Men” will be show for free at 1 p.m. Oct. 19 at MiraCosta College, San Elijo Campus, 3333 Manchester Ave., Room 204. English subtitles.The film of 2 hours, 3 minutes is rated PG-13 and is based on the true story of a small group of Cistercian monks in Algeria in the 1990s.

OCT. 20 TEENS ONLY Cardiff Library hosts a free “Teen Movie and Munchies” at 2 p.m. Oct. 20 at 2081 Newcastle Ave.. Feature film is on the big screen, presented by the Friends of the Cardiff Library. For more information, call (760) 753-4027 or visit sdcl.org. PHOTO ART The Encinitas Library will host an opening reception for the North County Photographic Society, Members’ Exhibition from 1 to 4 p.m. Oct. 20, at 540 Cornish Drive. Meet the artists, enjoy live music and refreshments. For more information, visit NCPhoto.org. BLUES TIME Robin Henkel sings the solo blues from 8 to 10 p.m. Oct. 20 at Zel’s Del Mar, 1247 Camino Del Mar, Del Mar. For more information, call (858) 755-0076.

OCT. 21 GET CLASSICAL A concert of light classical music by New Ground Chamber Music 2 will be held at 3:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at First Christian Church, 204 S. Freeman St., Oceanside.Tickets are $15. Reservations may be made at ocaf.info.

OCT. 22 Through the end of 2012, the Encinitas Library at 540 Cornish Drive exhibits Robert Wald’s “Lost Heritage: The Dorymen of Cardiff.” Through photography and text, the exhibit chronicles the thriving fishing industry in the 1970s. For more information, visit TheOceanMag.com.

OCT. 23 FINE, FREE FILMS See a free, critically acclaimed film every Tuesday on the full-size movie screen, with snacks from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive. Call the library for specific film titles. For more information, call (760) 753-7376.

ARTISTS OF LONGSTANDING The public is invited to view an exhibit of art and meet the artists from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at a reception at El Corazon Senior Center, 3302 Senior Center Drive, Oceanside. Staff members will conduct tours of the facility and provide information available for seniors and members of the community.

KAY COLVIN A Brush With Art A rising star is blurring the boundaries between fine art and craft. Marcus Papay, winner of multiple awards for innovative designs, continues to push the envelope of contemporary furniture design in his new Leucadia studio. Having learned threedimensional construction techniques from his father and grandfather, the Camarillo, Calif., native tells that he was “much more interested in how things were put together than in art” before pursuing his bachelor’s degree in applied design at San Diego State University. With a travel grant awarded during his subsequent graduate studies at San Diego State, Papay studied the furniture design firm of David Trubridge in New Zealand. “The designers were centered around ecologically responsible design, using recycled material and designing objects using as little as possible … The green and sustainable message they were presenting was legit; however the products seemed to be lacking stability and, I felt, could have been designed differently to last longer but express their ‘green’ statement.” Papay continues, “Addressing sustainability and ecological issues is more than just using recycled or ‘up-cycled’ materials, labeling your product ‘green’ and jumping on the sellable bandwagon of the green movement. I make work that stimulates the idea of using the minimal amount of resources to create the functional

objects in our lives that interest in his current “Sinuous” should out-live the user.” The recipient of the 2009 lighting collecNiche Awards’ furniture cate- tion is “to create gory says that a pivotal point nostalgic forms in his artistic development with a modern that occurred during the MFA pro- edge the gram at San Diego State enhances when design instructor Wendy Maruyama pushed the conceptual content of his work. He says, “ O n e thing t h e y don’t tell y o u about the Masters of Fine Art program is that … it is a full sensory investigation of everything around you, including yourself, as well as your past.” He continues, “I was simply building things before. I Marcus Papay displays his 60” x 30” carbon now build things fiber and mahogany sculpture entitled because of emotion- “Vessel,” from the Karen Fox Collection, at al meaning and the San Diego Contemporary Art Fair. what it means to (Marcuspapaydesign.com) Courtesy photo build it.” Papay’s aesthetic style has been mystery of the connection we described as “an interpreta- have with the generations tion of recognizable design, before.” Using computer aided modernized with new age composite materials that rep- modeling programs during resents lifestyle in Southern the design process, he says, California.” He says, “I pre- “With the use of modern fer to make nostalgic objects we associate with earlier time periods … A time when the creation of objects embodied pride that was invested into each detail.” Incorporating modern aesthetics with traditional design and a sense of hand–made craftsmanship, Papay says that the driving

materials (fiberglass and epoxy), I suggest a vintage product through a modern lens, embracing today’s design interests and all the baggage it comes with.” Papay says, “Surround yourself with beautiful things and you will be a happier person. Make your beautiful things last forever and you will be a happier person forever.” Marcus Papay’s work can be seen locally at Leaping Lotus in Solana Beach and at Urban Lighting in Downtown San Diego, as well as at Marcuspapaydesign.com. Kay Colvin is an art consultant and director of the L Street Fine Art Gallery in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter. She specializes in promoting emerging and mid-career artists and bringing enrichment programs to elementary schools through The Kid’s College. Contact her at kaycolvin@lstreetfineart.com. Say you saw it in The Rancho Santa Fe News

RSF library guild hosts author visit RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Library Guild’s ongoing Author Talk has just added to its fall author schedule, welcoming Adriana Trigiani presenting her book “The Shoemaker's Wife.” Trigiani will speak to the group from 11:30 to 1:30 p.m. Nov. 9 at the Rancho Santa Fe Branch Library, 17040 Avenida de Acacias. This event is only open to Rancho Santa Fe Library Guild members, however everyone is invited to become a member of the Library Guild.The cost for the author visit is $35 and includes author presentation, a signed copy of the book, and a light lunch. Go to rsflibraryguild.org or call (858) 756-4780.


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OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

M ARKETPLACE N EWS

Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

Could this be your solution to numbness, tingling, or burning pain? Do you have any of the following symptoms? Pins and needles feeling? Numbness in the hands or feet? Tingling or burning sensations? Weakness in the arms or legs? Sharp shooting or burning pains? If so, you may have a condition called Peripheral Neuropathy. Numbness, tingling, and pain are an extremely annoying problem. It may come and go...interrupt your sleep...and even make your arms or legs feel weak at times. Maybe you’ve even been to other doctors and they claim all the tests indicate you should feel fine. More Drugs Are Not The Solution. A common treatment for many nerve problems is the ‘take some pills and wait and see’ method. While this may be necessary for temporary relief of severe symptoms, using them long term is no way to live. Some of the more common drugs given include pain pills, anti-seizure mediations, and anti-depressants — all of which can have serious side effects. My name is Dr. Jeff Listiak. I’ve been helping people with neuropathy and nerve problems for more than 6 years. Neuropathy can be caused by Diabetes, Chemotherapy,Toxins, etc. It may also be compounded by poor posture or a degenerating spine stressing the nerves.

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The good news is that NeuropathyDR™ combination treatments have proven effective in helping patients with these health problems. Here’s what one of my patients had to say: “I had been feeling very sharp pains in my feet… they just felt like they were on fire. I just couldn’t stand it… every night for the last year or two. I’m so excited today to tell Dr Jeff that four days in a row I have felt no pain whatsoever.” — Marilyn You could soon be enjoying life...without those aggravating and life-disrupting problems.

Don’t Miss This Limited Time Offer. It’s time for you to find out if NeuropathyDR™ treatment protocols could be your neuropathy solution. For the next 14 days only, $20 will get you a complete NeuropathyDR™ Analysis that I normally charge $255 for! What does this offer include? Everything. • An in-depth discussion about your health and wellbeing where I will listen…really listen…to the details of your case. • A posture, spine, range of motion, and nerve function examination. • A full set of specialized x-

rays (if necessary) to determine if a spinal problem is contributing to your pain or symptoms. • A thorough analysis of your exam and x-ray findings so we can start mapping out your plan to being pain and numbness free. • And, if after the thorough analysis we feel we can’t help you, we’ll tell you that right away. Until Nov. 2nd, 2012 you can get everything I’ve listed here for only $20. So, you’re saving a considerable amount by taking me up on this offer. Call (760) 230-2949 now. We can get you scheduled for your NeuropathyDR™ Analysis as long as there is an opening before Nov. 2nd. Our office is located just off Interstate 5 in Cardiff, just a few minutes from you. When you call, tell us you’d like to come in for the NeuropathyDR™ Analysis so we can get you on the schedule and make sure you receive proper credit for this special analysis. Sincerely, Dr. Jeff Listiak, D.C. P.S. Remember, you only have until Nov. 2nd to reserve an appointment. Why suffer for years in misery? That’s no way to live, not when there could be help for your problem. Take me up on my offer and call today (760) 230-2949.

One-on-one instructional middle/high school opens a campus in Carlsbad The demand for personalized education is growing across the country and has landed in our backyard. Halstrom High School, the pioneer of 1:1 instruction, moved its campus from Vista to centrally located Carlsbad to serve more families in the north county area. At Halstrom High School, classrooms consist of one student and one teacher, offering 1:1 instruction in a caring environment with flexible scheduling options. Students are able to learn their way, on their schedule. Halstrom provides a designated space called “The Study” where students can chill out, talk to friends, do homework, get help from teachers or sign up for extracurricular activities. In addition, Halstrom helps students by preparing them for tomorrow’s world through its technology-rich environment. Halstrom’s iPad program gives students access to textbooks, lessons, teaching aps, and communication with their teachers — all in the palm of their hand. A few students share their experience at Halstrom:

thing has changed for the better.” Kendall: “As a competitive swimmer, I was having trouble balancing my training and studies. “I found Halstrom’s 1:1 instruction helped me work on areas of my course work that needed the most attention. “This year I was fortunate to make it to Olympic trials, and this fall I’m excited to start college at Northern Arizona University on a swimming scholarship.”

Students at Halstrom, a new middle and high school in Carlsbad, benefit from the one-on-one instructional experiences.. Photo courtesy of Halstrom

Kiana “Before coming to Halstrom, I didn’t take school seriously. “Now that I’m at Halstrom, I’m looking at universities and planning what I want to do with my life. It means more to me to come to

school and turn in my homework and have the teachers be proud of me because I have the one-on-one relationship with them. Not only have my grades changed, but my attitude has changed. “My outlook on life and my outlook on school — every-

Dallas: “I’m a professional go-cart driver and aspire to one day be a professional race car driver. “Through Halstrom’s flexible scheduling, I’m able to go to school Monday through Wednesday, then train and race Thursday through Sunday. “Between classes, training and racing, I fit in homework and am able to keep up in school. Halstrom makes it even easier with all my books and lessons on the iPad. “And the teachers at Halstrom make sure that no matter what, you get it. And they try to make sure you don’t quit — with anything.”

Why everyone needs an estate plan ■ Save a fortune on estate

taxes, ensure your assets go to the heirs of your choice By Angela L. Vehorn,

Author of “Estate Planning and Elder Care”* It’s National Estate Planning Awareness Week! In 2008 the National Association of Estate Planners & Councils (NAEPC), in conjunction with Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA) and 49 of his colleagues, co-sponsored and helped pass H. Res. 1499, which declared the third week in October National Estate Planning Awareness Week. This means that in 2012, National Estate Planning Awareness Week falls on Oct. 15 through Oct. 21. Did you know: The majority of Americans over 65 are totally dependent on their Social Security checks. With proper knowledge and planning, future generations can have a more secure retirement. It is estimated that over 120 million Americans do not have an up-to-date estate plan to protect themselves and their families, making estate planning one of the most overlooked areas of personal financial management. With advance planning, issues such as guardianship of children, managing bill paying and assets in the event of sickness or disability, care of a special needs child, long-term care needs, and distribution of retirement assets can all be handled with sensitivity and care, a reasonable cost. The majority of Americans lack the ability to adequately plan for their retirement. This can be changed immediately with knowledge and the right planning tools, such as living trusts, pourover wills, advance health care directives and irrevocable life insurance trusts (ILITs). Many people mistakenly believe that since they aren’t “rich” they do not need to do any financial and estate planning. Estate planning is not just for the wealthy and is important for everyone. This attitude can be financially harmful in the long-run and can be avoided with proactive action. You care deeply about your family and you want to ensure the assets you have worked so hard for will go to them when you die. How much of your estate will go to taxes and attorneys? How much will be left for your heirs? Your estate plan determines the answers to these questions. Therefore, it is imperative that you take the

time to consider which estate-planning options, such as living trusts, are available and which are best for your particular circumstances. The living trust may also be called a revocable living trust, inter vivos (Latin for “while living”) trust, A-B trust, or the double trust system. It is named the “living trust” because it is in effect during your lifetime and enables you to observe and control the trust, giving you the opportunity to alter or amend any provisions. This type of control is not possible with a will or an irrevocable trust. Remember that the living trust is a creature that is entirely dependent upon the words within it. Thus, it needs to be carefully drafted to contain the things you want and which are appropriate to you. Having a living trust means that, since all your assets are inside the trust, you do not hold title to anything. Since you have nothing in title in your own name, there is nothing to probate upon your death. With these factors in mind, we are offering estate planning (for those with estates under $2 million) and advanced estate planning workshops (for individuals with higher net worth) on the following dates: • Tuesday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m. Seascrest Village, 211 Saxony Road, Encinitas • Tuesday, Oct. 30, at 2:30 p.m., The Inn at Rancho Santa Fe 5951 Linea Del Cielo, Croquet Cottage, Rancho Santa Fe Please call (760) 8222640 to secure a spot. Space is limited. For more information, visit our website at trustdocprep.com. We look forward to seeing you there! If you are unable to attend the above workshops, please call to schedule a home appointment or one at our convenient Carlsbad office. Angela has worked with estate planning attorneys, including renowned estate planning attorney Donald J. Burris (author of “Protecting Your Assets”) since 1987. In addition to her book “Estate Planning and Elder Care,” she has co-authored several books on the subject. She’s been participating in estate planning seminars since the early 1990s, and has been a certified paralegal since 1989. She is licensed to work as a legal document preparer in Arizona and California. *available on amazon.com


A13

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

T HE R ANCH S PORTS

Contact us at sports@coastnewsgroup.com with story ideas, photos or suggestions

Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning orchestrates a 24-point comeback, tying an NFL record for most points overcome. The Broncos would shut out the Chargers in the second half and win 35-24 Monday night. Photos by Bill Reilly

Manning’s aim is true in win over Chargers By Tony Cagala

BOOK IT Rancho Santa Fe resident and professional golfer Phil Mickelson hits a 100-yard shot from endzone to endzone during the Chargers/Broncos Monday Night Football game for a chance to raise $1 million for charity. Mickelson was able to raise $50,000 with his shot, which will go to the purchase of new books for children in need. Photo by Bill Reilly

At his home in Vista, famed skateboarder Jeff King sits on a rail he built for “Flat Bar Fridays,” a dormant event that made a comeback at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. King is considering revisiting the rails that made him famous. Photo by Jared Whitlock

Jeff King gets back to basics By Jared Whitlock

Many remember Jeff King destroying his home in Encinitas two years ago. For King,it was a last hurrah. His Encinitas home, known as the Shred Ranch, was scheduled to be plowed over. King wasn’t a bad neighbor; he simply had to make room for nine luxury homes. Before the wrecking ball hit, he converted his entire home into a makeshift skatepark and invited friends and pros to do what they do best — skate. The demolition party was filmed for “Built to Shred,” King’s television show that featured him transforming everyday terrain and trash into skateable ramps and rails. But as a double-whammy for King, the show was canceled about a year after Shred Ranch’s demise. “The show was a ton of work, but I was sad to see it go,” King said of “Built to Shred.” “There was kind of a

question mark after it ended.” King currently lives with his wife, 3-year-old son and dog at his new Vista home, where a mini half pipe, rails, a chicken coupe, various crops and tools for woodworking can be spotted. From the ashes of the Shred Ranch and his show, King is building his life up again. He’s even eyeing a return to his roots. King served as the commentator and also brought some of his rails to a skateboard contest at the Del Mar Fairgrounds Oct. 6 during The Boardroom Surf Board Expo. It’s King’s way of testing the waters, as he’s thinking about resurrecting the rails that made him a local legend. Prior to hosting “Built to Shred,” about a decade ago he started King Rails, a business that sold rails for skateboarders. Initially, he held “Flat Bar TURN TO KING ON A14

SAN DIEGO — The time, the place was set for a good old-fashioned duel — Monday night, 5:30-ish at Qualcomm Stadium — between two of the NFL’s most notable quick draw quarterbacks. On one side there stood the fast and wild Philip Rivers; on the other the rehabilitated sharp shooter Peyton Manning. In a duel, the advantage lies in the quickness, but the key to survive is the aim. Rivers, 30, was quick to the draw, slinging the ball against the Broncos defense — in his 41 pass attempts Rivers got rid of the ball in an average of 2.32 seconds to Manning’s 2.41 seconds in his 30 pass attempts; but Manning, 36, had the aim. And that aim proved to be what kept the Broncos alive in a comeback win (overcoming 24 points at the half, tying an NFL record) and tying the Chargers at 3-3 for first place in the AFC West. Manning completed 24 of his 30 passes; Rivers completed 25 of his 41 passes and would throw four interceptions, a career high. He attributed those interceptions to being mostly just “poor throws.” Rivers, entering his ninth season, said that he wasn’t fooled once by the Broncos defense. He said the interception on the third down pass to Robert Meachem in the third was an attempt to “be an incomplete or maybe get interference.” Turner reduced Rivers’ interceptions to “trying to make a play.” Every loss hurts, Rivers said. “Regardless of what negative plays or bad plays or how you lose a game. When you lose it’s rough.” Turner said the loss was as tough as it gets. “Right now we’re not able to put together a complete game,” he said. Turner remained high on his team, describing them as an “awfully resilient group.” He added that there are things they have to fix so they

can play a complete game. Monday night’s loss is the second in a row where the Chargers led at halftime and let the game slip away in the second half. The Chargers led 17-14 at the half against New Orleans in a game that saw the Saints score 17 unanswered points in the second half for the win. Against the Broncos, Rivers struggled in the first two series to open the game, with each drive resulting in Mike Scifres’ punts. Special teams was able to give the Chargers’ offense extra opportunities from Dante Rosario’s fumble recovery on a punt and a Corey Lynch fumble recovery on a kickoff. Both plays resulted in Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers looks off to the sidelines after throwChargers’ scores. On the defensive side ing one of four interceptions in the loss to the Broncos. Quentin Jammer intercepted a pass from Manning and ran it back 80 yards for a touchdown in the second quarter, his first points of the season. “Obviously, we got the turnovers early and it gave us some momentum,” Turner said. “We made big plays. Defensively, we got great presin San Diego sure.” E x p an d ed Type 1 & Type Whether Manning had 2 Track s lost anything following his surATTEND THIS geries, one to repair a bulging disk and the other to fuse a nerve in his neck, no longer seems to be a valid question. He came out in the secIT WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE! ond half going 85 yards in eight plays, instigating a palpable shift in momentum. Manning finished the game throwing for 309 yards and three touchdowns. Bobby De en Turner didn’t single out Cr ystal Bowersox any one player or coach for any failings, instead taking the full brunt of the blame. “If Saturday, October 27, 2012 you want to make this about San Diego Convention Center somebody, it’s not about one of San Diego, CA : 9:00am - 5:00 pm the guys; make it about me,” he said. Sponsored by The Chargers head into Pre-Registration only $20.00 per week seven with a bye, before person : $15.00 per person when they resume against the 1-5 2 or more register together Cleveland Browns, Oct. 28. (Pre-Reg closes Oct 19 @ 12pm PST) In Collaboration with “I think if you look at our Day-of Registration: $25 per person team and you look at the (Registration fee includes healthy lunch) stretches where we play at a high level, we’re capable of Exhibiting opportunities Registration & Information Available at: available, contact becoming a very good team,” david@tcoyd.org www.tcoyd.org | 800.99TCOYD Turner said.

DO YOU HAVE DIABETES? DIABETES CONFERENCE & HEALTH FAIR

A m e rican I d o l Runner-up

Ce l e b r it y

Ch e f


A14 RESULTS

CONTINUED FROM A1

Malcolm McDonough and Pierce Rosenblatt; for third grade were Michael Chang, Matthew Fromm, Richard Gomez, Dax Kay, Delaney Lee-Bellows, Tessa Maud, Ella Sobhani, Thomas Witmeyer and Wasay Zaman; for fourth grade were Morgan Kiernan, Hannah Loly, Lucas Luwa and David Maldonado; for fifth grade were Daniel Carr, Ryan Curcio, Sheila Kaiser, Alex Lillian, Gabrielle Nguyen, Elyse Rosenblatt, Natalie Slosar and Rachel Waite; for sixth grade were Brandon Fitzpatrick, Breana Nguyen and Gabriella Patino; and for seventh grade were Lauren Flaming and Tiffany Zhang. Students who achieved a perfect score for language arts were: Zachary Kindel,

SLOSAR

CONTINUED FROM A2

tion of middle school students, which seems to be an issue. “I want our middle school to be the choice of middle school families. We lose students to private schools,” she said. Her next issue is that foreign language is not in the curriculum in elementary school as it has been in the past. “One year it just disap-

SELTZER

CONTINUED FROM A2

do,” he said. “We are pushing 960 (out of a possible 1,000) if we are not already there,” he said. “With 650 students, what we care about most as a school board is being responsive to all their needs,” he said. But, he said, test scores are only part of the measure of a school’s success. He said some of the

BROVICK-KENT CONTINUED FROM A2

employees, managing employees and salaries — just the whole breadth of the whole organization.” She said she thinks some of the programs need a closer look. “I don’t think parents

BUCHER

CONTINUED FROM A2

I can bring a unique background to the financial side of the equation,” he said. A graduate of Colgate, he worked in the family automotive and real estate business in Colorado. He is now employed by Credit Swift, a global financial corporation.

BURDGE

CONTINUED FROM A2

another school or rebuilding the existing one. “We were experiencing high growth and pupil attendance so we started looking for a second school site,” he said. After several bond propositions were rejected

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

and Hannah Williams Stephen Marren, second grade, earned perfect scores on both the language and math tests and Jane Mezzino, eighth grade, got a perfect score in both the science and history tests. After the awards were

identifying children who are struggling earlier. In statewide ranking, a school is compared to other schools of the same type in the entire state. The schools are ranked in 10 categories of equal size called deciles from one (lowest) to 10

(highest). R. Roger Rowe Elementary is ranked fourth in the state of similar schools behind Naples Elementary in Long Beach Unified, Las Lomitas Elementary in Los Lomitas and Los Coyotes Elementary in the Centralia Elementary School District. Rowe Middle School is ranked third behind Terman Middle School in Palo Alto Unified and the Accelerated Achievement Academy Charter School in Hollister. “When comparing ourselves to other schools, it is critical that we use Similar School Criteria,” Schaub said. “No other surrounding schools are on our similar schools list. Of the 100 schools most like us in the state, elementary ranks number four and the middle school number three.

peared,” she said. She said studying foreign language in elementary school just makes sense. “They will be studying foreign language in middle school and high school,” she said. Slosar said the school district is looking into foreign languages as an after-school activity for which the parents pay, but she believes it should be included in the curriculum. Slosar and her family have lived in Rancho Santa Fe

for the past 10 years. She was raised in Michigan and after college worked for a major automotive supplier where she worked on labor relations, union relations and negotiations. “Certainly it gives me understanding of the negotiation process and the importance of fiscal responsibilities and personnel issues,” she said. When she moved to San Diego in 1997, she returned to school and earned her Ph.D in

clinical psychology. “I dealt primarily with children and teens and that certainly helps me understand what motivates students and their overall behavior,” she said. She believes she could do a stellar job as a school board member. “I want my children to have the finest public education available,” she said. “I have a unique background and a good perspective on the management and overall education.”

other candidates are passionate about certain issues and are not looking at the entire picture which would “cloud their thinking,” in decisionmaking. He would like to see each child’s education enhanced by more individual instruction. If a child is excelling at a certain subject, they should receive extra instruction. “I think we should be able to provide that and for the kids who are struggling, we should be able to help

them,” he said. He said school funding will continue to be an issue. “We have had and must continue to have fiscally conservative leadership,” he said. He said as he looks around the community at families with school-age children, he realizes how important the school is to the community and how important the community is to the school. Seltzer’s background is with his family-owned,

Carlsbad-based Seltzer Companies, a company that provides raw materials, such as vitamins or fortifications, to food companies. That company was sold and now the family group is an investment group. Seltzer said he and his wife and children lived in Carlsbad. But, when the couple’s children started becoming school-aged, they gave up their home with an ocean view and returned to Rancho Santa Fe for the school.

know the cost of programs,” she said. For example, the Ocean Science program costs $30,000 a year, she said. In her former job, she was responsible for a $6 million budget. She was responsible for the national sales division and production. “I’d also like to see more

transparency between the school and the parents,” she said. She said she would like to find out what parents think either through a formal survey or community round tables. “We need to touch base with parents about what they value most,” she said. She said she would also

He said if elected to the school board, he would use his experience to provide tactical and strategic advice to the superintendent. “That is of first and foremost importance based on my experience,” he said. Buchner said he would also like to see technology in the school increased, like the current roll-out of iPads for instruction.

“I think we are seeing the first stages of that,” he said. Buchner said the Rancho Santa Fe Education Foundation is a good example of the partnering of the community and the school and he would like to see parental involvement continue to increase. “I think we are blessed to have an involved communi-

school officials decided to look elsewhere. “We shifted gears and decided to rebuild on the existing campus,” he said. Still, the decision was hard-fought and polarized the community. In the end, the voters seemed happy and the district got a beautiful new school, with a performing

arts center and a new athletic field. Now is the time to use these resources to their highest potential, he said. Still, Burdge believes that even if the school aid propositions pass, it will not be the solution to the lack of school funding. “My opinion, and I’m not an expert, but I think it

want to ask teachers their opinions, but not publically. “They will not tell what they think in front of their bosses,” she said. “I want to bring back the collective voice of the parents and the community. I want to bring back the voice of the COASTAL COSMOS parents into the school,” she CONTINUED FROM A7 said. we can all be proud of and rally behind, accomplishty and that we can draw on ments to make people smile the expertise of the parents,” and wonder. Science has the power to uplift our society he said. He said he was and find remedies to our impressed with how the afflictions. board did a recent technology The discovery of the Higgsstudy and how that resulted Boson at the CERN Large in providing iPads for the stu- Hadron Collider is one of the most important discoveries of dents. “I would like to see more our time. The enormous scistrategic and long-range plan- ence experiment, underning that would provide a ground the border of France and Switzerland, recently broad-based plan,” he said. announced the discovery of the particle that gives everyis a Band-Aid and next year thing mass. could be a whole other The wildly complicated issue,” he said. science done at a place like Burdge has experience CERN has long-reaching in finances having been the impacts on humanity. owner of an investment A fraction of us can truly banking firm for 20 years. understand it but we will all He holds a master’s eventually benefit from it. degree from NYU, New We hear about trickle York and an undergraduate down economics, but trickle degree from Trinity down science can truly College. change the world: medical

third grade; Ella Fox, fourth grade; Shannon Buss, fifth grade; and Kirk Butler, seventh grade. Those earning a perfect score for the science test were eighth-graders James Adelheim, Jack Claxton, Jack Creede, Emily Graham, Nadine Kadri, Romteen Sedighi

given Cindy Schaub, assistant superintendent, explained to the board what school officials did to raise the scores such as intervention and literacy support for those needing it, math coaching, enhancing the performing arts program, expanding time given for math and language and

You have the gift of intelligence and you used it to the best of your ability.” Lindy Delaney RSF School District Superintendent

KING

CONTINUED FROM A13

Fridays” at Moonlight Beach in part to promote his rails. But it soon became “about more than that,”King said.Every week for six years, hundreds gathered at the free events and skated rails that King provided. “I never made any money on the flat bar event and invested a ton of time into it,” said King, who estimated there were more than 300 Flat Bar Fridays.“I took pride in what it was for our community. Alcohol, drugs and fighting weren’t allowed. It was about a bunch of kids getting together, staying out of trouble and just skating.” Encinitas banned skateboarding at Moonlight Beach reportedly because of complaints from neighbors, though King is doubtful because “the feedback from everyone in the community was so positive,” he said. Sheriff’s deputies were handing out tickets for skating at Moonlight. At that point, King decided it was time to focus his efforts on working with the city to build a big community skatepark. That was in 2004, but the city only recently approved funding for the community skatepark. “The whole thing left a sour taste in my mouth,” King said.“I went to council meeting after council meeting. And planning meetings, too. There was a lot of lip service, but no action.” He said the goal is to have a safe place where kids can skate without causing problems. “It’s hard to believe it could take that long to put in a community park in a town with a reputation for being the best skate town out there.” While waiting for a community skatepark, Flat Bar Fridays was held at other locations, but they were either banned or didn’t stick. The events stopped about five years ago. “It bummed me out towards the end of it,” King said. “It meant and means a lot to me, and then to get yelled at and get in trouble for it was just really hard,” King said. Feelings of bitterness linger, but King said he’s largely put the skatepark delay and

the Moonlight Beach incidents behind him. Now he’s considering taking “the magic”of public skateboarding events and starting a contest circuit centered around rails. Specifically, skateboarders would compete in games of S-K-A-T-E, skateboarding’s version of basketball’s H-O-R-S-E. “One of the cool things that developed from Flat Bar Fridays is we were able to come up with a ratings system for a SK-A-T-E game,” King said. “Skating on the flat ground is one thing,skating on flat bars is another thing entirely.” He’s also looking at launching and supplying ramps and rails for skateboarding programs at local high schools and YMCAs. “I’d like the YMCA of Oceanside, as one possible example, to have a set of easily moveable skate obstacles that can be stored in a small space,” King said. “Kids who play football have a field, why not have a small space for skateboarders?” King added. And King isn’t ruling out another season of “Built to Shred.” Fuel TV cancelled the show following four successful seasons because the network switched from extreme sports to primarily UFC programming. Producing the show with another network is a possibility, King said. “To see him announcing again is really exciting,” said Jim Bell, a friend and owner of Vista-based Aura Skateboarding, the company that organized the event at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. “I approached him because he knows how to get people excited.” “I can’t say what he’ll do in the future, but I’d love to see him get back out there and do more flat bar events,” Bell added. King, for his part, seems excited to once again set up rails and solidify his reputation as the MacGyver of skateboarding. “A lot of people have been hitting me up about it (Flat Bar Fridays) over the years,” King said. “This opportunity just got me motivated. I can’t say for sure where it will go. In the meantime, I’m happy to be helping a friend put on a event.”

technology, computing, communications, energy and so on. Remember that the World Wide Web was invented at CERN for scientists to share data. How’s that worked out for us? The successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory, named Curiosity, is one of the greatest engineering accomplishments ever. Curiosity will spend at least two years roving around a crater and mountain searching for signs of habitability past, present and future. The more we learn about Mars, the more we learn about our own dear planet past, present and future.

Kyle Stock is originally from Ohio, is a passionate surfer, backpacker, astronomer, gardener, backyard scientist, runner, reader and K-6 science teacher at Solana Santa Fe Elementary in the Solana Beach School District. He can be contacted at kbstock23@gmail.com.


A14 RESULTS

CONTINUED FROM A1

Malcolm McDonough and Pierce Rosenblatt; for third grade were Michael Chang, Matthew Fromm, Richard Gomez, Dax Kay, Delaney Lee-Bellows, Tessa Maud, Ella Sobhani, Thomas Witmeyer and Wasay Zaman; for fourth grade were Morgan Kiernan, Hannah Loly, Lucas Luwa and David Maldonado; for fifth grade were Daniel Carr, Ryan Curcio, Sheila Kaiser, Alex Lillian, Gabrielle Nguyen, Elyse Rosenblatt, Natalie Slosar and Rachel Waite; for sixth grade were Brandon Fitzpatrick, Breana Nguyen and Gabriella Patino; and for seventh grade were Lauren Flaming and Tiffany Zhang. Students who achieved a perfect score for language arts were: Zachary Kindel,

SLOSAR

CONTINUED FROM A2

of middle school students, which seems to be an issue. “I want our middle school to be the choice of middle school families. We lose students to private schools,” she said. Her next issue is that foreign language is not in the curriculum in elementary school as it has been in the past. “One year it just disappeared,” she said.

SELTZER

CONTINUED FROM A2

do,” he said. “We are pushing 960 (out of a possible 1,000) if we are not already there,” he said. “With 650 students, what we care about most as a school board is being responsive to all their needs,” he said. But, he said, test scores are only part of the measure of a school’s success. He said some of the

BROVICK-KENT CONTINUED FROM A2

employees, managing employees and salaries — just the whole breadth of the whole organization.” She said she thinks some of the programs need a closer look. “I don’t think parents

BUCHER

CONTINUED FROM A2

I can bring a unique background to the financial side of the equation,” he said. A graduate of Colgate, he worked in the family automotive and real estate business in Colorado. He is now employed by Credit Swift, a global financial corporation.

BURDGE

CONTINUED FROM A2

another school or rebuilding the existing one. “We were experiencing high growth and pupil attendance so we started looking for a second school site,” he said. After several bond propositions were rejected

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

and Hannah Williams Stephen Marren, second grade, earned perfect scores on both the language and math tests and Jane Mezzino, eighth grade, got a perfect score in both the science and history tests. After the awards were

identifying children who are struggling earlier. In statewide ranking, a school is compared to other schools of the same type in the entire state. The schools are ranked in 10 categories of equal size called deciles from one (lowest) to 10

(highest). R. Roger Rowe Elementary is ranked fourth in the state of similar schools behind Naples Elementary in Long Beach Unified, Las Lomitas Elementary in Los Lomitas and Los Coyotes Elementary in the Centralia Elementary School District. Rowe Middle School is ranked third behind Terman Middle School in Palo Alto Unified and the Accelerated Achievement Academy Charter School in Hollister. “When comparing ourselves to other schools, it is critical that we use Similar School Criteria,” Schaub said. “No other surrounding schools are on our similar schools list. Of the 100 schools most like us in the state, elementary ranks number four and the middle school number three.

She said studying foreign language in elementary school just makes sense. “They will be studying foreign language in middle school and high school,” she said. Slosar said the school district is looking into foreign languages as an afterschool activity for which the parents pay, but she believes it should be included in the curriculum. Slosar and her family have lived in Rancho Santa

Fe for the past 10 years. She was raised in Michigan and after college worked for a major automotive supplier where she worked on labor relations, union relations and negotiations. “Certainly it gives me understanding of the negotiation process and the importance of fiscal responsibilities and personnel issues,” she said. When she moved to San Diego in 1997, she returned to school and earned her

Ph.D in clinical psychology. “I dealt primarily with children and teens and that certainly helps me understand what motivates students and their overall behavior,” she said. She believes she could do a stellar job as a school board member. “I want my children to have the finest public education available,” she said. “I have a unique background and a good perspective on the management and overall education.”

other candidates are passionate about certain issues and are not looking at the entire picture which would “cloud their thinking,” in decisionmaking. He would like to see each child’s education enhanced by more individual instruction. If a child is excelling at a certain subject, they should receive extra instruction. “I think we should be able to provide that and for the kids who are struggling, we should be able to help

them,” he said. He said school funding will continue to be an issue. “We have had and must continue to have fiscally conservative leadership,” he said. He said as he looks around the community at families with school-age children, he realizes how important the school is to the community and how important the community is to the school. Seltzer’s background is with his family-owned,

Carlsbad-based Seltzer Companies, a company that provides raw materials, such as vitamins or fortifications, to food companies. That company was sold and now the family group is an investment group. Seltzer said he and his wife and children lived in Carlsbad. But, when the couple’s children started becoming school-aged, they gave up their home with an ocean view and returned to Rancho Santa Fe for the school.

know the cost of programs,” she said. For example, the Ocean Science program costs $30,000 a year, she said. In her former job, she was responsible for a $6 million budget. She was responsible for the national sales division and production. “I’d also like to see more

transparency between the school and the parents,” she said. She said she would like to find out what parents think either through a formal survey or community round tables. “We need to touch base with parents about what they value most,” she said. She said she would also

He said if elected to the school board, he would use his experience to provide tactical and strategic advice to the superintendent. “That is of first and foremost importance based on my experience,” he said. Buchner said he would also like to see technology in the school increased, like the current roll-out of iPads for instruction.

“I think we are seeing the first stages of that,” he said. Buchner said the Rancho Santa Fe Education Foundation is a good example of the partnering of the community and the school and he would like to see parental involvement continue to increase. “I think we are blessed to have an involved communi-

school officials decided to look elsewhere. “We shifted gears and decided to rebuild on the existing campus,” he said. Still, the decision was hard-fought and polarized the community. In the end, the voters seemed happy and the district got a beautiful new school, with a performing

arts center and a new athletic field. Now is the time to use these resources to their highest potential, he said. Still, Burdge believes that even if the school aid propositions pass, it will not be the solution to the lack of school funding. “My opinion, and I’m not an expert, but I think it

want to ask teachers their opinions, but not publically. “They will not tell what they think in front of their bosses,” she said. “I want to bring back the collective voice of the parents and the community. I want to bring back the voice of the COASTAL COSMOS parents into the school,” she CONTINUED FROM A7 said. we can all be proud of and rally behind, accomplishty and that we can draw on ments to make people smile the expertise of the parents,” and wonder. Science has the power to uplift our society he said. He said he was and find remedies to our impressed with how the afflictions. board did a recent technology The discovery of the Higgsstudy and how that resulted Boson at the CERN Large in providing iPads for the stu- Hadron Collider is one of the most important discoveries of dents. “I would like to see more our time. The enormous scistrategic and long-range plan- ence experiment, underning that would provide a ground the border of France and Switzerland, recently broad-based plan,” he said. announced the discovery of the particle that gives everyis a Band-Aid and next year thing mass. could be a whole other The wildly complicated issue,” he said. science done at a place like Burdge has experience CERN has long-reaching in finances having been the impacts on humanity. owner of an investment A fraction of us can truly banking firm for 20 years. understand it but we will all He holds a master’s eventually benefit from it. degree from NYU, New We hear about trickle York and an undergraduate down economics, but trickle degree from Trinity down science can truly College. change the world: medical

third grade; Ella Fox, fourth grade; Shannon Buss, fifth grade; and Kirk Butler, seventh grade. Those earning a perfect score for the science test were eighth-graders James Adelheim, Jack Claxton, Jack Creede, Emily Graham, Nadine Kadri, Romteen Sedighi

given Cindy Schaub, assistant superintendent, explained to the board what school officials did to raise the scores such as intervention and literacy support for those needing it, math coaching, enhancing the performing arts program, expanding time given for math and language and

You have the gift of intelligence and you used it to the best of your ability.” Lindy Delaney RSF School District Superintendent

KING

CONTINUED FROM A13

Fridays” at Moonlight Beach in part to promote his rails. But it soon became “about more than that,”King said.Every week for six years, hundreds gathered at the free events and skated rails that King provided. “I never made any money on the flat bar event and invested a ton of time into it,” said King, who estimated there were more than 300 Flat Bar Fridays.“I took pride in what it was for our community. Alcohol, drugs and fighting weren’t allowed. It was about a bunch of kids getting together, staying out of trouble and just skating.” Encinitas banned skateboarding at Moonlight Beach reportedly because of complaints from neighbors, though King is doubtful because “the feedback from everyone in the community was so positive,” he said. Sheriff’s deputies were handing out tickets for skating at Moonlight. At that point, King decided it was time to focus his efforts on working with the city to build a big community skatepark. That was in 2004, but the city only recently approved funding for the community skatepark. “The whole thing left a sour taste in my mouth,” King said.“I went to council meeting after council meeting. And planning meetings, too. There was a lot of lip service, but no action.” He said the goal is to have a safe place where kids can skate without causing problems. “It’s hard to believe it could take that long to put in a community park in a town with a reputation for being the best skate town out there.” While waiting for a community skatepark, Flat Bar Fridays was held at other locations, but they were either banned or didn’t stick. The events stopped about five years ago. “It bummed me out towards the end of it,” King said. “It meant and means a lot to me, and then to get yelled at and get in trouble for it was just really hard,” King said. Feelings of bitterness linger, but King said he’s largely put the skatepark delay and

the Moonlight Beach incidents behind him. Now he’s considering taking “the magic”of public skateboarding events and starting a contest circuit centered around rails. Specifically, skateboarders would compete in games of S-K-A-T-E, skateboarding’s version of basketball’s H-O-R-S-E. “One of the cool things that developed from Flat Bar Fridays is we were able to come up with a ratings system for a SK-A-T-E game,” King said. “Skating on the flat ground is one thing,skating on flat bars is another thing entirely.” He’s also looking at launching and supplying ramps and rails for skateboarding programs at local high schools and YMCAs. “I’d like the YMCA of Oceanside, as one possible example, to have a set of easily moveable skate obstacles that can be stored in a small space,” King said. “Kids who play football have a field, why not have a small space for skateboarders?” King added. And King isn’t ruling out another season of “Built to Shred.” Fuel TV cancelled the show following four successful seasons because the network switched from extreme sports to primarily UFC programming. Producing the show with another network is a possibility, King said. “To see him announcing again is really exciting,” said Jim Bell, a friend and owner of Vista-based Aura Skateboarding, the company that organized the event at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. “I approached him because he knows how to get people excited.” “I can’t say what he’ll do in the future, but I’d love to see him get back out there and do more flat bar events,” Bell added. King, for his part, seems excited to once again set up rails and solidify his reputation as the MacGyver of skateboarding. “A lot of people have been hitting me up about it (Flat Bar Fridays) over the years,” King said. “This opportunity just got me motivated. I can’t say for sure where it will go. In the meantime, I’m happy to be helping a friend put on a event.”

technology, computing, communications, energy and so on. Remember that the World Wide Web was invented at CERN for scientists to share data. How’s that worked out for us? The successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory, named Curiosity, is one of the greatest engineering accomplishments ever. Curiosity will spend at least two years roving around a crater and mountain searching for signs of habitability past, present and future. The more we learn about Mars, the more we learn about our own dear planet past, present and future.

Kyle Stock is originally from Ohio, is a passionate surfer, backpacker, astronomer, gardener, backyard scientist, runner, reader and K-6 science teacher at Solana Santa Fe Elementary in the Solana Beach School District. He can be contacted at kbstock23@gmail.com.


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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

Health plan rankings find nonprofits leading the pack Nonprofit health plans are leading the pack in the annual health plan rankings from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), which Consumer Reports recently published. This year, 984 plans are ranked, including 474 private plans, 395 Medicare Advantage plans and 115 Medicaid HMOs. Open enrollment for private plans typically takes place in October and/or November, while Medicare open enrollment runs from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. For the third year running, Consumer Reports presented health plan rankings from NCQA, a nonprofit health-care accreditation and quality measurement group. Of the 32 clinical performance measures that the NCQA tracks, private HMOs show clear improvement in 23. Overall, more people receive certain recommended tests, such as colorectal cancer screening and blood sugar tests for people with diabetes. Seven indicators of consumer satisfaction tracked by NCQA have improved almost every year since 2007. But not everything is coming up roses, Consumer Reports notes. Measures designed to track overuse show particularly troubling trends. For instance, research shows that imaging tests aren’t helpful for most forms of lower-back pain and can even be harmful. But insurance plans have failed to rein in imaging claims for back pain in the seven years the NCQA has tracked it. In its reporting on unnecessary medical care, Consumer Reports has repeatedly advised consumers to be wary of imaging tests for lower-back pain. Imaging can expose patients to needless radiation while potentially leading to further tests and treatments and sometimes even unnecessary surgery. For the third straight year, the top ranked private plan in the nation was the nonprofit Harvard Pilgrim Health Care’s HMO in New England, and one of its preferred provider organizations (PPOs) finished fifth in the NCQA’s rankings. In fact, every one of the top 10 private plans is a nonprofit that doesn’t have to satisfy investors with growing profits. Consumer Reports’ analysis found that five out of 10 of the top performers in NCQA’s rankings of private plans are integrated health systems, which provide insurance while also employing the doctors, and in some cases owning the hospitals, that care for their customers. The five integrated health systems that rise to the top of NCQA’s health plan rankings are: Capital

undisclosed or less thorough data tend to be lower in the rankings. Consumer Reports also provided a Countdown to 2014 to give consumers a window into health reform’s next big changes. Starting this fall, all private health insurance plans must use a standard Summary of Benefits and Coverage, which allows consumers to compare plans side-by-side, including coverage examples that show the generosity of a given plan versus another. The key is allowing consumers to compare plans and giving them information that they can actually digest and make sense of.

Health Plan in Florida, Group Health Cooperative of South Central Wisconsin, and Kaiser Foundation Health Plans in Colorado, Northern California and Southern California. The rankings reveal that Kaiser performs the best of any of the major private insurers, with 75 percent of its private plans in

the top 25 percent of rankings. Plans not affiliated with a major national brand come next, with 53 percent in the top quarter, followed by Blue Cross Blue Shield plans, with 41 percent. Other big brands did not fare as well as Kaiser. Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare (the secondlargest health insurer in

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America after Blue Cross Blue Shield) all have more private plans in the bottom 100 than in the top 100. Coventry, which Aetna is in the process of buying, has two-thirds of its plans in the bottom quarter, all of them unaccredited. A caveat: Plans that don’t have NCQA accreditation or have a lot of missing,

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OCT. 19, 2012

SECTION

JEAN GILLETTE Small Talk

An unending curiosity Jean offers a favorite from the past this week. I have the nagging fear that someday I will leave my children with a sitter who is not really paying close attention. When I arrive home, my entire house will be in small pieces, tidily disassembled by my 4-year-old son. This child cannot just take something for granted. He cannot just see a vacuum cleaner do its job and be glad. He can no more leave the batteries in a flashlight than he can quit breathing. If there is a box, he must open it and if there is a button, he must push it and if there is a switch, he must flip it. This behavior applies to device that has the misfortune to come into his range of vision. From the moment he could make thumb meet forefinger, my son has set about taking apart everything that doesn’t move fast. That which could not be easily unscrewed, unhinged or unbuckled would be bent, banged or squashed until he could see its insides. His repertoire grows with each birthday and I am watching closely to see whether my admonitions of “Leave that alone, please!” will catch hold before he takes the tires off the family car. I know, of course, that this is a wonderful sign of a curious, intelligent mind. I say to myself that he will no doubt be a surgeon or a research scientist. But in my heart I yearn to be able to leave things on the table, secure that they will be there and recognizable when I next see them. And I secretly believe he will end up operating a wrecking ball. To avoid sounding too sexist, I will admit that my daughter has occasionally joined him in this exercise, but gender aside, her personality just doesn’t require full explanations of everything around her. When I married someone who is insatiably curious, I never equated it to having a child whose favorite sport was rearranging and disassembling everything he could reach. When I search for comfort amid the chaos, I remind myself that in just a few short years, my husTURN TO SMALL TALK ON B15

Teen’s volunteering efforts come ‘naturally’ By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Malia Rappaport has been chosen as Outstanding Youth Volunteer and will be recognized during an awards ceremony at the Hilton Bayfront in honor of the 40th annual Philanthrophy Day on Oct. 25. She was nominated by three of the charities for which she volunteers: Girl Scouts of San Diego and Imperial Counties, the Miracle League of San Diego and Kids Included Together. “I didn’t even know I had been nominated,” said the 17-year-old Rancho Santa Fe resident. “Then I started getting e-mails.” She said volunteering comes naturally to her. “I think I was born with it,” she said. “My parents raised us to be open to new experiences and to make a difference in the community.” She said her father is an inventor of toys and he has donated hundreds of baseball bats every year to the Miracle League of San Diego. Her mother is a Girl Scout troop leader. “It was natural to follow in their footsteps,” she said. The common thread in Malia’s charitable activities is “inclusion.” “I guess I grew up with my own disability, getting bullied and excluded from

My parents raised us to be open to new experiences and to make a difference in the community.” Malia Rappaport

Rancho Santa Fe resident Malia Rappaport is the Outstanding Youth Volunteer for her efforts with the Girl Scouts of San Diego, the Miracle League of San Diego and Kids Included Together. She said volunteering comes naturally to her and credits her parents raising her to be open to new experiences. Photo courtesy of Bob Ross

activities,” she said. She suffered the physical tics of Tourette’s Syndrome. “Kids were pretty mean to me, but once I explained to them, they were kinder to me once

they understood what was going on,” she said. As a volunteer for Miracle League, she is a buddy for a player on the team. “I help them with whatever they need,” she said. “I

help them get around the bases and bat. I love it, it is a great feeling. It’s such a family there.” Miracle League is for children with disabilities who otherwise would be unable to play baseball or

interact with other children, she said. She has been a Girl Scout since she was a small child and will soon earn her Gold Award, which is the TURN TO VOLUNTEER ON B15

Documentary on artist needs public’s help By Jared Whitlock

Steve Barilotti describes him as “the most influential artist you’ve never heard of.” And Barilotti is determined to tell his tale. Barilotti, a Cardiffbased journalist and filmmaker, is referring to Rick Griffin, who died in 1991. Many don’t recognize Griffin’s name, but his images are instantly familiar — the Rolling Stone magazine logo; the iconic posters kicking off the Summer of Love. Those were Griffin. He also designed artwork for Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead and was Surfer Magazine’s first illustrator. “His art radically changed the face of growing countercultures in the 1960s,” Barilotti said. “That’s what I want to capture.” Barilotti’s goal is to create a feature-length documentary about the life, art and times of Griffin.To do so, he launched a Kickstarter campaign, a website that allows anyone to contribute money to creative projects. Though Barilotti and Griffin never spoke, their lives are entwined in many ways. “He was the cool big brother I never had,” said Barilotti, who describes himself as “the younger brother of all the hippies.” Barilotti grew up going

Steve Barilotti with his archive of Rick Griffin, an artist best known for designing artwork for the Grateful Dead and Jimi Hendrix. Barilotti launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds in order to create a documentary about Griffin’s life. Courtesy photo

to a Catholic school in the Inland Empire. When he was 10 years old, he saw the classic surfing movie “The Endless Summer.” Barilotti credits the spirit of the film with stoking a passion for the ocean and inspiring him to rebel, or as he puts it, “Being an altar boy wasn’t on the menu anymore.” Barilotti happened to find solace in the three areas where Griffin’s artistic shadow looms large: surfing, underground comics and psychedelic rock. It was only later that Barilotti put two and two together and realized that “Griffin was behind much of the art that I loved.” “I’m sure there are a lot of people who were like me before, who adored his work

and never made that connection,” Barilotti said. In 1991 Barilotti was a junior editor at Surfer Magazine, the same place that featured Griffin’s illustrations in the 1960s and 1970s, including the famous “Murphy” cartoons. By chance, one of Barilotti’s early assignments was to cover Griffin’s funeral, after Griffin passed away from a motorcycle accident. Among the eclectic mix of people at the funeral was Jerry Garcia, who Barilotti gathered up enough courage to approach for an interview. “He gave me this beautiful five-minute interview, going on about how imporTURN TO DOCUMENTARY ON B15

A 45,000-square-foot tent taking shape in the Del Mar Fairgrounds parking lot will be home to Valitar, a high-energy equestrian show featuring more than 25 entertainers and 45 horses. Valitar runs Nov. 16 to Dec. 31. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

Tent structure rises over fairgrounds By Bianca Kaplanek

Anyone driving past the Del Mar Fairgrounds over the last few weeks may have noticed a large structure going up in the parking lot. The 45,000-square-foot tent will soon be home to the world premiere of Valitar, a high-energy equestrian show featuring more than 25 entertainers and 45 horses representing 12 breeds. The title comes from the Latin word validus, which means strong, mighty

and powerful. The show, according to its website, will demonstrate grace and power in a world where the mythological universe comes to earth to provide inspiration. “Valitar’s muses of love, war, earth, fire, wind and water will guide us through a story that demonstrates the mystical relationship of horse and man,” the website states. It will also provide some powerful unbudgeted TURN TO VALITAR ON B15


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OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Dreams: Routine brain function or window to the soul? By Lillian Cox

Dr. Patricia Ariadne, MFT has been keeping a journal for 35 years to record as much as she can recall of her dreams. She says the average human spends six years dreaming during their lifetime. Ariadne believes in the power of dreams to the extent that there are times she remembers meeting someone in her dreams that she didn’t meet in the physical world until later. “I even dreamed that I would be returning to a teaching job when, at the time of the dream, I had no desire or means to do so,” she said. “Before meeting two men for a potential job interview, I was shown that these men were unreliable and disorganized. This proved to be true.” Dreams play an important part in her therapy practice, workshops and books she has written including “Drinking the Dragon: Stories of the Dark Night of Soul” and “Women Dreaming-into-Art: Seven Artists who Create From Dreams.” “Ignoring a dream is like throwing away an unopened letter,” she tells patients, adding that working with dreams promotes self-awareness by revealing the part of ourselves we are least conscious of, while it can be apparent to others. “Dream work can help

us become less conflicted, more integrated, and more whole as persons,” she said. “Dreams also guide us spiritually, providing a means to connect with our Higher Selves, which creates a dependence upon internal guidance, rather than looking for answers outside of ourselves.” There is another school of thought held widely by the medical community including psychiatrist Dr. Ed Siegel, M.D. that views dreams as no more than an important biological func-

When you go to bed, relax and tell yourself that you will remember your dreams.” Dr.Patricia Ariadne Author

tion. “Dreams are usually a reflection of something that is currently going on in one’s life,” Siegel said. “The biology of the feelings involved in emotions (in the form of neurotransmitters) can still be recognized by the sleeping brain that has no other alternative

than to make up a story that will reflect the biological concomitants of those emotions.’ Regarding premonitions, Siegel describes them as “biological concomitants for wishes.” “Realistic wishes can often come true,” he explained. “Unrealistic wishes can still be expressed in dreams.” One thing Ariadne and Siegel agree on is the importance of dream journals. “I often ask patients to keep a dream log for me,” Siegel said. “Dreams can sometimes reveal aspects of the patient’s psyche that might otherwise be relatively inaccessible. Although I can’t claim to be Freud, he famously stated that ‘Dreams are the royal road to the unconscious.’ He, as do I, find that dreams can reveal underlying issues that might not be readily apparent to either the dreamer or the dream interpreter.” While we can’t direct our dreams, Ariadne says we can collaborate on them by asking guidance. “Sometimes people write a question on a slip of paper and tuck it under their pillows,” she advises. “Others repeatedly ask a question in a relaxed state before going to sleep. I find that when a question is asked with sincerity, humility and a genuine desire to grow as a person, the

Solana Beach psychiatrist Ed Siegel, M.D. also asks his patients to maintain a dream journal. Like Sigmund Freud, Siegel believes “Dreams are the royal road to the unconscious.” Courtesy photo

answers seem to more readily appear.” Ariadne suggests designating one night as a dream night where an individual goes to bed early, avoiding alcohol and over stimulation by television and movies. “When you go to bed, relax and tell yourself that you will remember your dreams,” she said. “Sometimes, you can ‘prime the pump’ by reading a chapter from a book about dreams or journal about something that happened during the day by treating the incident as if it were a dream.” Ariadne adds that it is important to keep a notepad and pen nearby to record a

dream while it is fresh, even a phrase that will tickle the memory later. “Pay special attention to hynogogic (right before sleeping) and hynopompic (right before waking) imagery,” she said. “We can be attuned to special messages or imagery at this time, even meaningful song lyrics.” Dr. Ariadne will be offering a workshop, Bridging Night and Day, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 20. For more information, visit drariadne.com. Dr. Siegel is the author of “A Spiritual Odyssey To Be with God.” For more information visit edsiegelmd.com.

Dr. Patricia Ariadne, MFT encourages patients in her Encinitas practice to keep a dream journal. She believes that dreams provide spiritual guidance and a means to connect with one’s higher self. Courtesy photo

Torrey Pines students stay busy on campus CARMEL VALLEY — Things are happening at Torrey Pines High School. Make plans for the Torrey Pines High School Financial Aid Night offered at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 14, in the campus Lecture Hall. Then, thanks to the Torrey Pines High School Foundation, enthusiastic students, staff support and

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invested parent and student volunteers, Challenge Day will return to TPHS from 7:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Oct. 22 through Oct. 25. Lunch is provided for all participants by the support of our Foundation. Challenge Day can be a powerful and transformational day that can change the way people view each other

forever. It is a day of fun, friendship and new possibilities. Through a variety of games, trust-building activities and presentations, students will be given an opportunity to see themselves and the people around them with a new understanding. Students and adults can get more information and sign up online at tphs.net.


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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

ODD Hospice auxiliary honors exceptional volunteer FILES

by CHUCK SHEPHERD

Great Art! For September’s Digital Design Weekend at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, artists Michiko Nitta and Michael Burton commissioned soprano Louise Ashcroft to sing, altering pitch and volume while wearing a face mask made of algae. According to the artists, since algae’s growth changes with the amount and quality of carbon dioxide it receives, Ashcroft’s voice, blowing CO2 against the algae, should vary the growth’s “taste” as to bitterness or sweetness. After the performance, the audience sampled the algae at various stages and apparently agreed. The artists said they were demonstrating how biotechnology could transform organisms.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit Jordan and Bryan Silverman’s start-up venture, Star Toilet Paper, distributes rolls to public restrooms in restaurants, stadiums and other locations absolutely free — because the brothers have sold ads on each sheet. (Company slogan: “Don’t rush. Look before you flush.”) Jordan, with 50 advertisers enlisted so far, told the Detroit Free Press in August that he came up with the idea, of course, while sitting on the can at the University of Michigan library. First-World Problems: After an international trade association reported that women bought 548 million pairs of shoes in 2011 (not even counting those used exclusively for sports), the manufacturer Nine West has decided to start its own cable TV channel with programing on “various aspects of footwear,” according to an August New York Times report. Programs will feature celebrities rhapsodizing about their favorite pair, women who hoard shoes (purchasing many more than they know they’ll ever wear even one time), tips on developing one’s stiletto-walking skills and shoe closet designs. It’s about a “conversation,” said a Nine West executive, “not about a shoe.” Habersham Funding of Georgia and its competitors make their money by buying terminally ill clients’ life insurance policies for lump sums, then continuing to pay the policies’ premiums so that they collect as beneficiaries upon death. The companies’ business model therefore depends on those clients dying quickly; a client who outlives expectations turns the investment sour.

Her home office is populated by famous names such as Wedgewood, Waterford, Bose, St. John and a limited edition Mickey Mouse in its original box. Her garage is stacked high with packing materials. Maxine McIntosh, 87, affectionately known as the Hospice of the North Coast (HNC) eBay Queen, has been named HNC’s 2012 Volunteer of the Year. She will be honored at the North County Philanthropy Council luncheon Nov. 8 at the Sheraton Carlsbad Resort & Spa. HNC’s Resale Shop in Encinitas, which customers often remark resembles a department store more than a thrift shop, accounts for approximately 8 percent of HNC’s annual revenues supporting unfunded programs and services provided to clients and the community. Of that, $20,000 to $25,000 per year is generated by the shop’s eBay operation, which McIntosh single-handedly created in 2002 and continues to run out of her Carlsbad home. “I handle the bulk of the process,” reveals this modest but capable woman who in 1947 became the first female graduate of the University of Wyoming’s College of Engineering. “After conferring with Resale Shop Manager Jean Cole on potentially valuable donations, I

even more excited when it sells.” McIntosh confides that her introduction to HNC was quite personal. “My mother died on HNC service in 1992. She received very good care. I was so grateful that I began volunteering; first with the Auxiliary and then at the Resale Shop. I started out ironing clothes, then was ‘promoted’ to cashier,” she laughs. In addition to working 20 to 25 hours a week on the eBay operation, McIntosh volunteers at the Resale Shop 10 hours per week, where Cole

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Maxine McIntosh was named Hospice of the North Coast volunteer of the Year for 2012. Courtesy photo

research values, photograph items, write descriptions, post eight to ten pieces each week, converse with sellers, finalize sales, then pack everything up, calculate postage and take the boxes to the post office.” Recently, a 1902 Edison phonograph was purchased by a man in Thailand for $1,700. A rare ceramic of a gorgeous red oriole sold for

Fashion show lines up latest trends Pacific Station will be the site of “Fall Into Fashion” a charity fashion show hosted by Olivenhainbased Fine magazine from 5 to 8 p.m. Oct. 24 at 687 S Coast Highway 101, Suite 229, benefiting Whole Kids. This show will be emceed by Graham Charles Ledger and will feature the fall collections of the shops in Encinitas’ Pacific Station and other local boutiques including Icons, Bliss 101,Whole Foods, Pink Soul, Queen Eileen’s, Deja Chic Encinitas, Shoes Me PB, Purses by LS Concoit, Pebbles By the Beach, Mister B, Peaches En Regalia. Hair styles will be provided by Beauty Bundles and Headlines for hair. The event offers a stylish evening of cocktails, appetizers and fashion showing off fall's musthaves Fine fashion and beauty trends. Along with the fashions, the event will showcase 14 vendor booths consisting of top boutique’s, designers, and health tips in each market to ensure attendees find unique and creative ways to stay up on the latest fashion, and beauty secrets. There will be goodie bags for the first 100 attendees who pay $20 online. Tickets are $30 at the door. This ticket includes a complimentary glass of wine and food from Whole Foods. General admission will be

says everyone loves and admires her. HNC Executive Director Nerice Kaufman said recognizing McIntosh is an honor for the organization, “To us, Maxine is a limited-edition treasure; a collectible as rare and valuable as anything you could buy on eBay.” Nonprofit Hospice of the North Coast was established in 1980 to fill the need for comprehensive, compassionate hospice care in North County San Diego. Call (760) 431-4100 or visit hospicenorthcoast.org.

$20 in advance and $30 at the door. For sponsorship opportunities, donations and booth spaces, contact Heather at (760) 415-7525.

$1,800. Many unique jewelry pieces are appraised by HNC board member Dale Condy, who owns Gems of La Costa. From apparel to golf clubs, McIntosh selects and sells only the cream of the crop. “Everything must be in pristine condition,” said this woman who knows the eBay business inside-and-out. “I get very excited when I find something wonderful. I get

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OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Top jockey guest of honor Doctor named president of College of Surgeons RANCHO SANTA FE — Hall of Fame thoroughbred jockey and local resident Julie Krone will be the featured guest at an open house and barbecue at the Rancho Riding Club in Rancho Santa Fe on the afternoon of Oct. 20. “Julie will be sharing stories of her life-long love of horses and how they can impact our lives in a positive way,� said Debbie Rocha, Rancho Riding Club instructor and co-organizer of the event. “The whole community is invited to hear her inspirational message, and to learn more about the Rancho Riding Club.� The Oct. 20 event will begin at 3 p.m.at the clubhouse of the Rancho Riding Club, 16924 Rambla De Las Flores, with a barbecue to follow Krone’s remarks. The Riding Club board of directors requests reservations by Oct.17 by calling (760) 803-4041. The Rancho Riding Club, founded in 1946, is an all-purpose equestrian facility on 11 acres in the heart of Rancho

Hall of Fame jockey and Carlsbad resident Julie Krone. Courtesy photo

Santa Fe. The club offers yearround activities, including horse shows, instructional clinics and social events, plus access to the extensive network of Rancho Santa Fe riding trails. In addition to winning 3,705 races during her career — including the 2003 Pacific Classic at Del Mar — Krone is an experienced equestrian in a variety of riding and training disciplines. After competing the final two years of her racing career in Southern California, she retired in 2004. She lives in Carlsbad with her husband,Jay Hovdey, and daughter Lorelei.

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RANCHO SANTA FE — As an 11-year old boy in Wyoming, Rancho Santa Fe resident Dr. Brent Eastman, witnessed the aftermath of a train wreck that would inspire him to become a trauma surgeon. The Chicagobound train was carrying surgeons heading from the annual convention of the American College of Surgeons, many of whom snapped into action to save many lives that cold, snowy night in 1951. Some 60 years later on Oct. 1, Eastman was installed as the 93rd president of the American College of Surgeons at the annual clinical congress in Chicago. A Fellow of the American College of Surgeons since 1976, over the course of his career, Eastman has made countless contributions to the field of trauma care both in San Diego and around the globe. In his role at Scripps as a trauma surgeon and later the N. Paul Whittier Endowed Chair of Trauma at

Bright, young musicians gather for concert FanFaire Foundation Musicians presents a program of “Kids Playing for Kids� sponsored by the Friends of the Carmel Valley Library at 1 p.m. Oct. 27, in the library’s community room, 3919 Townsgate Drive, to help celebrate National Arts Month. The program is free and will last 60 minutes. The concert will feature pianists Michael Chen, Ursula Hardianto, Clara Truong and Oksana Germain; violinist Kalvin Hibi and French hornist Christine Chen playing music of Mozart, J S Bach, Haydn, Elgar, Chopin, Brahms and Klaus Badelt that ranges from 18th century Baroque to contemporary film music. These young musicians, ages 9 to 17, who also love science and math, have been nurtured by the Foundation to be role models for children in San Diego.

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Business news and special achievements for North San Diego County. Send information via email to community@ coastnewsgroup.com. 30 years for Thrive Dr. Victor Tomassetti of Thrive Physical Medicine will be celebrating his 30th year as a chiropractor from 9 a.m. to noon, with an official cake-cutting at 11:30 a.m., Oct. 26 at 2741 Vista Way, Suite 111, Oceanside, in the El Camino North Shopping Plaza. Guests will be offered tours of the offices, as well as a meet-and-greet with Dr. Tomassetti.

DM Rotary gets biz assist Elevated Search, a new search marketing agency, is getting involved with local and international charities by supporting the Del Mar Rotary Club. Co-founder Ricardo Figueiredo said he and business partner Steve Peron “take seriously our initiative to partner with charitable organizations.� Elevated Search will sponsor two of the club’s fundraising events, the Chili & Quackers Challenge from 3 to 6 p.m. Oct. 20 at Powerhouse Park in Del Mar. The company also sponsored and donated a website for the Rotary Club of Del Mar’s Sunset Soiree back in May.

Gates debut Fairbanks Ranch Association celebrated the completion of the renovation of its gates with a dedication ceremony Oct. 5, acknowledging the work and contribution of its Gates & Road Improvement committee, board of directors, staff and project engineers,

Help by hypnosis Chiara Marrapodi of Dance of the Soul Hypnotherapy announced the opening of an additional practice at 317 N. El Camino Real, Suite 201, Encinitas. Its Realizing Your Potential Program works to bringing individuals closer to their greatest potential through the power of hypnosis. Call (760) 889-4180.

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California Youth Conservatory Theatre’s production of “Les Miserables� has been nominated for the Bravo San Diego award for Best Amateur Musical this year.

Patient appreciation Encinitas-based chiropractor Michael Monahan, at 285 N. El Camino Real, Suite 110, will host his annual twoday Patient Appreciation event and community canned food drive for the Encinitas Community Resource Center. Oct. 30 will offer free adjustments to existing patients who bring either five canned food items or a $5 donation for the Resource Center. Nov. 1 welcomes new patients with a free consultation and exam. For more information, call (760) 634-0232.

New bike store Ride Cyclery will open a new store Nov. 1 at 449 S. Coast Highway, Encinitas, which will feature the brand and products of Pink Peloton, tailored to the female cyclist and multisport athlete. The site will include a bicycle fit station and an in-house espresso coffee cafe. For more information, visit RIDEcyclery.com.

Multiple awards MiraCosta College has been recognized with five Medallion Awards from the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations District 6. The NCMPR District 6 Medallion Awards recognize outstanding achievement in communications. Awards included Gold Medallion Brochure/Flyer – “Arts and Events Spring 2012;� Gold Medallion - Social or Online Marketing – “Student Blogs;� Gold Medallion Website – “MiraCosta College Official Website;� Gold Medallion -Electronic Publication – “Virtual Tour,� Silver Medallion - Class Schedule – “Summer/Fall Schedule 2012.�

New Venture Christian Last Chance at Life Rescue group opened a new Fellowship celebrates is thrift shop at 3296 Mission grand renewal of its worship Ave. in Oceanside Oct. 14. center, with 110 feet of Imax video viewing screens, new sound system and media center at 5 p.m. Oct. 20 and at 8:30 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. Oct. 21, at 4000 Mystra Drive, Oceanside.

Kulchin feted

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The “Kids Playing for Kids� program was launched in October 2011. It enables musically gifted children to express and share their love of music with other children, further develop their creative skills, and build their self-confidence as performers. Its youngsters are also encouraged to excel in their studies and to learn the value of community service. The goal is that their passion for music will spark creativity and a sense of community in other young people so they can compete effectively in our science-based society. In celebration of the program’s first anniversary, the foundation has produced a CD of studio performances of classical and jazz pieces by 10 of its more than 30 musicians. It should be released in time for this concert. For further information call (858) 552-1668.

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Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, and as the chief medical officer, Eastman was a co-founder in 1984 of the San Diego County Trauma System, which has become a model for the nation. In addition, Eastman was part of the leadership team at Scripps that oversaw the health system's reorganization from a siloed collection of five hospital campuses and 23 outpatient facilities to a “horizontal management� structure that identifies and implements best practices in patient care and operations across the entire system to reduce costs and improve patient care. “This is a well-deserved honor that fittingly culminates Brent’s years of service to others,� said Chris Van Gorder, president and CEO of Scripps Health. “As a former cop,I know calling someone your partner is one of the highest compliments you can give. Throughout my years here at Scripps, I'm proud to say I have considered Brent my partner.�

Who’s NEWS?

Last Chance at Life is an allbreed rescue and adoption organization. Some of the pets are in foster homes, and others are housed at Bark Avenue Resort and Kamp for Pets, 655 Benet Road, Oceanside. Visit barkforpets.com/ or LastChanceAtLife.org.

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Carlsbad Republican Women Federated Member and Carlsbad Mayor ProTem, Ann Kulchin was honored for her 32 years of public service during the Carlsbad Republican Women Federated Luncheon Sept. 25. The CRWF President Marlene Towns and its board of directors recognized CRWF member Kulchin’s outstanding public service commitment.


RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

B5

Feast for Casa de Amparo Casa de Amparo and Chef Jeffrey Strauss partnered in September to present a special Crystal Ball Gala pre-auction item — a Pizza & Paella party at Strauss’s private home overlooking the ocean in the Solana Beach hills. Strauss, Chef/Owner of Pamplemousse Grille in Del Mar, offered a one-of-a-kind dining experience for over twenty guests, raising $10,000 for the nonprofit’s programs and services supporting children and families affected by or at risk of child abuse or neglect. The evening began with cocktails and gourmet pizzas prepared in Chef Strauss’s outdoor pizza oven. Lou Ferrero brought along his favorite a capella group, Augie & the Side Effects, and guests enjoyed the sunset view on the terrace for an

Dean Spanos and Bertrand Hug supported Casa de Amparo through an early-auction Pizza & Paella dinner at Chef Jeffrey Strauss’ Solana Beach home. The Crystal Ball Gala will be held Nov. 3 at Fairbanks Ranch Country Club in Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo

elaborate paella dinner and dessert. Guests included, Honorary Chairpersons of this year’s 14th Annual Bassett Crystal Ball Gala Rick and Kayleen Huffman; Sharon Stein, Gala Chair; Jenny Craig; Lizbeth Ecke

and David Meyer; Lou and Judy Ferrero; Lola and Walter Green; Brent Katsakos; Dawn Leeds and Kenneth Sanger; John and Cathy Lynch; Dean and Susie Spanos and Dan and Barbie Spinazzola. Tickets and underwriting opportunities are still available for the 6 p.m. Nov. 3 gala at Fairbanks Ranch Country Club in Rancho Santa Fe. For tickets and information, see casadeamparo.org or contact Trina Godwin, tgodwin@casadeamparo.org, or call (760) 566-3560.

HOT LICKS Rancho Santa Fe’s Fine Tune Academy presents Michael Jackson’s long-time guitarist Jennifer Batten (right) shown with guitarist Slash, from 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 20 at the World Famous Big Fish Studios in Rancho Santa Fe. For more information, call (760) 908-4911. Courtesy photo

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From left, Kayleen Huffman, Lou Ferrero, Lizbeth Ecke and David Meyer supported Casa de Amparo through an early-auction Pizza & Paella dinner at Chef Jeffrey Strauss’ Solana Beach home. The Crystal Ball Gala will be held Nov. 3 at Fairbanks Ranch Country Club in Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo

COAST CITIES Character and Experience set judicial candidate Robert Amador apart from his opponent, Jim Miller, in the upcoming election. The San Diego County Bar Association rated Amador “Well Qualified” based on character traits and qualifications necessary for a judicial candidate, including fairness, integrity, and temperament. Miller was found to be “lacking qualifications.” Miller was also removed from his volunteer position as Judge Pro Tem handling traffic tickets and small claims matters. For failing to disclose that information the Lincoln Club of San Diego revoked their endorsement and endorsed Robert Amador on 10/10/2012. A veteran prosecutor, Amador has tried over 100 jury trials, and 250 juvenile trials. He has tried and convicted murderers, sex offenders, arsonists, gang members, and child predators. Miller has tried just five jury trials and no felonies. Amador serves as liaison to county law enforcement agencies and is an expert on constitutional issues in criminal law. He teaches extensively on the subject and is on call 24/7 to provide legal advice to officers conducting investigations. Sheriff Bill Gore endorses Amador who received a Sheriff’s Merit Award for his efforts on the Chelsea King murder investigation in 2010.

Judicial Candidate Robert Amador -Courtesy photo

Amador has the respect and admiration of those who have worked with him, whether for or against. He has devoted his legal career to keeping the San Diego community safe and, as judge, will continue to do so. Over 85 San Diego judges support Amador along with law enforcement and victims organizations, prosecutors and defense attorneys, civil lawyers, elected officials, and community leaders. The Superior Court is no place for politics and the judicial race is nonpartisan. Judges decide cases based upon facts and law using knowledge and judgment gained from years of legal experience, trial experience, and life experience. Amador has that experience. Amador graduated USD law and is a 29 year prosecutor. To ensure the just and proper verdict, vote Robert Amador, Superior Court Judge. For more info visit www.amadorforjudge.com

Paid for by Amador for Superior Court, 2012


B6

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Family health history: What you need to know Health Watch By the physicians and staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas

YOUNG ARTISTS Part picnic, part art show, the Early Education Program at Horizon Prep pulls out all the stops for “Art in the Park!” What began as an annual back-to-school picnic, has grown into an exhibit for mini-Monets and precocious Picassos. from left, Scarlette Hopf, Anna Wilson, Elijah Joseph, Alyssa Bjorklund and Matthew Zhao. Photo by Melissa Pedersen

Rowe School rallies for Red Ribbon Week RANCHO SANTA FE — Rancho Santa Fe’s R. Roger Rowe School will kick off its annual Red Ribbon Week Oct. 29 with the theme is “Be Strong, Be Brave, Be Proud, Say No!”

Red Ribbon Week is a national campaign promoting drug, tobacco and alcohol abuse prevention and awareness in youths and their parents. This educational campaign encourages students of every age to choose to live healthy and positive lives and provides parents with the tools to help. For older students, making healthy choices include saying “no” to drugs, tobacco and alcohol. For younger students, healthy choices involve taking care of their bodies, good nutrition and fire prevention. Each day of Red Ribbon Week, the school will sponsor different events and activities to demonstrate to students the importance of mak-

ing healthy choices in their own lives. Students will tie red ribbons to the fences to indicate they have pledged to be drug free. Students in grades K through four will hang “hand print” banners outside on the courtyard railings to indicate their pledge to make healthy choices. Students in grades five through eight will turn in entries to an optional essay contest about what choices they will make in their lives that will always help to keep them alcohol, tobacco and drug free. Jamba Juice will be sold outside and proceeds will benefit Hope2gether, a nonprofit founded by Sherrie and Aaron Rubin to educate and raise awareness about the rising abuse of prescription drugs. The school’s daily dress themes as follows: Monday “Turn Your Back on Drugs,” (wear cloths backward); Tuesday — “Hats Off to Good Choices,” (wear your favorite hat); Wednesday – Halloween Carnival (no Red Ribbon dress theme), Thursday — “Wear Red,” and Friday — “Too Bright to do Drugs” (wear bright clothing). Red Ribbon Week commemorates the memory of Drug Enforcement Agent, Kiki Camarena, who was murdered by the drug cartel

in Mexico in 1985. Red Ribbon Week started as a national response to his killing. Special Agent Camarena was an 11-year veteran of the DEA assigned to the Guadalajara, Mexico office where he was on the trail of the country’s biggest marijuana and cocaine traffickers. In 1985, he was extremely close to unlocking a multi-billion dollar drug pipeline. On Feb. 7, 1985, he was kidnapped, brutally tortured, and murdered by Mexican drug traffickers. His tragic death opened the eyes of many Americans to the dangers of and the international scope of the drug trade. Shortly after Camarena’s death, Congressman Duncan Hunter and Camarena’s high school friend Henry Lozano launched “Camarena Clubs” in his hometown of Calexico, Calif. Hundreds of club members pledged to lead drug free lives to honor the sacrifice made by Camarena. The RSF School Red Ribbon Week Coordinator is Karen Buss. Special thanks to Rancho Santa Fe Pharmacy for donating prizes to the winning essay writers. For further general info: Call Shaunna Kahn, Communications Chair (760) 420-1262, sksalzetti@sbcglobal.net

It’s pretty clear to most Americans that family history plays a big role in determining their health.A recent survey found that 96 percent realize that knowing their family history is important — yet only one in three Americans have ever bothered to gather and record this information. Human diseases are usually driven by two main causes: genes inherited through family, and personal lifestyle. Some diseases have a stronger lifestyle factor, while others have a more prominent genetic component. What’s important to know is that these factors can work together to cause disease, and due to recent medical advances, also help prevent disease. Consider diabetes, which is on the rise around the world.Those with a family history of diabetes can have their blood sugar tested to see if they are “pre-diabetic.” If so, people can help control the advance of diabetes by losing or maintaining body weight through diet and exercise. The same is true for socalled vascular diseases such as heart attack or stroke. Patients with a family history of such diseases should inform their doctors, who can then pay closer attention to indications of high bad cholesterol (LDL) or lower good cholesterol (HDL). With a family history of heart attack and stroke, the bad LDL cholesterol should be lower than would otherwise be recommended. Weight and exercise can also play a role in maintaining these levels. The medical community now knows much more about the impact of blood pressure and its management in preventing serious disease. It was once thought that a 70 year old with a systolic (top line) of 170 was acceptable – but it’s now widely recognized that the systolic should not be more than 130. This knowledge can prompt changes in care and lifestyle that can prevent many strokes and heart attacks. Knowing about personal family history is also important with cancer.

Almost every form of cancer has a genetic element. Learning about family history and making appropriate lifestyle choices can help to prevent these diseases, diagnose them early or head off complications that come with them. People with a family history of disease should realize the lifestyle choices they make are still important. People can take vital steps such as earlier, more frequent or more rigorous screening exams, or more disciplined diet and exercise habits. Similarly, those with relatively healthy family histories can still develop serious disease if they have consistently poor lifestyle habits. To help people better understand their family health histories, federal health officials have created a useful Web-based tool, called My Family Health Portrait.This tool helps users organize their family history for sharing with doctors and other family members, and for continual updating. To learn more, go to familyhistory.hhs.gov. Family gatherings are good time to begin compiling historical health information. Begin with the immediate family and try to get two generations of information, including both the paternal and maternal branches of the family tree. Start with key areas such as major birth defects, cancer, stroke and cardiovascular problems. “To Your Health” is brought to you by the physicians and staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas. For more information or for physician referral call 1-800-SCRIPPS.

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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

B7

City puts the clamps down on food truck event By Jared Whitlock

Even though it was picking up speed, the city’s first regular food truck gathering was recently forced to come to a halt. The organizers behind “Food Truck Fridays” say there won’t be any events in the near future, and possibly ever again due to an unforeseen permit demand from the city. While it may end for good, some food trucks are contemplating moving to a nearby public spot, which may prompt the city to review its food truck policy. The Black Sheep, a yarn shop located off of Coast Highway 101, began hosting food trucks in its parking lot in early August. For more than a month-and-a-half, foodies flocked to the event every Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. “We started the event on a whim and didn’t know how successful it would be,” said Tom Henderson, who owns The Black Sheep with his wife Karen. But the last food truck gathering was Sept 21. Several days prior, the city asked The Black Sheep to discontinue the event. According to a ruling from the planning department,The Black Sheep, along with any other privateproperty owners considering playing host to weekly food truck gatherings, will now need to obtain a minor-use permit, otherwise the food trucks and The Black Sheep risk receiving fines. Henderson argued the

city didn’t initially communicate the possibility of needing a minor-use permit. In July Henderson floated the idea of a food truck event to the city. He was told the food trucks must acquire an Encinitas business license, as well as meet health and vehicle codes — no other requirements were voiced, Henderson said. “The city never even alluded to a minor-use permit,” Henderson said. “It came out of the blue.” A minor-use permit is required because the events were larger than expected and held weekly, not a one or two-time event, according to the city. In response, Henderson said he wasn’t made aware that regular versus one-off events “could even be an issue.” The food trucks operated on their property once a week in exchange for The Black Sheep getting a percentage of the sales. Some suggested the event was fast becoming one of the most popular food truck events in San Diego County, Henderson said. Statistics aren’t kept for a city-by-city comparison. But in addition to anecdotal evidence, some of Henderson’s own numbers indicated a mushrooming event: On average, food sales increased 25 percent at each event, though growth slowed during the last two weeks. Also, Food Truck Fridays started with four food

Residents walk through a food truck gathering, which recently ended, at The Black Sheep’s parking lot. The future of “Food Truck Fridays” is in doubt, but that doesn’t necessarily mean the food trucks are going anywhere. Photo courtesy of Tom Henderson

trucks and grew to seven. Although the event was profitable, Henderson said he isn’t sure whether he’ll pursue a minor-use permit. The process can take six months and the permit costs $1,600, including additional expenses for traffic studies, public hearings and other studies. The permit can be denied at any point in the process and the fees are nonrefundable, Henderson said. “The food truck event was an experiment,” Henderson said. “There was some controversy, but overall it seemed to be well received. I don’t think people want it to go. We’re weighing our options.” According to Kerry Kusiak, senior planner with the city, Encinitas’ municipal TURN TO FOOD TRUCKS ON B15

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B8

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

F OOD &W INE

The scenic Santa Lucia Highlands makes breakout pinots this lovely wine in all the wrong ways and in the wrong wine country. This is a stately, royal wine, deserving of all the accolades it gets. FRANK It has “captured the MANGIO imagination of many wine Taste of Wine lovers,” according to James Laube, senior wine writer for Pinot noir wines have Wine Spectator. The blueprint for this had their way ever since the movie “Sideways” glorified amazing grape varietal is the

vaunted Burgundy wine country of France. There, as in other European countries, the wines are named after the district, not the grape, as it is in the U.S. Pinot noir must be farmed carefully under precise conditions of warm days, cool nights and just the right humidity powered by the coastal sites of Central and

Northern California and Oregon. If you have not discovered it yet, I want to reveal a little known but perfectly placed wine country for pinot noir, and that is the Santa Lucia Highlands appellation, west of Highway 101 in Monterey County. Here the elevation goes sharply up some 3,000 feet, producing about 6,000 acres under vine. Chardonnay is the largest grape varietal coming out of this area. In total, Monterey wine country has nine designated AVA wine districts with 40,000 acres and 200 vineyards. Noting the cool breezes from Monterey Bay, missionaries made wine here in the 1790s. Now, Monterey with its 30,000 population, is the hub of activity with its scenic resorts, fine restaurants, Cannery Row and nearby Carmel Village. Recently, members of the Santa Lucia Highlands AVA paid a road show visit to San Diego where we could taste through their latest releases of world class Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Most were 2010 just brought to market. After sipping through the 14 wineries, I settled in with Morgan Winery and its finely crafted pinots and chardonnays. “We have 45 acres planted, 27 to pinot noir and 18 to chardonnay in our Double L Vineyard, on the northern end of Santa Lucia,” declared Dan Morgan Lee, the owner. He’s been planting there since 1996. He went on to say “it captures the breezes from Monterey Bay, allowing the grapes to fully develop by lengthening the growing season and harvest.” The cool weather-loving pinots and chards are perfect-

Carlos DeNarvaez manages Bernini’s Bistro, La Jolla. Photo by Frank Mangio

ly accommodated. Both are burgundian flavored here than most anywhere else. The go-to Morgan favorite is the Double L Pinot Noir 2010 for $50. Morgan has a tasting room on the outskirts of Carmel where all wines can be tasted from 11 to 6 p.m. daily. Call (831) 6263700 or visit morganwinery.com.

Bernini’s is La Jolla’s Mediterranean bistro Picture a village in France, Italy or Spain with a small bistro offering indoor/outdoor seating where diners gather to hear the talk of the day and to enjoy a snack or a meal over a glass of wine. On Fay Avenue La Jolla, this is Bernini’s Bistro. Bernini’s has been in this busy location for 13 years, growing into a thriving breakfast, lunch and dinner house, and a full bar with live music Thursday through Saturday nights. All pastas are hand-made. Before getting into that delicious entrée, try the Mediterranean Platter, with more garden-fresh vegetables than you can count. Nightly dinner specials always make it a menu discovery. For a value red wine with your meal, I would recommend the Hess Cuvee Block 19 Napa Valley. Call (858) 454-5013 or visit berninisbistro.com.

Wine Bytes The DePortola Trail, Temecula Wine Country is having a Wine-Up Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 20 at the Vail Lake Resort & Campground. A chef challenge, great wines and live music will be featured. The cost is $55 per person. Call (855) 398-9463 for details. San Diego Wine Company has a red blend wine tasting from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 20. Call (858) 586WINE for details. Meritage Wine Market in Encinitas presents Napa Valley wines from 3 to 6 p.m. Oct. 20. Cost is $50 each. Call for an RSVP at (760) 4792500. WineSellar and Brasserie in Sorrento Valley has Rhone Valley wines in a tasting on from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 24. Cost is $15. Details at (858) 4509557. Vigilucci’s on the Coast Highway in Carlsbad is celebrating its 10-year anniversary with a special benefit dinner to help “Cancer Angels.” Time is 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 25. Your dinner choice includes a free glass of champagne and petite tiramisu. RSVP recommended at (760) 434-2580. Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. His library can be viewed at www.tasteofwinetv.com. (Average Google certified 900 visits per day) He is one of the top five wine commentators on the Web. Reach him at mangiompc@aol.com.


B9

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

F OOD &W INE

Local barista takes top spot at Peet’s Coffee & Tea competition DAVID BOYLAN Lick the Plate I will be the first to admit that I’ve only recently been sucked into the whole gourmet coffee movement, if that’s what you call it. It’s hard enough keeping up on the ever-evolving food scene in San Diego so I’ve tended to stick with the basic brews, paying little attention to the nuances of the craft. That all changed recently when I had an opportunity to sit down with Rebecca Moak, the champion barista from Peet’s Coffee & Tea in Encinitas. Rebecca takes her coffee as seriously as a chef or accomplished bartender. I love that kind of passion and it really came through when I tasted her winning cortado served with blueberries and dark chocolate. It was like a perfect pairing of wine and food. Thanks Rebecca, now I have one more area of my life where the bar has been raised. Will ordinary coffee ever suffice again?? Here is the conversation I had with Rebecca. Lick the Plate: What was your first experience with good coffee and was there an

influence in your life that turned you on to coffee? Rebecca Moak: I have a nostalgic first memory of coffee. My grandparents always made Chemex coffee before switching to an automatic machine, and I remember being fascinated with the brewing method. It always made a great cup of coffee. LTP: There are a lot of coffee houses out there, what influenced you to work at Peet’s? RM: The main motivation was needing a job. I didn’t know a whole lot about Peet’s before working here, but the more I learned, the more impressed I was with the company. LTP: How long have you been a barista? RM: I have been a barista for about seven years. I started at my college campus’ coffeehouse for three years, two years at an independent coffeehouse, and two years at Peet’s. Each experience has been totally different. In my first coffee job, we didn’t have a whole lot of training, so I really had no idea what I was doing. We used to drink shots of espresso as a dare because we thought it was so gross. At Peet’s a shot of espresso is what it’s all about, and with the right knowledge and skill it is amazing! LTP: Did you realize early on that you had a spe-

Rebecca Moak, champion barista from Peet’s Coffee & Tea in Encinitas. Photo by David Boylan

cial knack for this? RM: I don’t think so; I would say that my skills have developed over a lot of time. At my second coffee job I had a lot of time to practice and to drink coffee, so I really started to appreciate the skill it takes to pull an excellent shot of espresso or make creamy, velvety foam. As soon as I started at Peet’s, my skills developed exponentially. It’s here that I’ve learned

the most drink-making technique and background knowledge related to where the coffee comes from, how it’s processed, and how that contributes to the flavor profile. LTP: Your winning drink is your signature espresso cortado; can you describe how this is made and what inspired it? RM: Essentially, a cortado is a really small cappuccino, about 3 ounces. One ounce espresso and 2 ounces foamed milk. The way the milk is poured into the espresso incorporates all the elements together so you get a creamy, very coffee-forward drink. I served blueberries and dark chocolate on the saucer with the intent of bringing out the fruity/pungent/winey/chocolaty flavors of the Arabian Mocha-Java espresso I used. LTP: You selected the Surfrider Foundation as the recipient of the $1,000 donation that Peet’s provides to the winner. They must have been stoked about that, what was behind that decision? RM: Growing up in North County San Diego, the beach has always been a big part of my life. Surfrider is an organization whose values resonate with those of my local community, so I felt it was the perfect organization to pick. I’m stoked for them that I won!

LTP: So what’s next? Is there a higher level competition involved or a career in coffee??? RM: No competitions, but hopefully a career. I feel like I’m in a great place with Peet’s because they are so focused on finding the best coffees and teas from around the world. I just want to keep on learning, and eventually pass on that knowledge to others. Stop in and sample one

of Becca’s award winning cortados at Peet’s in Encinitas located at 119 N. El Camino Real. Lick the Plate can now be heard on KPRi, 102.1 FM Monday-Friday during the 7pm hour. David Boylan is founder of Artichoke Creative and Artichoke Apparel, an Encinitas based marketing firm and clothing line. Reach him at david@artichoke-creative.com or (858) 395-6905.


B10

Advice offered on college financing CARMEL VALLEY — Parents can begin planning now for how to pay for their children’s college education. A “Show Me The MoneyFor College!” seminar is being held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 13 at Torrey Pines High

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

School Room 302, sponsored by San Dieguito Adult School. The cost is $32 and pre-registration is required. Call (760) 753-7073 or visit sdadulted.com. Financial planning for college funding can be over-

whelming and complex. Get information in the area of financial planning for a college education, beyond how to complete the FAFSA forms, that high school counselors and investment advisors may not know.

community CALENDAR Got an item for the calendar? Send the details via email to calendar@coastnewsgroup.com.

OCT. 19 THAT’S LIFE LIFE at MiraCosta College, the lifelong learning group,meets at 1 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Oceanside campus, 1 Barnard Dive., Admin. Bldg. 1000, Room 1068. Call (760) 721-8124. BUYERS AND SELLERS Mira Costa College is sponsoring “Meet the Buyers,” hosted by Assemblyman Martin Garrick from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Escondido Library, 239 Kalmia St., Escondido. Meet buyers and experts on how to get contracts. Registration is required at becsandiego.com. TAKE AT TRIP Sign up for the El Camino Real chapter of Questers bus trip to the Pasadena City College Collectible Flea Market Nov. 4. Pickup at 6:30 a.m.; expected return is 4:30 p.m. Cost is $45. Reservations and payment must be received no later than Oct. 26. Call (760) 591-3581 for details.

OCT. 20 CHILI & QUACKERS Join

So-Scary Estuary. Costumes are encouraged and kids can create lollipop spiders and animal masks. Go trick-or-treating along the “Haunted Hike” nature trail, plus live animal presentations at 2 p.m. each day. Visit SanElijo.org or call (760) 634-3026.

three meetings before joining. Call Patti at (760) 448-5086 or Michele at (619) 697-8209 or email dollarsandsenseforwomen@cox.net. ANCIENT CRAFTS A special teen workshop will be held at 4 p.m. Oct 24 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive to make a Dia de los Muertos sugar skull. Visit SDCL.org or PUT ON SOME PINK Join call (760) 753-7376. Unity of Carlsbad at 10 a.m. Oct. 21 at 3096 Harding St., Carlsbad, wearing pink to sup- STUDY ABROAD The port Breast Cancer Awareness. International Office at Cancer survivor Pam Bird will MiraCosta College invites stushare her experience and pro- dents to explore international vide information on prevention education opportunities at the and early detection. More infor- 2012 Study Abroad Expo, 11 mation visit unitycarlsbad.org. a.m. to 2 p.m., Oct. 25, at BEHIND THE SCENES The MiraCosta College’s San Elijo Drake Center for Veterinary Campus, on the Student Center Care, 195 N. El Camino Real Walk, 3333 Manchester Ave., hosts Kids’ Day at the Drake Cardiff. Visit miracosta.iip or Center for ages 7 through 12 at call (760) 795-6897 or e-mail 3 p.m. Oct. 21. Dress up in a lab iip@miracosta.edu. coat and help vets perform rou- ORCHID FEVER The San tine physical examination, use Diego County Cymbidium a stethoscope to listen to a pet’s Society will hold its annual heartbeat, look at slides orchid plant auction in the through a microscope, X-rays Ecke Building at the San Diego and learn about general pet Botanic Garden with plant care. For reservations, call (760) inspection and taco bar start at 753-9393. 6:30 p. m. and bidding at 7 p. m. Oct. 25. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call (760) HERITAGE HUNT Scots- 931-0502 or e-mail billtcIrish Research will be dis- wong@att.net. cussed by genealogist Anne Bowman at North San Diego POLITICAL EVENT A Town County Genealogical Society Hall meeting will be held from from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Oct. 23 in 7 to 8 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Carlsbad City Council Encinitas Community Center Chambers, 1200 Carlsbad 140 Oakcrest Park Drive, Village Drive, Carlsbad. For Encinitas. The meeting will more information e-mail tgor- focus on the new 49th congresdinier@roadrunner.com or call sional district, which includes all of the coastal communities (760) 435-2536. of North County.

OCT. 21

OCT. 25

OCT. 23

the Rotary Club of Del Mar Chili & Quackers from 3 to 6 p.m. at the beautiful ocean front Powerhouse Park in Del Mar. Join the Ducky Derby followed by a Chili Cook-Off. All proceeds benefit the Rotary INVESTMENT CLUB A Club service projects. women’s investment club is curNATURE’S COSTUMES rently accepting new members From 1 to 4 p.m. Oct. 20 and and meets at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 24 Oct. 21, the San Elijo Lagoon and every fourth Wednesday in Nature Center, 2710 North County. A prospective Manchester Ave. offers the Not- new member may attend up to

OCT. 24

OCT. 26 COME AS YOU AREN’T Join The Oceanside Museum of Art for its Halloween bash, “Art After Dark: Come as You TURN TO CALENDAR ON B15


B11

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

OCT. 19, 2012

Reflections and serenity in Playa Del Carmen, Mexico MACHEL PENN SHULL Machel’s Ranch I brought a wardrobe with me to Playa del Carmen. Usually when I travel to Mexico, I travel light. As my husband slept last night, I arranged my outfits perfectly in the wardrobe. I tried on my various outfits for the trip under the silence of our thatched roof in our hotel room. The humming of the ceiling fan added that “white noise” effect that felt like a Zen meditation moment in the wee hours of the morning. Then I actually did meditate. You know, like Julia Roberts did when she played Elizabeth Gilbert in “Eat, Pray, Love.” I sat with my legs crossed, my back straight and I took in those deep types of breath you forget to breathe in everyday normal life. The cold Spanish tiles added another layer of mystery to the ambience surrounding me. During this time of reflection much gratitude emerged from my heart. An overwhelming sense of how special it is to be alive; to share, to experience, to commit to this moment and open your soul to feel the power of love. After meditating, I laid down on the hard mattress in the darkness of the night. I could see bits of light streaming in from the outside behind the drawn curtains. I

stared up at the A-frame thatched roof with thoughts of how my journey has taken me here to Playa Del Carmen in the silence of this place, the foreign surroundings with the smell of sea salt mixed in with moisture dangling above me. The white sheets seemed oddly ethereal in the dark. What is this life but a vapor? Do you know that passage from the Bible? That’s how it feels right now. Like life is so precious. Like each moment needs to be savored, loved, held onto so I do not forget the textures, the smells and the feelings that imbue me. Life can be incredibly short. That’s what I want to tell you from Playa del Carmen. So make each moment count. Be soft. Be bold. Be real. Feel something. Don’t numb yourself to the beauty because there is so much to be thankful for each day. Tell someone you love them. Thank you for reading my column. I am grateful for you. Thank you for that.

Around town On Oct. 13, Robin and I crossed over an International border by foot. What we did not know is that the border we normally cross over was being remodeled. This meant extra walking involved. Picture me running in high heals in my black mini skirt with Robin close behind running as fast as we could across the new makeshift ramps to cross over into Mexico. When I saw the sign ahead, you could say I felt a sigh of relief. Next was the quick cab

Robin and Machel Shull on vacation in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. Courtesy photo

ride through Tijuana. Robin spoke to the cab driver about their newest president in Mexico. Then he asked about our election. It seems as if there is no escaping the political banter right now, not even in Mexico. We arrived at our gate to find the doors locked. Luckily for us, the flight attendant took pity on us and let us cross over onto the tarmac to board the plane. We soon flew off into the sky with beads of sweat still dripping off of our foreheads. Our plane first landed in Puebla, Mexico. Luckily we didn’t have to connect there. This flight was headed to Cancun. Later that day, we arrived at Cancun airport. We found a shuttle and then rode with a Polish couple to Playa Car in Playa Del Carmen. Playa Car is like The Crosby of Rancho Santa Fe. Cobbled streets, lined with Mexican villas amidst the most beautiful tropical jungle. “Where the jungle meets the Caribbean.” We tried to make small talk with the other couple, which failed miserably. I've never felt so “Californian” in my entire life in a way that did not feel appealing. The good news is we did not stay at the same resort with them

Morning in on the beach in the Mayan Riviera. Photo by Machel Penn Shull

and were able to wave goodbye forever once we made it to our resort. On Oct. 14, Robin and I walked through Playa Car to the nucleus of town. Imagine bright colors, palm trees and balmy weather lining the blue sea. We walked everywhere. We had researched many boutique hotels before coming here. So we stopped in at each one just to see what they looked like in person. What fun. We then had the most delicious Americana over ice at Starbucks. (Hate to say it, but I've never been happier to be inside of a Starbucks!) We shopped. We walked. We ate delicious skirt steak with a mean hot green salsa on the

side. This trip has felt like a variation of wonderful side dishes. The little things that add so much to the experience. Later that day, we walked back to our resort and swam in the green sea. The sun had set with streaks of orange bursting through the clouds. The gentle waves lapped over us late in the evening. It seems as if we were on a different schedule than the rest of the resort. Everyone had gone in for dinner and we were now swimming in the sea. The white beach lined with lounge chairs were empty. I floated with my ears submerged under the crystal clear water, while watching

Just one example of the Mayan ruins in this region Photo by Machel Penn Shull

the small clouds float above me. Another peaceful moment where life felt as if all had added up to that one moment of perfection and I felt nothing but love for all. Then the sun had set.The lavender horizon met the green sea in such tranquility I cannot fully describe the beauty of it in words. Some fear Mexico. However, the trick is to know where to go, how to travel and what to do. I am writing this to you right now from the hotel computer. This moment is fading. The one of writing my column in a new and unfamiliar setting. This moment is magical for me. I want to say thank you dear readers for reading. I look forward to returning to Rancho Santa Fe and sharing more stories with you. If you have a wonderful one to share, please contact me. I would love to hear from you. If you have a fun event you would like Machel Penn to cover, contact her at mpenn@coastnewsgroup.com.

Playa Car in Playa Del Carmen in Mexico. Photo by Machel Penn Shull

Crossing over the International border into Mexico. Photo by Machel Penn Shull

One of the many excursions to do when you visit Playa del Carmen. Photo by Machel Penn Shull


B12

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

remarkable achievements are possible.

SOUP TO NUTS by Rick Stromoski

By Bernice Bede Osol

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

The year ahead could turn out to be an extremely favorable period in which you’ll experience many new and exciting developments. It would be a great time to set lofty objectives and pursue them vigorously. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Today could launch an extremely significant cycle for you, especially where your finances and material needs are concerned. If you handle things right, surpluses will abound.

THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce

MONTY by Jim Meddick

ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

COW & BOY by Mark Leiknes

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Something is stirring that could produce an advantageous effect upon your future hopes and desires. Prepare yourself for all your tomorrows and look forward to what they’ll offer. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Now is the time to make that move, maneuver or adjustment you’ve been contemplating where your work is concerned. Everything is looking good for making such a change. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — If a significant and necessary decision is staring you in the face, it’s the day to take action. Depend on your good judgment and common sense to make the right choice.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — A smart friend who is concerned about your welSCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Those fare is likely to offer you some unusual whom you always feel compelled to advice. Even if it sounds strange, think it please may do a role reversal and per- through until you understand its essence. form something nice for you. This change in your relationship will allow you to hold CANCER (June 21-July 22) — This is an excellent day to spend some time sorting the strings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — out things that have been trying and conThere is a time for sowing and a time for fusing. Once you work things out, you can reaping. You’re now in a period in which reorganize your life for maximum efficienyou will be paid back in large measure by cy. those to whom you’ve given so much. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — There is no CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Some need to allow self-doubts to intimidate exciting new developments could be in you, because you have the answers the offing where your social life is con- needed to produce the end results you cerned. Both a few old and new friends desire. Figure out what you want and will play big roles in your happiness. then do it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — It would be a good thing to start elevating your sights in terms of your more ambitious objectives. Once you get on a roll, many

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Chance could play a big role in bringing about success. You’re apt to say the right thing at the right time to the right person.


OCT. 19, 2012

B13

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Over

100,000

readers every week!*

F.Y.I. 100 Garage Sales

92057

92054

Visit us at: www.coastnewsgroup.com

ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE Carlsbad Womens Club Sat. Oct. 6 from 7am until 1pm. 3320 Monroe St. Carlsbad, CA 92008 (across from Carlsbad High School). Furniture, Housewares, Toys, Childrenís Clothes, Books, Electronics, Art Work and More. FRACKING Please use your favorite search engine to search for fracking or fracing to stop polluting our environment. (330) 961-0095

92083 92056

92085 92084

92008

92078

92009

92024 92023 92091 92007

Items For Sale 200 92067

Antiques

92075 92130

ANTIQUE DINNER SERVICE 1940ís Trojan Seebring, 49 pieces, $150 (760) 822-6921

92014

Appliances NIKKEN AIR WELLNESS Power 5 Pro Air Filtration, paid $750, asking $125 (760) 599-9141 WASHING MACHINE For Sale: White Frigidare Gallery Front Loader Washer With Stand, Lightly Used, Excellent Condition $425 firm. Val Leucadia (760) 753-4412

THE COAST NEWS GROUP

Computer/Electronics ATT ROUTER AT&T Router for sale, $50 (760) 839-3115

INDEX F.Y.I..................................... ..100 HEALTH & WELL BEING ....150 ITEMS FOR SALE................200 BUSINESS SERV.............. ...300 FINANCIAL SERV.................310 HOME SERVICES................325 MISC. SERVICES.................350 PERSONAL SERV................375

HELP WANTED................ ....400 JOBS WANTED................ ....450 BUSINESS OPPS.................475 ROOMMATES.......................500 RENTALS..............................600 REAL ESTATE.................... ..700 LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICE.... 800 AUTOMOTIVE..................... 900

CLASSIFIED AD RATES

CELL PHONES Currently offering free cell phones with a new contract. Visit our website at: http://www.tmiwireless.com/?aid =54955 SATELLITE RECEIVER WITH DISH An adth satellite receiver #8800ir for european programming is for sale with a globe cast dish. Includes wireless remote and memory card. $95 set (760) 758-8344 TV COMBO - CLAYBROOKE With Radio/Lantern/Flashlight, Electric or 9C Battery, Yellow, in box, $25 (760) 599-9141

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATES:

Furniture

Per Paper 1-2 wks 3 wks 6 wks 12 wks 26 wks 52 wks

HEADBOARD For Single Bed, light blue upholstered in cloth good condition $60 (760) 7588958

Display PCI $40

$36

$32

$28

$24

$20

1/2 OFF SECOND PAPER BUY

CLASSIFIED LINE AD RATES: $3.00/word, 15 word minimum. Contract rates available for 4+ insertions. Call for information. LINE ADS RUN IN ALL PAPERS - 108,000 READERS

SAVE $1.00 PER WORD!

Miscellaneous 100 MISC. POST CARDS US & Foreign, Some Real Photos All for $15 (760) 845-3024 1970 KENMORE SEWING MACHINE Sears Model 1250, works good, comes with table (table needs work) $70 (760) 7588958

Place your own line ad online at coastnewsgroup.com

ARTS AND CRAFTS ITEMS Yarn, Wine Corks, Much Much More - All for $20 (760) 295-6061

DEADLINES

BATTLE STAR series, carriers, amphibious, & battleships. 1941 present day.

Ask for Classified Dept.

Awesome ship designs onto apparel, mugs, posters,& steins. Honorable gifts. zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein

760-436-9737 ext. 100 or fax ad copy 760-943-0850

BUSHNELL BINOCULARS 7x by 3T, Extra Wide Angle, With Case and Shoulder Strap, excellent condition $25 (760) 599-9141

or stop by office at: 828 N. Hwy 101, Leucadia

CLARINET Excellent Condition with Wood Case, made in USA $100 (619) 277-3961

Copy and Cancellations FRIDAY (DISPLAY), MONDAY (LINERS) 4PM

To view or place ads online go to: coastnewsgroup.com

Items For Sale 200

Items For Sale 200

DECORATIVE WICKER BASKET HUGE! Full of Stuffed Fruits and Vegetables $50 (760) 295-6061 DECOY DUCK A Very Old Wooden Mallard, Rare Find $29 OBO Please call Shelly (760) 8094657 FIREWOOD FOR SALE Wheelbarrows full, Oak, Pine and Eucalyptus - $25 per wheelbarrow full (760) 942-7430 HANDMADE QUILT TOP Red/White/Blue Cotton, 82” by 72” USA Vintage 1960 - 1970 $30, also Wood Quilt Rack 30” wide by 32” Tall $15 (760) 599-9141 HOT WHEELS box of fifty hot wheels in original packaging. random models. $40 (760) 7268491 LEATHER SUEDE JACKET Ladies Size Small with Fur Collar, “John Paul Richards” Brand, Camel Color - Never Used, Beautiful $20 (760) 5999141 LIGHT FIXTURES $20. EA 12” satin nickel w/ opaque glass. includes bulbs. never used & in box. (760) 721-7672 LIKE NEW HUNTER AIR PURIFIER. $99.00-hunter 30381 hepatech air purifier features a whisper-quiet fan that draws air into the unit without excessive noise. Operational manual included. Pictures available. (760) 842-1970 MAPLE BOOKCASE $30. maple laminate with 4 adjustable shelves. never used. 25”w x 35”h x 15”d (760) 721-7672 MEXICAN WALL HANGING Hand Knitted with wood attachment, 70 by 24, $20 (760) 2956061 MIKASA DINNERWARE English Countryside, 40 Piece Place Setting for 8, Excellent Condition, Only Used Twice, $150 (760) 420-7245 NAVY aircraft carriers awesome ship battle star designs onto apparel, mugs, posters,& steins. Honorable gifts. zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein REGULATOR CLOCK Howard Miller Brand, Beautiful Honey Oak, Key and Pendulum, Great Cosmetic and Working Condition, $89 OBO call Shelly (760) 809-4657 ROYAL TYPEWRITER (Century) model, manual, built in Japan in the 60ís, Pristine Condition, $59 OBO please call Shelly (760) 809-4657 VIETNAM war battle star collection: apparel / mugs / key chains Visit Online Store www.zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein

OLD COMIC BOOKS WANTED. Local collector will pay you big cash $$$. (858) 999-7905 OLYO’S PIZZA MEMORABILIA Anything considered but would love any pictures or t-shirts (adult size). Wanted for my nephew’s Christmas present! (760) 9947265

Roommates 500 GUEST HOUSE 1-2 bedrooms in or near Encinitas, long term, Art Student at Watts in Encinitas, References, no live-in boyfriends, no bad habits mariacalifornia@gmail.com (619) 977-8921

WANTED Wanted Used Saxophones, flutes, clairnets, any condition, will pay cash. 760-3469931 (760) 705-0215.

Automotive 900

Wanted To Buy

1984 CORVETTE Black with Tan Interior, 189k miles, new alternator and battery, re-built automatic transmission, Smogged and Registered until April 2013, $5000 or best offer (760) 4208245

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED Any Type, Any Brand. Will pay up to $10 a box. Call Ronda at (760) 593-7033.

Misc. Services 350 Take time for yourself... let us do the dirty work!

ANGEL’S

Cleaning Service Martha Padilla - Owner Deep cleaning in living areas, kitchen, dining, bathrooms, bedrooms & windows

Cell 760-712-8279 Or 760-580-6857 Se Habla Español

ornelas.f.p@gmail.com Licensed (#00026922) and Bonded

AFFORDABLE HOUSE CLEANING Husband and Wife team will clean your home or office for very reasonable rates. We do an excellent job, charge by the job (not hourly) and make it affordable for you. Last minute, weekends, move outs, etc. call (760) 893-9184 DREAM WORKSHOP Oct. 20, 2012, $45 includes free organic lunch plus take home materials. Learn how to work with your dreams for a more successful life. Limit 15 participants, call for reservation. Dr. Patricia Ariadne, www.transitiontherapist.com (760) 445-0805 PIANO LESSONS in Home, Teaching All Levels, For Information call (434) 321-2227 1st Month Free HAULING I will haul your trash, yard materials, left behind furniture for move outs, etc. for very affordable rates. call Everett at (760) 893-9184

Cars

2002 HONDA ACCORD LX BLACK 4 Door, Power Steering, Breaks, Windows and Locks, AC, AM/FM Radio, Tape Player, Clean Title, Smogged Last Week, Runs Great, Will buy your car and sell this one $3450 (760) 2745477 2004 MCCORMICK MTX120 Tractor ($19,000), 2wd, 16 speed power shift, left hand reverser, 120 engine hp, 100 pto hp, air seat, am/fm, rear wiper, 3 remotes, toplink, very good condition!. For more info/photo: rog. Perez@aol. Com 2005 TOYOTA COROLLA CE Blue, Good Shape, 75k miles $8500 OBO (619) 247-0954 AUTO Mb services has been in business since 1996. The co-owners Randy Brinker and Tony Munson have over 60 years combined experience in servicing and restoring vintage, classic, hot rods, motorcycles or anything that has a motor and runs on gas. (951) 696-1129 MAZDA SPORT Miata, mx, turbo, 2 seater, black soft top with cover, cd stereo, air, manual, (stick 6 speed), performance tires with spare, apprx. 38,000 miles. (760) 207-0073 San Marcos, $15,950.00 0B0.

Motorhomes 1986 FORD FIREBEAM MOTOR HOME 52k Miles, Smog and Registration up to date, $3900 (760) 415-3883

Sporting Goods POOL TABLE AND BALLS Very Good Condition $150 (760) 8226921 TENNIS RACQUET Head Crossbow 10 43/8 grip light weight powerful excellent condition $50 (760) 632-2487

Items Wanted JACK DANIELS Collector looking for old jd or lem motlow bottles and advertising or display items. Up to $149 each (760) 6302480

Place your own FREE print ad at coastnewsgroup.com If your item is under $150 dollars or is a vehicle for sale, you can place it FREE!


B14

OCT. 19, 2012

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

NANI CLASSIFIED ADS ADOPTION

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136296 Florida Agency #100021542

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A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR! Breast Cancer Research Foundation! Most highly rated breast cancer charity in America! Tax Deductible/Fast Free Pick Up. 1-800771-9551 www.carsforbreastcancer.org DONATE A CAR - HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Non runners OK. Tax Deductible. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-5780408

AUTOS WANTED

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We’re Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-4162330

CABLE TV

Bundle & Save on your CABLE, INTERNET PHONE, AND MORE. High Speed Internet starting at less than $20/mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159

ELECTRONICS

*LOWER THAT CABLE BILL! Get Satellite TV today! FREE System, installation and HD/DVR upgrade. Programming starting at $19.99. Call NOW 1-800-935-8195

HEALTH & MEDICAL

VIAGRA 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills +4 FREE only $99. #1 MALE ENHANCEMENT! Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Blue Pill now! 1-888-7968870

HELP WANTED

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS needed immediately! $150-$300/day depending on job. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-561-1762

Live like a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091

Movie Extras, Actors, Models Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 877-824-6260

NOW ACCEPTING!!! - up to $1000 WEEKLY PAID IN ADVANCE!!! MAILING BROCHURES or TYPING ADS ONLINE for our company. FREE Supplies! Genuine Opportunity. PT/FT. No Experience Needed! www.HelpMailingBrochures.com

MISCELLANEOUS

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MEDICAL CAREERS begin here – Online training for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com Meet singles now! No paid operators, just people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages, connect live. FREE trial. Call 1-877-737-9447 Rapid DNA / STD / Drug Testing Same Day, No Appointment Needed, Private, 15min. Testing 4500 locations Results in 1-3 days call to order 800-394-8690

Reach over 17 million homes nationwide with one easy buy! Only $1,995 per week for a 20 word classified! For more information go to www.naninetwork.com WORK ON JET ENGINES – Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 854-6156.

MOTORCYCLES/WANT TO BUY

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DOCUMENTARY CONTINUED FROM B1

tant Rick was to the (Grateful) Dead’s image and how much they loved Rick,” Barilotti said. Barilotti said the article was a major breakthrough for him. Thanks in part to it, he later became editor of Surfer Magazine and went on to write and produce surfing documentaries. Barilotti said his Kickstarter campaign, a way of raising money that wasn’t around until recent years, has given him a chance to revisit the subject that meant so much to him and helped springboard his career — Griffin’s life. “He’s art is very influential, something that should be covered,” Barilotti said. “His personal story is fascinating, too.” Griffin’s life was largely shaped by a car accident in the mid-1960s that dislocated an eyeball, put him in a coma and left dramatic scarring on the left side of his face. Once he came out of the coma, his artwork trans-

FOOD TRUCKS CONTINUED FROM B7

code does not specifically govern food trucks. The city based its decision on a section of code that states minor-use permits are necessary when items are sold outdoors on private property as part of regularly scheduled events. “The food trucks were uncharted territory for us,” Kusiak said. “In addition to the code, we determined they would need a minor-use permit after gauging the impacts on traffic, parking and other considerations.” Currently, the city’s code does not require special permits or prohibit food trucks operating on public streets, as long as they follow the California Vehicle Code, according to Kusiak. Christian Murcia, owner of Crepes Bonaparte, one of the food trucks that participated in the event, said the city’s ruling will push food trucks to set up shop on public property, which may further anger brick-and-mortarrestaurants that weren’t happy about Food Truck Fridays. At the end of August, more than 20 restaurants signed a letter addressed to the Downtown Encinitas Merchants Association expressing concern over the gatherings. “The city should waive the minor-use permit on public property,” Murcia said. “I think restaurants would much prefer us contained and parked on private property,

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OCT. 19, 2012 formed dramatically, becoming more abstract and ornate. He then moved to San Francisco, where his images were welcomed and celebrated, particularly at the height of “hippiedom.” But his style, personality and location were constantly on the move. Griffin even designed posters for local restaurants and surfed Swami’s Beach when he lived in Encinitas for about a year in the 1970s. Later in life, he became a born-again Christian and painted fine art. “It’s been said that no two people ever met the same Rick Griffin,” Barilotti said. “I like the idea of a documentary about of someone who’s constantly changing.” Barilotti’s documentary is officially underway. Dayby-day, he’s getting closer to shining a light on Griffin’s art. “I think it deserves to be known,” Barilotti said. Those interested have until Oct. 31 to donate to Barilotti’s Kickstarter campaign, which can be found by searching on kickstarter.com. rather than just being on the street right in front of their businesses.” Murcia estimates that the end of Food Truck Fridays will eat away at 10 percent of Crepes Bonaparte’s bottom line. But maybe not for long, he said. As something of a protest, Murcia and other food truck owners are planning on operating once a week for several hours at public parking spaces just east of The Black Sheep, he said. Encinitas hasn’t passed any ordinances barring or curtailing food trucks selling food on public property. As such, the food trucks would only be subject to same code and parking requirements as other vehicles. Some cities have tried to ban or limit food trucks on public and private property with ordinances, only to be overruled by sections of the California Vehicle Code and a state law from 1984 forbidding cities from outlawing mobile food vendors. Last month, in Monrovia, Calif. an ordinance restricting where food trucks can operate was overturned. The city had to settle with the SoCal Mobile Vendors Association and pay $215,000 in attorney’s fees. Should it take the necessary steps, The Black Sheep could potentially appeal the city’s code at a planning commission meeting, Kusiak said. If they don’t like that decision, they could make their case at a City Council meeting.

Defensible space around structures RANCHO SANTA FE — Property owners are required to remove and/or modify native brush and grasses within 100 feet of any structure either on or adjacent to the property. Any species of non-native plants may exist in this area if it is properly maintained; see Vegetation Management Ordinance 02-01 and the Wildland Urban Interface Development Standards, June 1997 Revision for additional guidelines.

VOLUNTEER

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equivalent of Eagle Scout for Boy Scouts. For her project, she feeds homeless once a month on Sunday and organizes birthday parties once a month for homeless children whose birthdays fall within the month. She also arranges for a special gift for the child, which

SMALL TALK

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band will finally have a constant companion with him to watch those endless PBS specials on how things work. But what I really want to know is why that wild curiosity is instantly quenched once they have the thing dissected? What missing chromosome prevents them from remaining interested until

shake roofs). Any accumulation of flammable vegetation or combustible materials must be removed within ten feet of an above-ground propane tank. Firewood must be neatly stacked and stored 30 feet from all structures. All flammable vegetation and combustible materials must be cleared or removed within 30 feet of firewood stacks.

Mature trees (preferably fire resistive) of any type must be: Skirted up at least six feet above surrounding vegetation Kept at least ten feet from any chimney or stovepipe. Trimmed a minimum of ten feet above a combustible roofFree of all dead or dying plants, trees or parts thereof (These are minimum requirements that may not provide adequate clearance for homes with

help other teens redefine the word “normal” and promote inclusion. She chooses her charitable work because it gives much back to her. “I don’t look at big picture, I just look at the experience,” she said. “If something is going to give me an amazing experience, I am there.” That might explain one of the ways she raises money for Kids Included it is cleaned up and back in Together, an organization she help found. The event working order? I am screwing my called “Over the Edge For courage to the sticking place for battle to come. VALITAR It will begin with get- CONTINUED FROM B1 ting him to make his bed (so he will have the pleasure of revenue for the fairgrounds. disassembling it again that Rancho Santa Fe residents night) and hopefully end in Mark and Tatyana Remley, who are producing the a wonderful compromise. He will be allowed to show, have secured the rearrange anything in sight, venue for $100,000. The fairgrounds will if he can have it reassemalso receive 100 percent of bled by dinnertime. the parking revenue and 75 percent of gross concession

is given to the mother to present. Also for her project, she has organized a curriculum about disability awareness for middle-schoolers that encourages teachers and other students to include children who are different or who have disabilities. She and 20 other teens created “I am Norm,” to

Tickets are $30 for nonmembers. Visit oma-online.org or call (760) CONTINUED FROM B10 435-3721 for reservations, or get tickets at the door. Guests must Aren’t” from 7 to 10 p.m. Oct. 26. be over 21. Guests are invited to dress as their own altered identity. Enjoy music by The Creepy Creeps and ROLL OVER FOR FUN DJ Danny Massure, a haunted staircase, movie props and draw- Chase Bank invites the commuings, live art, ZBrush creature nity and its canine friends to a projections, body-painting, per- spooktacular doggyfest with formance art, an open bar, appe- contests for most original costizers and a costume contest. tume, funniest costume and tal-

CALENDAR

OCT. 27

ented dog, from noon to 2 p.m. Oct. 27 at the El Camino Real and Leucadia Chase branch, 1080 N. El Camino Real, Encinitas. Call Doug Young at (760) 633-3133 for more information.

HELPING

HOSPICE

Hospice of the North Coast Auxiliary will host an afternoon tea from 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 27, Carlsbad Senior Center, 799 Pine Ave., Carlsbad. Visit

Charity,” is an opportunity for anyone who raises $1,000 for the cause to repel down the side of the 33story downtown Hyatt as a reward. “I’ve done it twice, It’s really empowering,” she said. Malia is a senior at Canyon Crest Academy. She plans to attend art school. Her long-term plans include becoming an entrepreneur. “There are a few business ideas going through my head,” she said. sales. Valitar opens Nov. 16 and will hold 50 shows before closing Dec. 31. Tickets are $60 to $245 and available through Valitar.com. The producers will donate $1 from each ticket sold to the equine and large animal hospital at Helen Woodward Animal Center. hnc@hospicenorthcoast.org to download registration and payment information. SAFETY AND FUN Solana Beach Fire Department will host its annual Open House from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Solana Beach Fire Department Station, 500 Lomas Santa Fe Drive. Exhibits and demonstrations. For more information, contact City Hall at (858) 720-2400.

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OCT. 19, 2012