The Coast News, February 12, 2021

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SAN Local groups MARCOS -NEWS frustrated by . pick council

Del Mar’s city manager on paid leave

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By Bill Slane

DEL MAR — The Del Mar City Council placed City Manager Christa Johnson on paid administrative leave pending the regularly scheduled council meeting on February 16, the city announced Friday. The move comes after a pair of closed session performance evaluations regarding Johnson on February 1 and February 3. Administrative Services Director AshJOHNSON ley Jones will be acting city manager during Johnson’s leave, according to an official city statement. No city officials would comment on the specific naTURN TO CITY MANAGER ON A5

By Samantha Nelson

parking before walking down, and eventually back up, a dirt path to access the beach. A staircase once provided access to the beach below, but a series of minor landslides caused by winter storms in 1982-83 damaged the structure. The city originally pursued a seawall at the beach during the 2000s, but the state withdrew the grant in 2009, citing its policy against sea walls. In October 2018, the city held two workshops to gather public input on how to address the issue. During those sessions, the public voiced a “strong desire” to remove invasive plants and reintroduce native species along the bluff face. “The overall goal of the

OCEANSIDE — ResiTHE dents and local groups who VISTA were left frustrated by the recent appointment proNEWS cess of new District 1 Councilmember Kori Jensen are calling for her resignation and for the San Diego County District Attorney’s Office to look into a l legat ions District 1 that she does voters lost not live in the district. opportunity, On Jan. some RANCHO 27, Jensen was SFNEWS chosen residents in a 3-1 vote believe to represent District 1. Mayor Esther Sanchez was the only vote opposed to Jensen’s appointment, explaining that she preferred to have a special election and that she did not know Jensen well enough from her brief interview and application for the position. Council opted to appoint a new member to represent District 1 instead of holding a special election, which would have been a large expense for the city and would have left the council with only four members for nearly a year. Jensen was chosen from more than a few dozen candidates, who were given a few minutes to explain why they should be chosen to represent District 1 during the Jan. 27 meeting. She was subsequently sworn in at the Feb. 3 council meeting, during which a mixed bag of nearly 40 public comments voiced support for Jensen or called for her resignation. Many feel that Jensen lied on her application about her place of residence, listed as being in the 800 block of N. Pacific Street. Until recently the home was listed on Airbnb

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AFTER THREE YEARS, Oceanside artist Clayton Parker celebrated his recently completed work restoring the Vista Historical Mural, the longest continuous mural in the world, on Feb. 5 in downtown Vista. The event coincided with the grand opening of Barrel & Stave Pour House, a business with exterior walls featuring portions of Parker’s work. Photos by Jordan P. Ingram

Planning Commission to review latest Beacon’s plan By Dustin Jones

ENCINITAS — The Encinitas Planning Commission will review a new project plan for the restoration of Beacon’s Beach during a virtual meeting at 6 p.m. on Feb. 18. The multi-permit project aims to preserve the beach access trail by planting native plants along the bluff face to prevent soil erosion. As previously reported by The Coast News, the city of Encinitas has been grappling for nearly two decades with how to fix the unstable coastal bluff that threatens the switchback staircase and the parking lot atop the coastal bluff at the beach. Leucadia State Beach, also known as Beacon’s Beach, is a well-known local THE CITY’S Planning Commission will consider the Beacon’s Beach Restoration Plan. The spot in Encinitas. During project aims to restore stability to the Leucadia bluff by removing invasive plants and rein- summer months, visiting troducing native species. Photo by Dustin Jones beachgoers struggle to find

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Share your LOVE this Valentine’s in the Village With hundreds of small businesses specializing in gifts just perfect for the upcoming Valentine’s Day celebration, there is no need to go anywhere else. And certainly no need to shop online. Need flowers? Visit Ohana Creations (538 Grand Avenue) for spectacular roses or a wide variety of amazing floral bouquets and designs. Delivery is still available if you act fast, with in-store and curbside pickup available as well through the weekend. Looking for a piece of jewelry that will make that special someone swoon? Consider Famulare Jewelers (3001 Carlsbad Blvd. Ste. F) for everything from diamonds to baubles to custom designs. There’s still time to create a wonderful memory. Would your someone special love a whimsical piece of beach artwork? Mermaids of Carlsbad (300 Carlsbad Village Dr. Ste. 105) has gifts in all price ranges that are sure to be treasured and keep the Carlsbad Village lifestyle alive every day. Valentine’s Day weekend calls for romantic dining. Need a location for dining al fresco? Outdoor dining is ample in Carlsbad Village with plenty of comfortable, heated, outdoor dining space. Several that come to mind are 264 Fresco (264 Carlsbad Village Dr.), Bluewater Grill (417 Carlsbad Village Dr.), and Taste of the Himalayas (300 Carlsbad Village Dr. Ste. 106). Dessert options are endless in the Village with a guaranteed hit, GelatoLove (300 Carlsbad Village Dr. Ste. 104), ready to please. There are so many delightful eateries from which to choose. The Carlsbad Village Association website lists retail businesses and dining establishments to help you make the best impression ever this holiday weekend. Why shop online when you can shop local instead? Thank you for supporting the many amazing small downtown Carlsbad businesses! Come explore Carlsbad Village during the final weekend of the “Follow Your Heart” Treasure Hunt. In collaboration with Barrio Glassworks, a glassblowing studio and retail gallery in the heart of the Village, a total of 75 custom blown glass hearts will be hidden over the course of the 10-day event. Glass hearts are hidden in plain sight at some of the Village’s most iconic locations and popular seating areas. Some might even be hidden near the beach this coming President’s Day holiday weekend. Once found, you can register your heart online for a chance to win a “private glassblowing experience” courtesy of Barrio Glassworks. Visit www.carlsbad-village.com for more information on the Follow Your Heart Treasure Hunt.

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Del Mar schools look to diversity, equity, inclusion By Dan Brendel

DEL MAR — Del Mar Union Elementary School District administrators touted efforts toward “diversity, equity and inclusion” at the school board’s Jan. 27 meeting, though the district’s ethnic diversity looks much different than other North County cities’. “One of our very intentional focus areas this year is … to ensure an inclusive environment for all children and adults by collectively confronting and preventing prejudice, racism and discrimination,” Assistant Superintendent Shelley Petersen told school board trustees. “Teachers are creating intentional learning opportunities … to start age-appropriate conversations with our children,” she said. For example, one teacher asked students to respond to a photograph of the Arkansas National Guard overseeing racial integration at Little Rock Central High School in 1957. “She might feel scared,” wrote one Del Mar student about one of the “Little Rock Nine.” “Additionally, many PTAs have taken steps to support libraries that include books representing a more diverse community, as well as books with lessons that can be used as conversation starters within our classrooms,” Petersen said. Titles include, for example, “Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation,” by Duncan Tonatiuh; “The Name Jar,” by Yangsook Choi; and “Hair Love,” by Matthew Cherry. In a similar vein, administrators briefed intentions to beef up Spanish immersion classes. “The key feature of the Spanish language immersion program is to really to foster cultural intelligence … so they're able to relate and work effectively across these cultures,” said Kindergarten Spanish teacher Vickie Anderson. “One of my favorite activities … that we engaged in this this year so far has

ARTWORK FROM Duncan Tonatiuh’s book, “Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation.” According to Assistant Superintendent Shelley Petersen, local PTAs are taking steps to help school libraries stock books that repesent a more diverse community. Photo courtesy of Duncan Tonatiuh/Abrams Books for Young Readers

Racial "diversity(ies)" present in all North County school districts' elementary grades, though generally skewed compared to regional cross-section Hispanic

White

Asian/Filipino/PI 0%

Del Mar Union Solana Beach Elem

2+ Races

20%

Black

Not Reported

40%

Native Am/Alaskan

60%

80%

100%

In Del Mar and Solana Beach, fewer Hispanics, more Asians

Rancho Santa Fe Elem Cardiff Elem Encinitas Union Carlsbad Unified San Marcos Unified North County 10-District 10-District Aggregate Aggregate

Hispanic

White (not Hisp.)

Asian 2+

Oceanside Unified Vista Unified Escondido Union

DEL MAR ELEMENTARY schools’ diversity is skewed compared to North County as a whole. Note that “Hispanic” isn’t a racial category meaning “brown”; Hispanics may have any skin color. Data source: Cal. Dept. of Ed. Graphic by Dan Brendel

been [discussing] ‘Living on [One Dollar],’” a documentary film about poverty in Guatemala, said sixthgrade Spanish teacher Andrew Burke. “Students

were able to describe what a good and bad day looks like for themselves here in the U.S. versus what a good or bad day might look like in Guatemala. … I was in-

credibly humbled and impressed by [the students’] sense of identifying with what someone might be going through, putting on their shoes for a second.”

While far from monochromatic, most of Del Mar’s school diversity, whether approximated by reported ethnicity or the native language of English

learners, owes to students of Asian/Pacific descent rather than Hispanic descent. That’s according to The Coast News’ analysis of the most recently published enrollment data from the California Department of Education. Del Mar doesn’t have the highest proportion of white K-6 children among North County districts. But it does have the lowest proportion of Hispanic children and the second lowest proportion of Spanish-speaking English learners. Hispanics and Spanish-speaking English learners account for about one-half and one-fifth, respectively, of North’s County aggregate K-6 student population. By comparison, those groups account for 11% and 2%, respectively, of Del Mar’s student body. One factor contributing to this skewing is “choice,” said Assistant Superintendent Jason Romero. “Where you live and what schools you send your children to are very personal family decisions. It could be that families choose to live where people of similar backgrounds reside.” School board trustees did not respond to requests for comment.

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FEB. 12, 2021

Opinion & Editorial

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of The Coast News

Ironic recall bears likely pluses for Gov. Newsom

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It’s time for tort reform

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By Bret Schanzenbach

ccording to a poll, almost 60% of Californians believe that lawmakers are not doing enough to combat lawsuit abuse. I happen to agree. Here in the Golden State, unwarranted and excessive litigation has gone so far as to make our state extremely unattractive to new businesses. In fact, existing businesses are fleeing the state just to escape the hostile, litigious business environment they’ve been forced to endure here for far too long. As the President and CEO of the Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce, I’ve seen firsthand the destruction that can result from lawsuit abuse. When local businesses are hit with a lawsuit or threatened with one, our economy suffers, and our people suffer. Jobs are lost, incomes are lost, community staples are lost. Especially given the state of the economy — which, as we know, has been ravaged by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic — the time is now for our lawmakers to address the problem at hand, and make meaningful changes to ensure it is fixed. Here in California, there are numerous laws in place that make it shockingly easy to sue local businesses. One such law is Proposition 65, or Prop 65. Prop 65 was originally intended to warn consumers of potentially harmful chemicals that a product may contain. It requires that if a product contains even the slightest, non-threatening trace of nearly 1,000 listed chemicals, that the retailer place an ominous warning label on the product. Seems reasonable enough, until trial attorneys quickly discovered that Prop 65 is the perfect law to exploit for a profit. Once they learned

that, baseless Prop 65 lawsuits began plaguing our courtrooms and burdening California’s small businesses. You see, the list of chemicals has gotten so out of control that anything from bathing suits, to jewelry to coffee are labeled with a warning sign that was originally intended to flag cancerous chemicals. Not only does this render the effectiveness of

suits filed against California’s business owners is endless. And, once again, what was originally intended to protect people has ended up benefiting only the trial attorneys who continue to profit off of others’ misfortunes. It is baffling to me that, given the ridiculous abuses of our state’s laws that we’ve seen over the years, our lawmakers have

“It is baffling to me that, given the ridiculous abuses of our state’s laws that we’ve seen over the years, our lawmakers have done little to nothing to address the anti-business lawsuit abuse...” these warning signs to be utterly useless, it also forces business owners to keep track of a list that includes naturally occurring, harmless chemicals, and ensure that they’re properly labeling their products. If they fail to do so, or mislabel, say, a coffee, they open themselves up to a wave of lawsuits that trial attorneys are all too eager to pursue. This constant threat of Prop 65 lawsuits is always on business owners’ minds. But that’s just one of many examples of the kinds of lawsuits they must worry about. Another favorite among trial attorneys is California’s Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA), a law that’s been coined the “Sue Your Boss” law, and for good reason. Under PAGA, any “aggrieved” employee can file a lawsuit against their employer for virtually anything. From a typo in the company name on a paystub to bonuses that are off by one penny, the list of technical, nit-picky law-

done little to nothing to address the anti-business lawsuit abuse that has been hindering our state’s economy for far too long. It’s no wonder that business owners are fleeing the state. Until something is done to improve California’s civil justice system and to repair our litigious reputation, we will continue to repel perspective businesses, and our existing businesses will remain under the constant threat of lawsuits, or worse, shut down by the cost of defending themselves against one of these frivolous lawsuits in court. I ask that in 2021, my fellow Californians join me in pushing lawmakers to address tort reform in a meaningful way. If we succeed, the economy, our local communities and local residents will reap the benefits of a balanced, fair legal system. Bret Schanzenbach is president and CEO of the Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce

he colorful internet ad from an organization called Rescue California, a lead sponsor of the petition drive to recall Gov. Gavin Newsom, accuses him of posting “The worst record of getting vaccines distributed” of any state in America. For one thing, that’s not correct. As of Feb. 1, California stood 37th among the states in the percentage of available COVID-19 vaccine doses that had already been administered. Not great, but far from the worst, and the pace has picked up since then. Then there’s the irony in that ad. Among the early leaders of the Newsom recall have been two organizers and leaders of rallies by the Freedom Angels, a group of hardline anti-vaccination activists. One of that movement’s adherents violently attacked the pro-vaccination leader and Democratic state Sen. Richard Pan last year as he walked in his Sacramento district. There can be few greater ironies than for anti-vaxx organizers to gripe about a governor not getting enough people vaccinated. Then there’s the fact that almost all recall leaders are part of the Republican far right, which often decries “cancel culture.” Yet, they’re trying to cancel the results of the 2018 election. The recall drive, of course, likes to play up Newsom’s admitted hypocrisy in attending at least one group dinner larger than the state’s then-recommended limit of 10 persons. Who are the bigger hypocrites here? Anti-vaxxers like those who shut down the mass vaccination site at Dodger Stadium for an hour the other

california focus

thomas d. elias

day, many of whom signed the recall petition, or the governor, who is very human and sometimes slips up? For sure, not even its blatant hypocrisy will stop the recall movement. So it’s time to examine how a recall that stands some chance of ousting Newsom could also make him a political hero and a martyr to many members of this state’s dominant Democratic Party. So far, major Democrats are staying off the list of alternative potential governors that will accompany the recall question if and when it appears in a special election. If this holds up, and Republicans don’t find a candidate with the wide popular appeal of an Arnold Schwarzenegger, Newsom can run a massive ad campaign labeling the whole thing a far-right attempt to usurp power. He could even borrow one of ex-President Donald Trump’s post-election slogans, “Stop the Steal.” So far, the biggest names willing to put their names on the list of potential new governors are Republicans Kevin Faulconer, the termed-out ex-mayor of San Diego, and his near neighbor, businessman John Cox of suburban San Diego County, defeated easily by Newsom in 2018. Former Sacramento area Congressman Doug Ose also may run. None of them has appeal approaching movie muscleman Schwarzenegger. When former Facebook executive and Demo-

cratic megadonor Chamath Palihapitiya begged off the campaign the other day, it left no well-funded Democrat planning to run. Prominent Democrats like Congressmen Adam Schiff of Burbank and Ro Khanna of San Jose won’t oppose a like-minded sitting governor, fearing they could become pariahs in their own party if he survives the ouster attempt. Only one significant Democrat took that risk in 2003, when voters dumped then-Gov. Gray Davis in California’s only successful statewide recall vote. That was former Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, who did become an enduring party pariah after losing to Schwarzenegger. Another former lieutenant governor, John Garamendi, considered running but backed off and later ran for Congress, where he sits today. One thing for sure: If and when Newsom beats back the recall, he would instantly win a reputation as someone who put a bunch of far-right populists in their place. That would give him a leg up in a future race either for president — which every California governor considers — or in a 2024 run for the Senate seat now occupied by Democrat Dianne Feinstein. Newsom now dreads the likely recall attempt but if it happens, he gets a chance to whip his three most likely 2022 reelection challengers well in advance of that election. He could turn the entire experience into one of the best things that ever happened to him, with the potential of becoming a lasting hero among his fellow Democrats, here and across the country. Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com.

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FEB. 12, 2021

Man pleads not guilty in teacher’s death By City News Service

CARMEL VALLEY — A man accused of killing his ex-girlfriend's fiance — a beloved Cathedral Catholic High School teacher — by shooting him outside his North Park home pleaded not guilty Wednesday to murder. Jesse Milton Alvarez, 30, is accused in the Feb. 1 slaying of 37-year- old Mario Fierro, who police found shot shortly after 7 a.m. outside his home in the 4500 FIERRO block of Kansas Street. He died at the scene. According to Deputy District Attorney Ramona McCarthy, Alvarez dressed in all black, waited outside Fierro’s home for about an hour until the victim left his residence, then shot him multiple times at close range, “executing him.” Alvarez is charged with murder, a fireTURN TO KILLING ON A15

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ture of the decision. Deputy Mayor Dwight Worden, speaking generally on closed session performance evaluations, said the city manager was subject to performance reviews at 6 months after hiring followed by annual evaluations from the time of hiring. Johnson began her tenure as city manager in February 2020 and did have her first performance reviews in August last year. “The only employees who actually work for the council are the city manager and city attorney, so we do contracts with them and we do their reviews,” Worden said. Worden also noted that when the city council performs its evaluations, it is common for there to be more than one closed session. “In general when we do performance reviews there is back and forth,” Worden said. “It usually takes two meetings maybe, possibly more.” Johnson replaced former City Manager Scott Huth last year after Huth’s retirement following eight years in the position. Johnson previously worked as the assistant city manager in Laguna Beach. The Del Mar City Council normally meets every first and third Monday of the month but their next meeting will be Tuesday February 16 due to the Presidents’ Day holiday.

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Oceanside to weigh closing Brooks Street pool By Samantha Nelson

OCEANSIDE — Residents have started a petition to save the Brooks Street Swim Center, a facility the Oceanside City Council will consider closing to offset costs for the new El Corazon Aquatics Center. The potential closure of local pool was brought up during the Feb. 3 City Council meeting, when city leaders were set to vote on the operation plan for the El Corazon Aquatics Center. Staff recommended appropriating $429,800 from the general fund for hiring and training of personnel as well as budgeting for $1.66 million in expenditures with only $895,000 as ongoing revenue for the city’s 2021-2022 fiscal year. Councilmember Christopher Rodriguez was strongly opposed to approving the operation plan due to the gap in funding between expenses and revenue despite Neighborhood Services Director Megan Crooks’ explanation that the $1.66 million in expenses and $895,000 in revenue are conservative estimates. Crooks along with City Manager Deanna Lorson also added that the new event facility built with the new Aquatics Center would likely bring in far more additional revenue than what the city budgeted. Still, Rodriguez wasn’t convinced. “We were not elected to hope for the best, we were elected and put in this position to make tough decisions,” Rodriguez said. “Approving this is not what is best. We need to look at options outside of the box to help offset these costs.” Councilmember Peter Weiss had similar concerns about the Aquatics Centers’ costs and suggested using the costs from the Brooks Street pool to help pay for El Corazon. Weiss noted the Brooks Street pool costs about $700,000 annually to oper-

OCEANSIDE RESIDENT Madison Klein takes a break from swimming at Brooks Street Swim Center in Oceanside. The Oceanside City Council will consider closing the pool to help offset costs associated with the El Corazon Aquatics Center. Photo by Lorna Holt Photography

ate and needs about $4-6 million in deferred maintenance and upgrades. Deputy Mayor Ryan Keim was also concerned about costs, but he wasn’t quite ready to decide on closing the Brooks Street pool. He instead preferred to look at the possible option and its numbers at a future meeting. Because closing the Brooks Street pool wasn’t an item on the meeting agenda, Council wouldn’t have been able to vote on it during the Feb. 3 meeting anyway. Instead, both the approval of the El Corazon operation plan and discussion about the possible closure of Brooks Street pool has been postponed until the Feb. 24 council meeting. Rodriguez, Weiss and new Councilmember Kori Jensen voted to go forward with postponing El Cora-

zon operation plan approval and looking into Brooks Street pool’s closure. Keim did not want to delay the El Corazon plan any further and voted no, and Mayor Esther Sanchez was outright opposed to both the delay of El Corazon and the possible closure of Brooks Street pool. Sanchez said the intention of the El Corazon Aquatics Center never included depriving communities on the coast, particularly the Latino neighborhoods of Eastside and Crown Heights, of their own pool. “The Brooks Street pool has continued to serve the community fully,” Sanchez said. “It is a highly used resource and I’m really surprised that this would come up and that we would be taking from the poor to give to the rich — that’s what it looks like.” Sanchez disagreed with

the idea that the city can’t afford the plan as is. She also noted delaying the El Corazon approval plan would likely delay construction and the promised opening date of Aug. 21. Historically, low-income families of District 1, as well as Oceanside High School’s swim and water polo teams, have used Brooks Street pool. According to a petition started on change.org by resident Stephanie Ramos, closing Brooks Street pool would “take community benefits from a low-income area and allocate those benefits to a more affluent neighborhood.” At the Feb. 3 meeting, Keim suggested possibly transporting the children of Crown Heights and Eastside to El Corazon through a potential partnership with the Boys & Girls Club or another non-profit, but res-

ident and Oceanside Justice Coalition co-founder Jimmy Figueroa is skeptical about that possible plan. “It’s great to say during a council meeting but in practicality who will that fall on?” Figueroa asked during an interview with The Coast News. Figueroa explained that for these children, their neighborhoods are their world. “They’re not traveling or going on vacation,” he said. Figueroa, who grew up in the Tri-City neighborhood in District 3 but has family in District 1 with similar lived experiences, said he didn’t travel past Ventura County until he was 25 years old. “The means aren’t there to do that, so folks trying to take away that resource is beyond infuriating and disheartening,” he said.

Dates set for hearings in Schumacher civil lawsuits By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — The case between Councilwoman Cori Schumacher and three men involving accusations of harassment and anti-SLAPP claims was again continued on Feb. 5. A second judge in the case recused himself and now presiding is Judge Cynthia Freeland. During a Feb. 5 hearing, Freeland scheduled three hearings for the case of Schumacher against Carlsbad residents Larry Posner and Anthony Bona, plus former Carlsbad resident Noel Breen. Schumacher filed a civil harassment restraining order (CHRO) in September 2020 against the three men alleging harassment and stalking, while Bona and Breen countered by filing the anti-SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation) claims several weeks later. Posner’s case was dis-

SCHUMACHER

missed in October 2020 and he is seeking attorney’s fees. Bona and Breen are also seeking attorney’s fees, but a ruling from Freeland on the current cases must first be ordered. Freeland scheduled the anti-SLAPP hearing for March 4, followed by Posner’s hearing on March 12 and the hearing for the restraining order on March 17. Also, Breen has filed a cross-complaint, to which

Bryan Pease, one of Schumacher’s attorneys, objected. The cross-complaint names the City of Carlsbad, Schumacher’s wife, Maria Cerda, and Schumacher’s campaign. Breen’s attorney, Scott Talkov, said in the complaint that Schumacher acted in her capacity as an elected official to suppress free speech, thus violating the First Amendment rights of his client, who writes a political blog and has been a loud and harsh critic of Schumacher. Bona’s attorney, Erik Jenkins, has also claimed Schumacher is attempting to silence his client through the courts and violating his First Amendment rights. Bona, who goes by the online persona “Regular Guy in Carlsbad,” has a YouTube channel, which he speaks about the state of the council and is also a vocal and staunch critic of Schumacher.

Pease’s objection to the Breen cross-complaint will be argued during the March 4 hearing; he took issue with the naming of Schumacher’s wife and campaign. Pease has also filed several motions to strike legal replies from Breen and Bona. “He (Talkov) peppered the court with paperwork … and it was late and over the page limit,” Pease said. “The cross-complaint named the city along with her campaign and spouse. That seems like harassment.” In total, the three men are requesting to recoup legal fees of at least $30,000, although the total is likely more since the case was continued on Dec. 15 after the first judge recused herself. Schumacher’s original filing states a number of “veiled threats” against her, including more recent threats by Bona “to force me to leave my home and stalking, after over a year

of consistent, increasingly obsessive and distressing activity directed at me and those who publicly associate with me.” Schumacher’s report, meanwhile, stated Bona also submitted a request to the city for her phone number. Bona emailed the city under a Public Records Request for the phone if it was paid for by the city. The city denied the request. Schumacher also attached screenshots in the filing of Bona saying people should surveil Schumacher. In Bona’s filings, he said there were rumors about Schumacher’s residence and if she lived in District 1 as required. Also, Schumacher has lined up a number of witnesses for the CHRO case who have submitted statements to the court alleging further harassment by Breen. Breen has denied those allegations.


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Coronavirus

County reports 810 COVID-19 cases, 51 deaths By City News Service

REGION — San Diego County public health officials have reported 810 new COVID-19 cases and 51 deaths as the county announced plans for a new vaccination super station at the Del Mar Fairgrounds to open Friday. The percentage of positive tests and hospitalizations continued to decline Wednesday, good indicators the pandemic may finally be on the wane, despite the heavy death toll. Of 19,461 tests reported by the county’s Health and Human Services Agency on Wednesday, 4% returned positive, dropping the 14day rolling average of positive tests from 6.8% last week to 6.5%, the lowest yet in 2021. Hospitalizations from the virus dropped below 1,000 for the first time this year, declining by 29 patients from Tuesday to 992. Intensive care patients rose by one overnight to 318 but remain generally on the decline. There were 43 available, staffed ICU beds in the county as of Wednesday. Wednesday’s numbers raise the total number of coronavirus infections in the county throughout the pandemic to 248,861, while the death toll increased to 2,904. It was the third consecutive day with fewer than 1,000 new cases. Meanwhile, officials announced that Scripps Health, San Diego County and the Del Mar Fairgrounds are planning to open a COVID-19 vaccination super station at the fairgrounds on Friday. The Scripps Del Mar Fairgrounds Vaccination Super Station, located at 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., will provide drive-through and walk-through services on an appointment-only basis to anyone eligible to receive a shot under county guidelines. “Scripps Health is pleased to collaborate with the county and the Del Mar

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AREA LEADERS, including Supervisor Terra Lawson-Remer, above left, and Escondido Mayor Paul McNamara, joined Palomar Health officials on Feb. 8 to announce the region’s first COVID-19 Resource Clinic that offers vaccines, testing and monoclonal anti-body therapy at the old hospital in downtown Escondido. Palomar Health COO Sheila Brown, above right, said the healthcare provider has administered the monoclonal anti-body treatment to 27 other patients at different sites. Photos by Jordan P. Ingram

Fairgrounds on what will be a very important community-wide resource and new tool in the battle to control and diminish the COVID-19 pandemic locally,’’ Scripps president and CEO Chris Van Gorder said. “We are ready to expand beyond the smaller vaccination clinics we’ve been able to offer to Scripps patients over the past few weeks. “All we need is a supply of more doses to vaccinate more people.’’ Current plans call for the station to open initially from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday and Sunday. Longer hours and more days of operation will be added as more vaccine doses become available. Appointment slots will be posted on the county’s vaccination website at www. vaccinationsuperstationsd. com once they are available. A total of 15.1% of San Diegans age 16 and over have received at least one of the two shots required to develop antibody protection against the virus. Around 3% of the population over the age of 16 is fully vaccinated. San Diego County coronavirus inoculation sites have received 703,200 doses of vaccine and administered 527,745 doses, according to the HHSA. San Diego County’s COVID-19 case rate has dropped dramatically in recent weeks. As recently as Jan. 19, the county reported an adjusted rate of 60.6 new infections per 100,000 residents. As of Tuesday, the number dropped to 34.2 per 100,000. The case rate is updated every Tuesday. However, there is still a long way to go. To come out of the mostrestrictive purple tier in the state’s four-tiered reopening plan, the county needs to register fewer than seven cases per 100,000 people.

HEALTHCARE WORKERS prepare for drive-thru COVID-19 testing services at the old hospital in downtown Escondido. Photo by Jordan P. Ingram

The county health agency reported nine new community outbreaks Wednesday, bringing the total in the past week to 70, tied to 290 cases.

Palomar Health opens COVID-19 Resource Clinic By Staff

ESCONDIDO — Palomar Health oficials and North County leaders unveiled the region’s first COVID-19 Resource Clinic on Feb. 8 in downtown Escondido. The clinic site is the old hospital and offers vaccines, testing and monoclonal anti-body therapy in one location. “What we have here is what our nation needs – the triple threat against the virus: The identification through testing, the vaccination for those who haven’t contracted it and the monoclonal antibody treatment for those who test positive for it,” said Diane Hansen, Palomar Health president

and CEO. “We are the only site in San Diego County to have this approach and I believe, the only site in the nation.” Vaccinations are offered Tuesday through Saturday, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are offered on select days, subject to availability. “I want to thank Palomar Health for being such a strong partner in the County’s COVID-19 vaccination campaign,” San Diego County Supervisor Terra Lawson-Remer said in remarks at today’s press conference in front of the former Palomar Medical Center Downtown Escondido. “The County is continuing to accelerate our efforts to vaccinate people across the region…at sites like this one.” The clinic hosted its first patients on Saturday, Feb. 6, vaccinating 400 people. The clinic accommodates both drive through vehicles and walk through pedestrians under the climate protection of the three level parking garage.

When fully operational the site will be able to vaccinate more than 1,000 people per day, according to health officials. COVID-19 drive through testing (pedestrians accommodated) is offered Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1-5 p.m. by appointment only. Monoclonal anti-body therapy, which has been used to fight cancer for years, is offered seven days per week, 12 hours per day (8 a.m. – 8 p.m.) utilizing space in the now closed hospital.

Board OKs more small business financial aid By City News Service

REGION — The San Diego County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously voted to provide $30 million in grants to small businesses impacted by the COVID-19 pandeic as soon as federal or state stimulus funds are available. County staff will devel-

op the grant program with each supervisor's office selecting the recipients. Supervisor Terra Lawson-Remer, who made the proposal along with Supervisor Joel Anderson, said it was important to support small businesses, who were “asked to sacrifice their livelihoods for the greater good” once the pandemic began. The county’s many mom-and-pop stores “are (the) backbone of our local communities,” she added. “This is the right thing to do.” Anderson said that in his district, many are “living on the edge due to the pandemic.” “Many may not fully understand what these people go through,” he said, adding that those facing unemployment have to consider how to afford food, while also holding on to their housing, car and insurance. To be eligible, small businesses must employ fewer than 20 people, and comply with state and local public health guidelines.


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Escondido OKs raises Judge tosses city’s objection in Davis suit for police, firefighters By Dustin Jones

By Tigist Layne

ESCONDIDO — The Escondido City Council recently approved new labor agreements for the city’s rank-and-file police officers and firefighters, raising the salaries for both jobs to the median range in the county. The memoranda of understanding (MOU) between the city and its emergency services also included two-year extensions to the contracts of both jobs. The council unanimously approved the agreements with minimal discussion. “I want to highlight the personnel and leadership with fire and police… the demonstration and collaboration and working together and coming to agreements on something that’s so important to all of us in this city, and important to those departments in particular, and the men and women who serve in those departments — what they mean to us and hopefully what this will mean to them, now and in the future,” said Councilmember Mike Morasco. The new agreement awards paramedics, firefighter/paramedics, fire en-

gineers and fire captains a 4% raise. In January 2022, the second year of the contract, they will be eligible for a raise of up to 2.5%, depending on the county’s median salary at that time. Police officers and sergeants will be awarded a 5% raise this month, followed by an additional raise of up to 3% next year, depending on the county’s median salary at that time. The firefighters contract will cost $969,535 over the next two years, and the police contract will cost $1,738,530 over the next two years, according to the staff report. The city will pay for a majority of the increased costs through a reserve fund it has established for employee salaries and benefits. “It is anticipated that use of the CalPERS Section 115 Trust will be a major factor, along with other decisions regarding the General Fund, in covering the costs of this contract,” said the staff report. The new contract agreements went into effect on Jan. 24.

ENCINITAS — The California Superior Court sided with the Davis family on Jan. 25, overruling a “natural condition immunity” objection in a case filed against the City of Encinitas late last August. The Davis family is suing the city, the State of California, Leucadia Seabluffe Village Community Association and Seabreeze Management Company after a bluff collapsed on Aug. 2, 2019, at Grandview Beach, killing Julie Davis, Anne Davis Clave and Elizabeth Charles. Both the city and the state argued Government Code 831.2, commonly called the “natural condition immunity,” which bars them from liability. However, Judge Robert Dahlquist tossed the objection out. “At this early stage of the case and in the absence of a more complete factual record, the Court is unable to find that the immunity set forth in Government Code § 831.2 bars liability,” the ruling read. “Specifically, the Court cannot determine, on this limited record, that the injury here was caused by a ‘natural condition’ of ‘unimproved public property.’”

The defendants were required to respond to the ruling by Wednesday. The large group of family and friends had gathered to celebrate Charles’ recent successful bout with breast cancer. According to court documents, the lawsuit alleged a lifeguard directed the party to an area under-

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JASON COKER, senior pastor at Oceanside Sanctuary, does not believe newly appointed Oceanside City Councilmember Kori Jensen was the most qualified candidate to represent District 1. Photo by Chris Stone/Times of San Diego

terview process. “The interviews were cut short so there wasn’t an opportunity to properly vet candidates, and it seems painfully obvious watching that council meeting that there was an abundance of applicants for that seat who were highly qualified to represent District 1,” Coker said. “It seemed curious and baffling honestly that Jensen made the top of the lists for three out of four councilpersons. … She has absolutely no history in public service, never served on a city commission and has never engaged in local po-

litical advocacy that we’re aware of while there were so many other applicants who had a long history of serving the needs of the city.” Coker also found it odd that none of the councilmembers who listed Jensen as one of their top candidates explained why they chose her. “They could have gone a long way towards addressing this issue by simply explaining why they thought Ms. Jensen was right for it, so without that transparency, it stirred a backlash from the community,” Coker said. In 2019, Council adopt-

when it came to the most recent appointment process. “It’s just disrespectful to have a policy adopted and then disregarded,” Hammerschmidt said. Hammerschmidt was also one of the members of the public who called for Jensen’s resignation at her swearing-in. The Oceanside Justice Coalition, a group of community advocates, released a statement on Instagram along with the support of Coker, the North San Diego County NAACP and the North County LGBTQ Resource Center claiming the council “clouded transparency and eroded public trust by jamming through the interview workshop without any council discussion of the candidates.” The statement also dives into the issue of why districts were created in the first place: to prevent diluting votes from protected classes and to increase the representation of communities of color. In 2017, Oceanside began the process of switching to district elections rather than at-large seats. That year, residents primarily from the Eastside, Crown Heights, Fireside/Mid Valley, Libby Lake, Deep Valley and Tri-City pushed to establish District 1 and 2 to better represent the city’s ethnic and socioeconomic diversity. According to Jimmy Figueroa, one of the founders of the Oceanside Justice Coalition, only a handful of council members actually came from those communities in Oceanside’s 130 years as a city. The switch to districts and the creation of Districts 1 and 2 aimed to get more people from those communities elected.

Figueroa wasn’t surprised that Sanchez, who grew up in the Eastside and has been on the council now for two decades, was elected to represent District 1 in 2018. But according to Figueroa, District 2 simply wasn’t ready and didn’t have enough time to prepare and inform its residents about the new process. Figueroa said these communities want to see people who they know and are involved to take office, but what frustrates many is that candidates only seem to start showing up looking for support 18 months before an election. Those candidates who lose are usually never heard from again, and those who win only seem to show up to a handful of events in the communities each year, he explained. With district elections, the hope was for voters in these areas to see their neighbors as councilmembers. “That’s why we said we have to have folks that are proximate to these communities,” Figueroa said. “If my community is dealing with an issue and a candidate is also from there, I don’t have to explain why it’s significant to address said issue.” With the most recent appointment process and the selection of Jensen, Figueroa and the others felt that District 1 voters had an opportunity taken away from them without a special election or even a more public-involved appointment process. “I would have liked to see which candidate got the most emails and calls from people in the district,” Figueroa said. “There was just no transparency in the entire process.”

FIRST RESPONDERS from across North County, including Carlsbad Fire Department, provided assistance after a fatal bluff collapse on Aug. 2, 2019, at Grandview Beach in Encinitas. File photo

COUNCIL

and had received reviews from guests as recently as January. The Airbnb page was taken down last week, and Jensen previously told The Coast News that she wouldn’t be renting out her home “ever again.” Jensen also told The Coast News that she does in fact live at the Pacific Street address, and at least one of the public comments from the Feb. 3 meeting came from someone who claimed to have stayed there “many times” with Jensen present. “I have personally stayed at her home many, many times in Oceanside with Kori Jensen, so I know she’s had a presence there for at least 15 years,” said Brent Lovett. Rev. Jason Coker, of the Oceanside Sanctuary, also asked Jensen about her residency on Pacific Street via email, to which she responded that she does live there. He then asked her to respond to accusations that she does not live there, but she has yet to respond to him. “I find it troubling that she hasn’t responded in detail to allegations and that she had been renting the home out all the way up through January,” Coker said. “I don’t find it convincing.” Complaints about Jensen’s alleged untruthfulness regarding her address have been forwarded to the San Diego County District Attorney’s Office, according to City Clerk Zeb Navarro. Coker and many others also found that Jensen was not as qualified as other candidates for the seat and took issue with the short in-

neath the cliff when Clave and a portion of the party asked where they should set up. The complaint argues the family was unaware of the dangers the cliff posed. Just before 3 p.m., a portion of the cliff collapsed, crushing Clave, Davis and Charles. Pat Davis — husband of Julie, father

to Anne and brother-in-law of Elizabeth — tried in vain to move the blocks of sandstone that had trapped the three women. Family and friends stood by witnessing the event unfold. The lawsuit alleges negligence, specifically the property above Grandview Beach contributed to erosion of the bluff. The legal filing additionally alleges the city was negligent and failed to address erosion, court documents said. The plaintiffs claim the accident was not a “random act of nature.” The lawsuit also suggests the development on the bluff above, Seabuffe Village, catered to non-native plants along the face of the bluff. The ice plant, also known as sea fig, was brought to California in the 1900s from South Africa to help stabilize soil along railroad tracks. The plant thrived in the state and has since spread up and down the coast. The plant takes in a lot of water and becomes heavy, which can destabilize the soil and increase the likelihood of landslides, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

ed a formal appointment process to the city office after community members pushed for a clearer, more transparent process. Resident Arleen Hammerschmidt was one of these vocal community members, but she felt the policy that was adopted was incomplete. “It was only a policy, which means it’s just guidance, which means the City Council can change or adopt it at will,” Hammerschmidt said. Hammerschmidt added that the City Council didn’t even follow its own policy


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Oceanside elementary students can return to campus in March By Samantha Nelson

OCEANSIDE — Oceanside Unified elementary students can return to district campuses in March. On Feb. 9, the Oceanside Unified school board unanimously voted to have all students receiving special education services in preschool through fifth grade return to in-person instruction the week of March 8, and general education students in the same grades return the week of March 15. Students will return for split days rather than full school days for the time being. The board made the decision based on the decline of COVID-19 case rates in the county along with its hiring of new staff that will enable “a safe and efficient return to campus,” according to a board letter addressed to parents published on Feb. 10. For parents like Amanda Maslowski, the decision to reopen could have come a lot sooner.

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Maslowski is an Oceanside resident and mother of two little boys, one in kindergarten and the other a special needs preschool student at Del Rio Elementary. Virtual classes don’t work at all for her younger son, Gavin, who has autism and is unable to absorb the lessons from a computer screen. Special needs students receive IEPs (Individualized Education Program), which documents each student’s individual learning needs and sets goals for them. Maslowski wrote to Gavin’s teacher and principal, describing her concerns with how her son would be able to meet his IEP goals if he could not absorb lessons virtually. Maslowski was able to finally get that one-ontime for Gavin and each of his teachers for academics, physical education, speech therapy and more, but she knew that wasn’t the reality for everyone else.

Her older son, Wyatt, has also been struggling with virtual classes over the last year. “He’s very smart, but he’s struggling,” she said. “Wyatt is more capable, but he still can’t read, and I have to be on top of him to do assignments, and the amount of work he receives as a kindergartner seems like a lot.” Maslowski was excited to see both of her sons on the same playground together this year, but so far that hasn’t happened. She has been vocal

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Carlsbad City Council meets to discuss goals amid tension By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — The Carlsbad City Council on Feb. 4 kicked off the first of three days to set its annual goals, including discussion on council decorum, staff's heavy workload and collateral damage from public disagreements between councilmembers. While previous goal-setting meetings focused on projects, such as trenching railroad tracks in Carlsbad Village or building a new City Hall, the council's four-hour meeting featured discussions about how the council can more effectively manage staff’s time and work together. Additionally, City Manager Scott Chadwick reported staff members have been caught in the middle of the council’s disagreements, although he did not identify any particular members of the council. “We don’t want staff to create a distraction for council and want to be as high functioning as possible,” Chadwick added. “I want to make sure staff can respond and we can be as professional as an organization as possible.” Mayor Matt Hall noted some staff members are “scared” and the council must take those feelings seriously. Hall also pushed for a discussion centering on the council’s decorum, respect for colleagues and public comments, noting the last two years have been challenging and councilmembers have not been truthful with each other. Councilwoman Cori Schumacher said she did not “consent” to Hall’s call for dialogue regarding decorum, but she would like to put forward an ethics ordi-

nance. As for the staff’s workload, a number of senior-level staffers reported in detail their day-to-day workload — many working six to seven days a week and 12 or more hours per day. Although much of the staff is fatigued, Chadwick said no one is complaining. Chadwick's report to the council also showed the additional workload due to the formation of several ad hoc committees. Over the past two years, Chadwick reported the council made 516 inquiries and passed 122 minute motions. Additionally, staff reported issues with the city’s IT infrastructure and issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Chadwick. “Our prioritization of assignments is faltering,” Chadwick added. “Everyone is doing multiple jobs … and responding to the pandemic. Also, there has been an increase in engagement with the public.” Another issue, Chadwick said, is upgrading the IT infrastructure. While not “sexy,” he said it is critical as the city uses several methods to access simple information or to something such as the Capital Improvement Projects. He said the city must upgrade its cybersecurity efforts, data retention and get systems to “talk” to each other. “There are so many systems that don’t work together,” Chadwick said. “Manual data entry can be unreliable.” The council and staff were to reconvene on Feb. 11 and either finish the workshop or it will be continued one more week, according to Kristina Ray, the city’s communication director.

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FEB. 12, 2021

Alleged Oceanside hate crime raises alarm By Samantha Nelson

A SERIES of switchbacks leading to Beacon’s Beach has eroded after several rain events and bluff collapses. File photo

BEACON’S

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(latest) restoration program is to create a self-sustaining, native southern coastal bluff scrub habitat that will stabilize soils, lessen erosion along the bluff and trail, and enable continued access to Beacon’s Beach along the existing trail,” according to the project file. A 2018 plan involved decreasing parking capacity in the lot above the bluff, moving the lot inland and using a set of stairs to access the beach. The stairs in the previous proposal would have been able to withstand a landslide. But in December 2019, the Planning Commission voted to deny the project, ruling that the city’s proposal for a wooden staircase was too similar to an earlier concrete version, which locals had ridiculed as a “Las Vegas Skyway.” Since then, rain events have further damaged the beach access trail, which

was repaired in May 2020 with a wood lagging retaining wall, according to the project file. The current plan aims to restore the bluff over the course of two years and avoid new construction altogether. The updated proposal comes after bluff-related incidents have struck Encinitas beaches over the past two years. Last August, a 40-foot stretch of bluff collapsed at Stone Steps Beach. Just one year earlier, in August 2019, three women were killed by a cliff collapse at Grandview Beach. Despite warning signs posted along beach access ways, staircases and parking lots, some beachgoers still sit dangerously close to the cliffs and bluffs at Encinitas beaches. Multiple attempts were made to contact the city’s Associate Planner Todd Mierau for more information about the project, but he failed to respond before publication.

OCEANSIDE — For Geremias Martin, an openly gay Oceanside resident, a nice meal with friends turned into a fight for his life after he was stabbed in an unprovoked attack last November. Martin, 41, was eating with two friends — another gay man and a transgender woman — on Nov. 24, 2020, at a local Oceanside restaurant when a man stabbed Martin three times in the back. The three friends did not have any kind of exchange with the perpetrator prior to the attack. The suspect did not attempt to steal from the victim during the attack. According to the North County LGBTQ Resource Center, the assailant's only apparent motive was his hatred of LGBTQ+ people. Using closed-circuit camera footage of the attack, Oceanside Police identified the attacker, someone who was previously known to them, and filed charges of attempted murder. However, the suspect has since fled to Mexico and has not been apprehended yet. The Resource Center originally agreed to respect the police department’s request for silence regarding the incident to avoid potential interference with the investigation. Two months after the attack, however, the Resource Center reached out to The Coast

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GEREMIAS MARTIN, of Oceanside, was stabbed three times on Nov. 24, 2020, during an unprovoked attack. According to the North County LGBTQ Resource Center, Martin is the victim of a hate crime. Courtesy photo

News because its advocates feel the community needs to know that hate crimes against LGBTQ+ people are still happening. The San Diego County District Attorney’s Office has yet to conclude whether the attack was a hate crime. According to Max Disposti, executive director of the Resource Center, attacks against LGBTQ+ individuals are more difficult to determine if they are hate crimes than racially based attacks. Consequently, many anti-LGBTQ+ hate crimes go unnoticed. “Unless the man was screaming, ‘I’m going to kill you because you are gay,’ it’s hard to prove,” Disposti said. Disposti noted the attack against Martin wasn’t likely racially motivated either as the attacker and Martin are both Latino. One thing appeared certain to Disposti: The attacker aimed to kill Martin. According to Martin, his liver was punctured, requiring doctors to open Martin's chest from his ribcage down to his belly to perform extensive surgery. Though the outside has mostly healed, Martin’s insides will need to take lon-

ger to heal. For example, his stomach is incredibly sensitive and some foods cause him pain and discomfort. But the attack left more than just physical injuries on Martin. “Sometimes I can be happy, and sometimes I get angry,” Martin told The Coast News. “I get really bad anxiety and sometimes I’m suicidal.” This wasn’t the first time Martin had been attacked. Earlier in the summer, Martin had been tricked and robbed while on a trip to Las Vegas. Several years earlier in 2013, Martin was severely beaten by five other people in Orange County. Martin said he sometimes feels guilty for these attacks, which has only exacerbated his mental health issues. Before the attack, Martin had been working side jobs while attending barber school. But after his most recent hospitalization, he just couldn't move around as he did before. At this time, Martin’s friend got him in touch with Disposti at the Resource Center.

“I actually didn’t believe they were going to help me,” Martin said. But the Resource Center followed through by helping provide Martin with rent money and food. And without the Resource Center’s immediate help, Martin said he likely would have been homeless by now. While the District Attorney’s Office offers support for victims of attacks by helping with medical costs, relocation expenses, mental health services and loss of income, services and assistance can take several months. According to Martin, the most significant help the Resource Center gave him was access to therapy through their mental health services program. The program provides clinical service intakes and referrals at low or no cost. Sessions are provided by associates and licensed therapists, according to the Resource Center’s website. “It helps talking about it,” Martin said about the attack. “The more I share about it, I think it’s better for me.” The LGBTQ Resource Center, celebrating its 10year anniversary this year, provides numerous other services to individuals including HIV prevention and care, transitional and crisis housing for LGBTQ+ youth, substance abuse recovery, immigration assistance, social support groups and more. Additionally, the group also facilitates training for LGBTQ patients, employees, city workers and police officers. Though California has progressive laws and protections for LGBTQ individuals compared to some other states, people here still experience targeted attacks, threats and discrimination. Disposti said the organization deals with a handful of incidents each year, but noted that Martin's injuries were some of the worst he’s ever seen. Disposti also noted that many people are afraid to go to the police or even the Resource Center TURN TO HATE CRIME ON A19

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FEB. 12, 2021

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T he C oast News

Carlsbad woman finds successful career in solar sales By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — Like many people, the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Hobson family hard. Vanessa Hobson and her husband, Tod Haneberg, own an Anytime Fitness Gym in eastern Washington State and when it reopened, they lost 30% of their previous business. To make matters worse, Vanessa Hobson still hadn’t found a job yet after being laid off in 2019. But while sifting through job ads, Hobson stumbled onto Solar Energy Partners about six months ago and found a rebirth in her career and life. Home improvement projects were all the rage throughout the summer, which spilled over into residential solar panels. Brought on as an independent contractor, Hobson is closing an impressive four to five home installs per month. Also, the newfound flexibility and being her own boss has opened up the possibilities for her new career as she is taking advantage of marketing gaps to build her own brand, Clean Power On, and it allows her to spend more time with her family. “From a marketing standpoint, I knew I wasn’t going to find a job,” Hobson said. “We ended up going solar and referring people left and right and banking all these referral credits.

VANESSA HOBSON, 43, of Carlsbad was out of work prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, but found a new career in selling residential solar panels with Solar Energy Partners. The transition, she said, has changed her life for the better.

I started looking for a job and found a dealer.” The solar industry has exploded during the pandemic as people are installing panels for several reasons from trying to save money to doing their part in being more green. She’s also more financially stable than in her previous job, leveraging personal relationships for those interested in solar and taking to social media for marketing and virtual calls to answer any and all questions. David Madrid, one of the founding partners of Solar Energy Partners,

INSTALLATIONS OF RESIDENTIAL solar panels have exploded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Courtesy photos

said Hobson’s background was a perfect fit. She is a people person, he said, and because of federal policies and the shift to solar in the residential market reduces the difficulty in the sales process. “She is incredibly talented and we’re grateful to have her,” Madrid said. “She has an ability to connect with people.” As she builds her own business and brand, Hobson said she is in the pro-

cess of scaling her brand and also becoming a mentor for other contractors. Her life, she said, has changed for the better because she no longer has to “punch a clock” and manage a set schedule defined through the workplace. Now, she finds it easier to handle her own schedule, along with her 11-year-old son’s obligations. “It’s been a complete life shift,” she said. Solar Energy Partners

was founded in 2017 and is based in Turlock, CA with another main office in Dallas, TX, Madrid said. He said they made 2020 into a growth year, despite the pandemic, by pivoting from in-home presentations to social distancing and virtual appointments. Also, the company was able to hire more people and create new training methods to help individuals with no sales experience. In total, the company has 500

contractors in five states. As far as Hobson, Madrid said her marketing and helping her husband run the gym made her a prime candidate as she had experience with direct sales. “The transition wasn’t too big of a leap for her,” Madrid said. “Her drive, her discipline and her ability to connect with people are all really important pieces (of) solar sales platform.”

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A12

T he C oast News

FEB. 12, 2021

North County's Last Great Butcher Shop!

Cele

bra

54 YE

ting

sinc ARS e 19 67

Big John and his staff wish all of you a very

We are open for food take out & outside dining everyday

It’s all about the meat & you!

With springtime right around the corner, Tip Top Meats is prepared, just like every year to bring you the nothing but the best! Starting with Valentine’s Day, they continue to offer their unrivaled filet steak dinner for two with a bottle of wine for only $25.98! Then stay tuned for their preparations, which are in full swing for both St. Patrick’s Day and Easter, which is only 6 weeks away! Nothing can stop Tip Top Meats from bringing you the finest, highest quality products at the most competitive prices to make your holidays easy, stress free and delicious! No one can match what they do as far as prices, quality and value. Big John says, “Our staff is working relentlessly to provide the unique and special items you have come to expect from Tip Top Meats,” John says, “Everyone on our team takes pride in their work and our unparelled customer satisfaction continues to drive us all to excellence in serving you!” In addition to the holiday specials at Tip

Top Meats, they also work hard every day hamburger and also their famous bacon. If with prepared food and meals to fulfill the you are too busy to cook, stop by Tip Top Meats and pick up great home-made soups. This week they are featuring New England Style Clam Chowder and Swedish yellow pea soup, all made with home-made stock, low-sodium and gluten-free. John says, “With our eatery now open for limited service, and hopefully soon, full-serThis Valentine’s treat that special someone to vice, we will delight you with either dining in TIP TOP MEATS VALENTINE’S meals or take out! We are proud to continue to offer our popular Valentine’s Day special STEAK DINNER FOR TWO! of two filet steak dinners and a bottle of wine Receive two tender Tip Top filet (8-10 oz.) steak for $25.98, no one offers this type of value, dinners, with potatoes, vegetables, salad and roll plus a bottle of our house wine. quality and selection. This special offer is our way of saying thank you to our many loyal customers, we appreciate you, love servicplus tax ing you and thank you for your many years of business!” He went on to say, “We buy the daily needs of their busy customers. Stop best, sell the best at the lowest possible pricby on your way home from work and pick up es. No one else in the county can compete pot roasts, delicious meatloaf, fresh ground with us.”

Only $

2598

Enjoy one of our everyday specials! Three eggs, any style, home fried potatoes & toast. ALL YOU CAN EAT (on the premises) sausage, bratwurst or ham.

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7

$ 98 plus tax

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1298 FILET/N.Y. $1498 SIRLOIN $

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7

$ 98 plus tax


FEB. 12, 2021

A13

T he C oast News

Regional transit agency rolls out new locomotives By Samantha Nelson

OCEANSIDE — The North County Transit District (NCTD) celebrated its rollout of five new, ultramodern locomotives and several refurbished COASTER passenger cars on Feb. 8 at the Oceanside Transit Center. Regional leaders including NCTD Board Chair and Encinitas Deputy Mayor Tony Kranz, SANDAG Board Chair and Encinitas Mayor Catherine Blakespear and Rep. Mike Levin (D-San Juan Capistrano) gathered Monday morning at the Oceanside Transit Center for a ribbon-cutting ceremony that showcased the new locomotives and renovated passenger cars. Supervisor Nathan Fletcher also tuned in virtually on behalf of the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District Board. The COASTER commuter trains have been in service for 25 years as part of NCTD’s transportation system, which also includes the BREEZE buses, SPRINTER hybrid rail trains and LIFT para-transit services. In 2019, the COASTER provided more than 10 million passenger trips throughout North County and into downtown San Diego. That amount dropped significantly in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced NCTD to reduce COASTER operating hours.

SANDAG CHAIR and Encinitas Mayor Catherine Blakespear and Rep. Mike Levin (D-San Juan Capistrano) meet during a media event held to celebrate the rollout of new COASTER locomotives and passenger car renovations. Photo by Samantha Nelson

The system currently only runs Monday through Friday with no weekend services and will continue to do so until ridership increases. The regional transit agency hopes to increase ridership with the implementation of the new locomotives and the overhaul program that has updated the passenger cars’ insides. Through the overhaul program, all of the outdated cars will be gutted to a shell and installed with new seating upholstery, upgraded LED lighting, new carpet and more charging ports at

some seats. “The seats are much softer than the previous model and some of the stations that you sit at will have charging ports,” Kranz said. The cars are also to be painted with a new color scheme. All 28 of the COASTER passenger cars will be finished with the overhaul program by 2026. While the passenger cars were in good enough condition to be upgraded, the locomotives pulling the cars weren’t, which is why the COASTER system received five new Siemens lo-

comotives as replacements. Additionally, NCTD will be receiving two additional replacement locomotives and two more locomotives for expanded service. NCTD will receive these four additional locomotives by June 2023. The total of nine new locomotives cost approximately $70.3 million, most of which came from various state and local funding opportunities. The new locomotives run more efficiently with lower emissions and are significantly quieter than the older fleet of locomotives.

“In addition to being cleaner and quieter, it does mean you need to be well aware that the trains run on the tracks,” Kranz said. “So if you see tracks, think train, because there could be one coming and it could be so quiet that you don’t hear it.” Sean Loofbourrow, NCTD’s chief of safety, told the Oceanside City Council during its Feb. 3 meeting that the district has finished safety testing of the new locomotives and rail improvements. The process included testing signals, flagging and effectiveness of crossings. “We want to make sure that as the locomotives approach the crossings that the crossings recognize the equipment that’s coming and make sure that the gates are lowered down,” Loofbourrow told Council. Funding for the five new replacement locomotives that were launched on Feb. 8 came from a $10 million grant from the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District Carl Moyer Program, and nearly $47 million from the State of California Senate Bill 1. “The new COASTER locomotives will increase service reliability, improve the rider experience and are more environmentally friendly,” Kranz said at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. NCTD will also be receiving 10 expansion bi-level passenger coaches, and

one replacement rail cab with the hope of increasing train frequencies from 22 to 42 trains per average weekday over the next three to five years. The San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) is funding the expansion equipment with nearly $58.8 million in funding. “We need to invest in our trains if we’re going to have a functioning transit system,” Blakespear told The Coast News. “We have had trains that are really old and threadbare, and barely keeping it together, so this is an investment in the next generation of trains so that we can provide more service that goes more frequently and is faster so that people feel that transit is a reasonable option and they want to take it.” Blakespear noted there was some controversy on the SANDAG board over whether this investment in the COASTER rail system was worth it. “There are a lot of priorities in this county and $50 million is a lot of money, and there were some on the SANDAG board who were wondering if this was really a good investment,” Blakespear said. “It fell to members like me and Councilmember Kranz, and a lot of other advocates and staff members at the agencies to say that if we want to have good transit we have to invest in the trains themselves.”

inest North County’s F

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Top Choice Fish Market is here to supplement those practitioners of the season and for everyone else too! We have the freshest fish in North County. Traditionally, Lent is a favorite time for Catholics to “give something up” and fresh fish is the answer! Bring your diet in to balance every day of the week, they have fresh fish flown in to their first-class facility, whole and freshly fileted on premise. Top Choice offers the highest quality

and variety at the best prices. They have Dungeness Crabs for your enjoyment along with loads of live lobsters (prepared and poached or grilled on site for no charge.) Choose from fresh oysters, shrimp or king crab legs. Also, at the eatery get fish and chips, fish tacos and a variety of grilled fried or poached fish entries. Big John says, “When it comes to value, variety, quality and large portion size, Top Choice Fish Market and Eatery can’t be beat and outpaces everyone else.”

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A14

T he C oast News

FEB. 12, 2021

Sports

K.C.’s Reid has a Chief fan in childhood chum Pallas

I

f not for a pandemic, Ted Pallas was bound for Super Bowl 55. It wasn’t so much to root on a team, but for a childhood chum: Kansas City Chiefs coach Andy Reid. “I’ve know him since we were 5-6 years old,” said Pallas, a longtime Del Mar resident. The pair lived five houses down from each other in Los Angeles. Pallas and Reid shared the same elementary and junior high schools, then became standout athletes at Marshall High. While Reid was a big shot in football, Pallas stood out on the mound although he really wanted to join Reid on the gridiron. “But the baseball coach wouldn’t let me play football,” Pallas said. “He said, ‘Your future is in baseball,’ and he ended up being a smart guy because I got a scholarship to Pepperdine.” Pallas was on the first Waves squad to advance to the College World Series in 1979 and the team was inducted into Pepperdine’s

CALENDAR Know something that’s going on? Send it to calendar@ coastnewsgroup.com

FEB. 12

GARDEN OF LOVE

San Diego Botanic Garden is presenting ‘Garden of Love’ a Valentine weekend experience for visitors of all ages (including youngsters) from 5 to 8 p.m. Feb. 12, Feb. 13 and Feb. 14. Stroll through romantically-lit pathways, listen to live music, grab some food from a food truck and get warm by a fire-pit. You can also buy a treat for someone special (like plants… or chocolate). Tickets from $18 for adults to $7 for youth, are available online at SDBGarden. org and must be purchased in advance. As a reminder, San Diego Botanic Garden remains open under the purple tier. For more information, visit the website at SDBGarden.org or contact Visitor Services at vistorservices@sdbgarden.org. NEW VACCINE SITE OPENS

A drive-through Covid-19 Resource Clinic opened in Escondido Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Palomar Medical Center Downtown Escondido, 555 E. Valley Parkway, Escondido. The vaccine site is open Tuesday to Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vaccines will be given by appointment only to those who meet the eligibility requirements. Appointments are available through the PalomarHealth. org/Vaccine website.

athletic Hall of Fame. It was a shame to Pallas seeing what happened at the Super Bowl as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers beat the sputtering Chiefs, 31-9. “I’ve been watching football forever and anytime a team has to settle for field goals it is usually going to lose,” Pallas, 61, said. “You have to take advantage of those red zone possessions.” But K.C. didn’t and the Buccaneers’ Tom Brady made the Chiefs pay. That prevented Pallas’ pal from winning consecutive Super Bowl titles as Brady claimed his seventh. “It shows you two things,” Pallas said. “That it’s hard to repeat in sports, especially in football. And Tom Brady will likely go down as the greatest athlete in America.” host a free series of online lectures in North County San Diego, on Fridays at 1 p.m. Learn about our changing community from a news journalist, get an update on the decommissioning of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, learn about meanings of flowers from an art historian and more, on Zoom. Registration is required at https://forms. gle/UMnrvJrnnNfHEcNVA or e-mail life.miracosta@ gmail.com. AMIGOS DE LAS AMERICAS

On March 9, Amigos de las Américas (AMIGOS), an international non-profit organization creating experiences for teens rooted in cultural immersion and leadership development across the Americas, is launching its first Local Community Impact Project throughout the county. This eight-week initiative gives teens the chance to take action in their community and work with other young leaders in the San Diego area. The group creates projects that address pressing local issues, and build a network of like-minded friends. For more information and to register, visit amigosinternational.org.

FEB. 13

HOULIHAN BOOK SIGNING

The Encinitas Historical Society will be hosting a book signing on Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 13 in the garden outside the 1883 One-Room Schoolhouse, at 390 West F St. Ian Thompson, husband of the late city council mayor and local activist and politician, LIBRARY LECTURE SERIES Maggie Houlihan, wrote a The Oceanside Pub- true account “An Inconvelic Library and MiraCosta nient Voice, One Woman’s Learning is For Everyone Fight Against Injustice,” of

Reid was a presence on Pallas’ block. “He was so much bigger than everybody else, but he handled it so well,” Pallas said. “A lot of kids would rag on him because he was — in a lot of people’s eyes — different. He was probably 6 feet, 220 pounds when he was 12 years old. He was a man.” That was evident in a YouTube video where Reid is competing at the L.A. Memorial Coliseum in the Punt, Pass and Kick event. Reid had to borrow a Rams player’s uniform to wear in the competition. Pallas, who owns an audiovisual company, said while Reid’s competitive fire always burns, it doesn’t extinguish his kindness. “With Andy, what you see is what you get,” Pallas said. “He is the nicest guy there is and he’s funny.” When they connect, football is seldom discussed. “When we get together, we really are not talking football most of the time,” Pallas said. “We make it a point to not say, ‘What were you thinking when they their years in Encinitas. ROMANCE IN THE GARDEN

K.C. COACH Andy Reid grew up in L.A. down the street from longtime Del Mar resident Ted Pallas. Courtesy photo

threw that pass?’ Instead, we talk about life and the old days.” Reid never shed his Southern California persona despite NFL coaching stops in Green Bay, Philadelphia and Kansas City. Reid often wears shorts when long johns are more appropriate. For big wins, Reid occasionally has Tommy’s chili and cheeseburgers flown in from L.A. to celebrate. cinitas Library Bookstore is now open by appointment only Monday through Friday, 1 to 4 p.m. To make an appointment, call (760) 9087334. Thousands of newly donated books including Fiction, Children’s, Classics and many more are available, as well as DVDs, CDs and audiobooks.

San Diego Botanic Garden, 230 Quail Gardens Dr., Encinitas, offers a Garden of Love this Valentine’s Day weekend. Stroll through romantically-lit pathways, listen to live music, grab some food from one of the food trucks and hold hands by a fire-pit. You can buy a treat for yourself or someone special (like plants… or REPUBLICAN CLUB chocolate). Purchase tickets Join the Republican at sbdgarden.org. Club of Ocean Hills at 1 p.m. Feb. 17 to hear speaker Paula Whitsell, incoming chair of the Republican Party of NEWS ON BREAST CANCER San Diego County. For more The Immunothera- information and the link to py Foundation will be host- attend the ZOOM meeting, ing another episode of its e-mail RepublicanClubO“Coffee & Conversation,” fOceanHills@gmail.com or webinar series via Zoom, call John at (760) 497-6117. from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Feb. Check out RCOH at republi15, on the topic of “Breast canclubofoceanhills.com. Cancer and Immunotherapy.” Featured speaker is Dr. ASH WEDNESDAY WALK Rebecca Shatsky, a breast The Village Church in cancer oncologist at UCSD Rancho Santa Fe will offer working to change the base- an onsite Walk of Prayer and line for treatment of breast Reflection on beginning at 3 cancer patients. For more p.m. Ash Wednesday, Feb. information and to register, 17 at 6225 Paseo Delicias, visit https://bit.ly/3iBTdL0. Rancho Santa Fe. Small vials of ashes will be available for self-application and the prayer stations will remain DOGGY-GRAS AT HWAC open until 5 p.m. No RSVPs Helen Woodward An- are needed, but physical imal Center will host a distancing and masks are virtual Doggie Gras event required. A pre-recorded and photo contest open to online Ash Wednesday seranimals of all kinds. Regis- vice starts at 9 a.m. at viltration closes at 11:59 p.m. lagechurch.org. Feb. 16, with winners announced Feb. 19. Cost is $10. To participate, or for more information, go to https:// PARENT COVID SUPPORT animalcenter.org/events / Kids4Community presdoggie-gras-virtual, or call ents Supporting Parents and Helen Woodward Animal Kids During COVID-19 free Center: (858) 756-4117, ext. Virtual Speaker Series with 362. “Montessori Techniques You Can Use at Home,” BOOKSTORE BY APPT. at 4 p.m. Feb. 18. This sesThe Friends of the En- sion is for both parents and

FEB. 17

FEB. 15

FEB. 16

FEB. 18

Reid’s hunger to mesh with others is among his attributes. So are his high-scoring offenses, although K.C. didn’t reach the end zone against the Bucs. Reid stops in his Capistrano Beach home for the offseason, a place where Pallas visits him and finds the same Andy Reid that he’s known for years. Reid’s success didn’t rob him of his humility. “It hasn’t fazed him one bit,” Pallas said. “He’s still the nicest guy. “But obviously I’m feeling for him after Sunday’s game. I know he will probably take a week off and get right back at it. I think they can go to the Super Bowl again next year.” If so, Reid won’t be far from home and Pallas promises to attend the game at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood. Unlike when they were tykes, the game will start, and not end, when the lights come on. Contact Jay Paris at jparis8@aol.com. Follow @jparis_sports.

Schottenheimer, former Chargers coach, dies at 77 By City News Service

REGION — Marty Schottenheimer, who during a 21-year NFL head coaching career led the then-San Diego Chargers for five seasons from 2002 to 2006, died Feb. 8 at the age of 77. A statement released by his family said Schottenheimer died Monday in Charlotte, North Carolina, with his family at his side. He had been battling Alzheimer’s disease since 2014. Though he never took a team to the Super Bowl, he is one of only eight coaches to reach 200 victories. He had only two losing seasons. In 2002, he took over a Chargers team that went 5-11 the year before and went 8-8 in his first season. The team fell to 4-12 the next year, but Schottenheimer then ran off seasons of 12-4, 9-7 and 14-2. In all, Schottenheimer went 47-33 with the Chargers. Overall, he finished his career with 200 wins, 126 loss and one tie for a winning percentage of .613.

kids). Register at signup- art lesson for all ages and genius.com/go/60b0c44ab- abilities. Pick up your craft ae2aa1f94-montessori. kits the week of Feb. 15. BIRCH SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego is offering 600 free virtual programs to local schools in need this year. The aquarium’s education team adapted its Next Generation Science Standards-aligned Discovery Lab programs into new 30- and 45-minute virtual lessons for students from pre-kindergarten through grade 12. Register at https://aquarium.ucsd. edu/teachers/online-learning/virtual-after-school-series or e-mail birchaquariumprograms@ucsd.edu or call (858) 534-7336. RED CROSS NEEDS BLOOD

The American Red Cross is urging the community to give blood. As a thank-you for helping ensure a stable blood supply, those who give this February will receive a $5 Amazon.com gift card via e-mail, courtesy of Amazon. Additional information and details are available at RedCrossBlood. org/Together. ABOUT TOXIC SUBSTANCES

The California Department of Toxic Substances Control will hold its first quarterly public meeting of 2021 via Zoom webinar from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18 at https://dtsc.ca.gov/.

FEB. 19

VIRTUAL ART CLUB

The Escondido Public Library, 239 S. Kalmia St., Escondido, hosts a virtual Inclusive Art Club at 2:00 p.m. Feb. 19 on Facebook and Instagram. Join Mrs. Garcia for a fun story and

FEB. 21

FOR THE SOUL

Miracle Babies will host a “Chicken Soup for the Soul”-style discussion with author and Holocaust survivor, Edith Eva Eger from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. 21. Proceeds from this virtual discussion will go toward Miracle Babies’ newest program, to provide group and individual therapy, support and treatment to any individual experiencing prenatal or postpartum stress, depression, or anxiety. For tickets and additional information, visit miraclebabies.org/calendar-event/chickensoup/.

FEB. 22

VIRTUAL HS SCIENCE WEEK

The Salk Institute of Biological Studies in La Jolla and March Of Dimes will be transitioning their annual weekend high school science day to a “virtual high school science week” this year from Feb. 22 to Feb. 26. This event will feature interactive webinars, and the guiding theme will be, “Where Cures Begin,” to highlight the importance of basic research in scientific discoveries. Webinars will give students a glimpse of a day in the life of scientists and provide students with an opportunity to interact with Salk researchers, by letting their questions dictate the discussion. The event will emphasize both the process of science and the people behind it. For more information and to register, visit salk.edu/about/ education-outreach /salkmarch-of-dimes-high-schoolscience-week/ by Feb. 17.


FEB. 12, 2021

A15

T he C oast News

Report: Del Mar in ‘stable financial position’ despite COVID-19 By Dan Brendel

DEL MAR — Despite COVID-19 striking heavy blows to certain key revenues, the City of Del Mar weathered the Fiscal Year 2020 fairly well, with its bottom line dipping only slightly, according to a financial report released last week. The city’s “net position” — its net worth, everything it has (including land, facilities and equipment) minus everything it owes — decreased less than 2%, from $95.9 million to $94.5 million. But in the bigger picture, its net position increased during all but two of the last ten years. “Over time, increases or decreases in net position may serve as a useful indicator of whether the financial position of the city is improving or deteriorating,” according to the financial report. Though the city dipped into its contingency reserve, at the end of the fiscal year those funds weighed in at 17% of annual operating expenditures,

KILLING

CONTINUED FROM A5

arm-use allegation and a special circumstance allegation of lying in wait. The special circumstance allegation means Alvarez could face the death penalty, if prosecutors elect to pursue it. McCarthy said Alvarez was “fixated” on his ex-girlfriend, who alleged in court documents that after breaking up with him, Alvarez exhibited increasingly erratic behavior, including stalking and suicidal threats. McCarthy said the woman, referred to as Ms. Doe in court, changed her address and phone number and deleted all social media in an attempt to avoid the defendant. She also sought a restraining order against Alvarez, a request that a judge denied. At Alvarez’s arraignment, the prosecutor read a statement from Fierro’s fiancee, who asked the court to deny Alvarez bail, saying she has lived in fear of him for over a year and was “pleading to be taken seriously” this time, after her restraining order request “was wrongfully denied.” Doe wrote, “I stand before you grief-stricken and heartbroken over the violent murder of my beloved fiance, Mario Fierro, the true love of my life, at the hands of my defendant.” McCarthy said Alvarez presented a threat to Doe’s safety, were he to be released. He is being held without bail per the prosecution’s request, but a bail review hearing was scheduled for Feb. 17. Fierro was a 2002 graduate of the school where he went on to teach social science starting in 2016, and also served as a football coach.

financial manager. Excluding this big transfer, General Fund revenues during FY 2020 actually exceeded General Fund expenditures by $1.3 million. Though COVID tanked certain income streams — namely, transient occupancy (hotel) tax and sales tax — the city offset the loss by cutting operational expenditures and deferring capital projects, among other measures. For example, the city paused its utility undergrounding and Shores Park planning projects. It also set aside no new money in its reserve fund covering unfunded pension obligations. Transient occupancy and sales tax revenues fell 22% and 64%, respectively, in FY 2020. Some city officials have said they expect the pandemic’s fallout to last several years, during which time the city government would likely focus only on delivering core services but undertaking nothing new.

On the other hand, property taxes’ decades-long climb powered through COVID, increasing nearly 6% in FY 2020. Largely for this reason, “Del Mar continues to be in a stable financial position,” according to the financial report. “The city’s largest revenue source is its very stable property tax base, which has increased each year since 1995. Due to the city’s excellent location on the coast, … its real estate market does not typically experience the downturns that the inland areas experience in periods of economic decline.” “Assessed [property] valuation is projected to continue to increase,” according to the report. “Since Del Mar has been largely built-out for many years with properties occupied by long-time residents, many of Del Mar’s residential properties carry very low assessed values compared to current market value; and as these properties turn over, they are reassessed at higher values.”

Law enforcement, residents discuss policing

Escondido council hears financial report

NET POSITION increases in earlier years reflect the addition of Torrey Pines Bridge to capital assets, according to Monica Molina, the city’s financial manager. Data source: FY 19-20 CAFR. Graphic by Dan Brendel

equivalent to about two months of daily operations. That falls short of the city’s 25% target (about three months of operations), but exceeds the 10% minimum (about one month of oper-

ations). The city’s General Fund balance — cash on hand, some available for discretionary spending, though mostly set aside for various purposes — fell

24%, from $8.2 million to $6.3 million. This decrease stems mostly from a General Fund transfer, to be repaid, to a separate fund for road reconstruction, said Monica Molina, the city’s

By Steve Puterski

CARLSBAD — A series of community meetings with the city’s police department transpired over the past week, including four sessions for residents to speak about policing. At the center of the virtual discussions was whether a civilian oversight committee would be recommended to the City Council, as the issue picks up after the Black Lives Matter protests in June. The city asked residents, which totaled more than 100 over the four meetings, about the committee and the goals the committee would achieve. Some residents feared the action would lead to defunding the police, although civil rights and local equality groups stressed stripping police of funding serves no purpose. “There are so many ways to see this issue and what civilian oversight means,” Carlsbad police Asst. Chief Mickey Williams said. “The police department sees the absolute value in transparency and communication.” The sessions were conducted by district with each councilmember appearing for their respective meetings, while Mayor Matt Hall attended all four. The city will then collect the feedback and report back to the council for further discussion and possible action. The community discussions came about after several groups, including the Carlsbad Equality Coalition, lobbied the City Council to create the event so residents could provide feedback, experiences and potential solutions to up-

By Tigist Layne

MAGGIE MUNN, of the Carlsbad Equality Coalition, has been an active voice in helping the city organize community meetings with the Carlsbad Police Department regarding policy and a review board. The city hosted four meetings over the last two weeks to gather input from residents. Photo by Steve Puterski

dating policy and policing tactics. Keyrollos Ibrahaim and Maggie Munn, two of the co-founders of CEC, said they have met with several members of the council including Hall, who pushed for the community meetings, along with Williams, over the past several months on potential changes and recommendations for the department. Ibrahaim and Munn praised Williams for his openness and ability to work with the group knowing some of the issues may be contentious. In fact, it has been the opposite, Ibrahaim said, noting Williams and the CEC have a solid working relationship and progress is being made.

Williams, who has spent 26 years with the department, said the meetings have generated “outstanding feedback” and developed consistent themes, which will be helpful in moving forward. Additionally, CPD is doing a lot of work on de-escalation and crisis management through new training, he added. “For the most part, I think the community and police department understand that we are coming together to provide transparent communication … and set that as a standard for our city,” Munn said. “Overall, the meetings have been very eye-opening and communicative. It’s an issue that is felt across North County.” As for residents, the

discussions have been respectful and full of varying viewpoints, he and others said. Some of the issues raised during the Feb. 3 meeting for District 4 included whether a citizen review board was needed; what powers or authority it would have; interfering with investigations; cost; autonomy; fairness; being used as a political vessel; impacting recruiting; and supporting the department through finding additional funding for various programs. Councilwoman Teresa Acosta, who was elected as the District 4 representative in November 2020, said she would not take a public position on the reforms or review board until it comes before the council for discussion or a vote.

ESCONDIDO — The Escondido City Council met on Wednesday, Feb. 3 and heard a Second Quarter Financial Report for fiscal year 2020/21, which still projects an $8 million budget deficit for the city in FY 2021/2022. The city did, however, receive positive sales tax results this quarter meaning that sales tax revenue may return to previous levels by FY 2021/22. Operating revenue has exceeded the amount that was estimated to be received through this second quarter by about $1.7 million. The amount of actual sales tax revenue received has also increased by $1.9 million compared to the prior year’s receipts. Sales tax, property tax and revenues from current development, which include building permits, planning fees, building department fees and engineering fees have all increased from the prior year. “Escondido is fortunate to have a comprehensive mix of businesses and a diverse job base and is not heavily dependent on one of the hardest-hit sectors, such as hospitality and travel reliant businesses, for the majority of General Fund revenue,” said the staff report. Despite these positive trends, the City of Escondido is still facing a projected $176 million structural budget deficit TURN TO FINANCE ON A19


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CITY OF ENCINITAS Notice of Preparation of a Draft Environmental Impact Report PROJECT TITLE: Marea Village Mixed Use Development Project; PROJECT APPLICANT: Encinitas Beach Land Venture, LLC; PROJECT LOCATION: 1900 & 1950 North Coast Highway 101, Encinitas, CA 92024; County Assessor Parcel Numbers: 216041-20; 216-041-21; 216-041-06 CASE NUMBER: MULTI-003780-2020, DR-003786-2020, BADJ-003787-2020 & CDP003788-2020 Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the City of Encinitas (City) is issuing this Notice of Preparation (NOP) of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the proposed project. Implementation of the project may require approvals from public agencies. As such, the City seeks input as to the scope and content of the EIR based on your agency’s purview of the project (if any). In addition, comments are being solicited from other interested persons. Comments received in response to this Notice will be reviewed and considered by the City in determining the scope of the EIR. PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: Encinitas Beach Land Venture I, LLC (Applicant) proposes a mixed-use development located at the southwest corner of La Costa Avenue and North Coast Highway 101 in the City of Encinitas. The project would consist of 94 for-lease apartments, a 30-room boutique resort hotel, and 18,262 square feet (SF) of mixed-use commercial. The project would also include a subterranean parking garage, a walking paseo, pedestrian plaza, and an outdoor seating area. Of the 94 apartment units proposed, 19 would be density bonus affordable units dedicated to “low-income” qualifying residents. The project is comprised of two sites; County of San Diego Assessor Parcel Numbers (APNs) 216041-20 and 216-041-21 (Site 1), and 216-041-06 (Site 2) totaling approximately 3.8 acres. The project is within North Highway 101 Corridor Specific Plan boundary, with the site (and/or portions of) being located within the Coastal Zone, Hillside/Inland Bluff Overlay Zone, and/or a designated Scenic Highway/Visual Corridor. Site 1 is designated as Visitor Serving Commercial (VSC) by the General Plan and zoned as Commercial Residential Mixed 1 (N-CRM-1). Site 2 is designated as General Commercial (GC) by the General Plan and zoned as Limited Visitor-Serving Commercial (N-LVSC) with a Residential-30 (R-30) Zone overlay. As part of the City of Encinitas Housing Element Update, Site 1 of the project was allocated a minimum of 33 residential units if the site is developed at a mixed-use ratio. City approval of a density bonus tentative map, design review permit, and coastal development permit will be required to allow for project development. Project plans may be reviewed on the City’s website at: https://encinitasca.gov/I-WantTo/Public-Notices/Development-Services-Public-Notices under “Environmental Notices.” It is anticipated that the EIR will focus on the following environmental issue areas: aesthetics, air quality, biological resources, cultural resources, energy conservation, greenhouse gas emissions, geology and soils, hazards and hazardous materials, hydrology/water quality, land use, noise, public services, recreation, transportation, tribal cultural resources, and utilities and service systems. COMMENT PERIOD: Please send your comments to Scott Vurbeff, Environmental Project Manager, Encinitas Planning Division, 505 S. Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024, or via email to svurbeff@encinitasca.gov. All comments must be received by no later than 6:00 p.m. on March 15, 2021. 02/12/2021 CN 25113

CITY OF ENCINITAS DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE PLANNING COMMISSION PLACE OF MEETING: Council Chambers, Civic Center 505 S. Vulcan Avenue Encinitas, CA 92024 IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT/SECTION 504 REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973 AND TITLE VI, THIS AGENCY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PUBLIC ENTITY AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, ETHNIC ORIGIN, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, RELIGION, VETERANS STATUS OR PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITY IN EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVISION OF SERVICE. IF YOU REQUIRE SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS MEETING, PLEASE CONTACT THE DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT AT (760) 633-2710 AT LEAST 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE MEETING. PURSUANT TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND AMENDED COUNTY HEALTH ORDERS, MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC WILL ONLY BE ALLOWED TO PARTICIPATE IN MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY. PUBLIC COMMENT PRIOR TO THE MEETING: to submit a comment in writing, email planning@encinitasca.gov and include the agenda item number and/or title of the item in the subject line. If the comment is not related to an agenda item, indicate oral communication in the subject line. All e-mail comments received by 3:00 p.m. on the day of the meeting will be emailed to the Planning Commission members and made a part of the official record. Please note, e-mail comments received prior to the meeting will no longer be read at the meeting. PUBLIC COMMENT DURING THE MEETING (INCLUDING ORAL COMMUNICATIONS, AND COMMENTS RELATED TO CONSENT CALENDAR ITEMS AND ACTION ITEMS): to provide public comment during the meeting, you must register by 2:00 p.m. on the day of the meeting to join the Planning Commission meeting webinar. You do not need to register to watch but must register if you wish to speak. Members of the public will not be shown on video; they will be able to watch and listen, and to speak when called upon. Each speaker is allowed three (3) minutes to address the Planning Commission. Please be aware that the Planning Commission Chairman has the authority to reduce equally each speaker’s time to accommodate a larger number of speakers. All comments are subject to the same rules as would otherwise govern speaker comments at the meeting. Speakers are asked to be respectful and courteous. Please address your comments to the Planning Commission as a whole and avoid personal attacks against members of the public, commissioners, and city staff. To register to speak at this meeting, go to the agenda for this meeting found on the city’s website at: https://encinitasca.gov/government/agendas-webcasts. It is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held on Thursday, the 4th day of March, 2021, at 6:00 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, by the Encinitas Planning Commission to discuss the following hearing item of the City of Encinitas: CASE NUMBER: PLCY-003816-2020 (GPA – Housing Element Update); APPLICANT: City of Encinitas; LOCATION: City-wide; PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Public hearing to consider the update to the City’s Housing Element for the 2021-2029 housing cycle. The Housing Element is required by State law to identify and analyze existing and projected housing needs in order to preserve, improve and develop housing for all economic segments of the community, and demonstrate how the City will accommodate its fair share of regional housing needs. The City of Encinitas is updating the Housing Element consistent with the requirements of State law. No changes in the zoning of sites are proposed in the Housing Element. The Planning Commission will be making a recommendation on the item to the City Council. The City Council will consider the item at a separately noticed public hearing. ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: It has been determined that the proposed Housing Element is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the CEQA Guidelines because it can be seen with certainty that there is no possibility that the proposed Housing Element would have a significant effect on the environment, in that no new policies adopted would have the potential for causing a reasonably foreseeable direct or indirect change in the physical environment. STAFF CONTACT: Jennifer Gates, AICP, Principal Planner: (760) 633-2714 or jgates@encinitasca.gov. The Public Review Draft is available for review on the City’s website at: https://encinitasca.gov/I-Want-To/ Housing-Plan-Update/Housing-Update-2021-2029. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, effective March 18, 2020, all City facilities are closed to the public. Hard copies will be mailed upon request. Should City facilities re-open during the public review period, it will also be available for review at the City of Encinitas Development Services Department: Encinitas Civic Center, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024. Copies will also be available at City Hall, Encinitas and Cardiff Libraries, and the Senior and Community Center during normal business hours, once open to the public. Under California Government Code Section 65009, if you challenge the nature of the proposed action in court, you may be limited to raising only the issues you or someone else raised regarding the matter described in this notice or written correspondence delivered to the City at or before the time and date of the determination. For further information, or to review the application prior to the hearing, please contact staff or contact the Development Services Department, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024 at (760) 633-2710 or by email at planning@encinitasca.gov. 02/12/2021 CN 25117

T.S. No.: 2020-00160-CA A.P.N.: 169-455-56-00 Property Address: 5065 VIEWRIDGE WAY, OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED

TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니다

NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ

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THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 01/26/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor: TOM L. MEYER AND LILLIAN E. MEYER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 02/02/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-0076003 in book ---, page-- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 04/07/2021 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY THE STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 278,775.91 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 5065 VIEWRIDGE WAY, OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 A.P.N.: 169-455-56-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 278,775.91. Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there

are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2020-00160CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction, if conducted after January 1, 2021, pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (866)960-8299, or visit this internet website http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 2020-00160-CA to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid, by remitting the funds and affidavit described in Section 2924m(c) of the Civil Code, so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase. Date: February 4, 2021 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite

237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 9608299 http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 02/12/2021, 02/19/2021, 02/26/2021 CN 25105

made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $ 521,018.06. Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust has executed and delivered to the undersigned a written request to commence foreclosure, and the undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2019-03441CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction, if conducted after January 1, 2021, pursuant to Section 2924m of the California

T.S. No.: 2019-03441-CA A.P.N.: 157-690-41-00 Property Address: 4843 SAGINA COURT, OCEANSIDE, CA 92057 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07/06/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor: WILLIAM PEREZ and TRACEY PEREZ, Husband and wife Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 07/18/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0505434 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on 10/19/2006 as 2006-0743407 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 04/07/2021 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY THE STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 521,018.06 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: All right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described as: More fully described in said Deed of Trust. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 4843 SAGINA COURT, OCEANSIDE, CA 92057 A.P.N.: 157-690-41-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. The sale will be


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Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (866)960-8299, or visit this internet website http://www.altisource. com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 2019-03441-CA to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid, by remitting the funds and affidavit described in Section 2924m(c) of the Civil Code, so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase. Date: February 2, 2021 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 960http://www.altisource. 8299 com/MortgageServices/ DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 02/12/2021, 02/19/2021, 02/26/2021 CN 25099

appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on January 9, 2018 as DOC#2018-0009484 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, executed by: Razuki Investments, LLC, a California Limited Liability Company, as Trustor, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). At: At the entrance to the East County Regional Center by the statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, Ca, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: See attached exhibit “A” Legal Description The land referred to herein below is situated in the County of San Diego, State of California, and is described as follows: Parcel 1: Parcel “B” of Parcel Map No. 3450, in the City of Vista, County of San Diego, State of California, filed in the Office of the County Recorder of San Diego County, January 31, 1975. Parcel 2: An easement and right of way for road and utility purposes over, under, along and across a strip of land lying within Parcel “C” and “D” of Parcel Map No. 3450 in the City of Vista, County of San Diego, State of California, filed in the Office of the County Recorder of San Diego County, January 31, 1975, as described as follows: beginning at the northerly corner common to said Parcels “C” and “D” being the center of a 40.00 foot radius circle in the cul-de-sac, at the southeasterly end of Avocado Drive, shown on said Parcel Map; thence along the boundary of said Parcel “C” as follows: South 04° 15’ 30” east, 40.00 feet; south 39° 33’ 30” east 222.90 feet; south 08° 26’ 00’ east 58.04 feet; and south 81° 34’ 00” west, 20.00 feet to the westerly line of the easterly 20.00 feet of said parcel “C”; thence along said westerly line; north 08° 26’ 00” west , 31.50 feet more or less to a line that is parallel with and 30.00 feet southwesterly measured at right angles from the northeasterly line of said Parcel “C”; thence along said parallel line north 39° 33’ 30” west, 283.00 feet more or less, to the northwesterly line of said Parcel “D”; thence along said westerly line north 38° 19’ 06” east, 20.77 feet to a point in the arc of the aforementioned 40.00 foot curve a radial of said curve bears south 85° 20’ 00” west to said point; thence along said radial line north 85° 20’ 00 east, 40.00 feet to the point

beginning. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1869 Avocado Drive, Vista, Ca 92083. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $1,541,368.26 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The Beneficiary may elect to bid less than the full credit bid. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Notice to potential bidders: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. Notice to property owner: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619) 7041090 or visit this Internet Web site innovativefieldservices. com, using the file number assigned to this case 20646. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For any other inquiries, including litigation or bankruptcy matters, please call (619) 7041090 or fax (619) 704-1092. Notice to tenant: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of

the California Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (619) 704-1090, or visit this internet website innovativefieldservices.com. com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20646 to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase. 1/22/21 ACTION FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC. 7839 University Avenue Suite 211 La Mesa, Ca 91942 (619) 704-1090 Sale Information Line: (949) 860-9155 or innovativefieldservices.com James M. Allen, Jr., President (IFS# 22738 01/29/21, 02/05/21, 02/12/21) CN 25075

Trustee Sale No. 20646 Loan No. 1521 Title Order No.1668325CAD APN 183-20103-00 TRA No. 12010 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Note: There is a summary of the information in this document attached* *Pursuant to civil code § 2923.3(a), the summary of information referred to above is not attached to the recorded copy of this document but only to the copies provided to the trustor. You are in default under a deed of trust dated 12/19/2017. Unless you take action to protect your property, it may be sold at a public sale. If you need an explanation of the nature of the proceedings against you, you should contact a lawyer. On 02/17/2021 at 10:00AM, ACTION FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION as the duly

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Title Order No. 05942529 Trustee Sale No. 85162 Loan No. G19048139 APN: 204-232-01-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/13/2019. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU,YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 2/22/2021 at 1:00 PM, CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALISTS, AS TRUSTEE as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 9/27/2019 as Instrument No. 20190429587 in book N/A, page N/A of official records in the Office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, executed by: KOVENS CHERRY CARLSBAD, LLC, A NEVADA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY , as Trustor GOLDMAN SACHS BANK USA, A NEW YORK CHARTERED BANK , as Beneficiary WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). At: Outside the Main entrance at the Superior Court North County Division located at 325 South Melrose Drive, Vista, CA 92081, NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE – continued all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described the land therein: PARCEL 1 OF PARCEL MAP NO. 21475, IN THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER ON JUNE 29, 2017, AS DOCUMENT NO. 2017-7000236 AND

LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

CITY OF ENCINITAS PUBLIC NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR BIDS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Encinitas Public Works Department (City) invites Request for Bids (RFB) for: Maintenance of Mechanical Systems at City Facilities And Replacement of HVAC Equipment The website for this RFP, related documents and correspondence is PlanetBids (www. encinitasca.gov/bids). All project correspondence will be posted on the PlanetBids website. It is the responsibility of Bidder to check the website regularly for information updates, clarifications, as well as any addenda. Bidders must be registered with the City of Encinitas as a vendor on PlanetBids. To register as a vendor, go to the following link (www.encinitasca.gov/bids) and then proceed to the “New Vendor Registration” link. All addenda will be available on the PlanetBids website. To be considered for selection, a Bid must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) on Friday, February 19, 2021 to: PlanetBids. Each prospective bidder is responsible for fully acquainting himself with the conditions of the work site as well as those conditions relating to the work in order to fully understand the facilities. All prospective bidders shall attend a pre-bid meeting scheduled for 9:00 a.m., Friday, February 12, 2021 at Encinitas City Hall, 505 S. Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024. Information on this meeting is available via PlanetBids. Failure to attend the pre-bid meeting shall result in disqualification. The City hereby notifies all potential Bidders that it will ensure that in any Contract issued pursuant to the advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit a response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color or national origin in consideration for an award. The City reserves the right to reject any or all Proposals or waive any irregularities or technical deficiencies in any Proposal. The City does not discriminate based on handicapped status in the admission or access to, or treatment, or employment in its programs or activities. Please contact www.encinitasca.gov/bids for additional information. 02/05/2021, 02/12/2021 CN 25086 FORMERLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOTS A AND B, IN BLOCK 2 OF PALISADES HEIGHTS, IN THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF NO. 1777, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, JANUARY 11, 1924. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE SOUTHWESTERLY 5.00 FEET. ALSO EXCEPTING FROM SAID LOT B, THE NORTHEASTERLY 73.00 FEET. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 187-191 CHERRY AVENUE CARLSBAD, CA 92008.. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit $8,454,803.30 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election of Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 1/19/2021 CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALISTS, AS TRUSTEE, as Trustee 8190 EAST KAISER BLVD., ANAHEIM HILLS, CA 92808 PHONE: 714-283-2180 FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION LOG ON TO: www.stoxposting. com CALL: 844-477-7869 JANINA HOAK, ASST. VICE PRESIDENT CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALIST IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. “NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 844-477-7869, or visit this internet Web site www. stoxposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case T.S.# 85162. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.” For sales conducted after January 1, 2021: NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California

Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (844) 477-7869, or visit this internet website www. STOXPOSTING.com, using the file number assigned to this case 85162 to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase. STOX 927257 01/29/2021, 02/05/2021, 02/12/2021CN 25069 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Sections 3071 and 3072 of the Civil Code of the State of California that First Platinum Properties located at 39221 Daily Road, Fallbrook, CA 92028, will sell at public auction on February 26, 2021, at 10:00 A.M. the following: 2015 BMW 428I; Lic.# 8NMG502; VIN: WBA3N7C52FK223309 and a 2015 Chrysler 200; Lic.# 7KME637: VIN: 1C3CCCAB3FN681812. Said sale is for the purpose of satisfying a lien of First Platinum Properties in the amount of $8,725.00 each together with the costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 02/12/2021 CN 25106

Coast News legals continued on page B12


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FEB. 12, 2021

Supervisors vote to simplify renewable energy process By City News Service

FOUNTAIN PATIO REOPENS The Oceanside Civic Center Plaza Fountain area has reopened Mondays through Fridays. Residents can support local businesses and grab lunch to go, to enjoy on the Oceanside Fountain Patio. The Fountain Patio area is made possible through a partnership with the city of Oceanside and provides monitored and sanitized additional outdoor seating options for Downtown restaurant customers. Open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., weather permitting. Courtesy photo

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about her desire to have the schools reopen and has spoken at board meetings. She also attended a parent protest demanding the schools reopen prior to Tuesday evening’s meeting. The school district promised to make “every possible effort” to keep 6 feet between students and will meet the minimum required distance of 4 feet.

Teachers must be kept 6 feet apart. The schools will no longer check students’ temperatures upon arrival but expects parents to conduct self-screenings at home for COVID-19 symptoms such as fever, cough and runny nose. The district stresses that parents keep their children home if they are sick. The school district is currently prohibited from opening middle and high school campuses while San

Diego County remains in the state’s most restrictive purple tier. However, some low-contact California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) sports like cross country and golf are allowed to launch condensed competition seasons. More sports are expected to open as the county moves into the red, orange and yellow tiers. Board member Eric Joyce pleaded for fellow board members to consider

allowing special education students in middle and high school to be allowed to return to campus as well. “There are students who sorely lack access to their education in a virtual environment,” he said. Joyce explained that the district is currently able to bring those students back to campuses in small groups for short periods of time and wants the board to consider moving forward with a plan to do so.

REGION — A plan to streamline the environmental review process for energy projects in unincorporated areas was unanimously approved Wednesday by the San Diego County Board of Supervisors. The goal is to “simplify and enhance current site plan and design reviews, project development requirements, and permit streamlining opportunities to reduce renewable energy project development barriers,” according to the board. According to a county Planning & Development Services presentation, increasing the number of renewable projects in San Diego County — including solar panels and wind turbines — could increase energy supply, create over 40,000 jobs, and reduce energy consumption through incentives like weatherproofing. Board Chairman Nathan Fletcher said a renewable energy plan had been “continued and continued and continued” until Wednesday’s meeting. For over a decade, the Board of Supervisors has considered ways to promote local renewable energy sources. In May 2013, the board approved a zoning ordinance amendment intended to streamline and clarify

existing wind energy regulations to increase turbine development opportunities. In the last eight years, 35 turbines have been installed in the county’s unincorporated areas. In October 2019, the board voted to establish a community choice energy program for unincorporated areas, which includes a goal of 90% renewables by 2030. In April, the board directed staff to explore options for renewable energy projects. Supervisor Joel Anderson stressed that the county should look at all renewable options, including wave technology, which involves harnessing the power of waves for energy generation. During a public comment period on Wednesday, several people called in to voice their support for more renewable energy use, including Joe Gabaldon, public affairs manager for San Diego Gas & Electric. However, Donna Tisdale, chairwoman of the Boulevard Planning Group, voiced her opposition to massive wind and solar projects, which she said harm well water and property values and create both fire and noise hazards. “Our ruggedly beautiful area shouldn’t be sacrificed for alternative energy,” Tisdale said.

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FEB. 12, 2021

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M arketplace News Marketplace News is paid advertorial content. If you would like to buy space on this page, please contact the Coast News Group.

COX CONTOUR’S Valentine’s Day Movie Collection has something for everyone to help them celebrate love. Courtesy photo

Cox’s Valentine’s Day movie collection makes at-home date night stress-free

GIRL SCOUTS HELP MCDONALD HOUSE Members of Girl Scout Troop 1942 in Carlsbad, top row, from left, Kayla Newton, Harrison Lupo, Sophie Turner, Chloe Williams and bottom row, from left, Lily Barstad, Isabelle Faris, Penelope Pollard, Liv Morley, Sydney King and Emma Pickering, are working on earning their Bronze Award — the highest award a Girl Scout can earn in their 10- to 11-year-old age group. The troop is hosting a virtual drive at https://troop1942.wixsite.com/bronze to collect items and money to put together welcome bags to help families at Ronald McDonald House. These troop members all started together in kindergarten. Even though they aren’t all in the same school, this troop remains strong. The scouts attend La Costa Meadows, La Costa Heights, Pacific Coast Academy and Classical Academy. Courtesy photo

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for help, including Martin before Disposti reached out to him. “People don’t always feel comfortable going to the police, so we can do it for them,” Disposti said. “We have LGBTQ liaisons in Oceanside and in almost every other North County city and the Sheriff’s Department.” The North County LGBTQ Resource Center is calling upon the District Attorney’s Office to treat this attack against Martin as a hate crime and to more swiftly assist victims like Martin. The organization is also encouraging legis-

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over the next 18 years. The council approved budget adjustments to increase to the Fire Department operating budget of $1,025,520 and an increase to the Fleet Services budget of $52,000, reallocate $200,000 in Gas Tax funds to build four Welcome to Escondido monument signs, and two others. The council also voted 4-1 to confirm the city’s acceptance of a grant to fund traffic safety programs such as DUI checkpoints in the amount of $515,000. Councilmember Martinez was the single “no” vote. The council also discussed ways for the public to participate in and comment on virtual council meetings. Staff was asked to bring back options for the March 3 meeting. Councilmembers then

lators to implement clear language that will make it easier for targeted attacks against LGBTQ people to be ruled as hate crimes rather than being swept under the rug. Martin also encourages people to come forward about incidents that happen to them. “For whoever it is out there, it doesn’t matter if you’re LGBTQ, if you’re a victim of a violent crime report it because if you let it go then that person is going to do it over and over again,” Martin said. Martin is grateful for the help he has received from the North County LGBTQ Resource Center, as well as the nurse and heard a presentation Escondido Disposal’s Inc.’s (EDI) expansion of the City of Escondido (“City”)’s green waste recycling program to include food waste. In recent months, EDI launched an extensive public education campaign outlining state mandates requiring organics recycling, as well as the plans to meet the new requirements. Those plans include establishing an edible food recovery program, community outreach, and providing organics collection to residents and businesses. “I think this really sets the standard, raises the profile of our city about how we’re concerned about the environment and recycling and everything like that,” said Mayor Paul McNamara. “I think we’re going to change the culture of the city and that’s what we’re all about.”

hospital staff who took care of him after the attack. He is also grateful for the help he has received from those who have donated to his GoFundMe page, which is accessible here: https://gofund.me/fd2d62be. Despite the attack, Martin doesn’t hate the man who hurt him. “I hate the situation he put me through, but I don’t hate him,” he said.

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Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01527365. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measure-ments and square footages are approximate.

With Valentine’s Day approaching, many people are already planning a fun, stress-free date night at home this year, and movies have a magical way of bringing us closer. Whether you’re married, single, or in a relationship, Cox Contour’s Valentine’s Day Movie Collection has something for everyone to help them celebrate love – from classic romance and gal pal categories to romcoms and Black Love (in honor of February’s Black History Month). Just say “Valentine’s Day” into your Contour voice remote control or go to the On Demand library to see all the date-night choices available at your fingertips with your Contour service.

on to that tissue as you laugh so hard you’ll cry with the Marilyn Monroe classic “Some Like It Hot,” which was filmed at San Diego’s very own Hotel del Coronado, or Eddie Murphy in “Coming to America.” LOVE IS LOVE – Make your favorite drink, grab your Valentine’s chocolates and watch a movie that celebrates love, whether it’s the award-winning “Brokeback Mountain,” a love story between two cowboys, or “Lady Bird,” which focuses on a complicated mother-daughter relationship.

BLACK LOVE – February is Black History Month so celebrate diversity with popular movies such as “How Stella Got Cox Contour’s Valen- Her Groove Back” and “The tine’s Day Movie Collec- Bodyguard” and “Love tion categories (available Jones” or the Halle Berry/ through Feb. 19) include: Eddie Murphy romantic comedy “Boomerang.” CLASSIC ROMANCE – Light some candles NANCY & NORA – and grab a cozy blanket as This category features you settle down to a classic movies written, directed from the golden age of Hol- or produced by filmmakers lywood (think “Casablan- Nancy Meyers and Nora ca,” “Roman Holiday” and Ephron who are responsible “From Here to Eternity”), for some of the most beloved a modern-day favorite like romantic movies. Check out “Titanic” or 1980s hits like Ephron classics like “Sleep“Sixteen Candles,” “Dirty less in Seattle,” “When HarDancing” and “Say Any- ry Met Sally” and “You’ve thing.” Got Mail” or Meyers films like “Father of the Bride,” GALENTINE’S GOODIES – “The Parent Trap” and “It’s Zoom with galfriends Complicated.” while enjoying a glass of wine and some laughs be- BLOODY VALENTINE – fore everyone selects a You may not want to movie to watch then dis- dim the lights when watchcuss virtually afterwards. ing “Carrie” or “House at Enjoy “Clueless” or “Brid- the End of the Street.” Or get Jones’s Diary,” or make maybe a scary movie on Valit a Sarah Jessica Parker entine’s Day will bring you double feature with “Girls closer – literally. Just Want to Have Fun” and “Sex and the City: The MovWith so many choicie.” es through Cox Contour to watch a movie on demand or LOVE SERIOUSLY – stream via Cox high speed Don’t forget to grab internet and your Contour some tissue before watch- apps, Valentine’s Day is ing movies like “A Walk to the perfect time to stay in Remember,” “Ghost” and and enjoy a good movie – “The English Patient.” whether you’re pampering yourself or watching with LOVE LAUGHS – a loved one. For more inforYou might want to hold mation, visit cox.com.


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FEB. 12, 2021

Proudly serving our community since 1961 Tri-City Medical Center has served our community for nearly 60 years and prides itself on being the home to leading orthopedic, spine and cardiovascular health services while also specializing in world-class women’s health, robotic surgery, cancer and emergency care. Tri-City’s Emergency Department is there for your loved ones in their time of need and is highly regarded for our heart attack and stroke treatment programs. When minutes matter, Tri-City is your source for quality compassionate care close to home.

50 + Community Partners Tri-City Medical Center’s COASTAL Commitment initiative tackles our communities’ most pressing health and social needs.

Leader in North County Technologically-advanced Emergency Department 1st accredited Thrombectomy Capable Stroke Center certification, 36th nationwide 1st in San Diego to offer Mazor Robotic Spine Surgery Largest Level III NICU

visit tricitymed.org


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A tribute to Mr. Encinitas

Valentine’s Day? I’m not a very big fan

Remembering the life and works of Edgar Engert

By Dustin Jones

ENCINITAS — Edgar Engert, known locally as “Mr. Encinitas,” passed away on Jan. 10 due to complications related to COVID-19. He was 84 years old. The longtime philanthropist will be remembered for his many contributions to the city that aimed to bring everyone together. Edgar was born on April 15, 1936, in Kreimbach, Germany. Following the difficult aftermath of WWII, his aunt invited him to move to America in 1958. Edgar and his wife Renate, who was pregnant with their first child at the time, jumped at the opportunity. While leaving his family behind was difficult, Edgar knew that life in the United States would be his best chance at providing for them. Edgar landed a job working for a flower grower in New York City, where

he dedicated every penny earned towards bringing his family over from Germany. In 1959, exactly one year after he had arrived in America, Edgar reunited with Renate, who arrived hand in hand with their daughter, Liane. His first son, Ron, was born one year later followed by the youngest, Jimmy, four years after that. The family of five lived happily in New York for about a decade before ultimately packing their car and driving west to California in 1968, Liane explained. Two parents, three kids and a dog. Edgar had bought a three-bedroom home in Cardiff, just one mile from the beach. At the time, Encinitas and Cardiff were tiny beach towns, a small strip of road lined with a handful of shops, but he knew this is where he wanted to settle down, Liane said. “When they moved to

O

doubt CSUSM is a university of and for our region, and that means all aspects of personal identity are welcomed, celebrated and valued, from race to ethnicity to religion, ability, sexual and gender identity,” Neufeldt said. “This is a commitment you can count on me to lead in partnership with all of you.” Neufeldt thanked the North San Diego County Branch of the NAACP and the North County African American Women’s Association, as well as the Chicano Federation for their partnerships and commitment to CSUSM students, faculty and staff. She also highlighted CSUSM’s role in offering students the chance for so-

h yippee. Only two more days until St. Valentine’s Day. You will never, ever convince me this guy was a saint. In fact, I really doubt it was a guy at all. I’m betting it was some woman who whacked off her hair and slapped on a monk’s cowl in an effort to get her husband’s attention. The result has become this tiresome day when every man gets the opportunity to have his thoughtlessness really stand out. Doesn’t every woman need a day geared to squash that fantasy that men suddenly want to drop everything and cuddle? Some women don’t mind giving specific reminders to their significant others. The way I see it, if I have to remind a man to notice me, any real sincerity comes seriously into question. Cripes, my dog will roll over if I ask him to, but that sure as heck doesn’t mean that he wanted to. And I have no time for the magazine’s advice that I “turn it around and make him the object of the Valentine goodies.” I tried that. My kind and well-meaning husband just smiled and said, “Oh, thanks. I might have some of that cake after I check my e-mail, mow the lawn and take my shirts to the cleaner.” The pressure to be romantic once a year has become a marketer’s dream. On every storefront there are giant pink hearts. Every magazine cover offers recipes for intimate dinners for two. On every sidewalk there are deals on roses. The kids are buying their cute, little heart-shaped cards and the candy aisles look like a “Lolita” film festival. Even the men’s department offers clever boxer

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TURN TO SMALL TALK ON B6

LOCAL PHILANTHROPIST Edgar Engert will be remembered for his decades of public service in Encinitas and across North County. Edgar passed away last month due to complications associated with coronavirus. Courtesy photo

California, they knew they would never move back to Germany,” she explained. “They were so happy they moved here.” Edgar was a family man, always considering the needs of his wife and

kids before his own. A close second to the family were his neighbors. He cared about how the people in the community were doing, and as the town grew, as it inevitably would, he tried to retain the “hometown vibe,”

his son Ron told The Coast News. “He was proud of where he lived, he wanted to do better for the community,” he said. “That’s just TURN TO MR. ENCINITAS ON B4

CSUSM holds virtual Report to the Community By Tigist Layne

SAN MARCOS — California State University at San Marcos (CSUSM) held its annual Report to the Community on Thursday, Feb. 4, with nearly 600 business and civic leaders attending the first-ever virtual format. The signature award of the event, the CSUSM Community Partner of the Year Award, which honors community partners who have engaged with CSUSM over the years, was presented to the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency. “While there is no doubt that this pandemic has presented innumerable challenges, it has also come with opportunities to engage and enhance key partnerships,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, San Diego pub-

CSUSM PRESIDENT Ellen Neufeldt delivered her first Report to the Community, laying out her strategic vision for the university’s next 30 years. Photo courtesy of CSUSM

lic health officer. “My work helping all communities and mission… has always attain their full potential been guided by the goal of and well-being, and the

pandemic has not changed that.” CSUSM President Ellen Neufeldt, who started at the university in July of 2019, then delivered her first ever Report to the Community, highlighting the innovative work being done on campus by students, faculty and staff. She praised the university’s faculty and staff for quickly transitioning to online learning in a matter of days while making sure each and every student had the tools and resources they needed to be successful online. Neufeldt also spoke about the challenges of racial injustice that arose this year, emphasizing the need for ongoing work and partnerships to address these injustices. “There must be no


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FEB. 12, 2021

Good time to go off the grid, but please go prepared hit the road e’louise ondash

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f there is a tiny silver lining to this COVID-19 black cloud, it’s that more people have discovered the outdoors and, I hope, have developed a greater appreciation for our wide-open spaces. Consider: Golf courses, after several years of decline in business, are jammed with both veterans and newbies, and golf instructors’ schedules are booked solid. My favorite athletic-shoe store can’t keep walking shoes and hiking boots on the shelves. Boat, RV and bicycle sales are off the charts, and the number of neighbors and dog-walkers circumnavigating my subdivision has increased exponentially since our COVID lockdown began almost a year ago. Sojourns into the backcountry and remote areas are up, too, according to Denise Davila, corporate communications manager for SPOT (https://www. findmespot.com/en-us/), a personal satellite messaging and emergency notification device that facilitates rescues when adventurers get into treacherous situations. She knows this because of the spike in SPOT sales and use that started in May 2020 and continued

SCOTTY BREAUXMAN, who splits his time between Baja California and Del Mar, is the founder of the Baja Rally. A 1,000-mile dirt-bike competition held on the Baja Peninsula every fall, the rally requires all participants to wear a personal tracking and emergency call device. Photo by Hing Yeung

through the holidays. “There is a national trend for opting to go offgrid,” Davila said, and California is leading the pack. In addition to the 4.2 million messages that have been sent within California, “SPOT … has initiated more rescues in California than anywhere else in the

country during 2020.” In San Diego County, “there have been a lot of (device) activations in the Cuyamaca Mountains,” Davila said, including a recent incident involving “a rock climber who had a seizure.” Additional rescues have occurred in situations

that involve hiking and mountain sports; camping; car accidents; 4-wheelers; boating and water sports; missing persons in group activities; and bicycles, motorcycles and dirt bikes. Scotty Breauxman, who splits his time between Del Mar and Mexico, counts himself among

those in that last category. The 52-year-old certified financial planner is the founder of the Baja Rally (https://www.bajarallymoto.com/), an annual dirt-bike event that he describes as a five-day, 1,000-mile route through Baja California that is a “light-impact, environmen-

tally friendly competition.” “Riders start a new leg of the race every day at the same point but at different times,” he explained, “so the first person to arrive at that day’s destination may not be the fastest rider.” Each year, Breauxman designs a new route, which passes through isolated areas and historic and culturally significant towns. Competitors are required to follow a paper map, may not use GPS, and are required to wear personal satellite trackers because of the remote terrain and the unpredictability of the weather (The Baja peninsula, because of its topography, has a reputation for severe, erratic and rapidly changing weather). In 2017, Breauxman was mapping a new course in a “winding, rocky canyon about 200 miles south of the border.” He became dehydrated and suffered electrolyte imbalance which led to exhaustion. “I got progressively worse,” he recalled, and eventually couldn’t move. With the help of his SPOT device, a satellite phone and a Mexican cowboy who was traveling with him, a rescue party brought him the necessary liquids and Breauxman survived. “There have been at least two rescues in Baja just this last month that we know of,” Breauxman said. “It’s important to prepare for both the things you can control and can’t control. That’s where SPOT comes in. These trackers are like insurance. You never really need it until you need it.”

The Encinitas Historical Society

WILL BE HOSTING A BOOK SIGNING ON

Saturday, February 13 • 10:00am to 1:00 pm

A Love Story of Two People and the Community They Loved It will be in the garden outside the 1883 One-Room Schoolhouse, which is located at 390 West “F” Street. Ian Thompson, husband of the late city council mayor and beloved local activist and politician, Maggie Houlihan, wrote a true account of their years in Encinitas. This record reveals their love for each other and for the causes they served and the unbelievable injustice that followed Maggie during

the time she served our community. Thompson’s book “An Inconvenient Voice, One Woman’s Fight Against Injustice”, is a fascinating read. This accurate documentation of her years here, her community service, and her time in office is an important part of the history of Encinitas. “The story of Maggie Houlihan’s journey from poverty to politics as told by the man who knew her best”.

A THANK YOU banner for frontline workers by Encinitas Friends of the Arts artist Sean Hnedak. Courtesy photo

Art banners thank frontline workers By Staff

ENCINITAS — In partnership with Encinitas Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department, Encinitas Friends of the Arts released a set of banners, created by local artists, to thank frontline workers for “courageously working to keep the community safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.” EFA member artists Kirsten Francis, Deanne Sabeck, Patricia Frischer, Naimeh Woodward and Sean Hnedak created the banners.

The banners will be displayed at prominent locations on Encinitas Boulevard, Via Cantebria and at the Encinitas Library. EFA, a community based nonprofit arts and culture organization, commissioned artists to create the banners to show gratitude for health care workers, first responders, frontline, and essential workers. “This is a small but important gesture and one way the arts can step forward to serve our community,” said EFA president Woodward.

“As we face difficult and uncertain times together, the generosity of our community inspires us to move forward with hope, optimism and resolve.” The community is invited to submit messages of gratitude and support to encinitasarts@gmail.com. The messages, along with images of the banners and additional information, can be viewed at encinitasarts. org or by using the QR code located on each banner. For more information, e-mail encinitasarts@ gmail.com.


FEB. 12, 2021

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Who’s

NEWS?

Business news and special achievements for North San Diego County. Send information via email to community@ coastnewsgroup.com. ZERO WASTE EFFORT

Surfrider Foundation San Diego has launched a new and free program, Ocean Friendly To-Go, for local restaurants, customers and our ocean. View the map to find local Oceanside restaurants participating in the program to help build a movement for zero waste takeout. Visit https://sandiego.surfrider.org /oceanfriendly-to-go/ to learn the measurable impacts of the program. OUTSTANDING STUDENTS

— Bryant University named Ryan Ramirez, from San Diego, and Madison Scherner, from Carlsbad, to the dean's list for the fall 2020 semester. — Camryn Cox, a Theatre Arts major from Del Mar, earns a spot on the president's list at Coastal Carolina University. — Dashiell Gregory of Encinitas, a graduate of San Dieguito High School Academy majoring in music theater, has been named to the dean's list for the fall 2020 semester at Baldwin Wallace University. — Montclair State University congratulates Avery-Claire Nugent of San Diego, Theresa Govoni of Oceanside and Kaitlyn Bucci of Carlsbad, who were named to the Fall 2020 dean's list. — At Georgia Institute of Technology, graduates include Benjamin Kelly of San Diego, Master of Science in Computer Science; Reagan Kan of San Diego, Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with Highest Honors; Kristina Theroux of San Diego, Master of Science in Computer Science; Nicholas Ghinazzi of San Marcos, Master of Science in Computer Science; and Fu Lin of Vista, Master of Science in Computer Science. — Hofstra University congratulates Leilah Abelman of San Diego, Jordan

LEARN CIVIL DISCOURSE WIN, WIN, WIN situation with solar made affordable, energy savings for nonprofits such as this Vale Terrace Drive facility in Vista. Courtesy photo

Dubroy of San Marcos and Alexis Friedman of Oceanside for being named to the Fall 2020 dean's list. — Luke Bons, Escondido, and Napua Glossner, San Diego, earned fall 2020 semester honors from Kansas State University. — Park University’s December 2020 graduates included Tracey Clark, Oceanside, with a Master of Business Administration, Homeland Security, and Or’Rayia iEaden, Oceanside, with a Master of Business Administration. NEW TRAINS

North County Transit District held a virtual celebration Feb. 5 at the Oceanside station for the roll out of new COASTER locomotives and overhauled passenger cars. New locomotives and passenger cars are part of a long-term, strategic plan to increase transit ridership and regional mobility over the next five years. VCC PROVIDES COVID INFO

The Vista Community Clinic has partnered with a branch of the University of California, Davis to help disseminate information on COVID-19 to agricultural workers. To improve personal understanding of the virus, healthy habits, and workplace safety, the

Pet of the Week Nell is pet of the week at your Rancho Coastal Humane Society. She’s a 3 year old, 21 pound, female, Chihuahua / Dachshund mix (Chi-Weenie). Nell and her three puppies were stray on the street. The little family was transferred to Rancho Coastal Humane Society and went into foster care together. When they returned, the puppies were adopted. Now it’s Nell’s turn to begin her new life. She’s very shy. Nell needs patient owners who will work to help her build confidence. She might like living with another dog. The $145 adoption fee for Nell includes medical exam, spay, up to date

vaccinations, registered microchip, and a one-year license if her new home is in the jurisdiction of San Diego Humane Society’s Department of Animal Services. For information about Adoption by Appointment or to become a Virtual Foster log on to SDpets. org.

proposed outreach project, known as COVID-19 Statewide Agriculture and Farmworker Education Program, will be led by the University’s Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety in collaboration with the California Institute for Rural Studies and farmworker-serving community-based organizations like VCC. SOLAR FOR NONPROFITS

Vale Terrace Drive facility in Vista used an innovative financing mechanism through the SunForAll Solar Fund, a joint effort between CollectiveSun and the BQuest Foundation. The fund provides nonprofits with access to solar credits, grants and low-interest financing. It’s a win-win-win situation with solar made affordable, energy savings for the nonprofit which frees up dollars for program services, and re-

duction in GHG emissions. “Placing solar energy on our Vista facility will reduce our annual energy costs by $105,539, rolling precious dollars back into our program services,” said Michele Lambert, Vista Community Clinic CFO.

The public is invited to attend the American Association of University Women Del Mar-Leucadia Branch virtual program “10 Tips for Managing Conflict” from 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 13. Above, Kathryn Shade, senior program manager for the National Conflict Resolution Center, will discuss how to bridge the current climate of polarization in families and across the political divide and how to restore civil conversations with those with whom we disagree. Send name and e-mail address to membership@aauwdml.org to receive a Zoom link to the meeting and for your name to be recognized when you enter the Zoom Waiting Room. For more information, visit delmarleucadia-ca.aauw.net or contact Karen Dorney, membership@aauwdml.org. Courtesy photo

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

Boys & Girls Clubs of Oceanside announced the kickoff of their year-long, 70th anniversary campaign to celebrate seven decades of youth development in the Oceanside community. BGCO will celebrate the anniversary beginning with a drive-in movie event April 9 at MiraCosta College. Tickets are $70 per car and include a showing of the classic movie “Grease,” and a popcorn and candy combo. For information or to purchase tickets to this socially distanced event, visit BGCOceanside.org or call (760) 433-8920.

NORTH COUNTY’S REAL ESTATE FAMILY SINCE 1982! 39

s in Year state E l Rea

CALL THE LUND TEAM IN 2021!

BRE#01394870

760-438-0800 • www.LUNDTEAM.com


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FEB. 12, 2021

More North County cities eligible for rent assistance By Tigist Layne

EDGAR ENGERT and his wife, Renate. The couple were married 63 years and had three children, five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Courtesy photo

MR. ENCINITAS CONTINUED FROM B1

how he was,” Ron said. Two of his biggest contributions to the city came in the form of festivities. Edgar brought Oktoberfest to Encinitas to share a portion of his German heritage and he started the city’s Holiday Parade, which takes place every December, to bring the people together. “The joy that brought to the community brought him joy,” Ron said. “He loved bringing the community together.” Edgar was involved in a number of local organizations throughout the city, including the Encinitas Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club of Encinitas, Del Mar Fair Flower and Garden Show, San Diego Botanic Gardens, San Dieguito Heritage Museum and California State Flo-

rist Association. After 40 years of dedicated service, Edgar became the longest-standing member on the board of the Magdalena Ecke Family YMCA. During his time as both YMCA staff and leadership, Edgar also served on committees for the Poinsettia Ball and Roof Raisers Golf Tournament. Edgar served in many capacities for the local organization, including florist, tour guide and volunteer docent at Ecke Ranch. Paul Ecke III, who operated his family’s 100-year-old poinsettia farming business for nearly 20 years, said Edgar was a tireless worker. “I’m very sad he’s gone but I’m also surprised because Edgar never seemed to stop,” Ecke III told The Coast News. “He never seemed to sleep, he was always working, spending time with his family and

helping with charities. I guess I’m still a bit in shock, I can’t believe he’s gone.” In 2006, Edgar received the YMCA of San Diego County’s Golden Triangle of Distinguished Service Award, honoring individuals each year for outstanding service. According to Ecke III, Edgar was working as a grower in Long Island when he approached his father, Paul Ecke Jr., about working for the Ecke family business. There was no job available at the time but several months later, Edgar showed up on his father’s doorstep in Southern California with his family in the car and told him he was ready to work. “My dad had no choice but to hire him and he turned out to be a great employee,” Ecke III said. “Edgar never took ‘no’ for

an answer. He always made things happen. Edgar managed to get 26 hours in every day.” Through all of these endeavors, family and friends recall Edgar was always trying to give back to people in his community. “There wasn’t anyone he ever met that wasn’t a friend,” Liane said. Edgar often reflected upon his life. In his younger years, Edgar never thought he would be so fortunate to spend 63 years married to the love of his life, raising three children, five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren along the way. Edgar and Renate loved taking vacations and did their best to bring the whole family along. “I just want to make memories,” Edgar told Liane. “This is what life’s about — making memories and being together.”

share? Do you know someone in the community we should spotlight for their outstanding efforts? If so, email us with the subject line: Story Ideas. As a Public Access entity, keep in mind that KOCT needs to remain unbiased on issues, providing all sides of a story, and we cannot spotlight commercial interests. We’d love to hear from you!

Did you know KOCT Television has an Emmy Award-Winning Crew? You can HIRE KOCT to share your organization’s story! You can also rent our SoundStage Studio and HIRE our crew. If your organization has a Commercial, PSA, or Mission Statement to share KOCT can produce it for you! We can help craft your project from concept to completion! With COVID-19 many organizations are focusing on Virtual Events and Zoom to stay connected. Our talented crew excels at putting on Virtual Events and Streaming Live on site from our Truck Studio. We can Live Stream your Virtual Gala, Townhalls, Virtual Special Events, and more! KOCT has all of the latest technology, equipment, and professional talent to take imagination and make it reality. KOCT is the Voice of North County. We focus our coverage on Oceanside and the Greater North County. We need your input! What stories would you like to hear about? Do you have stories to

KOCT Television’s Internship Program is a highly sought after program. We mentor a select group of talented interns from local high schools and colleges, providing them with real world experience. Apply today for an internship! Email us for more info! We are excited about the New Year! We will be celebrating 40 Years of KOCT! We Welcome New Sponsors and Underwriters. Stay Connected: Call us at 760.722.4433, or email us at FRIENDS@KOCT.ORG. Like Us on Facebook, Follow Us on Instagram and Watch KOCT! Many Thanks,

Carly Starr Brullo Niles Executive Director, KOCT

REGION — The County Board of Supervisors voted recently to expand the county’s emergency rental assistance program, which over the months has sent millions of dollars in relief money to cities that the board had originally deemed ineligible. The $27 million rental assistance program that was launched in August was not supposed to benefit cities that already had their own rental assistance programs, unless those funds had already been expended. However, a recent review of public data by inewsource showed that most of the program’s money spent through December went to residents in San Diego, El Cajon, Chula Vista and La Mesa, cities that already had rent relief programs in place and had not yet spent all of their funds. In fact, nearly half of the residents who were helped by the county’s program live in San Diego. Meanwhile residents in Carlsbad, Escondido, National City and San Marcos, which also had rent relief programs, remained ineligible for assistance. Karen Youl, the housing and neighborhood services manager for the City of Escondido, told The Coast News that Escondido had a small program in place through their Emergency Solutions Grant money, which ultimately could not be used to provide residents with rent relief. “It’s homelessness prevention funding, so those funds actually need a ‘notice of eviction’ in order to be spent or we can’t use it. However, we’re also in the middle of an eviction moratorium.” Youl said. “The county interpreted those funds as a rent relief program even though we can’t use them, and they decided that we did have an active program and therefore would not be eligible for the first round of funding.” Youl added that the city had to put the program on hold so that residents could become eligible for the county program. Nancy Melander, community education and grants program manager in the housing services division for the City of CarlsVOLUNTEER

bad, also said that they weren’t eligible because they already had their own program. “We didn’t receive any explanation as to why we were ineligible, but other cities with programs were eligible,” Melander said. “It’s our understanding that we will be eligible for this next round, but we don’t have the details yet on how it’s going to be rolled out.” She added that they still have an active rent relief program and their funds have not yet been expended. Craig Sturak, a county spokesperson, responded via email: “The County’s ERAP program policy stated that jurisdictions with an active program, as of the date of the County’s application period, would be excluded from the County ERAP service area. Active programs were defined as taking or planning to take applications for their own ERAP program. “The San Diego Housing Commission had ceased taking applications as of August 7, 2020 (prior to the beginning of the County’s application period) and therefore City residents were included in the County’s service area. During the first application period (9/24/2020 to 10/8/2020) the cities of San Marcos, Carlsbad, National City, and Escondido had active programs. Since that time, Escondido stopped taking applications for their own program and the County has started processing applications we’ve received from residents of that jurisdiction.” The spokesperson for Supervisor Nathan Fletcher could not be reached for comment. The county’s new program, which launched on Jan. 26, will also help residents with utilities and other household expenses. The money for the $49 million program comes from federal coronavirus funds. Sturak confirmed that Carlsbad, Coronado, Del Mar, El Cajon, Encinitas, Escondido, Imperial Beach, La Mesa, Lemon Grove, National City, Oceanside, Poway, San Marcos, Santee, Solana Beach and Vista will all be eligible for the program.

JOIN THE NORTH COASTAL SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT SENIOR VOLUNTEER PATROL

The Senior Volunteer Patrol of the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station performs home vacation security checks, assists with traffic control, enforces disabled parking regulations, patrols neighborhoods, schools, parks and shopping centers and visits homebound seniors who live alone for the communities of Encinitas, Solana Beach, Del Mar.& portions of the county’s unincorporated areas. Volunteers must be at least age 50, be in good health, pass a background check, have auto insurance & a valid California driver’s license. Training includes a two week academy plus training patrols. The minimum commitment is 24 hours per month, & attendance at a monthly meeting. Interested parties should call (760) 966-3579 to arrange an information meeting.


FEB. 12, 2021

Property tax auction seeks bidders By City News Service

REGION — Bidder registration is open for the 2021 online property tax auction featuring nearly 700 properties in San Diego County, County Treasurer-Tax Collector Dan McAllister announced Monday, Feb. 8. A total of 695 properties will be up for sale when the auction opens, March 12-17. “These properties have been in tax default for five or more years, so it’s time we get them into the hands of new owners and back on the tax roll,” McAllister said. “Our online system makes it simple to research and bid on a variety of properties across San Diego County.” Anyone around the world can bid during the online property tax auction. To participate, bidders must register before March 4 at the TreasurerTax Collector’s tax auction website, sdttc.mytaxsale.com. Prospective bidders must also submit a refundable $1,000 deposit and a nonrefundable $35 processing fee as some parcels may require a larger deposit. “We have 53 residential or commercial properties, 558 timeshares, and 84 parcels of land for sale. If all properties are sold for the minimum bid, the county would bring in $15,512,100,” McAllister said. In 2020, the county collected $1,980,500 from the sale of fewer than 100 properties — each the least since 2014. In 2017 and 2018, the county made more than $7.5 million from the auction, with 1,700 properties sold over the two years. All sales are final, so McAllister warns this is a buyer beware sale. He recommends beginning the research process on its website. Owners of the auctioned properties can still avoid going to sale; they have until 5 p.m. on March 11 to redeem their parcel and pay all taxes and fees owed. Before the sale, every effort is made to contact the owners of these properties to notify them about the impending sale.

Carlsbad musician shares his passion for music EDITOR’S NOTE: Hailey Mullen, a student at La Costa Canyon High School in Encinitas, is an intern at The Coast News. This is her first published article. By Hailey Mullen

CARLSBAD — Since attending Carlsbad High School, independent recording artist Alec Beretz has developed a passion for music that he wants to share with others. “For a long time, I’ve been running all over California, sleeping at friends’ houses, sleeping on couches, performing in backyards, anything to keep the music alive,” Beretz said. Beretz, who sings and plays guitar and bass over electronic beats, is known for his lyrics confronting tough issues, such as mental health, in songs he has self-produced over the years. Since age 16, he has produced several singles, including “I See Ghost,” and a full-length album, “Peep This,” which features 10 original songs. On the track “I See Ghost,” Beretz collaborates with Minnesota’s DJ Sidereal and OMB Peezy, an Alabama-based hip-hop artist. “(The song) is not about getting through the depression, but the moment when you’re like, ‘You know what? I’m just gonna keep pushing,’” Beretz said about the track. According to Beretz, mental health is an issue close to his heart, as he struggled with his own depression. At some point, he noticed how the people around him appeared to be ruled by their problems, so he started making an effort to stop letting his troubles define him. In order for Beretz to connect with people through his songwriting, he had to first find himself. He drew on his experiences from theatre when he played the title role in a high school production of “The Phantom of the Opera.” “I didn’t realize (at the time) how amazing the program was,” Beretz said, giving a shout-out to his drama teacher, Monica Hall. “It was so, so awesome.” Beretz said he feels a kinship between musical theatre and pop music, but the hardest part of songwriting was learning to be himself, which he has described as a “beautiful,” “spiritual” and "exhausting

INDEPENDENT ARTIST Alec Beretz is a former student at Carlsbad High School. Beretz’s latest album, “Peep This,” is a “Rorschach blend of styles encompassing the off-the-wall hype of a rapper like Lil’ Uzi Vert, the sleek expressiveness of a singer like Daniel Caesar, and the sharp-toothed attitude of your favorite punk band,” BuzzMusic wrote. Photo via Facebook

process." “(As a musician), you’re playing yourself, you’re the writer of the play and the director and everything, but you have to embody the character that is you.” Growing up, Beretz moved around a lot but was lucky to have supportive and creative parents who made a strong impact on him. He considers his family to be his home more than any location but always loves to come back to Carlsbad. “I really love it here, it’s so cool to be coming back,” Beretz said. “I get a feeling of peace when I’m down here. … I love that people here seem to have respect for where they live,

which I don’t feel anywhere (else).” After earning his Bachelor of Arts at California State University, Chico, in 2016, he shifted his focus from being a musical jackof-all-trades to primarily core songwriting, specifically developing lyrics, chords and melodies. But despite his musical independence, the COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted his ability to perform his music and connect with others. Since concerts and open mic nights have all but ceased to exist, many artists have moved to online platforms. And Beretz is no exception, developing a music profile on Twitch, a

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cial mobility. “Higher education is a launching pad toward higher economic status, and regional public universities like CSUSM are truly the proud vehicles of lower and middleclass social mobility,” Neufeldt said. “In fact, I am proud to share that we were recently ranked 28th nationally out of almost 1,500 colleges and universities in the Social

Mobility Index — which measures the extent to which a university educates more economically disadvantaged students at lower tuition and graduates them into good paying jobs.” The report concluded with an encouragement to the CSUSM community to nurture its future leaders and help all students reach their full potential. “We are here. We are charting the course, and, with you, we are leading the way,” Neufeldt said.

video live stream service. “I think it’ll be fun, especially while we’re waiting for concerts to get up and at it,” he said. “I think this will be a really good and interactive way to create a community again. I think the most important thing with music is… finding the highest emotional connection you can with your audience.” For Beretz, building a community around music in Carlsbad, whether online or in-person, is integral to his career as an artist. “I love it here and I want to start throwing events and taking more of a leadership role in expanding the music scene, and creating experiences for

people,” Beretz said. “I’m very into collaboration and including other artists so I want to book local artists and give anybody a voice.”

Thank You! Anne G. Eisner, 92 Carlsbad February 1, 2021

Vesta H. Frankston, 93 Oceanside January 17, 2021

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“Let me live in a house by the side of the road and be a friend to man.” These words by Sam Walter Foss bring to mind our desire to be a friend to our neighbors in their time of need. We are very grateful to the many families who have lived here for generations - folks who have come to know and trust us to care for their loved ones over the years. In an era when most funeral homes have been purchased by far-away corporations, we are proud to be your local family-owned & operated mortuary. Our roots & hearts are here with you. As we mark our 57th anniversary this month, we thank you for the honor you have bestowed upon us by choosing our family to serve yours!

THANK YOU! ALLEN BROTHERS MORTUARY, INC. VISTA CHAPEL FD-1120

1315 S. Santa Fe Ave Vista, CA 92083

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FEB. 12, 2021

Coastal Roots, a farm for everyone in Encinitas

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ore than 30,000 pounds of vegetables, fruit, herbs and eggs! That is how much food was donated and distributed by Coastal Roots Farm in Encinitas last year, to foodscarce families and community throughout San Diego County and regions beyond. Kesha Dorsey Spoor, Director of Philanthropy, Program Strategy and Communications explained, “We are proud to be part of a what is a much larger global movement for environmental sustainability. This is our humble contribution to a larger food system. “We are committed to serve those who are food insecure in a dignified manner. We have many groups who are served and our food delivery team is working four days each week to deliver over 30,000 pounds a year. “One of the groups that we are very proud to serve is 26 families in the San Diego area who are Holocaust survivors. It is our privilege to make these deliveries door-to-door, and to serve our cherished elders, many of whom are food insecure.”

Feed Darlene...

"Because Kindness Matters"

Kindness Meters found at these North County locations:

Tip Top Meats • Agua Hedionda Lagoon Foundation • Boy’s & Girls Club of C’bad (Bressi Ranch) Moonlight Amphitheater The Lund Team Office and Downtown Carlsbad (at the sign) 100% of the proceeds benefit 7charitable organizations in the community including the Carlsbad Charitable Foundation, Carlsbad Educational Foundation, Agua Hedionda Lagoon Foundation, and The Moonlight Cultural Foundation, Kids for Peace and Boys and Girls Club of Carlsbad

www.kindnessmeters.com

COASTAL ROOTS FARM in Encinitas donated and distributed more than 30,000 pounds of food to food-insecure families throughout San Diego County and beyond last year. File photo

A second group that is served by Farm Distribution Manager Garth Denton-Borhaug and his farm team is the Vista Community Clinic. According to Hermenia Ledesma from VCC, “The immigrants and refugees who come to the weekly food distribution are thankful to have a reliable source for food access. Stephanie Ortez, who works at the Coastal Roots Farm Stand, began her interest in public service at VCC. “I started out at the Vista Community Clinic but now I work at Coastal Roots at the farm stand and as part of the food delivery team,” Ortez said. “We deliver to senior centers, Community Resource Centers, military bases and as far as Santa Ysabel, home of the Iipay Nation.” The farm stand, open Thursday and Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m., has a “pay-asyou-can” policy that is discreetly processed at the cash register.

JAVIER GUERRERO, president and CEO of Coastal Roots Farm, was honored at Cal State San Marcos this month with the 2021 Fran Aleshire Leadership Award. Courtesy photo

When I visited the farm pleasant manner, “How stand, Stephanie waited on much would you like to pay me and when she rang up today?” my sale, she said in a very The other young wom-

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summer in Cooperstown. The youngsters had spent the year raising their bunnies, pigs and sheep to display at the State Fair. Each participant received ribbons, but the grand prize was a baby goat that my neighbor had donated to the group. Baby goats and bunnies might not be pets that children can raise in suburban North County, but parents and grandparents can certainly introduce their children to the joys of farming and raising animals at Coastal Roots events and children’s classes. According to its website, “Coastal Roots Farm is a ‘living Jewish farm,’ making practices that are thousands of years old relevant lessons for today. These practices inform how we grow produce, share belongings, treat neighbors, observe the passing of time, celebrate and improve, care for plants and animals, and create a vibrant, welcoming community. All of this makes Coastal Roots Farm a Jewish farm for everyone.” Recently, Javier Guerrero, president and CEO of Coastal Roots, received the 2021 Fran Aleshire Leadership Award, which goes to a graduate of the Leadership North County Alumni Network program at Cal State San Marcos. At Coastal Roots Farm, Guerrero has built a team to increase equitable educational programming, introduced internships and after-school programs, and overseen a 35% increase in production to distribute food to more than 30,000 marginalized community members annually. For information regarding events, children’s camps, virtual visits and numerous family events, visit coastalrootsfarm.org. or contact Megan Freeman at 760-479-6505. The Farm Stand is located at 441 Saxony Road in Encinitas.

en, who were filling the stand with freshly harvested produce, are all interested in farming and educating the public. Victoria Lapidus, Emma Tuttleman-Kriegler and Cleo Person all hope to further their education in agriculture and community service. In a time when many teens and young adults often seem glued to their cellphones and computers, it was such a breath of fresh air to meet these young women who were finding a way to incorporate their love of service with handson gardening into their lives. The young farm staff I interviewed reminded me of the members of the New York State 4-H Youth Clubs who I worked with while I was serving as Director of the Cornell Cooperative Jano Nightingale is a Extension Master Gardener horticulturist and lives in Program in Cooperstown, Vista, where she gardens New York. with her son and teaches It was my pleasure to gardening classes in North judge a 4-H Animal HusCounty. She can be reached bandry project, held each at janosgarden@hotmail.com

SMALL TALK CONTINUED FROM B1

shorts covered with lipstick kisses, which most men would sooner leave the planet than wear, anywhere, anytime. Don’t even go near the lingerie department of your local department store. That much concentrated spandex and ostrich feathers may cause a serious rash. My simple and delicious solution is to order up spring rolls, some dim sum and perhaps some war won ton soup and spend the entire month of February celebrating the Lunar New Year of the Ox. Gung Hay, Fat Choy. Jean Gillette is a freelance writer who will admit the holiday is a great excuse to buy herself a pound of chocolate.

SAVE CARDIFF ICON

During a windstorm last month, one of the iconic Cardiff-by-the-Sea signs was damaged. Cardiff-based San Diego Visual Arts Network and Cardiff 101 would like to restore the sign. Visit GoFundMe and donate $25 or more to be entered to win a $50 gift card to Waverly. Courtesy photo


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Surfing reminds how pollution reaches ocean By Ann Van Leer

SURF PALACE for rent. Needs work, but it’s close to the surf and cool in the summertime. Photo by Chris Ahrens

Surf houses and overpriced whistles waterspot chris ahrens

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he surfers I grew up with were never interested in the cars they drove or the house they occupied. They didn’t need to impress anyone; they were busy perfecting the art of living. A house was nothing more than a place to eat and sleep. A car got you to essential surf spots. A house was a roof, a bedroom, a kitchen and a bathroom. Garages were good because you could make surfboards in them. A yard could also be useful, because in them you could clean whatever fish you might have speared and, for the more industrious among us, grow vegetables. Before land prices in North County rivaled the national debt and condos became the rage for the upwardly mobile among us, there were some beach shacks scattered along the coast. My first one was in Encinitas, in the summer of 1970, located at the corner of 3rd and G, where a hundred bucks a month split half a dozen came along with an all-access pass to Swami’s. Initially, I paid nothing to sleep on a couch on the front porch. When I scored a job for $2.50 per hour, however, I moved into my own bedroom and paid the rent for those who were unemployed. Years later, in it’s final gasp for life, the house earned the name “Rag Pile,” a title it held until its destruction in the late ’70s. Customers can’t find you if they

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From 3rd and G, I alternately landed between luxury’s lap and poverty’s basement a number of times before moving into a two-bedroom shack (or palace depending on your POV) on the cliff, overlooking Swami’s. It had been part of a migrant worker’s camp and was in bad repair when we moved in and stapled visqueen where the windows had once been, built bunk beds, laid down an old piece of carpet in what passed for a front room, had the water, gas and electricity turned on and endured paradise. Of course, devils have ways of kicking residents out of Eden and the place was mowed within a year of our moving in and turned into honeycombs with carports and locked gates where the young, nervous and upwardly mobile could find shelter from the elements that longed to free them. Regardless of where I traveled in my endless search for surf — Hawaii, Guam, Australia and New Zealand — it was the same and I found surfers living beyond polite society, willing to sacrifice comfort for freedom. When I think about these houses, I am reminded of a short piece by Ben Franklin called “The Whistle.” In it, Franklin tells how he once paid too much for a wooden whistle and, after learning his lesson, carried the metaphor over to life. Whenever he observed someone with an object not worth the pain of its attainment, he thought to himself that that person had “paid too much for the whistle.” Imagine Ben living in a time of $800 phones, four-buck cups of coffee and rent sucking up half your monthly salary. Trust an old man when he says that the waves you rode and the people you were with will be alive in your memory long after your current car is a bucket of rust and your house has been demolished to make way for someone else’s dream. It’s only a whistle. Don’t blow it.

ENCINITAS — At the western terminus of the Escondido Creek, spectacular surfing at Cardiff State Beach in January reminded us how a clean and natural watershed makes for a clean ocean, and why the work of The Escondido Creek Conservancy is so vital. As surfers carved across wave faces buffeted by offshore winds, Conservancy board member Richard Murphy was there to photograph them. What the pictures don’t show is upstream pollution that invariably finds its way to the beach. “Once it gets into the storm drain system, it’s on its way to the ocean,” said Greg McBain, a Leucadia resident. McBain, a retired civil engineer who specialized in water and wastewater, is a former Conservancy board member. He consults with the Conservancy on our efforts to improve water quality in Escondido Creek. Pollution, he said, often begins on the streets when motor oils, antifreeze, and other contaminants wash from the pavement into the gutters and storm drains that empty into the creek. One piece of trash, especially after a heavy rain, can travel nonstop from Escondido to Cardiff State Beach. Plastics, when absorbed by marine life, make their way up the food chain and can contaminate the seafood we eat. Nitrogen compounds in fertilizer make for a green lawn but, when washed into watersheds, can cause algae blooms that deplete creeks and lagoons of oxygen, killing insects and fish. “People need to act responsibly in terms of what they’re letting out into a

ONE PIECE OF TRASH, especially after a heavy rain, can travel nonstop from Escondido to Cardiff State Beach. Photo by Richard Murphy

storm drain or sewer,” McBain said. So must government agencies. State and federal laws require local jurisdictions to prevent pollutants from entering watersheds. The most common prohibited discharges come from: irrigation runoff; trash; vehicle washing; hos-

ing down or pressure-washing streets, sidewalks or parking lots; swimming pool discharges, or sewer overflows. Back at the beach, rivers and creeks are “the dominant source of finegrained sediment that enters the ocean,” according to a U.S. Geological Survey

Report, and at many surf breaks, that sand improves surfing conditions. The damming and channeling of creeks and rivers alters the natural flow of sand, gravels and small stones, which has led to increased coastal erosion, flooding and property damage. A natural creek bed, by contrast, contains a balance of rock, gravels, and sand, which reduces erosion during flood events. The Conservancy’s work to preserve land within the Escondido Creek watershed reduces flooding and minimizes pollution that would otherwise reach San Elijo Lagoon and the beach. The more natural a watershed is, the less erosion and over-siltation occurs, making for healthier and cleaner waters, and a better surf break. The Conservancy’s education program addresses all of this. Learn more at www.escondidocreek.org.


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FEB. 12, 2021

Food &Wine

Lady Pirate brings fermented treats to Leucadia lick the plate david boylan

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ne of the great pleasures of writing this column is coming across women like chef Rocio Fleckenstein at the Leucadia Farmers Market, where she sells her amazing pickled and fermented products. And, yes, being somewhat of a pickle freak, I can’t simply walk by someone selling them, especially with a name like Lady Pirate. Anyway, when I began my research dive into the talent behind Lady Pirate, I learned of the impressive culinary road that chef Rocio cut her culinary chops on leading to this current venture. More details on her journey in our interview below. And please, make it a point to either stop by the Leucadia or Rancho Santa Fe farmers markets or order her products online. LTP: Tell me a bit about your background, where you grew up, culinary influences, was there gardening, pickling and canning going on? Rocio: I grew up in Southern California and in Spain. My experiences in Spain led me to appreciate food and community. The Spanish or Mediterranean cuisine I was around had a lot of pickled

LADY PIRATE Products offers a variety fermented foods, including kimchi rojo, mato verde and kraut morado. Photo courtesy of Lady Pirate Products

or preserved foods. I have fond memories as a kid eating pickled anchovies on chips and dousing it with vinegar in a plaza in Spain. My grandmother would pickle fresh anchovies in vinegar and parsley, and I learned from my mom how to do it. That was a big influence in my connection with food long before I realized I wanted to be a chef. LTP: Take me down your professional road to Lady Pirate. Rocio: I started cooking as a job at 15 years old. I was a cafe cook and an aspiring cheese monger at a cheese and wine shop that was connected to a culinary school. I would trade washing dishes at night during culinary classes to

ROCIO FLECKENSTEIN

sit in and learn. I went to Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, right out of high school. From there I

hopped around kitchens to gain experience and landed in Spain and ironically worked at an Italian restaurant as a sous chef. From there I came back to California and started working at True Food Kitchen in Newport Beach when they were fresh on the scene. I worked under Nathan Coulon when he was the chef there. He had a big influence on my growth as I began my journey through the trenches. You never forget your first mentor. He is still a friend today. I moved to San Diego after that and worked at Brooklyn Girl to get my feet wet with the San Diego scene. I was the executive

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catering chef for Alchemy with Ricardo Heredia before Alchemy closed its doors. I was introduced to fermentation when I was executive chef at The Joint in Ocean Beach. But it’s when I worked for Ballast Point in Little Italy as the sous chef when I really got into it. We started making our own vinegars from wine and beer, fermenting vegetables, and pickling everything. From that experience I was selected for Chefs Celebration, which is a sponsored trip that selects a group of rising chefs in San Diego, sends them to Napa for classes at CIA’s sister school Greystone. That’s the moment where I was able to dive deeper into the rustic cooking methods like fermentation, smoking and pickling. After that I became the chef at Ballast Point in Miramar and then opened Kairoa Brewing Co. as the executive chef. I had perfected my kimchi recipe over the years and my wife, Leah, pushed me to start selling it. I started at the North Park Farmers Market. I went back to Spain in February 2020 for my grandmother’s funeral. Between COVID, the state of everything and my grandmother passing, it got me thinking about what mattered most to me. I had climbed the culinary ladder and was ready for a new challenge, so I decided to do Lady Pirate full

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time. It brings me joy, helps people and it’s delicious. LTP: Lady Pirate is a great name — tell me more about it. Rocio: It’s a reference to breaking the mold and becoming an entrepreneur and charting my own waters. Pirates were actually outcasts because they didn’t fit into the mold, so the powers-that-be banished them from being a part of society, so they lived on the sea. There were many pirates that were women and LGBTQ+ that became pirates to feel accepted and live as normal and free life as they could. Many started off as buccaneers which is derived from the French word Boucan, which was someone who smoked or preserved foods. I grew up on boats and on the water for a long time. My grandfather is related to Captain James Cook. Cook was commissioned to help find new ways to prevent scurvy aboard ships. Ships couldn’t keep fresh produce or citrus aboard so they tried sauerkraut since it would keep forever, and it was packed with vitamin C and B vitamins. Three years and almost 8,000 pounds of sauerkraut later, zero deaths had occurred during his travels. LTP: Tell me about your product line and the attributes of each of them. Rocio: Some of the products have Spanish words in the names, which is a nod to my heritage. We currently have five products available to the public and a few that are still in R&D stages that we’d like to offer this year. Kimchi Rojo is a traditional Korean inspired kimchi, bold, crunchy and saucy. Kraut Morado is purple sauerkraut made with red cabbage, caraway and a little juniper berry. It’s mild, tangy, versatile and vegan. Our Deli Dills are a New York deli-style dill pickle with that crunchy salty-sour balance that everyone is looking for. Mato Verde are novelty pickled green tomatoes and our La Reina Kimchi Sauce is a probiotic packed sauce to add on almost anything. This sauce is derived from our kimchi batches. We bottle up all the kimchi sauce that’s left over and full of flavor and probiotics. LTP: Where can folks find you and order? Rocio: We are at Leucadia and Rancho Santa Fe farmers markets on Sundays from 10 to 2 p.m. You can also order off our website, www.ladypirateproducts.com. Discount code: LP2021. We deliver all over San Diego every week and ship nationwide. Follow us on Instagram @ladypirateproducts.


FEB. 12, 2021

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Food &Wine

Drinking average beer during a lackluster Super Bowl they calling timeouts? • Hey! I like Brussels sprouts. That’s unexpected. • Hmm. I wonder what Twitter is thinking about this game. Checking. Whoa. Mahomes’ pre-game threepiece suit attire kind of makes me want to wear a suit, but not if it means taking off this fleece onesie. • Hey! My beer is gone. What happened to my beer? It just sort of disappeared. Kind of like the Chiefs’ hopes at becoming a dynasty, am I right?

Cheers! North County

Ryan Woldt

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he Super Bowl was less than super this year — a blowout whose most memorable moments came on incomplete passes and penalties. It is always an odd sporting event where there are more corporate ticket fans in the stands than actual followers of a given team and more commercials than there are breweries in San Diego County, making for a somewhat anesthetized viewing experience. This year people have latched on to sports as a way of re-gaining some normalcy, but for me, unless my team is in the game it is just a reason to open a beer. This year I found the beer that perfectly matched my Super Bowl experience, Costco’s Kirk-land Signature Citra Hop Session IPA. I know, I know, a beer from Costco isn’t the normal local beer that I’d encourage you as the reader to support. Shop local! This particular beer was left for me to try by a socially distanced patio guest. Considering the commercialization of the big game, it seemed like the right time to crack it open.

KIRKLAND SIGNATURE Citra Hop Session IPA ended up being a perfectly average beer for an unmemorable Super Bowl game. Photo by Ryan Woldt

Also, it was the only IPA left It’s light and refreshing and in the fridge, and we went … on a first-half drive togeth• Brad Pitt’s voice is so er (obligatory football pun). soothing. I wonder if he’s on Cameo? How much is too Here is a recap: much to pay him to wish • Oh hey, the game is someone happy birthday? about to start I need a beer • Why isn’t that ref (grabs can of Kirkland Ci- wearing a mask? It seems tra Hop). like a lot more than 20,000 • Poetry is back. Aman- people in those stands. da Gorman, you’re crushing • I wonder who makes it. this beer. “Brewed & Bot• That’s a subtle hint of tled by Hopfen Und Malz Citra wafting out of the can. Brewing Co., San Jose,

California.” Googling. Googling. Oh, Gordon Biersch Brewing Company. • Congrats to the first female Super Bowl ref, Sarah Thomas. That’s cool. Did you see that nonsense about her ponytail? • There is a sweetness to this beer that I don’t dislike. Not terribly hop forward. I almost don’t taste the hops. • Oh my god. Mahomes is running for his life.

• We need food (takes beer and phone into the kitchen). • Andy Reid’s face mask looks like a homemade undergarment. • Brady to Gronk. • Beep, beep, beep. Time to flip the potatoes and shake the pan of roasted veggies. • Brady to Gronk again. Ugh. • ANOTHER FLAG! • Timeout? Why are

Just like that it was halftime, and the beer was gone. It was a fine beer, I think. Unoffensive and seemingly designed to appeal just a little bit to every beer drinker without offending any-one. Kind of like the game itself. Kirkland Citra Hops Session IPA is a commercialized version of craft that perfectly matched the mood of the game. I don’t have more tasting notes because nothing about it was terribly memorable, which isn’t great, but it isn’t bad either. A year from now, when I’m hopefully at a huge post-pandemic Super Bowl party dipping tortilla chips into a homemade chili dip, meeting new babies and trying to avoid that one close talker while grabbing a local craft beer out of a cooler, I probably won’t remember much of anything about it, or the game.

DAOU Vineyards’ Patrimony Estate dream team is born

E

very great legacy begins with a back story. Georges and Daniel Daou grew up in France after their family migrated from wartorn Lebanon. While growing up in France and influenced by stimulating conversations he had with his father, Joseph, and brother Georges, Daniel became fascinated with wine. The Daou brothers came to San Diego to attend UCSD as engineering majors. After graduating, they created Daou Systems, a health care information technology company, and then sold the company after several years. Daniel’s dream of becoming a winemaker was about to come true. As engineers, successful business owners and quality seekers, Georges and Daniel combed the world looking at hundreds of wine terroirs. They knew to create world-class wines, they

needed the best phenolics, which are organic soil compounds, and a perfect climate. When they saw what is now DAOU Mountain in the Adelaida District of Paso Robles, they immediately knew the calcareous soil with some of the best phenolics in the world matching that of Bordeaux France, and the 2,200-foot elevation creating a climate like Napa Valley’s, would be a perfect terroir to create DAOU Family Estates. These exemplary conditions and passion for perfection enabled Daniel Daou, lead winemaker, to create a California “first growth” Bordeaux-style Cabernet Sauvignon called Patrimony. Several weeks ago, I received a text from Daniel saying, “Ciao Fratello, I have earth-shattering news to share with you.” Minutes later, I learned that Chris Avery, Steve Palumbo and Nicholas Holmes—all longtime veterans of Opus One and other iconic wineries, would be joining Patrimony estate as the global sales and marketing team led by Chris. Also, Erik Johnson, former head sommelier at The French Laundry, would join as the Patrimony Estate di-

DAOU’S ‘PATRIMONY’

rector. Taste of Wine and Food was excited to be the first to learn of this news outside of the winery. Seconds later I was sharing the epic news with Senior Editor Frank. When the story officially broke on Feb. 2, Taste of Wine and Food had an in-

terview with Daniel Daou, Chris Avery and Maeve Pesquera, senior vice president, to learn more about Patrimony Estate. Daniel shared that Patrimony is more than a wine, it will be its own DAOU entity. DAOU purchased 269 acres bordering its property for the Patrimony Estate project. Eighty acres will be planted for Patrimony fruit, leaving space for a winery, French cottages, a restaurant, wine caves and DAOU Mountain views, creating a chateau masterpiece destination overseen by the new dream team. During the interview, I asked what makes Patrimony different from Soul of a Lion, which is dedicated to Daniel and Georges’ father, who told the boys when life gets tough, have the “soul of a lion.” Soul is a spectacular wine as well, with 100% estate, free-run juice outselling the best of Napa Valley wines. Daniel shared, “It is all about the phenolics” and gave an example of color. “Most first-growth Bordeaux wines have color at 180 parts per million (ppm). Soul of a Lion has around 300 ppm, and Patrimony has 480+ ppm.” Patrimony is aged in

three barriques (barrel or cask), including limited Tonnellerie Sylvain barrels made from 362-year-old fine-grain oak, originating from a forestry program initiated during the reign of Louis XIV; only 35 of these barrels were produced from two fallen oaks. The aging includes 30 months in barrels and an additional year in the bottle. This creates seamless integration with perfect balance in color, structure, and tannins resulting in Patrimony’s “Modern Antiquity,” deserving to compete on the world stage. Speaking of world stages, Pesquera mentioned, “DAOU has changed Paso Robles. People who are in and have experience in the world of wine are drawn here. A perfect example being the new dream team. Patrimony is another defining moment for Paso. Patrimony will extend what Soul of a Lion started 13 years ago as a world-class luxury wine and show what Paso Robles can do.” Avery added to the commentary, “Patrimony is approachable with depth. It will evolve in your glass while drinking, over the course of a few hours, a couple of days even without Coravin preservation, and

in the cellar for years.” Of course, Frank and I had to put Avery’s comments to the test and opened a bottle. I have never seen color or legs so bold in a Cabernet Sauvignon. When a glass is tilted exposing the purple-black color of the wine, a layer coats the side of the glass and after a few seconds, deep legs formed. The nose had fruit with floral hints and some spice, sweet fruit through the palate with soft and balanced acidity, baby smooth tannins, and a long earthy finish. Patrimony is truly a phenomenal wine. One of the best, if not the best, that I have ever had! As the interview was winding down, I had one final question for Daniel: Why Patrimony? He said, “While Soul of a Lion is dedicated to Georges’ and my father, Patrimony is Georges’ and my legacy. This is what Georges and I want to leave the world and be remembered by.” Starting with the 2017 vintage, each bottle is prominently molded above the label with “Legatum Nostrum,” meaning “Our Legacy” in Latin. I suspect some readers are thinking, where TURN TO TASTE OF WINE ON B10


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FEB. 12, 2021

FEB. 14

Tickets, $10, will be sold via bellyup.com where fans can LOVE SONGS ON PIANO purchase an MP3 download Oceanside Theatre of the evening’s perforCompany and Scripps mance and limited-edition Ranch Theatre present a The White Buffalo T-shirts. free Valentine's Day conKnow something that’s going cert “Robert Parker: Love on? Send it to calendar@ Songs Live,” with classic coastnewsgroup.com love songs from pianist AT-HOME ART PROJECT Robert Parker. The conIn celebration of the cert will stream live at 6 100th anniversary of the p.m. Feb. 14. Audiences can passing of the 19th Amendtune in at http://scrippsNEW EXHIBITIONS ment, granting women the Lux Art Institute’s new- ranchtheatre.org /robert- right to vote, the North est artist residency is enti- parkerlovesongs/ or http:// County Arts Network oftled “[Glyph].” This exhibi- o c e a n s i d e t h e a t r e . o r g / fers At-Home Art Projects tion, at 1550 S. El Camino robertparkerlovesongs /. at carlsbadca.gov/civicax/ Real, Encinitas, features This show is free as a Valen- filebank/blobdload.aspxthe work of multiple art- tine from SRT & OTC to the ?BlobID=46530, inspired ists. Work will be presented community. by contemporary female through installations, perartists from the 19th, 20th formances, and sculptures ART FROM THE HEART and 21st centuries. Design Valentine’s Day is syn- a whimsical castle creation across Lux’s outdoor campus. Beatriz Cortez through onymous with arts & crafts, inspired by artist Mary Feb. 27. rafa esparza March and music, and dance, and Blair or a stylized polka-dot2 to March 6. Kang Seung performing arts. Amanda ted pumpkin inspired by Lee March 9 to March 13. Ecoff, executive adminis- Japanese pop artist Yayoi Pavithra Prasad March 16 trator of North County Arts Kusama. Styles and lessons to March 20. Candice Lin Network suggests you write vary.
 March 23 to March 28. Due a poem, paint a picture, to COVID-19, artists will tell a story, compose music, work onsite outside of regu- make your own work of vilar visitor hours to maintain sual art. Go online and take CIVIL WAR DRAMA EXTENDED distance from visitors. Tick- a virtual tour of a museum, North Coast Repertory ets free at luxartinstitute. watch a foreign film, down- Theatre has extended “Necload an arts project that essary Sacrifices” through org. you can do by yourself, as a March 7. “Necessary Sacricouple or with your kiddos. fices” is based on the two Whatever you choose, give documented meetings beyour heart the Valentine’s tween Abraham Lincoln FOUNDRY STUDIOS The Foundry Artist gift of the love of creation. and Frederick Douglass at Studios at New Village Arts, Visit sdncan.org. the height of the Civil War. at 2787 State St., Carlsbad, Tickets at northcoastrep. is hosting a gallery show VIRTUAL WHITE BUFFALO org. featuring a collection of The Belly Up welcomes pandemic-inspired art by the White Buffalo’s “Songs Foundry artists from noon of Anarchy” livestream to 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Sat- concert Feb. 21 on bellyup. LET’S TALK THEATER urdays and Sundays. Find com. The White Buffalo is North Coast Repertory THE WHITE BUFFALO is Jake Smith — singer, songwriter, guitarist, teller of stories and Emmy Kasia on Instagram @arty- Jake Smith – singer, song- Theatre welcomes Chris- nominee. Tickets, $10, will be sold via bellyup.com. Courtesy photo by.kasia. Face masks and writer, guitarist, teller of topher Williams and new distancing required. stories and Emmy nominee. celebrities each week to its “Theatre Conversations,” robin/, for a two-part se- preceded by a series of an ongoing selection of in- ries highlighting the con- newly produced and recordterviews with various ac- tributions of women artists ed pre-concert lectures, tors and others from the throughout the ages. Cost interviews, and readings, theater world. Subscribe to $5. Part One: 7 to 8:30 p.m. hosted and curated by Stethe NCRT YouTube channel Feb. 18. Part Two: 7 to 8:30 ven Schick, music director. at https://bit.ly/3cNJNIB or p.m. March 11. Productions will be aired e-mail NCRT at conversaFeb. 19, March 19, April 16, tions@northcoastrep.org. May 14 and June 18. Series subscriptions or individual LA JOLLA SYMPHONY SERIES event tickets can be purLa Jolla Symphony and chased by visiting lajollasWhen you become a subscriber, you GREAT WOMEN ARTISTS Chorus offers a re-imag- ymphony.com, phoning the support what matters. Your readership SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY There will be online ined, all virtual 2020- box office at (858) 534-4637 helps keep our staff reporting on the local Lectures: “Great Women 2021 Season. “Stay Home or by writing to boxoffice@ for as little as and regional developments affecting you. Artists, Then And Now,” With Us” will be a six-part lajollasymphony.com. It ofYour readership encourages independent in association with the up- monthly series, with musi- fers a “pay what you can” businesses to keep advertising and coming “Twenty Women cal encounters, interviews, and the $500 Amadeus growing. Most importantly, your readership Artists: NOW” exhibition solo performances and se- Club subscription options. helps keep our community connected, at Oceanside Museum Of lected pre-recorded works For more information, visinformed and engaged in democracy. Art. Join Robin Douglas from the La Jolla Sympho- it https://lajollasymphony. at https://oma-online.org/ ny and Chorus archives, com/.

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TASTE OF WINE CONTINUED FROM B9

and how do I get Patrimony ($275)? Patrimony will remain a small production wine, even with the 80-acre expansion. Interested patrons are encouraged to sign up for the waiting list on their website. An interesting factoid is that starting with next year’s 2018 vintage, bottles will be tagged with near field communication (NFC) tags and have certificates of authenticity. This will allow collectors to trade Patrimony like artwork on markets such as Sotheby’s. Details at patrimonyestate.com. — Story by Tech Director/Writer Rico Cassoni

Wine Bytes

• West End Bar & Kitch-

en in Del Mar presents a night of royal treatment with Schramsberg Sparkling Wine Vineyards and Davies Vineyards of Napa Valley in a memorable three-night wine dinner, Thursday-Saturday, Feb. 25-27, at 6 p.m. This event is close to a sellout so don’t delay. Cost is $95 per person plus tax and gratuity. Call 858-259-5878 to reserve your seat. • Flora Bar & Kitchen in the Carmel Valley Trader Joe’s Center is planning a DAOU wine dinner with proprietor and winemaker Daniel Daou, Wednesday, March 24, at 6 p.m. This five-course dinner menu will perfectly complement the carefully selected DAOU wines, including the world-class DAOU Soul of a Lion. Call 858-461-0622 to reserve your seat. Cost is $75 per person plus tax and gratuity.

Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. Reach him at frank@tasteofwineandfood.com.


B11

T he C oast News

1. ANATOMY: What is the hardest substance in the human body? 2. GEOGRAPHY: Off which U.S. state’s coast is Santa Catalina Island located? 3. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Who was the first president to hold a press conference? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: How many breaths does the average human being take in one day? 5. MOVIES: Which movie featured the Seal song “Kiss From a Rose”? 6. U.S. STATES: A city in this state became the first in the world to install a parking meter? 7. ANCIENT WORLD: Before he became a philosopher, what was Socrates’ profession? 8. LANGUAGE: What is the only letter that does NOT appear in any of the U.S. states’ names? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of giraffes called? 10. LITERATURE: Which dystopian 1950s novel was originally titled “The Fireman”?

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Doing something nice for others is typical of the generous Arian. But be prepared for some jealous types who might try to question one of your more recent acts of kindness. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You’re eager to take on new responsibilities. But before you do, you might want to check out exactly what would be required of you so that you don’t face any “surprises” later. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It might be best to put off an important decision until a fluctuating situation becomes more stable. Recently received news could help resolve a long-standing family matter. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you still have a problem getting that information gap closed, you might consider asking a higher authority to resolve the matter, leaving you free to move on to another project. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A family matter needs to be dealt with at the start of the week. Once it’s resolved, the Big Cat can devote more attention to that new opportunity that seems to hold so much potential. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Pay attention to those niggling doubts. They could be warning you not to make any major decisions until you’ve checked them out — especially where money matters might be involved.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A business venture might need more of your attention than you are able to provide. Consider asking a trusted friend or family member to help you work through this time crunch. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A more-positive aspect helps you get a clearer focus on how to handle your time so that you can deal with several responsibilities that are just now showing up on your schedule. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A very close friend (you know who that is!) has advice that could help you work through a confusing situation. So put your pride aside and ask for it. You’ll be glad you did. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A workplace situation could turn a bit tense. The best way to handle it is to confront it and deal with it openly. Doing so can help reveal the underlying reasons for the problem. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A colleague’s remarks appear to be especially cutting. But don’t waste your time or your energy trying to deal with the situation. You have more important things to do. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Support for your work comes as a surprise from someone you thought was critical or, at least, indifferent. Your spouse or partner has big plans for the weekend. BORN THIS WEEK: Your spiritual strength often acts as an inspiration to help others make decisions about their lives. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

TRIVIA TEST ANSWERS

1. Tooth enamel 2. California’s 3. Woodrow Wilson, March 1913 4. About 23,000 5. “Batman Forever” (1995) 6. Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) 7. Stone mason 8. Q 9. A tower 10. “Fahrenheit 451,” Ray Bradbury

FEB. 12, 2021


B12

T he C oast News

FEB. 12, 2021

LEGALS

LEGALS

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Coast News legals continued from page A17

Time: 1:30 PM; in Dept.: 503. Court address: 1100 Union St., San Diego CA 92101, Central Division, Probate. Effective November 2, 2020: Appearances must be made by video conferencing, using the free Microsoft Teams application (“MS Teams”) or by calling the department’s teleconference phone number. Please plan to check in 30-minutes prior to the scheduled hearing time. The department’s MS Teams link, teleconference phone number and additional instructions can be found at www.sdcourt. ca.gov/ProbateVirtualHearings. No personal appearances are allowed until further notice. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Debra L. Leffler Streeter, Esq. Streeter Law Group, APC 217 Civic Center Dr., Ste 10 Vista CA 92084 Telephone: 760.945.9353 02/05, 02/12, 02/19/2021 CN 25081

the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: Apr. 21, 2021; Time: 1:30 PM; in Dept.: 502. Court address: 1100 Union St., San Diego CA 92101, Central Division, Probate. Effective November 2, 2020: Appearances must be made by video conferencing, using the free Microsoft Teams application (“MS Teams”) or by calling the department’s teleconference phone number. Please plan to check in 30-minutes prior to the scheduled hearing time. The department’s MS Teams link, teleconference phone number and additional instructions can be found at www.sdcourt. ca.gov/ProbateVirtualHearings. No personal appearances are allowed until further notice. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Debra L. Leffler Streeter, Esq. Streeter Law Group, APC 217 Civic Center Dr., Ste 10 Vista CA 92084 Telephone: 760.945.9353 02/05, 02/12, 02/19/2021 CN 25080

name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: On Mar 02, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 23 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Regional Division. NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE ABOVE DATE; ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court’s facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this. Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other nonsigning parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. IT IS SO ORDERED. Date: Jan 12, 2021 Sim Von Kalinowski Judge of the Superior Court. 01/29, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19/2021 CN 25073

without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: On Mar 02, 2021 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 23 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Regional Division. NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE ABOVE DATE; ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of court personnel and the public, rendering presence in, or access to, the court’s facilities unsafe, and pursuant to the emergency orders of the Chief Justice of the State of California and General Orders of the Presiding Department of the San Diego Superior Court, the following Order is made: NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE. The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120). If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC100) will be granted without a hearing. One certified copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner. If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions. If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a remote hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions. A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future remote hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this. Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other nonsigning parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. IT IS SO ORDERED. Date: Jan 12, 2021 Sim Von Kalinowski Judge of the Superior Court. 01/22, 01/29, 02/05, 02/12/2021 CN 25066

S/Lorena Romero, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25115

Name(s): A. Encinitas Colon Hydrotherapy. Located at: 965 2nd St., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: 1033 Guildford Ct., Encinitas CA 92024. Registrant Information: 1. Kiersten E Turrell, 1033 Guildford Ct., San Diego CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2021 S/Kiersten E Turrell, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25108

NOTICE OF PUBLIC LIEN SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the contents of the following storage units will be offered for sale at public auction for enforcement of storage lien. The Online Auction will be held Friday, February 26, 2021 at 1PM. Location of Online Auction: www.storagetreasures. com. Storage address: 2405 Cougar Drive Carlsbad, CA 92010. Terms are CASH ONLY! West Coast Self-Storage reserves the right to refuse any bid or cancel the auction. The following units may include, but not limited to electronic items, furniture, & household items, unless otherwise stated. Size 5x10 5x5 5x10

Name Kristie Elizondo Andy Kohanzad Areiontae William

02/12/2021, 02/19/2021 CN 25100

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KAREN M. DAVIES, aka KAREN MARLENE DAVIES and KAREN A. DAVIES Case# 37-2021-00003437-PRPL-CTL ROA 1 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Karen M.

Davies, aka Karen Marlene Davies and Karen A. Davies. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Patricia A. Fister in the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego. The Petition for Probate requests that Patricia A. Fister be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: Apr. 08, 2021;

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MELANIE J. HOFF aka MELANIE HOFF Case# 37-2020-00034039-PR-LACTL ROA 22 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Melanie J. Hoff aka Melanie Hoff. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Kim A. Sliffe in the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego. The Petition for Probate requests that Kim A. Sliffe be appointed as personal representative to administer

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-2021-00001277-CUPT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Brycson J Bregen filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Brycson J Bregen change to proposed name: Bryson J Bregen. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-2021-00001282-CUPT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Jennifer Robyn Austin filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Jennifer Robyn Austin change to proposed name: Jennifer Robyn Light. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001259 Filed: Jan 28, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Therapy in Session. Located at: 1035 S Clementine St., Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: PO Box 81, Carlsbad CA 92018. Registrant Information: 1. Anne E Robershaw, 1035 S Clementine St., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/01/2015 S/ Anne E Robershaw, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25116 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000592 Filed: Jan 21, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Las Amazonas Express; B. Las Primas Transport. Located at: 333 Lento Ln., El Cajon CA San Diego 92021. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Lorena Romero, 333 Lento Ln., El Cajon CA 92021; 2. Erika Romero Estrada, 1598 Ionian St., San Diego CA 92154. This business is conducted by: Co-Partners. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001604 Filed: Feb 02, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Studio Y Salon. Located at: 720 S Rancho Santa Fe Rd. #8, San Marcos CA San Diego 92078. Mailing Address: 1466 Golden Sunset Dr., San Marcos CA 92078. Registrant Information: 1. Yvonne Romberg, 1466 Golden Sunset Dr., San Marcos CA 92078. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 02/01/2016 S/Yvonne Romberg, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25114 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001677 Filed: Feb 03, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Marcon Termite & Pest Control; B. Marcon Termite Control. Located at: 5421 Old Ranch Rd., Oceanside CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Marcon Inc., 32243 Via Cirillo, Temecula CA 92592. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Marvin Artiaga, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25112 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001703 Filed: Feb 03, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. LUX Insurance Services. Located at: 1917 Wandering Rd., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. STARR International Inc., 1917 Wandering Rd., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/13/2021 S/Heidi K Lebherz, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25111 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001180 Filed: Jan 28, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Behncke Framing. Located at: 1227 Clarence Dr., Vista CA San Diego 92084. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Brendan Johnathon James Behncke, 1227 Clarence Dr., Vista CA 92084. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 12/09/2020 S/Brendan Johnathon James Behncke, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25110 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001742 Filed: Feb 03, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. MBConcrete Design. Located at: 155 W Jason St. #6, Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Matthew Stephen Banks, 155 W Jason St. #6, Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/14/2021 S/ Matthew Stephen Banks, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25109 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000779 Filed: Jan 25, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001630 Filed: Feb 02, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Big Bucks Investment Club. Located at: 399 Islander St., Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Marshall T Head, 399 Islander St., Oceanside CA 92054; 2. Tallie M Carey, 442 Mainsail Rd., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: General Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/1997 S/ Marshall T Head, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25107 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001339 Filed: Jan 29, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. The Private Banker. Located at: 6030 El Tordo #A, Rancho Santa Fe CA San Diego 92067. Mailing Address: PO Box 7103, Rancho Santa Fe CA 92067. Registrant Information: 1. Kerry J Witkin, 2365 5th St., Encinitas CA 92024; 2. Robin L Witkin, 2365 5th St., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Married Couple. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 06/01/1986 S/ Kerry J Witkin, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25104 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001176 Filed: Jan 28, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Prepare 2 Care; B. Prepare2Care.co. Located at: 1918 White Birch Dr., Vista CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: 1611-A S Melrose Dr. #112, Vista CA 92081. Registrant Information: 1. Michele Talbot, 1918 White Birch Dr., Vista CA 92081; 2. Linda Larson, 1494 Wilshire Rd., Fallbrook CA 92054. This business is conducted by: General Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/01/2019 S/ Michele Talbot, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25103 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001232 Filed: Jan 28, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. bungalowBlonde. Located at: 1790 Hawk View Dr., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Halle M Kost, 1790 Hawk View Dr., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2021 S/Halle M Kost, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25102 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000682 Filed: Jan 22, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. A Balance Within. Located at: 1327 Windsor Rd., Cardiff CA San Diego 92007. Mailing Address: PO Box 236065, Encinitas CA 92023.


FEB. 12, 2021

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LEGALS

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Registrant Information: 1. Lori B Correia, 1327 Windsor Rd., Cardiff CA 92007. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 11/11/2020 S/Lori B Correia, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26, 03/05/2021 CN 25101

200 N Cedros Ave., Solana Beach CA San Diego 92075. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Toehead Properties LLC, 200 N Cedros Ave., Solana Beach CA 92075. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/James Miller, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25091

Jan 20, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Body Blossom; B. Bissati. Located at: 845 La Mirada Ave., Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Fernanda Navarro Guimaraes, 845 La Mirada Ave., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 12/14/2020 S/Fernanda N. Guimaraes, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25089

Filed: Jan 27, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. San Diego Wellness Collaborative. Located at: 7632 Cortina Ct., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: PO Box 230397, Encinitas CA 92023. Registrant Information: 1. San Diego Healthcare Quality Collaborative, 7632 Cortina Ct., Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Katherine Bailey, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25087

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000907 Filed: Jan 26, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Rescue Baby. Located at: 3022 Azahar Ct., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Tiffani Czapinski, 3022 Azahar Ct., Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/28/2020 S/ Tiffani Czapinski, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25083

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000870 Filed: Jan 26, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Nostalgic Motor. Located at: 7490 Opportunity Rd. #2995, San Diego CA San Diego 92111. Mailing Address: 130 Townwood Way, Encinitas CA 92024. Registrant Information: 1. Nostalgic Motor LLC, 7490 Opportunity Rd. #2995, San Diego CA 92111. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 12/01/2020 S/ Nohman Baysudee, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25098 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000828 Filed: Jan 26, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Oceanside Self Service Car Wash Inc. Located at: 1515 Coast Hwy South, Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Oceanside Self Service Car Wash Inc., 1515 Coast Hwy South, Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2020 S/Craig L Jones, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25097 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000750 Filed: Jan 25, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. KW Luxury International; B. KW Homes and Estates: C. Keller Williams Homes and Estates; D. KW North County. Located at: 6005 Hidden Valley Rd. #250, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. ABC Realty Carlsbad Inc., 6005 Hidden Valley Rd. #250, Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/James M Crotwell Jr., 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25096

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001167 Filed: Jan 28, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Vintage Drifters; B. North County San Diego Notary. Located at: 2814 Turnbull St., Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Kristin Marie daRoza, 2814 Turnbull St., Oceanside CA 92054; 2. Joseph Robert daRoza, 2814 Turnbull St., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Married Couple. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Kristin Marie daRoza, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25090 Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000533 Filed:

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000962 Filed: Jan 26, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Pearly Clean. Located at: 1906 Stewart St., Oceanside CA San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Haley Elizabeth Presto, 1906 Stewart St., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Haley Elizabeth Presto, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25088 Fictitious Statement

Business Name #2021-9001020

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000918 Filed: Jan 26, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Roundtree Properties. Located at: 6506 Avenida Del Paraiso, Carlsbad CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: PO Box 130801, Carlsbad CA 92013. Registrant Information: 1. Tammy Lynne Harpster, 6506 Avenida Del Paraiso, Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Tammy Lynne Harpster, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25085

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001082 Filed: Jan 27, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Big Spirit Little Body. Located at: 5121 Palmera Dr., Oceanside CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Jacqueline Palomar Grossman, 5121 Palmera Dr, Oceanside CA 92056. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Jacqueline Palomar Grossman, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25082

LEGALS

LEGALS

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000819 Filed: Jan 25, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. PB Truffles. Located at: 1344 Pine Ave., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Alexa Kingaard, 1344 Pine Ave., Carlsbad CA 92008. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Alexa Kingaard, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19, 02/26/2021 CN 25079

Jan 06, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Mother Art. Located at: 2944 Hypoint Ave, Escondido CA San Diego 92027. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Auburn Taylor Henderson, 2944 Hypoint Ave., Escondido CA 92027. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2020 S/Auburn Taylor Henderson, 01/29, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19/2021 CN 25072

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000545 Filed: Jan 20, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Coast Carpet Cleaners. Located at: 2408 Majano Pl., Carlsbad CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Rebeca A Moody, 2408 Majano Pl., Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 08/01/1988 S/ Rebecca A Moody, 01/29, 02/05, 02/12, 02/19/2021 CN 25074

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000041 Filed: Jan 04, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. LC Studio. Located at: 2317 Oxford Ave., Cardiff by the Sea CA San Diego 92007. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Carolyn Christine Humber, 2317 Oxford Ave., Cardiff by the Sea CA 92007. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 11/13/2020 S/Carolyn Christine Humber, 01/22, 01/29, 02/05, 02/12/2021 CN 25067

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9000113 Filed:

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Fictitious Business Name Statement #2021-9001216 Filed: Jan 28, 2021 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Toehead Properties, LLC dba Oakhurst Resort. Located at:

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Inside: 2016 Sprin g Home & Gard en Section

VISTA, SAN MARCOS, ESCONDID O

Citracado Par extension pro kway ject draws on MARCH 25,

By Steve Putersk

It’s a jung

le In ther

Emi Gannod , 11, observe exhibit is s a Banded open now through April 10. Purple Wing butterfl Full story y at the on page A2. Photo San Diego Zoo Safari Park’s by Tony Cagala Butterfly

e

Commun Vista teacity rallies behind her placed on leave

Jungle exhibit. The

By Hoa Quach

TURN TO

Republic ans endors Abed ove r Gaspar e EXTENSION

ON A3

VISTA — Curren former t ents are students and and pardemanding social studies a teacher Vista lowed to be alkeep his the admin job. Vincen By Aaron Romero istration to keep has workedt Romero, Burgin at Ranch Vista High o for the who REGIO Unified School. Buena Vista ty Repub N — The Coun- Krvaric A protest since 1990,School Distric lican Party Sam Abed’ssaid. “Clear thrown at the school was also held paid admin was placed t ly has its suppor long-ti . Escondido on t behind steadfast commi me and istrative “This from his Republican leave Mayor tment Abed in gry,” wrotemakes me so na Vistajob at Rancho BueSam anprinciples to ty Dist. the race for Coun- values earned of Fallbro Jeffrey Bright and March 7. High School 3 Superv him port of on graduated ok, who said isor. The committeethe suphe Now, of San Republican Party bers and we more than from the school memwith morean online petitio 20 years last weekDiego announced endorse him.” are proud to already ago. “I tures is than 1,900 signa-n fear that it that our endorse ucation Gaspar’s istration asking the admin A social Abed overvoted to reache edcampa Republican apart. I system is falling d fellow back to to bring Romer - placed on studies teacher pressed this week ign and the classro at Rancho adminis tas Mayor not goingworry my kids o dents disappointme exBuena Vista are om. On his last to get a and parentstrative leave in Kristin Encini- not receivi who educat early nt in Gaspar, is also to launch ro told day, Rome- Romero. Photo March. The High School ion at publicvaluable ng the nomina an online was anymo supervisor running for by Hoa Quach party’s schools leaving students he re.” petition move prompted seat currenthe several tion, but touted in support stuwas sorry held by David Whidd key endors nization because “the orgaof Vincent tly she I can’t be is seekinDave Roberts, who Marcos ements has receive with the rest change.” decided to make g re-elec called on of San out the campa d throug of the year. you for do “shameful.” a my choice tion. the move Abed, h— we’re It’s not “(They a polariz who has been “While ign. “This is confidence ) no longer have it goes.” , but it’s the way until there’s going to fight I’m a teache his two ing figure during pointed not genuin fight with. nothing left know what in me that r that terms as In the to get thedisapto wrote. ely cares,” Whidd I plan to Escondido, roughly I ute speech mayor in ty endorsement, I’m doing,” for your parRomero, “Both be back senior year.” proud to secured said coveted Mr. Romer of my sons on whose to studen4-minwere record have theI’m very the of Romer remark emotional ts, an ment by party endors joyed his o and greatly had support Mayor students o also urged on Facebo ed and posteds to fight the Romero vowed Faulco ene- the class.” his to be kind than two receiving more administratio four Repub ner and new A former like what ok. “They don’t “I’m not Counc lican City n. but social studies to their mine studen committee’s thirds of I do. They ing,” like the the tors ilmembers, don’t not said Romer disappear- pal to give “hell” teacher RomerVelare of Vista,t, Jasvotes, threshold Senais what way I do it. So, to Princio Charles the and Bates and Anders said going away.o, 55. “I’m happens. this someth candidate required for teacher.” was “an amazin Schindler. Assemblyman on, Follow ing I’m really This is a Chavez g to receive ing endorsement Rocky nounce ,” “I that’s what I can fight, the the an- get himwas lucky enough party membe over a fellow “I’ve been Gaspar said. we’re goingand ture, a ment of his deparmyself to petition tive Repub a very effecr. to on Petitio was created “He truly cares,” she wrote. “Endorsing lican mayor nSite.com, publican for what one Re- a Democratic in urging he city ing on quires a over another balanced by focusTURN TO TEACHER budgets, — and 2/3 vote thresh re- economic ON A15 rarely happenold and GOP quality development, Chairman s,” continu of life Tony Board e to do so and will on the of Superv isors.”

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2016

i ESCON enviro amendment DIDO — An port nmental impact to the lution of from April rereso- ternati 2012. AlCitracado necessity for ves the sion projectParkway exten- with residenwere discussed ts in four munity Wednesday was approv ed of publicmeetings and comby the Council. gatherings. a trio City “The project Debra rently Lundy, property real cated designed as curcity, said manager for and plannewas lothe it was due to a needed manner that will d in a compatible omissionsclerical error, be most the est with attached of deeds to public good the greatbe private and least adjustm to the land. The injury, ent said. ” Lundy parcel beingis the only acquired fee the city, which is by city She also reporte ty, she added. a necess and proper d the i- have ty owners had The project, eminent domain meetings inmore than 35 the past in the which has been years to develo four works for years, will However, p the plan. several erty complete the missing the mit owners did not proproadway section of a counte subthe ny Grove, between Harmo city’s statutoroffer to the ry offer and AndreVillage Parkw - April 14, 2015. on ason Drive. ay to Lundy, Accord The the owners ing not feel a review city conduc did the ted offer matche which was of the project what the land , outlined is worth, d in the al-

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FEB. 12, 2021

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T he C oast News

NANI/CADNET

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B16

T he C oast News

FEB. 12, 2021

Monthly payment of $15.87 per $1,000 borrowed. No down payment required. Offer may vary by location. Other rates and payment terms available. Cannot be combined with any other coupon, direct/email offer or promotional offer unless allowed by that offer. Financing for well-qualified applicants only. Length of contract is limited. Subject to credit approval, vehicle insurance approval and vehicle availability. See participating retailers for details. Must take delivery from retailer stock by March 1, 2021.

Car Country Drive

Car Country Carlsbad

Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations. Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2021 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.

Car Country Drive

760-438-2200 5500 Paseo Del Norte

** EPA-estimated fuel economy. Actual mileage may vary. Subaru Tribeca, Forester, Impreza & Outback are registered trademarks. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, $80 dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 3 /1/2021.

282

6 Years/72,000 Miles Transferable Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty

ar Country Drive

Car Country Drive

2021 Volkswagen Tiguan S FWD Automatic Transmission

ar Country Drive

ar Country Drive

$

per month+tax 39 Month Lease $0 Down Payment

JEEP • CHRYSLER • MITSUBISHI

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Tiguan: 2 at this payment Example: VIN: 3VV1B7AX1MM041325 Stock: VM1158 , VIN: 3VV1B7AX3MM032125 Stock: VM1125 *Closed end lease Lease offer through VW Credit.available through Feb 14, 2021 for a new, unused 2021 Tiguan S Automatic Transmission on approved credit to highly qualified customers by Volkswagen Credit. Monthly lease payment based on MSRP of $26,760 and destination charges less a suggested dealer contribution resulting in a capitalized cost of $23,690 Excludes tax, title, license, options, and dealer fees. Amount due at signing excludes first month’s payment, customer down payment of $0, and acquisition fee of $675. Monthly payments total $10,998. Your payment will vary based on final negotiated price. At lease end, lessee responsible for disposition fee of $395, $0.20/mile over 24,375 miles and excessive wear and use. See your Bob Baker Volkswagen dealer for details or, for general product information, call 1-800-Drive-VW. .

VOLKSWAGEN

760-438-2200 5500 Paseo Del Norte Car Country Carlsbad

BobBakerVW.com

All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, $80 dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 2-14-2021. CoastNews_2_5_21.indd 1

2/8/21 1:13 PM


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