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PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID ENCINITAS, CA 92024 PERMIT NO. 94

THE COAST NEWS

.com SERVING NORTH COUNTY SINCE 1987

VOL. 33, N0. 18

MAY 10, 2019

SAN MARCOS -NEWS

California Pacific negotiates with new ownership

.com

By Staff

CARLSBAD — Paragon Partners, as NewCo, is currently in negotiations to acquire the majority ownership in California Pacific Airlines, according to a recent release by Paragon obtained by The Coast News. The acquisition group is chaired by Robert Nisi, a former securities attorney and active i nve s t me nt banker who was a part of the founding team, alongside Richard Nisi Branson, of Virgin American Airlines. Nisi served as Virgin’s corporate director for several years before the company was sold to Alaska Airlines in 2016 for $2.6 billion. If the deal is completed, Nisi would be named Chairman of CP Air. “Our target is to close and get flight operations underway as soon as possible,” a Paragon associate said. The planned acquisition includes assumption of debt, transfer of stock and cash considerations. According to the release, operations will begin service with a 50 passenger Embraer-145 and a 70 passenger Embraer 170 and is estimated to phase in within six months, according to the release. CP Air plans to provide service to six western cities with five aircraft initially, including San Jose, Oakland, Reno, Sacramento, Phoenix and Las Vegas. Nisi, with airline experience and chairman-to-be TURN TO CP AIR ON A7

THE VISTA NEWS

.com RANCHO SFNEWS

.com MURAL GETS A NEW FACE With the completion of the newest mural on the Carlsbad Art Wall (CAW) by visiting muralist SLIM, Carlsbad Art Wall founder and director Bryan Snyder launched the 2019 CAW fundraising campaign. Donations will help finance murals through 2019. On April 7, SLIM painted the newest mural on the Carlsbad Art Wall, a rotating exhibit that changes art every two months on an outside wall at Señor Grubby’s restaurant at 377 Carlsbad Village Drive. SLIM’s hyper-realistic mural titled “Sandcastles” is based on a photo of Snyder’s 3-year-old daughter, Stella. The Carlsbad Art Wall first began in March 2015, and there have been 21 murals painted on the wall by local and visiting artists since. Donations can be made at carlsbadcrawl.com/donate. Courtesy photo

Temporary field lights to stay up one more year at Leo Mullen By Aaron Burgin

ENCINITAS — The temporary field lights that have illuminated soccer practices at Leo Mullen Sports Park for nearly three years will stay up at least one more year, as city officials continue to explore the possibility of permanent field lights. On May 8, the City Council will consider on its consent agenda a one-year

extension of the agreement between the city and the Encinitas Express soccer club for the field lights. The city granted the soccer club the rights to use the lights in November 2016, after two years of debate over whether the city could legally allow the club to use them to light nighttime practices at the park in Encinitas Ranch. That agreement was

meant to give the city 18 months to study whether permanent lights were feasible and to amend the plan that governs Encinitas Ranch, which currently prohibits lighting at the park. But parks and recreation officials said that the city is still working on the study — specifically a light study that was commissioned in June 2017 — be-

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fore it can determine how to proceed with amending the document, called the Encinitas Ranch Specific Plan. “The City commissioned a light study to assess the feasibility of installing permanent lights at Leo Mullen Sports Park,” City Parks and Recreation Director Jennifer Campbell wrote in an email. “We are still waiting for addi-

tional information from the consultant and after receiving the information we can then determine how we would proceed with amending the Encinitas Ranch Specific Plan to allow lights at the park.” After approving two earlier six-month extensions, the council’s vote on Wednesday will grant the TURN TO FIELD LIGHTS ON A23

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Emergency contract to repair bluff OK’d

Resolution condemns shooting

By Lexy Brodt

Senators respond to Poway attack REGION — California Sens. Kamala Harris and Dianne Feinstein introduced a Senate resolution May 8 to condemn the deadly April 27 shooting at the Chabad of Poway synagogue. The resolution condemns anti-Semitism, white supremacy, white nationalism and other forms of hatred as antithetical to “American values of dignity and respect for all people.” It also expresses hope that the three injured survivors of the attack make a full and swift recovery and includes a call to honor the memory of Lori Gilbert Kaye, 60, who died at the scene of the shooting that occurred during a celebration of the end of the eight-day Jewish holiday of Passover. “The rising threat of white nationalism and white supremacy is in direct contradiction with the highest ideals of our country, and I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this resolution to condemn this despicable hate,” Harris said. “Hate has no place in our country,” Feinstein said. “Our resolution condemns the anti-Semitic attack on Congregation Chabad and reaffirms our nation’s values of openness and tolerance so all Americans can worship freely without fear of violence.” A similar Senate resolution condemning anti-Semitism was introduced last week by Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Tim Kaine, D-Virginia. Chabad of Poway Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein, who lost his right index finger in the shooting, attended the White House's May 2 National Day of Prayer event at the invitation of President Donald Trump. The president's adviser on Israel, Jason Greenblatt, called Goldstein “a pillar of strength” after a visit to the synagogue last week. John T. Earnest, 19, of Rancho Penasquitos, has pleaded not guilty to murder and attempted murder charges in the April 27 attack. — City News Service

DEL MAR — In the aftermath of an April 21 bluff collapse on Jimmy Durante Boulevard, the city approved an emergency contract with Southland Paving, Inc. to implement a temporary repair to the area during a May 6 City Council meeting. The impacted northbound Jimmy Durante Boulevard remains closed, with traffic being diverted to Camino Del Mar. The roadway is currently covered with sand and debris, as contractors finish up the process of removing loose material from the area. According to the staff report, removal and grading will make way for a more permanent repair in the future. The traffic delays and continued concern over coastal bluff instability have provoked some ire locally, with many begging the question — how did this happen? Although the answers aren’t clear, resident and architect Dean Meredith took to public comment at the May 6 meeting to assert that the construction of his new home on Seaview Avenue — just south of the collapse — was not the cause. Shortly after the bluff failure, 10News interviewed local geologist Pat Abbott to assess how the bluff might have collapsed. He pointed to this year’s heavy rainfall and irrigation from blufftop properties — common culprits of area collapses. But he also added that the bluff could’ve taken a hit from the construction of Meredith’s new home on an adjacent property. His statement carried over to social media platforms such as NextDoor — where neighbors conducted a back-and-forth on the potential causes of the collapse. Abbott spoke at the council meeting to apologize for the statement, which he called “speculation.” “The new house there is … not responsible in any way, shape or form for the bluff failure,” he said. According to Meredith, Abbott’s statement damaged his career as an architect and left him and his wife, Monica Meredith, at the mercy of social media tirades. Leslie Reed, whose geotechnical engineering company conducted services for the Merediths’ home, said he hoped the city’s response would “help

A BLUFF COLLAPSE on Jimmy Durante Boulevard has cut off northbound traffic, diverting cars to Camino Del Mar for the time being. The city just approved an emergency contract to clear and fix the site. Photo by Lexy Brodt

alleviate somewhat the firestorm of negative response,” referring to the social media response and hate mail received by the Merediths. City Councilwoman Terry Gaasterland and Mayor Dave Druker highlighted the importance of

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know nothing beyond the road’s closed and we’re looking at it,” he said. “That in turn reinforces people’s mistrust and distrust of the government.” The staff report did not outline a timeline for the project, but Druker said the clean-up will take a few

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T he C oast News

MAY 10, 2019

Opinion & Editorial

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of The Coast News

Similar causes for plagues of measles, anti-Semitism

A

Should we be allowed to love our natural lands to death? By Diane Nygaard

The recent controversy over mountain biking at the Carlsbad Highlands Ecological Reserve is not a new issue, and is not one that can be easily resolved. Some would argue that these are public lands. Our tax dollars paid for them so we should be allowed to use them. But these lands were acquired in many ways — including donations and exaction from developers to mitigate for land that has already been lost for more housing or strip malls. Ecological Reserves, like the Carlsbad Highlands, are lands that are specifically set aside to protect plants and wildlife that are at risk of becoming extinct. Can we use these lands and not harm the plants and wildlife they are intended to protect? That answer depends upon the land, and the kind of use that is proposed. Some areas can’t tolerate any use — nesting birds could abandon their eggs if disturbed by an inquisitive dog, or soil compaction from walking can destroy dormant plants in a vernal pool that might not even be visible most of the time. But sawing down mature plants, digging holes

and building jumps is vandalism, not “use.” No one has the right to vandalize these lands that have been set aside for all of us. In other areas, low impact public use can coexist with native plants and wildlife. But that determination must be made at the time the land is set aside. That ensures sufficient funds are committed to manage the land so that all allowed uses will not cause damage, or if they do, that damage can be reversed. Legally, public use of these lands is a privilege, not a right. And it is a privilege that we all want to protect. But whether we have “use” of the lands or not, we all benefit from having natural lands incorporated into the fabric of our communities. Our air is cleaner. Our watersheds are less polluted. Our spirits are enriched by views that don’t include cars and houses, by the sound of the gnatcatcher or the smell of artemesia in the spring. We all see how our communities are changing as growth occurs, and we know that much of that change is inevitable. More houses are built, so we have less open space land. Those houses bring more people who now

have less land to recreate on. And we all love our natural lands and want to spend time there. Houses, and mountain bikers, and people and native plants and wildlife can’t all exist on the exact same piece of land. But we all need to support ways that allow these, sometimes competing, interests to coexist. That means providing places for healthy outdoor recreation like mountain biking that doesn’t damage sensitive areas like Carlsbad Highlands, adequately funding the California Department of Fish and Wildlife so they can protect our native plants and wildlife, and supporting sound planning that reduces sprawl development and provides for growth while still protecting natural open space. We can recognize these conflicts, and commit the funding, and effort to do better than we have been doing. Or, we can ignore these conflicts at Carlsbad Highlands and elsewhere, and allow ourselves to love these lands to death. Diane Nygaard is president of Preserve Calavera, a local nonprofit conservation organization.

Tackling mental health and addiction By Marie Waldron

Mental health and drug addiction are often co-occurring disorders, with a big impact. I have been working on commonsense, bi-partisan solutions to these problems since my days on the city council. As a member of the Mental Health Caucus, I serve on several committees that deal directly with these issues, including Assembly Health Committee and the Select Committee on Health Care Delivery & Universal Coverage. I am also a member of the Stanford 5 Year

Initiative on Neuroscience, a working group that fosters communications between policymakers and researchers regarding mental health and opioid addiction. This session I introduced legislation to strengthen the voice of local mental health boards to help meet the needs of the mentally ill and a bill to allow payment to substance use providers in every county. In addition, I have joined with Assembly Republicans to support expanding current programs providing loan repayment for physicians and mental

health providers who practice in underserved areas, including rural parts of this region. Those suffering with mental illness and substance abuse can turn their lives around. There is a lot of work to do. By making access to treatment available and affordable while reducing stigma, we can restore lives. Assembly Republican Leader Marie Waldron, R-Escondido, represents the 75th Assembly District in the California Legislature.

t first glance, there appears to be no relation between two plagues now affecting California and much of America, the return of measles and a rise in anti-Semitic rhetoric, vandalism and violence. But a closer look reveals both are based on misinformation transmitted via the internet and social media, which then becomes widely believed. Both also employ scapegoating. Neither plague originated in California, or even in America. But Californians and their government can move to stem the spread of both within this state. With the measles, there’s a grossly overblown autism claim. Vaccinations, goes the frequently repeated trope, often cause autism. This great exaggeration has lurked in the minds of some non-scientists for many years. Its best-known proponent is Robert F. Kennedy Jr. He leads anti-vaxxers who — lacking proof — charge vaccinations increase the incidence of autism, a problem some doctors believe is overdiagnosed. Lacking anything else to blame, some parents make vaccinations the scapegoat. So far, there are several dozen cases of measles in California this year, and no deaths. Nationally, more than 700 cases are reported, the most in this century – and the year is still young. Lies and scapegoating are also behind the anti-Semitism plague that most recently manifested as murderous gunfire in the Chabad of Poway synagogue. Some of those lies are perpetrated by a movement seeking a worldwide boycott of everything to do with Israel, the world’s only Jewish country, along with

california focus thomas d. elias divestment from investments there and sanctions against anything Israeli. It’s called BDS – boycott, divest, sanction. This drive is most vocal on college campuses, including Stanford University and UC campuses like Davis and UCLA. Hotly contested California student government votes for and against pushing university administrations toward BDS show the efficacy of widespread anti-Israel propaganda, which many times bleeds over into outright anti-Semitism. They also show how ill-informed students can be. One lie is that Israel is an apartheid state, despite taking in and making full citizens of many thousands of black Ethiopians, not to mention millions of ethnic-Arab Jews expropriated and exiled from several Arab countries at the time of Israel’s founding. Plus, the more than 1 million Arab Palestinians living in Israel have citizenship and full voting rights. It was likely no accident that the 19-year-old Poway synagogue shooting suspect was a Cal State San Marcos student exposed to BDS rhetoric on campus. Just as it was no accident when another white American fired on worshippers in the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh last fall after seeing Nazi-like ideas on social media. Is it reasonable to expect impressionable young people to disbelieve what they see or read when similar tropes are purveyed

in the New York Times, arguably America’s most influential mass medium? Especially when the editors who print them go unpunished despite the newspaper’s apologies? When the President of the United States says there were “good people” among white supremacists who chanted “Jews will not replace us” — a slogan based on another lie — during their infamous 2017 Charlottesville demonstration/riot, is it reasonable to expect no one will act on it? The notion that Jews seek to replace white Protestant Americans is immediately disproven by the fact that Jews have fought and died in every American war and have lived here as long as anyone other than Native Americans. How can Jews replace white Americans when almost all of them are themselves white Americans? But here, as elsewhere, when economic times get tough, Jews get blamed. Such scapegoating spans two millennia. Of course, anti-Semitism has a far longer, more complex history than anti-vaccination ideology. But anti-vaxxers refusing to inoculate as many as 30 percent of pupils in some schools make California children vulnerable to contagion, where formerly they were not. Falsehoods like those slandering Jews and vaccinations can only take root among folks willing to believe almost any conspiracy theory about people and things of which they know little. The sad reality is that the rhetoric of anti-vaxxers and anti-Semites will never stop. It can only be combated by education, which means public school curriculum must change or these very contemporary plagues will never end.

The CoasT News P.O. Box 232550, Encinitas, CA 92023-2550 • 760-436-9737 www.thecoastnews.com • Fax: 760-274-2353

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MAY 10, 2019

Appeals court rules for Escondido police By Steve Horn

ESCONDIDO — In an April 25 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit concluded that the Escondido Police Department did not commit an unconstitutional violation during a May 2013 altercation in which a resident was tackled to the ground. The U.S. Supreme Court had remanded the Emmons v Escondido case to the appeals court in the aftermath of its January ruling. Marty Emmons, the original plaintiff in the federal case which began in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California in 2014, alleges that the police acted outside the bounds of the Fourth Amendment constitutional protection against “unreasonable searches and seizures” by rushing to use force on him at the time. The city of Escondido has argued that the “qualified immunity” doctrine developed over years of federal court rulings prevents such a legal complaint from bearing fruit. Qualified immunity gives broad deference to law enforcement during use of force incidents. Emanating from a 2011 9th Circuit case, Ashcroft v. al-Kidd, which created a test of what a “reasonable official would have understood that what he is doing violates that right.” Looking at the stack of case law on the books, the court ruled in favor of the Escondido Police Department. Pointing to the 2018 U.S. Supreme Court Kisela

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v. Hughes, the 9th Circuit ruled that Emmons would have had to find an appellate court case with a nearly mirror image fact pattern in which the plaintiff won on similar grounds to pass legal muster. “Use of excessive force is an area of the law ‘in which the result depends very much on the facts of each case,’ and thus police officers are entitled to qualified immunity unless existing precedent ‘squarely governs’ the specific facts at issue,” the Supreme Court ruled in Kisela v. Hughes. After doing its own research, the appeals court concluded it could not find such a case and that the ones Emmons cited did not fit that bill either. And thus, the officers at the scene in 2013 were “entitled to qualified immunity,” the court ruled. Trenton Lamere, an attorney for the Singleton Law Firm — which represented Emmons in the case — said he believes the ruling points to broader issues inherent in what he called the “legal fiction” of the qualified immunity doctrine itself. “Despite there being several prior cases in which similar conduct was found to be unconstitutional, the Ninth Circuit (following recent Supreme Court guidance) concluded ... that tackling an unarmed, non-threatening elderly man would violate the Fourth Amendment,” Lamere wrote via email. “These officers are individually immune

from even having to defend against this lawsuit. And to make matters worse, the Ninth Circuit (again following Supreme Court guidance) refused even to analyze whether the conduct alleged in this case would be a violation of the Fourth Amendment.” Just two weeks before the appeals court published its ruling, a consortium of cross-ideological groups and legal scholars petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the qualified immunity doctrine. Lamere said his firm next intends to bring a new federal civil lawsuit on the grounds that the Escondido Police Department committed a constitutional violation under the legal precedent set forth in the case Monell v. Department of Social Services of New York. Monell is a 1978 U.S. Supreme Court decision that said that municipalities can be held liable for conduct which results in constitutional violations, as well as decisions to “ratify or approve unconstitutional conduct after the fact,” Lamere explained. Emmons alleged a Monell violation in his initial 2014 U.S. District Court complaint, but the court issued a summary judgment ruling that only grappled with the qualified immunity doctrine, dismissing the case on those grounds alone. City of Escondido attorney Michael McGuinness did not respond to a request for comment.

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T he C oast News

Encinitas: ‘No thanks’ on Senate housing bills

Seawater use at desal plant a step closer CARLSBAD — The San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board issued a permit May 8 to develop and install seawater intake and discharge facilities at the Claude “Bud” Lewis Desalination Plant in Carlsbad. The plant currently produces roughly 50 million gallons of potable water each day for use across San Diego County, but draws most of its salinated water from the Aqua Hedionda Lagoon, which is then circulated to the plant by the Encina Power Station. Under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit, the plant will continue to draw from the lagoon while the Water Authority and plant owner Poseidon Water develop stand-alone facilities for seawater intake and discharge. According to the Water Authority, the new facilities are necessary for the plant's long-term desalination operations. “We are very thankful to the Regional Water Quality Control Board for supporting the environmental enhancements of the Carlsbad project and water supply reliability for San Diego County,” said Poseidon Water CEO Carlos Riva. The Water Authority estimates the transition to the stand-alone facilities will take roughly four years. Installation of the fish-friendly intake and discharge pumps is scheduled to begin by mid-2020, while the new system is expected to be connected by the end of 2023. The Water Authority said it is seeking partial state funding for the new facilities, which are expected to cost between $66 million and $83 million. The plant has produced more than 46 billion gallons of drinkable water since opening in 2015. Currently, the plant supplies roughly 10 percent of the county's water. The Water Authority and Poseidon Water signed a 30-year deal in 2012 to produce more than 18 billion gallons of potable water each year, enough for roughly 400,000 people. — City News Service

MAY 10, 2019

By Aaron Burgin

MORE THAN a dozen residents spoke to the Carlsbad City Council on May 7 regarding the legal settlement between the city and San Diego County. Photo by Steve Puterski

Council reaffirms airport deal Carlsbad vote comes in response to Brown Act allegation By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — It took more than two hours, but the Carlsbad City Council reaffirmed its position on the legal settlement with the San Diego County regarding the McClellan-Palomar Airport on May 7. The council voted 4-1 to settle the city’s lawsuit under the California Environmental Quality Act challenging the findings of the airport master plan environmental impact report. The council also approved re-

ing relationship with the county. The two also said they understand the trust issues residents have with the county. “If I would’ve made an emotional decision, I would’ve voted the other way,” Bhat-Patel said. “I understand that in the past we did not have a good working relationship with the county. I also understand the distrust that comes with that past.” “I still do feel that I made the right decision,”

I still do feel that I made the right decision. I don’t believe we gave authority to the county that they didn’t already have.” City Councilwoman Barbara Hamilton

scinding a resolution to initiate a zoning amendment to restrict airport uses. Councilwoman Cori Schumacher was the lone no vote, saying “it was a re-statement of the status quo.” The matter came back before the council after attorney Cory Briggs, on behalf of Citizens for a Friendly Airport, sent a demand letter to the city alleging a Brown Act violation for a lack of notice of the public meeting and to reverse its decision. The city and county both sent letters to Briggs stating they disagreed with his clients’ position. City Attorney Celia Brewer said the action taken by the council does not concede or admit to any violations, but “if an agency acts” a court would likely dismiss any subsequent legal action filed against the agency. “It concerns me that the context and the past and the history of this body that we’re entering into a very loose agreement with … that we’re relying on a history of bad action,” Schumacher said of the county. Meanwhile, Councilwomen Priya Bhat-Patel and Barbara Hamilton, who said she’s received “hate mail and calls” regarding the issue, backed their initial decisions to vote in favor of the agreement on March 27. Both said they are against airport expansion, but said their votes were based on what was best for the city moving forward, better advocacy, ensuring the city still has its rights and creating a better work-

Hamilton said. “I don’t believe we gave authority to the county that they didn’t already have. We have to make a commitment to be there having these conversations.” Mayor Matt Hall, though, said he believes the impacts from the airport are better than they were 20 years ago. In 1999-2000, the airport had between 280,000 to 290,000 takeoffs and landings per year. Now, the number has dropped by almost half, between 140,000 to 150,000 per year. Numerous residents, once again, stated their firm opposition to the airport citing noise, pollution and expansion. Many objected to the city’s agreement with the county, saying the deal does not provide enough control and power over decisions regarding the facility. In addition, many railed against the upgrade to the D-III designation by the San Diego County Board of Supervisors on Oct. 10, 2018. They also criticized the lengthening of the runway of up to 800 feet, moving the runaway and taxiway north, becoming an offload airport from San Diego International Airport, the lack of restricted flight paths, non-enforceable voluntary flight hours and the county not following CEQA. “Our direction, not our intentions, determines our destination,” resident Frank Sung said. “In order to avoid ending up where you don’t want to be, you need to determine whether there is a

disconnect between your intentions and your destination and change directions if needed.” Another issue was with the city’s Conditional Use Permit 172, which the county has agreed to voluntarily follow; although Schumacher noted by moving the runway and taxiway, the county is already “violating” the CUP. She also noted how the county is fighting against another lawsuit regarding its Climate Action Plan and greenhouse gas standards. Attorney Peter Kirsch, whose Denver-based firm Kaplan Kirsch and Rockwell was hired by the city last year, said the agreement has several functions and protections for the city. The city and county will have regular quarterly meetings, while the county will also address all mitigation concerns address by the city. As for zoning, the city, through state law, holds the power to approve and land acquisitions by the county. “The agreement provides no permission, no approval, no authorization, no facilitation, no acquiescence for airport expansion,” Kirsch said. “I don’t know how to express that any clearer. There is nothing in this document that provides for airport expansion. The city retains all the legal rights it had before the agreement … to oppose expansion of the airport, if and when that’s ever proposed by the county. The city has given up no power to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), to the county or anyone else.” The council, though, voted 3-1-1 to oppose the San Diego County Board of Supervisors’ Oct. 10 decision to re-classify the airport to a D-III facility. Hall opposed and Councilman Keith Blackburn abstained, saying he wanted more information on the supervisors’ comments and a presentation from city staff. The council also approved a future agenda item to discuss placing the settlement agreement on the March 2020 ballot for an advisory vote. Even if approved by voters, it is a non-binding vote, thus the county has no obligation to incorporate the results into any future plans, according to city staff.

ENCINITAS — Encinitas is prepared to become the region’s first city to oppose a pair of State Senate bills aimed at easing the housing crisis that city officials said further erodes local jurisdictions’ discretion over housing projects. Senate Bill 50, authored by State Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), would allow developers to build taller and denser buildings than allowed by local zoning codes near major transit stops, such as train stations and ferry terminals, and “job rich” areas. The bill has been hotly contested across the state, as local control advocates have decried it as a massive overreach by the state, while housing advocates have argued that it reduces the red tape that developers face in jurisdictions aimed at limiting new housing development. A recent amendment would exempt counties with less than 600,000 people and coastal communities with less than 50,000 people. Encinitas has more than 63,000 people, per the latest census counts. The second bill, Senate Bill 330, authored by State Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), has been less discussed. The legislation declares a statewide housing crisis and prohibits cities from imposing parking requirements, adjusting impact fees, imposing impact fees on affordable housing developments and limits new design standards for a period of 10 years. Encinitas on its consent agenda Wednesday could vote to send letters to state legislators opposing both bills. “SB 50 would greatly undermine locally adopted General Plans, Housing Elements (which are certified by the Department of Housing and Community Development), and Sustainable Community Strategies (SCS),” the letter reads. “By allowing developers to override state-approved housing plans, SB 50 seriously calls to question the need for cities to develop these community-based plans in the first place.” The letter also calls out the exemptions included in the bill. “SB 50 allows some communities to be exempt; however, all jurisdictions need to have the ability to have a community-led planning process that considers local needs and input as long as State objectives are still met,” the letter states. Mayor Catherine Blakespear said Tuesday that both bills go too far in their attempt to spur affordable housing development at the expense of community character and local control. “It’s just too extreme,” Blakespear said of SB 50. “It would change the char-

acter of our community too much, too quickly and limit our ability to control our land use, so we oppose it.” SB 50, which was introduced in December, is working its way through the senate, and despite the debate surrounding it, has passed two committees with close to unanimous support. Blakespear said the city waited until the bill was further along before announcing its opposition because it was likely going to be amended. “The bill was modified quite substantially, so we wanted to see what was going to happen to it,” Blakespear said. “We didn’t want to take a position until it was in a more final format, because we would be blowing our opportunity to effect it.” The Coast News reached out to cities across the region to gauge whether they had taken positions on the bill. Oceanside was the region’s first city to send a letter of opposition in late March, and Carlsbad joined them in April. Escondido and Vista both have not taken positions, while San Marcos has currently taken a “watch” position on the bill. The bill drew strong opposition from elected officials — past and present — in Solana Beach, the county’s second smallest city. Although there is a train station serving the city’s downtown area, Mayor Dave Zito wrote in a letter to Sen. Mike McGuire that the infrequent headways of the commuter train do not meet the standard for “high quality” transit options. However, alterations to the bill applied in late April now exempt coastal zones within a city of less than 50,000 people. Solana Beach has a population of about 13,400. Regarding SB 330, the city’s letter argues that prohibiting locales from imposing parking requirements would lead to congestion and parking conflicts as more residents compete for limited parking. “SB 330 would prohibit local agencies from imposing any type of parking standard allowing developers for new residents to compete for a dwindling parking supply,” the letter states. “This will also lead to congestion and parking conflicts because people resist giving up their vehicles.” The limits on developer fees, the city contends, would hamper the city’s ability to provide the new residents in those developments with adequate public services and improvements. “Freezing fees for a decade will make it difficult to adequately service the needs of a community,” the letter states. Lexy Brodt contributed to this story


MAY 10, 2019

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After five years, Poinsettia fire still leaves a mark By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — Over the course of 96 hours, the Poinsettia fire gripped the city as a massive blaze ripped through its center putting residents on edge. The fire ignited at 10:34 a.m. on May 14, 2015, on the Omni La Costa Golf Course near Poinsettia Lane. Once the report came in, the Carlsbad Fire Department was on full alert and city officials immediately began coordinating evacuations and their response. However, the deck was stacked against first responders as it was a “perfect storm,” said Battalion Chief Mike Lopez, who was the incident commander. It was the hottest day of the year (95 degrees), relative humidity was 5% and wind gusts reached 20 mph when the fire started. Wind gusts reached up to 55 mph later in the day. “It really tested us,” Lopez said. “All that training came to fruition, especially with the managing of the incident with David Harrison. I was humbled. We were all taxed that day.”

Damage

In total, the blaze scorched 400 acres, more than 240 structures and caused more than $12 million in damage. Investigators still have not pinpointed the cause. There was one fatality, but an underlying medical condition may have been responsible for the death, according to retired Chief Mike Davis and Emergency Preparedness Manager David Harrison. The fire was spotted by San Diego Copter One, which was responding to the Bernardo fire in 4S Ranch. The helicopter was also the first to put water on the fire, Davis said. In total, more than 68,000 gallons of water was dropped. Within the first 30 minutes, numerous firefighters from other jurisdictions responded, making rescues allowing Carlsbad Fire Department to collect the resources to fully fight the fire. “These are the very best fire professionals in the state,” Davis said of individuals from San Marcos, San Diego and other departments. “They came and not just helped us, but made an impact and changed people’s lives forever.” Adding to the complexity to Carlsbad Fire’s response was the rest of San Diego County was dealing

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conducting all functions from its headquarters at the Carlsbad Safety Center rather than at the incident command post. It paid off, as staff and CERT were seamless in its functions, Harrison said. “I remember during the Poinsettia Fire thinking at one point how similar it felt to the drills we’d done,” Tina Ray, Carlsbad’s community outreach and engagement director recalled. “We knew what we needed to do, like muscle memory. These aren’t ‘table top’ exercises, they’re full on simulations, with TV news stations blaring in the background, maps and charts projected on all the walls, phones ringing off the hook. FIVE YEARS after the Poinsettia Fire ripped through the middle of Carlsbad, some areas are still Putting that level of effort charred from the 400-acre blaze. The fire started at the north end of the Omni La Costa golf into planning and training course (background) and jumped Poinsettia Lane and El Camino Real. Photo by Steve Puterski really paid off.” with 17 other fires in the same timeframe, said Chief Mike Calderwood. Calderwood had been assigned to assist with the Tomahawk fire at Camp Pendleton. The Poinsettia Fire, meanwhile, grew more aggressive and soon jumped north across Poinsettia Lane and lit up brush and chaparral on the perimeter of Alga Norte Park and threatened businesses off Cassia Road. The fire jumped the firefighters’ line and kept raging north. In addition, the blaze also jumped southwest over El Camino Real to the open space adjacent to Cassia Road and Poinsettia Lane, threatening Aviara Oaks middle and elementary schools, as well as hundreds of apartments and single-family residences. The fire burned right up to the eastern edge of the school’s campus, but its response in evacuating the children is one of admiration from Davis. The blaze also went down Black Trail Road north toward Palomar Airport Road. “It looked like a nuclear bomb went off in the middle of the city,” Davis recalled. “There was never a thought, in my mind, that we didn’t have the capacity to do what needed to get done. That capacity is generated through the relationships we have.” The cleanup took nearly one year, Davis said. Lopez and Calderwood said it was amazing what was discovered in the charred remains on the west side of El Camino Real. Since the terrain was hidden for decades, items such as refrigerators, cars airline with an additional $35 million, but details of the negotiations between Paragon and CP Air ownership remain confidential, as are the details of the capital raise. In February, CP Air engaged Glidepath Capital Partners, an aviation/aerospace investment banker, to manage the acquisition and capital raise process, which includes the transfer of ownership and control. Current owner Ted Vallas could not be reached for comment.

and hazardous materials were littered throughout the valleys of the area. Adding to the complexity was all 400 acres burned were on private property, although those owners and the city worked to maximize cleanup efforts and restoration. Operations center

Harrison has built one of the premier emergency response departments in the state, Davis said. Over the course of his tenure with the city, Harrison, a former Naval officer, has ramped up the training and response for city staff, along with building the Certified Emergency Response Team (CERT), made up of volunteer residents. Within the first two hours of the fire, he began sending out evacuation calls to residents and business in the area. He said the city delivered about 20,000 calls reaching between 7,000 to 10,000 people, noting it is difficult to calculate the exact number of people contacted. One area of concern was layering the calls and responses to avoid creating additional choke points along the roads, as Carlsbad police had established roadblocks to prevent incoming traffic. “In higher density cities, the problem that creates is you exceed the road-carrying capacity … and it creates choke points,” Harrison explained. “So, it was really the first time we were trying to balance calls versus choke-point monitoring. It was innovative and the time, and probably still innovative. We were trying to

meter the evacuation.” Lopez, meanwhile, was deep into coordinating efforts between Carlsbad Fire Department and neighboring agencies. The San Marcos Fire Department responded, but then had to return to its city as another fire broke out forcing those firefighters to respond to their own incident. Throughout the four days it took to extinguish the fire, at least 75 agencies including ones from Utah and Mexico, assisted with the Poinsettia Fire. In addition to coordination efforts, Davis and Harrison were also putting together supplemental action plans ranging from two to 72 hours. “You need to have a planning section,” Davis said. “That planning section is twofold: plans that have to happen in terms of operation personnel and then there’s citywide issues that have to managed.” The emergency operations center (EOC) is the central hub for city staffers to take their assigned positions, relaying information to and from the field. The EOC is a hodgepodge of different departments working on all aspects from logistics, support, organizing shelters, evacuations, traffic control and feeding between 350 and 400 firefighters. Organization and communication are critical to the success of the EOC, Harrison said. And fortunate for the city, Harrison had conducted a drill in October 2014, providing a refresher for the staff. Davis said the EOC was

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After effects

A fire of this magnitude doesn’t happen often, especially in more densely populated area, Davis said. The Poinsettia fire is classified as an urban fire, much different in scope than wildland fires. But the large open space east of the school also could have spelled disaster for the first responders. Lopez said there is no record in the city’s history, dating back 120 years, of the area ever burning. So, grass and other vegetation reached 20 feet in height, thus providing a blanket over what the terrain actually is. Once the blaze burned down all the brush and grass, it revealed areas with steep cliffs, which formerly looked like rolling hills with more gentle slopes. “If it wasn’t for everyone participating in that fire, the fire would’ve burned all the way … to the

Pacific Ocean,” Lopez said. “We started it at Alicante and Poinsettia and you literally had flames laying down on Poinsettia.” While the Poinsettia fire left scars, Davis, Lopez and Calderwood still, five years later, receive compliments about how well and organized the city fought the blaze. Firefighters from other departments will and have approached each of the men and said the base camp was the best they’ve ever experienced. And much of that is due to Harrison’s efforts, but also city staff, CERT and residents and businesses who overwhelmed those with food donations, water and anything else they thought were of need. “I was in Sacramento last week and someone came up to me and said they were on the Poinsettia fire and said ‘that was the best base camp I’ve ever been on in my life,” Calderwood said laughing. “That was just last week. It was the city and community support.”

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MAY 10, 2019

Neptune re-striping boosts bikers, pedestrians By Aaron Burgin

ENCINITAS — For years, cyclists, walkers and moms with strollers walking along Neptune Avenue in Leucadia would straddle the edges of the street, hoping to avoid contact with northbound cars that occupied the same sliver of space. But Encinitas officials are hoping a recent re-striping of the one-way street that parallels Coast Highway 101 will provide both motorists and nonmotorists safer passage. As part of the re-striping, the vehicle travel lane was narrowed to create what is known as a “Type 3 pedestrian facility,” a 5-foot wide lane for nonvehicular modes of transpor-

tation. The striping also more prominently identifies the parking bays along both sides of the street. Councilwoman Kellie Shay Hinze, who lives just south of the restriped segment, said she has already seen a pronounced difference in how people are driving along Neptune. “It looks great, and the lane narrowing has slowed traffic significantly, at least from my perspective,” Hinze said. “I’ve already seen that cars have come to understand that this is going to be a highly pedestrian-utilized corridor.” The project was approved last year, with city crews restriping and resur-

facing the street in March and April. Michelle Lorch, who was jogging in the new lane with her dog, Oscar, agreed with Hinze. “I feel safer just because there is a delineation of where cars should be and where runners and cyclists should be,” said Lorch, who said she has jogged Neptune regularly for 10 years. “I have no complaints.” Neptune Avenue has been at the center of two controversies involving the future of the roadway, the most prominent being the proposed overhaul to Coast Highway 101 and the interim speed calming measures, which residents believed would cause more cars to drive down their

one-way street. Some neighbors who spoke to The Coast News, however, said they had mixed feelings about the striping, saying that it channels too many competing nonvehicular modes of transport into too narrow of a space. One neighbor, who chose not to give her name, said the neighborhood “got along fine without” the new striping. Lorch, however, said that vehicles had been driving faster and more hurriedly along the stretch, some using it to bypass traffic along Coast Highway 101. “This is not the street you want to be using if you are in a hurry,” Lorch said.

DANNY ROJO, a volunteer with La Colonia Community Foundation, chats with English as a second language students at a “Conversation Café” Mira Costa class. Photo by Lexy Brodt

Solana Beach nonprofit aims to enrich community By Lexy Brodt

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SOLANA BEACH — To resident Lisa Montes, La Colonia de Eden Gardens offers a rich history waiting to be told. And by founding a nonprofit organization along with several other La Colonia community members, she is hoping to share that history with the community at large. La Colonia Community Foundation was launched in early 2019 with the broad mission to give back to the community. Said mission is materializing in ways both subtle and profound, but the foundation’s biggest task ahead? Planning the city’s 2019 Dia de los Muertos event. In 2018, two separate Dia de los Muertos events took place, largely due to divisions within the La Colonia community. In years past, the event has been sponsored jointly by the city and La Colonia de Eden Gardens Foundation — of which Montes was a founding member. But now Montes, vice president of the La Colonia Community Foundation board, is hoping to make a change. The new organization is awaiting final signoffs from the city after applying to host the event, and planning is underway. Montes said the event will focus on the importance of altars, a commemorative symbol of the Mexican holiday. “That is what Dia de los Muertos is all about … honoring the memory of our ancestors,” she said. Montes said the event will offer not only a reunion for the La Colonia community, but a chance for families in greater Solana Beach to be involved and build their own altars as well. The board is in the process of seeking vendors and exhibitors for the event, but bands (Jimmy Castro’s band and Los Gringos Muertos) have committed to playing, and Elba Montes’ Ballet Folklorico will perform. Down the road, the foundation is hoping to host various fundraisers to prepare for the event, such as a rummage sale on May 11 at 9 a.m. and a pancake breakfast in late June. But when they’re not

making arrangements for the neighborhood celebration ahead, the foundation’s members can be found mentoring the La Colonia Changers — a youth group based in Eden Gardens and sponsored by the San Dieguito Alliance for Drug Free Youth, or working with English as a second language students at a biweekly MiraCosta College class. Every Monday and Wednesday, several of the foundation’s board members volunteer at the community center in La Colonia Park, participating in MiraCosta’s “Conversation Café” with students from all corners of the globe. The class’s teacher, Zakia Farouq, reached out to the board, and since then, several of the foundation’s members have been coming every week to lend a hand. Montes said getting involved with the Conversation Café is just another way the foundation is hoping to build connections with the community. “It’s to develop our place — our place is to connect with the greater Solana Beach community, to tell our story,” she said. The foundation is also honing in on how to empower youth in the community — through mentoring, but also by encouraging them to take on leadership roles. And this starts with the foundation’s board itself — 18-year-old Natalie Salgado, a La Colonia Changer, recently joined the board as a member. Salgado, a senior at Coastal Academy High School, said she is excited to be involved with the foundation, “a legitimate movement that actually wants to make a difference,” she said. Salgado is a familiar name around La Colonia — her great grandparents were among the founding families in the community, and opened up the area’s famed Tony’s Jacal restaurant. For her, getting involved with the board is a way to connect the community to “our family history” and show others what it means to be Latino. “It makes me feel like my great grandparents who founded this community would be proud of what I’m doing,” she said.


MAY 10, 2019

Book probes environmental impacts on Native Americans By Steve Horn

SAN MARCOS — Dina Gilio-Whitaker, an adjunct professor of American Indian Studies at Cal State University San Marcos, has released a new book on the history of environmental justice through a Native American lens. In “As Long as Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice, from Colonization to Standing Rock,” she argues that the history of environmental impacts on the native population of the U.S. coincides with colonial expansion and displacement. Gilio-Whitaker outlined some of the arguments, read passages from the book and fielded questions at an April 23 event at CSUSM’s Kellogg Library. During the talk — convened by the American Indian Student Alliance, California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center and the American Indian Studies Department — Gilio-Whitaker said she hopes her research reframes how the public discusses environmental justice issues as they relate to Native Americans. Specifically, she has argued for a scholarly framework called “indigenized environmental justice.” “What I mean by that is that environmental justice theory and frameworks need to … expand beyond the concept of racism,” she said. “It needs to acknowledge the history of colonization as a historical process of dispossession of native peoples and their lands in order to understand the way native people are still fighting these battles.” A descendant of the Colville Confederated Tribes, Gilio-Whitaker commutes to teach at CSUSM from her home in San Clemente. She also works as the policy director and senior researcher at the Center for World Indigenous Studies and runs a consulting firm, DGW Consulting. Her 165-page book begins at the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s monthslong encampment set up in 2016 to oppose the Dakota Access oil pipeline. The pipeline passes through the tribe’s drinking water under both Lake Oahe and the Missouri River, and those who opposed the project called

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themselves Water Protectors. Gilio-Whitaker wrote that she chose that example, in particular, because it highlighted the historical and social dynamics she would explore throughout the rest of her book. Dakota Access started “from the assumption that colonization was not just a process of invasion and eventual domination of Indigenous populations ... Giliobut also that Whitaker the eliminatory impulse and structure it created in actuality began as environmental injustice,” she wrote. “Seen in this light, settler colonialism itself is for Indigenous peoples a structure of environmental injustice.” Beyond a detailed focus on the role the U.S. government has played in what she has described as the “environmental deprivation” of its native population, Gilio-Whitaker also focuses her lens on a lesser known history of the U.S. environmental conservation movement. That movement, she writes in the book, has roots in dispossessing land once occupied by indigenous populations. In particular, she argues, the creation of the U.S. national parks system has roots in that dispossession. Gilio-Whitaker said that she believes non-Native individuals in the U.S. must develop an awareness of “settler privilege” that they possess. She said so in paying homage to the famous scholarly essay arguing that “white privilege” exists, by scholar Peggy McIntosh. “What does white privilege look like through the lens of settler-colonialism?” Gilio-Whitaker asked rhetorically in explaining the concept. “It looks like settler privilege. But what is settler privilege? What that infers is that it’s always about — land.”

‘Tree topper’ competition for lighting ceremony ENCINITAS — It has been 25 years since Luis Ortiz approached Peter and John Danforth with a request to string lights on their stately 87-foot pine tree that sits near the corner of 4th and C streets in Downtown Encinitas. Since then, the lighting of the tree — which became the city’s second heritage tree in 2011 — has become a major community event, drawing hundreds of merry makers, carolers and families to kick off holiday season in Encinitas. To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the tree-lighting ceremony, the Encinitas Historical Society is hosting a competition to create the ornament that will top the three at this year’s ceremony on Dec. 6. The “tree topper” design competition kicked off in late April and runs through June 30. Historical Society members are asking all creative minds young and old alike to submit their designs for this year’s tree topper. The winning design will be unveiled at the ceremony. “We are hoping to see something that jumps out and embodies the spirit of this event and Encinitas at the same time,” said Jim Filanc, who organizes the tree lighting ceremony for the Historical Society. Filanc said that there are only a couple of rules for the contest: the topper has to be something that can be built with little complication and it can’t be boring. A panel of judges will select the best “buildable” design. Filanc, who has been involved with the ceremony since 2014, said that the tree lighting holds a special place in the hearts of many Encinitas residents because it captures both the holiday spirit and that of the community. In 2011, the city designated the pine tree, which the Danforths planted in 1952, as a heritage tree, a nod to the significance

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of the ceremony and the tree’s place in downtown. The ceremony is 100% donation driven, with Ortiz at the heart of those efforts, Filanc said. “He would basically go around the community kind of like the ‘Save the Clock Tower’ scene in ‘Back to the Future,’ asking people for donations, and people responded,” Filanc said. “And over the years, the event has grown in size.” More than 500 people attended last year’s tree lighting, and Filanc said he believes that number could double with the contest having a web page and a social media presence. “We are really looking forward to it,” Filanc said. For more information on the competition or to download an entry form, visit www.encinitashistoricalcociety.org

By Aaron Burgin

THE 87-FOOT PINE at 4th and C streets near Moonlight Beach became Encinitas’ second heritage tree in 2011. For 25 years, the tree has been lighted to kick off the holiday season in the city. This year’s lighting will take place on Dec. 6. Courtesy photo

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CROOKED

amination and passed a specified ethics exam. LaJevic left his Pennsylvania practice in good standing and moved with his wife and office assistant Lori Werder to Nevada. According to a verified complaint filed in District Court by the Nevada State Board of Dental Examiners, LaJevic and Werder were practicing dentistry without a state-issued license. The longtime couple reached a stipulation agreement with the court, admitting no wrongdoing and paying a $7,000 fine. LaJevic and Werder then moved to California where LaJevic was granted a probationary license on Oct. 16, 2015.

TEETH A Rancho Santa Fe dentist faces new allegations of fraud by a former patient

By Jordan P. Ingram

ENCINITAS — After a string of criminal and professional violations spanning four decades and three states, a Rancho Santa Fe dentist faces new allegations of fraud by a former patient of Correct Choice Dental Group in Encinitas. Gerry Simoni, 62, of Escondido, filed a civil complaint on April 24 in San Diego Superior Court’s smallclaims division against James Charles LaJevic, accusing the dentist of fraudulently billing $2,750 for dental services that were never performed. Simoni further alleges that LaJevic, 71, charged him for procedures not included in his original treatment plan. The complaint is the third claim filed in Superior Court against the embattled practitioner by a patient or professional associate in the past six months. “I did what I could to come to a mutual agreement, but he has ignored all my requests,” Simoni said.

“It’s clear to me that he has no concern for his patients, especially those who he has damaged.” According to Simoni, LaJevic offered him a “great price for procedures” if he paid him $4,500 upfront for four crowns, Invisalign treatment and scaling and root planning on all four quadrants. When Simoni received an itemized bill after months of treatment, he said LaJevic had charged him for services that never occurred, including scaling and root planning (SRP) on all four quadrants. According to Simoni, LaJevic called him on April 2 to inform him that he would not provide any more treatment and to “never step foot inside of his office again.” “I was in shock to say the least and felt sick to my stomach because I knew he had just stolen a good part of my money,” Simoni said. Simoni said several more attempts to contact LaJevic were ignored.

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The legal action comes just four months after Simoni’s daughter, Christiana, filed a Jan. 22 lawsuit against LaJevic alleging professional negligence after a wisdom tooth extraction resulted in paresthesia. After filing suit, Christiana said she advised her father to see a different dentist but learned that Simoni had already paid LaJevic upfront for treatment. “I feel like he got off lucky considering what happened to me,” Christiana said. “My dad got scammed but the quality of my life got taken away.”

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In November 2018, Dr. Gary Braunstein, of Encinitas Dental Care, filed a complaint in small claims court after LaJevic refused to reimburse him $4,750 for a patient’s treatment.

levied against LaJevic, including gross negligence, practicing dentistry with an expired license, taking office drugs for personal use and abandoning a patient mid-treatment.

...(I) felt sick to my stomach because I knew he had just stolen a good part of my money.” Gerry Simoni Escondido resident The patient, Christine Praefice, had received a refund from Care Credit, a health care financing company, based on her claim of assault and malpractice by LaJevic, according to court documents. “(LaJevic) just abuses people,” Braunstein told The Coast News in January. “He is not honest with people, billing fraudulently and his dentistry is questionable.” These incidents are the latest in LaJevic’s tumultuous dental career that includes a series of well-documented professional and personal misconduct ranging from gross negligence and fraud to felony-tax evasion. A history of violations

As previously reported by The Coast News, in 1994, the Pennsylvania State Board of Dentistry found “sufficient evidence” to sustain 12 of 47 allegations

At the time, the board noted that “Dr. LaJevic’s continued practice of dentistry in the Commonwealth was an immediate and clear danger to the public health or safety,” according to court documents. Pennsylvania law enforcement agents also learned that the dentist was filling prescriptions for Valium and a narcotic cough syrup for “office use” with an expired Drug Enforcement Agency Certificate of Registration. Following the state’s investigation, the Pennsylvania Dental Board suspended LaJevic’s dental license indefinitely in 2001 after discovering that he had falsified renewal applications for his expired DEA certificate. The Pennsylvania Dental Board later granted a full reinstatement of LaJevic’s dental license after he completed a clinical re-ex-

In granting LaJevic’s license, the California Dental Board acknowledged LaJevic’s past violations but approved his license anyway. Carlos Alvarez, enforcement chief with the California State Dental Board, said that dental licenses in the state can’t be denied solely on past convictions or violations. “We have to look at (the applicants’) entire history,” Alvarez said. “Do they have any proof of certificate or rehabilitation from other states? Did they meet the conditions of any other administrative actions? Everything is taken into consideration before we issue a license.” Alvarez said that every complaint submitted to the board is reviewed by dental consultants to see if the dentist fell below the “standard of care” which is determined on a case-by-case basis. The most egregious cases are sent to the attorney general’s office for further investigation and prosecution. But other than filing complaints, only criminal allegations, such as fraudulent billing and sexual misconduct, offer the possibility for repeat offenders to have their license permanently removed. “This dentist needs to be investigated immediately,” Simoni said. “There is no doubt in my mind that he should have his license revoked in California so he cannot do any more damage to other people.” LaJevic could not be reached for comment.

Suspect in ’95 San Diego rape series pleads not guilty REGION — An Arizona man accused of carrying out a series of rapes in the city of San Diego 24 years ago was charged on May 7 with eight felony sexual assault counts. Christopher VanBuskirk, then in his early 20s, allegedly threatened his victims with a knife while sexually assaulting them on four occasions between August and November of 1995, according to San Diego police. Vanbuskirk faces 190 years to life if convicted for the San Diego cases, two of which occurred in the Tierrasanta neighborhood, one

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in Pacific Beach, and one near San Diego Mesa College, according to Deputy District Attorney Martin Doyle. He pleaded not guilty Tuesday afternoon to four counts of forcible rape and two counts each of forcible oral copulation and forcible sexual penetration with a foreign object, and is due back in court May 16 for a readiness conference. “In each case, the victim agreed to participate in a sex-assault examination to collect physical evidence from the assault,” Lt. Carole Beason said. “The DNA evidence recovered revealed

(that) the same (man) committed all four crimes, but he was unidentified.” In March 2002 and November 2004, two more women were raped under similar circumstances in Riverside County. In February of this year, the SDPD Sex Crimes Unit sought help with the case from the FBI Forensic Genetic Genealogy Team, and investigators from the two agencies were able to identify the alleged perpetrator two months later via public-access genealogical databases. — City News Service


MAY 10, 2019

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Report: Camp Pendleton, others fall short on domestic violence response By Samantha Taylor

OCEANSIDE — Law enforcement officials on several military bases around the country, including Camp Pendleton, are not consistently following requirements when investigating domestic violence incidents according to a recently released report. The report from the Department of Defense Office of Inspector General analyzed whether law enforcement organizations on military bases were complying with department policy when responding to nonsexual domestic violence incidents with adult victims. The report randomly selected 219 of the 956 total law enforcement domestic violence incident responses. Of that number, 47 were from Camp Pendleton and 24 were from Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) offices at Naval Base San Diego, Camp Pendleton and Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia. The Department of Defense (DoD) defines domestic violence as “an offense that involves the use, attempted use, or threatened use of force or violence against a person, or a violation of a lawful order issued for the protection” of a person who is a current or former spouse, a person with whom the abuser shares a child or a current or former intimate partner with whom the abuser shares a residence.

DoD policy requires military service law enforcement personnel to respond to and investigate reports of domestic violence. Additionally, policy also requires law enforcement to assemble evidence and notify the bases’ Family Advocacy Program (FAP) staff immediately upon receiving a domestic violence incident allegation, and to submit subject criminal history data to the Defense Central Index of Investigations (DCII) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation Criminal Justice Information Services Division. The report found that law enforcement organizations were not consistently complying with DoD policies when responding to nonsexual violence incidents with adult victims, specifically regarding processing crime scenes, conducting thorough interviews, notifying FAP of the incidents and submitting criminal history data. The report determined that the noncompliance was the result of law enforcement commanders instructing law enforcement personnel to implement practices that weren’t consistent with DoD requirements, not having the proper equipment such as cameras to collect and preserve evidence, and not performing effective supervision over incident responses. There was a 92% noncompliance rate among the 219 domestic violence inci-

THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE report found that law enforcement organizations on military bases were not consistently complying with DoD policy on nonsexual domestic violence incidents involving adult victims. Courtesy photo

dent responses evaluated. The Marine Corps at a noncompliance rate of 88%, the NCIS 58%, and the Army, Navy and Air Force all had 100% noncompliance rates. “If Military Service law enforcement personnel do not thoroughly investigate and document their response to domestic violence incidents, decision makers, such as commanders and prosecutors, will not have the necessary information to make informed disciplinary or prosecutorial decisions,” the report states. “Further, these deficiencies could hinder criminal investigations, impact law enforcement and national security interests, and expose victims to addi-

tional harm.” According to the report, Camp Pendleton’s operations noncommissioned officer said the noncompliances related to crime scene processing were due to law enforcement personnel not documenting procedures they performed and a shortage in cameras. The officer added that cameras were recently purchased. Additionally, the officer said a domestic violence investigation unit was established so that any time an incident is reported, patrol officers will respond and then notify the domestic violence unit, which will send an investigator to respond. According to the re-

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port, the same Camp Pendleton operations officer also said noncompliances related to interviewing were due to lack of supervisory oversight of patrol officers. Children weren’t being interviewed because Camp Pendleton uses FAP officials to interview children instead, according to the officer. “We agree that the practice of relying on FAP to conduct interviews is acceptable because these personnel often have more training and experience interviewing children,” the report states. “However, during our evaluation, we found no evidence that children were interviewed by FAP.” The Marine Corps also had a 12% noncompliance rate with regard to notifying FAP of domestic violence incidents. According to the Camp Pendleton officer, noncompliances related to FAP were due to patrol officers not documenting FAP notifications they completed, but the domestic violence unit should prevent such noncompliances from happening. The Marine Corps had a 62% noncompliance rate with regard to submitting names to the DCII, while NCIS had a 17% rate. In one case, NCIS personnel at Camp Pendleton investigated a domestic incident where a subject strangled a victim and threw her to the floor. The incident

report was evaluated and determined to contain sufficiently credible information that would allow the subject to be entered into the index, but that never happened. Comment provided from the branch head of the Marine Corps Law Enforcement, Investigations, and Corrections Branch did not respond to six recommendations from the DoD report. Those recommendations include adding subjects who were not properly titled and indexed in the DCII, to collect and submit the DNA that wasn’t already sent in to the Defense Forensic Science Center, and to make sure practices, equipment and supervisory reviews are adequate to comply with DoD policies. “Specifically, the Branch Head did not state whether he agreed or disagreed with the recommendations, nor did he describe actions the Marine Corps would take in response to the recommendations,” the report states. “As a result, we consider all of the recommendations to the Navy and Marine Corps unresolved and we request additional comments from the Navy and the Marine Corps.” The DoD requests additional comments from the Navy and Marine Corps to state whether those branches agree or disagree with the recommendations, and to describe specific actions they will take to resolve those recommendations.

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Days after synagogue shooting, CSUSM rededicates Holocaust memorial display By Steve Horn

SAN MARCOS — On May 1, at the Forum Plaza at Cal State University San Marcos, university officials and representatives participated in a rededication ceremony for the restoration of an iconic Holocaust memorial. Named the White Rose Memorial, the public art piece has sat since 2003 near the front of the university’s Arts Building. It pays homage to three non-Jewish students at Munich University who were executed via guillotine by the Nazi government for acts of peaceful resistance in opposition to the regime as part of a group called the White Rose Society. The ceremony took place just four days after a shooting inspired by anti-Semitism occurred at Chabad of Poway, allegedly committed by CSUSM nursing student John Earnest. While the day’s events were scheduled long before the Poway shooting, which saw one synagogue member killed and several other wounded, most of those who spoke in front of the white rose display discussed it. Among them were CSUSM art students Sarah Bricke and Kimberly Lopez, who led the design efforts for the retooled White Rose Memorial. “Before we can fully affect change, we must fully understand the world that we live in,” said Bricke, speaking to a crowd of over 100 people. “We live in a country where people are afraid to worship, where students are afraid to go to school. Simply put, we live in the kind of country that the White Rose resistance gave their lives to prevent.”

ANDREA LISS, art and cultural history professor at Cal State San Marcos, waters the White Rose Memorial at the May 1 rededication ceremony. Photo by Steve Horn

CSUSM President Karen Haynes, who will retire at the end of the academic year, also mentioned the Poway synagogue shooting in her remarks. “Like all of you, I was dismayed and disheartened to learn that the alleged shooter was a CSUSM student,” Haynes said. “His actions and beliefs are antithetical to everything we stand for at this university. In trying to find some comfort in this difficult time, it has been reassuring to see how our campus has come together in solidarity and support of the victims, their families, friends and our entire community.” Sophie Nadler, the president of CSUSM Hillel — a campus student Jewish organization — said she also believes the art’s pres-

ence on-campus symbolizes interfaith solidarity. “For me, the White Rose means so much,” Nadler said. “My heart warms every time I walk past it. I think it symbolizes the strength of the CSUSM students in our community and how we all fight against hate. Walking by this memorial every day will continue to remind me that there are so many people fighting against anti-Semitism.” The White Rose Memorial was originally created by then-CSUSM art student Cynthia Joseph. Not merely a monument, visitors can also water the rose, making it an interactive experience. “(Joseph’s) idea to base the entire work on a participatory element brings you

into an active stance in history,” said CSUSM art history and cultural theory professor Andrea Liss, author of the book “Trespassing through Shadows: Memory, Photography and the Holocaust.” “That's bringing the concept of inter subjectivity from past to present, idea into gesture, and movement into thought and action.“ Liss also explained the difficulty of creating public art about a moment of historical trauma. “Adding to the extreme difficulty of conceptualizing aspects of the events through creative means is that the artists who confront this task now did not experience the events,” said Liss. “Thus, this post-witnessing presents difficult conunTURN TO MEMORIAL ON A23

MAY 10, 2019

Palomar College considers campus housing proposal By Steve Horn

SAN MARCOS — At its April 23 meeting, the Palomar College Governing Board considered a proposal to build housing at the school’s San Marcos campus. Brought forward by the Chicago-based Scion Group, the firm presented the findings of a survey it had distributed to the Palomar College student body — as well as focus groups it organized — to gauge student and employee interest in campus housing. The results, said Scion Group, shows sufficient interest to build about 750 beds on campus for students. “The survey was sent to all of your students by way of an email link from the college,” explained Ann Volz, a real estate consultant for Scion Group. “And we can't close that survey until what we have is this statistically appropriate response that gives that proven confidence factor. So (we kept it open) until we reached that, and I think we even left it open a little bit longer because we got the reasonable response rate so quickly.” According to a presentation given by Aejin Yoon, a project consultant for Scion Group, units would cost students a range of $750 to $1,000 per month. Yoon said that the focus groups she organized bore out that cost was a major concern for Palomar’s students. “A lot of stories were shared regarding the homeless students on this campus and how the (campus) community is feeling very sad and sharing the frustration of theirs,” said Yoon. “And some students that we met in the focus groups were sharing with us some stories that there are fun events going on at campus, but they can't even think of going there because they have to hit the road because 15 minutes of traffic can turn into two hours easily.” Palomar College’s Institutional Research and Planning department data says that 45% of its student base is classified as economically disadvantaged. During the question

and answer portion of the presentation, trustee Nina Deerfield expressed concern about the cost of the housing proposal, asking whether students would be able to afford it. She said the students she has spoken to have told her they are looking for housing prices “way below” the amount estimated in Scion Group’s projections. Campus housing at neighboring Cal State University San Marcos costs students $8,200 to $8,800 for a standard double-bed dorm room, or over $900 per month. Palomar College President Joi Lin Blake, in response, stated that the housing costs could be covered if students take out additional loans. “One of the things, if the district decides to move forward, is we’ll be working with our financial aid office because the financial aid receipts will increase because housing is part of that package,” Blake said. “So, for example, the student awards are going to increase because student housing would be available. That’s what they do at the universities.” Blake also said having housing on campus would help students who have long commutes from places such as Borrego Springs and Ramona. “They could come stay here during the week and then go home,” said Blake. Peter Hofman, an analyst for Scion Group, said that the campus housing would be funded at a 1.2 debt service coverage ratio for Palomar College. Hofman explained that number is a typical real estate industry standard for developers working with clients to finance projects. “(T)ypically when going out for a public private partnerships, the developers are looking for at least the 1.2 coverage, which indicates a little buffer between breaking even and cash flowing on the project,” Hofman detailed. Volz said that a realistic timeline, were the community college to decide to build campus housing, would be having the units on campus by 2022 or 2023.

County gas price drops for third consecutive day REGION — The average price of a gallon of selfserve regular gasoline in San Diego County dropped seven-tenths of a cent May 9 to $4.086, the third consecutive decrease after rising three days in a row to its highest amount since July 27, 2015. The average price dropped six-tenths of a cent on Wednesday and one-tenth of a cent on Tuesday after rising 1 cent over the previous three days, according to figures from

the AAA and Oil Price Information Service. The average price is six-tenths of a cent less than one week ago but 21.8 cents more than one month ago and 39.2 cents higher than one year ago. — City News Service

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MAY 10, 2019

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Special needs actors thrive at New Village Arts By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — A lifetime spent helping and working with special needs students has taken a new turn for a local actor. Samantha Ginn, who performs regularly at the New Village Arts Theatre and recently wrapped the comedy “The Servant of Two Masters,” has a passion to create new opportunities for special needs actors. Partnering with New Village Arts, Ginn and Executive Artistic Director Kristianne Kurner established a program five years ago specific to include neurodiverse actors into the theater’s offerings. Ginn’s passion comes from her mother, who was a special needs teacher. After graduating from college, Ginn, who was raised in Carlsbad and now resides in University Heights, also worked as a special needs preschool teacher in Solana Beach. She has since moved on to other opportunities, including creating an avenue for special needs individuals to get paid for acting in community theater. “That’s kind of where my training comes in,” Ginn said of her teaching days. “I see how much theater and music is a great teaching tool for these students. I went independent … teaching them social skills and any goals they’re working on in life, I used theater and improve to help facilitate that.” Ginn and Kurner started small five years ago offering one class every five to six weeks. As it grew, the program was rebranded Monday Night Live! where 15 special needs students practice their craft once a week for six weeks in the spring and fall and write their own sketch comedy show. And as word started to spread about the program, so did the programming including the Mainstage Players, where the selected students rehearse with their neurotypical peers for the big New Village Arts shows. Ginn selected five of the best actors to act with her on stage, most recently in “The Servant of Two Masters.” Each special needs actor played a banana salesman, most recently by Rachael Ford on May 3, who landed several jokes and received a thunderous ovation from the audience. As for the next performances, the students will participate once per week in the fall production of the musical “Around the World in 80 Days.” In addition, the past two years the students also performed at the Ruby Schulman Auditorium at the Dove Library. “We realized some of these students were hitting their low 20s (age) … and what Sam recognized is they need more of a professional training class,” Kurner said. Rachael Ford, 20, is one of the five actors who has found a home and passion at New Village Arts. The Torrey Pines High School graduate started with the theater several years ago and

SAMANTHA GINN, in orange shirt at left, works with Rachael Ford (yellow shirt) and more than a dozen other special needs actors through a New Village Arts program that provides training and acting opportunities for special needs individuals. Five special needs actors took to the stage during the run of “The Servant of Two Masters.” Photo by Steve Puterski

has since blossomed into a more confident person, she said. Ford has Down syndrome, a condition wherein

an extra chromosome affects the cognitive process. She found theater in high school and wanted to keep chasing the dream once she

graduated. Her mother, Meg Ford, said the program at New Village Arts has been a blessing for her daughter. She

said her daughter is more confident, passionate about the work and driven to land roles in future plays. Rachael Ford said Ginn

is a role model and provides a positive atmosphere for all the actors in the program. The other four actors chosen — Kenton Makings, Ethan Marr, Reid Moriarty and Liam Porter — also took center stage. “It felt awesome,” Rachael Ford said of delivering her lines. “I wasn’t nervous at all. I like being with the cast members and Kristianne.” But for Ginn and Kurner, the program has taken on a life of its own. They see more opportunity to expand and create pathways for special needs actors to break into the industry. Ginn, especially, is driven to break down roadblocks for her understudies. She said the benefits are far reaching, specifically with the cast of “Servant,” who embraced their peers as they would anyone. “Incredible response,” she added. “When one of the students would come into the dressing room, it would elevate all of us. You could even feel the audience elevating. It was about all of us being affected by inclusion.”

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MAY 10, 2019

New proposal for public plaza in Vista By Steve Puterski

VISTA — The city is moving forward with plans to revitalize a public plaza to engage residents and create a more unique feel. The plaza, on the southeast corner of Main Street and South Indiana Avenue, is 3,000 square feet with a gazebo, benches, landscaping and parking. The city has contracted with ADL Planning Associates to develop conceptual plans to reshape the plaza, John Conley, community development director for Vista, said during the April 23 City Council meeting. Residents Dave and Julie Lowen gave a short presentation on another alternative, one to make the area a more pedestrian-friendly and possibly close down South Indiana Avenue. In short, the Lowen proposal is akin to a public plaza and town square to drive traffic to businesses, provide opportunities for those looking to start a business and options for visitors. The Lowens likened it to Santa Monica and other cities where public areas are a focal point of those cities. The council approved to bring capital improvement project with possible mods and cost estimates for evaluating the Lowen proposal. “There are a lot of us down there who’ve invested a lot in the downtown area,” Julie Lowen said. “We’re going to need more feet to get more behinds in seats.” She said it could be an opportunity zone to grow business, be a pathway to entrepreneurship and help with cleaning up the area. As such, she said she and others would like the work with the city to explore public and private partnerships to redevelop the area. “What we are basically asking the city to do … is to start exploring those ideas,” Julie Lowen said. “We would like to develop a town square befitting of Vista and we don’t feel like the three options do that.” Mayor Julie Ritter said she loves the idea, but wasn’t sure if the city’s population could handle such a large-scale project, and wondered where the money would come from to construct it. Councilwoman Amanda Rigby said it would be better to grow into the Lowen proposal and leave the door open to re-evaluate and expand in the future. Both Ritter and Rigby supported the third option and then to possibly grow into the public square. “If we can grow it slowly and see if we activate it smaller, we can have that it mind for the future,” Ritter explained. Councilman John Franklin said the Lowen proposal has “a lot” of merit. However, he noted it is

a big proposal but worth researching and looking at whether it would be wise to spend several hundred thousand dollars for the third option and potentially regret the Lowen proposal. Franklin also asked why not take a couple months to research the Lowen proposal, especially since it appears to be a good idea. “That proposal is a good proposal,” he said. “It’s a real opportunity for beautification. What have we lost if spend a couple of months examining this? What, really, is the cost in dollars in stopping this to give consideration to this idea?” Councilwoman Corinne Contreras said she likes the Lowen proposal, but the city must move and act sooner rather than later. She preferred the third option with the turf area, saying the Lowen proposal may not be feasible along with being a multi-million-dollar project. Councilman Joe Green also had reservations about the plan, noting three business, including Belching Beaver, were not in favor of closing the street. He said the city options are a microcosm of what the Lowes are proposing. The council as a whole also was wary of the financial implications, each member noting how and where the money would be generated or secured to invest in such a project. “My feeling … is that we go with option C and that we look at that Vista Town Square Public Market as a long-term option,” Green said. “For us to stop all we’ve done at this point … would be irresponsible.” One plan calls for doubling the size of the plaza to 6,000 square feet by removing some surface parking in the adjacent public lot, but adding angled parking on both roads, which would increase the total parking spaces by five from 35 to 40. “Staff has looked at this area in terms of increasing the usable space,” Conley said. “We are looking at this site plan in terms of expanding usable space by shifting parking to Main Street.” However, feedback from the city’s outreach to nearby businesses had the city come back two additional plans, including one with a turf field for kids to play and an arts sculpture and garden. A community meeting last year revealed residents and businesses preferred the third option, which features the turf area, Conley said. However, on Feb. 25 the Parks and Recreation Commission preferred the first plan, noting the site should not cater to children. “They felt it should be more adult-oriented,” Conley said.

A GROUP OF FRIENDS decided to start a wine company, Minority Vines, with the intention of benefiting students from underrepresented backgrounds on their way to college. Pictured, from left: Jerome Stewart and Erika Viviani from Point Loma, Tracy Martinez and Alan Wittgrove from Del Mar, and Jason Schmidt from Costa Mesa. Photo courtesy DeWavez Photography

Friends partner in wine venture benefiting students By Lexy Brodt

DEL MAR — Local resident Tracy Martinez was initially joking when she told a group of friends she planned to start a wine label — particularly with the intention to help students from minority backgrounds find their way to college. The group had been sipping wine in St. Helena in 2017, mired in a conversation on the divisive political and social climate and finding themselves “very saddened by the growth in minority discrimination and bias,” said Martinez, a registered nurse and sixyear Del Mar resident. Galvanized to create positive change, the group soon made Martinez’s kidding call to action a reality. The seven friends became partners in creating “Minority Vines,” a wine company aimed at benefitting students from underrepresented backgrounds who are “academically outstanding,” but in need of financial support. So far, fundraising efforts through wine sales have yielded over $2,000, to benefit a scholarship foundation out of Bishop Mora Salesian High School in Los Angeles. To get to that point, the partners faced a steep learning curve. But one thing was clear: they wanted to create a wine that would offer up a lesson in both taste and philosophy — reminding its drinkers of the importance of diversity. Partnering with wine maker Jonathan Gelula, they underwent a seven-month process of nailing down the taste through samples and test groups. The end product? “Diversity,” a red blend made with a mix of grapes from Lodi, Lake County and Amador County. The group held their first fundraiser in March: The event packed a local Italian restaurant with almost 60 guests, and the partners sold six and a half cases of wine.

With their first fundraiser behind them, the partners are looking to host a similar event quarterly — Martinez said they are planning to hold the next fundraiser in Santa Monica. Although current efforts are focused on Bishop Mora Salesian, Martinez said Minority Vines is hoping to benefit a different high school every two years — focusing on one at a time

in order to make the greatest impact. They are also expanding their vision by featuring the stories of prominent and successful immigrants on their webpage, while working to add a white wine to their offerings on top of “Diversity.” So far, Martinez said the biggest challenge for the partners was finding time amidst their varied

careers to bring the idea to fruition. “It wasn’t an easy endeavor,” Martinez said. But at the end of the day, Martinez said the partners are just “having fun with it,” benefitting students in need of financial assistance and enjoying the positive response from the community in the process. “There’s a lot of love out there,” Martinez said.

COMMUNITY MEMBER OPENING ON TRI-CITY HEALTHCARE DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS COMMITTEE The Tri-City Healthcare District Board of Directors currently has a community membership opening on the following working Committee: 1.

Audit/Compliance/Ethics Committee – one opening. This Committee meets quarterly and as needed. Applicants shall have a basic understanding of finance and accounting and be able to read and understand financial statements, and shall have experience and familiarity with the specialized issues relating to health care financial issues. Applicants will be expected to attain a basic understanding of the design and operation of an Internal Audit Program and Ethics & Compliance Program, including: (1) review of Office of Inspector General/AHLA materials for Boards; (2) review of OIG compliance program guidance; and (3) attendance at relevant educational sessions presented by the Chief Compliance Officer, Internal Auditor, and/or the Health Care Compliance Association or similar organizations. If members of the public have an interest in serving as a community member on the above listed Committee, please send a resume or biography delineating your experience relevant to this Committee to: Teri Donnellan, Executive Assistant Tri-City Medical Center 4002 Vista Way Oceanside, CA 92056

Your information will be forwarded to the Chairperson of the Committee and Board Chairperson for review and consideration. After consideration by the full Committee, a recommendation will be forwarded to the full Board of Directors for final approval/appointment. All appointments are voluntary and do not include compensation. Community members shall serve a term of two years, with an option to renew the appointment for one additional two year term. At the conclusion of the second term, the community member shall not be eligible to serve on the same Board Committee for at least two years. It is preferable that a community member shall be a member of no more than one Board Committee at a time. The Board of Directors of Tri-City Healthcare District desires to ensure that its Committee community members are knowledgeable as to the issues that face the District. Therefore, only applications submitted by persons residing within the boundaries of the Tri-City Healthcare District will be considered.

2/2019

www.tricitymed.org


MAY 10, 2019

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Hoops star shifts gears, This Machado hits 500 and keeps on going decommits from Duke sports By Aaron Burgin

REGION — On a chilly Friday night in November, Rejean Ellis sat at a table in Mission Bay High School’s gymnasium, in front of hundreds of family, friends and fans in the stands and a phalanx of cameras. Ellis, known best by his nickname “Boogie,” selected a Duke University baseball cap from the table and placed it on his head, announcing to the world that he would play college Ellis basketball at one of the nation's most prestigious universities. He became the first San Diego prep basketball player to commit to Coach Mike Krzyzewski and the Blue Devils since San Pasqual High's Erik Meek in 1991. But by May 2, Ellis had a change of heart. The 6-2 high-scoring guard confirmed that he had asked for, and received, a release from his national letter of intent (LOI) from Duke and would be looking to commit to another school.

News of Ellis’ decision sent shock waves through college basketball circles, as reaction to the news ran the gamut from surprise, disappointment and approval. Ellis said he decided to forgo his commitment after Duke announced that current freshman guard Tre Jones would return for his sophomore season and the Blue Devils signed another Southern California guard prospect, Sierra Canyon High senior Cassius Stanley. Ellis said he wanted to find a school where he would play heavy minutes at the point guard, which grew unlikely with the changes to Duke's roster. “To be successful I have to play the 1,” Ellis said, referring to the point guard position. “Everyone in the country knows I can score the ball.” Ellis, who played travel basketball with the Oakland Soldiers, signed to Duke during the early signing period in November. He chose the Blue Devils over the University of Southern California, San Diego State, Memphis and the University of North Carolina. TURN TO DECOMMIT ON A23

talk

jay paris

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he name is Machado, the game is baseball so by any chance ... “I tell people all the time he’s my cousin,” Justin Machado, La Costa Canyon High’s baseball coach, said with a wink. Manny Machado is the Padres slugger with the staggering $300 million contract. Still LCC’s Machado recently hitting the 500 mark is equally as impressive. That’s wins at LCC, not dollars, and that’s fine. “Where else would I have it better than out here on this field,” Machado said. Machado, LCC’s lone coach in its 23 seasons, has it pointed toward the CIF San Diego Section playoffs, which start next week. LCC has won three CIF titles and no telling if No. 4 is on the horizon. What’s clear as the pristine infield Machado religiously manicures is he’s doing something right. While rivals swear at drawing LCC in the postseason, Machado’s players and coaches swear by him. “He’s the most fun coach I’ve ever played for,”

said Spencer Jones, the Mavericks’ standout two-way player. “It’s always a lowstress environment and he lets the players play.” Joey Burke, an assistance coach and former Maverick, agreed. “He’s got a ton of patience and he’s out there having fun,” he said. Once the LCC diamond was a patch of brown grass lacking an outfield fence with convertible dugouts — no tops. But the gem was Machado, a baseball-lifer possessing a dream and a fungo. Baseball stirred his passion after playing at San Dieguito, MiraCosta College and Sonoma State. At MiraCosta he learned under the hardnosed John Seeley. “He was a disciplinarian,” Machado said. “You had to run three miles in 21 minutes and do six 40-yard sprints before he gave you your uniform.” At Sonoma State John Goelz was in charge. “He was more relaxed,” Machado said. “I think I took more after him.” It was there Machado, 48, embraced the idea of coaching. He directed San Dieguito’s JV team after college and then applied for the LCC job. “I got it and a year later I became a teacher, too,” he said.

JUSTIN MACHADO recently won his 500th game as baseball coach at La Costa Canyon High. Courtesy photo

Making baseball a joy is easy. Economics? “He makes it a fun class,” Jones said. “Even first thing in the morning he has that energy and is just someone who’s easy to talk to.” Machado eventually talked his father, Jim, into constructing dugout roofs. Others contributed blood, sweat, tears and funds to transform the field with a 1,000 bad hops into one with seldom a blade out of place. “It’s incredible how he loves working on the field,” Burke said. “He wants it just right for the parents, players, fans and for them to see how nice of a place this is.” It’s advanced countless players into the college and pro ranks. Mickey Moniak was the 2016 draft’s No. 1 overall pick by the Phillies.

Machado never gets his fill of baseball, but he recognizes its harsh realities. It’s a game constructed around failure. Slumps invariably arrive. “He has a way that when players get frustrated he calms them down,” Burke said. “He reminds them of the good things they’ve done and to forget about the bad things.” The ying-and-yang of coaching teenagers hits home for Machado as his son, Austin, is among LCC’s top players. It’s yet another chapter in a coaching tome that is still being written. “I’m having a fun,” he said. “I wouldn’t quit unless I got bored.” Speaking of boards, there’s yet another Machado. Rob Machado, Justin’s brother, is an iconic surfer living around the corner from his sibling in Cardiff. Rob hears plenty about Justin, who’s been named the California Coaches Association’s baseball coach of the year. Justin encourages his crew to give Rob the needle. “I tell them to say, ‘Hey, I know your brother,”’ Justin said. It’s the one that knows baseball and it’s true it hasn’t provided Justin with a $300 million deal. But he’s wealthy in other ways, some that are not so easily quantified in his economics class.

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MAY 10, 2019

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RESOLUTION NO. 2019-15

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to you, because your interest may be affected, that the City Council of the City of Carlsbad will hold a public hearing at the Council Chamber, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, California, at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 to consider approving a Tentative Tract Map and Site Development Plan to construct a five-unit, residential air-space condominium project on a 0.22-acre site located at 2569 Roosevelt Street and more particularly described as: The Northwesterly half of the Northwesterly half of Lot 22 of Seaside Lands, in the City of Carlsbad, County of San Diego, State of California, according to Map thereof No. 1722, filed in the Office of the County Recorder of San Diego County, July 28, 1921. Excepting therefrom that portion thereof described as follows: The most Easterly portion, 8 feet in width, along the Easterly Boundary of said lot bearing North 34 degrees, 33 minutes West and 62.165 feet in length, as granted to the City of Carlsbad on document recorded June 28, 1991 as Instrument No. 1991-0316665, of Official Records Whereas, on April 3, 2019, the City of Carlsbad Planning Commission voted 6-0-1 to recommend approval of a Tentative Tract Map and Site Development Plan to construct a five-unit, residential air-space condominium project on a 0.22-acre site located at 2569 Roosevelt Street in the Village General (VG) District of the Village and Barrio Master Plan and within Local Facilities Management Zone 1. The City Planner has determined that this project belongs to a class of projects that the State Secretary for Resources has found do not have a significant impact on the environment and is therefore categorically exempt from the requirement for the preparation of environmental documents pursuant to section 15332 (In-fill Development Projects) of the State CEQA guidelines. Those persons wishing to speak on this proposal are cordially invited to attend the public hearing. Copies of the staff report will be available on and after Thursday, May 16, 2019. If you have any questions, please contact Chris Garcia in the Planning Division at (760) 602-4622 or chris.garcia@carlsbadca.gov. If you challenge the Tentative Tract Map and Site Development Plan in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City of Carlsbad, Attn: City Clerk’s Office, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008, at or prior to the public hearing. CASE FILE:

CT 2017-0006/SDP 2018-0013 (DEV2017-0213)

CASE NAME:

ROOSEVELT TOWNHOMES

PUBLISH:

FRIDAY, MAY 10, 2019

CITY OF CARLSBAD CITY COUNCIL

05/10/19 CN 23210 on February 28, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-0137953 in the Office of the County Recorder, San Diego County, California; and WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest in the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary,

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CITY OF ENCINITAS

CITY OF CARLSBAD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

TS No: CA07000440-19-1-HC APN: 168-161-24-00 TO No: 8752664 NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, on February 23, 2007, a certain Deed of Trust was executed by VIRGINA A BERRY, TRUSTEES OF VIRGINIA A BERRY LIVING TRUST, DATED SEPTEMBER 03, 1991 as Trustor in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary and FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO as Trustee, and was recorded

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pursuant to an assignment dated January 20, 2016, and recorded on January 25, 2016, as Instrument No. 2016-0030632, in the office of the County Recorder, San Diego County, California; and WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in that the payment due on January 31, 2019, was not made and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this notice, and no payment has been made sufficient to restore the loan to currency; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of April 24, 2019 is estimated to be $400,901.15; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on December 11, 2015, as Instrument No. 20150635416, notice is hereby given that on June 10, 2019 at 10:00 AM, local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the

RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ENCINITAS, CALIFORNIA DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO ORDER THE RENEWAL OF THE ENCINITAS LANDSCAPE AND LIGHTING DISTRICT FOR FY2019-20 AND SETTING OF A PUBLIC HEARING ON MAY 22, 2019, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF DIVISION 15, PART 2 OF THE STREETS AND HIGHWAYS CODE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, in 1987, the City Council of the City of Encinitas, California formed a Landscape and Lighting District pursuant to the terms and provisions of the “Landscaping and Lighting Act of 1972”, being Division 15, Part 2 of the Streets and Highways Code of the State of California, in what is known and designated as: ENCINITAS LANDSCAPE & LIGHTING DISTRICT (hereinafter referred to as the “District”); WHEREAS, at this time there has been presented and approved by this City Council, the preliminary Engineer’s Report (“Report”) as required by law, and this City Council is desirous of moving forth with the proceedings for said annual levy; and WHEREAS, at this time, the City Council is desirous to take proceedings to provide for the annual levy of assessments for the next ensuing fiscal year to provide for the costs and expenses necessary for the continued maintenance of improvements within said District. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 1. That the above recitals are all true and correct. SECTION 2. That the Preliminary Report as presented consists of the following: A. Plans and Specifications, B. Estimate of Cost, C. Diagram of the District, and D. Assessment of the Estimated Cost SECTION 3. That the Preliminary Report regarding the annual levy for said District which Report is for operation and maintenance of public street lighting, traffic signals, and landscaping for the Fiscal Year 2019-20 is hereby approved and is directed to be filed in the Office of the City Clerk as a permanent record and to remain open to the public for inspection. SECTION 4. That the public interest and convenience requires, and it is the intention of this City Council to order, the annual assessment levy for the District as set forth and described in said Preliminary Report, and further it is determined to be in the best public interest and convenience to levy and collect annual assessments to pay the costs and expenses of said maintenance of improvements as estimated in said Preliminary Report. SECTION 5. The assessments levied and collected shall be for the maintenance of certain improvements, as set forth in the Preliminary Report, referenced and so incorporated herein. SECTION 6. The County Auditor shall enter on the County Assessment Roll the amount of the assessments, and shall collect said assessments at the same time and in the same manner as County taxes are collected. After collection by the County, the net amount of the assessments, after the deduction of any compensation due to the County for collection, shall be paid to the City of Encinitas for purposes of paying for the costs and expenses of said District. SECTION 7. That all monies collected shall be deposited in a special fund known as: “ENCINITAS LANDSCAPE & LIGHTING DISTRICT” Payment shall be made out of said fund only for the purpose provided for in this Resolution, and in order to expedite the making of this maintenance or improvement, the City Council may transfer into said special fund, from any available source, such funds as it may deem necessary to expedite the proceedings. Any funds shall be repaid out of the proceeds of the assessments provided for in this Resolution. SECTION 8. Said contemplated maintenance and improvement work is, in the opinion of this City Counhighest bidder: Commonly known as: 4229 DUSK LANE, OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 LOT 24 OF OCEANSIDE MANOR UNIT #1 ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF #7648 FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, MAY 30, 1973. The sale will be held at the entrance to the East County Regional Center by statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $400,901.15. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling $40,090.11 [10% of the

Secretary’s bid] in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not accompany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of $40,090.11 must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs

cil, of special and direct benefit to the properties within the boundaries of the City-wide District, and this City Council makes the costs and expenses of said maintenance and improvements chargeable upon a District, which District said City Council hereby declares to be the District benefited by said maintenance and improvements, and to be further assessed to pay the costs and expenses thereof. Said District shall include each and every parcel of land within the boundaries of said District, as said District is shown within said Preliminary Report, as approved by this City Council and on file in the Office of the City Clerk, and so designated by the name of the District. SECTION 9. Any lots of land known as public property and used exclusively in the performance of a public function, as the same are defined in Section 22663 of Division 15, Part 2 of the Streets and Highways Code of the State of California, which are included within the boundaries of the District, shall be omitted and exempt from any assessment to be made under these proceedings to cover any of the costs and expenses of said operation and maintenance work, unless these properties are located within the boundaries of the Encinitas Ranch Specific Plan. SECTION 10. The City Council establishes the following assessments for FY2019/2020: Zone A (Citywide Street Lighting, Landscaping, and Traffic Signals) = $5.22 Zone B (Localized Residential street lighting) = $9.90 Zone C (Localized Commercial Street lighting) = $2.18 Zone D (Localized Landscaping) = $25.24 Zone E (Localized Landscaping) = $0 Zone F (Localized Landscaping) = $0 Zone G (Localized Landscaping) = $579.00 Zone H (Localized Lighting and Landscaping) = $100.00 SECTION 11. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT 6:00 PM ON MAY 22, 2019, AT THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE ENCINITAS CITY COUNCIL, AT THE CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 505 S. VULCAN AVENUE, ENCINITAS, CALIFORNIA, IS THE TIME AND PLACE FIXED BY REFERENCE FOR A PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE ANNUAL LEVY OF ASSESSMENTS, RESPECTIVELY, TO THE EXTENT OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AND ANY OTHER MATTERS CONTAINED IN THIS RESOLUTION. ANY PERSONS WHO WISH TO OBJECT TO THE PROCEEDINGS FOR THE ANNUAL LEVY SHOULD FILE A WRITTEN PROTEST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO THE TIME SET AND SCHEDULED FOR SAID PUBLIC HEARING. SECTION 12. That the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to publish a copy of this Resolution in a newspaper of general circulation within said City, said publication shall be not less than ten (10) days before the date set for said Public Hearing. SECTION 13. That this Resolution shall take effect immediately upon adoption. SECTION 14. For any and all information relating to the proceedings, protest procedure, and documentation and/or information of a procedural or technical nature, your attention is directed to the below listed person at the local agency or department so designated: Christine Ruess, Sr. Management Analyst City of Encinitas 505 South Vulcan Avenue Encinitas, CA 92024 (760) 943-2231 PASSED AND ADOPTED this 24th day of April, 2019, by the following vote to wit: AYES: Blakespear, Hinze, Hubbard, Kranz, Mosca NAYS: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None /Catherine S. Blakespear Catherine S. Blakespear, Mayor City of Encinitas, California /Kathy Hollywood Kathy Hollywood, City Clerk 05/10/19 CN 23211 associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for 15day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit or, at the election

of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein. HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. The scheduled foreclosure sale shall


MAY 10, 2019

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be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the Foreclosure Commissioner not less than 3 days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified or cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before public auction of the property is completed. The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is $400,901.15 as of April 24, 2019, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Date: 04/24/2019 ROSENDA CARDENAS, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps Foreclosure Commissioner 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 Phone: 949-252-8300 Fax: 949-252-8330 Order Number 59236, Pub Dates: 05/10/2019, 05/17/2019, 05/24/2019, THE COAST NEWS CN 23208

be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: CHRISTINE FOX, A WIDOW Duly Appointed Trustee: Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP Deed of Trust recorded 12/9/2005, as Instrument No. 2005-1061615, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 6/3/2019 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $642,151.96 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1244 CREST DR # A&B ENCINITAS, California 92024-5204 AKA 1244 CREST DR ENCINITAS, California 92024-5204 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 262-011-02-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear

title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 848-9272 or visit this Internet Web site www.elitepostandpub. com, using the file number assigned to this case 1854471. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 5/2/2019 Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For NonAutomated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (714) 848-9272 www.elitepostandpub.com Michael Busby, Trustee Sale Officer This office is enforcing a security interest of your creditor. To the extent that your obligation has been discharged by a bankruptcy court or is subject to an automatic stay of bankruptcy, this notice is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a demand for payment or any attempt to collect such obligation EPP 28866 Pub Dates 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/2019 CN 23207

The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: BOBBI L CASKEY, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP Deed of Trust recorded 8/2/2007, as Instrument No. 2007-0518478, The subject Deed of Trust was modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded as Instrument 2011-0649217 and recorded on 12/2/2011, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 6/7/2019 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Entrance of the East County Regional Center, East County Regional Center, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $931,291.20 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 7319 BINNACLE DRIVE CARLSBAD, California 92011-4681 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 216-520-18-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 2802832 or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the file number assigned to this case 18-54000. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 5/2/2019 Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated

T.S. No. 18-54471 A P N : 262-011-02-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/2/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will

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T.S. No. 18-54000 A P N : 216-520-18-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/26/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below.

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

CITY OF ENCINITAS DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING By The CITY COUNCIL PLACE OF MEETING:

Council Chambers, Civic Center 505 South Vulcan Avenue Encinitas, CA 92024

THE ABOVE MENTIONED AGENCY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PUBLIC ENTITY AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, ETHNIC ORIGIN, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, RELIGION, VETERANS STATUS OR PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITY IN EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVISION OF SERVICE. IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT/SECTION 504 REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973, IF YOU NEED SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS MEETING, PLEASE CONTACT THE DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT AT (760) 633-2710. It is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held on Wednesday, the 22nd day of May, 2019, at 6 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, by the Encinitas City Council to discuss the following hearing item of the City of Encinitas: CASE NUMBER: 18-120 CDP; FILING DATE: July 9, 2018; APPLICANT: Randy Peterson, Cardiff School District.; APPELLANT: Save the Park and Build the School; LOCATION: 1888 Montgomery Avenue (260-340-01 and -02); PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Public hearing to consider an appeal of the Planning Commission’s decision for a Coastal Development Permit to demolish, relocate and construct new or expand classrooms/auditorium; reconfigure and expand an existing parking lot, grading and landscaping improvements. ZONING/OVERLAY: The project site is located in the Public/ Semi Public (P/SP) Zone and the Coastal Overlay Zone.; ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: A final Environmental Impact Report has been adopted by the Cardiff School District. STAFF CONTACT: Andrew Maynard, Associate Planner, 760-633-2718, amaynard@encinitasca.gov This appeal will be considered by the City Council pursuant to Chapter 1.12 of the Municipal Code. Any person who wishes to submit a written position with arguments, documents, exhibits, letters, photos, charts, diagrams, videos, etc., addressing the challenged determination MUST submit these to the City Clerk by 5:00 P.M. on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, seven (7) calendar days prior to this hearing. No new information will be considered by the City Council after this deadline. Upon filing with the City Clerk, those items will be available to the public. Any questions, please contact the City Clerk at (760) 633-2601. The above item is located within the Coastal Zone and requires issuance of a regular Coastal Development Permit. The action of the Planning Commission or City Council may not be appealed to the California Coastal Commission. Under California Government Code Section 65009, if you challenge the nature of the proposed action in court, you may be limited to raising only the issues you or someone else raised regarding the matter described in this notice or written correspondence delivered to the City at or before the time and date of the determination. For further information, or to review the application prior to the hearing, please contact staff or contact the Development Services Department, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024 at (760) 633-2710 or by email at planning@ encinitasca.gov. 05/10/19 CN 23226 Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (800) 280-2832 www.auction. com Michael Busby, Trustee Sale Officer This office is enforcing a security interest of your creditor. To the extent that your obligation has been discharged by a bankruptcy court or is subject to an automatic stay of bankruptcy, this notice is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a demand for payment or any attempt to collect such obligation EPP 28863 Pub Dates 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/2019 CN 23206 T.S. No. 19-55344 A P N : 215-231-66-05 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 3/8/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by

the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: CRYSTAL JOHANNA HARRIS, AND SHAWN MICHAEL HARRIS, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP Deed of Trust recorded 3/19/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-0231687, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 5/28/2019 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $615,585.68 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 7359 ALICANTE ROAD CARLSBAD, CA 92009 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 215-231-6605 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If

you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 848-9272 or visit this Internet

Coast News legals continued on page B6


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T he C oast News ter for the free composting workshop at the Pine Avenue Community Gardens, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 11. Carlsbad residents can also purchase low-cost composting bins, subsidized by the City of Carlsbad. Register at reearthconsulting.com/ carlsbadcomposting.html.

CALENDAR Know something that’s going on? Send it to calendar@ coastnewsgroup.com

MAY 10

CASINO NIGHT IN RIO

Join Casino Night in Rio from 6 to 9:30 p.m. May 10 at St. Thomas More, 1450 S. Melrose Drive, Oceanside. Beginning with Happy Hour, the event will feature hors d’oeuvres, raffles, live and silent auctions and gaming with $200 in free money and free lessons. Cost is $50 per person. To register go to stmoside.org/Casino-Night or call (760) 758-4100, ext. 120 or chriss@stmoside.org.

TIME FOR BUTTERFLIES

Batiquitos Lagoon Foundation docents will host a free focus on butterflies event from 9 to 11 a.m. May 11, 7380 Gabbiano Lane, Carlsbad. Pat Flanagan will speak about the local butterflies and how to attract them. Afterward, go on the trail to find butterflies, moths and caterpillars. Visit batiquitosfoundation.org/.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

The San Dieguito Interfaith Ministerial Association invites you to brighten the day of someone in need by sharing your friendship, talents and/or your pets with residents receiving Alzheimer’s care at Somerford Place Encinitas. All are welcome, bring your whole family. Sign up to help at signupgenius.com/go/ 70a0b44a8aa23a2fe3-sdima.

TREAT THAT FISH WELL

MAY 10, 2019

CHEF YANNI HASSIR will share his culinary knowledge at 9:30 a.m. May 10 at the Senior Anglers of Escondido. Courtesy photo

from bacteria and parasites due to improper fish handling, Hassir created FishermansBelly.com. Open to all anglers age 50 and above. LEGACY USERS GROUP

The Legacy Users Group will meet from noon to 2 p.m. May 10 at Georgina Cole Library, 1250 Carlsbad Village Drive. Legacy is a popular genealogy software program. Bring lunch and a laptop. Free, reservation not required. For questions call 760-743-3660 or email lug@nsdcgs.

Seafood chef Yanni Hassir will be sharing his knowledge of the kitchen and recipes at the May 10 meeting of the Senior Anglers of Escondido at 9:30 a.m. at the Escondido City Hall in the Mitchell Room, 201 N. Broadway, Escondi- TAKE TEA FOR MOTHER’S DAY do. Focusing on food borne The city of San Marcos illnesses that can come will host its annual Mother’s

Day Tea at 3 p.m. May 10 at the Senior Activity Center, 111 Richmar Ave., San Marcos. The event features a traditional tea menu, live harp entertainment and a fashion show presented by Garment Gourmet. The cost is $10, and tickets are available at the front desk of the senior center. For more information, call (760) 7445535 or visit san-marcos. net.

Manchester Ave., Student Conference Room.

MAY 11

CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL

Treat your sweet tooth at the Chocolate Festival at San Diego Botanic Garden from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 11 at 230 Quail Gardens Drive, Encinitas. Admission, adults $14, seniors, students, active military $10, children ages 3 to 12 LIFE LECTURES $8. Tasting tickets will be Hear John Wixted, of sold inside the gardens. UCSD, speak on the reliability of eyewitness mem- COME OUT AND COMPOST ory at the LIFE Club San Learn about compostElijo from 1 to 3 p.m. May ing solutions for Carlsbad 10 at the San Elijo Campus residents at the State Street of MiraCosta College, 3333 Farmers’ Market and regis-

PANCAKES FOR ALL

The Boys and Girls Club of Oceanside Mother’s Day Pancake Breakfast from 8:30 to 11 a.m. May 11 in the BGCO gymnasium, 401 Country Club Lane, Oceanside. Cost is $5 for children 12 and younger, $7 for adults or $20 for family of four. Tickets at (760) 433-8920 or https:// thebgcoceanside.ejoinme. org/MyEvents/MothersDayPancakeBreakfast2019/tabid/1053333/Default.aspx.

HEALING GRIEF WITH ART

For those experiencing grief from loss of a loved one, join Expressive Arts Workshop from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 11, UCSD Cancer Center, 1200 Garden View Road, Encinitas. Suggested donation $20. E-mail Alessandra@AlessandraColfi. GET IN ON GOLF BALL DROP Encinitas Coastal Ro- com for more information. tary Club invites you to sign up for its fifth annual FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT Come to the free family Golf Ball Drop held May 11 at Encinitas Ranch Golf movie night, with “IncrediCourse, 1275 Quail Gardens bles 2” from 6 to 9 p.m. May Drive, Encinitas. Grand 11 at Glen Park, 2149 Orinprize is $2,000. Register at da Drive, Encinitas. Acencinitascoastalrotary.org. tivities begin at 6 p.m. for youngsters. Be sure to bring blankets or low-back chairs, HIKE AND SURVEY Join Buena Vista Audu- a picnic and drinks, but no bon Society at 9 a.m. May 11 glass containers. For more to conduct surveys for the information, call (760) 633rare plant Brodiaea filifolia 2640. on BVAS’s 31-acre Mauro Preserve. Meet at the cul de sac at the end of Muirfields Drive, Oceanside. Terrain is CHIP YOUR PET FOR FREE San Diego Humane difficult to navigate. Wear sturdy boots; hiking poles Society is offering free miand snake gaitors recom- crochipping at upcoming mended. For more informa- vaccine clinics Sundays in tion, contact Natalie at bue- May from 8 to 10 a.m. at the navistanature@gmail.com TURN TO CALENDAR ON A21 No experience needed.

MAY 12

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MAY 10, 2019

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M arketplace News

Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

Smart home tech helps older Americans age in place May is Older Americans Month and this year’s theme of connecting, creating and contributing is made easier with smart home technology that helps our aging population connect with family and friends wherever they are in the world, create a safe and healthy home environment, and continue contributing their invaluable knowledge and life experiences in their community. Smart home technology also makes it easier to “age in place,” which is important considering 90% of adults age 65 and older say they prefer growing older in their current home rather than uprooting and moving to an assisted-living facility. Not only does technology empower seniors to live independently longer, it is often a less expensive option than moving. And it can be less intimidating than people think. Technology is made “smart” by connecting devices to a high-speed Internet connection. Through a national smart home tour of

“Connected Independence” homes that had its origins in San Diego, Cox Communications has been demonstrating to communities across the country how smart-home technology gives seniors the ability to live independently at home, while providing adult children and caretakers peace of mind that their loved one is safe. Technology can also combat the feelings of isolation common in older adults, as it’s easier to connect with friends, family and caregivers without leaving the home. A connected home allows seniors to get the things they need in their daily routine while maintaining the quality of life at home. Here are some technology highlights from Cox’s “Connected Independence” smart home tour: Telehealth allows patients to have live, personal interaction with their doctors via video conferencing while at home. This technology relieves patients from having to find transporta-

CALENDAR

MAY 14

CONTINUED FROM A20

PREVENT ALZHEIMER’S

Health and Wellness experts share tips, tools and insight on how to improve your quality of life with Nutritional Secrets to Prevent Alzheimer’s and Sharpen Your Memory by Angela Vittucci 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. May 14, at Carlsbad City Library’s Schulman Auditorium, 1775 Dove Lane, Carlsbad. Admission is free; seating is first come, HISTORIC HOME TOUR Take mom on a Home first served. For more inforTour visiting five historic mation, call (760) 602-2055. homes through Historic Old Escondido, from 11 a.m. to 4 DELAY DEMENTIA “Maintaining Your p.m. May 12, beginning at Juniper Street and 6th Ave- Brain Health,” is presented nue. Tickets $25 in advance by Dementia Care Consulat oldescondido.org or $30 tant Jean Alton from Alzheimer’s San Diego, from at the event. 10:30 a.m. to noon May 14 at the Civic Center LiLEARN BIKE SAFETY The city of Encinitas brary Community Rooms, and local advocacy group 330 North Coast Highway, Rider Safety Visibility will Oceanside. The program is promote bicycle and rid- free and sponsored by the er safety with bike safety Friends of the Oceanside tips and demonstrations Public Library and Alzheiof safety equipment at the mer’s San Diego. To regisLeucadia Farmer’s Market ter, call (858) 492-4400 or on May 12 and June 2, 185 visit alzsd.org. Union St., Encinitas. Escondido Campus, 3500 Burnet Drive and Wednesdays in May from 10 a.m. to noon at the Oceanside Campus, 572 Airport Road. Microchips available while supplies last. Microchipping is always available at all SDHS campuses (no appointment necessary) for $15.

SINGLE TRAVELERS

MAY 13

SUMMER SOLSTICE COMING

Tickets are selling now for the Del Mar Summer Solstice event planned from 5 to 8 p.m. June 20 at Powerhouse Park, Del Mar. Get tickets at https://visitdelmarvillage.com.

SUMMER SCHOOL

Summer semester enrollment is now open at Palomar College. First classes of the summer begin May 28, and run through Aug. 16, including 4-, 6- and 8-week sessions starting at different times in May, June and July. View the class schedule online at palomar.edu/ schedule.

Single Travelers Club will meet from 5 to 7 p.m. May 14, at Hunter Steakhouse, 1221 Vista Way, Oceanside. The discussion will be “Sue’s China Travels and Making Sense of Travel Insurance.” Call Jackie at (760) 438-1472 to RSVP.

GENEALOGY SOURCES

Mary Von Orsdal, former genealogy librarian, will present an Intermediate Genealogy Class, “Citing Your Sources,” sponsored by North San Diego County Genealogical Society, 10 to 11:30 a.m. May 14 at 1635 Faraday Ave., Carlsbad. For questions, call (949) 310-1778 or e-mail membership@nsdcgs.org.

TECHNOLOGY IS MADE “smart” by connecting devices to a high-speed Internet connection. Courtesy photo

tion or physically traveling to a medical facility for every consultation; Home automation and security features, including the ability to see who is at the front door and lock and unlock doors remotely through Cox Homelife, make it easier for seniors to let visitors and caregivers in

and out of the home safely; “Smart” pill dispensers provide audible and visual alerts up to 30 minutes when pills are scheduled to be taken; Automatic pet feeders can be controlled through an app, making it easier to care for a pet; Smart toothbrushes re-

KNOW YOUR MEDICARE

Nights, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. May 15, along Coast Highway 101 and in adjacent parking lots, featuring the North County Cruisers, and Secret Car Club with live music from LAE and Friends, Linda Berry and John January and The Retro Rocketts. More information at encinitas101.com, FRIENDS AND FAITH The Catholic Widows (760) 943-1950. and Widowers of North County support group for CUT-A-THON FOR PUPS those who desire to foster Hair Lounge & Spa at friendships through vari- Cedros invites you to join ous social activities, Dinner in on their Cut-a-Thon, at the American Legion, benefiting San Diego HuVista May 14 and go bowl- mane Society from 10 a.m. ing at Surf Bowl and din- to 4 p.m. May 15 at 112 S. ner at Hunter Steakhouse, Cedros Ave., Solana Beach, Oceanside May 16. Reser- with adoptable pups greetvations are necessary: (858) ing guests. Haircuts - $20; 674-4324. Haircut & Blowdry - $50; Shampoo & Blowdry - $30; Lash Lift with Marcina SPRING WREATHS Join the Spring Suc- $49. Call to reserve your culent Wreath class from 9 space at (858) 755-4522 and a.m. to 3 p.m. May 14 at the make sure to mention the San Diego Botanic Garden. Cut-a-Thon. 230 Quail Gardens Drive. Cost is $78 (fee includes materials). Take home a beautiful succulent wreath ABOUT SERVICE DOGS you make yourself. StuThe San Diego Hudents should bring small mane Society offers a PET clippers or scissors to class. Talk: Canine Companions To register, visit sdbgarden. for Independence and Serorg/classes.htm. vice Dog Etiquette from 6 to 7:30 p.m. May 16 at the SDHS Oceanside Campus, 572 Airport Road, Oceanside. $10 per person. HELP THE BIRDS Want to know what Sign up at http://support. you can do to help Ameri- sdhumane.org/site/Calenca’s birds? Join the Buena dar/893810294?view=DeVista Audubon Society at tail&id=134090. 6:30 p.m. May 15 at 2202 S. Coast Highway, Oceanside and hear David Younkman, of the American Bird Con- FIRE AWARENESS EVENT servancy, speak about the The Carlsbad Chamber threats facing America’s of Commerce and its Ready birds and what can be done. Carlsbad Business Alliance For more information, call will hold the Fire Aware(760) 439-2473. ness Symposium from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. May 17 at the Carlsbad Safety Center, KICK OFF CRUISE NIGHTS The Encinitas 101 2560 Orion Way, Carlsbad. MainStreet Association The goal is to spread awarebegins Encinitas Cruise ness of fire hazard in southVista County Library will host a Medicare educational seminar - Medicare 101, The Basics at 1:30 p.m. (English) and 2:45 p.m. (Spanish) May 14 at Vista Library, 700 Eucalyptus Ave., Vista.

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port brushing habits and provide oral health advice through an app; Smart forks help track eating habits, which help older Americans with their nutrition; Smart kitchen appliances make it easier to cook for one; Voice-activated TV re-

motes such as those available through Cox Contour gives users the ability to find their favorite shows without pressing buttons or navigating through on-screen menus; Life-like pets that have built-in sensors such as a cat that meows when being petted. These pets provide comfort and relaxation, and are used with Alzheimer’s patients, but don’t require the stress of physically caring for a real pet. To maximize the power of a smart home and all the potentially life-changing devices and services in it, you’ll need a fast and reliable highspeed Internet connection and in-home wi-fi. Cox Communications now offers gigabit internet speeds to homes throughout its service area in San Diego County, as well as Panoramic Wi-Fi, making it easy to run 50 connected devices simultaneously. For more information on what kind of internet is right for your smart home to help you or a loved one age in place, go to www.cox.com.

ern California and teach Tickets at Library Administration Offices, or onwildfire preparedness. line at eventbrite.com/e/ s i mply- s uc c u le nt s - t ic kDOWLOAD THOSE E-BOOKS For Learn how to download ets-58757184320. e-books from 1 to 2 p.m. May more information, visit 17, at the Oceanside Public oplfriends.org or oceansLibrary, Mission Branch idepubliclibrary.org. Community Room, 3861-B Mission Ave, Oceanside. ENDANGERED SPECIES EVENT This free program is sponBuena Vista Audubon sored by the Friends of the Society and Preserve CalaOceanside Public Library vera are sponsoring an Enand is open to the public. dangered Species Day and For more information, visit open house from 10 a.m. to oceansidepubliclibrary.org 2 p.m. May 18 at the Buena or call (760) 435-5600. Vista Audubon Nature Center, 2202 S. Coast Highway, Oceanside. Activities for children of all ages: nature GARDENS FREE FOR MILITARY journals, seed “mudders,” From May 18 through lagoon dip, a scavenger Labor Day, Sept. 2, the San hunt and more. Diego Botanic Garden at 230 Quail Gardens Drive, VOICES FOR CHILDREN Encinitas, offers free adVoices for Children’s mission for active-duty U.S. eighth annual Wine, Wommilitary and up to five im- en & Shoes will be held mediate family members. from 1 to 4 p.m. May 18, on the Rooftop Deck of the Del Mar Plaza, 1555 CamiWILDCAT RUN There’s fun for the no Del Mar, Del Mar. The whole family at the Wild- afternoon party, featurcat Run Car Show, from ing fashion, fine wine, and 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 18 at philanthropy, will benefit El Camino High School, Voices for Children and its 400 Rancho Del Oro Drive, Court Appointed Special Oceanside. Free parking Advocate (CASA) program. and admission. Pancake Tickets $250. Call (858) breakfast, vendors, food 598-2271 or visit winewombooths, prize raffles, silent enandshoes@speakupnow. auction, entertainment, org. and more than 200 cars and trucks on display. If you have a car you’d like to show, visit ecwildcatfoun- FAMILY DAY AT THE RANCH dation.org or register day of Bring the family to show. Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 19 at The Heritage Ranch, 450 Quail SUCCULENT DISPLAY The Friends of the Gardens Drive, Encinitas. Oceanside Public library Adults $5, with all children will host a “Simply Succu- 12-and-under free. Activilent” event from 1 to 4 p.m. ties will include Olivenhain May 18 at the El Corazon 4H petting zoo, arts and Senior Center, 3302 Senior crafts, DJ music, scavenger Drive, Oceanside. Cost is hunt, face painting, games $40 for a complimentary and visitors from the Enciglass of champagne, light nitas Fire Department, plus refreshments, and a small TURN TO CALENDAR ON A22 succulent to take home.

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M arketplace News Consignment Classics — a better way to buy and sell home furnishings Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

ENCINITAS — It’s Friday afternoon, and plenty of activity is happening inside Consignment Classics. Families, friends and couples of all ages are perusing the aisles of the showroom. And with an expansive 20,000 square feet, there is indeed the space to hold something for everyone. Consignment Classics has been an Encinitas staple for nearly 15 years, and it’s easy to see why. Those looking to fill their homes or even just find that perfect missing piece are likely to find what they are looking for at a price point they can afford. In addition to their main storefront, they also have a 4000 square foot décor showroom located right across the driveway that’s filled with a constantly changing selection of unique items. On some

days, they bring in more than 500 new pieces, so you’re always sure to find something that fits your style. Furniture for every room, from new to vintage and mid-century, is just the beginning. The showroom is also adorned with rugs, sconces, art and jewelry. Customers can, and often do, spend hours treasure hunting with friends. Items range from new to gently used, and the staff takes great care to ensure that every item is chosen and inspected carefully. For those looking to downsize, the back of Consignment Classics is the place to go. Customers can bring their consignments in daily between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., no appointment is necessary. They also accept full and

CONSIGNMENT CLASSICS has furniture for every room, from new to vintage and mid-century, and that’s just the beginning. Courtesy photo

tiave to estate sales that are partial estates. If you want to consignmentclassics.net. Many Rancho Santa Fe prohibitted in their commusave yourself a trip, you can send photos of your items for residents choose Consign- nity. The decision is easy givconsideration to encinitas@ ment Classics as an altern- en the convenient location, as

well as the ability to consign everything from furniture to fine jewelry. So how does consignment work? Once your item has been accepted, you sign a contract that earns you 50% of the consigned selling price. If your item doesn’t sell after 30 days, the sale price may be discounted. It’s a simple way to unload unneeded items without any hassle, let the staff at Consignment Classics do the work for you! As one employee said, “Once people realize it’s here, they ask ‘why would you shop anywhere else?’” Consignment Classics is located at 201-D S. El Camino Real in Encinitas. For more information and other San Diego locations, call (760) 635-0730 or visit consignmentclassics.net.

Mixing business with pleasure works for local moms REGION — Many people advise not to mix business with pleasure, but one group of entrepreneurs are having the time of their lives doing just that. Julie Silva, Amy Rocker, Mary Smylie and Maria Lucian are four local moms who share a passion for not only selling high-quality CBD products and helping people improve their lives, but also for adventure. The group realized a perfect way to balance hard work and fun and the Millionaire Adventure Club was born. “All four of us are independent advocates for Green Compass, a CBD company established by sixth-generation farmers with deep-rooted values,” Silva said. “We are passionate about self-care. Having met at the gym we are constantly sharing with

each other ways to better our lives. We are firm believers in the health benefits of CBD, Green Compass’ high quality products, and in the power of getting out there and having a good time.” The CBD industry is exploding because of the many health benefits it provides, and Rocker is proud to represent a company that has the highest standards for its products. “Green Compass offers full spectrum extracts, refined isolates and topical creams,” she said. “Our products can be used to treat anxiety and pain, help with sleep and about a thousand other things.” Quality in the products they sell is equally important to quality of life. “We started LOCAL MOMS love adventure but also share a passion for helping people improve their lives. the Millionaire Adventure Courtesy photo Club as a way to live life to the fullest and explore the to offer,” Maria said. “We’ve Chip Rock and attended the yoga on a yacht! The group fun activities San Diego has been skydiving, hiked Potato Lakeside Rodeo. Next up is has grown to about 25 people

friendships through various social activities, will hold a meeting and pottortillas, shave ice, a bake luck at Las Brisas Pacificas Clubhouse, San Marcos on sale and beverages. May 19. Reservations are necessary at (858) 674FUN RUN IN VISTA North County San Di- 4324. ego based Vista Community Clinic (VCC) will be holding its second annual charity fun run/walk ne SUMMER CAMP FUN The city of San MarMay 19 at South Ponto Beach in Carlsbad. The 5k cos is offering specialized fun run/walk event will half-day camps for chilbegin with registration dren ages 5 to 17 that will at 7 a.m., and will benefit run for one week from 9 the health center directly. a.m. to noon, or from 1 to Registration for the event 4 p.m. Camps include sciis $30 per adult, $10 for ence, technology, sports, children 6-12, and free for dance, art and cooking kids 5 and under. All ages programs, with indoor are welcome to run, walk, camps held in the San ride, scoot, or skate on a Marcos Community Censhort, scenic course along ter, and outdoor specialthe coast. Dogs on leashes ty camps at various city are also invited. Sign up parks and fields. Learn at http://vccfunrun.doat- more by visiting san-marcos.net/classes. tend.com.

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FAITH AND FRIENDS

The Catholic Widows and Widowers of North County support group, for those who desire to foster

with acupuncturist, herbalist and nutritional counselor Rose Thomas, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. May 21, at Georgina Cole Library’s Community Room, 1250 Carlsbad Village Drive. Admission is free; seating is first come, first served. For more information, call (760) 602-2055. BONSAI AND BEYOND

Bonsai and Beyond will meet at 6 p.m. May 21 at the San Diego Botanic Gardens, 230 Quail Gardens Drive, Encinitas. Call Cindy Read, (619) 504-5591. Remember to bring your plants, gloves, and imagination. Extra plants are appreciated.

LEARN TO LEAD

Carlsbad Educational Foundation hosts “Learning to Lead,” from 6:30 to 9 p.m. May 21 at the Dove Library’s Schulman Auditorium. Sponsored by CEF’s Student Leadership BEAT THE STRESS Council, the program is Learn how to live your led by 40 high school stubest life at “Stress Less!” dents from Sage Creek and

MAY 21

Carlsbad High Schools to cials.htm. provide a platform for local leaders to share important life, career and leadership lessons. OY VAY! “Yiddish for BeginGET MEDICARE LOWDOWN ners” a six-class series, Learn the facts about focused on conversationMedicare in a free work- al Yiddish will be held at shop for those who are 2:15 p.m. starting May 23. turning 65 or retiring. at Cost: $70 for the whole se6:30 p.m. May 21 at the ries. $15 for individual sesCarmel Valley Branch sion. The lessons will inLibrary Community clude everyday greetings, Room,
3919 Townsgate common idioms, and the Drive,
San Diego. Register very basics of grammar, at sharp.com/citywellness. plus some Yiddish songs. Sign up via e-mail, at rbiner@ampmrestoration.com or Jana at yaaana.org@ gmail.com. BLUE STAR PROGRAM The San Diego Botanic Garden is proud to participate in the Blue Star Museum program, offering WARRIORS’ WORKSHOP free admission to all acTickets are available tive duty, National Guard now for Alana Fairchild’s and Reserve members of “Sacred Rebels & Earth the U.S. military and their Warriors” workshop from families (card carrier plus 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 20 five immediate family at EVE Encinitas, 575 S. members), to say ‘thank Coast Highway 101, Enciyou’ to the U.S. military. nitas. Tickets $133. Call More information at sdb- SoulScape at (760) 753garden.org /military-spe- 2345.

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now, and we plan to keep going.” Green Compass is hosting an event at Cicciotti’s in Cardiff on May 16 from 4:306:30 p.m. “This is the perfect opportunity for people to learn more about becoming an advocate for Green Compass, hear the benefits of CBD, buy CBD products and join the Millionaire Adventure Club,” Smylie said. “We will have appetizers and a cash bar and a 30-minute presentation. We would love the chance to meet anyone who might be interested in joining us on our adventure.” For more information about Green Compass and Millionaire Adventure Club, Email: millionaireadventureclub@gmail.com Website: www.millionaireadventureclub.com Instagram: @millionaireadventureclub

Muslims begin observance of Ramadan REGION — Muslims in Southern California and around the world will mark the beginning of the monthlong Islamic holiday of Ramadan on May 5. During the observance, which lasts until June 4, Muslims fast from dawn to sunset, and engage in increased prayer and charity. “The fast is performed to increase spirituality, discipline, self-restraint and generosity while obeying God’s commandments,” said Hussam Ayloush, executive director of the Greater Los Angeles Area office of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. The holy month will feature community service projects and outreach to help those of other faiths get to know the Muslim community better, he said. — City News Service


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Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

Toxins — an often overlooked cause of chronic disease Toxin exposure has become a regular part of our daily routines. From inorganic beauty products to smoggy air to hidden mold, our bodies have plenty of harsh substances to filter out on a regular basis. But when these toxin levels become too high, our detox systems weaken. Dr. Ari Kasprowicz-Calhoun of North County Natural Medicine compares the body to a bucket. “We can fill the bucket with toxins, and there’s a small drainage at the bottom,” Dr. Calhoun illustrated. “If we’re filling the bucket excessively, that can accumulate to the point where our body can no longer handle that burden.” The most common burden-causing toxins are mold and heavy metals. This winter, heavy rainfall led to increased amounts of mold in local structures not designed to accommodate wetter weather. Mold exposure starts with allergy like symptoms of cough and runny nose, but may later escalate,

according to Dr. Calhoun. Heavy metals like mercury and lead can have a similar effect. Mercury is common in high consumptions of fish as well as older tooth fillings. Lead is present in homes built before 1978 as well as gun ammunition. Children especially are at risk for lead, which can slow growth and development and cause conditions like ADHD. “Lead is stored in the bone, so when someone grows, lead can be released in the blood at an increased rate when someone is going through a growth spurt,” Dr. Calhoun said. To help tackle these toxins, Dr. Calhoun has dedicated her life to naturopathic medicine, using science-based natural therapies to improve health and treat illness. People of all ages approach her for symptoms across the board -- some have a chronic cough or runny nose, while others may have neurological issues. First, Dr. Calhoun and her team will screen for toxins, then identi-

“We can enhance detox pathways without any sort of testing, but without identifying and going after the source of exposure, we are missing the boat,” Dr. Calhoun explained. Next up is the toxin extraction. Dr. Calhoun ensures the patient’s elimination organs are functioning proper-

houn said. Dr. Calhoun wants to help people understand the effects toxins like mold and heavy metals have on overall well-being, whether a patient is seeking help for a sickness that’s lasted years or simply trying to optimize general health. “This is not an area ad-

We can enhance detox pathways without any sort of testing, but without identifying and going after the source of exposure, we are missing the boat.” Dr. Ari Kasprowicz-Calhoun North County Natural Medicine

AFTER THEY HELP patients identify the toxins within their body, they can help identify the source within the environment. Courtesy photo

fy the ones causing problems. After, they help patients change their environments — for example, they may

send in a mold expert or connect a patient with a holistic dentist to replace a mercury filling.

ly, so the body can effectively dispose of waste through all channels. Then, her team begins procedures that pull toxins out of tissues. Some substances can be removed by taking a supplement. Heavy metals are treated with chelation therapy through an IV. “Once toxins are released from the tissue where they were stored, we can help aid normal detox and elimination processes,” Dr. Cal-

dressed within other realms of medicine,” Dr. Calhoun said. “Whether or not we’ve been exposed is not the question, but it’s how much is at play in our current standing.” For a consultation, visit North County Natural Medicine at 815 N. Vulcan Ave. in Encinitas. Schedule an appointment at www.northcountynaturalmedicine.com or call 760-385-8683.

‘Honor Walk’ raises funds for Encinitas American Legion Post 416 It’s said, ‘home is where the Heart is’ and come Memorial Day, Encinitas American Legion Post 416 is hoping the public will help to raise funds for a new building by participating in the post’s first “Walk for the Fallen.” On May 27 from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p. m., all are welcome to join the walk honoring those who have “served our country, deceased and retired from the military, anyone killed in action or those missing in action.” Each Memorial Day American Legion Post 416 hosts a barbecue, beer garden and live music event (held after the walk from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.) and this year has added the honor walk. "As we walk forward to honor our fallen heroes, we must remember that ‘freedom' is not free and that some made the ultimate sacrifice and gave all for

those freedoms that we hold so very dear to our hearts,” said Matt Shillingburg, United States Army Ret. Commander, San Dieguito American Legion Post 416. “I wish to thank all that walk for our fallen.” The walk will take place over two courses: 1/2 mile and 2-mile; each course starts and finishes at Post 416, between 2nd and 3rd streets at "F." Cost: $29 with 100 percent of net proceeds going to the new building fund. Register to walk or “virtual walk’ at: https://excelarace.com/ According to Schillingburg the San Dieguito American Legion was established in 1931 by World War I veterans as a sanctuary and meeting place to help them deal with the horrors of the war. “The San Dieguito (meaning little San Diego)

area spans from Carmel Valley through most of Carlsbad and inland to Black Mountain. For the last 88 years, the current facility has served veterans, family members and the community through charitable donations and volunteer efforts,” he said. The proposed new building will keep the original WWI barracks and add two stories beside the original structure with the second story serving as a C om mu n it y and Veterans Resource Center with full-time veterans service officer tied into

MEMORIAL

alized by the White Rose public art are also featured in the film, “Sophie Scholl – The Final Days,” a 2005 movie nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Joseph, the artist who created the installation, said in a November CSUSM press release that she hopes

the edifice exists on-campus long into the future. The university had to raise $4,600 to restore the piece. “I call it an iron vase,” Joseph said. “It symbolizes the resistance to those who would deprive people of their personal freedoms. I invite people to water the plant, to add life.”

the All-Section First Team. A number of schools have reached out to Ellis since Thursday, including UCLA, Arizona and Memphis, which many consider to be Ellis' likeliest destination. But Ellis said that he's not close to making a decision. “I haven’t made a list yet,” Ellis said. “I’m still figuring things out.”

Many San Diego State fans have taken to social media to implore Ellis to “stay home” and play for the Aztecs. But Aztec fans aren't likely to see this happen after the program accepted commitments from two experienced guards this spring: former Santa Clara University point guard Ke'Jhan Feagin and Trey Pulliam of Navarro Junior College.

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drums about how to respectfully represent aspects of this genocidal history and its subsequent traumas without disrespecting and revictimizing those whose humanity was so beautiful.” The events memori-

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He has had a storied high school career, leading the Buccaneers to the 2018 CIF Open Division championship as a junior, the same season he was named San Diego Section Player of the Year. As a senior, he broke his high school's all-time scoring record and was named to

the Department of Veterans cility for the next 100 years; everyone should come and Affairs. “Any veteran can enjoy this event.”Among the many new amenities, the walk into our facility building will have an and ask the veterans elevator to the second service officer, ‘What floor and the facilbenefits do I have as ities will be ADA a veteran?’” Schilcomplaint, and linburg said. “We’re Smart wired building a new fawith solar roof panels. Plans are in the complet ion of the design phase a n d expect to go to the planning commission in June. The planning process is expected to be 8-12 months before breaking ground and construction should take 6-12 months. Event Director Steve Lebherz encourages everyone to come out and show support or to join the walk. “My father, Capt.

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soccer club use of the field lights until May 8, 2020. If the city at any point does not approve the amendment, the club would be required to remove the lighting. Encinitas Express lobbied the city for nearly two years to install artificial turf and permanent lighting at the soccer field located adjacent to the Encinitas Ranch Town Center, which serves as the organization’s primary practice field. Currently, the rules governing the Encinitas Ranch neighborhood prohibit lights at the park, which the soccer club, of about 1,700 participants, says reduces practice time.

After nearly a year of delays, the city proceeded with installing the artificial turf and completed it in September 2016. But soccer club officials at the time said that without the lights, the lack of practice time could force the club to shut down. The lighting has proven to be more complex, as neighbors and residents previously questioned if installing lights would trigger an election under Proposition A — the city’s 2013 voter initiative that requires a public vote for major changes to zoning and intensification of land use — and whether the impacts of the lighting needed additional environmental scrutiny. City Attorney Glenn

Thomas B. Lebherz, USN Medical Corps. Ret., an OB/ GYN, served in the U.S. Navy for 26 years. I was one of seven chil-

FREEDOM ISN’T FREE. dren all whom were born on military bases throughout the U.S. Though he never served in a combat zone, everyone in the military system is important to the cause. It is said he delivered more than 40,000 babies to military families during his long career. There are 250,000 active duty, retired or family members in San Diego, we encourage everyone to support this event.” To register for the Honor Walk, or to purchase tickets to the BBQ fund-raiser, visit excelarace.com.

Sabine issued an opinion in March 2016 that a public vote wouldn’t be required as long as the field lights were below 30 feet. The City Council in October 2016 unanimously voted to move forward with the process of amending the specific plan that governs Encinitas Ranch to allow for permanent field lights, but Cambria residents — many of whom were among the subdivision’s original owners — protested the move, arguing that they bought their homes with the understanding the field would never have lights. This led to the November 2016 vote in which the council agreed to plant a tree buffer to shield those neighbors from the temporary lights.


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NATIONAL

NURSES WEEK We Love Our Nurses!!! May 6th - May 12th For more information please call: 855.222.8262 or visit www.tricitymed.org


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Gaspar to seek reelection

small talk jean gillette

Little ones require a big voice Jean Gillette hopes you will enjoy one of her earlier columns, in a sympathetic salute to all young moms today. have suddenly pinpointed my strongest weapon and tool possessed as a mother of young children. It is not a certain look. It is not hugs and kisses, the world-famous “timeout” or a spanking. It is my voice. Without a good, strong voice that carries well, I don’t know how you manage motherhood. I crashed into this revelation this week when a virus turned my throat into a sand pit. It is a child’s dream and a mother’s nightmare. Suddenly, I could not respond to the 1,001 questions and requests that my youngsters fire over their shoulder in a constant stream from the minute their eyes open until they drop off to sleep. I truly was amazed at how often my kids needed a verbal response. This steady stream of chatter had become second nature to me until I found I could not be heard. With no voice, you cannot get your children to look at you, or even slow down long enough to be caught. For better or worse, my voice has always been a major part of my persona. I achieve a volume, especially with my children, that is the bane of my neighbors and the envy of every fishwife and drill sergeant. I use it often and with ex-

Three challengers for supervisor’s seat City News Service

“The community has welcomed us with open arms,” Campbell said. “We can feel the enthusiasm and passion for our ice cream when talking to our customers. We look forward to being part of local fundraisers, supporting local charities, and catering various celebrations for our neighbors.” Touting a historical tradi-

REGION — San Diego County Supervisor Kristin Gaspar announced May 3 that she will seek a second term. Gaspar, the former mayor of Encinitas, is the only member of the current board eligible to run for reelection in 2020. Supervisors Dianne Jacob and Greg Cox will be termed out after spending more than 50 combined years on the board, while supervisors Nathan Fletcher and Jim Desmond were elected to their first four-year term last November. The an- Gaspar nouncement quelled speculation that Gaspar may launch a second run for Congress. She finished fifth in the June 2018 primary for the 49th District seat, a race eventually won by Rep. Mike Levin, D-Dana Point. “Using innovative approaches to government is important to me and serves as a catalyst for the private sector and nonprofits to get more involved,” Gaspar said. “We are changing lives by engaging the community, investing in prevention and working together toward solutions.” Gaspar represents the board's District 3, which includes parts of North County, including Encinitas, Escondido, Del Mar and Solana Beach. Democrats have lined up to run against Gaspar, a Republican, for the technically nonpartisan board. Terra Lawson-Remer, a former U.S. Treasury Department adviser during the Obama administration, Escondido City Councilwoman Olga Diaz and

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HANDEL’S ICE CREAM has come to Carlsbad Village Faire Shopping Center just in time for summer. Courtesy photo

Handel’s reception anything but chilly By Lucia Viti

CARLSBAD — I scream! You scream! We all scream for ice cream! Carlsbad Village is screaming with joy for its newest storefront, Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream. Celebrating their first State Street digs, franchise owners Marcus Weenig and Travis Campbell are “thrilled” to be selling the “world’s best ice cream,” in a com-

munity that “gives so much.” Boasting 175 rotating flavors that fill cones, waffles, pops, sandwiches, banana boats, floats, sodas, smoothies and sundaes, the window-only confectionary has been well received by residents and tourists since its April opening. As family and friends gather to “share memories,” the partners are delighted by the reception that “exceeded all expectations.”

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Fire Dist. Foundation to host debut fundraiser By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Fire District Foundation is readying for its inaugural fundraiser on May 18 at the Cielo Village Square in Rancho Santa Fe. The goal of the recently formed 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization is to provide the district with resources and equipment needed to protect its community members and firefighters. Funds raised for the foundation help bridge the financial gap despite the taxation residents pay. According to the president of the foundation, Jim Depolo, one of the primary THE RSF FIRE DISTRICT FOUNDATION is holding a fundraiser May 18 at Cielo Village Square goals of the fundraiser is to in Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo let people know about the

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*Reflects base pricing and is not inclusive of any applicable ocean view premiums, location premiums or preselected upgrades. **Brokers must register clients on their first visit to the sales office; no exceptions. ©2019 Van Daele Homes. Van Daele, Van Daele Homes “One Family, One Promise”, and “You’ll Feel Good About Your New Home®” are registered trademarks of Van Daele Development Corporation. Van Daele Development Corporation reserves the right to make modifications to floor plans, exterior elevations, features and amenities without notice or obligation. All artwork, renderings, floor plans and maps are artist’s conception and are not to scale. Models do not reflect racial preference. DRE#00974168

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“We have already granted monies for a drone to assess fire situations better and get personnel in and out of areas with a greater degree of safety, a detox sauna for firefighters after they have been exposed to toxic smoke inhalation, and a new septic system in Station 6,” she said. “We are hoping to raise funds for solar on station roofs so they can be more efficient, provide new, better equipment for firefighter protection and safety, fire engines where needed, individual station improvements, and increased educational tools.” In addition to raising funds, Depolo said the fundraiser is a chance for residents to meet while learning more about the foundation and what it does. “This event is to spread the world that we exist, and we are here to help,” he said. Sage Bleu Catering will provide the hors d'oeuvres for the event, and there will also be musical entertainment. “This event is an opportunity to make a difference in your community while providing support for our brave men and women that support us in medical emergencies and fire suppression,” Baumgartner said. “We hope to see you there.” The Rancho Santa Fe Fire District Foundation fundraiser will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. May 18 at the Cielo Village Square, 18029 Calle Ambiente in Rancho Santa Fe. To learn more about the event, or to RSVP, call (760) 703-3994 or visit https://www.rsffirefoundation.org/

Three UCSD professors elected to National Academy of Sciences

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nonprofit and its mission. “Those who attend will learn that there is a foundation available in the community that supports our six fire stations within our 50 square mile district — it’s a lot bigger than people realize,” Depolo said. “We are working together for the good of our community and our fire department.” Depolo said the general population is surprised to learn that the fire department needs additional funding and thinks it is all is covered through taxes. “The ability to have these extra funds to do more is in everyone’s best interest,” he said. Bonita Baumgartner, who serves as secretary of the foundation, said she is looking forward to getting the word out that the foundation is up and running and supporting the brave men and women in the Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District. Baumgartner said the district serves more than just Rancho Santa Fe. Its other areas include 4S Ranch, Santa Fe Valley, Bernardo Lake Estates, Bernardo Pt., The Summit of Rancho Bernardo, Fairbanks Ranch, Whispering Palms, Del Mar Country Club, Rancho Santa Fe Farms, Rancho Santa Fe Lakes, Santa Fe Sur, Rancho Farms Estates, Del Rayo Estates, Montecito Rancho Santa Fe, Sun Valley, The Bridges, The Crosby, Cielo, Harmony Grove Village, Elfin Forest and more. Baumgartner said the foundation was created to raise funds for firefighters to be better prepared to protect the community during wildfires.

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REGION — Two UC San Diego professors and one professor emeritus have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the university announced on May 3. Biology professors Susan Ackerman and Bill McGinnis and Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor emeritus Jeremy Jackson were elected to the organization, considered one of the highest honors for American scientists and engineers to receive. The three professors are part of an induction class of 100 new members and 25 foreign associates. “Membership in the National Academy of Sciences is an honor conveyed only on top scientists whose discoveries have had major impact,” said Kit Pogliano, the dean of UCSD’s Division of Biological Sciences. “The collective impact of these three individuals is remark-

able and I am pleased that they have achieved the prominence and recognition afforded by being elected to the National Academy of Sciences.” Ackerman and McGinnis also are members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences while Jackson has received multiple awards for his work as an ecologist and a conservationist, including Harvard University’s Peterson Medal, the Darwin Medal of the International Society for Reef Studies and the BBVA International Price in Ecology and Conservation. With the election of Ackerman, McGinnis and Jackson, UCSD has 76 current and former faculty members in the National Academy of Sciences. Of those inductees, 23 are from the school’s biology department. — City News Service

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MAY 10, 2019

Who’s

NEWS?

Business news and special achievements for North San Diego County. Send information via email to community@ coastnewsgroup.com. EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS

MiraCosta College honored students Beverly Balderrama, Darren Vawter, Helaina Baes-Erbs, Oscar Fernandez-Paz and Thu Nhi Tran with its Medal of Academic Merit, the school’s highest academic award. Students are nominated by the teaching faculty and need to have a minimum 3.5 GPA in de-

B3

T he C oast News gree-applicable courses. ence anxiety, stress, anger Breadth, depth, and rigor of or depression. For more incoursework are considered. formation, visit https://bit. ly/2UtrMFz. COPING CARDS

A new playing-card sized active mindfulness exercise technique called, “My Coping Cards,” created by Carlsbad residents Jeff Holland and his wife, reached its crowdsource application goal on Kickstarter.com. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Infinite Hero Foundation and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). My Coping Cards are durable cards that contain positive affirmations, motivational phrases and activities for use when people experi-

MEMORIAL REDEDICATED

The Cal State San Marcos community gathered in solidarity May 1 at the rededication of its White Rose Memorial, which honors the brave acts of a committed group of college students who were executed for peacefully resisting the Nazi regime in 1943. The White Rose Memorial was rededicated on Yom HaShoah, which is Holocaust Remembrance Day. Designed by CSUSM student Cynthia Joseph in 2003, the memorial had fallen into disrepair

over the years. Last fall, the Jewish Faculty-Staff Association led a fundraising effort to help restore the memorial; over $5,500 was raised. BOYS & GIRLS CLUB GRANT

Boys & Girls Clubs of Oceanside has received a $738 grant from San Diego County Employees’ Charitable Organization to purchase two science lab tables for their new Center for Innovation. The center is a 2,800-square-foot addition that includes a Culinary Arts Teaching Kitchen, a Performing Arts Center and a STREAM (Science, Technology, Research, Engineering, Arts, and Math) Lab.

MAJOR GRANT FOR CSUSM

Cal State San Marcos is part of only six project teams in the state to receive a full award in the first request for proposals from the California Education Learning Lab, a grant-making program that seeks to close equity and achievement gaps in STEM and other disciplines. CSUSM was selected to receive a Learning Lab award of up to $1,038,000 over three years.

NEW DINING SPOT

Eureka!, an all-American concept, opens its doors April 29 in the new LIFT project in Carlsbad at 6021 Innovation Way, Suite 110, Carlsbad. Try everyday

“Hoppy” Hour from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. and 9 to close, Tuesday: Half-off Wine, Wednesday: Steal The Glass and Saturday and Sunday Brunch (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.) with $5 Bloody Marys and Mimosas. NEW IN CARMEL VALLEY

Ulises Vera and Cliff Arellano have associated with the Carmel Valley office of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage as affiliate agents. Vera, formerly of RE/MAX, comes to the office with 16 years of real estate experience. Arellano, formerly of Big Block Realty, comes to the office with 17 years of real estate experience.

Cooper honored for outstanding senior service ENCINITAS — The city of Encinitas Senior Citizen Commission, in partnership with the Encinitas Rotary Club, announced Sharon Cooper as the award recipient for the 2018 Senior Citizen of the Year Award and Service to Seniors Award. The award goes to identify and celebrate one who has selflessly contributed to the city of Encinitas as a senior citizen role model or as someone who advocates on behalf of senior citizens. Cooper has been hosting a dance every Wednesday, year round, for the past nine years, and offers dance lessons that have enriched the lives of senior citizens. The weekly dance and lessons are a wonderful form of exercise, while at the same time providing a fun, social experience. She spends a great deal of time securing food donations, creating playlists, coordinating dance routines, and offering friendship and guidance to those she meets. In addition to managing the dances, Cooper

SHARON COOPER is congratulated by her husband, Martin Cooper, on being honored with the Encinitas 2018 Service to Seniors and Senior Citizen of the Year award. Courtesy photo

takes the time to call participants that have not attended in a while to check on them and make sure that all is well. Cooper volunteers 35 to 40 hours per week serv-

Canyon Crest Academy seniors named U.S. Presidential Scholars REGION — A pair of San Diego County students were named Presidential Scholars on May 7 by the U.S. Department of Education. Canyon Crest Academy seniors Anne Liu and Michael Chen are among 10 California students to be honored as national scholars for academic excellence. The Department of Education named a total of 161 high school seniors to the 55th class of Presidential Scholars. The White House Commission on Presidential Scholars chooses each annual class based on their academic achievements as well as their demonstrated community service and leadership. More than 5,200 students qualified for this year’s class, according to the Department of Education. Candidates either qualified through their SAT and ACT scores or were nominated by each state’s educa-

tion officials. The Department of Education and the White House will honor the Presidential Scholar class next month in Washington, D.C. Each student will receive a U.S. Presidential Scholars medallion during the ceremony.

ing seniors and children in the Encinitas community. She is a board member of the Boys and Girls Club of San Dieguito Foundation and helps secure scholarships for Encinitas School

District children to attend Sylvan Learning Center. “She exemplifies outstanding volunteer efforts and tireless volunteer service to the senior community as well as the children in Encinitas,” said the award planners. “Congratulations to our award recipient who displayed dedication, overarching commitment, and demonstrated impact of those served.” Cooper will be honored at a city council meeting at 6 p.m. May 22 with a personal award, and a perpetual plaque housed at the Encinitas Senior Center. Additionally, she will be recognized at the Encinitas Rotary Dance May 22 at the Encinitas Community and Senior Center, and invited to participate as a special guest of the Senior Citizen Commission at the Encinitas Holiday Parade on Dec. 7. For more information regarding these awards, contact Christie Goodsell, city of Encinitas Community and Senior Center Manager at (760) 943-2251.

KOCT.ORG - The Voice of North County is a non - profit, live stream PEG outlet funded by the City of Oceanside and powered by Cox Cable. Since 1984, KOCT.ORG has produced and programmed the issues that directly affect our daily life, keeping us locals well informed & engaged as a continual voice for the North County community. By becoming a Friend of KOCT, you help insure the future of quality KOCT productions, an access to The KOCT Community Calendar, a dedicated airtime for submitted programming, discounts on KOCT production services and many other great benefits. Show your support and become a Friend of KOCT! Tune into to watch KOCT, The Voice of North County on Community Channel 18 and Government Channel 19 on Cox Cable in Oceanside or AT&T Channel 99 Countywide. Visit KOCT.ORG! Like us on Facebook @KOCTTV Follow us on Instagram @KOCTTELEVISION Find us on Twitter @KOCTTV And call us at 760.722.4433 with comments or questions. We thank you for your support.

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MAY 10, 2019

Vista High student nabs national photography awards By Steve Puterski

VISTA — What started as a hobby has now become a passion coupled with several prestigious awards. Vista High School senior Jonathan Olivares is one of 16 high school students to be recognized by the Alliance for Young Artist and Writers for his photography portfolio titled “Mi Vida Mexico.” With the recognition, he also receives a $10,000 scholarship and a trip to Carnegie Hall in New York City on June 6. By earning a national gold portfolio, Olivares also received the Maurice “Robbie” Robinson Vision Award from Scholastic, which is given to one student each year. His collection captures Mexican culture through black and white photos, a preferred style for Olivares. Submissions for the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers award numbered more than 340,000. Also, three of his photos will be part of a national exhibit touring the country for the next year.

ONE OF THE IMAGES of Mexican culture and life that helped Vista High School senior Jonathan Olivares win two national awards. Several of his photos, shot in black and white, will be displayed on a national tour. Photo courtesy Jonathan Olivares

“I was scared and excited at the same time,” Olivares said through a translator upon hearing the news. “I’ve never had an experience like this, with a prestigious award and schol-

arship. There are all these people watching me. I’ve never liked putting myself out there too much. People are going to look at me and think that I’m better than everyone.”

Olivares was born and raised in Tijuana, but moved with his family to Vista several years ago to pursue a better education and life. He first began taking photographs as a child at the en-

couragement of his mother. Over the past two years, however, Olivares has fully committed to his art and learning more skills from his teacher, Laura Olden. As a result, the Vista High senior has blossomed and become a force in his own right. “With a picture, people think you just take a picture,” Olivares said. “But there is a lot more to a picture. One person can see an image, but there is so more depth that you can capture. All the background that goes into a photograph.” Olivares said what draws him to photography is the depth one can capture with a single image. It delivers background, expression and interpretation on a different scale than video or writing. Olden, in her eighth year as the photography teacher at Vista High, said when Olivares first came to her class last year he was shy and reserved. He often struggled to deliver presentations, she said and adding the language barrier was a

challenge. But as time wore on, Olivares has become more comfortable and confident through his work. “He’s improved so much over the course of the year and his transformation,” Olden said. One inspiration for Olivares came from an assignment by Olden. Once per year, she has her students select a photographer to study, which she dubs, “Photographer as mentors.” Olivares landed on Manuel Álvarez Bravo, a Mexican photographer who is credited as having been one of the most important and influential Latin American artists in the 20th century. Some of Bravo’s work includes street life and culture, Olden said, which is the same avenue Olivares pursued with his collection. “Jonathan was drawn to his work and drew inspiration from his work for his own series,” Olden added. “It was drawing inspiration from them, but then making their own story and incorporating their own lives.”

SMALL TALK

their attention. It feels like pearls before piglets, but I have to keep trying or I will never recover. The really strange moments came during the weekend away with a close friend and her children. Fortunately, she too is a mom who knows how to express herself, so she got to express herself for both of us. Then I kept turning and whispering. “Tell my son to stop splashing his sister, please. Ask my daughter to stop running near the pool, please,” and so on. It was like a bad ventriloquism act. They would hear her, turn, look at me, see my scowl or furious hand motions, and finally, obey. Instead, I have let some transgressions, usually noted, just go by. The kids love it, but I’m not sure they realize it is temporary. They may be in for a cold shock when I heal. For now, I’m gargling frequently, picking my fights carefully and wishing I had made my children fluent in sign language.

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In loving memory of

Alex Nava

April 5, 2019

It is with immeasurable sadness that we share with our community the passing of our enigmatic and charismatic son, Alex Nava. He lost his eightmonth long battle with opioid addiction on Friday, April 5, 2019. He had called the Village Park area his home for all of his 24 years. Alex’s smile is what we will remember. He was a light in the world. He was authentic and genuine, with a greeting full of affection,

Ruthanne Gaertner, 83 Oceanside April 27, 2019 John Lee Walters, 70 Oceanside April 30, 2019

and his smile and goofiness will remain with us. It is our hope that Alex’s light will help someone find their way through the disease of addiction and stay alive. Some of us will forever remember Alex as he stood outside of his childhood home wearing his favorite boots and Magic Girl costume. And then there were the days he wore nothing at all, except those boots. Alex leaves behind his mother Lisa, father Antonio, brother Andrew, and sisters Angela Morgan and Ariana. His Nava and Morgan families extend across the U.S. and Mexico. In lieu of flowers, the family is graciously accepting donations to contribute to continued expenses, and there will be a one-time donation in Alex’s name to a program to be determined.

Mark A. Roeder San Marcos May 1, 2019 Bettye P. Scribner, 92 Escondido April 23, 2019

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Mothers

What is a Mother? She’s somebody to confide in...her trust is always there. She’s somebody who is very special; who deserves so much. She’s a tear and a smile. She’s a warm and loving touch. She is always there to listen and to hear my point of view. She’ll give me her suggestions without telling me what to do. She gave her life in raising me and helping me to grow. She’s been there through the happy times and comforts me when I’m feeling low. She makes sure I know I am special and important to her. She was there through wet diapers, skinned knees, dates, first kisses, and the vows of love, “I DO.” She’s my best friend as well as MOM. We’ve cried, we’ve laughed, we’ve hugged. I thank you, Mom, for all your love! We proudly honor Mothers on Mother’s Day and every day!

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cellent success in the discipline of my children. It also allows me to respond to their every beck and call from upstairs or down. They don’t exactly stop in their tracks when I bellow, but it gets their attention more quickly than anything else I have tried. CROP I have never felt so .93 powerless as when I let fly a .93 shriek at my son, who was blithely ignoring me about 4.17 something, and managed 4.28 nothing more than a fine imitation of a strangling bullfrog. My sprinting speed has increased since physical contact has become critical for getting any message across. My hands are blistered from clapping, and I have remastered the fine art of the two-finger whistle I learned as a kid. Finally, I sat both children down, and reminded them that mom’s throat was sore and that I had no voice. They must not stand upstairs and holler at me, expecting the usual audible response. They must watch me more closely when we are out to know if I need VOLUNTEER

Jean Gillette is a freelance writer who rarely needs a megaphone. Contact her at jean@coastnewsgroup.com.

JOIN THE NORTH COASTAL SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT SENIOR VOLUNTEER PATROL

The Senior Volunteer Patrol of the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station performs home vacation security checks, assists with traffic control, enforces disabled parking regulations, patrols neighborhoods, schools, parks and shopping centers and visits homebound seniors who live alone for the communities of Encinitas, Solana Beach, Del Mar.& portions of the county’s unincorporated areas. Volunteers must be at least age 50, be in good health, pass a background check, have auto insurance & a valid California driver’s license. Training includes a two week academy plus training patrols. The minimum commitment is 24 hours per month, & attendance at a monthly meeting. Interested parties should call (760) 966-3579 to arrange an information meeting.


MAY 10, 2019

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T he C oast News

Nonprofits partner for RSF home tour By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Historical Society and The Rancho Santa Fe Garden Club have joined forces for a one-of-akind home and garden tour on May 11. Open air trollies will take guests on an adventure and an inside peek into four exclusive Rancho Santa Fe estates for its debut event, Architecture in Bloom. Co-chairing the event are Norma Nelson-Wiberg of the Rancho Santa Fe Historical Society and Rancho Santa Fe Garden Club Executive Director Thora Guthrie. Funds raised for the day will benefit local nonprofits. According to Nelson-Wiberg, the partnership

between both nonprofits allows visitors to tour both the homes and gardens with interior and exterior docents to point out the unique qualities of each home in the tour while showcasing the diversity in Rancho Santa Fe. “It’s wonderful to have the ability to share the rich history we have in Rancho Santa Fe along with the exquisite gardens that will delight all of our patrons for a pleasurable day,” said Nelson-Wiberg, adding live music will be performed at each home. Guthrie added that one of the estates on the tour was designed by renowned architect Cliff May, which highlights a mid-century modern

home. Before guests embark on the Architecture in Bloom tour, they will first gather at The Garden Club property where they can peruse an arts and crafts marketplace while visiting specific stations for foods and beverages. After visiting each estate, patrons return to home base at The Garden Club and await another trolley for the next tour. Guthrie said Architecture in Bloom is a wonderful concept because The Garden Club and Historical Society are combining their tours which has never been done before. Each has had its own specific tour, but the events have evolved in 2019 uniting

both. “These homes on the tour are gorgeous with extensive gardens. The gardens are theme based depending on the style of the home.” Guthrie said. “This event is going to be a funfilled day with lots of things to do including touring these luxurious homes and visiting our array of vendors at the marketplace.” Architecture in Bloom will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 11. Ticket prices are $50 per person and can be purchased online at RSFGardenClub.org or the day of the event at The Garden Club located at RSF GARDEN CLUB executive director Thora Guthrie is co17025 Avenida De Acacias in chair of the May 11 home and garden tour in Rancho Santa Rancho Santa Fe. Fe. Photo by Christina Macone-Greene

Gun-shaped bong leads to arrest at downtown hotel REGION — A man caused a scare in downtown San Diego on May 7 when he allegedly waved what looked like an assault-style rifle out the window of a hotel room, but the purported weapon turned out to be a bong. Officers were patrolling the trolley line about 6:30 p.m. in the area of Park Boulevard and Market Street when someone approached and told them a suspect had brandished an assault-style rifle at them from a thirdfloor window of the Palms Hotel at 509 Park Blvd., according to San Diego Police Department Capt. Mike Holden. Officers cordoned off the area, halted trolley traffic and went to the room at the residential hotel where the alleged brandishing oc-

curred, Holden said. They ordered the occupants out of the room and detained a man and a woman, Holden said. A search of the premises turned up a gold-colored replica firearm that looked like a smaller version of an AR-15 rifle but was actually a bong that can be used for smoking marijuana, according to Holden, who said the item was found in a refrigerator. The man, who is in his early 20s, will be booked on suspicion of exhibiting a replica firearm in a threatening manner, Holden said. His name was not immediately available. The woman was released, Holden said. — City News Service

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T he C oast News LEGALS

Coast News legals continued from page A19 Web site www.elitepostandpub. com, using the file number assigned to this case 1955344. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 4/26/2019 Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (714) 8489272 www.elitepostandpub. com Michael Busby, Trustee Sale Officer This office is enforcing a security interest of your creditor. To the extent that your obligation has been discharged by a bankruptcy court or is subject to an automatic stay of bankruptcy, this notice is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a demand for payment or any attempt to collect such obligation EPP 28807 Pub Dates 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/2019 CN 23185 T.S. No. 19-55356 A P N : 219-074-16-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 8/10/2016. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for

LEGALS

LEGALS

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the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: DAVID W. HUGHES, A SINGLE MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP Deed of Trust recorded 8/12/2016, as Instrument No. 2016-0413978, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 5/24/2019 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Entrance of the East County Regional Center, East County Regional Center, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $402,345.90 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 3629 9TH STREET SAN MARCOS, CA 92078 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 219-074-16-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee

sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 2802832 or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the file number assigned to this case 19-55356. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 4/23/2019 Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 8487920 For Sale Information: (800) 280-2832 www.auction. com Michael Busby, Trustee Sale Officer This office is enforcing a security interest of your creditor. To the extent that your obligation has been discharged by a bankruptcy court or is subject to an automatic stay of bankruptcy, this notice is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a demand for payment or any attempt to collect such obligation EPP 28768 Pub Dates 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/2019 CN 23184

CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $480,963.81 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1409 DIVISION STREET OCEANSIDE, California 92054 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 150-241-0200 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 848-9272 or visit this Internet Web site www.elitepostandpub. com, using the file number assigned to this case 1851293. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 4/19/2019 Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 or Sale Information: (714) 8489272 www.elitepostandpub. com Michael Busby, Trustee Sale Officer This office is enforcing a security interest of your creditor. To the extent that your obligation has been discharged by a bankruptcy court or is subject to an automatic stay of bankruptcy, this notice is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a demand for payment or any attempt to collect such obligation EPP 28750 Pub Dates 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/2019 CN 23183

T.S. No. 18-51293 APN: 150-241-02-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/4/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: ALFREDO MURUATO, AN UNMARRIED MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP Deed of Trust recorded 12/13/2006, as Instrument No. 2006-0883471, The subject Deed of Trust was modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded as Instrument 2012-0065929 and recorded on 2/3/2012; and further modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded as Instrument 20150179664 and recorded on 4/15/2015, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 5/28/2019 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL

MAY 10, 2019

LEGALS T.S. No.: 2018-02180-CA A.P.N.: 128-360-12-00 Property Address: 11927 Keys Creek Road, Valley Center, CA 92082 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/19/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor: THOMAS W. CURRAN, A SINGLE MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 10/27/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0762559 in book ---, page--- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 05/30/2019 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY THE STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 355,271.97 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 11927 Keys Creek Road, Valley Center, CA 92082 A.P.N.: 128360-12-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the

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time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 355,271.97. Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2018-02180-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: April 19, 2019 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 9608299 http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 04/26/19, 05/03/19, 05/10/19 CN 23181

FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE 2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/31/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashier’s check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an “as is” condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: Cheryl Ann Myers and Phillip R. Myers, wife and husband as joint tenants Duly Appointed Trustee: National Default Servicing Corporation Recorded 01/12/2005 as Instrument No. 2005-0029832 (or Book, Page) of the Official Records of San Diego County, California. Date of Sale: 05/24/2019 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the entrance to the East County Regional Center by statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $930,970.79 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 793 Trailside Place, San Marcos, CA 92078-6907 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The requirements of California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b)/2923.55(c) were fulfilled when the Notice of Default was recorded. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. No. 18-20975-SP-CA Title No. 180558935-CA-VOI A.P.N. 222-631-07-00 ATTENTION RECORDER: THE


MAY 10, 2019

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highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-7302727 or visit this Internet Web www.ndscorp.com/sales, site using the file number assigned to this case 18-20975-SPCA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 04/18/2019 National Default Servicing Corporation c/o Tiffany and Bosco, P.A., its agent, 1455 Frazee Road, Suite 820 San Diego, CA 92108 Toll Free Phone: 888-264-4010 Sales Line 714-730-2727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com Rachael Hamilton, Trustee Sales Representative A-4691524 04/26/2019, 05/03/2019, 05/10/2019 CN 23159

TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 08/01/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor: Michelle Heil, A Married Woman as Her Sole and Separate Property Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 08/15/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0578490 in book ---, page--- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 06/03/2019 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY THE STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 588,272.59 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 527 Chinquapin Avenue, Carlsbad, CA 92008 A.P.N.: 206-101-16-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by

said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 588,272.59. Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2018-03023-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: April 13, 2019 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 9608299 http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 04/26/19, 05/03/19, 05/10/19 CN 23158

T.S. No.: 2018-03023-CA A.P.N.: 206-101-16-00 Property Address: 527 Chinquapin Avenue, Carlsbad, CA 92008 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO

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T he C oast News LEGALS ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-2019-00022988-CUPT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Natascha Paul filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Natascha Paul change to proposed name: Natasha Paul. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: On July 02, 2019 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 23 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Regional Division. Date: May 06, 2019 Sim von Kalinowski Judge of the Superior Court. 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23209

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF ANDREW J. WOLF aka ANDREW JOHN WOLF II, DECEASED SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO IN RE THE WOLF 1984 TRUST CASE NO. 37-2019-00022282-PRNC-CTL Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named Decedent, that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at Central Courthouse, 1100 Union Street, San Diego, California 92101, and mail a copy to MONICA L. WOLF MARVIN, as trustee of the Wolf 1984 Trust, wherein the Decedent was the surviving trustor, at 119 Via Solaro, Encinitas, California 92024, within the later of four months after May 10, 2019, or if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Kenneth G. Coveney Attorney for MONICA L. WOLF MARVIN, Trustee Dostart Hannink & Coveney LLP 4180 La Jolla Village Drive, Suite 530 San Diego, California 92037 05/10/19, 05/17/19, 05/24/19 CN 23205

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF LISA CRAWFORD Case# 37-2019-00021661-PR-LACTL [IMAGED] To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Lisa Crawford. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Linda Allard, in the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego. The Petition for Probate requests that Linda Allard be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval.

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Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on Jun 11, 2019 at 11:00 AM in Dept. 504 located at 1100 Union St., San Diego CA 92101, Central Courthouse, Probate. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Mara Allard (SBN 159294), Allard Smith APLC, 2103 Camino Vida Roble # D, Carlsbad CA 92011 Telephone: 760.448.6189 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23187

file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Mara Allard (SBN 159294), Allard Smith APLC, 2103 Camino Vida Roble # D, Carlsbad CA 92011 Telephone: 760.448.6189 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23186

que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta.Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): Superior Court of California, North County Regional Center, 325 S Melrose Dr, Vista CA 92081. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Steve S. Mattia, Esq., 343 E. Main St. Suite 202, El Cajon CA 92020 Telephone: 619.795.6632 Date: (Fecha), 11/26/2018 Clerk (Secretario), by P. Gonzaga, Deputy (Adjunto) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23182

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KELLY McCOSKEY aka KELLY WILSON Case# 37-2019-00019781-PR-LACTL [IMAGED] To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Kelly McCoskey aka Kelly Wilson. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Michael McCoskey Jr., in the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego. The Petition for Probate requests that Michael McCoskey Jr., be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on May 23, 2019 at 1:30 PM in Dept. 503 located at 1100 Union St., San Diego CA 92101, Central Courthouse, Probate. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or

SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE #: 37-2018-00059231-CU-BC-NC NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): RAAD MIKHAIL, DOES 1 - 10. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JOHNY ASMAR NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil. case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-2019-00020269-CUPT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Jayahna Mahal Navarro filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Jayahna Mahal Navarro change to proposed name: Jayahna Mahal Navarro-Jimenez. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear

Coast News legals continued on page B15


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Summer F un & L earning The THEATRE SCHOOL@NORTH COAST REP

SUMMER THEATRE CAMP 2019

AGES 4–8 

One-Week, 9:30 am–12:30 pm & 12:30–3:30 pm Jungle Book Jam . . . . . . . . . . . June 24–28, a .m . Dumbo’s Circus Celebration . . June 24–28, p .m . Toy Story Alien Adventure . . . . . . July 8 – 12, a .m . Robotic Rumbles Through Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 8 – 12, p .m . Captain Jack’s Pirate Parade . . . July 22–26, a .m . Many Mumbling Mice . . . . . . . . . July 22–26, p .m .

AGES 8–12 

Two-Week, 9:30 am–3:30 pm

Miss Nelson is Missing . . . . . . . . . . . . June 17–28 Rock Around the Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 8–19 Disney’s Cinderella Kids . . . . . . . . .July 22–Aug 2

AGES 12–19 

Two-Week, 9:30 am–3:30 pm

Shrek the Musical, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 17–28 The Hobbit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 8–19 The Addams Family . . . . . . . . . . . .July 22–Aug 2

Registration & Information: (858) 481-1055 | NorthCoastRepTheatreSchool.org

MAY 10, 2019 Summer Fun and Learning articles are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

Theatre Camps for ages 12-21 For more intensive fun creative skill-building for Tweens and Teens The Theatre School @ North Coast Rep offers three different two-week full day performance camps for ages 12-21. Students will go from the audition process to performance in a fast paced, fun, and creativity enhancing experience to present a one-hour production in just two-weeks! Director of Education, Ben Cole, says: “As a teen I always felt like the weird kid. I loved to read and be silly with my friends, but didn’t have a focus for all my energy. Then I found theatre and I realized everyone there was just as zany as I was, and I haven’t

As a teen I always felt like the weird kid ... Then I found theatre and I realized everyone there was just as zany as I was.”

Ben Cole Director of Education

stopped having fun in the theatre since!” Choose one, two, or even all three of the exciting options: Shrek the Musical Jr., The Hobbit, and The Addams Family Young@Part

edition! “Some of our students have a lot of theatre experience and want to expand on their abilities, and some are just trying theatre for the first time. Our experienced staff specializes with meeting these different needs and keeping our relatively small class sizes focused and active,” adds Cole. All camps focus on actor training, not on spectacle, and culminate in a showcase performance for family and friends. For full camp descriptions and to register, call 858-481-1055 or www.northcoastreptheatreschool.org or email Ben@northcoastrep.org with questions.

The School of Rock difference At School of Rock, we believe the best way to learn music is to play music. Through our performance-based approach to music instruction, School of Rock students are more inspired to learn, more motivated to excel, and more confident as a result. We combine weekly private music instruction with group band rehearsals in front of live audiences in a concert setting. Our Performance Program introduces teamwork and collaboration into music instruction by grouping students together to put on real rock shows at real music venues. Students learn musicianship and how to per-

Odd Files Florida! Police officers in Indialantic, Florida, responded to at least seven calls about a man disturbing the peace on April 7. Patrons of Starbucks and Sassy Granny’s Smoothies, among others, were startled when 61-year-old Thomas Devaney Lane started yelling, calling himself “the saint” and threatening to unleash his army of turtles on the community. According to WKMG, Lane went along with an officer to the police station, where he screamed at the dispatcher and pounded on the walls, but then left the building. He was located later at a 7-Eleven, verbally assaulting customers. As officers stood by, Lane called 911 and told the dispatcher, “I need to leave now or you will all be sorry you (expletive) with the saint.” Lane was charged with disturbing the peace, resisting arrest without violence and misusing 911. [WKMG, 4/12/2019]

was taking over the town, brides and bridesmaids celebrating bachelorette parties were confounded by the crowds. WZTV reported on April 25 that the influx of crazed football fans was cramping the style of several groups: “We come here to listen to country music, not hang out with football boys,” pouted a bride named Cara. “I’ll tell you who’s going to pay for this. My husband. No football next season,” threatened a bridesmaid named Cyndi. But a bride named Savannah was more Zen about the situation: “We’re gonna make the best of it. It is what it is.” [WZTV, 4/26/2019]

Running Out of Time Lukas Bates, 30, of southeastern England, dreamed big while running the London Marathon on April 28, according to Fox News. In addition to finishing, Bates hoped to secure a Guinness world record as the fastest runner dressed as an iconic building. His costume, the tower known as Big Ben in London, rose several feet above his head -- and that, it turns out, is what tripped him up. As The Way the World Works Bates approached the finIn Nashville, Ten- ish line, his costume got nessee, as the NFL Draft caught on the scoreboard

structure overhead. Finally a sympathetic race steward helped Bates free himself and make it over the finish line in three hours, 54 minutes and 21 seconds -- missing by only 20 seconds the record held by Richard Mietz, who ran last year’s Berlin Marathon dressed as Germany’s Holstentor gate. [Fox News, 4/28/2019] You’ve Thought of It, Too United Press International reported on April 25 that the Arizona Department of Public Safety arrested yet another driver using a dummy in the passenger seat to cruise in the HOV lane along State Route 202. “Don’t let this be you,” the department’s Twitter feed warned. The mannequin in this case was dressed as a woman. [UPI, 4/25/2019] Least Competent Criminal One way to assure a negative response to a job application is to lift a few items from your prospective employer on the way out. So it went for an unnamed 36-year-old man in Gillette, Wyoming, who visited a Sportsman’s Warehouse on April 24, where he paid for some items with a rewards card but also left

the store with some bullets and a pair of sunglasses. Two days later, the Gillette News Record reported, the man returned and asked to fill out a job application, then walked out with two more pairs of sunglasses worth $85. This time, workers called police, who arrested the man and recovered all the stolen items. [Gillette News Record, 4/28/2019] Inexplicable The Lankenau Medical Center in suburban Philadelphia was the site of a break-in on the morning of April 20, but it was the stolen loot that leaves us scratching our heads. Two men and a woman stuffed several colonoscopes worth $450,000 into three backpacks. The scopes are used to examine colons during colonoscopies. “This is not something that a typical pawn shop might accept,” said Lower Merion Police Det. Sgt. Michael Vice. “My feeling would be that it was some type of black market sales.” He also told WCAU that it’s not yet clear whether it was an inside job. [WCAU, 4/25/2019]

Summer camps are now enrolling. Call today for more information

form in an authentic rock show environment. Each season, students hone their skills by learning some of the greatest songs in rock and roll history. In our Rock 101 program, kids just starting out will learn the fundamen-

when you can just fake a trip to an iconic destination? That’s the service offered by Fake a Vacation, a Nebraska company that offers to superimpose you in a photo from a popular vacation spot, such as Las Vegas or the Grand Canyon, for posting on your social media pages. According to United Press International, they’ll even offer you some fun facts about the place you choose to help you make your trip stories more legit. Packages start at $19.99; no word on what it costs to get your dignity back. [UPI, 4/25/2019]

Awesome! Idahoans embraced the Big Idaho Potato, a 28-foot-long steel-and-plaster potato constructed in 2012 to mark the Idaho Potato Commission’s 75th anniversary. It’s been traveling the country ever since, promoting Idaho’s biggest crop, and the plan was for it to be retired this year, when Big Idaho Potato 2.0 arrives. But Kristie Wolfe had better idea. The tiny house builder has converted the sculpture into a single-room hotel (aptly called the Big Idaho Potato Hotel), reported USA Today. It Lame Why spend all that features a queen bed, two money on a real vacation chairs and a bathroom with

tals of playing a musical instrument in a fun and interactive group environment. Songs are chosen to build a strong foundation on a respective student’s musical instrument. Our Summer, Winter and Spring Break Camps are designed for musicians of all skill levels who play guitar, bass, drums, keyboard, and vocals. Honing music performance and ensemble skills in a fun environment, students work in a hands on atmosphere that includes learning the nuts and bolts of live performance, interacting with other musicians, Rock and Roll music appreciation, and a LIVE rock show!

a whirlpool and skylight for stargazing; Wolfe lists it on Airbnb for $200 per night. “It’s a way of inviting people to experience Idaho in a unique way,” remarked Frank Muir, CEO of the Idaho Potato Commission. [USA Today, 4/24/2019] The High Price of Vanity A “vampire facial” is a procedure during which blood is drawn with a needle and then “spun” to separate the plasma, which is then injected into the face. For customers of a spa in Albuquerque, New Mexico, though, the most lasting effects may come after a blood test. The state’s Department of Health is urging customers of VIP Spa, which closed in September 2018, to undergo HIV testing after two people were infected following treatment there. Dr. Dean Bair of the Bair Medical Spa said people should always make sure they’re going to a licensed facility for such procedures. “This is just the worst example of what can go wrong,” he told KOAT. The spa closed after inspectors found the spa’s practices could potentially spread blood-borne infections, including hepatitis B and C as well as HIV. [KOAT, 4/30/2019]


MAY 10, 2019

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Summer F un & L earning

Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

LAGSD empowering women in soccer on and off the field of play As the Women’s World Cup takes center stage this summer millions of young girls will be inspired by some of our Nation’s top athletes and will dream of someday representing their country as a member of the U.S. Women’s National Team. Meanwhile in Carlsbad, CA, LA Galaxy San Diego (LAGSD) youth soccer club has their own team of allstar role models on display for young female athletes to look up to: their coaches. The women of LAGSD are instrumental in delivering the club’s vision with twelve female coaches whose expertise spans from coaching the youngest entry level competitive players to elite level college bound athletes. “It’s important our female players have strong female role models,” said LAGSD Director of Coaching, Michael Duggan. “We are very proud to have 65% of our girls coached by fantastic female coaches who have played collegiately and professionally.” The club recently added Vanessa Valentine to their coaching staff to work with the Girls Academy teams and college recruitment program. Valentine attended La Costa Canyon High School and played Division I college soccer at Cal State Ful-

lerton. Over the past six years she has coached at nearly every level of the college game, most recently as assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Oregon State University. Valentine takes pride in her ability to relate to her players but knows her responsibility to them stretch-

HANDEL’S

“We love Handel’s quality and flavor options,” Weenig said. “You can’t find such a variety of flavors anywhere else. People try it once and often say that it’s the best ice cream they’ve ever eaten.” Training to learn how to make the “best ice cream on the planet,” takes place in Ohio. Owners learn how to wake up at the crack of dawn as every morning at 6 a.m. sharp, machines churn milk products to output up to 40 batches of ice cream. Fifty flavors rotate daily with 125 in tow during the year. Flavors include familiar favorites like mint chocolate chip plus seasonal assortments and unusual flavors “you’ll only find at Handel’s.” And toppings, syrups and sundries are doled out in “fistfuls.” Franchise owners are encouraged to send corporate new flavor ideas for testing. This year’s newbies included lemon pie, mud pie, and pineapple upside down cake. While Carlsbad may have its own future namesake, the partners love every flavor on the board. “My favorite flavor is whatever I try next,” Weenig said. “You just can’t go wrong.” The red, white and blue windowed store front once laid claim to a motor repair shop, a tactical repair shop and even a meat

CONTINUED FROM B1

tion of excellence, Weenig and Campbell admit that customers have sustained Handel’s reputation from “generation to generation” from its truly humble beginnings. Alice Handel began serving ice cream from her husband’s gas station during the summer of 1945. Using homemade recipes, fresh ingredients, and fruits picked from her own backyard, the novelty refreshment captured the taste buds of many. As the frozen indulgence travelled as a business enterprise from its home in Youngstown, Ohio, the family worked diligently to maintain its traditional homemade values. Successful to this day, franchises are strewn throughout California, including Encinitas, as well as Florida, Indiana, Nevada, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Arizona and, of course, Ohio. Handel’s has even been recognized in notable publications the likes of “The Ten Best of Everything” and “Everybody Loves Ice Cream.” Made fresh daily, “one batch at a time,” with premium dairy products in machines exclusive to the family, Handel’s is dedicated to quality, a constant that attracted the partners into investing.

I was fortunate to play for one female coach in my youth career. She impacted my life greatly as a role model.” Courtney Drummond LAGSD Director of Player Development U12-U19

es beyond soccer. “It’s important that we are empowering these young ladies and building their confidence,” said Valentine. “They look up to us and see our confidence and our strength as female coaches in a male dominated profession and it shows them if they are confident and strong that they can achieve anything they

want.” LAGSD Director of Player Development (U12-U19), Courtney Drummond remembers looking up to one of her own coaches this way and now hopes to pay it forward to her players. “I was fortunate to play for one female coach in my youth career. She impacted my life greatly as a role model,” said Drummond. “My players mean so much to me. I hope I can make as much of an impact on their lives as they have on mine.” Drummond has been instrumental in developing an inclusive culture at LAGSD that empowers girls to be more than just soccer players. “I want us to always ‘be better’ in all aspects of what we do. I want each player that graduates from this program to know they always have a place to come home to. A place to train, a support staff and place where they can impact the next generation of players. At some point in her life every female soccer player dreams of playing for the U.S. Women’s National Team. Perhaps now, when they look at the role models they work with on the fields every day, some of those young girls will be inspired to chase a different dream in the game of soccer: being a coach.

packing plant. “The site went through many iterations,” Weeing said. “We literally transformed the building with electrical and plumbing upgrades required for our complex ice cream machines.” “While the building needed TLC, we envisioned bringing the old school feel of a classic Handel's to the Village,” Campbell said. The duo signed a multi-year lease with plans to “be there a long time.” “We’re involved,” Weenig said. “We’ve hired upwards of 50 employees including high school and college students, some working their first job. To be a part of the tradition of a good first job is to be a part of all facets of the community.” Weening expressed his admiration for the Village with its “local touches.” “Ice cream is a great collection point for locals to gather and see familiar faces,” he said. “We’re excited for tourists and locals to enjoy the Village’s new shops, restaurants and theaters. It’s great to be a part of the revamping of the entire area.” “We plan on being a part of the many great events hosted in Carlsbad,” Campbell said. “It’s cool to watch people congregate. Everyone loves to take a walk to get ice cream.”

North County death brings flu toll to 68 for the season; confirmed cases slowing REGION — The county's flu death toll inched closer to 70 last week, while lab-confirmed flu cases continued to decline, the county’s Health and Human Services announced May 8. The county received one report of a flu-related

death last week, a 74-yearold North County man who had additional medical issues. County health officials did not disclose whether he had received this flu season's vaccine. The county’s flu death toll now sits at 68. The county confirmed

SUPPORT FOR U.S. EQUESTRIANS

Olympic equestrian gold medalist Will Simpson, left, donated a rib dinner for 20 for auction as part of the April 26 U.S. Equestrian Team Foundation Spring Soirée, a fundraising event at the Pomponio Ranch in Rancho Santa Fe. The event, which raised more than $200,000, served as a benefit for U.S. Equestrian high performance programs, including developmental and elite, to ensure athletes and teams representing the U.S. have the necessary support to compete at the highest level of the sport. Courtesy photo

86 flu cases last week, down from 114 cases during the prior week. Confirmed flu cases have declined for six consecutive weeks since reaching a season-high of 692 in mid-March. County health officials have now confirmed 9,373 flu cases to date this season. “Flu activity in the region continues to wane, but it is still elevated for this time of year,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, the county’s public health officer. While flu season appears to be wrapping up, county health officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still strongly advise the annual flu vaccination for everyone 6 months and older, especially in demographics with a heightened risk of serious complications, such as pregnant women, people older than 65 and people with chronic conditions. Flu shots are available at doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, community clinics and the county’s public health centers. Residents also can call 211 or visit the county’s immunization program website, sdiz.com, for a list of county locations administering free vaccines. — City News Service


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Ask the Doctors

Dr. Elizabeth Ko

Dr. Eve Glazier

VAPING ON THE RISE, BUT RISKS AREN’T KNOWN DEAR DOCTOR: My grandson is always carrying around a little device that he smokes like a cigarette. It puffs smoke just like one, too. I'm a former smoker, and my lungs aren't in great shape, so I'm worried. What is he using? Is it safe? DEAR READER: Your grandson is vaping, which means he's inhaling an aerosol produced by the device you've seen him using. It's that aerosol, or vapor, that gives the practice its name. As for the specific type of device he's using, it's difficult to say without a clearer description. It's definitely not an e-cigarette; those look just like tobacco cigarettes, and you would have recognized it. E-cigarettes were the vanguard of vaping devices and first made an appearance in this country in 2007. They quickly gave way to vape pens, which as the name suggests, are slim devices that resemble a ballpoint pen. Larger and bulk-

ier in size are vape mods, which are modified (again, there's the root of the name) vape pens. These are known for their abundant vapor production. More recent to the marketplace is the JUUL, a small vaping device that's about the size of a USB drive. Whatever the specific type of device (there are many), most use disposable pods or cartridges that hold a liquid, or e-liquid, typically propylene glycol or vegetable glycerin. These liquids can contain quite a few other compounds, but at this time, manufacturers are not required to divulge them. When heated, the liquid produces the vapor that the user is inhaling and exhaling. Most e-liquids contain nicotine, along with flavorings such as strawberry, banana, chocolate or mint. The allure of those flavorings to young people has been particularly controversial, and the outcry has resulted in a number of actions at the state and federal levels to limit their availability. In asking whether vaping is safe, you've touched on a roiling debate. The general consensus is that vaping is safer than smoking cigarettes. That's because rather than the tens of thousands of compounds produced in the burning of tobacco and its additives, many of them toxic, the number of ingredients in e-liquids is limited. However, many teens

and young adults who would not otherwise have taken up smoking are finding the tech and the flavors of vaping so alluring that the practice has become widespread. It is estimated 20 percent of high school students and 5 percent of middle school students have used vaping devices, more than a third of them unaware that the product contains nicotine. The fact is that nicotine poses a real health risk to young people, whose brains and bodies are still developing. Likewise, the effect of regularly inhaling vaporized glycerin and propylene glycol is not yet known. The practice of vaping is so new that we have to wait in real time for the results of studies into the long-term effects. So far, studies have linked vaping to hypertension, increased heart attack risk, slow wound healing, lung inflammation and increased likelihood of moving on to smoking tobacco. The Food and Drug Administration states vaping is not safe for young people. We wholeheartedly agree, and would go even further to end the sentence after the word “safe.” Eve Glazier, M.D., MBA, is an internist and associate professor of medicine at UCLA Health. Elizabeth Ko, M.D., is an internist and assistant professor of medicine at UCLA Health.

COMMUNITY MEMBER OPENING ON TRI-CITY HEALTHCARE DISTRICT BOARD OF DIRECTORS COMMITTEE The Tri-City Healthcare District Board of Directors currently has one community membership opening on the following working Committee: Finance, Operations & Planning Committee – one open community seat. This Committee meets monthly to review Hospital finances, operational issues and strategic planning issues, including but not limited to budgets, operating performance and proposals for new capital. Applicants should have a background in finance. If members of the public have an interest in serving as a community member on the above listed Committee, please send a resume or biography delineating your experience relevant to this Committee to: Teri Donnellan. Executive Assistant Tri-City Medical Center - Administration 4002 Vista Way Oceanside, CA 92056 Your information will be forwarded to the Chairperson of the Committee and Board Chairperson for review and consideration. After consideration by the full Committee, a recommendation will be forwarded to the full Board of Directors for final approval/ appointment. All appointments are voluntary and do not include compensation. Community members shall serve a term of two years, with an option to renew the appointment for one additional two year term. At the conclusion of the second term, the community member shall not be eligible to serve on the same Board Committee for at least two years. It is preferable that a community member shall be a member of no more than one Board Committee at a time. The Board of Directors of Tri-City Healthcare District desires to ensure that its Committee community members are knowledgeable as to the issues that face the District. Therefore, only applications submitted by persons residing within the boundaries of the Tri-City Healthcare District will be considered.

02/2019

www.tricitymed.org

MAY 10, 2019

BALLET FOR CADETS

For the fourth year in a row, Encinitas Ballet Academy was invited to perform at the U.S. Army and Navy Academy in Carlsbad. Ballet students Ha Decker, Sydney Lupien, Ariel Asatryan and Allen Asatryan had the opportunity to perform for the cadets alongside professional musician Valentin Lysenko, from Seattle. The show incorporated various ideas, including getting the school’s cadets up and dancing, a brief history of Ukrainian music, and performances by four students. The school was presented with an award recognizing its service to the community for the second year in a row. Courtesy photo

Sense & Sensitivity by Harriette Cole

INEXPERIENCED BUSINESS OWNER WANTS NETWORKING TIPS DEAR HARRIETTE: I want to start a business selling body-care products. I have already made some creams and lotions and tested them at street fairs in my neighborhood. I want to take it to the next level, and I understand that networking is essential. What are some ways that I can start meeting new people and getting my products out there? -- Becoming an Entrepreneur DEAR BECOMING AN ENTREPRENEUR: Testing the market is good, and that's what you have been doing in your neighborhood. You should know that many small businesses start in that way. In fact, the beauty company Carol's Daughter was started by Lisa Price more than 20 years ago in her kitchen. She built her brand by first selling at street fairs and slowly making her way into stores. Ultimately, she got investors and sold to L'Ore-

al. The goal of an entrepreneur who gets financial backing is to sell and turn a profit. It happened for her, and, if you work hard and have a wise strategy, it may happen for you, too. What can you do to get further along your path? First, make sure that your product line is replicable and unique. There are many beauty products on the market. Why do you think people should choose yours over the others that are already out there? You need to be able to answer that question clearly. In terms of networking, join your local chamber of commerce. Contact the local office of the Small Business Administration to see what support is available for you as you grow. Find online sites where you can promote your product. Go to community board meetings and introduce yourself to local government and business leaders. Identify community bulletin boards online and elsewhere, and post dates and locations for your sales. As summer is approaching, sign up to sell your products at as many local fairs as possible. This is a smart first step for raising awareness.

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DEAR HARRIETTE: My 4-year-old niece is becoming more mature and is very smart and aware of her actions. She does not always listen and chooses to do wrong things for attention. Discipline is essential for young kids, but how much is too far? Do you believe we should spank our kids, or should we simply talk it out with them? My sister keeps asking me what I think she should do, but I don't have kids. -- Theories of Discipline DEAR THEORIES OF DISCIPLINE: Though I grew up with the occasional spanking, I am not a believer in that form of discipline. This is primarily because I do not think that violence begets positive behavior. Instead, it inspires fear, anger and disillusionment. Sometimes "talking it out" doesn't work, either. I recommend that a child who is not listening well and is misbehaving should have privileges taken away. Often that means no electronics, no TV, no video games, etc. It could mean using a timeout, where a child has to be quiet and isolated for a set period. With a child as young as 4, five minutes is often long enough for a child to have to be quiet. Your sister needs to develop a consistent strategy. If her daughter behaves in a manner that is inappropriate and belligerent, she needs to be reprimanded and then shown that there are consequences to her actions. If there are consistent consequences to bad behavior, she will learn to stop doing those things. Harriette Cole is a lifestylist and founder of DREAMLEAPERS, an initiative to help people access and activate their dreams.


MAY 10, 2019

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Bags & Baubles draws hundreds, raises thousands By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — More than 400 guests attended the ninth annual Bags & Baubles fundraiser benefiting the Face Foundation at a private estate in Rancho Santa Fe. While the numbers are still being tallied, it’s expected that the April 28 fundraiser will reach its $130,000 goal to help pets receive life-saving veterinary care. According to FACE Foundation Executive Director Danae Davis, Bags & Baubles is the nonprofit’s largest fundraiser of the year alongside its dog-friendly Golf Tournament which lands every November. “Our events make up over 25% of our annual income and provide us a huge opportunity to share our work with the community,” Davis said. “When people bring their friends and families to our events, they are spreading the word about FACE and the issue we are trying to solve — economic euthanasia. Our events provide an opportunity for those to get involved through volunteerism, and for everyone involved to have a great time while saving lives.” Davis described the event day as spectacular due to the perfect weather,

THE NINTH ANNUAL Bags & Baubles fundraising event for the FACE Foundation attracted more than 400 shoppers, and it’s expected that the event hit its target of raising $130,000. Courtesy photo

high attendance numbers, and top-shelf items. There was something for everyone at Bags & Baubles. “The first item to sell was a Van Cleef 18k Tiger's Eye Ten Motif Alahambra Necklace that was generously donated to us — it was beautiful,” Davis

said. “Most of our high-end brands like Judith Leiber, Prada and Nancy Gonzalez sold really well, but our vegan brands and accessories did really well, too.” Davis gave special thanks to the fabulous shoppers who helped FACE raise the necessary funds

for pets in need. Just this year, FACE has saved more than one pet every single day from economic euthanasia. Hosting Bags & Baubles is a team effort. Donors provided shoppers this year with more than 400 handbags, nearly 100 pieces of

fine jewelry, over 60 pairs of designer sunglasses, and an overflowing amount of accessories. In addition to the generosity of donors, Davis noted how 100 volunteers helped make Bags & Baubles a success. “We couldn’t have

pulled this event off without them and our wonderful sponsors who underwrote everything from food to event supplies,” she said. In addition to a shopping extravaganza, patrons enjoyed complimentary food and beverages donated by Hooters and Opera Patisserie. Opportunity drawings were also abundant during the day such as a Tory Burch packages, Kate Spade package, and Padres tickets. Davis said while everyone had a great time, it was even more meaningful that at the very core, people were there to help FACE save pets and support families. “Every day, we get contacted by distressed pet parents trying to save the lives of their beloved pets facing emergency medical situations who deserve a second chance at life,” she said. “These pets deserve to stay with their families that are fighting hard to care for them, but simply do not have the funds needed for a sudden, emergency treatment. We aim to save lives and keep families whole by avoiding economic euthanasia.” For more information on the FACE Foundation including future events, visit www.face4pets.org.

World War II Veteran passes away aboard Honor Flight REGION — A local World War II veteran’s body is scheduled to be transported to Michigan on May 8 after he died Sunday at the age of 95 while returning to San Diego from a visit to Washington, D.C. Frank Manchel was flying back to San Diego after spending the weekend in the capital courtesy of Honor Flight San Diego, a nonprofit that flies World War II and Korean War veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit the memorials dedicated to the conflicts in which they fought. Manchel was a technical sergeant in the U.S. Army during the war. Manchel collapsed and died during the return flight and could not be revived.

Frank Manchel According to Honor Flight San Diego, his body was draped in an American flag and two chaplains aboard the flight said prayers for him. Manchel was accompanied on the trip by his son, Bruce Manchel. “Frank passed quick-

ly and peacefully and the compassion and respect that was shown to our family will always be treasured,” Bruce Manchel said. “May he rest in peace as he is now with his other beloved son Jimmy.” The two Manchels and the trip’s other veterans spent the weekend visiting various memorials, museums and historic sites. The trip served as a miniature family reunion, according to Bruce Manchel, as Frank was able to meet up with another son and his 93-year-old brother while they were in Washington, D.C. American Airlines, which contracted with Honor Flight San Diego to fly the Manchels to Wash-

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fire captain and Palomar Health Board member Jeff Griffith are all running against Gaspar. In response to Gaspar's announcement, the San Diego County Democratic Party referred to her as a “Trump Republican.” “Kristin Gaspar can try to make voters forget that she’s spent the last two years supporting Trump’s outrageous border wall and racist, anti-immigrant agenda,” said party Chairman Will Rodriguez-Kennedy. “San Diegans rejected Trump in 2016, and we will make sure that voters know that Kristin Gaspar shares Donald Trump’s values, not ours.”

ington, D.C., will fly Frank Manchel’s body to Detroit, Michigan, where his body will be buried Thursday. American will also fly the rest of the Manchel family to Michigan for free to allow them to attend the service, according to Honor Flight. Manchel is the first to die on an Honor Flight San Diego trip, but six other veterans have died on flights that began in other cities around the country. “We extend our deepest sympathies to the Manchel family,” said Honor Flight San Diego Chair Julie Brightwell. “It was our privilege to honor this true American hero during his final hours.”

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T he C oast News

MAY 10, 2019

Food &Wine Belching Beaver builds beer, wine togetherness petition and the 2019 County Fair, go to thetoastofthecoast.com.

taste of wine

Wine Bytes

frank mangio

B When homemade is better than the box tastefood by Lynda Balslev

W

hen I was young, one of my favorite side dishes was rice pilaf. It came in a slim box with a portion of rice and a sachet of spices, dehydrated chicken stock -and goodness knows what else -- all set to prepare with water on the stovetop. The results were salty, addictive and aromatically flavored. My brothers and I would fight over who got to finish the bowl on the dinner table; one box was never enough. These days, I make pilaf from scratch -- and you probably do, too, without

realizing it. The principle behind pilaf is that rice, or another grain such as bulgur or farro, is sauteed to lightly toast the grains, and then steamed in a flavorful broth, along with a few aromatics such as onion, garlic and spices. When ready to serve, the rice is fluffed to separate the grains and prevent stickiness, and handfuls of fresh herbs, chopped almonds or chilies are added for extra flavor, crunch and color. You can choose to keep the rice simple or add the garnishes selectively to your taste. I tend to pile them all on, because rice pilaf always seems to bring out TURN TO HOMEMADE ON B13

elching Beaver is one of the leading craft beers in San Diego County. Sure I know, the area is loaded with crazy stories from the over 130 breweries in this region, some beer is garage made, others are billion dollar businesses. At least 115 wineries operate in the county. Neither wine or beer are treated equally at drinking and eating establishments … until now. Belching Beaver has been a little different in its fast-growing history. Their motto … DAM GOOD TIMES! Hospitality Director and Wine Sommelier Ralph Lizarraga and I talked about how the name Belching Beaver came to be. “Well, I wasn’t there but the owners had a marathon drinking meeting over a name for this incredibly good beer,” he recalled. My guess is they chewed on it for hours, finally said they felt like belching beavers, and it was a done deal. They are now in nine states and five countries, and locally they have five tasting locations and a production brew house in Oceanside. Lizarraga went on that “the beaver shows up in just about everything we do and offer, from small bites to large dinners and he’s always grinnin’ and laughin’ like he’s havin’ a good time.” The beer list never stops flowing from digitized taps that change daily. There are 66 taps in the Tavern & Grill, including 34 “Beavers” and the

BELCHING BEAVER Hospitality Director and Sommelier Ralph Lizarraga in the wine vault at the Belching Beaver Tavern & Grill in Vista. Photo by Frank Mangio

rest other brands. Beaver names you’ll want to try include Peanut Butter Milk Stout, Here Comes Mango and Phantom Bride. From burgers and Belching Beaver beer in the bar area, to comfy booths, decorative flame décor, and an executive chef with upscale entrees and lots of quality wine to pair, the grill side of Belching Beer Tavern & Grill will impress you. Chef Romiro Guerra gave us a quick tour of the menu. His top rated appetizer is the Fried Cauliflower, locally grown and organic. His Chef’s Special was the Bone-in Ribeye, fire gilled with potato and vegetable, blue cheese crust and house-made steak sauce. I paired it with one of their Cab beauties from Sonoma, a 2014 Stonestreet, on a commanding elevation in the Alexander Valley. Thanks to Lizarraga, his quality wine selections have earned the restaurant a Wine Spectator Award of Excellence. One more kudo… on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, guitarist Jimmy

Patton, none better in the area, plays guitar for diners inside and on the outside patio. See more at BelchingBeaver.com. Ramona wines score well at 8th annual competition

Congratulations to 10 of the Ramona Valley Vineyard Association members on their award winning wines, in competition in nearby San Diego’s Toast of the Coast County Fair competition. I was one of the founding judges in the first year of this event. Ramona is one of the few districts in Southern California where there is a trail of over 40 wineries for a day’s worth of premium wine tasting. Significant victories went to Woof’nRose for Best Cabernet Franc and Best of Ramona Valley AVA. The judges tasted 820 wines from the 135 wineries including wines from Napa Valley, Sonoma, and Paso Robles. Other Gold winners from Ramona included Eagles Nest Winery for its Picpoul Blanc white dessert wine and Speckle Creek for their 2017 Falanghina. For more about the com-

• WineSellar and Brasserie in Sorrento Valley San Diego presents a Famille Perrin Wine Dinner from 6 to 9 p.m. May 11. This is a nice Mother’s Day family celebration with wine from France’s Chateau Beaucastel from the Rhone Valley. Cost is $109 each. Club members pay $99. Call today at (858) 450-9557. • Country Line Dancing and wine sipping highlights from 7 to 8:30 p.m. May 11 at La Fleur’s Winery in San Marcos. No cover charge. Wine, cheese and crackers available for sale. Info at (760) 315-8053. • A spectacular Brunch is being served for Mother’s Day on May 12 at 20/ Twenty Grill in Carlsbad from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Start out with a chilled glass of rosé then the made-toorder omelet station and much more, all prepared by Executive Chef Julian Quinones. Pricing is $85 for adults and $30 for children 12 and under. RSVP today at (760) 827-2500 or by visiting 20twentygrill. com#reservation. • PAON Restaurant & Wine Bar in Carlsbad has a Scott Palazzo Napa Valley wine dinner, from 5:45 to 9 p.m. May 22. The food selections will be perfectly matched to the wines. Cost is $150, with club members will paying a discounted $120. Call for more info at (760) 729-7377 or check it out at eventbrite.com. • The San Diego County Vintners Association is holding its annual Wine Festival from 1 to 4 p.m. May 18 at Sikes Adobe Historic Farmstead in Escondido. Dozens of San Diego County’s finest wines will be poured with unlimited tasting. Also enjoy a silent auction, live music and exhibits. Many of these wineries have lately been award winners in international competitions. Tickets are $55 and can be purchased through www.Brownpapertickets.com.

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T he C oast News

Food &Wine

Newly opened Valentina blossoms in heart of Leucadia 



         

A

s much as I loved the Moto Deli concept of scratchmade, chef-driven sandwiches, it never really made the transition into dinner and evening hours. Given its killer location in the heart of Leucadia, and the now bustling   nighttime dining scene, a fresh concept to cater to that crowd was inevitable and happened recently with the birth of Valentina. Owner Mario Warman and chef/partner Alex Carballo have transformed the space into an elegant yet casual restaurant that feels like a more mature, yet still playful Moto Deli. It should be noted that many of the amazing Moto Deli sandwiches are still available on the lunch menu. That was good to hear, as they are still some of my favorites anywhere. The Valentina menu is eclectic, influenced by the styles of Mexico, France and Italy as interpreted by Chef Alex Carballo. If that name sounds familiar it’s because Alex pops up in Lick the Plate often bringing his culinary prowess to help launch some of my favorite places to eat in the area including Clara in Carlsbad.

 

HOMEMADE CONTINUED FROM B12

the hoarder in me -- and they do add sensational taste. So, before you reach for a box of pilaf in the supermarket with a long list of multisyllabic ingredients, remember that it’s really quite easy -- and much cheaper -- to make your own from scratch.

Homemade Rice Pilaf Active Time: 10 minutes Total Time: 45 minutes Yield: Serves 6 as a side dish 2 3/4 cups chicken stock 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon sweet paprika Generous pinch of saffron threads 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup orzo 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped, about 1/2 cup 1 garlic clove, minced 1 1/4 cup basmati rice



  



THE FABULOUS Steak Frites at Valentina in Leucadia. Photo via Facebook

The menu is simple yet obviously chef-driven with a focus on fresh ingredients and a playful mix of offerings. It has three sections, 1.0, 1.2, and 2.0 with prices ranging from $4 to $23, which is very reasonable given the quality of the food and the skill creating it in the kitchen. The 1.0 section includes some of the best values on the menu including some of the best frites I’ve had anywhere. These are obviously hand-cut and they are amazing. The Pulpo & Papas (octopus and potatoes) is charred with a Piquillo Pepper and is a simple delight.

The Albondigas & Marinara (meatballs in a red sauce) comes with ricotta and fired basil and is a very hearty starter that could almost be an entrÊe for one and it’s very good. Heirloom Tomato & Burrata was another standout drizzled with a high quality Balsamic. Gazpacho rounded out our samples of starters and their version of chilled tomato soup had pickled cucumber and was light and refreshing. Our 1.2 adventure started with the Mussels al Vino in a shallot-wine broth with herbs and some perfectly toasted bread for soaking up that delightful broth.

I could eat their Yellow Tail Crudo with curry-pickled strawberries every single day and it would never get old. It’s that good. And while Mac & Cheese is nothing new on menus, they do it right, serving it in a mini cast iron skillet with pancetta and grantine. Grantine is the crusty top layer that elevates a common mac and cheese to another level and the pancetta was a nice touch. Moving on to the 2.0 portion of the menu I was thrilled to see a simple Steak & Frites with Chimichurri as it is one of my favorite dishes ever. The steak came out

sliced at a perfect medium rare and those spectacular frites I mentioned earlier are there to soak up the juice. Valentina is my new local go-to joint for steak frites and I’m quite happy about that. Pescado del Dia is the daily fish option and on separate occasions I’ve had a really nice Grouper and Sea Bass. Preparations will vary on this but rest assured they will do it right. Gnocchi with a mushroom confit, ricotta and a brown-butter sauce was perfect rich and creamy yet not too heavy. Some dishes I will be back for include the Chicken Palliard and Cochinita Pibil, a slow roasted pork dish with origins in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. The wine list curated by one of my favorite wine guys Derry Van Nortwick who I met at Clara and is always introducing me to fun new wines. This time it was the Silvaner Wasem which is described as an “Old Vine� Rheinhessen from Germany. It’s a bright, citrus-lad-

en style that is totally different than most garden-variety white wines and pairs nicely with asparagus which can be difficult to pair with wine. Very accessible sparklings, rosÊ, and reds are all represented with five solid options of Pinot Noir including Klee from the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Local beer and hard kombucha is available on tap along with a variety of nonalcoholic options The Churros are quite good and Mamey ice cream was a new and delightful new discovery for me. This exotic silky ice cream with Latin origins has hints of tropical fruit with a creamy texture and orange color similar to sweet potato or pumpkin. So yeah, Moto Deli grew up yet it was a graceful transformation worth checking out. The menu will change with what’s in season and you can check it out online at www.restaurantvalentina.com . Valentina is located at 810 N Coast Hwy 101 in Leucadia.

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dium saucepan. Bring to a simmer and keep warm. Heat the oil and melt the remaining 1 tablespoon butter in a deep skillet (with a lid) over medium heat. Add the orzo and saute until light golden, about 2 minutes. Add the onion and saute for about 1 minute, and then add the garlic and saute until fragrant, Combine the stock, 2 about 30 seconds. Add the tablespoons butter, the salt, rice and continue to cook, paprika and saffron in a me- stirring constantly to coat

and lightly toast the rice, for about 2 minutes. Pour in the stock and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low and cover the pot. Cook, undisturbed, until the rice is tender and the liquid is absorbed, about 25 minutes. Remove the lid and fluff the rice with a fork. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes. Serve with the garnishes sprinkled over the top.

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T he C oast News

MAY 10, 2019

A joyfully sad week brings loss, celebration of life waterspot

chris ahrens

T

he week began heavily after hearing that legendary waterman Mike Doyle had passed away. Doyle, who lived in Encinitas for much of his life, was a legendary surfer; complete with his public statue gracing PCH in Huntington Beach. Next came news that former World Surfing Champion Sunny Garcia was in a coma. Things had to get better. Thank you Scott Bass for lifting our hearts. The Bass brainchild known as The Boardroom blew out 12 candles last weekend as it celebrated the surfing and board building of our favorite mid-’60s legend, Australian Wayne Lynch. As this year’s “Master of Foam” the show was built around Wayne’s progressive surfing and the egg-shaped board he began his journey on. His rising star was already lighting up the southern hemispheres when, at age 14, he shaped his first double-ended surfboard. A combination of this new design and reflexes that would make my cat

THE BOARDROOM recently celebrated legendary Australian Wayne Lynch, a bright spot amid some tough news in the surfing world. Courtesy photo

Henry look slow made the reached his first peak at age another major player of the “Shortboard Revolution,” Victorian goofy footer the 17. The surf movie “Evo- Nat Young. most talked about surfer The rest of us followed in the world by the time he lution” starred Lynch and as closely as possible, cutting down out longboards and vainly attempting to follow. However, while a few were able to match Nat’s power and speed, nobody at the time came close to equaling Wayne’s vertical moves, a trip from which we

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have never recovered. Humble, kind, articulate — everybody loves Wayne Lynch. One of the most popular features of the Boardroom is the “Master’s Shape Off,” where a field of surfboard shapers are allocated an hour to replicate the originator of the genre, which, as I may have mentioned, was Lynch this year. When I left the show,

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29-year-old Ryan Burch was still in the running, competing against his close mate, Australian born and bred Shyama Buttonshaw. Whoever said there’s too much to do and too little time could have been referring to the Boardroom. Turn any corner and you might run into the Surf Shed’s Bird Huffman, Pipeline master Gerry Lopez, Surfer’s Journal publisher Steve Pezman, surfboard coinsurer and pro surfing pioneer Randy Rarick, ocean artist Wade Koniakowsky, or painter of the coast, Matt Beard. Beard’s new art book, “Painting The California Coast Volume I” was prominently displayed at his booth along with his original artwork. This proved a conflict for Matt’s many fans since they were unable to decide between a fine canvas or one of his coffee table masterpiece. I am not covetous by nature, but those paintings and the hundreds of resin lollypops with their various outlines and fin combinations ruined me. It is in times like these that I am grateful to be independently poor as I was unable to finance a polluting plastic bottle containing a nickel’s worth of water for five bucks. Can we please boycott this nonsense? Thankfully some are fighting the plastic wave, like Arctic Foam’s Marty Gilchrist who is about to release new algae-based surfboard foam onto the market. As I wandered the isles one final time, I was left with a lovely reminder of the agony and ecstasy of the life aquatic as I viewed a Hansen Mike Doyle Model and mentally reviewed his fantastic life and quick departure. While we’re saying our final alohas to Doyle, let’s not forget to offer prayers for Sunny, whom I heard opened his eyes a few days ago. Come back to us, Sunny. Much love, dear friends.

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LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

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the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil. case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta.Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente.

Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): Superior Court of California, San Diego County Hall of Justice, 330 W. Broadway, San Diego CA 92101. .The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Joan T. Jackson, 5737 Alta Vista Ave., San Diego CA 92114. Telephone: 619.991.1118 Date: 07/31/2018 Clerk (Secretario), by J. Ledbetter, Deputy (Adjunto) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23154

at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: On June 18, 2019 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 23 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Regional Division. Date: Apr 19, 2019 Sim von Kalinowski Judge of the Superior Court. 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23162 SUMMONS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF LINN TOBY DELAPEÑA, Petitioner, and RICHARD QUIBRERA, Respondent. Case No. 19DR06201 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! Your spouse has filed a petition for the dissolution of your marriage. You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal document called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. Date of first publication: April 26, 2019. s/ Jeffrey M. Clayson, OSB# 183239 Attorney for Petitioner 80 E. Maple Street, Lebanon, OR 97355 Telephone: (541) 258-3194 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23157 SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE #: 37-2018-00038014-CU-BC-CTL NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): PATRICK LAWRENCE, ACCESS PLATINUM, AND DOES 1 - 20, YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): LYNNE ZIMET. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-2019-00019190-CUPT-CTL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Goulda Selene Angelique Aban filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: a. Present name: Goulda Selene Angelique Aban changed to proposed name: Selene Angelique Goulda Aban. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: On Jun 20, 2019 at 9:00 AM, Dept. 903 of the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, 1100 Union St., San Diego CA 92101, Central. Date: Apr 15, 2019 Peter C .Deddeh Judge of the Superior Court 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23152 Statement of Abandonment of Use of Fictitious Business Name #2019-9011140 Filed: Apr 30, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s) To Be Abandoned: A. Village Law Center. Located at: 1132 San Marino Dr. #201, San Marcos CA San Diego 92078. Mailing Address: Same. The Fictitious Business Name Referred to Above was Filed in San Diego County on: 08/22/2018 and assigned File #2018-9021431. The Fictitious Business Name is being Abandoned by: 1. Dennis P Kelly, 952 Knoll Vista Dr., San Marcos CA 92078. The Business is Conducted by: Individual S/ Dennis P Kelly, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23225

LEGALS Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011141 Filed: Apr 30, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Village Law Center. Located at: 1132 San Marino Dr. #201, San Marcos CA San Diego 92078. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Alicia M Skow, 1148 Whispering Water Dr., San Marcos CA 92078; 2. Dennis P Kelly, 952 Knoll Vista Dr., San Marcos CA 92078. This business is conducted by: General Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/01/2019 S/ Alicia M Skow, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23224 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011294 Filed: May 02, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. The Florence. Located at: 13480 Evening Creek Dr. N. #150, San Diego CA San Diego 92128. Mailing Address: 8910 University Center Ln. #400, San Diego CA 92122. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Legal Restaurants LLC, 8910 University Center Ln. #400, San Diego CA 92122. This business is conducted by: Limited Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 03/25/2019 S/ Nicholas Sanderson, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23223 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010920 Filed: Apr 29, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. The Fancy Penelope. Located at: 3747 Vista Campana S. #70, Oceanside CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Magda Conant, 3747 Vista Campana S. #70, Oceanside CA 92057. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 05/01/2018 S/ Magda Conant, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23222 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011476 Filed: May 03, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Swingworx Golf Performance. Located at: 778 Hymettus Ave., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Max Evan Allen, 778 Hymettus Ave., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Max Evan Allen, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23221 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011186 Filed: May 01, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Soul Voyager Studios. Located at: 1400 Loretta St., Oceanside CA San Diego 92058. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Shana Thompson, 1400 Loretta St., Oceanside CA 92058. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 05/01/2019 S/ Shana Thompson, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23220

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Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011147 Filed: Apr 30, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Sand n Straw Community Farm. Located at: 629 Mar Vista Dr., Vista CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Sand n Straw LLC, 629 Mar Vista Dr., Vista CA 92081. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2019 S/April Viles, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23219

San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Good Clean Girls. Located at: 1024 Laguna Dr. #14, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: PO Box 1454, Carlsbad CA 92018. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Ann Maureen McGrath, 1024 Laguna Dr. #14, Carlsbad CA 92008. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2019 S/ Ann Maureen McGrath, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23214

business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Steven Andrew Weber, 3592 Jasmine Crest, Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/22/2019 S/ Steven Andrew Weber, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23201

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011590 Filed: May 06, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. RoseBIZ; B. Anini Press. Located at: 875 Chelsea Ln., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Rose Business Solutions Inc., 875 Chelsea Ln., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 05/06/2019 S/Glen Medwid, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23218 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009903 Filed: Apr 16, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Moonlight Acupuncture. Located at: 230 2nd St., #201, Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: 1040 Cottage Way, Encinitas CA 92024. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Celeste Star Parke, 1040 Cottage Way, Encinitas CA 92024; 2. Jason Erik Parke, 1040 Cottage Way, Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Married Couple. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/16/2019 S/Celeste Star Parke, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23217 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010577 Filed: Apr 24, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Mickelson Capital Consulting; B. Mickcap. Located at: 301 Mission Ave. #209, Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. David Mickelson Insurance Services Inc., 301 Mission Ave. #209, Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 12/01/2002 S/ David Mickelson, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23216 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011260 Filed: May 01, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Hayward Bros Inc. Located at: 3250 Maezel Ln., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Hayward Bros Inc. 3250 Maezel Ln., Carlsbad CA 92008. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Louis Hayward, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23215 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011571 Filed: May 06, 2019 with County of the

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010993 Filed: Apr 29, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Ginger Road Skin Lab. Located at: 811 E 7th Ave., Escondido CA San Diego 92025. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Dog Beach Style Inc., 811 E 7th Ave., Escondido CA 92105. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Greer C Bohan, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23213 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9011315 Filed: May 02, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Edin Design; B. Liv Design. Located at: 1452 Spyglass Ct., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Jodi Smart, 1452 Spyglass Ct., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Jodi Smart, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24, 05/31/19 CN 23212 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010926 Filed: Apr 29, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Wellness Landscape Inc. Located at: 1534 Orangeview Dr., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Wellness Landscape Inc., 1534 Orangeview Dr., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/20/2019 S/Jason Franco, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23204 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009063 Filed: Apr 08, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Coast Auto Gallery. Located at: 6920 Miramar Rd. #321, San Diego CA San Diego 92121. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Homan Allen Anvari, 28877 Pujol St. #1525, Temecula CA 92590. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Homan Allen Anvari, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23202 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010366 Filed: Apr 22, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. ZDigital. Located at: 3592 Jasmine Crest, Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010822 Filed: Apr 26, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Your CBD Station. Located at: 3837 Plaza Dr. #801, Oceanside CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Abigails Medical Supplies Inc., 3837 Plaza Dr. #801, Oceanside CA 92056. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Abigail Newsome, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23200 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010848 Filed: Apr 26, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Weston Yards. Located at: 7428 Capstan Dr., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. John Keith Sherritt, 7428 Capstan Dr., Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/John Keith Sherritt, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23199 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010728 Filed: Apr 25, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Vivace Salon. Located at: 720 S Rancho Santa Fe Rd. #17, San Marcos CA San Diego 92078. Mailing Address: 4181 Kimberly Ln., Oceanside CA 92056. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Kalyn Sieminski Inc., 4181 Kimberly Ln., Oceanside CA 92056. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 06/01/2013 S/ Kalyn Sieminski, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23198 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009228 Filed: Apr 09, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Senior Care and Living Options LLC. Located at: 2642 Galicia Way, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Senior Care and Living Options LLC, 2642 Galicia Way, Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Ivy Garcia, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23197 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010838 Filed: Apr 26, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Rancho Realty Plus. Located at: 799 Hilo Way, Vista CA San Diego 92081.

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Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/22/2019 S/ Grace Mitchell, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23193

This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 05/01/2018 S/ Carrie Ann Moore, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23178

Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s) To Be Abandoned: A. Oceanside Debt; B. Oceanside Business Management. Located at: 4224 Oceanside Blvd. #H, Oceanside CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. The Fictitious Business Name Referred to Above was Filed in San Diego County on: 09/21/2015 and assigned File #2015-024526. The Fictitious Business Name is being Abandoned by: 1. Debt Doctors Inc., 4225 Oceanside Blvd. #H, Oceanside CA 92056. The Business is Conducted by: Corporation S/Michael J Reminger, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23174

Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Roberto Yanez, 799 Hilo Way, Vista CA 92081; 2. Dina E Yanez, 799 Hilo Way, Vista CA 92081. This business is conducted by: Married Couple. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/26/2019 S/ Roberto Yanez, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23196 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010116 Filed: Apr 18, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Pacific Drain & Plumbing; B. Pacific Drain Service. Located at: 1330 Park Center Dr. #101, Vista CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Arrow Pipeline Repair Inc., 1330 Park Center Dr. #101, Vista CA 92081. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Kevin Post, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23195 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010338 Filed: Apr 20, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. North County Web Services; B. Pin Point Local Encinitas. Located at: 1562 Pacific Ranch Dr., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Jonathan David Searle, 1562 Pacific Ranch Dr., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/08/2019 S/ Jonathan David Searle, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23194 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010373 Filed: Apr 22, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Grace Land United. Located at: 709 Comondu Ct., El Cajon CA San Diego 92020. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Grace Mitchell, 709 Comondu Ct., El Cajon CA 92020. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010660 Filed: Apr 24, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Evolve Baseball Training. Located at: 234 Chapalita Dr., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Kevin Timothy How, 1286 Discovery St. #124, San Marcos CA 92078. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Kevin Timothy How, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23192 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010748 Filed: Apr 25, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Bety’s Catering. Located at: 991 Lomas Santa Fe Dr. #179, Solana Beach CA San Diego 92075. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Jesus Aldaz, 411 S. 46th St., San Diego CA 92102. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/30/2018 S/Jesus Aldaz, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17, 05/24/19 CN 23191 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010410 Filed: Apr 22, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Dog Puck Toys. Located at: 314 Acacia Ave. #D, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Kelly Elizabeth Smith, 314 Acacia Ave. #D, Carlsbad CA 92008. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Kelly Elizabeth Smith, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23179 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009629 Filed: Apr 12, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Trove MarketPlace. Located at: 2832 #B State St., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Carrie Ann Moore, 7767 Caminito Monarca #107, Carlsbad CA 92009.

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009840 Filed: Apr 15, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. The Rob Fournier. Located at: 121 W E St., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: 208 W J St., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Robert J Fournier, 208 W J St., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/15/2019 S/Robert J Fournier, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23177 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9008668 Filed: Apr 04, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Sacred Mama Healing. Located at: 4014 Wooster Dr., Oceanside CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Jamie Linn Meekins, 4014 Wooster Dr., Oceanside CA 92056. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/01/2019 S/ Jamie Linn Meekins, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23176 Statement of Abandonment of Use of Fictitious Business Name #2019-9010441 Filed: Apr 22, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s) To Be Abandoned: A. Pacific Business Management; B. Pacific Debt Management. Located at: 825 College Blvd. #102, Oceanside CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. The Fictitious Business Name Referred to Above was Filed in San Diego County on: 10/02/2014 and assigned File #2014-026313. The Fictitious Business Name is being Abandoned by: 1. No Failing Inc., 825 College Blvd. #102, Oceanside CA 92057. The Business is Conducted by: Corporation S/Michael J Reminger, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23175 Statement of Abandonment of Use of Fictitious Business Name #2019-9010440 Filed: Apr 22, 2019 with County of the San

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010173 Filed: Apr 18, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Nido Plumbing and Mechanical. Located at: 2451 Bella Vista Dr., Vista CA San Diego 92084. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Pedro Nido, 2451 Bella Vista Dr., Vista CA 92084. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Pedro Nido, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23173 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010191 Filed: Apr 18, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. iAuto. Located at: 502 S Coast Hwy, Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: 60 Kingsbury, Irvine CA 92620. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. iAuto Inc., 60 Kingsbury, Irvine CA 92620. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Anthony Korona, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23172 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010201 Filed: Apr 18, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. GEMRIDES. Located at: 3850 El Cajon Blvd #A, San Diego CA San Diego 92105. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Indivision Inc., 1723 Lahoud Dr., Cardiff CA 92007. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 02/08/2019 S/Joe Miller, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23171

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LEGALS Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010047 Filed: Apr 17, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Garcia Wellness. Located at: 7968 Los Pinos Circle, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Eunice M Garcia, 7968 Los Pinos Circle, Carlsbad CA 92009; 2. Ismael V Garcia, 7968 Los Pinos Circle, Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Married Couple. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Eunice M Garcia, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23170 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009948 Filed: Apr 16, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. BG PhoDOGraphy. Located at: 166 Harding St., Oceanside CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Niccola Lee Gentile, 166 Harding St., Oceanside CA 92057. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/16/2019 S/ Niccola Lee Gentile, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23169 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9010404 Filed: Apr 22, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Angel Print; B. Angel Printing; C. Los Angeles Printers. Located at: 237 Luiseno Ave, Oceanside CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Printing CEO Inc, 237 Luiseno Ave., Oceanside CA 92057. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/15/2019 S/ Vladimir Medvinsky, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10, 05/17/19 CN 23168 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009855 Filed: Apr 16, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Sweet Nana. Located at: 6441 Goldenbush Dr., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Amai LLC, 6441 Goldenbush Dr., Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Jeannine M Davison, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23156 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009766 Filed: Apr 15, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Mystic Growth. Located at: 1778 Orchard Wood Rd., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Heidi Kristine Lebherz, 1778 Orchard Wood Rd., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/15/2019 S/Heidi Kristine Lebherz, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23151 Fictitious

Business

Name

LEGALS

LEGALS

Statement #2019-9009277 Filed: Apr 10, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Trendsetter Galz. Located at: 1314 Oro Vista Rd. #110, San Diego CA San Diego 92154. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Janette Uy, 1314 Oro Vista Rd. #110, San Diego CA 92154; 2. Gladys Mission, 2005 Costa Del Mar Rd. #603, Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: General Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Janette Uy, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23150

04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23146

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009128 Filed: Apr 09, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Thomas Tool Co.. Located at: 1732 Avenida Segovia, Oceanside CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Tommy David McDonald, 1732 Avenida Segovia, Oceanside CA 92056. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Tommy David McDonald, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23149 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9008214 Filed: Mar 29, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. The Karma Building. Located at: 1645 Village Center Cir., Las Vegas NV Clark 89134. Mailing Address: 125 N Acacia Ave., #103, Solana Beach CA 92075. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Jean Ann Balgresky Himshaw, 1645 Village Center Cir., Las Vegas NV 89134; 2. Dorrell Parker Hinshaw, 1645 Village Center Cir., Las Vegas NV 89134. This business is conducted by: Limited Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 06/01/2012 S/ Jean Ann Balgresky Hinshaw, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23148 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009719 Filed: Apr 15, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Premier Home Mortgage Loans. Located at: 1902 Wright Pl., 2nd Floor, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: 2744 Llama Ct., Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Andrew Movsesian, 2744 Llama Ct., Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Andrew Movsesian, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23147 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9007361 Filed: Mar 21, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Pegasus Pilates. Located at: 205 N Highway 101, Solana Beach CA San Diego 92075. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Living Light LLC, 205 N Highway 101, Solana Beach CA 92075. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/31/2002 S/ Jennifer Van Deausen, 04/19,

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009600 Filed: Apr 12, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Luminous Nails & Spa. Located at: 427 Santa Fe Dr., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: 10437 Greenford Dr., San Diego CA 92126. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Luminous Nails & Spa LLC, 427 Santa Fe Dr., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 03/15/2019 S/ Kaitlyn Nguyen, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23145 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009282 Filed: Apr 10, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Judaic Paper Arts. Located at: 7110 Daffodil Pl., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Barbara Irene Schenker Johnson, 7110 Daffodil Pl., Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/09/2019 S/Barbara Irene Schenker Johnson, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23144 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9007637 Filed: Mar 25, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Estars LLC. Located at: 3960 Howard Hughes Pkwy #290, Las Vegas NV Clark 89169. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Estars LLC, 3960 Howard Hughes Pkwy #290, Las Vegas NV 89169. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Elizabeth Wood, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23143 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9008736 Filed: Apr 04, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Chef 4 Souls. Located at: 2022 Thibodo Rd., Vista CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Lance Evan Roll, 2022 Thibodo Rd., Vista CA 92081. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/04/2019 S/Lance Evan Roll, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23142 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2019-9009279 Filed: Apr 10, 2019 with County of the San Diego Recorder/ County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Arasmas Publications. Located at: 221 Witham Rd., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is hereby registered by the following: 1. Gary Joseph Crowley, 221 Witham Rd., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Gary Joseph Crowley, 04/19, 04/26, 05/03, 05/10/19 CN 23141


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TEEN DANCER A GRAND PRIZE FINALIST Zack Sommer, fourth from left above and at right, a junior at Canyon Crest Academy in Carmel Valley, was selected as a Grand Prize finalist for “non-classical dance” in The Music Center’s Spotlight program, a Los Angeles-based scholarship and arts training program for Southern California high school students. More than 1,600 students auditioned, with 14 selected as finalists. The Grand Prize for each category includes a $5,000 scholarship. The winners perform at Walt Disney Concert Hall at 7 p.m. June 4. Courtesy photos

Installation of automatic school locks begins in RSF By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — A new automatic system to lock classroom doors as well offer global lockdown capability is currently being installed in the Rancho Santa Fe School District. A 4-1 school board vote on March 14 approved the $424,000 system. The district’s capital facilities fund will pay for the lock upgrades. The electronic access control system went out for public bid, and Accurate Security Pros, Inc. is doing the installation. According to Brad Johnson, chief business officer at the Rancho Santa Fe School District, a little over a year ago the district hired School Safety Operations to assist with a hazard and vulnerability assessment. Jeff Kaye of School Safety Operations “looked at various safety measures throughout campus, and we at the time, were starting to finalize some of our research on the electronic access control system and folded that into part of the recommendations,” Johnson said. “Since then, we’ve brought presentations to our board of trustees and also shared this information with our Safety Advisory Committee and finally got approval to procure the system through one of our contractors.” The electronic system chosen to manage the sys-

tem is Identicard. While the total cost of the system is $424,000, Johnson said a couple of other modifications will be made to gates and a few minor hardware adjustments so the total project cost may be closer to about $435,000. Johnson said parental feedback was an essential part of the process, which included the Safety Advisory Committee. “We wanted to make sure that any parents and community members that were involved with the school had a chance to participate and provide feedback. This was one of many things we discussed, but we did receive positive feedback,” Johnson said. “We also had a workshop recently after the Parkland shooting in 2018 where additional security measures were discussed with community members.” Ben Holbert, the district’s technology director, said the existing lock system is Schlage, so they looked at the Schlage suite of electronic locks to preserve the same manufacturer for all the locks on the site, both electronic or mechanical, such as closets. New system features will include global lockdown capability, lockout capability, ID card readers, perimeter gate controls, and door monitoring by way of electronic locks with a LED

light “lock” indicator on the school’s 71 classroom doors. Holbert went on to say that the system’s zone control will allow individuals into certain areas and not others. “There was also a desire to get away from a physical key that when the master is locked, you have to rekey the entire site,” Holbert said. Another safety enhancement will be a camera system outside of the school’s solid wood front doors with a large interior monitor for viewing. According to Superintendent Donna Tripi, the work for the electronic access control system began during spring break and is continuing with work that can be done while school is still in session. However, when the students leave in June, the rest of the installation will be completed along with lock testing. Tripi said the new system will afford a safer environment. “The teachers especially will have the proximity cards and won’t have to worry about whether their classroom doors are locked or not. Because right now they can’t tell, and they have to go completely outside of the door to lock the doors at this point,” she said. “There will be a much easier and safer way to conduct business day to day.”

Celebrating Anniversaries

parative religion. Chopra will serve as the school’s “distinguished professor of consciousness studies and wellbeing.” In that role, Chopra will offer academic advice to students and host special events focusing on the science of consciousness in addition to his work as a professor, said Hope Umansky,

the school’s co-president and academic dean. Chopra said in a statement that he is “pleased to have the opportunity to work with CIHS, which for over two decades has been working to heal the unfounded schism between science and spirituality.” — City News Service

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Encinitas grad school adds Chopra as professor ENCINITAS — The California Institute for Human Science announcedthe appointment May 8 of author and alternative medicine advocate Deepak Chopra as the Encinitas school’s newest professor. CIHS is a graduate school and research center focusing on psychology, health studies and com-

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VOL. 3, N0. 7

Inside: 2016 Sprin g Home & Gard en Secti

VISTA, SAN MARCOS, ESCONDID O

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Citracado Par extension pro kway ject draws on

MARCH 25, 2016

By Steve Putersk

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Emi Gannod , 11, observe exhibit is s a Banded open now through April 10. Purple Wing butterfly Full story at the on page A2. Photo San Diego Zoo Safari Park’s by Tony Cagala Butterfly

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Commun Vista teacity rallies behind her placed on leave

Jungle exhibit. The

By Hoa Quach

i ESCON environ amendment DIDO — mental An port to the lution of from Aprilimpact rereso- ternati 2012. AlCitracado necessity for ves the sion projectParkway exten- with residenwere discussed ts in four munity Wednesday was approv ed of publicmeetings and comby the Council. gatherings. a trio City “The project Debra rently Lundy, property real cated designed as curcity, said manager for and plannewas lothe it was due to a needed manner that will d in a compatible omissionsclerical error, be most the est with attached of deeds to public good the greatbe to the private and least adjustm injury,” ent is theland. The said. parcel being Lundy only acquired fee the city, She also which is by reported ty, she added. a necessi city and proper the - have ty owners had The project, eminent domain meetings inmore than 35 the past in the which has been years to develop four works for the plan. years, will However, several erty complete the missing the mit owners did not proproadway section of a counte subthe ny Grove, between Harmo city’s statutoroffer to the Village ry offer and Andrea Parkway- April 14, 2015. on son Drive. to Lundy, Accord The the owners ing not feel a review city conduc did the offer ted matche which was of the project what the land , outlined is worth, d in the alTURN TO

Republica Abed ove ns endorse r Gaspar EXTENSION

ON A3 VISTA — Curren former t ents are students and and pardemanding social studies a teacher Vista lowed to be alkeep his the admini job. Vincen stration By Aaron Romero to keep has workedt Romero, Burgin at Rancho Vista High for the who REGIO Unified School. Buena Vista ty Republ N — The Coun- Krvaric A protest since 1990,School Distric ican Party Sam Abed’ssaid. “Clear thrown at the school. was also held t paid adminiwas placed ly has its suppor long-tim Escondido on t behind steadfast commi e and strative “This from his Republican leave Mayor tment Abed in gry,” wrotemakes me so na Vistajob at Rancho BueSam anprinciples to ty Dist. the race for Coun- values earned of Fallbro Jeffrey Bright and March 7. High School 3 Superv ok, him port who on graduated the supisor. of commi The said he Now, ttee memof San Republican Party bers and we more than from the school with morean online petitio 20 years last weekDiego announced endorse him.” are proud to already than 1,900 n ago. tures is that it signaendorse ucation fear that our “I Gaspar’s istration asking the admin- A social Abed overvoted to reache edcampaign Republican apart. I system is falling studies d this fellow back to to bring Romer placed teacher week and Encini pressed disapp the classro tas Mayor not goingworry my kids o dents on administrative at Rancho Buena are om. On and parents leave ointment exVista High who is also Kristin Gaspar - not receivi education to get a valuab to launch in early March. ro told his last day, Rome- Romero. Photo in ng the School le , nomina at public The an online was anymo supervisor running for by Hoa Quach party’s schools leaving students he re.” petition move prompted seat currenthe several tion, but touted in support stuwas sorry held by David Whidd key endors nization because “the orgaof Vincent tly she I can’t be is seekinDave Roberts, who Marcos ements has receive with the rest change.” decided to make g re-elec called on of San out the campa d throug of the year. you for do “shameful.” a my choice, tion. the move Abed, h— “(They a polariz who has been but it’s It’s not until we’re going to “While ign. “This is confidence ) no longer have it goes.” the way there’s fight genuin I’m disapa teache his two ing figure during pointed not fight with. nothing left know what in me that r that terms as In the ty endors to get the parto wrote. ely cares,” Whidd I plan to Escond roughly I ute speech mayor I’m doing,” for Romero, ement, “Both ido, secure your senior be back in said I’m very coveted Mr. Romer of my sons on whose to studen4-minyear.” d the proud to have were recorde Romer remark emotional Romer ts, an the suppor of Mayor ment by party endors joyed his o and greatly had students o also urged d and posteds to fight on Facebo t Faulco ene- the class.” the adminio vowed new his to be kind than two receiving more four Republ ner and like what ok. “They don’t stration. to their mineA former studen social studies “I’m not thirds committee’s I do. They but of the Councilmembers,ican City ing,” like the tors don’t not said Romer disappear- pal to give “hell” teacher RomerVelare of Vista,t, Jasvotes, threshold Senais what way I do it. So, o, 55. “I’m to Princio Charles the and Bates and Anders said going happens. this candidate required for teacher.” was “an amazin Schind ler. Assemb on, Follow ing I’m really something away. This is a Chavez lyman Rocky g to receive endorsement nounce ,” “I that’s what I can fight, the the an- get himwas lucky enough party membe over a fellow “I’ve been Gaspar we’re goingand ture, a ment of his deparsaid. myself,” to petition tive Republ a very effecr. to on Petitio “He truly she was “Endorsing ican mayor cares for wrote. nSite.com, created publican one Re- a Democratic what he in urging city ing on quires a over another balanced by focusTURN TO TEACHER budgets, — and 2/3 vote threshore- economic ON A15 rarely happen ld and GOP quality development, Chairman s,” continu of life Tony Board e to do so and will on the of Superv isors.”

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arts CALENDAR Know something that’s going on? Send it to calendar@ coastnewsgroup.com

MAY 10

while the youngsters, ages 5 to 15, enjoy Karaoke, a dance party, Name That Tune, Silly Song lyrics contest, musical crafts or drum and rhythm circle activities at Leading Note Studios, 2146 Encinitas Blvd. Suite 105, Encinitas. $35 per child. Visit leadingnotestudios.com for more information.

MURAL ARTIST WANTED

The city of Carlsbad’s Library & Cultural Arts Department is seeking a mural artist to create a large-scale mural that will be all-ages friendly and have a strong visual impact. Deadline to apply: May 17 by 5 p.m. More details and applications at carlsbadca.gov/ services/depts/arts/default. asp. The mural will be on the wall of the Georgina Cole Library. The budget is $35,000. This includes artist time, travel, wall prep, materials including sealant.

MAY 11

PEACEMAKERS PLAY VISTA

Bridging the gap between rock and roll, road house Americana, and the sound of the Southwest, Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers will be in concert at 7:30 p.m. May 11 at the Moonlight Amphitheatre, 1250 Vale Terrace Drive, Vista. Tickets and information at moonlightstage.com.

ART ON THE GREEN

MAY 10, 2019 ing Amateurs from 4 to 5:30 p.m. May 11 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas. Suggested donation $20. More information at (949) 945-3570.                            

MAY 12

THEATER CAMP

Get an Early Bird discount before May 15 for any of three Village Church Community Theater Summer Theater Camps, 6225 Paseo Delicias, Rancho Santa Fe. Youth, Teens, and Tech (also teens) in workshops, classes and rehearsals to expose them to a broad theater experience of acting, music, movement and tech. A scholarship application form is available JEWISH MEN’S CHOIR will perform at 3:30 p.m. May 19 at the First United Methodist Church on-line at villagechurchcommunitytheater.org. of Escondido, 341 S. Kalmia St. Courtesy photo

in front of the Carlsbad Inn Every Saturday and Beach Resort, 3075 Carlsbad Sunday (weather permit- Blvd., Carlsbad. MUSIC NIGHT OUT ting), COAL Gallery memFriday night is now date ber artists display their art- SATURDAY ARTWALK night May 10 for the parents, work for sale on the lawn The Escondido Arts

Partnership Municipal Gallery hosts a reception during Second Saturday Artwalk, 5:30 to 8 p.m. May 11, in the Expressions Galleries, “Chair Words: Chairs have

Feelings Too.” and at 1 p.m. Barbara Armbruster reads from her new book “Chair OMA SUMMER CAMP You may register now Words”  at 262 E. Grand for the Oceanside Museum Ave., Escondido.                                                            Of Art Summer Art Camp INTERNATIONAL DANCE NIGHT from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. MonEncinitas Friends of the days through Fridays, July 8 Arts host a celebration of in- to July 26. Cost is $350 per ternational dance from 7 to week. Young artists ages 7 to 9:30 p.m. May 11 at the En- 15 can choose from Week At cinitas Community Center, The Living Museum July 8 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive, to July 12, Sky-High Puppet Encinitas, with an artisan Masters July 15 to July 19 or marketplace and drawings. DIY Fashion Week, July 22 Performances by Blue Ming to July 26. Register at http:// Chinese Dance, Flamenco oma-online.org/camp/. Arana, Malone Academy of Irish Dance, Ni Wayan Ekarini Balinese and LITVAKdance Company. Tickets MUSEUM SEEKS ARTWORK $20-$35. For more informaThe Oceanside Museum of Art is calling for arttion, call (760) 298-1706.     work submissions through MUSIC WITHOUT BOUNDARIES July 7 to https://oma-online. A benefit concert will org/six/, for an exhibition be held for the 2019 San of six-word stories that will Diego International Piano TURN TO ARTS CALENDAR ON B22 Competition for Outstand-

MAY 13

MAY 14

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Home

Inside : 2016 Sprin & Garde g n Sectio n

NO. 94

Citracad extensio o Parkway n project draws on MARCH

By Steve

It’s a jun

gle In there

Emi Gannod, exhibit is open11, observes now through a Banded April 10. Purple Wing Full story butterfly on page at the San A2.

Comm Vista teunity rallies be acher placed hind on lea ve Photo

By Hoa

Quach

by Tony

Diego

Cagala

Zoo Safari

Park’s

Butterfly

Jungle

exhibit.

The

Puterski

25, 2016

ESCON amendm DIDO — An environ lution ent to mental port from of necessitthe resoCitracad impact April o Parkway for the ternativ resion project es were 2012. Aly exten- with resident Wednes discusse was s in four d Council day by approved munity meeting the City of public . s and comDebra gatherin a trio “The propert Lundy, project gs. y manage city, real rently designe as due tosaid it was r for the cated and d was curplanned needed manner loomissiona clerical error, compati that will in a attached s of deeds the be ble to be est public with the most adjustm to the greatgood parcel ent is theland. The private injury,” and least only fee said. the city,being acquire Lundy She d by ty, she which is a necessicity and also reported added. The propert have the project, eminent had more y owners domain meeting in the which s in the than 35 years, works forhas been years to develop past four Howeve missing will completseveral the e the erty owners r, the plan. roadway section ny Grove, between of the mit a counterdid not propsubVillage Harmo- city’s statutor offer and Andreas to Parkwa April y offer the on Drive. 14, y to The Lundy, 2015. Accordi on a review city conduct the not ng feel owners of the which ed was outlined did project, what the the offer land is matched in the worth, alTURN

VISTA former — Current ents are students and social demand and parTO EXTENSIO ing a lowed studies teacher Vista N ON A3 to keep Vincent his job. be alhas worked Romero , who the adminis Unified for School the Vista Romero since tration By Aaron District to keep at Vista paid 1990, was Burgin High Rancho Buena adminis placed from his School. REGION trative on A ty Republi — The at the protest was na Vista job at Rancho leave school. also held thrown can PartyCoun- Krvaric High March “This Sam Abed’ssaid. SchoolBue7. Escondi its support has makes gry,” “Clearly on Now, wrote long-tim me Abed do Mayor behind steadfast of Fallbroo with more an online Jeffrey so ane and petition ty Dist.in the race Sam Republi commitm than graduat tures k, who Bright 3 Supervi for Coun- values can principl ent to is asking 1,900 signasaid he more ed from istration The port earned him es and the than the school of San Republi sor. already back to to bring admin- A social 20 years can Party bers of committ the supthe classroo Romero placed studies last weekDiego announc and ucation fear that ago. “I teacher On endorse we are ee memdents on administra our edendorse that it system apart. ro told his last day,m. ed proud him.” and parents tive at Rancho is falling I worry to leave Gaspar’ Republi Abed overvoted to Rome- Romero. Photo not going leaving student in early Buena Vista to my kids s can March. fellow reached by Hoa launch an High tas Mayor campaig educatio to get nization because s he was and are online School The Quach this pressed a valuable petition move prompted was anymor n at who is Kristin Encinichange. decided “the orga- sorry I can’t disappo week ex-n in support to make e.” public schools ” the stusupervisalso running Gaspar, not receivin be intment of Vincent David “(They) nominat a my rest of the with you g the for in held by or seat for Marcos Whiddo confiden choice, year. no longer currentthe several ion, but party’s Dave n of San but it’s It’s not do — we’re ce is seeking “shame called know Roberts have it goes.” ly key endorse touted the way until there’s going what in me that the move ful.” , who she has received Romero I’m In the Abed, re-elect ments “This out the fight with. nothingto fight , whosedoing,” saidI ute speech a polarizi who ion. roughly were campaig through has been left to genuinely is a teacher I plan recorde emotion “While to student4-min- for your senior his two ng figure n. cares,” wrote. on Faceboo to be that d andremarks al “Both during pointed Whiddo s, an Escondi terms as Romero year.” back Mr. like what k. “They posted to fight the Romero not to I’m disapRomero of my sons n coveted do, ty endorse mayor also urged vowed students get joyed like the I do. secured don’t in proud “I’m administration. and greatly had to be ment, the parnew social his class.” his party kind ment the is what way I do They don’t ing,” said not disappe to have I’m very enbut to studies to their mineA former happens it. So, this not going Romero the than by receivinendorse- of Mayor argive teacher two Faulcon support . I’m really somethi Velare student, committ away. , 55. “I’m pal Charles “hell” to thirds g more the four Republi Romero Jaser of This that’s ng I can thresho ee’s votes,of the Councilmember can and FollowinSchindler.Princi- teacher. was “anVista, said is fight, what tors Bates City ” amazing candida ld required we’re s, and nouncement g the the Senature, going an- get “I was lucky endorse te to receivefor a and Assemband Anderso a petitionof his departo on him myself,” enough Chavez, lyman n, Petition party ment over was the ” Gaspar Rocky to member Site.com created “He truly cares she wrote. a fellow “I’ve been “Endors . , urging tive Republi a very said. for what publican ing one he effeca TURN over another quires Re- ingDemocratic can mayor TO TEACHER city by in on balance — anda 2/3 vote ON A15 re- econom focusrarely thresho GOP d budgets ic Chairm happens ld and quality develop , ,” continue an ment, of life Tony and to do Board so on will of Supervi sors.” the

Republ Abed icans endors over Gas e par

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1. LITERATURE: Which one of Charles Dickens' novels features a character named Pip? 2. TELEVISION: Who played the title role in the 1970-80s sitcom "Alice"? 3. ANATOMY: Which part of the brain regulates homeostasis of wake/sleep cycles, hunger and thirst? 4. U.S. STATES: What is the capital of Washington state? 5. MYTHOLOGY: What was the name of the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite? 6. GEOLOGY: Diamonds are mostly made of which element? 7. HISTORY: In which American city did the Great Molasses Flood occur in 1919? 8. THEATER: Which long-running musical features the character Fanny Brice? 9. ACRONYMS: What does the acronym "ROYGBIV" stand for? 10. FOOD & DRINK: What is ciabatta? (c) 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Untangling personal problems might take more time than the impatient Lamb expected. But it’s important to hang in there until all those knotty situations are straightened out. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You still need to work out last-minute snags in your dealings with a rival. Hold your ground despite a perceived lack of support. Things should turn around before you know it. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Best not to delay preparing for that upcoming family event. The sooner you get things started, the better chance you have of finding potential problems and making needed changes. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The romantic Moon Child might be reluctant to see the reality behind that “ideal” situation. But by midweek, the practical Crab emerges to help clear away the moonbeams. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Although the Big Cat might be receptive to more “purr-suasion” to get you to agree to a workplace change, make sure you can distinguish the fine line between facts and flattery. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Your positive attitude in the workplace helps to get you noticed by the right people. Now go ahead and use some of that new self-confidence to help shore up a personal relationship.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Although you might still have to work out some problems with a business partner, things go more smoothly on the home front. An investment opportunity might need more study. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Don’t be reluctant to act on your suspicion. Even if others see nothing wrong, the astute Scorpio could sense an underlying problem that isn’t always obvious on the surface. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A new opportunity presents some obstacles that need to be dealt with as soon as possible. Delaying action in hopes that the problems will go away could be counterproductive. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A friend or family member’s request might carry some hidden factors that could later create problems. Be sure you know all the facts before you make your decision. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A setback in implementing a plan could turn out to be a blessing in disguise. Use the downtime to rework your original concepts and see where changes could be made. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You might not be consciously fishing for compliments, but admit it — won’t you feel great when your efforts are noticed? So accept the praise gracefully. You earned it. BORN THIS WEEK: Your love of beauty in your personal life extends to your efforts to protect and preserve the natural world around you. © 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.

Trivia Test Answers 1. "Great Expectations"; 2. Linda Lavin; 3. Hypothalamus; 4. Olympia 5. Venus; 6. Carbon; 7. Boston; 8. "Funny Girl"; 9. Color sequence of the rainbow (Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet); 10. Type of Italian bread

MAY 10, 2019


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MAY 10, 2019

trep.org. Enjoy appetizers TASTE OF HAWAII The Hutchins Consort, and drinks with a brief preCONTINUED FROM B20 sentation before creating an featuring Kunia Galdiera and Matt Akiona, perform accompany selected photo- original work of art. “Hawaiiana” at 8 p.m. May graphs. Southern California 17 at St. Andrew’s Episartists are invited to submit TASTE OF ART artwork and stories with a Oceanside Museum Of copal Church. 890 Balour creative, whimsical, and in- Art presents “Taste Of Art: Drive, Encinitas. in a musitrospective interpretation Female Abstract Expres- cal voyage celebrating the of the culturally-diverse sionists” 6 to 8 p.m. May people and culture of Hatheme.  16 at 704 Pier View Way, waii. For more information, Oceanside. Tickets $50 at visit hutchinsconsort.org or call (858) 366-2423. oma-online.org.

and Other Images” will be at the Encinitas Community Center Gallery, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive.

ARTS CALENDAR

MAY 22

YOUNG STARS

We d n e s d a y s @ N o o n presents a free concert by Young Artists Competition winners, Eden Tremayne, soprano, Tzytle Steinman, mezzo-soprano and Laynee Dell Woodward, soprano at noon, May 22 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas.

MAY 16

‘SHE KILLS MONSTERS’

North Coast Repertory Theatre offers a comedic romp into the world of fantasy role-playing games, with “She Kills Monsters, Young Adventurers Edition” by Qui Nguyen at 6 p.m. May 16 and May 17, 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. May 18 and 2 p.m. May 19 at 987 Lomas Santa Fe Drive, Suite D, Solana Beach. Tickets at northcoas-

TEEN ART

MAY 17

MUSIC BY THE SEA

Music by the Sea presents Azer Damirov on violin with Adelya Shagidullina on viola at 7:30 p.m. May 17 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas. Tickets $14 at encinitas.tix. com, (800) 595-4849 or at the door. $15-$35

Studio ACE announces a teen class in Expressionism Painting from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. May 17, May 24 and May 31 at 3861 Mission Ave., Oceanside. Cost for all three classes is $25, Military $21. This class series explores abstract forms to translate emotional experiences through texture,

INTERNATIONAL DANCE NIGHT is 7 to 9:30 p.m. May 11 at the Encinitas Community Center, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive, Encinitas. Courtesy photo HEART OF ENCINITAS

MAY 23

color & incorporated text in call (760) 730-5203. painting. You can register for all classes on studioace.org or

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MAY 18

‘OPERATIC ODYSSEY’

The North Coast Symphony Orchestra presents “An Operatic Odyssey” featuring soprano Katie Polit, at 2:30 p.m. May 18, at the San Dieguito United Methodist Church, 170 Calle Magdalena, Encinitas. Tickets available at the door: $10 general, $8 seniors/students/military, $25/family max. For more information, visit northcoastsymphony. com.

Barbara Murray presents “My Town” photography, reflecting the residences, back alleys, and small out-of-the-way streets in Encinitas, through July 17, with a reception at 6 p.m. June 1 at Encinitas Community Center Gallery, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive.

MAY 24

GUITAR ORCHESTRA

A group of 35 classical guitarists, the Encinitas Guitar Orchestra, performs at 7:30pm. May 24, Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 925 Balour Drive. $12, at the door. Peter Pupping, direcCHORAL DOES ‘SPRING RING’ St. Thomas More Cath- tor. More information at enolic Church is hosting the cinitasguitarorchestra.com/.  Southern California annual Spring Ring at 5 p.m. May 18 at 1450 S. Melrose Drive, Oceanside, with choral AT THE AMPHITHEATRE The Moonlight Amphigroups from all over Southern California. A free will theatre presents The PettyBreakers at 7:30 p.m. May offering will be taken. 25 with tickets $15 to $40, at Moonlight, 1250 Vale TerALL ART ALL DAY The alternative mul- race Drive, Vista. Tickets at tidisciplinary art space, moonlightstage.com/. A Ship In The Woods, has invited a lineup of artists FOCUS ON WATERCOLORS Kene Lohmann, waterand musicians to perform and exhibit from 10 a.m. to color artist and instructor, midnight May 18 at 3007 Fe- will be featured at the Carlslicita Road, Escondido, with bad Senior Center, 799 Pine the goal of raising funds to Ave, Carlsbad, for the month support its inaugural music of May. Lohmann currently residency. The evening will teaches a watercolor class end with a special perfor- at Studio Ace in Oceanside mance by Jibz Cameron, a Mondays and Fridays. Visit performance/video artist. studioace.org for more inforEarly Bird tickets, $12, at mation. shipinthewoods.com/ beneCAMP AT OMA fit2019. Sign up now for the fourth annual Kids’ Camp from June 24 through JEWISH MEN’S CHOIR June 28 at the Oceanside Hear the San Diego Museum of Art, 704 Pier Jewish Men’s Choir, will of- View Way Oceanside. Davin fer a performance at 3:30 Waite from Wrench & Rop.m. May 19 at the First dent is returning to camp, United Methodist Church bringing more fun in the of Escondido, 341 S. Kalmia kitchen, as he helps prepare St., A free-will offering will a locally sourced meal with be accepted. zero waste. 

MAY 25

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MAY 19

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FOUR IN ONE

The Carlsbad Music Festival will host four programs from 1 to 5 p.m. May 19 at St. Michael’s by-theSea Chapel, 2775 Carlsbad Blvd., Carlsbad. At 1 p.m., hear Clinton Davis, followed at 2 p.m. with Peter Sprague, Viento Callejero at 3 p.m. and The Paragraphs at 4 p.m. Reservations at carlsbadmusicfestival.org/ eclectic-lawn-2019/.

SUMMER ART CAMPS

Lux Art Institute offers summer art camps for ages 4 to 7, a STEAM art camps for ages 8 to 12, Youth Studio for ages 10 to 15 and Teen Ceramics for ages 12-17. For registration and information, visit luxartinstitute. org/programs/.

TINTA Y LUCHA

The city of Carlsbad is hosting “Entre Tinta y Lucha: 45 Years of Self-Help Graphics & Art” through June 9 at William D. CanPHOTO ART non Art Gallery, Carlsbad An exhibition of pho- City Library complex, 1775 tography by Jeff Maysent, Dove Lane, Carlsbad. Ad“Seaside Reef in the Rain, mission is free.

MAY 20


MAY 10, 2019

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Local Encinitas Hay House Author and Radio Host

Marisa Moris

DISCOVER INTUITION (Offices/Staff/Studio/Consultation Located on 1054 2nd Street, Encinitas, CA

LEADERSHIP AND LOVE From left, Steve Atkinson of Channel 10 News presents the Channel 10 Leadership Award to Brad and Beth Thorp, founders of the Mitchell Thorp Foundation, joined by Shelly and Blake Matthews, with children Charlie and Noland. The foundation supports those like the Matthews family who have children with life-threatening illnesses, diseases and disorders, by providing financial, emotional and resource support. To know more, visit mitchellthorp.org. Courtesy photo

County eyes additional land for O’side park REGION — County supervisors on May 1 took steps toward land purchases that would increase a Ramona preserve and an Oceanside park. By a 4-0 vote, the board set June 5 public hearings for a possible 123-acre purchase for the Ramona Grasslands and a proposed 8-acre purchase for San Luis Rey River Park. Supervisors will formally vote on the land purchases after the hearings. According to the meeting agenda, the county has identified the parcel to add

to the north side of 3,490acre Ramona Grasslands Preserve. The property is located north of Old Survey Road No. 97 and east of Bandy Canyon Road. The land, owned by the Carroll family, has an appraised value of $950,000. Board Chairwoman Dianne Jacob said if added to the preserve, the 123 acres will provide needed conservation and possibly a new trail. The county is also looking at purchasing 8 acres to add to the 9-mile-long San Luis Rey River park,

located in eastern Oceanside. The property is located south of state Route 76, near the Gird Road intersection. According to the county, the parcel is owned by Ocean Breeze Ranch LLC and appraised at $403,500. Calling the area a “great treasure,” Supervisor Jim Desmond said the 8-acre purchase will add trail and parks along the river. Supervisor Nathan Fletcher had to leave the meeting early to attend another government event.

Marisa is a renowned spiritual intuitive, channel and master reiki instructor with 15 books and counting Through her books, classes, and one-on-one classes, Marisa will teach and heal your mind body and soul by introducing you to your higher self / soul / angelic team Joe Moris, Marisa’s dad, is a Christian. Together through Joe’s questions and comments and Marisa’s channelled responses, have penned the “Bible Speaks” series based upon interviews with Christ and the New Testament Authors. Quotes, lessons, and new parables can be found in “Ask Jesus” Marisa, together with renowned author and publisher, William Gladstone, have penned non-biblical but thoroughly spiritual books called the “Skeptics” series. These books on numerous subjects will blow your mind. Must reads!

—City News Service

Helen Woodward hosts celebration for animal alums RANCHO SANTA FE — Helen Woodward Animal Center invites adopted alumni and all furry princes and princesses to a royal celebration of animal rescue. The center’s annual Puppy Prom calls on fourlegged friends to reunite since finding their happily-ever-after and rejoice … on the dance floor. Helen Woodward Animal Center’s seventh annual Puppy Prom is 10 a.m. to noon May 18 at Casa Sol y Mar, 12865 El Camino Real. Dressed in fairytale attire for the storybook ball, pups and their parents are

invited to enjoy corsage and bowtie making-stations, opportunity drawings, photos with prom-themed backdrops and treats for all. Once again, Casa Sol y Mar will host the happy event and provide free light appetizers for the humans, with 20 percent of all additional food/beverage sales from the event going back to HWAC. The festivities will culminate in the crowning of Best Dressed Prom King and Queen. Enter with a $10 fee, which supports the center. Helen Woodward Animal Center loves its kitty

alumni too and will honor them with a Best Dressed Kitty King and Queen Contest. To enter your rescue kitty, go online to submit a photo of your cat (dressed in their prom finery). Photos will be shared on our social media sites and voted on at the Puppy Prom by attending prom-goers with prizes awarded to the Best Dressed Kitty Prom King and Queen. For more information, to RSVP and to register your cat or pup for the Best Dressed contest, head to animalcenter.org/puppyprom.

WEEKEND TEACHING CLASSES AND SEMINARS WEDNESDAY NIGHT WORLD-WIDE ONLINE CLASSES ONE-ON-ONE SESSIONS ALL BOOKS AVAILABLE ON KINDLE AND AUDIOBOOK AND AVAILABLE THROUGH:

711 TEABERRY STREET, ENCINITAS $679,000 914 N. Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas

858.437.7033

Ben@swellproperty.com

DiscoverIntuition.com, Amazon.com Barnes & Noble & Soulscape Encinitas

Listen to Marisa at 1:00 PM, Tuesdays on Hay House Radio (through App)

Archived shows available on

Patreon.com and DailyAttunement.com

www.DiscoverIntuition.com


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MAY 10, 2019

2.5i Premium

289

$

per month +tax 36 Month Lease $1,499 Due at Lease Signing

1 at this payement K3312600 MSRP $33,034 (incl. $975 freight charge). (2.5i Premium model, code KDD). $1,499 due at lease signing. Net cap cost & monthly payment excludes 1st payment, tax, license, title, registration, retailer fees, options, insurance $0 security deposit. Lease end purchase option is $18,829 Cannot be combined with any other incentives. Special lease rates extended to well-qualified buyers. Subject to credit approval, vehicle insurance approval & vehicle availability. Not all buyers may qualify. Net cap cost & monthly payment excludes tax, license, title, registration, retailer fees, options, insurance & the like. Retailer participation may affect final cost. At lease end, lessee responsible for vehicle maintenance/repairs not covered by warranty, excessive wear/tear, 15 cents/mile over 10,000 miles/year and $300 disposition fee. Lessee pays personal property and ad valorem taxes (where applies) & insurance. Model not shown. Expires 5/10/19

Car Country Drive

Car Country Carlsbad

Car Country Drive

760-438-2200 5500 Paseo Del Norte

Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations. Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2019 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.

www.bobbakersubaru.com

** EPA-estimated fuel economy. Actual mileage may vary. Subaru Tribeca, Forester, Impreza & Outback are registered trademarks. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, $80 dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 5/10 /2019.

ar Country Drive

Car Country Drive

66Years/72,000 Years/72,000Miles Miles Transferable Transferable Bumper-to-Bumper Bumper-to-Bumper Limited LimitedWarranty Warranty

0

$

per month lease +tax 39 Months $0 Due at Signing!

down payment

JEEP • CHRYSLER • MITSUBISHI

JEEPCHRYSLER MITS

0

$

due at signing*

0

$

security deposit*

0

$

first month’s payment*

Excludes TDI® Clean Diesel and Hybrid models. Lessee responsible for insurance. Closed-end lease offered to highly qualified lessees on approved credit by Volkswagen Credit/VCI. Supplies limited. U.S. cars only. Additional charges may apply at lease end. See dealer for financing details.

1 at this payment Stock # : VK1114 VIN : 3VWN57BU4KM111728 Lease a 2019 Volkswagen Jetta S for $222* a month. 39-month lease. $0 Customer Cash due at signing. No security deposit required. For highly qualified customers through Volkswagen Credit. *Closed end lease financing available through May 31, 2019 for a new, unused 2019 Volkswagen Jetta S, on approved credit by Volkswagen Credit. Monthly lease payment based on MSRP of $20,160 and destination charges. and a Selling Price of $18,694 Amount due at signing includes first month’s payment, capitalized cost reduction, and acquisition fee of $350. Monthly payments total $8436 Your payment will vary based on dealer contribution and the final negotiated price. Lessee responsible for insurance, maintenance and repairs. At lease end, lessee responsible for disposition fee of $350, $0.20/mile over for miles driven in excess of 24,375 miles and excessive wear and use. Excludes taxes, title and other government fees.

760-438-2200 VOLKSWAGEN

5500 Paseo Del Norte Car Country Carlsbad

BobBakerVW.com

* 6 years/72,000 miles (whichever occurs first) New Vehicle Limited Warranty on MY2018 and newer VW vehicles, excluding e-Golf. See owner’s literature or dealer for warranty exclusions and limitations. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, $80 dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 5-31-2019.

ar Country Drive

222

$

ar Country Drive

2019 Volkswagen Jetta S

Profile for Coast News Group

The Coast News, May 10, 2019  

The Coast News, May 10, 2019