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MAKING WAVES IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

VOL. 28, N0. 20

May 16, 2014

School district gives reply to Grand Jury report By Christina Macone-Greene with two of the recom-

Fire crews respond to a brush fire on Tuesday. The blaze grew from a 2-acre fire to more than 700 acres because of the heat and excessive winds. Photo by Tony Cagala

Bernardo Fire consumes 700 acres, mandatory evacuations issued By Christina Macone-Greene

REGION — At approximately 10:45 a.m., the Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District received a call about smoke in the 4S Ranch area. As of 4 p.m., on Tuesday the fire has charred 700 acres and mandatory evacuations are issued at north Fairbanks ranch and along Artesian Road. Fire offi-

cials have listed the blaze at 5 percent contained. According to Julie Taber, public information officer of the RSF Fire Protection District, when units arrived at the scene they discovered approximately a 2-acre brush fire. “We called for additional resources right away due to the high and erratic winds,” Taber said.

Due to the winds and dry brush, the fire spread quickly. Taber said the fire burned right along the 4S Ranch and San Diego border. “Now, it has made its way to Fairbanks Ranch and down the south towards Carmel Valley and Rancho Peñasquitos,” she said. Initially firefighters

from Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego and Cal Fire were on the scene. Now, all units from San Diego County are there. “Currently, no structures are threatened in Fairbanks Ranch and along Artesian Road,” Taber said. Fairbanks Ranch residents are being evacuated to Torrey Pines High School at 3710 Del Mar Heights Rd.

Giving his career a stylish makeover Regarded RSF stylist branches into eco-friendly business

RANCHO SANTA FE — In an effort to increase the awareness and effectiveness for school safety, the San Diego County Grand Jury issued a report on March 24, 2014 entitled, “School Security: There Is No Greater Purpose.” It was sent to the San Diego School Districts. In its summary, the Grand Jury felt because school violence still “remains a viable threat,” the principle reason behind the report was to implement safety initiatives for its students, teachers and administrators. Out of nine recommendations, the Rancho Santa Fe School District replied to the San Diego Grand Jury regarding two of them. The district’s legal representative, Richard Currier, Esq., has been their external general counsel for 25 years. Currier pointed out

mendations. In fact, Currier already issued a letter to the Grand Jury regarding their two recommendations. One of which was 1410: Develop and publish a Security Awareness and Prevention Program that is geared specifically for parent participation to help them identify abnormal behaviors of their children and the resources to turn to for help. “Superintendent Delaney and I discussed this at some length, and in regard to all these recommendations, we thought it was quite frankly, ‘over the top’ to have a program that is geared specifically to parents to participate in it to identify abnormal behaviors and inform the district about them,” said Currier, adding how he thought its description was vague. Rather than having parents inform the district about abnormal be-

We were lucky enough to build a new school, where we were able to implement and add safety eatures to the new school that our old school did not have.” Lindy Delaney Superintedent, Rancho Santa Fe School District

By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — Internationally, and especially in Rancho Santa Fe, Alex Schlange’s name is synonymous with style and creativity. Former owner of Salon Salon at the Fairbanks Village Plaza for the last 14 years, Schlange remains at the Ranch for his long-term clientele, but has also branched into something new. He’s the current chief executive officer of DynaKor Global LLC, with a satellite office based in Carlsbad. “As a stylist, my clientele had diversity with different businesses backgrounds as well as many entrepreneurs,” said Schlange, adding how they were his inspiration to try Alex Schlange, the former owner of Salon Salon, has branched out into a green consulting and marketing

TURN TO STYLIST ON A18 firm. Photo by Christina Macone-Greene

that from time to time, the Grand Jury focuses on various topics, will determine whether or not to investigate them, and if so, they then issue a report. Currently, school security is the report topic. Currier shared that seven of these nine recommendations by the Grand Jury were already being implemented such as identifying key personnel for school security; a school security plan for emergency response and preparedness; security training programs with outside support services such as local law enforcement, and, website access for Crime Stoppers and Students Speaking Out. While the Rancho Santa Fe School District takes school security highly seriously, Currier said, they did disagree

haviors, Currier said, the concern was more to be informed by the parents if a child were to make any threats with regard to the school or anyone at the school. The other was recommendation 14-15: Develop a plan for initiating school-to-parent communication channels that encourage parents and others to come forward and report behavioral problems that could result in violent behavior. “Our thoughts are that we don’t need a plan for that, maybe we just inform parents if you think there is a problem, pick up the phone and call the district administrator,” Currier said. Currier went on to say that sometimes there is an emphasis that a whole plan, procedure TURN TO REPORTON A20


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Human trafficking gains ground How one new criminal element has fostered growth in sex crimes By Rachel Stine

REGION — A new element to the age old crime has made sex trafficking carried out in San Diego County more sophisticated, more widespread, and more mobile. The involvement of gangs in human trafficking is changing how the crime is being committed and the faces of victims, according to law enforcement and prosecution officials. In recent years, gangs, including those in North County, have realized how lucrative prostitution can be, and have concentrated more of their criminal operations on selling sex. Where once sex trafficking was the third most profitable criminal business in the county, it is now the second most lucrative illegal undertaking, above arms dealing and after drug selling, according to a report from the district attorney’s office. The underground commercial sex economy in the city of San Diego brought in about $96.6 million in 2007, according to a March 2014 study by the Urban Institute, “Estimating the Size and Structure of the Underground Commercial Sex Economy in Eight Major US Cities.” “(Gangs) make big bucks on this,” explained San Diego County’s District Attorney, Bonnie Dumanis. She and other experts spoke on the rise of human trafficking in the county at North County Lifeline’s second annual human trafficking conference on May 3. To increase the scope and profits of their pimping operations in a certain area, gangs are teaming up with rivals gangs factions. Sgt. Joe Mata of the Sheriff’s Department explained that even local gangs with intense, historical rivalries including the Bloods and the Crips will join forces. “They will basically come together and forget about their wars and battles to get in together on human trafficking because it makes so much money,” he said. “We’re seeing the emergence of a hybrid type of gang,” said Gretchen Means, a former deputy district attorney for the county who specializes in sex crimes.

It cost $183,400 to correct the incorrect property tax bills and process refunds. The San Dieguito Union High School District voted May 1 to approve $80,000 toward the expense. Photo by Jared Whitlock

Faulty property tax bills cost county $183K to fix By Jared Whitlock

Laura Duffy, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of California says the department is setting records every year for the number of human trafficking defendants that are charged and cases that are tried. Photos by Rachel Stine

Though gangs still utilize established tracks, or city blocks where pimping and prostituting is commonplace, they are also selling their victims for sex using the Internet. Law enforcement officials have realized that websites, including BackPage. com and MyRedBook.com, are rife with human trafficking advertisements. Gangs are also working together to create what’s called a circuit or pipeline, a series of cities across the country that pimps travel to transport people for sex trafficking. Traveling to different counties and different states allows pimps to avoid being tracked by law enforcement and, if they are caught, makes prosecutions across multiple jurisdictions more challenging. Local gangs frequently pay certain hotels, most along major transit ways, for rooms secluded from other guests to carry out human trafficking. “If you basically see a hotel from the freeway, there is a victim being prostituted out of there,” said Dustin Nelson of the North County Human Trafficking Task Force. Via the exploitation by gangs, the amount of human trafficking carried out in San Diego County is rising. Over the past dozen years, violent gang crime in Oceanside has dropped while human trafficking has risen in the city, according

San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis speaks at a human trafficking conference on May 3.

to Detective Jack Reed from the Oceanside Police Department. “The department is setting records every year for (the number of) human trafficking defendants that are charged and cases that are tried,” said the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of California, Laura Duffy. And with the increase of the commercial sex trade, gangs are recruiting victims from all corners of the community, tempting their targets with promises of love and money. “These young people are getting plucked out of schools, malls, from all over our communities, (and) from the Internet,” Duffy said. While many human trafficking victims have cer-

tain risk factors, including coming from unstable, impoverished families and having a history of trauma, the prevalence of recruiting as resulted in victims coming from all types of economic, family, and educational backgrounds. “Those girls are looking less and less like the girls in the shadows, and more and more like my 13-yearold daughter,” Means said. “They come from intact homes, they come from good schools, (and) they come from high socio-economic areas.” “These are victims who are in plain sight,” stated Duffy. Law enforcement officials, prosecutors, and service providers are working to catch up to the changing landscape of domestic human trafficking by supporting new laws, developing victim services, collaborating with other agencies, and spreading awareness. Officials said it is encouraging to see how far San Diego County has come already with the prevention and prosecution of human trafficking. “The only way to fight (human trafficking) is working together,” Dumanis said. Pointing to the expansion of North County Lifeline’s conference as a demonstration of the community’s growing commitment to fighting human trafficking, Means said, “I am shocked by how far this community has come.”

ENCINITAS — Thousands of homeowners in the San Dieguito Union High School (SDUHSD) were overcharged on their property tax bills last fall. The cost to send out accurate bills and issue refunds: $183,400. Acknowledging its role in the error, the county Treasurer-Tax Collector office recently agreed to pay $103,400 of that amount. The district, which also admitted fault, contributed the remaining $80,000. The county miscalculated the tax rate for Proposition AA, the $449 million bond for building and technology upgrades in the district. At its May 1 meeting, the SDUHSD board of trustees voted 4-1 to approve its portion of the cost. On May 5, board President Joyce Dalessandro said the board recognized it should pay the roughly $80,000 that was spent on postage, printing and associated mailing costs. Once the error came to light, she noted, the district insisted on sending out correct bills with an explanation to reach those who had yet to pay their property taxes. An alternative course of action that was considered: issue refunds after residents paid their bills. But that likely would have created additional confusion, she said. “We wanted to fix this as soon as possible,” Dalessandro said. Documents show the county spent most of the $103,400 on computer software, programming changes and additional staff to process refunds and mail corrected bills in just two weeks. Mailing that many

bills normally takes at least two months. Michael Workman, a spokesman with the county, said in an email that the $103,400 came from the county’s general fund. He did not return a request to comment on the county’s part of the cost. For Prop AA, the county should have collected $23 per $100,000 of assessed home value. Yet property tax bills reflected a fee of $38 per $100,000. Most property bills were about $100 higher than they should have been. Eric Dill, the district’s associate superintendent of business services, said the miscalculation stems from the bond premium being shuffled to the wrong place. Specifically, the initial $160 million bond sale generated a $7 million premium. The county should have sent the premium to a special account so the money could pay down the bond principal. However, those funds were sent to a SDUHSD account. But the district also erred by failing to return the premium, Dill added. Because the $7 million wasn’t in the right account, the county Treasurer-Tax Collector office charged taxpayers for the missing premium. “We received funds that we shouldn’t have, and we should have caught that error,” Dill said. “And we didn’t. That’s what we’re owning up to.” Dill added SDUHSD didn’t spend any of the $7 million; that money was just accounted for incorrectly. Del Mar Times reporter Marsha Sutton broke the story of the incorrect tax bills last fall.

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Opinion&Editorial

May 16, 2014 Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not necessarily reflect the views of the Rancho Santa Fe News

Community Commentary

The public safety choice for judge By Ernie Susi

Thrilled with bold move By Ron Ranson

I am thrilled that the city of Encinitas made the bold decision to buy the Pacific View property. Thank you to Tony Kranz, Lisa Shaffer and Teresa Barth for your positive leadership in making this happen. It should have been a unanimous decision but election year politics jumped in just when the city should have been celebrating a wonderful future for the arts. (Kristin Gaspar and Mark Muir voted no on the decision to buy the property.) We all know it was a hefty price: $10 million was extracted from the city by the questionable “leadership” of Encinitas Union School District. Instead of reaching a reasonable agreement with the city of Encinitas for the benefit of the community, the superintendent of EUSD used unprofessional behavior to force the city to pay more money than was necessary. All those EUSD board members who supported his actions should be voted out of office at the next opportunity and Maureen Muir should be applauded for standing up to his bullying and opposing him. When the City Council committed to borrow money to buy a piece of greenhouse property off Santa Fe Drive in February 2001, there was not community consensus on what to do with the land. It was used as a political tool for several council elections. There were claims that the city paid too much. More than 10 years passed before the city put together the funding to build what is now known as the Encinitas Community Park ... (even though many question the “community” nature of the park.) A total of over $40 million will have been spent by the time the park opens later this year. In 2011-12, with a General Fund balance of $1.1 million, a total of $7 million was committed to the park, taking away funding for fire station construction ($1.6 million), railroad quiet zone, trails, and City Hall maintenance, among other items. The park was the priority

and the park is being built. Supporters of the park dismissed the criticism, promoted the idea of borrowing when money was cheap, and funded a park plan that included many amenities that serve only small segments of the community in the name of public service and quality of life. Now the final opportunity to purchase Pacific View has presented itself. The very people who approved of the approach to funding the park are suddenly calling the same approach (for Pacific View) irresponsible and dangerous. But just as Encinitas has a strong sports and outdoors ethos, we also have a very large and engaged arts community. I witnessed group after group who came forward at city council meetings to describe the shortage of space for arts education, for studios and rehearsal space, and for performance venues. During my years as an arts commissioner for Encinitas I saw study after study documenting the critical role of the arts in creating vibrant communities and strong economies. People want to live in Encinitas in part because of our arts and culture. Contrary to what Mark Muir has asserted, there is no need to cut public services or implement a hiring freeze of city employees, (except fire fighters, of course. Muir is our former fire chief), to pay for Pacific View. We don’t need to budget the future from a position of fear and scarcity. We can maintain our fiscal responsibility and pay for Pacific View. Encinitas did well relatively through the last recession. There is a reserve fund of 20 percent of the general fund to address unanticipated problems. Revenues are up and we have already budgeted for increasing pension obligations. Even with additional borrowing to fund the purchase, Encinitas will still have a debt ratio that maintains our excellent financial rating. Unlike the park, the

Pacific View property has the potential for short-term revenues without a significant investment while we engage the community in defining the ultimate vision for its use. Plus the arts community is more likely to be successful at fundraising than the sports community has been. The Pacific View property is an asset that will pay back in quality of life and economic terms for many years to come. I was quite upset to see the cheap theatrics of Councilmember Kristin Gaspar at the “State of the City” ceremony a few weeks ago. What should have been a love-fest for the city of Encinitas was turned into a negative, doom and gloom tirade about what will happen to our charming city because of Pacific View. Kristin is running for council again. This was not the time to turn a positive event into a poorly thought out campaign launch using a fear mongering lecture straight out of a Fox News strategy playbook. Spreading messages of fear, implying that core services will somehow be sacrificed to make this investment, and attempting to return us to divisive partisan squabbling does not serve the citizens of Encinitas. Rather than pit one part of town against another, or foment conflict between sports patrons and arts patrons, let’s work together to promote both healthy active lifestyles and a vibrant arts and culture environment. We can afford Pacific View. In fact, we can’t afford not to go forward with it if we truly want to preserve and promote what makes Encinitas such a special place. Ron Ranson is a former Encinitas arts commissioner and a Leucadia resident since

We expect judges to understand public safety issues. We hope they come to the bench with a track record supporting law enforcement and the community. In the June election there’s one open seat without an incumbent seeking re-election. The obvious choice in Seat No. 25 is clear: Deputy Attorney General Brad Weinreb. The San Diego County Probation Officers Association well understands how the “Realignment Act” (AB 109) impacts Public Safety. The February 2014 SANDAG report indicated the Act has resulted in one in three offenders being in local jails instead of state prison. We also have various early or medical parole release plans, drug diversion and alternate sentencing plans with the hopeful goal of reducing the revolving door of recidivism. The relationship between the San Diego County Probation Department and the courts is incredibly important because many of these criminals will be released into our community and under the supervision of our officers sooner than ever before. We need judges who understand how these changes impact Public Safety. Brad Weinreb will be one of those kinds of judges. Brad Weinreb has been a Deputy Attorney General and state prosecutor here in San Diego who has spent almost 25 years making sure criminals remain in prison or off our streets. He has prosecuted significant cases used by courts and prosecutors throughout California: the case upholding lifetime civil commitments for sexually violent predators, the first California case to uphold a sexual molest victims right to have a courthouse dog accompany them to the witness stand, the case that helps prosecute animal abuse and neglect, the first case to uphold a prison term for hazardous waste dumping, and decisions that help law enforcement to track registered sex offenders. He’s an expert on “Jessica’s Law” and Human Trafficking and teaches law enforcement and prosecutors about constitutional rights of crime victims under “Marsy’s Law.” His dedication to crime victims and Public Safety resulted in Brad being recognized as one of the “Top 100” Attorneys in

Ernie Susi is president of the San Diego County Probation Officers Association

Letters To the Editor Self serving versus self preservation conduct. There is no written law requiring single-file bike riding in groups. Maybe there should be, since the self-serving urge to communicate side-by-side with one’s fellow riders, often puts the riders at risk and at same time causes the “car-cyclist separation requirement” to be violated by passing vehicles and their drivers. I note that it’s happening with greater frequency too.

Cyclists, do you want to get the respect of vehicle drivers? Then ride with a better sense of road courtesy. If lines are painted for a bike lane, try to stay at least a foot inside the lane, not ride on the line. We vehicle drivers gave up that valuable real estate to make bike riders safer. Now many bike riders are taking full advantage of the lane and then some. Why do they do it? Two riders abreast is often the

cause. For solo riders, there might be a pavement smoothness factor. Whatever it is, it irks us vehicle drivers a lot. We know passing a slower bike is a legit reason. Doing it without any other reason, just tells us that you cyclists become different persons from the time you leave your car and snap your shoes into those pedal pegs. G. Lance Johannsen, Carlsbad

Rancho Santa Fe newS P.O. Box 232550, Encinitas, CA 92023-2550 • 760-436-9737 theranchosantafenews.com • Fax: 760-943-0850

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Letters to the Editor and reader feedback are welcomed. Please submit letters or commentaries, including your city of residence and contact information (for confirmation purposes only) to letters@ coastnewsgroup.com.

California in 2010. Our opinion that Brad Weinreb is the best candidate for seat No. 25 is shared by others. The San Diego County Bar Association thoroughly evaluated candidates and their reputations and considered the input of judges and members of the legal community. His opponents were deemed “lacking qualifications” to be a judge, but he was rated “qualified” (with the coveted “highly qualified” rating going to incumbent judges). Dozens of Superior Court Judges endorse him as the kind of colleague they’d like on the bench. The San Diego Deputy District Attorneys Association, the Lawyers Club of San Diego and the La Raza Lawyers Association also endorse him. In addition to the legal community, Brad Weinreb has the support of Crime Victims United, San Diegans Against Crime, other law enforcement associations like the San Diego Black Police Officers Association, the San Diego District Attorneys Investigators Association and the San Diego Chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police. He also has support from respected Public Safety leaders like Sheriff Bill Gore and San Diego City Attorney Jan Goldsmith. There’s another factor that makes him different and we sometimes overlook it when we think about judicial candidates. Integrity and Ethics. Brad Weinreb investigated and prosecuted judicial misconduct cases for the Commission on Judicial Performance, giving him keen appreciation for judicial temperament, objectivity, fairness and ethical conduct of judges both on and off the bench. We believe that’s important. So does Sheriff Bill Gore who said, “As a prosecutor Brad keeps violent criminals and child predators off the streets. Just as important, Brad’s fair-minded with the character and integrity expected from our judges.” We hope you agree June 3. Because Brad Weinreb is the clear Public Safety choice for San Diego County Superior Court Judge.

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May 16, 2014

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Country Friends jump into spring By Christina Macone-Greene

Mahsa Olamai, left, and Sarah Riccitelli, volunteers for Encinitas Friends of the Arts, set up a booth at the Encinitas Street Fair to tell the public about the group’s mission. The nonprofit is dedicated to raising money for a city-owned arts center, along with providing fund for art education and causes. Photo courtesy of Naimeh Tanha

New group fundraising for city arts center By Jared Whitlock

ENCINITAS — Broadly speaking, Encinitas Friends of the Arts (EFA), a newly formed nonprofit, wants to elevate arts throughout the city. That mission statement might not turn heads. But increasingly, the group is gaining attention because many believe it’s fulfilling a much-needed role: fundraising for a city-owned arts center. “Residents are very excited — they believe we ought to provide more opportunities for artists,” said Naimeh Tanha, the president of the organization. Tanha explained currently artists can perform or showcase work at the spots like the Encinitas Community Center and Encinitas Library, but overall there’s a shortage of venues in the city. The need is especially acute when considering dance groups and other large performances, she added. “These big performances have to go to Carlsbad, Oceanside or even La Jolla,” Tanha said. “We don’t have a stage that’s the appropriate size.” Per capita, Encinitas has the second highest concentration of artists in the county, according to a 2012 study from the nonprofit Americans for the Arts. Tanha said that’s another reason EFA is dedicated to helping an arts center take root. But where? Many residents have long said the Pacific View site should be transformed into an arts center. And because the city recently agreed to pay $10 million for it, the spotlight is on the 2.8-acre property. However, Tanha noted the council is still a ways away from determining what should be done with Pacific View. Instead, funding from EFA could go toward converting a vacant pad at Encinitas Ranch Town Center into an open-air theater — and that’s just one alternative.

“Ideally, that would be wonderful if Pacific View could be an arts center,” Tanha said. “But we’re not limiting ourselves to Pacific View.” Tony Councilman Kranz likened the group to Friends of the Encinitas Library and a related Cardiff organization. “Those groups raise money for purchases that are outside the budget,” Kranz said. Kranz cited the Encinitas Ranch pad as an example of why EFA is necessary. Several proposals to build a theatre there have failed over the years because initially the cost seemed daunting. “When you get private donations, it makes a project much more feasible,” Kranz said. On that note, Tanha said the group recently administered a survey at the Encinitas Street Fair asking residents how a public arts center should be funded. Of 120 surveys, about 90 percent of respondents stated a mixture of public and private funds should be used. Several months ago, the council asked the Arts Commission to assist in developing a city-owned arts center. That kicked Tanha, who is on the city’s Arts Commission, and two other commissioners into action. “We wanted our role to expand, so we formed the group,” Tanha said. Beyond fundraising for venues, Tanha said the organization would also support art education. EFA accepts donations through the Coastal Community Foundation at coastalcommunityfoundation.org. Additionally, the website offers information for those looking to volunteer or become a member. California “Across and the nation Friends of the Arts groups have been very successfully in giving back to their communities,” Tanha said. “We want that to happen in Encinitas as well.”

REGION — An afternoon of shopping, a fashion show, opportunity drawings, a savory lunch and enjoying the company of others was had at the Spring Membership Luncheon hosted by Country Friends. Roughly, 100 guests attended the afternoon soiree at the Sheraton Carlsbad Resort & Spa on May 7. Every year, the membership luncheon is held in May and is one of the many fun events Country Friends presents. “Everything that we make on this day will go towards all of our charities and all of our vendors who participate will give back 20 percent to Country Friends,” said Donna Ahlstrom, administrative coordinator at Country Friends. “We are honoring all the ladies who give Janean Stripe, Rhonda Tryon, and Andrea Naversen; Photos by Christina MAcone-Greene their time to come into the Country Friends Store and help with serving our customers to polishing the silver.” All the workers at the store, Ahlstrom pointed out, are volunteers. While guests checked in, attendees noticed a painted portrait of Jean Newman. The luncheon was also a tribute in loving memory to Newman who was a member of Country Friends for 35 years, and also the consignment manager. Newman passed away in December. The luncheon reminded attendees of their mission, their many thanks to the volunteers and members, and celebrating 60 years as a nonprofit organization. To learn more about Country Friends, please visit Marci Cavanaugh and Peggy Peck Shana Witkin and Yvette Letourneau thecountryfriends.org.

County of San Diego

COLLECTION EVENT

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE, ELECTRONICS AND UNWANTED MEDICATION

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Time: 9:00am—2:00 pm Who: San Diego County Unincorporated Residents

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May 16, 2014

RSF Senior Center recognizes Personal History Awareness Month by launching new class By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — The month of May not only means springtime, but also an opportunity for people to be proactive in learning about themselves and family members during Personal History Awareness Month. The RSF Senior Center decided it was a perfect opportunity to bring Debbie Broida, a personal historian onboard, to guide seniors through her very unique program, Memory Magic. In essence, Broida’s passion is to help people exercise their memories by having them think about past experiences which paint a picture of who they are. And for many, this could be the start of creating their personal memoir. “A memoir is more than just facts and people don’t have to be intimidated by not being a formal and bona fide writer in order to write a memoir,” Broida said. “All people need is their personal experiences and stories.” Broida’s plan is to have participants get into a group setting and start sharing stories, describing the experience as a wonderful community building scenario as well as a fun one. She’ll also utilize different props to jar memories such as electric rollers, the original alarm clock before it went digital, a clothesline, and various fragrances which may spur a recollection. These group sessions and storytelling time can actually trigger recall. “My ultimate goal is that I am able to help people find three, four or five memories that they are interested in

Debbie Broida, a personal historian, is offering the class, “Memory Magic,” starting May 7 in honor of Personal History Awareness month. The class is free and will be held and the Rancho Santa Fe Senior Center. Courtesy photo

turning into stories and getting away from thinking that it has to be formal,” Broida said. She continued, “I want them to share their stories, as if they were telling them to their grandchildren while they were tucking them into bed at night.” This is the first time Broida has brought Memory Magic to the RSF Senior Center and is looking forward to helping people realize that they do have stories that can be saved forever. “There have been studies that children who know about their ancestors have higher self-esteem than those who don’t — your grandkids and great grandkids will know who you real-

Look in today’s Classified Section for everything from Autos to Real Estate

ly are,” she said. Sharon Wax has worked with Broida and said she provided her exactly what she needed. “Debbie offers an incredible opportunity for anyone to express themselves and be able to pass on their essence to their loved ones,” Wax said. “I’m excited for Debbie, and think it’s great that she’s providing such a valuable service to our community.” The Memory Magic kickoff date is May 7 and will last four weeks. These afternoon Wednesday meetings last for two hours and they are free. And for those who may be apprehensive about not being a writer, Broida wants people to know it’s not important. Everyone has an interesting story to share, and to approach the writing as if one was having a conversation with someone special. “Your family wants to hear these stories and it’s great to leave them a legacy,” she said. To learn more about Memory Magic at the RSF Senior Center, please call (858) 756-3041.

At the Book Cellar

Matthew Kenville taking a reading break

Sakis Pavlakakis and his dog, Shirley Corless and Susan Bailey Cowan Poochie

Char Yingling and Cheryl Vincent Photos by Christina Macone-Greene By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE —The Book Cellar Sale took place on May 2 and 3. The Book Cel-

lar sale was a success — they tallied more than 150 sales, which means they had that number (or more) visiting the store

during their weekend sale. Proceeds from the book sale will go to support the Rancho Santa Fe Library Guild.

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May 16, 2014

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

Tourism improvement numbers look good By Bianca Kaplanek

Collin Apodac spoke against the electronic smoking bans before the Board of Supervisors. Representing the Vape a Vet Project, Apodac works with active duty military and veterans to quit smoking by using e-cigarettes to gradually reduce their nicotine intake. Photo by Rachel Stine

County supervisors place regulations on e-cigarettes By Rachel Stine

REGION — Out of concern for public health, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors passed new regulations on electronic smoking devices on Tuesday. The Board’s action bans the use of electronic smoking devices, including e-cigarettes, anywhere conventional cigarettes cannot be smoked. Smoking cigarettes is prohibited around public buildings, parks and trails, restaurants, and smoke-free workplaces. Eight cities in San Diego County, including Carlsbad, Encinitas, and Oceanside, have already enacted such regulations of e-cigarettes. Electronic cigarettes are electronic or battery-operated devices that produce a flavored water vapor for inhalation. The vape liquid typically contains varying amounts of nicotine. The devices are not yet regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the side effects of the vapor or secondhand vapor have yet to be determined. But county officials, residents, and local cities have voiced concern over the safety of e-cigarettes. The number of calls to poison centers about consumption of e-cigarette liquids that contain nicotine rose from one per month in September 2010 to 215 per month in February 2014, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of those calls involved children under five years old. Citing the statistic, Supervisor Dave Roberts called e-cigarettes a “major public health concern.” Opponents to the regulations asserted that residents are using e-cigarettes to quit smoking by

gradually decreasing the amount of nicotine in the vaping liquid they inhale. They also claimed that the effects of secondhand vapor are harmless and that the vapor hardly smells. The Supervisors acknowledged that the FDA has not made a final ruling on the health effects of e-cigarettes but asserted that there was enough available research to convince them of the risks of using the devices. “I think we did our homework. We didn’t just blindly run into this just because some other city has done this,” said Supervisor Ron Roberts. Supervisor Bill Horn stated that the County “may be getting ahead of the research,” but argued that policies prohibiting the smoking of e-cigarettes in public places were practical. Supporters of the e-cigarette bans voiced concerns that the electronic smoking devices particularly appeal to youth. E-cigarettes are a gateway to other drugs for young people, particularly high schoolers, according to Zack Jafek, a member of the San Dieguito Alliance for Drug Free Youth. A recent graduate of Torrey Pines High School, Jafek said for teenagers, there is not as much of a stigma around e-cigarettes as there is for conventional cigarettes. Carol Skiljan, a commissioner of First 5 San Diego and board member of the Encinitas Union School District, mentioned that the flavored vape liquids target young consumers. “They even had chocolate flavoring,” she said. The Supervisors passed the new e-cigarette regulations unanimously.

DEL MAR — After nearly four years, Del Mar’s Tourism Business Improvement District seems to be fulfilling its goal to increase occupancy in the city’s six hotels, according to a required update presented at the May 5 meeting. Since the district was approved in late 2010, occupancy has increased about 5.7 percent annually, with the average daily rate up by 20.5 percent. “Those are very strong numbers,” said John Lambeth, of Civitas Advisors, who helped develop the Del Mar program. During the past three years the district focused on improving the visibility of Del Mar as a destination rather than a pass-through entity, Lambeth said. Last year the main goal was to increase awareness of the city as a brand. “Obviously it already has a very strong brand, but it was something we wanted to increase with the funds raised through the Tourism Improvement District,” he said. There was a major effort to improve internet traffic and drive people to the dreamdelmar.com website to bring more overnight guests, which result in increases in transient occupancy and sales taxes for the city. TOT funds were approximately $1.8 million in fiscal year 2011-2012, shortly after the TBID started. Last year they increased to about $1.95 million and are projected to be $2.1 million for the current fiscal year. Lambeth said hotels are reporting about a 12.6 percent increase in revenue. The district has also

After nearly four years, Del Mar’s Tourism Business Improvement District seems to be fulfilling its goal to increase occupancy in the city’s six hotels. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

provided funding to the Del Mar Village Association for assistance at the visitor center, the Winter Wonderland program and streetscape improvements such as new pedestrian directory signs, bike racks, historic building plaques, benches and recycling cans. The TBID had a marketing budget of about $240,000 last year. Some of the money was used for advertising and public relations firms to launch the website and help with social media efforts. “It seems pretty evident that the TBID is doing a pretty good job – 12.6 percent over last year,” Noel Warner of Skiver Advertising said. “I think that … tells me that we’re doing something right. “The TBID hired us to let the world know what the TBID is doing, so it’s our job to make sure that we’re talking about all the great things that are going on within Del Mar,” he added. He said in less than four months there were 32 million impressions and 19,000 visitors to the

Dream Del Mar website. “Those are some really compelling numbers,” Warner said. Of the 19,000 visitors, there were 1,000 booking inquiries, “which shows there’s really a lot of interest in staying in Del Mar.” Zenzi Communications is handling the social media efforts, with a focus on Facebook and Pinterest. Zenzi also developed a “Seaside Wellness” guide to attract fitness and yoga enthusiasts “to book a stay in Del Mar to rejuvenate, rest and re-energize at TBID hotels.” Lambeth said goals for the upcoming year include tracking actual bookings through each of the hotels and revising the current campaigns based on opportunities that were successful. He said glitches with the booking engine didn’t allow tracking in the past. “This has been a work in progress,” he said. “We’re in a far different place than we were last year. We hope to make as much progress over the next year as we’ve made

over the last.” Lambeth said some numbers are hard to track. The market is getting better so one would expect the numbers to go up, he said. “But these are very significant increases and we think the (district) is responsible for some increment within that increase,” he added. The TBID is funded by a 1 percent fee paid by hotel guests — a “very competitive rate” compared to other districts, Lambeth said. It was formed, as was required, with unanimous support from the city’s hoteliers and City Council. Oversight comes from a board of directors made up of hotel owners. It will automatically expire in 2015. Hotel owners must repeat the multistep process to re-establish the district, but if approved it will be valid for 10 years. “It took a while to get this started,” Councilman Don Mosier said. “I’m anxious to see what happens in the next year because now I think it’s fully operational and we’ll get a valid result in a year or so.”


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At Access Medical Centers, excellent medical care also comes with the convenience your busy life demands and the personal attention you deserve. Founded in 2001, Access Medical Centers is one of North San Diego County’s leading primary care providers, offering comprehensive care services, seven days a week. If you need medical attention and can’t wait for an appointment, Access Medical Centers’ Urgent Care offers prompt treatment for minor to serious illnesses and injuries. They make it easy for patients to see an experienced, caring doctor, even after hours and on weekends without an appointment. Led by Dr. Ramin Farsad, the team of providers at Access Medical Centers is comprised of experienced family practitioners, internists, nurse practitioners and physicians assistants who are dedicated to your comfort and well-being. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call (760) 943-9111 or visit accessmed.net. For more than 25 years, physicians at North Coast Health Center have been providing highly personalized care to coastal north San Diego County. With more than 250 physicians to choose from, North Coast Health Center patients have access to primary care, a surgery

May 16, 2014

Health care system often overlooks patient needs ENCINITAS — Frustration surrounding the current state of health care has people across the nation at a loss. Access Medical Center in Encinitas recognizes the need for quality affordable health care and provides North County patients a wide range of services regardless of their insurance status. Dr. Ramin Farsad of Access Medical Center acknowledges the risks associated with a fractured health care system. “The system is inherently unstable, that is why U.S. health statistics are getting worse,” he said. According to Dr. Farsad, patients aren’t getting the care that they need. “The insurance system basically tries not to pay for much of what patients need,” he said. “Health care insurance is probably the most frustrating and complex system there is.” To combat this problem, Dr. Farsad said Access Medical Center offers a very simplified, low-cost alternative to patients who either do not have insurance or often choose not to use it

Access Medical Center also offers new advanced testing systems. “We offer advanced diagnostic tests which check neurotransmitter levels and micronutrients,” Dr. Farsad said. “This can greatly help remedy long-term issues such as chronic fatigue, mood issues, poor concentration and many other issues affecting people in today’s world.” Dr. Farsad realizes that today’s patient is busy, and often symptoms and issues go untreated or ignored due to a hectic schedule. “Most offices do not have the flexibility to manage such broad ends of the health care spectrum,” he said. “However, these issues are very real and very common for people and they need to be managed in the most efficient way possible.” He added that Access Medical Center can accommodate even the busiest calendar, as they see patients every day of the week, even on weekends. Dr. Farsad and his team have a distinct vision for their patients’ experiences. “Using the best combination

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of western and holistic medicine, we provide our patients fast, efficient, proactive and comprehensive care,” he said. The team at Access Medical Center includes Ramin Farsad, M.D. ; Carol Butler, N.P. ; Cheryl Jucksch, N.P. ; Cambria DeMarco, N.P; Mary Ann Cathey, N.P. ; Megan Walla, N.P. ; Marianne Placey, N.P. ; and Karen Kupferman, N.P. Access Medical Center is located at 477 N. El Camino Real, Suite A100 in Encinitas. They are open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome. For more information, call (760) 943-9111 or visit accessmed.net.


May 16, 2014

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Yosemite worth revisiting hit the road e’louise ondash

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ur guide, park ranger Karen Powers, could be a stand-up comedian. She punctuates her narration about the history of Yosemite National Park with one-liners and personal anecdotes as we ride through the valley in an open-air tram. She also tells stories of interesting and eccentric characters who came to this geologically spectacular landscape before and after Abraham Lincoln designated it as the country’s first protected wild land. That was 150 years ago June 30. Happy birthday, Yosemite. “So you can thank Abe, among other things, for this beautiful place,” Powers says. Our tram stops at the Tunnel View turnout so we can take in the iconic view of the vast and wondrous Yosemite Valley. Whether it’s your first or 50th viewing, this panorama is breathtaking and seemingly unreal — like a backdrop for a souvenir photo. But it’s genuine, alright, as are the other wonders of the park — the fast-flowing Merced River; the granite walls favored by climbers; the other-worldly, crimson snow plant that has just emerged from the rich spring earth. It’s been at least two decades since my husband and I visited Yosemite. Of course, not much has changed geologically speaking. Yosemite Falls, Half Dome, El Capitan, Cathedral Rocks and Glacier Point stand pretty much as they have for the last bazillion years. It is the visitors who are changed by the park’s soaring peaks, stunning canyons, giant sequoias, granite monoliths and delicate dogwood. Later we lunch in the dining room of the venerable Ahwahnee Hotel — something we’ve wanted to do for years. The 34-foot-high

beamed ceiling, floor-toceiling windows, elegant chandeliers and table linens all contribute to the room’s grandiosity. The hotel, listed on the National Register of Historic places, was built in the mid-1920s using 1,000 tons of steel, more than 5,000 tons of stone and 30,000 feet of timber — all of it hauled over crude mountain roads. The purpose of the enduring materials was to avoid destruction by fire, a fate suffered by so many other grand hotels of the time. Its interior elegance was to attract affluent patrons sympathetic to the National Park System. For a post-lunch hike, we choose a popular trek (don’t expect solitude) to the 620-feet high Bridalveil Fall. It’s up all the way but worth it. We get close to the top but forego the last few feet in order to stay dry. Go to the end and you get really wet. This 3-mile-plus hike is our last hurrah for the day. We return to the beautifully rustic, welcoming lobby of Tenaya Lodge, just outside the park’s south gate. The next morning, the fireplace in our room is the perfect corner to wait out a rain storm (imagine!) that soaks the earth and clears the air. I am disappointed to miss a nature hike, but at 5,200 feet, the temps are in the mid-30s. Hanging by the fireplace is an excellent Plan B. Elsewhere in Tenaya Lodge, it’s a beehive of activity, especially during this third week of April when families are on spring break. They fuel up on the restaurant’s generous fresh breakfast buffet in the Sierra Restaurant. Think

whole-grain cereals, yogurt, lusciously large, sweet strawberries, pastries and croissants, waffles and bacon. The staff is attentive to my gluten-free needs; I get eggs scrambled in a separate pan and even gluten-free toast and pancakes. Tenaya’s spa is conveniently located on the lower level (no fighting the elements to reach Nirvana). My 90-minute massage explains why the beautifully appointed spa is named Ascent. To borrow from the writings of Fed by snow melt, spring and early summer is the best time to see waterfalls in Yosemite National Park, naturalist and wilderness including Yosemite Falls. From the top of the upper falls to the bottom of the lower falls, it measures more advocate John Muir, for than 2,400 feet, making it the highest waterfall in North America. Photo by Jerry Ondash whom Yosemite Valley was heaven, my massage caused my “cares to drop off like autumn leaves.” In spring and summer, Tenaya’s activities office offers something for everyone: hiking, a climbing wall, archery, indoor and outdoor pools, whitewater rafting, bicycling, fishing, picnics and more. Burn some calories during the day so you can treat yourself to an exquisite meal in the Embers Restaurant. Executive Chef Frederick Clabaugh and staff are more than eager to accommodate any special dietary needs. We decide to go out big, so following our superb rack of lamb with polenta, we give in to Bananas Diablo. It is so named because the cloves that punctuate the spiraling, flaming orange peel glow red “like the devil’s eyes.” For information: Yosemite National Park nps.gov/ yose/index.htm or call (209) 372-0200 (press 3 then 5); Tenaya Lodge TenayaLodge. com or call (801) 559-4965; Ahwahnee Hotel yosemitepark.com/the-ahwahnee. aspx or call (801) 559-4884.

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May 16, 2014

Breast Cancer Angels luncheon a success By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — The first annual White Rose Luncheon hosted by Breast Cancer Angels was a resounding success, earning close to $4,000 for the nonprofit.

Proceeds will filter back to women in the Breast Cancer Angels San Diego Chapter who are fighting breast cancer and need financial assistance. Breast Cancer Angels helps women with food,

housing needs, legal assistance, home healthcare, medical co-pays, transportation and much more. Author and Rancho Santa Fe resident, Adrienne Falzon, chaired the White Rose Luncheon.

The theme of the event was to not only support Breast Cancer Angels, but to also comfort attendees whose mothers have passed away and for those who have lost a child. It was an ambience of support and genuine kindness. During the course of the luncheon, marketing manager of Breast Cancer Angels, Caitlin Cutt, approached the podium welcoming all that were in attendance. While thanking Falzon for her generosity in helping coordinate the luncheon at her golf club, Cutt then presented the “Halo Award” to their community ambassador, Holli Lienau. “We had such a great turnout,” said Cutt, noting how there were about 50 guests. “And it’s so beautiful here.” Held at the Santaluz Golf Club, the outdoor affair backdrop was a perfect setting for the luncheon and event vendor shopping. All vendors donated between 15 to 20 percent of their proceeds to Breast Cancer Angels. Boutique vendors included Khara Serrato of Chic Mommy, Nancy Alvarez of Rolling Boutique, Chris Bolton of Chris Bolton Jewelry, and Mandy Teperson of Sasha & Me. Falzon was also on hand to personally sign and donate a percentage of her published illustrated children’s book, “What Is An Angel?” For Falzon, the afternoon was magical. “Breast Cancer Angels has really inspired me,” she said. To learn more about Breast Cancer Angels visitbreastcancerangels.org.

Above: Marketing Director of Breast Cancer Angels Caitlin Cutt, Community Ambassador and recipient of the Halo Award Holli Lienau, and Adrienne Falzon chair of the White Rose Luncheon. Below: Mandy Teperson of Sasha & Me Photos by Christina Macone-Greene

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May 16, 2014

Concert at Belly Up will benefit veterans courtyard By Bianca Kaplanek

SOLANA BEACH — Belly Up has teamed up with Solana Beach and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5431 to raise funds for a courtyard to honor service members. Donnie Edwards, a former linebacker with the San Diego Chargers and Kansas City Chiefs, will host the May 19 event that begins at 5 p.m. and features The Fabulous Pelicans, a classic rock band. The cost is $25 per person. Plans for the Veterans Honor Courtyard at La Colonia Park are complete, but $200,000 is needed before construction can begin. To date, about $16,500 has been raised. Recognition for veterans was previously included in a $4 million improvement plan for La Colonia Park and Community Center, but that project is on hold indefinitely because of a lack of funding. Money was to come from the city’s redevelopment agency, but Gov.

A concert to raise funds to build a Veterans Honor Courtyard at La Colonia Park will be held at 5 p.m. May 19 at the Belly Up in Solana Beach. Courtesy rendering

Jerry Brown abolished those agencies in 2011. Council members approved plans for what was originally slated to

be a veteran’s memorial in 2012 after a community group asked if the project could move forward apart from the La

Colonia renovation. Councilman Mike Nichols said the name was changed because it was not necessarily meant to be just a memorial. It will honor all U.S. veterans living and deceased, as well as those who are currently serving. The courtyard will feature a stone veneer wall with military seals behind a reflecting pool. Water will “sheet” over the wall into the pool. As proposed, there will also be a flagpole with a dedication plaque, a central medallion with a “In honor of those who served” statement, seating and a main entrance with decorative pilasters and an iron arch. Personalized 1-foot square tiles will be installed in the courtyard to honor service members. The cost is $300 each. Visit vetshonor.org for more information on the courtyard and bellyup.com to buy tickets for the fundraiser.

Representatives from the Encinitas Firehouse Subs restaurant, Encinitas city officials and firefighters come together on Wednesday for the awarding of a donation from the Firehouse Subs’ Public Safety Foundation. The nonprofit foundation donated more than $11,900 to the Fire Department to purchase needed equipment. Photo by Tony Cagala

Firehouse Subs makes donation to fire department By Tony Cagala

ENCINITAS — To help fill in some of the funding gaps in the city’s firefighting budget, Firehouse Subs, using funds from its Public Safety Foundation, donated more than $11,900 to the Encinitas Fire Department. Encinitas Deputy Fire Chief Mike Stein, with other city officials, was on hand on Wednesday at the Firehouse Subs location on N. El Camino Real, to accept the donation, which is going towards the purchase of a thermal imaging camera and other accessories for Fire Station No. 6 in Olivenhain. “Smoke robs us of our sight,” Stein said, adding that there are situations during a structure fire when you can’t even see your hand in front of your face. With the new thermal imaging camera, which has already been ordered for the station, firefighters will

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be able to use the piece of equipment to essentially see through the smoke. By doing that, they can see whether, during a fire, there’s someone in the structure, or even where hot spots might still remain once a fire

is under control. nizations in 40 states and in Firehouse Subs created Puerto Rico. their nonprofit Public Safety Foundation nine years ago. Since its inception, they’ve been able to donate $9 million to first responders and public safety orga-

Council agrees on some elements of new City Hall By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — As the process to build a new civic center moves forward, council members reached consensus on a few elements at the May 5 meeting. There was general agreement that the facility should be one story with the City Hall and Town Hall as adjoining buildings. But Councilman Don Mosier said his colleagues should remain open-minded since two-story buildings tend to be more energy efficient. Last month council members were presented with two opinions on how much space is needed for the complex. They ranged from 8,395 square feet to 10,837 square feet for the City Hall and 4,313 square feet to 5,046 square feet for the Town Hall. The major differences were in the circulation allowances, or the area for hallways, corridors, partitions and wall thicknesses, and the size of indoor public space for counters and storage. While council didn’t nail down specific sizes, they agreed the Town Hall should have seating for a minimum of 100 people with about 75 additional public parking spaces. They all favored a 15,000-square-foot plaza, which would be large enough to accommodate the farmers market. “I’m all for large plazas,” Mosier said, adding that the farmers market “is a critical part of community.” He said a 15,000-square-foot plaza on a 66,000-squarefoot lot is not unreasonable. He added that he would prefer tables and chairs that can be moved rather than concrete benches or stools. “I don’t think we need to overbuild this,” Councilman Al Corti said. “I don’t think we should overbuild this.” Council members also agreed to slow the process down a bit and perhaps add another workshop before presenting some alternatives to the public. They especially did not want to rush into crafting a ballot measure for the November election. Language for that would have to be finalized by July, which Mosier said was too short of a timeframe. “Let’s say flexible,” he said about the schedule. Resident Bill Michalsky agreed. “Don’t rush this process,” he said. “The community has to chew on this. … I want a new building as much as anyone but I think it needs to be kept in scale to be successful.” City officials are just trying to get a ballpark figure on the necessary space so they can come up with cost estimates. No plans have been created yet.


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May 16, 2014

Sports SDSU women win club water polo championship Chargers draft grade is out and it doesn’t mean much Contact us at sports@coastnewsgroup.com with story ideas, photos or suggestions

By Bianca Kaplanek

REGION — The San Diego State University women’s water polo team topped the University of Michigan 10-9 in a double-overtime, sudden-death game May 4 to become the school’s first National Collegiate Club Champions. Meghan Harder scored the game-winning goal with less than 7 seconds on the clock in the final game of a three-day tournament in Geneva, Ohio. “It’s still kind of sinking in,” coach Jamie Cassidy, a Solana Beach resident, said the day after returning home. It was the Aztecs’ second appearance in the national club-team championships since joining the Collegiate Water Polo Association six years ago. Last year the team placed fifth, losing to California Polytechnic State University. When Cassidy began coaching four seasons ago, there were 10 girls on the roster, and the team finished “in the middle of the pack” in the CWPA’s Pacific Coast Division. “That first year was pretty rough,” she said. This season, with 21 players, Cassidy was able to roster two teams and is the sole coach for both. “We’ve really grown in size and dedication,” she said. The girls were undefeated in league play and had only one loss in a tournament during the approximately 20-game season. “I knew right away we had a very good shot at going to the championship tournament and going deep,” Cassidy said. “But you don’t know about the other teams you’ll be play-

sports talk jay paris

The No. 2 seeded San Diego State University women’s water polo club team, coached by Solana Beach resident Jamie Cassidy, left, topped the University of Michigan May 4 to become the school’s first National Collegiate Club Champions. Courtesy photo

ing.” who was Cassidy, named coach of the year for SDSU club sports, said she had about seven girls who could have played Division 1 but opted not to for various reasons. “They really advanced everyone to the next level,” she said. “That pushed everyone to work harder.” She said camaraderie is also a key to the team’s success. “They are all friends. They all live together,” Cassidy said. “When anyone wins (an award) the girls are so excited for each other. There’s no jealousy and no one’s upset. They realize they needed each other for this to happen. Their one common goal was to win it all. It didn’t matter who scored the winning goal.” The roster includes Morgan Klingfus, Kathryn Enstad, Nina Escobedo, Jessie Espera, Madeline Schwartz, Bailey Wickliffe, Mary Abary, Meghan Harder, Kelli Boling, Tara DeRosier, Kathryn Andrews, Natalie Parker, Addison

Gosslein, Jenny Waters, Allison Tester, Carolina Conway, Kim Fraisse, Nicole Ryder, Agy Socha, Bridget Poland and Allie Jackson. All are Californians except Tester, who is from Texas. San Diegans include Escobedo, DeRosier, Andrews, Waters and Ryder. Several coach at area high schools such as Canyon Crest Academy and Scripps Ranch and Grossmont College. Parker referees high school games. Cassidy said the athletes play to stay in shape, meet new people — especially the freshmen — or make lifelong friends. Her goal is to have them look back and realize the benefit of being part of the team. “I want to help them grow,” she said. “I try to help them with internships so they leave as well-rounded individuals. I want them to know they have someone in their corner when they get out of college.” To that end Cassidy plans to bring in guest speakers — most likely female professionals — to guide the players with future career goals. “I wish I had something like that in college,” she said. Cassidy currently works at Pear Sports, a Solana Beach company that produces a “mobile training intelligence” system. She coaches at night and is paid, but not a lot.

She played water polo and swam in high school and college, but the sport is more of a hobby now, she said. “I enjoy it. The money’s not important. I just want to give back,” she said. The team receives a small stipend from the university, but club members, unlike Division 1 athletes, pay to play. The cost is $250 for the first semester and $300 for the second semester, which is club season for women. Teams don’t know until about three weeks before the tournament if they will be going so the last-minute plane tickets were pricey — $780 each. Other expenses included hotel rooms, transportation, food and an entry fee. The ladies had to come up with at least $250 each. Fundraising efforts took in $10,000 and included donations from parents and Division 1 water polo players. “Some girls didn’t go because of work, the money and finals,” Cassidy said. “But I don’t want money to be a problem.” With only two graduating seniors, Cassidy is looking forward to another successful season next year and is hoping to secure sponsors to help fund future trips Ohio. Anyone interested in sponsorship information can contact Cassidy at jamievessey@gmail.com.

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It’s that time when grades are important and just not to graduating seniors. The NFL Draft has come and gone and can we get a “Hallelujah!” New York’s Radio City Music Hall was recently the center of the sports universe and did the Rockettes ever get that much hype? Probably not. But what did was the annual disbursements of collegiate players. The Chargers played tourists, leaving the Big Apple with six new employees and a Statue of Liberty foam crown. OK, we’re not sure about the crown. We do know the Chargers’ brass is crowing about their picks, and what did you expect? General manager Tom Telesco swung hard and connected last year in his maiden draft. His top three selections morphed into starters as right tackle D.J. Fluker, linebacker Manti Te’o and wide receiver Keenan Allen all earned their varsity letters. Would this spring’s basket be filled with as many golden eggs? Telesco thinks so and the same goes for NFL insiders grading these sorts of things. The Chargers received, virtually across the board, a ‘B’ for their decisions. That letter dotting your transcripts won’t get you in UC San Diego, but for a draft, that’s considered a success. Texas Christian cornerback Jason Verrett was the team’s top pick. He was followed by Georgia Tech linebacker Jerry Attaochu and Notre Dame guard Chris Watt. My grade? Incomplete. No one knows if these guys will be stiffs. Or someday golfing in the Marshall Faulk Celebrity Championship, which is underway at the Omni La Costa Resort and Spa. All of the Chargers wanna-bes have pluses, have minuses, and anyone predicting with confidence their ability to transfer their skills to the next level is blowing smoke. Verrett was an All Big-12 selection with a knack for denying receivers the ball. That he’s maybe 5-foot-9 when on his tippy-toes can’t be ig-

nored. Well, that and a growing up a Raiders fan, but first things first. Attaochu is quick and relentless, a perfect combination for an outside linebacker in a 3-4 alignment. But he needs to be pointed toward the weight room; he declined to pump iron for scouts at the Combine. Lifting heavy objects and eating spinach is required, otherwise he’ll have the Georgia peach fuzz knocked off him. Watt is a former Te’o teammate but arrives without the sideshow, which accompanied Te’o. Watt is solid and smart, but some worry about his length and lack of a firm base to negate massive defensive tackles. Still, the Chargers had needs entering the draft and their initial three picks addressed them. The Chargers don’t brag about having the AFC’s worst pass defense. When sharing a division with Denver’s Peyton Manning, that’s not a good thing — hello, Verrett. The Chargers reach quarterbacks as often the Padres score 19 runs in consecutive games. Oh, it happens, not just very often — greetings, Attaochu. The Chargers’ interior line needs depth, and just maybe a starter if Telesco determines the millions headed Jeromey Clary’s way could be better spend — hola, Watt. The other three fresh Chargers are nose tackle Ryan Carrethers (Arkansas State), running back Marion Grice (Arizona State) and wide receiver Tevin Reese (Baylor). Of that trio, the bulky Carrethers has the best shot of earning a roster spot. Of that trio, the speedy Reese has the best nickname unless you can find something keener than “Sweet Feet.’’ How this six-pack of Baby Bolts fare will be determined during the hot, sticky summer at training camp. It’ll feature plenty of spirited competition with the Chargers eager to prove last year’s playoff run was no fluke. Me? I can’t wait to see Chargers coach Mike McCoy, especially if he’s wearing that Statue of Liberty crown. He’ll be easy to spot among the team’s huddled masses; one welcoming six new draft picks trying to make the grade. Contact Jay Paris at jparis8@aol.com. Follow him on Twitter at jparis_sports.


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NCTD applies for TIGER grant for transit center OCEANSIDE — The North County Transit District has applied for a $5 million Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) Discretionary Grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation. The TIGER program may award up to $35 million in fiscal year 2014 for planning grants. If the agency’s application is successful, the money will be used to fund the planning of the proposed transit facility on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. Camp Pendleton is the largest employer in North San Diego County with an average daily base population of approximately 70,000. Currently, the vast majority of individuals access the base in private cars creating significant congestion both entering and exiting the base. Three NCTD BREEZE bus routes are the only public transit serving Camp Pendleton. In 2011 officials from NCTD and Camp Pendleton signed a cooperation agreement to explore the possibility of building a transit center on the base. Last year, the U.S. Marine Cops Installations Command provided conceptual approval for the transit center which would serve NCTD’s COASTER commuter rail, and potentially also serve Amtrak and Los Angeles-based Metrolink trains. The Camp Pendleton Transit Center aligns with the goals of the TIGER Grant program to improve access to reliable, safe, and affordable transportation for disconnected communi-

ties. The regional benefits of the transit center are many. It would make the area more economically competitive by connecting the military, retired military, and civilians, who live and work on base, or regularly access the base, with key employment centers in the region. Building the multi-modal transit center on base would decrease transportation costs for base residents and workers. By providing easy access to public transportation, the transit center would improve quality of life and enhance environmental sustainability by; reducing dependence on foreign oil, improving air quality and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The transit center would also reduce vehicle miles traveled in private automobiles annually by more than 75 million and save more than 2.5 million gallons of fuel each year. “The Camp Pendleton Transit Center is a true partnership between NCTD, the Marine Corps, the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), and our transportation partners; Amtrak, the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) and Metrolink. This partnership believes the transit center would provide the full range of economic and environment benefits to the base as well as the entire region,” said Matthew O. Tucker, NCTD executive director. “We are confident the Department of Transportation will recognize the benefits and the alignment of this project with the government’s goals for the program and awards us this vital funding.”

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New sign welcomes people to downtown By Jared Whitlock

ENCINITAS — What’s known as the Encinitas sign arcs over Coast Highway 101 and D Street. Now, the southern portion of downtown has a landmark welcoming people. Residents and city officials celebrated the debut of a new 8 foot-by-10-foot sandblasted redwood sign near the Santa Fe Undercrossing on May 6. Part mosaic, part mural — two artists joined forces for the project. Terry Weaver, one of the artists, said he “pretty much accidentally” became involved with the piece. About three years ago, he created a mosaic of the Encinitas city seal. But the artwork didn’t have a home, so Weaver walked into the Encinitas 101 Mainstreet Association office one day in hopes of finding a location. Impressed by the piece, Encinitas 101 representatives recommended affixing the artwork to the downtown sign, which was only in the planning stages at that point. “When we saw this mosaic, we said, ‘holy moly — we have to include it,’” said Dody Crawford, executive director of Encinitas 101. Spearheaded by the Encinitas 101 board, the sign has been in the works for more than five years. Most of the funding came from an $11,000 county Board of Supervisors community development grant. “This sign dresses up downtown and let’s people know what’s in store for them when passing through,” Crawford said.

Bob Partlow, left, shakes hands with Terry Weaver in front of their new sign near the Santa Fe underpass. The two artists joined forces for the piece, which greets people coming into downtown Encinitas. Photo by Jared Whitlock

“It’s a great way to welcome them.” To Weaver, whose other miniature mosaics adorn downtown Encinitas sidewalks, the sign represents the best parts of Encinitas — a city he holds dear. “I’ve lived in Hawaii for 26 years now, but I grew up in Encinitas, and my heart is still here,” Weaver said, noting that he flew into town just for the unveiling. “It’s really a fitting place for the mosaic,” Weaver added. Initially, the artists weren’t exactly sure where to place the piece. Weaver approached Don Hansen,

who owns Hansen’s Surf Shop and the surrounding land. “I knew him years ago and he was very gracious in accommodating the sign,” Weaver said, noting one of Hansen’s classic surfboards makes a cameo in the mural. Bob Partlow, the other artist, is no stranger to murals. He painted a welcome sign in Cardiff, and he owns the local company Bob Partlow Sign Artist. While an experienced painter, he noted creating pieces takes him longer than most artists. That’s because a car

battery explosion injured one of his eyes, destroying his depth perception. “It doesn’t detract from how much I enjoy art,” Partlow said. “I’ll think every mural is my last, but I just keep on going,” he added. He welcomed the challenge of capturing downtown Encinitas, opting to depict local staples like the Boathouses, Encinitas Child, La Paloma Theatre, peeling waves at Swami’s Beach and the Santa Fe underpass. “I love doing things like this for the community,” Partlow said.


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Kim Doherty painting at China Cove south of Carmel, Calif. Doherty is hosting a series of adult painting courses at the Rancho Santa Fe Community Center. Photo courtesy of Kim Doherty

Artist creating buzz at Community Center By Christina Macone-Greene

RANCHO SANTA FE — There is a buzz of excitement at the Rancho Santa Fe Community Center. Professional artist, Kim Doherty, who is also the president of the Rancho Santa Fe Art Guild, will be teaching an adult art class series. Members of the community center, even beginners, have the opportunity to learn oil painting from one of the most highly regarded artists in the area. Doherty is considered a modern impressionist with a colorist influence.

Bringing in adult art classes to the Rancho Santa Fe Community Center is a new experience. “We are really excited to have Kim coming in because she is so talented and passionate,” said Michelle Shah, program manager. “Kim is such a big part of Rancho Santa Fe and we wanted to bring that to our community center; and, we cherish our members and we want them to have fun.” Shah pointed out that their organization caters to their community youth, but the adults in the com-

munity play a big part, as well. This new adult art class for beginner and intermediate students will add a dimension of activity, socialization, and creativity. Doherty said when she met with Shah, and Linda Durket the executive director, she was thrilled with the offer to teach there. It was decided early on the class would hold a minimum of three students and a maximum of nine to teach the basics of landscape and still life oil painting. “What I would love everyone to know is that you do not have to be somebody who has painted before to take this class,” Doherty said. She went on to say, “I really embrace beginners and what I am looking to do is to share my passion for art and teaching art with people who have an interest in learning how to paint.” Doherty shared one of the common things which happen with students is they feel intimidated because they claim they are not artistic. She does not want anyone to feel this way. “I am all about making this fun and making it a great learning environment,” she said. Doherty, who also teaches art at The Bridges, tailors it to meet the needs of beginners and interme-

diate students in the same class. It will be the same at the community center. Doherty will cover principles of composition and design, drawing, color mixing, brush work and basically all the steps to take for successful painting. Materials will also be provided so students don’t have to be concerned about purchasing the “right items” ahead of time. The first art class is slated for Wednesday evenings running on June 4, 11, 18, and 25. Other sessions are scheduled for August, September, and October. These session dates will vary in days and times, giving everyone the opportunity to try their hand at oil painting. Doherty said students are encouraged to attend as many sessions as they like so they can see their progression, while others, can step in anytime. “I have worked with people who have never picked up a paintbrush before, and within a few sessions, it’s amazing what they are producing,” she said. To learn more about the upcoming adult art classes please visit rsfcc. org or call (858) 756-2461. Doherty also invites interested students to visit her website to learn more about her artwork at kimdohertyart.com

May 16, 2014 Send your arts & entertainment news to arts@thecoastnews.com

arts CALENDAR

Know something that’s going on? Send it to calendar@ coastnewsgroup.com MAY 16 TGIF Join Carlsbad Village Friday Night Live festivities from 7 to 9 p.m. May 16 and every Friday weekly through Oct. 24 (except July 4 and Sept. 19) at Grand Avenue and State Street, Carlsbad. Enjoy live busker music on the sidewalks. Visit the city’s Facebook page to see who’s performing each week. For more information, call (760) 434-2553. FAMILY ART Lux Art Institute offers a Family Friday from 1 to 4 p.m. May 16, at 1550 S. El Camino Real, Encinitas. Get a tour of the studio and current project. The event is free for up to two children per paid adult admission. Additional children are $5 ach. You can also register for Summer Art Camps by calling (760) 4366611 or visit luxartinstitute. org. BIRDS UP CLOSE Did you know more than 500 bird species visit San Diego County during the year? Jack Daynes has made birds the focus of his photography. His work will be on display at the Solana Beach Library through June 15 at 157 Stevens Ave. Call (858) 7551404 for more information. PIANIST IN CONCERT The Encinitas Arts Division will present pianist Somang Jeagal in concert, 7:30 p.m. May 16 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas as part of the Music by the Sea concert series. Tickets are $13 at (760) 6332740 or online at EncinitasCA.gov/concerts, or at the door. For more information, call (760) 633-2746. MAY 17 CELEBRATE VERDI The North Coast Symphony and the San Luis Rey Chorale present “Of Chorus!” at 7:30 p.m. May 17 and at 4 p.m. May 18 at Lighthouse Christian Church, 4700 Mesa Drive, Oceanside, celebrating Verdi. There will be a goodwill offering. More information is available at northcoastsymphony.com YOUTH ORCHESTRA Civic Youth Orchestra is holding auditions and an open house May 17 for primary and wind ensemble 9 to 11 a.m., chamber strings 9 to 10 a.m., intermediate strings 10 a.m. to noon, symphony 9 a.m. to noon and symphonic 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 130 Woodward Ave., Escondido. For more information, visit civicyouthorchestra.org/. M ASTERWOR KS MiraCosta College’s Masterworks Chorale and Chamber Choir will combine with Palomar College’s Chorale and Chamber Singers and the Alexandria Strings at 7 p.m. May 17 in the Palomar College Howard Brubeck Theatre, 1140 W. Mission Road, San Marcos. General admission is $12. Tickets are $50, $40 and $20. Call (760) 744-1150, ext.2453 or online at palomarperforms.com. MAY 18

PLAY PROMPTS ART The Brooks Theatre in Oceanside will be hosting an interpretational fine art exhibit in the lobby through June 1 at 217 N. Coast Highway in Oceanside, in conjunction with its current play, “Lost in Yonkers.” The artists will be interpreting and rendering their version of the play’s theme. For more information, visit oceansidetheatre.org, or e-mail info@ oceansidetheatre.org. CHILDREN’S ART The Carlsbad-Oceanside Art League will hold its opening reception for its 20th annual children’s art show from 3 to 5 p.m. May 18 at its gallery, 300 Carlsbad Village Dr. Suite 101, Carlsbad. The show runs through June 7. Visit coalartgallery.com. MAY 19 SUMMER WITH SHAKESPEARE The Intrepid Shakespeare Company’s summer theater camps, begin June 23, held at the San Dieguito Academy, 800 Santa Fe Drive, Encinitas. For more information, visit intrepidshakespeare.com or call the administrative office at (760) 295-7541. MAY 20 JEWISH ARTS FEST The 21st annual Lipinsky Family San Diego Jewish Arts Festival will have a one-night performance of “Una Nocha Yidishe” at 7:30 p.m. May 20 at the Oceanside Museum of Art, 704 Pier View Way, Oceanside. Tickets are $8 at (760) 435-3720. MAY 22 ROCK ON The Rock the Library! concert series features winning teen bands from 7 to 8 p.m. with Occupancy 64 on May 22 and Step Forward Lads June 5 at the Carlsbad City Library’s Ruby G. Schulman Auditorium, 1775 Dove Lane. Admission is free. For more information, call (760) 602-2058. ART CENTRAL “Cruizing the Art Scene” is being held 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. May 22 at Carlsbad Village Faire art venues throughout the village, with live music and more. MAY 23 MONTY PYTHON “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” will be projected onto a large screen at the Moonlight Amphitheatre at 8:30 p.m. May 23 at 1200 Vale Terrace Drive, Vista. Admission is free. For more information, call (760) 724-2110 or visit moonlightstage.com MAY 24 STAR IN CONCERT The Vista Chamber of Commerce presents Juice Newton and Gin Piston in a benefit concert at 7:30 p.m. May 24 at the Moonlight Amphitheatre, For tickets call (760) 724-2110 or visit vistixonline.com. Proceeds go to Angel Depot. MARK THE CALENDAR JOIN THE CHOIR San Diego Children’s Choir is holding 5- to 10-minute auditions from May 28 to June 7 for children in grades three to 12. No audition needed for grades one and two. To schedule an audition or for more information, call (858) 587-1087 or visit sdcchoir.org/. The choir meets in Del Mar.


May 16, 2014

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Nickel Creek reunites with the intent to keep making music By Alan Sculley

When Nickel Creek went on hiatus seven years ago, mandolin player Chris Thile said the decision was simply a product of feeling they couldn’t make a better album than “Why Should the Fire Die?,” the 2005 album that marked the third and final release by the trio during their initial time together. “With ‘Fire,’ I do think it was the best record we had made, and I also really did feel like there wasn’t a way to beat it at that point,” Thile said in an early April phone interview. “It felt like we had drained the well dry.” Now that Thile and his Nickel Creek bandmates, siblings Sean (guitar) and Sara Watkins (violin), have reunited after doing other musical projects, released a new Nickel Creek album, “A Dotted Line,” and started an extensive tour, the trio has also learned another important lesson about themselves. They know there is life after Nickel Creek — and this is giving them a new perspective on the group. “We don’t need Nickel Creek to be everything,” Thile said. “Before basically it was like a well that we would, we were draining it because we had to get everything that we wanted out of music fromNickel Creek. “So we’re not imposing certain aspects of our musical agendas on our respective projects,

Nickel Creek will perform May 20, at the Balboa Theatre in San Diego. Photo by Brant-

ley Gutierrez

which means Nickel Creek gets to develop more naturally than it ever has because we can come back to it now and go ooh, as a trio, this is what we’re really good at,” he said. “Let’s do that, instead of like again, someone having an idea that would really be better for a different project, but because this is all we’ve got, we’re kind of like ramming it down the other two musicians’ throats. “That’s the main difference I see.” The three musicians were certainly busy during their time away from Nickel Creek. Thile (pronounced thee-lee)

made four albums with Punch Brothers, an ensemble that was even more bluegrass oriented than Nickel Creek, but pushed its music in adventurous directions within that idiom. Thile also did a 2011 album, “The Great Rodeo Sessions,” which featured collaborations with Yo-Yo-Ma, Stuart Duncan and Edgar Meyer and won a 2013 Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album. He further broadened his musical horizons with a 2013 solo album of his arrangements for mandolin of Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas. Sean Watkins released two albums with Fiction Family, his

duo project with Switchfoot singer Jon Foreman. He also formed Work Progress Administration (WPA), a folk-rock group that also featured Toad the Wet Sprocket frontman Glenn Phillips and fiddler Luke Bulla. Sara Watkins also contributed to WPA, but focused mainly on starting a solo career. Her two solo albums, a 2009 self-titled release and 2012’s “Sun Midnight Sun,” were produced by former Led Zeppelin bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones. Finally, last year Thile and Watkins siblings began to consider a Nickel Creek reunion. They realized 2014 would mark the 25th anniversary of the group, which played its first show at a San Diego pizza parlor when Thile and Sara Watkins were eight and Sean Watkins was 12. Initially, the threesome thought it might record an EP and play a few shows, but things progressed from there. “As we started working on new music, it’ just started coming,” Thile said. “So that was very encouraging. We were like wow; we might be able to get a whole record together. We’re all sitting there going I really like this. So we just got more and more ambitious with it.” “A Dotted Line” feels like it picks up where “Why Should the Fire Die?” left off.

Like that previous album, new songs like “Christmas Eve,” “21st of May” and “Where is Love Now” have rich melodies and blur the lines between bluegrass, folk, country and pop. But the three musicians sound more assured — with Sara Watkins especially displaying new confidence as a vocalist — while the playing is tight and assertive. Thile is eager to see how the public responds to “A Dotted Line” and to Nickel Creek’s live shows. If the response is positive, he feels he and the Watkins siblings can reconvene periodically as Nickel Creek alongside their other projects. “If we can get people to come with us, then I think it would be great to keep making music,” he said. “The only thing that could make it tricky to do that is if people only want to hear the old (songs). “We’ll do it. We’re happy to go look at the baby photos, and it can be fun, but we don’t want to have to actually live there. “I’m just nothing but honored that our music made as much of an impression on people as it did,” he said. “But at the same time, we all grow, and I don’t think anyone wants to be around people who are putting on an act, who are faking anything. So that would be the only tricky part. But like I said, hopefully it won’t be like that.”

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Rancho Santa Fe couple teams up for new Broadway-style production ATTORNEY By Christina Macone-Greene

REGION — A Broadway style production of “Annie Get Your Gun,” is arriving to North Park Theatre and being championed by the San Diego Musical Theatre. The husband and wife team of Erin and Gary Lewis, both the producers and executive directors of the San Diego Musical Theatre, are counting the days until opening night. “Irving Berlin’s ‘Annie Get Your Gun,’ is one the most amazing scores that he wrote,” Erin Lewis said. “It’s a fun show and also what we call a family show. We thought the community would enjoy this since it has not been done for a while.” The musical runs from May 9 to May 25 and tickets are already sought after. Much of this has to do with the fact that two Broadway veteran stars are performing the lead roles. Beth Malone, will play the role of Annie Oakley, while Steve Blanchard portrays the character of Frank Butler. “When we decided to do the show we knew we needed Broadway veterans,” she said, adding how Blanchard lives in New York and has come to the west coast for this role. Lewis has also watched the rehearsals and describes the cast as fantastic. “They are just amaz-

Husband and wife Gary and Erin Lewis are serving as producers and executive directors of the San Diego Musical Theatre’s “Annie Get Your Gun,” which opened on May 9. Photo courtesy of San Diego Musical Theatre

ing,” Lewis said. “And the choreography by John Todd, who is also directing, is fun. John is adding some new ‘wow’ moments.” Lewis is quick to point out that she and her husband are not the creative types.

They bring their business background to this musical theatre organization and hire the artistic people around them. This business savvy duo, though, often collaborates with their directors. “Gary and I decide on

the show, find the set, the costumes, and then have the auditions; and, once we get all that done, our director and choreographer will put the show together,” Lewis said. Lewis shared that their influence in musical theatre actually started with their daughter when she was 11 years old. As a young girl, she had a passion for acting and singing in musical theatre, and even today, is still on stage. Lewis pointed out how both she and her husband enjoy musical theatre, and realized there wasn’t any in their area, except for national tours that came into town. “There wasn’t any full time year-round musical theatre in San Diego,” Lewis said. While San Diego is very rich with live theater, the couple decided they wanted to pitch in and do just musicals. Though it was hard work, they are glad they did. For those who have never been to North Park Theatre, Lewis calls it a gorgeous venue. Built in 1928, it is rich with character. Much like Broadway, at the North Park Theatre, there isn’t a bad seat in the house. San Diego Musical Theatre is labeled as an award winning nonprofit which

brings vibrant live musicals to the community and is known as the local way to see Broadway. “You really don’t want to miss this show because it’s going to be fun and professional with our Broadway veterans,” Lewis said. “It is Mother’s Day month and a perfect show to bring the entire family to see.” For more information about “Annie Get Your Gun” or to purchase tickets, visit SanDiegoMusicalTheatre.com or call (858) 560-5740.

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May 16, 2014

Members of the Blue Lotus Dance group perform at the Escondido Renaissance Faire on May 3. Photos by Tony Cagala

The good ‘olde’ times By Tony Cagala

ESCONDIDO — Queens, knights, lords and ladies roam the grounds of Felicitia Park for the annual Escondido Renaissance Faire on Saturday. Visitors dressed in their finest threads exchanged “Good Morrows,” and “Fare thee wells,” with each other during the two-day event on May 3 and May 4 put on by Gold Coast Festivals. Another Renaissance Faire is scheduled for two weekends in the fall beginning Sept. 20.

Clockwise from top: Jesus Pina takes some medieval punishment. Ansel Leos, left, and Derek Dawson see who the last man standing is during a game of tug of war. Sandy Draper on Indiana, or “Sir Indy” for the Renaissance Faire on May 3 in Escondido’s Felicita Park. Indiana is a 20-yearFaye Card, left, and Emily Bennion are members of the Queen’s Court. old approved Friesian Horse.

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something new. It all started with Organica, a green cosmetic line, which asked him to take a look their product and offer feedback. Two weeks after the meeting, Organica contacted Schlange and wanted him onboard to help with rebranding and marketing ideas. Under Salon Salon, Schlange was their consultant. It didn’t take long for word to get out that Schlange had talent in this area. In fact, companies

which approached him as a consultant were all eco-friendly. It was if he was a magnet. Schlange has always been mindful of the environment. “Now is the time to have eco-friendly products, because resources are getting lower and there is a battle for energy — it’s a great time to remarket and rebrand green energy,” he said. “And this topic needs to be taken out of the political arena because it is just the right thing to do.” Quickly, green building material manufacturers wanted to be represented by Schlange. And that’s

when the creation of DynaKor Global emerged. “DynaKor Global was launched with the guidance of international key advisors to address the need to integrate selected individual brands for globally environmentally friendly technology solutions, seeking an entry into high growth business sectors,” Schlange said. He went on to say how the company is transparent and engages in all areas of marketing for green products such as design, social entertainment, media, business development and branding.

They help bridge the eco-friendly gap. Schlange’s vision is to make sure a green product gets known, seen, revitalized and brought to the forefront. Schlange said he’s involved in an array of environmentally conscious projects such as smart energy management systems for the energy grid, waste to energy solutions, fully sustainable development solutions, green technology building blocks and more. While DynaKor Global is fairly new, Schlange said, an impressive proj-

ect named Anahol is in the works. On the island of Kauai, a self-sustainable village for native Hawaiians will be built on 200 acres. Mixed use and residential properties will be constructed with MillenniumBlok® and green energy by Pure Power. Both companies are represented by DynaKor Global. “MillenniumBlok® is a patented low-cost construction building block using breakthrough green technology utilizing recycled materials to build strong, safe, and efficient

buildings for commercial and residential properties,” Schlange said. “What makes it so great is that it’s fire resistant, earthquake resistant up to 8.2 on the Richter scale, can withstand 165 mph winds, and it doesn’t mold.” Schlange pointed out that his RSF clientele, who he still styles for, have been extremely supportive of his new business venture. “Doing hair for so long, this pathway offers new beginnings, he said. “I’m able to try something completely different and still be creative.”


May 16, 2014

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Kevin Faulconer, the mayor of San Diego, reversed his decision to not include funding to the San Dieguito River Park. The cut in funding could have had serious impacts on the River Park’s staffing levels. Photo by Tony Cagala

Funding for River Park is restored By Tony Cagala

REGION — Had the funding not been restored to the San Dieguito River Park, members of the Joint Powers Authority Board would have been working on a plan b to establish their budget for the upcoming fiscal year, which would most likely have included layoffs to park rangers. But after the submission of 1,500 petitions delivered to San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer and San Diego City Council members on May 1, and meetings between the city and JPA members in April to discuss the cost benefits of the park, Faulconer agreed to restore the $254,000 funding. “I’m glad that we won’t be looking at immediate layoffs,” said Susan Carter, deputy director of the San

Dieguito River Park. we’ve had over the last 25 Faulconer released a years,” said Roberts. letter on May 2 to County Su“We’re going to look at pervisor Dave Roberts, who all of the different items is also the chair of the JPA TURN TO FUNDING ON A20 Board. The letter agreed to reinstate the funding to the River Park for one year, though it also included several points of concerns that the city wants addressed by the JPA. “I think it’s a very positive step, and I’m really pleased that the mayor and the City Council understand the value of our partnership that

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May 16, 2014

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that were raised; we met with the mayor and two of the council members, Council member (Sherri) Lightner and Council member (Mark) Kersey, and we had heard about the issues so we want to bring them back to the full board to discuss in public.” Lightner and Kersey also serve on the JPA board. Carter did have some confusion about the city’s concerns, but she added that the JPA board would look to address them possibly at their May 16 meeting.

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or policy is needed. But in some cases, all that is required is informing parents to contact the district if there is an issue or problem they need to be aware of. “In my letter, it is in-

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Having just finished the Birdwing Open Air Classroom, off of Via de la Valle, which is slated for a grand opening May 13, the River Park’s next large project will be the building of a ranger station near the Birdwing structure, but closer to the California Bank & Trust building, explained Carter. “We’re also working on extending the Coast to Crest trail, east of El Camino Real, and then further in eastern back country, and we’re working in Pauma Valley to extend the trail,” Carter said. Carter added that funding from the city was

steady until April 2010, when they eliminated all of their funding to the JPA. “We went for threeand-a-quarter years without any funding,” said Carter. Former Mayor Bob Filner reinstated the funding in 2013 for the 2014 fiscal year. During the more than three years without the city’s funding, the River Park was able to keep going without laying anyone off due to a combination of things, including their executive director retiring and continuing to work pro bono, as well as other member agencies increasing contributions.

dicated that the Rancho Santa Fe School District is a small elementary school district, with only one school site,” said Currier, noting how the report represented a once size fits all approach which didn’t pertain to their district. The Grand Jury responded to Currier’s April 11 letter, requesting a more detailed reply to the disagreed recommendations. Currier is in the process of doing that now and conveyed that the school district has always made safety and security its top priority. “We were lucky enough to build a new school, where we were able to implement and add safety features to the new

school that our old school did not have,” Superintendent Lindy Delaney said. Additionally, they also implement regular safety and security drills. Having the sheriff’s substation across the street is another benefit. “And not only are they responsive, but they are proactive and the Rancho Santa Fe Patrol is also a great help to us as a school and we can call on them anytime,” said Delaney, noting how fortunate they were. For Delaney, school security is always a work in progress. The district has done a lot in regard to school security, Currier said, while still trying to maintain the friendly, rural nature of the school.

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May 16, 2014

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Artist Santos Leonel Orellana Paz in front of his mural at Cafe Ipe. Photo by John Redman

The murals of Encinitas Some are hidden, others overt, but the murals around the city highlight the distinct talents of its artists By Yeshe Salz

Special to The Coast News ENCINITAS — When was the last time you walked through Encinitas and stopped to look at a mural? Chances are, it wasn’t too long ago. Encinitas is strewn with murals — some hidden behind buildings and on nearly every street corner. Private businesses sporting painted entryways have become the new norm and you can even find city-owned mosaics and art pieces in select areas across town. Yet, despite its encouragement of the arts, Encinitas doesn’t have a budget for public art. “We have a maintenance budget for the public art in the city’s collection, but we do not have funds in place for public artwork,” said Encinitas Arts Administrator Jim Gilliam. So where is all of the art coming from? Some of it originates from organizations like the 101 Artists Colony, and more and more

Riverside artist Geoff Gouveia, whose signs his work as “Wend,” paints a mural for Mac-

TURN TO MURALS ON B11 beth Clothing Store in Encinitas. Photos by Yeshe Salz

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May 16, 2014

SECTION

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Are you ready for the ‘limepocalypse’? All hands on deck. Code Blue. Take phasers off stun. Stop, drop and roll. Defcon 1! We may need to kick up our foreign aide to Mexico. I just heard we are having a lime shortage and 97 percent of them grow in Mexico. They are calling it a “lime-pocalypse.” As I contemplate this, I’m feeling a little green myself. Why do I care? I don’t use limes much in my daily routine, and it’s not a common condiment. It doesn’t have much medicinal use, since scurvy is pretty rare these days. It’s not a go-to seasoning for cooking and lime doesn’t really work in iced tea. So why the panic mode? One word. Margarita. Summer in Southern California is nearly here and without frozen Margaritas or at least a Corona with a lime slice in it, well, we might as well live in Kansas. If you know me well at all, you know I am the Margarita’s biggest fan and its future is dicey. Hearing that Mexico is having serious lime-producing problems just brings tears to my eyes. It seems the growers had a triple smack down. Heavy rain knocked the flowers off the trees, making the harvest smaller TURN TO SMALL TALK ON B15

Artist Santos Leonel Orellana Paz in front of his mural at Cafe Ipe. Photo by John Redman

The murals of Encinitas Some are hidden, others overt, but the murals around the city highlight the distinct talents of its artists By Yeshe Salz

Special to The Coast News ENCINITAS — When was the last time you walked through Encinitas and stopped to look at a mural? Chances are, it wasn’t too long ago. Encinitas is strewn with murals — some hidden behind buildings and on nearly every street corner. Private businesses sporting painted entryways have become the new norm and you can even find city-owned mosaics and art pieces in select areas across town. Yet, despite its encouragement of the arts, Encinitas doesn’t have a budget for public art. “We have a maintenance budget for the public art in the city’s collection, but we do not have funds in place for public artwork,” said Encinitas Arts Administrator Jim Gilliam. So where is all of the art coming from? Some of it originates from organizations like the 101 Artists Colony, and more and more

Riverside artist Geoff Gouveia, whose signs his work as “Wend,” paints a mural for Mac-

TURN TO MURALS ON B7 beth Clothing Store in Encinitas. Photos by Yeshe Salz

Jax Meyers, left, and artist Skye Walker clink celebratory glasses in front of Royal Liquor Store where Walker will be painting a mural this summer. Walker was selected among a host of applicants to paint this Leucadia wall.

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B2

T he R ancho S anta F e News

May 16, 2014

HOAs respond to affordable housing project By Bianca Kaplanek

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SOLANA BEACH — An organization that represents condominium associations on South Sierra Avenue is not planning to challenge an affordable housing complex approved by City Council last month.

“We won’t take any action against what the city did,” said Tom Ryan, chairman of the Condominium Organization of South Sierra Avenue, a nonprofit group formed in 1988 to “make local government aware of the particular interests, con-

cerns and consensus of the community.” “As far as I’m concerned, that issue is over,” Ryan said. “I could be wrong but that would be up to the individual homeowners associations.” City officials worked with Hitzke Development Corporation for about three years to build a 10unit, mixed-use development that would satisfy a legal requirement to re-

the configuration of the building and the lack of an area where children could safely play. “COOSSA didn’t take a position of opposition,” Ryan said. “There were a lot of different opinions about whether the project was worthy of support or not worthy of support. But we had concerns.” He said the issue of legal action was “raised as a general topic but not really discussed.”

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place low-income housing lost when a mobile home park was closed more than two decades ago. Most residents said they support affordable units but opposed the project on a city-owned parking lot in the 500 block of South Sierra because it is too big for the site and presents some safety concerns. Ryan said COOSSA representatives and a few dozen residents from Seascape Sur met about a week before the April 23 City Council meeting to review the plans. He said after 90 minutes of discussion and opinions being expressed he abstained from a unanimous decision to send a letter to the city voicing concerns about

During the April 23 meeting, City Councilwoman Lesa Heebner noted most of the opposition to the project came from residents of Seascape Sur, which is across the street from the proposed development. “Everybody else didn’t send in anything,” Heebner said. “Their silence says a lot to me.” In a letter dated April 24, Seascape Sur withdrew from COOSSA, which until then represented about 895 units and 1,400 voters. Bill Gifford, president of the Seascape Sur homeowners association, said his group is meeting the week of May 12. He said he would pre-

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May 16, 2014

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

Odd Files Owners call new theater a nod to By Chuck Shepherd

Price of Friendship “Whoever said, ‘Money can’t buy you friends’ clearly hasn’t been on the Internet recently,” wrote The New York Times in April, pointing to various social media support services that create online superstars by augmenting one’s Facebook “friends,” Twitter “followers” and Instagram “likes.” The reporter described how, by paying a company $5, for example, he immediately acquired 4,000 “friends,” and had he splurged for $3,700, could have had a million on his Instagram photo account. Such services have been around for two years, but earlier, cruder versions (sometimes, just unmonitored email addresses) are now sophisticated “bots” — groups of computer code created on algorithm farms in India and elsewhere — that “behave” on social media with original messaging (often “drivel,” wrote the Times) as if they were real people. The Entrepreneurial Spirit We All Scream: (1) In April, Haagen-Dazs announced it will introduce two new ice creams (thankfully, only in Japan): carrot orange (with bits of pulp and peel) and tomato cherry (made from tomato paste). (2) A South Wales ice cream maker (“Lick Me I’m Delicious”) announced in April that it has perfected an ice cream containing about 25mg of Viagra per scoop (though it is not yet generally available). Marketing Challenges: (1) In January, London’s Daily Telegraph found three British companies in competition to sell deodorant supposedly made especially for women’s breasts. According to one, Fresh Body, “We’re replacing ‘swoobs’ — dreaded boob sweat — with smiles.” (2) Owner Christian Ingber recently opened a sandwich shop in Gothenburg, Sweden, named “A F***ing Awesome Sandwich.” An American expatriate told Stockholm’s The Local news service that Swedes think English “curse words” are “cute and charming.” Science Fair Medical Marvels: (1) China’s Chengdu Commercial Daily reported in March that Liu Yougang, 23, finally had surgery to remove that whistle he had swallowed when he was 9. He had been experiencing worsened breathing — and had been making “shrill whistle sounds” nightly after falling asleep. (2) London’s Daily Star featured Sarah Beal, 43, of Arley, Warwickshire, England, in a March story demonstrating her skin condition in which writing words on her skin makes it puff up for about an hour before it recedes. It is referred to by doctors as the “Etch A Sketch condition” (formally, dermatographia), and despite occasional pain, she described it as “cool” and a “party trick.”

changing times, La Jolla culture By Dave Schwab

La Jolla Today LA JOLLA — La Jolla Village is losing a boutique market and gaining a boutique theater. Boffo Cinemas has signed a 20-year lease with Jonathan’s Market to transform the retail space at 7611 Fay Ave. from a high-end market into a premium multiplex theater. “We will have a bar and restaurant that will cater to our patrons and offer in-seat service,” said Adolfo Fastlicht of Boffo, a firm named for the movie industry term denoting a smash success. “It will be a family venue, an upscale boutique catering to everybody in the community,” said Carlos Wellman, Fastlicht’s partner in the venture. Jonathan’s announced on May 1 that it will close June 1 after 18 years at the Fay address. Fastlicht noted that Boffo will be something different — and more — than your garden-variety theater, as it will offer “reserved seating, online reservations and an augmented menu.” While not disclosing what cuisine exactly will be served, Fastlicht noted such fair typically includes items like sushi, paninis, wraps, sliders, salads and pizza. Boffo’s decor, said Fastlicht, will be well appointed, with “warm and inviting finishes that will translate into a comfortable environment.” He said the affect will be to create a “hospitality-type feel that is pleasant and relaxed.” Preliminary plans include the building of seven screens, with 50 to 60 comfortable lounge seats each. The complex is scheduled to be open 365 days a year. Fastlicht noted that the former Jonathan’s space will necessitate extensive remodeling, including a partial second

Carlos Wellman, left, and Adolfo Fastlicht say their new theater should help fuel La Jolla culture for years to come. Courtesy photo

story. He added that it’s hoped the theater will open next March. The retail space was a Big Bear supermarket before it was purchased by the Dallo family in 1995. The Dallos turned it into a boutique market. Attorney Michael Dallo said Boffo came to them with a proposal for altering their retail space. “They approached us with this idea of leasing the property to them,” Dallo said, “and, after long thought, it made sense for us.” He added that the final decision to lease the property was “tough — bittersweet.” But in the end, Dallo said, “We felt it was a (business) opportunity for us, and exactly right for La Jolla, which is developing and changing.” Dallo said Boffo will take control of Jonathan’s on June 1, the date of the market’s closure. He said the boutique market’s approximately 45 employees will be offered employment elsewhere at the company’s Harvest

Ranch locations in El Cajon and Encinitas and at its Foodland Markets in South Bay. For a number of reasons, Fastlicht said La Jolla was the perfect choice for their new theater concept. “La Jolla is a great market, has fabulous demographics — the right population density, the right average household income, the right education levels, the culture and sophistication,” he said, noting the community “has lacked a movie theater for many years.” La Jolla had a single-screen theater, the art-moderne-style Cove, at 7730 Girard Ave. The Cove was built in 1948. In 2002, it was sold and converted into a European-style furniture store. Currently, the nearest movie theaters to the Village are on La Jolla Village Drive and in La Jolla Village Square. Wellman and Fastlicht noted there was a “void in the (La Jolla) market,” adding they wanted to “develop something here”

given that the Jewel is a “unique, wonderful destination... incredibly difficult — if not impossible — to replicate.” Fastlicht said his vision revolves around retro in that it harkens to the glory days of Hollywood, when movies were king. “We are returning to 50, 60 years ago, when going to a movie was an event,” he said, noting that concept has been lost with commercialization and the development of malls and multiplexes. “The theater just became another anchor,” Fastlicht said, adding that’s about to change. “We want people to make a conscious decision to come here (theater) because they want to be pampered,” he said, adding that a Boffo patron will no longer be “one of 300 people in an auditorium having to wait three, four or five deep in a concession line. Though our concept may not be right for everyone everywhere, the beauty of it is we will be right in the middle of a town that has the culture, the sophistication and the willingness to appreciate it.” Noting it’s “regretful that Jonathan’s is closing,” Fastlicht pointed out that “times change.” “We really think this theater will have the ability to propel the village of La Jolla for the next couple of decades,” he said. “It should really become a classic.” For more information visit boffocinemas.com.

Join pet day on the bay RANCHO SANTA FE — San Diego Bay-lovers and canine-fanatics are invited to Hornblower’s pup-friendly Pet Day on the San Diego Bay. The 14th annual dog and dockside adventure will be held with three different departure times — 9:30 a.m., 11:15 a.m. and 1 p.m. May 17. Each cruise departs from 1800 N. Harbor Drive, San Diego. Owners get a free canine ticket with purchase of one adult ticket for $23. A portion of the proceeds supports the Helen Woodward Animal Center. Participants are also asked to donate a gently used blanket or towel. Helen Woodward Animal Center adoptable dogs will be portside as they depart from the dock. Once on board, dogs will be treated to a Delectable Doggie Treat Bar, sponsored by Petco, and dog owners can brush up their pet handling skills with fun training tips from Petco’s dog training department. Tickets are $23 for adults, $11.50 for children ages 4 to 12 and $21 for seniors and the military. Children three and under are free. To make reservations, visit hornblower. com/port/overview/sd+ petdayonbay. Well-behaved dogs of all sizes and breeds are welcome for Hornblower’s Pet Day cruises. Canines must be kept on a leash throughout the cruise. Guests can board without dogs, as well, or simply stop by the ticket booth between 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. drop off blankets, towels or financial donations for the center.

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Say you saw it in the Rancho Santa Fe News!

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

May 16, 2014

County adopts new tool for providing services Services will go to those gravely disabled by mental illness By Rachel Stine

REGION — San Diego County has adopted new means of providing services for those gravely disabled by mental illness by allowing extended psychiatric treatment for people who are committed involuntarily. The new tool may save the county thousands of dollars. An individual suffering from mental illness can be involuntarily detained for treatment in a hospital or mental health

clinic. To be committed involuntarily, a law enforcement officer, mental health clinician, or doctor must determine that the person is unable to care for themselves or may be a danger to themselves or others. Currently in San Diego County, doctors have the ability to keep a person for treatment for up to 17 days. If a doctor believes that a patient will need psychiatric treatment beyond those two-and-a-half weeks, the doctor must petition for temporary conservatorship. A temporary conservatorship appoints a person to make medical and

legal decisions on behalf of another person who is deemed unable to do so on their own. In cases involving the gravely mentally ill, a temporary conservatorship gives the appointed conservator and doctor the legal authority to continue involuntary psychiatric treatment beyond 17 days. The catch is that doctors do not have the full 17 days to decide whether or not to petition for temporary conservatorship on behalf of a patient, according to Dr. Michael Krelstein. Krelstein is the clinical director for the county Health and Human Services Agency’s Behavioral Health Services. Doctors need to decide about the petition by the twelfth or thirteenth day of a patient’s treatment to allow the county conservator’s office enough time to investigate the case before the petition is decided in court. According to Krelstein, less than two weeks is not enough time for a doctor to make a determination about petitioning for a temporary conservatorship. He explained that most of the time, psychiatric

medications take about two weeks to fully take effect. Because of this, doctors often end up filing temporary conservatorships that later turn out to be unnecessary when a patient responds to treatment and is ready to be discharged by the sixteenth or seventeenth day of involuntary treatment. “The difference between discharging (a patient) at day 12 versus day 17, 18 is really significant clinically,” said Krelstein. “This is right at the time period where the medicine might kick in.” “C onser vatorsh ip is good for those who need it, but it also involves court. It’s a long process,” said Shannon Jaccard, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) San Diego’s CEO. “It should be used if it’s appropriate, not just if you need more time in a hospital.” The unneeded filings of temporary conservatorships also racks up costs for The Office of the Public Administrator, Public Guardian, and Public Conservator. TURN TO SERVICES ON B15

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A small farm at Ocean Knoll Elementary. The council will explore options to encourage urban agriculture. Photo by Jared Whitlock

Encinitas considers ways to grow urban agriculture By Jared Whitlock

ENCINITAS — The council plowed the way for new agriculture initiatives on Wednesday night. For one, council members agreed to take a closer look down the line at an urban agriculture ordinance, similar to what the city of San Diego approved two years ago. That legislation loosened restrictions on chickens, goats and bees in residents’ backyards. “I thought San Diego did a very good job with theirs,” Kranz said, adding he’d like to see if that city’s ordinance fits Encinitas. For instance, before San Diego’s ordinance, chickens were only allowed if kept farther than 50 feet from surrounding homes. Now, up to five chickens are permitted if the coop is outside a house’s setback. For those with 15 to 25 chickens, the coop has to be at least 15 feet from the property line. Businesses like City Farmers Nursery have stated the new rules provided a shot in the arm to agriculture and the local food supply. Currently, Encinitas’ city code specifies up to 10 chickens are allowed in residential areas, though they can’t be within 35 feet of neighboring homes. Kranz said the city should consider easing the distance, but emphasized a local ordinance wouldn’t apply to roosters. Wednesday’s meeting, part of a series of strategic planning sessions, was dedicated to all things land use. Still, council members spent a significant part of the evening discussing agriculture. Mayor Teresa Barth asked for the city staff to analyze the state’s Urban Agriculture Zones Act and report back to council. The law gives landowners a property tax break on the condition

they dedicate three-acre lots or smaller to growing agriculture for at least five years. The goal: transform barren lots into vibrant farming hubs. Passed last year, cities must opt in to the program for it to take effect. Landowners who lease to a farmer would benefit from a reduced property tax assessment based on the per acre value of irrigated cropland in California. This was $12,000 per acre in 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. However, the law does have restrictions. Notably, homes aren’t permitted on properties looking for a tax reduction. In a presentation to the city, Eric Larson, executive director of the San Diego County Farm Bureau, said urban agriculture is taking off. “It’s really catching hold and becoming more popular in urban settings, especially as communities like Encinitas reach build-out,” Larson said. “People want to see some greenery around them and have a chance to get their hands dirty.” Encinitas is poised for urban agriculture in many ways, Larson said, citing the city’s climate and locals’ passion for growing food. But he added there are barriers. Starting a commercial farm typically requires a minor-use permit and other fees, which run approximately $1,000. And additional permitting is necessary for farms that lie idle for more than 100 days. The council also agreed to hold city meetings with farmers to better understand issues facing the industry. Councilwoman Kristin Gaspar said many growers have left the area in recent years. Feedback from the meetings would help inform future agriculture policies and potentially retain farmers, she added.


May 16, 2014

Woodward gala heads ‘Down the Rabbit Hole’ RANCHO SANTA FE — Don’t be late for a very important date. Helen Woodward Animal Center invites animal and party-lovers to take a journey to Wonderland at the 26th annual Spring Fling Gala. The Mad Hatter Fling committee, headed by Chairwomen Marlaine Fetzer and Rebecca Vigil, will host a black-tie event, themed “Down the Rabbit Hole.” The center’s largest fundraiser of the year takes place from 5:30 p.m. to midnight June 7 at Fairbanks Village Plaza in Rancho Santa Fe and will be emceed by KUSI’s Dave Scott and Jack FM’s Shelly Dunn. Guests will wear “Cheshire Cat” grins as the evening opens with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and a silent auction before a dinner of portioned classic and innovative dishes. A celebrity judge will award both the Best Food and Best Décor category. Spring Fling Restaurant Chair Ann Dizney has secured Searsucker Del Mar, The Fish Market, Casa Sol y Mar, The Melting Pot La Jolla, Truluck’s Seafood, Steaks & Crab House, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, Pamplemousse Grille and more. After dinner, guests will toast to one another’s “unbirthdays” with local beer, wine, and spirits while enjoying live entertainment from The Heroes, special guest appearances, fuzzy VIPs and a live auction. Attendees will also have the opportunity to purchase a raffle ticket for a chance to win one of two Wine Cellars including both red and white bottles, each with a 92 point rating or higher. Tickets to the gala can be purchased in silver, gold and platinum levels, ranging

The pups at Helen Woodward Animal Center invite the community to jump down the rabbit hole with them for the Mad Hatter Fling, a black-tie event, from 5:30 p.m. to midnight June 7 at Fairbanks Village Plaza in Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo

from $250 to $500 a ticket with various special amenities included at each level. Platinum level seating includes a VIP experience with private dining and bar servers, two bottles of fine wine, a chocolate and port pairing digestif with artisan cheeseboard, priority check-in/out, valet service, a charming Wonderland souvenir and an exclusive VIP gift for each guest. Sponsorship and auction opportunities are still available. All profits raised support the pets and programs at Helen Woodward Animal Center. For more information or to purchase tickets, call (858) 756-4117, ext. 350 or mindyy@animalcenter.org.

510(k) clearance for additional sizes of the company’s sterile-packed ZIP ULTRA Minimally Invasive Interspinous Fusion System Business news and special and clearance for the comachievements for North San pany’s new sterile-packed Diego County. Send information ZIP MIS system. The ZIP via email to community@ features non-articulating coastnewsgroup.com. bone anchors, Aurora’s patent pending one-step Top schools locking mechanism with no Each year the Califor- set screw and a large graft nia Department of Educa- space designed for biologic tion designates California material. The additional Distinguished Schools. sizes, 35mm and 40mm, This year Carlsbad Uni- expand the company’s portfied School District’s Hope folio to better conform to Elementary School and patient anatomy. Encinitas Union School District’s La Costa Heights El- Whisler joins Ultra ementary were recognized Encinitas native Jenny as one of the state’s most Whisler is the new in-house outstanding public schools. licensed This year’s Distinguished esthet iSchools will be honored at cian and the 2014 California Distin- p r o f e s guished Schools Awards s i o n a l Ceremony, where State Su- makeup perintendent Tom Torlak- a r t i s t son will present each school at Ultra with a 2014 Distinguished B e a u t y School plaque and flag. Supply & Salon in the Encinitas Town Nearby pup care Center. Whisler has more Sydnee’s Pet Grooming than 13 years in the beauhas opened its fourth loca- ty industry with MAC costion at Helen Woodward metics, BOOTS Retail USA Animal Center, 6525 Helen and Murad Skin Care. She Woodward Way, Suite A in has appeared on regional Rancho Santa Fe, It also broadcast programs includhas locations in San Marcos ing the HSN, San Diego’s and Solana Beach. The new KUSI News (Good Morning salon offers vet, boarding, San Diego) and LA-TALK day care, training, or now Live. grooming Fridays through Sundays 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Skating rink coming to The salon can be reached at Carlsbad (858) 756-4117 ext. 2 or visit Western States Techsydneespetgrooming.com/. nologies Inc. recently closed two commercial real New technology estate transactions valued Aurora Spine Corpo- at $9.8 million within the ration, based in Carlsbad, greater San Diego area. The has received U.S. Food group sold a 32,441-squareand Drug Administration foot R&D building at 2283

Who’s

NEWS?

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Cosmos Court, Carlsbad for $3.5 million. The building was sold to Skateoplex Inc., an ice rink owner that has received a conditional use permit from the city of Carlsbad to operate a public ice rink in that location. Roger Carlson and Lannie Allee of CBRE’s Carlsbad office represented both Western States and Skateoplex in the Cosmos Court transaction. Western States has acquired a 36,936-square-foot corporate headquarters building in the Sorrento Mesa industrial submarket. Western States purchased the property from Moxie Partners LLC for $6.3 million and is currently 100-percent leased by Cobham Defence Electronics. Shred anniversary In celebration of one year since its official startup, Shred Industries Clothing, 125 S Coast Highway, Oceanside, is showcasing a new half-pipe skate spot and its new clothing collection from noon to 6 p.m. May 24 with some surprise guests, raffle giveaways, free food, free music and good company. Great golfers The Santa Margarita Women’s Golf Association listed the winners in its recent Encinitas Ranch Country Club tournament, with Pat Gallagher taking Flight A Low Gross Over the Field with a 75 and Bonnie Easton with the Flight C Low Net Over the Field with a 66.The Santa Margarita Women’s Golf Association was organized in 1967 and was so named because all member clubs

Alumnus provides innovative support RANCHO SANTA FE — University of Rochester alumnus and Trustee Laurence “Larry” H. Bloch and his wife, Cindy, of Rancho Santa Fe, have made a significant gift to endow funds supporting the university’s fundraising program and the position of chief fundraising officer. The university position of chief advancement officer, previously held by James D. Thompson, will now be known as the James D. Thompson Chief Advancement Officer. Created in honor of Bloch’s eight-year partnership with Thompson, the fund — formally known as the James D. Thompson Chief Advancement Officer: Endowed by Larry and Cindy Bloch — will support the head of the fundraising program. In addition, to support fundraising at the university in perpetuity, the Blochs established the Larry and Cindy Bloch Endowment for University Advancement. “I am deeply moved by how Cindy and Larry express their support of the university,” said President Joel Seligman. “This gift will allow us to meet the significant challenges we will face in the road ahead for the development of our

advancement program, far into the future. The Blochs’ choice to recognize Jim at the same time captures the true spirit of named positions, as we will be building on his hard work and great success. We are incredibly fortunate to so often be the beneficiaries of the Blochs’ generosity and counsel.” The Blochs’ innovative fund supporting a university staff member aligns closely with the university’s faculty support goal for The Meliora Challenge: The Campaign for the University of Rochester, as a lasting resource that is designed to help attract and retain exceptional professionals. The campaign seeks to establish a minimum of 80 endowed professorships by its close June 30, 2016. In November 2013, the university’s campaign surpassed the $1 billion mark on its way toward its ultimate goal of $1.2 billion. The Blochs said they made their gift to recognize the milestone and the man who they feel played a major role in its realization. “For the university to be approaching $1.1 billion in campaign commitments with more than two years to go is something very few would have imagined eight

years ago. This accomplishment is very much a reflection of Jim’s vision and deep-rooted commitment to the university’s donors,” said Larry Bloch. “Generating support from alumni, faculty and staff, parents, and friends requires a great advancement organization and forward-thinking leadership. Endowing the chief advancement officer in Jim’s honor will enable the university to maintain the very high standard he set.” Thompson, recruited to the university with Bloch’s help in 2005, worked closely with the board throughout his eight-year tenure as chief advancement officer. In that time, he successfully developed and implemented a plan that greatly expanded the advancement program the has today. University Thompson is now serving as special counsel to the president, where he will be advising President Seligman on long-term growth in advancement and planning for the next campaign. As members of the George Eastman Circle, the Blochs funded a statue of George Eastman, the university’s greatest benefactor and namesake of the society.

were within the borders of the original Spanish Land Grant.

services partner. The marketing and public relations agency will oversee all communications efforts regarding the revitalization of the Village, a collaborative effort between the CVA, the city of Carlsbad and Urban Place Consulting Group.

five new members May 1, including Emily Blumenthal, Terry Stafford, Cheryl Prater, Arlene Butterman-Cope and Jean Smithers. In addition, Beryl Price, Kathy Packard, Diane Modjeski, Jean Smithers and Kathy Michaels participated in the annual Walk MS on April 27 at Legoland-Carlsbad to raise funds to support those with multiple sclerosis.

Top in stroke care Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas earned a high-level performance achievement award for meeting strict, evidence-based guidelines related to stroke care during 2013. The hospitals were granted the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. Scripps Encinitas are designated as primary stroke center. Three-peat Encore, Carlsbad High School’s intermediate wome n’s choir, won first place at the 20th annual Southern California Show Choir Invitational. This was Encore’s third first-place win this season and their third year in a row winning first-place at So Cal. New transit chief In Oceanside, Donald Filippi has joined the North County Transit District as Chief of Safety. The Safety Division is responsible for accident prevention and investigations, developing and maintaining System Safety and works with public safety agencies on emergency response drills. Marketing group for Carlsbad Following a formal bid through the Village’s RFP process, Carlsbad Village Association named The Nth Element as its new marketing and communications

Women in action Members of the GFWC Contemporary Women of North County added


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May 16, 2014

Educational Opportunities Academy of Arts and Sciences...

A leader in the frontier of educational options For students who fall behind, AAS can help turn things around with our award winning credit recovery courses. Our curriculum is designed to ensure that students receive credit for what they already know and supports them with dedicated teachers that will build mastery in the areas they need to complete their courses. Our credit recovery courses are available free of charge during the school year and as part of our free summer school as well. Credit recovery courses are available in all core subject areas (Math, English, Science and Social Studies and some elective areas). Academy of Arts and Sciences is a leader in the newest frontier of educational options: online learning. AAS, a leading free public charter school of choice for students in grades K-12, offers a blended (online and on site) customized learning program. Students engage in an exceptional learning experience that blends innovative online learning with critical face-to-face and lab time. At Academy of Arts and Sciences, students will be able to access a diverse range of Arts and Science electives. “We understand that students learn best when their education is tailored to

The flexibility of blended learning provides choice for students.” Sean McManus CEO

their needs, which is why a key tenant of the Academy of Arts & Sciences philosophy is flexibility,” said CEO Sean McManus. “With this instructional model, on site and off site time can be adjusted to fit individual student needs. The flexibility of blended learning provides choice for students.” The school utilizes cutting edge 21st century curriculum. Students are able to access the curriculum twenty four hours a day, and have the flexibility to participate in a wide variety of events, activities and experiences that enhance the learning experience. AAS also allows students the opp`ortunity to access a wide variety of world language, humanities, media and technology, engineering and robotics, app and game design as part of the rich elective program. Online learning differs from traditional schools in that classes do not take place in a building, but rather at home, on the road, or wherever an Internet connection

can be found. Because of this, students take courses online with support from their teacher via phone, online Web meetings, and sometimes even face to face. This new way of learning allows the parent to take an active role in the student’s learning and to really become a partner with their child. The parent (or "Learning Coach") keeps the student on track in line with the provided lessons plans. In addition to the online courses, AAS provides plenty of opportunities to connect online and offline with other AAS students and families. The Academy of Arts and Sciences staff is very active in the community and can often be found interacting with families at Beach Clean Up Days, various community festivals, and organized activities that take place at their Learning Centers. An online education offers students the opportunities to learn in a small setting with a course schedule that is tailored to meet their individual learning styles and needs. This unique learning environment meets the needs of all types of learners and offers solutions to many different educational challenges. Many students find that learning in the comfort of their own home allows them be successful in ways never dreamt of before!

Montessori School enriches children’s lives SOLANA BEACH — Large classrooms filled with colorful and inviting Montessori learning materials await bright-eyed, eager children. Before long these children learn how to read, add and subtract. They learn the differences between vertebrates and invertebrates. They can name the countries of the world, the internal organs of the human body and the planets of the solar system and all this happens in the preschool classes! The children at Santa Fe Montessori School seem to learn effortlessly. They find joy in “working” in the classroom, although to them

No matter your child’s age, he or she will be honored and respected for who they are. it feels like play. Because both their developmental needs and their personal preferences are honored, the children appear rested, calm and peaceful. They learn and grow at an amazing rate, yet retain their

childish innocence and playfulness. A Montessori education can transform your child's life by developing not only their academic excellence, but their personal excellence as well. No matter your child’s age, he or she will be honored and respected for who they are, cared for and nurtured, as well as enticed into learning concepts and facts that will amaze you. Call to arrange a visit to our toddler, preschool/ kindergarten and elementary classes and see for yourself. For more information, call (858) 755-3232 or visit santafemontessori.org.

The Grauer School offers . . .

Summer enrichment camps Summer School Co-Coordinator, Nick Scacco, encourages students and parents to think open-mindedly about summer school and The Grauer School’s Summer Session. “Summer school is no longer just for students who need to repeat a class. It’s a time to get ahead or explore a creative outlet. Taking a summer school course for academic credit can free up a period during the regular school year for a fun elective or lighten your workload if you have a lot of extracurricular commitments.”

The Grauer School is expanding its summer program to include additional enrichment camps. The Grauer School is continuing to offer a diverse set of UC approved summer school courses for high school and college-bound students looking to get ahead this summer. Virtually all classes can be offered in an independent studies format to accommodate busy summer schedules. For middle school students, The Grauer School Summer Session offers kick-

start boot camps to prevent learning loss over the summer. One- to two-week enrichment courses such as creative writing, technical writing, poetry, multimedia-digital production, drawing, and painting are also available throughout the summer. Available workshops include acting for theater, stage, and screen; music performance; and music theory. Descriptions of classes, fees, transfer credits, prerequisites, and the enrollment application can be located at www.grauerschool.com/summerschool.

SUMMER! GET YOUR COLOR ON THIS Who said summer classes have to be drudgery? Why not Painting? Theater? Music? Guitar building? Why not skill-building experiences rich in color and fun? At Grauer, we offer UC-approved core classes. We also offer intensive, exciting learning opportunities that are just too cool for the regular school year. Sign up today. Get your color on!

|

SESSION 1: 6/23 – 7/11 SESSION 2: 7/14 – 8/1

Our students mean the world to us.

ENROLLING FOR SUMMER GRADES 2-12 | GRAUERSCHOOL.COM | (760) 274-2118 | ENCINITAS 92024


May 16, 2014

Dr. Clifford Colwell: Changing orthopedic surgery Health Watch From the physicians, Staff of Scripps Health For more than three decades, La Jolla resident Clifford Colwell, M.D., has worked with a team of orthopedists to improve patient care. As the first orthopedic surgeon at Scripps Clinic, he has helped thousands overcome joint pain and other conditions. He also founded the Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education (SCORE) at Scripps Clinic, which studies arthritis, musculoskeletal diseases and surgical procedures and has published hundreds of papers on its findings. In addition to his work, Dr. Colwell enjoys dancing, guitar, skiing and is a nationally ranked father-son tennis player. Tell us about the work at SCORE. We’re trying to improve care, not just in San Diego but worldwide. First, we’re studying cartilage and bone defects, mostly using stem cells and bioprinting (3D printing using biological materials) in the lab and allografts (transplanted bone or soft tissue) in patients. We also do biomechanical studies to design better implants. We invented the electronic knee (E-knee), which measures stresses in artificial knee joints in real time. Before the E-knee, we studied when implants failed, or whether revision surgeries were needed to correct a

problem. Now, we study a patient’s daily living activities, as well as sports, such as golf and tennis, using the internal sensors in the E-knee. We’ve established a fellowship training program that teaches the latest orthopedic techniques. In addition to passing along important skills to the next generation of surgeons, the program has helped generate 400 peer review research publications. We also have an outreach program that educates high school, college, medical and physical therapy students. One of the most important things we do is track patient clinical outcomes, which we maintain in an extensive database.

to active motion—walking— and there were no differences. By taking advantage of the database, we can gradually change practice. What are you currently working on? We recently published a landmark paper on a new device that prevents deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot in the legs or lungs following hip or knee replacement surgery. These complications can be catastrophic. For years anticoagulants have been used to prevent DVT, with a risk of increased bleeding. We led a nationwide

10-center study on an external intermittent pneumatic compression device, which compresses the leg in coordination with the patient’s venous blood flow. Comparing the device with standard anticoagulants, there were no differences in outcomes. However, the device does not cause bleeding, so it’s much safer. This type of information changes clinical practice. “Health Watch” is brought to you by the physicians and staff of Scripps Health. For more information or for a physician referral, call 1-800-SCRIPPS or visit scripps.org.

How does the database improve care? The only way to establish the effectiveness of an implant or procedure is to evaluate the patients after 5, 10 and 25 years. This gives us the opportunity to collect and mine that information and compare surgical results using different materials and approaches. The database helps us in many ways. For example, during early development, knee replacement patients were outfitted with a continuous passive motion (CPM) device to move the knee following surgery. We have looked at the data comparing CPM

Rock out with battle of bands LEUCADIA — The Leucadia 101 Main Street presents invites the community to jump to the beat at its Battle of the Bands from noon to 4 p.m. May 18 at 1144 N. Coast Highway 101. The stage is set for the young musicians of Encinitas to compete for a spot at this year’s Summer Fun on the 101: Leucadia’s Music Festival June 27 and June 28. Each band that enters will have 20 minutes on stage to impress the judges and audience. At the end of the concert, a panel of judges will

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choose one band, and a second band will be chosen by audience vote. Young musicians interested in entering should contact the Leucadia Main Street Association via email at info@leucadia101. com and ruthlesshippies@ gmail.com. Space is limited and bands will be selected on a first-come, first-served basis. See more information at leucadia101.com/events/ battle-bands. For more information, call (760) 436-2320 or visit the Leucadia 101 Main Street at leucadia101.com.

To view other CityMark communities visit citymark.com/newhomes BRE#01895729 Prices subject to change

Pet of the Week Sherman is a 3-yearold, 12-pound Brown Tabby blend who has taken the Helen Woodward Animal Center by storm. With a handsome face and serious stringtoy skills, he’s won hearts from the lobby to the cattery. His adoption fee is $106, and he has been altered and is up-to-date on all of his vaccinations. As with all pets adopted from Helen Woodward Animal Center, he is micro chipped for identification. Kennels at 6461

El Apajo Road in Rancho Santa Fe are open daily Monday through Thursday from noon to 6 p.m.; Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information call (858) 756-4117.


May 16, 2014

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Educational Opportunities Adventure camps offered by San Dieguito Boys & Girls Clubs OF SAN DIEGUITO

Boys & Girls Clubs of San Dieguito is offering Summer Adventure Camps for ages 5-15 beginning June 16th–August 22nd. Choose from Day Camps, Junior Camps, Specialty Camps, Sports Camps, Teen Camps, Leaders in Training and more! We offer multiple locations in North County to include Carmel Valley, Del Mar, Solana Beach,

We offer multiple locations in North County to include Carmel Valley, Del Mar, Solana Beach, and Encinitas.” and Encinitas. Our Summer Adventure Camps offer maximum flexibility with our Day Camps options and early/late pick-up and

drop-off program. Our staff is background checked, drug tested, trained, and CPR/ First Aid/AED certified for your child’s safety. Camp prices start as low as $145. Call (858) 720.2180, visit our website at www. bgcsandieguito.org, or visit the Camp Office at the Polster Branch – 3800-A Mykonos Lane San Diego, CA 92130 for more information.

Junior Lifeguards open to all levels of athletic abilities DEL MAR — With summer fast approaching, beach and ocean safety are on the minds of parents everywhere. The Del Mar Junior Lifeguard and Little Turtle programs offer peace of mind for parents and fun and useful skills for children ages 7 to 17. Programs take place at 29th Street in Del Mar and include a variety of age-appropriate activities and education including CPR, First Aid, sun safety, surfing, boogie boarding, paddle boarding and body surfing. Some of the skills taught include teamwork, leadership, self-esteem

The Del Mar Junior Lifeguard instructors are all ocean lifeguards. building, physical fitness, and lifesaving and rescue techniques with lifeguard equipment. Additionally, participants learn appreciation of the beach and ocean environment. Amidst all of the learning are plenty of fun and games. The Del Mar Junior Lifeguard instructors are all ocean lifeguards. Many

of the instructors are Junior Lifeguard alumni. Each instructor strives to pass on their excitement about the ocean, their sense of discipline and integrity along to their students in a fun learning environment. Xtended Program is available for the morning sessions to remain at the beach supervised by Del Mar Junior Lifeguard staff for more fun until 3:00 p.m. There are two- and fourweek sessions available. Find out more about Del Mar Junior Lifeguard and Little Turtle programs at delmarjg.com or by emailing info@delmarjg. com.

www.delmarjg.com info@delmarjg.com

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should be arising from the citybased Encinitas Commission for the Arts. “The Commission for the Arts is working on a ‘Percent for Arts Policy’ and we plan to bring it to the City Council in the summer. But we are just at the beginning stages right now,” said Gilliam. But most of the art you see on a day-to-day basis comes from somewhere else — the artistic eye of private home and business owners across Encinitas. It’s nearly impossible not to spot a mural or two when you stroll by storefronts up and down Coast Highway 101. What makes the city such a hub for privately owned public art and mural work? Jax Meyers of Paint Encinitas took a stab at answering the question while leading a walking tour of all of the murals in the city. “I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we have a lot of local businesses here who want to hire artists to paint their walls. And we have a community of artists here, a huge community of art patrons here, and just a big community of creators,” Meyers explained. “When you get a lot of different artists in, you get a lot of different flavors from all around… so you’re making this place a center for a culture of art. And that culture is what Paint Encinitas revolves around.” Just four months ago Meyers founded Paint Encinitas, an organization dedicated to beautifying Encinitas one wall at a time. “Our mission is to creatively unite the community, artists and local businesses together to manifest visual arts in the public domain.”

This mural by Kevin Anderson is located at the very end of Leucadia on a wall next to 7-Eleven. It marks the end of the Encinitas mural tour.

Mural by Bleu Avina, 2012. Mural can be found on a private home in Encinitas. Photos

by Yeshe Salz

A newcomer to the city’s arts world, Paint Encinitas provides a fresh initiative towards the pursuit of the arts. “We want to be the leading pioneer of the public arts movement by organizing accessible visual and live art events that keep our town fresh, noteworthy, and funky to its roots,” Meyers said. “It’s funny because we are already seeing that move to Encinitas from other cities,” she added, “We’re really getting a melting pot here in Encinitas.” Skye Walker, a contract graphic designer illustrator and muralist from Big Bear, Calif. is one of those artists who has gravitated towards Encinitas’ art-conscious culture.

Walker spent eight years working as the art director and senior designer of major companies such as Rip Curl and prAna. However, he dove back into the world of mural work when Whole Foods in Encinitas hired him to paint the inside of the store. “The Whole foods job kick started me back into murals and now, that’s all I want to do; I’m in love with it,” Walker said, “It’s different than just painting a picture that goes in someone’s home. When you do a piece for the public eye, it takes up a space where you have to stop and look at it and it takes you into it — people take notice of that.” Local artists like Walker and

art patrons like Meyers, see the value of public art and are dedicated to bringing it to the community. “There is so much value in a mural. It’s supporting the arts and it’s supporting local artists and hopefully making a space more beautiful,” said Walker. “For me, murals kick start a lot of creative ideas and help to inspire others.” Walker’s mural work can also be seen inside Cafe Ipe, the Encinitas Whole Foods parking garage, Pandora’s Pizza and Mesa Rim Climbing Jim. Adding to the melting pot of the Encinitas art scene, a Honduran artist called Santos set up shop in his art gallery in Leucadia four years ago and is also contributing to North County’s art world. Inside his gallery, situated next to Surfy Surfy, you can find his paintings stretched big and wide across enormous canvases reflecting bright colors and bold patterns. “I’m doing all of these murals

because I know that ultimately that’s where it belongs. It belongs large and it belongs directly on walls,” he said Santos painted the mural outside Cafe Ipe and has also launched a program called “Mural Campaign,” dedicated to bringing arts to the streets and the schools of Encinitas and North County. “I started to do my mural campaign because arts are beginning to be removed from schools and I want to counteract that.” Because of their socially active and publicly present nature, artists like Santos and Walker have become fixated upon the creation of mural-work. And they aren’t the only ones. Artists across Encinitas are convening and partnering up with local businesses to create a more beautiful, unique and socially engaged city. “Encinitas supports the arts,” Meyers said, “and that’s what’s most important.”


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College helps at-risk kids SOLANA BEACH — MiraCosta College students have joined with La Colonia De Eden Gardens Foundation to provide backpacks for La Colonia’s Summer Leadership Camp. The camp benefits at-risk youths, ages 12 to 17, by providing a weeklong retreat where they learn leadership, communication, collaboration, and coping/stress management skills. Students are collecting donations of “leadership backpacks” filled with items the youngsters can use as they expand their skills. Donors are asked to put together an entire backpack, donate an empty backpack, or donate individual items. All contribu-

tions are welcome. Backpack items needed include erasers, pens, notebooks, colored markers, journals, construction paper, etc. Deadline for donations is May 19. Drop off locations include: — Oceanside: MiraCosta College, 1 Barnard Drive, Office of School Relations/ Outreach, Student Center (Bldg. 3400) — Cardiff: MiraCosta College San Elijo Campus, 3333 Manchester Ave., Student Activities Office (Bldg. 900) For more information, contact Sarah Little in the San Elijo Campus Student Activities Office, (760) 9444449, ext. 7782.

May 16, 2014

Equestrians shined during Del Mar Horse Show DEL MAR — The 69th Del Mar National Horse Show took place April 17 through May 4 in the Del Mar Fairgrounds Arena and featured champion riders and horses in three disciplines: Western, Dressage and Hunter/Jumper. Complete results for all three weeks can be found on the Del Mar National Web site at delmarnational.com. Western Week saw Bob Avila, of Palm Springs take home four perpetual trophies in the PCHA Reining Division. Tom Foran, of Burbank, scored four PCHA Open Reining perpetual trophies. Young horsewoman, Delany Van Horn,

of El Cajon, ran off with five perpetual trophies, including Western Pleasure Rider 13 & Under, Horsemanship, and Trail. Dressage Week, featured Steffen Peters and Legolas 92 who reigned supreme in the $5,000 FEI Grand Prix Freestyle with a score of 78.05 percent. Jan Ebeling and Rafalca followed with a score of 76.30 percent, and Brian Hafner and Lombardo LHF rounded out the top three with a score of 71.45 percent. Peters and Legolas 92 won the $5,000 FEI Grand Prix Test (71.84 percent), second went to Jan Ebeling and Rafalca (71.12 percent), and Kathleen Raine

and Breanna placed third (68.66 percent). Peters and Apassionata also won the $1,500 FEI Prix St. Georges (72.32 percent), followed by Nick Wagman on Zenith (69.47 percent), and Dawn White-O’Connor and Aristo (68.33 percent). During the $1,500 FEI Intermediaire I, Nick Wagman and Zenith took first (70.17 percent) over Peters and Apassionata (69.78 percent), and Aristo, ridden by Dawn White-O’Conner placed third (69.60 percent). The $2,500 FEI Intermediaire I Freestyle honors went to White-O’Connor and Aristo (72.66 percent), Peters and Apassionata (72.08 percent). Allison Dechant Nimmo and her mount, Rufus, took third (69.04 percent). Raine and Breanna took the blue (69.33 percent) in the $2,000 FEI Grand Prix Special, Germany’s Lientje Schueler and Mike Tyson-L took second (67.98 percent), and Kimberly McGrath rode Winslow

to third place (65.62 percent). Hunter/Jumper Week wrapped up the threeweek show with the $25,000 Surfside Grand Prix, the new $10,000 Speed Derby of Del Mar, and the $100,000 Grand Prix of Del Mar. On May 3, 12 entries took part in the new $10,000 Speed Derby of Del Mar. First place went to Colgan Cruise, Harry & Mollie Chapman and Richard Fellers with second place earned by Dancer, Crooks Show Jumping, LLC, Lauren Crooks. Each year the pinnacle event, the $100,000 Grand Pix of Del Mar, challenges horses and riders. Course Designer, Leopoldo Palacios, of Caracas, Venezuela, presented a tough test for horses and riders. Two riding teams went clear and dueled in an exciting jump-off: Lane Clarke, riding Kiss the Sky, came in second to the winner Karl Cook, riding Jonkheer Z.

Film festival line-up announced LA JOLLA — The International Rescue Committee announced the line-up for its sixth annual International Documentary Film series, held at the La Jolla Village Cinemas, 8879 Villa La Jolla Drive at 7 p.m. May 19, June 2 and June 9, with a showing of one film on each evening. The films screened will include: — “Stolen Seas” May 19. Stolen Seas presents an exploration of the Somali pirate phenomenon. Utilizing interviews and unparalleled access to pirates, hostages, hostages’ relatives,

ship-owners, and pirate negotiators. Speaker: Director and Producer of Stolen Seas Thymaya Payne, — “Coach Zoran and his African Tigers” June 2. South Sudan became an independent state in July 2011, following almost 50 years of civil war. The new nation forms a national soccer team, led by Zoran Djordjevic, and ollows the team over its first year. — — “Call Me Kuchu” June 9. This emotional film follows Uganda’s first openly gay man as he fights for gay rights in court, on TV and at the U.N.


May 16, 2014

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Food &Wine

Bonjour Beaujolais: France’s new ‘discovery’ taste of wine frank mangio “Discover Beaujolais� read the campaign slogan. It caught my eye because Beaujolias is one of the oldest wine brands in the world, crafted by respected wine makers in eastern France above Lyon for something like 2000 years. It’s squeezed into an area dominated by Burgundy in the north, and the Rhone wines in the south. The region has excellent growing conditions with granite-based soil that lend great structure to the vines. So Beaujolais is hardly a “new kid,� but a seasonal grown up. Beaujolais shows up on more Thanksgiving dinner tables than almost any other varietal, because it goes so well with traditional entrees at that holiday’s dinner table. In the past, it was available only during that time of the year. It was harvested, fermented, aged for a short time, bottled and sent off to America as France’s annual pop-the-cork and “drink now� match for the nation’s turkey, ham and fish dinners. Maison Louis Jadot ($14.95) with its 100 percent Gamay grapes is the name and big winner for Beaujolais. It’s slightly spicy with a touch of licorice and rose petal, with a slightly tannic touch to aid in the acidity for food pairing. Joshua Orr, the Beaujolais specialist and Sommelier at Marina Kitchen at the San Diego Embarcadero, went on about the Gamay grape. “These wines are incredible values. We are educating the public that these wines are for year-round, not just the fall and Thanksgiving. I love the minerality in these wines and how it works with a fish combination and other light entrees. In Beaujolais, reds are the Gamay grapes and whites are Chardonnay. In this wine country, there are old vines that

The beauty of a Spudz Potato in their proprietary pan. Photo courtesy of

Spudz Potato

Potatoes taken to new heights at Spudz Beaujolais spokesman Anthony Collet, Monica Valentino, Joshua Orr Beaujolais Specialist and columnist Frank Mangio at a Beaujolais campaign kickoff at Puesto in San Diego. Photo

by Frank Mangio

have produced wines for over 80 years adding great character to the wine.� Gamay is somewhat quirky in that its skin is black, the juice is white but Gamay Beaujolais is red. Many Gamay lovers prefer to chill this wine before drinking, as they would a white wine. From beef to berry desserts, Beaujolais can be trusted as a refreshing drink and an alternative to heavy reds. See discoverbeaujolais.com. Follow-up: San Diego International Wine Show he San Diego International Wine Show T Was held recently in the Pad-

dock area of the Del Mar Fairgrounds. There was a lot to taste from both domestic and overseas wineries. The many cultures were flowing, from Italy to the Guadalupe Valley in Mexico. Not to be outdone, California wines were well represented. San Diego favorite Orfila Wines scored big with their Syrah, Viognier and an Italian varietal, Montepulciano di Abbruzzo with Justin Mund the wine maker.

From the Jackson Family Estates, Freemark Abbey and Hartford Family Winery, from Napa Valley and Sonoma’sRussian River topped the list. Proceeds went to Country Friends Rancho Santa Fe community projects. To contact the show’s director for next year’ s production, call (619) 8WINESD. Wine Bytes Firefly Grill and Wine Bar in Encinitas presents a Chalk Hills Wine Dinner May 22 at 6:30 p.m. For pricing and details call (760) 635-1066. Il Fornaio in Coronado brings you a Wedell Cellars Wine Maker dinner, May 22 at 6 p.m. Cost is $65. RSVP at (619) 437-4911. The owner/winemaker will be in attendance. Dynamic Wine & Food Pairing with instructor Deborah Lazear is the kickoff of the next wine series at San Diego State University May 31 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Get complete details at (619) 5945152. The Ramona Valley Vineyard

Wine of the Month By Frank Mangio

2112 Benziger Sauvignon Blanc North Coast

 About this wine: Bright citrus and floral notes, fresh and enduring on the palate. Old world flavor offers subtle minerality and tastes of grapefruit and lime. An elegant balanced acidity. About this winery: A certified sustainable organically grown winery. Natural vineyard management. Located in Sonoma. Jeff Mcbride is the wine maker. The cost: Buy this wine for $12.49 at WINE STEALS, Cardiff. (760) 230-2657.

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I

t’s not often that something new comes along that rocks my culinary world with its originality, simplicity and pure taste sensation. That happened recently when I stumbled upon Spudz Potato at the Leucadia Farmers Market. The first thing I noticed was the line, always a good sign. That and the six guys in the booth working like a finely tuned assembly line cranking out this unique concoction. Who doesn’t like hash browns right? Think of hash browns filled with a variety of savory treats then grilled to a crunchy goodness with the option to top it with a perfectly fried egg or chili. Believe me folks, this is a taste and texture experience like you’ve never had before and as you will learn below, they have already been discovered by a VC who has plans to bring them to the masses so experience them at the intimacy of your local farmers market while you can. Spudz was founded

by Robert Aguilar and I caught up with him recently to learn more about his very cool venture that is on the verge of exploding.

Q

: You have created something totally original with Spudz. What is the history of the dish and how did you end up forming the business? The history of the dish comes from a city in Southern Brazil called Curitiba. In this city they call it Swiss batata and it was made mostly by the poorer people because its main

ingredient was the potato and they could take any leftover food and place it in the middle of this kind of potato pie. In Brazil the dish is made in the kitchen using two medium sized frying pans, you place the shredded potato inside the pan like a pie crust leaving room for the food you would like in the middle while taking the other pan, also filled with shredded potato, ready to place on top of each other to create this beautiful golden brown pizza looking dish. I came up with the idea to start this business almost by luck. My wife Erika, who is from Sao Paulo, Brazil, and I were on our last two days of vacation in her home town of Santo An-

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May 16, 2014

Dr. Clifford Colwell: Changing orthopedic surgery Health Watch From the physicians, Staff of Scripps Health For more than three decades, La Jolla resident Clifford Colwell, M.D., has worked with a team of orthopedists to improve patient care. As the first orthopedic surgeon at Scripps Clinic, he has helped thousands overcome joint pain and other conditions. He also founded the Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education (SCORE) at Scripps Clinic, which studies arthritis, musculoskeletal diseases and surgical procedures and has published hundreds of papers on its findings. In addition to his work, Dr. Colwell enjoys dancing, guitar, skiing and is a nationally ranked father-son tennis player. Tell us about the work at SCORE. We’re trying to improve care, not just in San Diego but worldwide. First, we’re studying cartilage and bone defects, mostly using stem cells and bioprinting (3D printing using biological materials) in the lab and allografts (transplanted bone or soft tissue) in patients. We also do biomechanical studies to design better implants. We invented the electronic knee (E-knee), which measures stresses in artificial knee joints in real time. Before the E-knee, we studied when implants failed, or whether revision surgeries were needed to correct a

problem. Now, we study a patient’s daily living activities, as well as sports, such as golf and tennis, using the internal sensors in the E-knee. We’ve established a fellowship training program that teaches the latest orthopedic techniques. In addition to passing along important skills to the next generation of surgeons, the program has helped generate 400 peer review research publications. We also have an outreach program that educates high school, college, medical and physical therapy students. One of the most important things we do is track patient clinical outcomes, which we maintain in an extensive database.

to active motion—walking— and there were no differences. By taking advantage of the database, we can gradually change practice. What are you currently working on? We recently published a landmark paper on a new device that prevents deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot in the legs or lungs following hip or knee replacement surgery. These complications can be catastrophic. For years anticoagulants have been used to prevent DVT, with a risk of increased bleeding. We led a nationwide

10-center study on an external intermittent pneumatic compression device, which compresses the leg in coordination with the patient’s venous blood flow. Comparing the device with standard anticoagulants, there were no differences in outcomes. However, the device does not cause bleeding, so it’s much safer. This type of information changes clinical practice. “Health Watch” is brought to you by the physicians and staff of Scripps Health. For more information or for a physician referral, call 1-800-SCRIPPS or visit scripps.org.

How does the database improve care? The only way to establish the effectiveness of an implant or procedure is to evaluate the patients after 5, 10 and 25 years. This gives us the opportunity to collect and mine that information and compare surgical results using different materials and approaches. The database helps us in many ways. For example, during early development, knee replacement patients were outfitted with a continuous passive motion (CPM) device to move the knee following surgery. We have looked at the data comparing CPM

Rock out with battle of bands LEUCADIA — The Leucadia 101 Main Street presents invites the community to jump to the beat at its Battle of the Bands from noon to 4 p.m. May 18 at 1144 N. Coast Highway 101. The stage is set for the young musicians of Encinitas to compete for a spot at this year’s Summer Fun on the 101: Leucadia’s Music Festival June 27 and June 28. Each band that enters will have 20 minutes on stage to impress the judges and audience. At the end of the concert, a panel of judges will

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choose one band, and a second band will be chosen by audience vote. Young musicians interested in entering should contact the Leucadia Main Street Association via email at info@leucadia101. com and ruthlesshippies@ gmail.com. Space is limited and bands will be selected on a first-come, first-served basis. See more information at leucadia101.com/events/ battle-bands. For more information, call (760) 436-2320 or visit the Leucadia 101 Main Street at leucadia101.com.

To view other CityMark communities visit citymark.com/newhomes BRE#01895729 Prices subject to change

Pet of the Week Sherman is a 3-yearold, 12-pound Brown Tabby blend who has taken the Helen Woodward Animal Center by storm. With a handsome face and serious stringtoy skills, he’s won hearts from the lobby to the cattery. His adoption fee is $106, and he has been altered and is up-to-date on all of his vaccinations. As with all pets adopted from Helen Woodward Animal Center, he is micro chipped for identification. Kennels at 6461

El Apajo Road in Rancho Santa Fe are open daily Monday through Thursday from noon to 6 p.m.; Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information call (858) 756-4117.


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Dinners, classes served up on farm ENCINITAS — Reservations are being taken now for the July Sunday Suppers on the Farm July 13 and July 27. The events feature Chef Jen from Coral Tree Farm, 598 Park Lane. To reserve your spot, call (951) 445-2342 or coraltreefarm@gmail.com with your name, phone number and whether one or two in your party. The suppers are designed to introduce people to their food and where it comes from. Spend a night al fresco with a farm tour

facebook/therancho santafenews.com

and dinner. For a suggested donation of $58 per person you receive, a welcome glass of sparkling wine, and a five-course “Chef’s Choice” family-style meal featuring the tantalizing creations of Chef Jenn Felmley. The event is limited to 16 seats. Coral Tree Farm is just off Requeza Avenue on a seemingly suburban Encinitas block, but there you will find a completely organic and biologically diverse urban farm. The farm plays host to a tribe of goats, ducks, chickens, fruit orchards, and a large variety of heirloom fruits and vegetables, all beyond organic and free range. The farm and Chef Jenn are also combining to bring you cooking classes. The day on the farm will start with a tour of Coral Tree Farm followed

by a cooking demonstration and tasting by Chef Jenn; the menu will be determined my Mother Nature and what bounties the farm has to offer. A class will be held from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. June 1 and is $36 per person. Part of the proceeds will go toward farm owner and head farmer Laurel Mehl’s future plans for the farm. To reserve your spot, email jlfelm@yahoo.com. Come learn, eat and support your local farmer. Classes will be held outdoors under the palm trees. You are requested to bring your own plate, fork and cup. Iced tea and water will be provided.
 After class students will be able to purchase farm produce, eggs and seeds, but don’t forget to bring cash.
 Classes are limited to 20 people.

May 16, 2014

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Association has its 2nd annual Grape Day in the Back Country May 24 at the San Vicente Inn. Program goes from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. with breakfast and lunch included. $30 for RVVA members, $45 for the public. Speaker is Wes Hagen, wine maker for Clos Pepe in Lompoc. Reservation information at (760) 505-9022. Celebrity Cruises has launched the first cruise land-based Great Wine and Food Festival, May 31 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Great Park in Irvine Orange County. The event benefits Legal Aid of Orange County, with 40 great wines, craft breweries and spirits com-

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dre. I’m always up to try anything new and she asked me if I wanted to try this Brazilian potato dish, I said sure and away we went. I did not think about that dish again until about February 2012, when a friend of mine, who is from Curitiba, Brazil, invited us over to his house for dinner and to my surprise was making Swiss batata! We must have made over 10 different types that night and I said to my friend “You know we could sell these right?” Two months later in April of 2012 Spudz was born. : Your combination of crispy hash brown Q type potatoes with differ-

ent fillings and toppings makes so much sense, but your preparation makes all the difference. Tell me how these are prepared, the different menu options and more about that special cast iron pan you use. How we came up with our menu options was at first just picking stuff that we like to eat. I love carne asada burritos and I decided that was going to be my first creation. We call it the Speedy Gonzales and we use a quality beef and all fresh

From left: show Director Donato Santarsieri, Italo Americano publication sales director Andrew Bagley and wine maker Lenny Ciarmoli toast the successful 3rd Annual International Wine Show. Photo by Frank Mangio

nowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. His columns can be viewed at tasteofwinetv. com. He is one of the top wine commentators on the web. Reach him at mangiompc@aol.com. Frank Mangio is a re-

panies and top Orange County restaurants. $75 early bird tickets until May 12. $100 after. Go to greatwinefestival.com for details and tickets.

vegetables for the pico de gallo, add in some avocado, cheese and don’t forget to top it with my grandmother’s chili recipe. The Egghead was our next one and who could say no to a single dish with golden brown shredded potato, warm delicious bacon, cheese and a fried egg on top? We wanted something for the non-meat eaters and create the Popeye, which is a mixture of ricotta cheese, sundried tomatoes and spinach. Now the “PAN” is truly the secret to our success, it gives our dish such a great look and it works perfectly every-time. At first we tried using the frying pan method to cook but it was not working out very well. Then again almost by luck we had a friend who knew someone that might be able to help us with our problem. We talked with him about how we needed a design that enabled us to cook our dish without having to hold two pans together ourselves and use a material that could get very warm, very fast. He sent us our “PAN” and now we have patent pending and hopefully soon will be offering them for sale.

Q

for expansion. Do you have any plans to take it to another level? One day at the Vista farmers market this guy orders a Speedy Gonzales, puts my grandma’s chili on top and walks away. A couple minutes later I notice the guy standing off in the corner just staring at our booth still. He walks back up and asks me if I’m the owner. I say yes and he hands me his card, his name is Thomas and he is a venture capitalist. He asked me straightforward if I want to open one Spudz spot because if I do he can’t help me, but if I want to open 50 then he can help. After making some phone calls and checking out Thomas I find out he is legit. He is a great friend and advisor now who will be helping to take Spudz to the next level for sure. Check out Spudz at the Leucadia Farmer’s Market and other markets around San Diego. Find out more at spudzpotato.com

Lick the Plate can now be heard on KPRi, 102.1 FM Monday - Friday during the 7pm hour. David Boylan is founder of Artichoke Creative and Artichoke Apparel, an Encinitas based marketing firm and clothing line. Reach him at : This seems like a david@artichoke-creative. concept that is poised com or (858) 395-6905.

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College helps at-risk kids SOLANA BEACH — MiraCosta College students have joined with La Colonia De Eden Gardens Foundation to provide backpacks for La Colonia’s Summer Leadership Camp. The camp benefits at-risk youths, ages 12 to 17, by providing a weeklong retreat where they learn leadership, communication, collaboration, and coping/stress management skills. Students are collecting donations of “leadership backpacks” filled with items the youngsters can use as they expand their skills. Donors are asked to put together an entire backpack, donate an empty backpack, or donate individual items. All contribu-

tions are welcome. Backpack items needed include erasers, pens, notebooks, colored markers, journals, construction paper, etc. Deadline for donations is May 19. Drop off locations include: — Oceanside: MiraCosta College, 1 Barnard Drive, Office of School Relations/ Outreach, Student Center (Bldg. 3400) — Cardiff: MiraCosta College San Elijo Campus, 3333 Manchester Ave., Student Activities Office (Bldg. 900) For more information, contact Sarah Little in the San Elijo Campus Student Activities Office, (760) 9444449, ext. 7782.

May 16, 2014

Equestrians shined during Del Mar Horse Show DEL MAR — The 69th Del Mar National Horse Show took place April 17 through May 4 in the Del Mar Fairgrounds Arena and featured champion riders and horses in three disciplines: Western, Dressage and Hunter/Jumper. Complete results for all three weeks can be found on the Del Mar National Web site at delmarnational.com. Western Week saw Bob Avila, of Palm Springs take home four perpetual trophies in the PCHA Reining Division. Tom Foran, of Burbank, scored four PCHA Open Reining perpetual trophies. Young horsewoman, Delany Van Horn,

of El Cajon, ran off with five perpetual trophies, including Western Pleasure Rider 13 & Under, Horsemanship, and Trail. Dressage Week, featured Steffen Peters and Legolas 92 who reigned supreme in the $5,000 FEI Grand Prix Freestyle with a score of 78.05 percent. Jan Ebeling and Rafalca followed with a score of 76.30 percent, and Brian Hafner and Lombardo LHF rounded out the top three with a score of 71.45 percent. Peters and Legolas 92 won the $5,000 FEI Grand Prix Test (71.84 percent), second went to Jan Ebeling and Rafalca (71.12 percent), and Kathleen Raine

and Breanna placed third (68.66 percent). Peters and Apassionata also won the $1,500 FEI Prix St. Georges (72.32 percent), followed by Nick Wagman on Zenith (69.47 percent), and Dawn White-O’Connor and Aristo (68.33 percent). During the $1,500 FEI Intermediaire I, Nick Wagman and Zenith took first (70.17 percent) over Peters and Apassionata (69.78 percent), and Aristo, ridden by Dawn White-O’Conner placed third (69.60 percent). The $2,500 FEI Intermediaire I Freestyle honors went to White-O’Connor and Aristo (72.66 percent), Peters and Apassionata (72.08 percent). Allison Dechant Nimmo and her mount, Rufus, took third (69.04 percent). Raine and Breanna took the blue (69.33 percent) in the $2,000 FEI Grand Prix Special, Germany’s Lientje Schueler and Mike Tyson-L took second (67.98 percent), and Kimberly McGrath rode Winslow

to third place (65.62 percent). Hunter/Jumper Week wrapped up the threeweek show with the $25,000 Surfside Grand Prix, the new $10,000 Speed Derby of Del Mar, and the $100,000 Grand Prix of Del Mar. On May 3, 12 entries took part in the new $10,000 Speed Derby of Del Mar. First place went to Colgan Cruise, Harry & Mollie Chapman and Richard Fellers with second place earned by Dancer, Crooks Show Jumping, LLC, Lauren Crooks. Each year the pinnacle event, the $100,000 Grand Pix of Del Mar, challenges horses and riders. Course Designer, Leopoldo Palacios, of Caracas, Venezuela, presented a tough test for horses and riders. Two riding teams went clear and dueled in an exciting jump-off: Lane Clarke, riding Kiss the Sky, came in second to the winner Karl Cook, riding Jonkheer Z.

Film festival line-up announced LA JOLLA — The International Rescue Committee announced the line-up for its sixth annual International Documentary Film series, held at the La Jolla Village Cinemas, 8879 Villa La Jolla Drive at 7 p.m. May 19, June 2 and June 9, with a showing of one film on each evening. The films screened will include: — “Stolen Seas” May 19. Stolen Seas presents an exploration of the Somali pirate phenomenon. Utilizing interviews and unparalleled access to pirates, hostages, hostages’ relatives,

ship-owners, and pirate negotiators. Speaker: Director and Producer of Stolen Seas Thymaya Payne, — “Coach Zoran and his African Tigers” June 2. South Sudan became an independent state in July 2011, following almost 50 years of civil war. The new nation forms a national soccer team, led by Zoran Djordjevic, and ollows the team over its first year. — — “Call Me Kuchu” June 9. This emotional film follows Uganda’s first openly gay man as he fights for gay rights in court, on TV and at the U.N.


May 16, 2014

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Educational Opportunities Adventure camps offered by San Dieguito Boys & Girls Clubs OF SAN DIEGUITO

Boys & Girls Clubs of San Dieguito is offering Summer Adventure Camps for ages 5-15 beginning June 16th–August 22nd. Choose from Day Camps, Junior Camps, Specialty Camps, Sports Camps, Teen Camps, Leaders in Training and more! We offer multiple locations in North County to include Carmel Valley, Del Mar, Solana Beach,

We offer multiple locations in North County to include Carmel Valley, Del Mar, Solana Beach, and Encinitas.” and Encinitas. Our Summer Adventure Camps offer maximum flexibility with our Day Camps options and early/late pick-up and

drop-off program. Our staff is background checked, drug tested, trained, and CPR/ First Aid/AED certified for your child’s safety. Camp prices start as low as $145. Call (858) 720.2180, visit our website at www. bgcsandieguito.org, or visit the Camp Office at the Polster Branch – 3800-A Mykonos Lane San Diego, CA 92130 for more information.

Junior Lifeguards open to all levels of athletic abilities DEL MAR — With summer fast approaching, beach and ocean safety are on the minds of parents everywhere. The Del Mar Junior Lifeguard and Little Turtle programs offer peace of mind for parents and fun and useful skills for children ages 7 to 17. Programs take place at 29th Street in Del Mar and include a variety of age-appropriate activities and education including CPR, First Aid, sun safety, surfing, boogie boarding, paddle boarding and body surfing. Some of the skills taught include teamwork, leadership, self-esteem

The Del Mar Junior Lifeguard instructors are all ocean lifeguards. building, physical fitness, and lifesaving and rescue techniques with lifeguard equipment. Additionally, participants learn appreciation of the beach and ocean environment. Amidst all of the learning are plenty of fun and games. The Del Mar Junior Lifeguard instructors are all ocean lifeguards. Many

of the instructors are Junior Lifeguard alumni. Each instructor strives to pass on their excitement about the ocean, their sense of discipline and integrity along to their students in a fun learning environment. Xtended Program is available for the morning sessions to remain at the beach supervised by Del Mar Junior Lifeguard staff for more fun until 3:00 p.m. There are two- and fourweek sessions available. Find out more about Del Mar Junior Lifeguard and Little Turtle programs at delmarjg.com or by emailing info@delmarjg. com.

www.delmarjg.com info@delmarjg.com

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should be arising from the citybased Encinitas Commission for the Arts. “The Commission for the Arts is working on a ‘Percent for Arts Policy’ and we plan to bring it to the City Council in the summer. But we are just at the beginning stages right now,” said Gilliam. But most of the art you see on a day-to-day basis comes from somewhere else — the artistic eye of private home and business owners across Encinitas. It’s nearly impossible not to spot a mural or two when you stroll by storefronts up and down Coast Highway 101. What makes the city such a hub for privately owned public art and mural work? Jax Meyers of Paint Encinitas took a stab at answering the question while leading a walking tour of all of the murals in the city. “I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we have a lot of local businesses here who want to hire artists to paint their walls. And we have a community of artists here, a huge community of art patrons here, and just a big community of creators,” Meyers explained. “When you get a lot of different artists in, you get a lot of different flavors from all around… so you’re making this place a center for a culture of art. And that culture is what Paint Encinitas revolves around.” Just four months ago Meyers founded Paint Encinitas, an organization dedicated to beautifying Encinitas one wall at a time. “Our mission is to creatively unite the community, artists and local businesses together to manifest visual arts in the public domain.”

This mural by Kevin Anderson is located at the very end of Leucadia on a wall next to 7-Eleven. It marks the end of the Encinitas mural tour.

Mural by Bleu Avina, 2012. Mural can be found on a private home in Encinitas. Photos

by Yeshe Salz

A newcomer to the city’s arts world, Paint Encinitas provides a fresh initiative towards the pursuit of the arts. “We want to be the leading pioneer of the public arts movement by organizing accessible visual and live art events that keep our town fresh, noteworthy, and funky to its roots,” Meyers said. “It’s funny because we are already seeing that move to Encinitas from other cities,” she added, “We’re really getting a melting pot here in Encinitas.” Skye Walker, a contract graphic designer illustrator and muralist from Big Bear, Calif. is one of those artists who has gravitated towards Encinitas’ art-conscious culture.

Walker spent eight years working as the art director and senior designer of major companies such as Rip Curl and prAna. However, he dove back into the world of mural work when Whole Foods in Encinitas hired him to paint the inside of the store. “The Whole foods job kick started me back into murals and now, that’s all I want to do; I’m in love with it,” Walker said, “It’s different than just painting a picture that goes in someone’s home. When you do a piece for the public eye, it takes up a space where you have to stop and look at it and it takes you into it — people take notice of that.” Local artists like Walker and

art patrons like Meyers, see the value of public art and are dedicated to bringing it to the community. “There is so much value in a mural. It’s supporting the arts and it’s supporting local artists and hopefully making a space more beautiful,” said Walker. “For me, murals kick start a lot of creative ideas and help to inspire others.” Walker’s mural work can also be seen inside Cafe Ipe, the Encinitas Whole Foods parking garage, Pandora’s Pizza and Mesa Rim Climbing Jim. Adding to the melting pot of the Encinitas art scene, a Honduran artist called Santos set up shop in his art gallery in Leucadia four years ago and is also contributing to North County’s art world. Inside his gallery, situated next to Surfy Surfy, you can find his paintings stretched big and wide across enormous canvases reflecting bright colors and bold patterns. “I’m doing all of these murals

because I know that ultimately that’s where it belongs. It belongs large and it belongs directly on walls,” he said Santos painted the mural outside Cafe Ipe and has also launched a program called “Mural Campaign,” dedicated to bringing arts to the streets and the schools of Encinitas and North County. “I started to do my mural campaign because arts are beginning to be removed from schools and I want to counteract that.” Because of their socially active and publicly present nature, artists like Santos and Walker have become fixated upon the creation of mural-work. And they aren’t the only ones. Artists across Encinitas are convening and partnering up with local businesses to create a more beautiful, unique and socially engaged city. “Encinitas supports the arts,” Meyers said, “and that’s what’s most important.”


May 16, 2014

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

Food &Wine

Bonjour Beaujolais: France’s new ‘discovery’ taste of wine frank mangio “Discover Beaujolais� read the campaign slogan. It caught my eye because Beaujolias is one of the oldest wine brands in the world, crafted by respected wine makers in eastern France above Lyon for something like 2000 years. It’s squeezed into an area dominated by Burgundy in the north, and the Rhone wines in the south. The region has excellent growing conditions with granite-based soil that lend great structure to the vines. So Beaujolais is hardly a “new kid,� but a seasonal grown up. Beaujolais shows up on more Thanksgiving dinner tables than almost any other varietal, because it goes so well with traditional entrees at that holiday’s dinner table. In the past, it was available only during that time of the year. It was harvested, fermented, aged for a short time, bottled and sent off to America as France’s annual pop-the-cork and “drink now� match for the nation’s turkey, ham and fish dinners. Maison Louis Jadot ($14.95) with its 100 percent Gamay grapes is the name and big winner for Beaujolais. It’s slightly spicy with a touch of licorice and rose petal, with a slightly tannic touch to aid in the acidity for food pairing. Joshua Orr, the Beaujolais specialist and Sommelier at Marina Kitchen at the San Diego Embarcadero, went on about the Gamay grape. “These wines are incredible values. We are educating the public that these wines are for year-round, not just the fall and Thanksgiving. I love the minerality in these wines and how it works with a fish combination and other light entrees. In Beaujolais, reds are the Gamay grapes and whites are Chardonnay. In this wine country, there are old vines that

The beauty of a Spudz Potato in their proprietary pan. Photo courtesy of

Spudz Potato

Potatoes taken to new heights at Spudz Beaujolais spokesman Anthony Collet, Monica Valentino, Joshua Orr Beaujolais Specialist and columnist Frank Mangio at a Beaujolais campaign kickoff at Puesto in San Diego. Photo

by Frank Mangio

have produced wines for over 80 years adding great character to the wine.� Gamay is somewhat quirky in that its skin is black, the juice is white but Gamay Beaujolais is red. Many Gamay lovers prefer to chill this wine before drinking, as they would a white wine. From beef to berry desserts, Beaujolais can be trusted as a refreshing drink and an alternative to heavy reds. See discoverbeaujolais.com. Follow-up: San Diego International Wine Show he San Diego International Wine Show T Was held recently in the Pad-

dock area of the Del Mar Fairgrounds. There was a lot to taste from both domestic and overseas wineries. The many cultures were flowing, from Italy to the Guadalupe Valley in Mexico. Not to be outdone, California wines were well represented. San Diego favorite Orfila Wines scored big with their Syrah, Viognier and an Italian varietal, Montepulciano di Abbruzzo with Justin Mund the wine maker.

From the Jackson Family Estates, Freemark Abbey and Hartford Family Winery, from Napa Valley and Sonoma’sRussian River topped the list. Proceeds went to Country Friends Rancho Santa Fe community projects. To contact the show’s director for next year’ s production, call (619) 8WINESD. Wine Bytes Firefly Grill and Wine Bar in Encinitas presents a Chalk Hills Wine Dinner May 22 at 6:30 p.m. For pricing and details call (760) 635-1066. Il Fornaio in Coronado brings you a Wedell Cellars Wine Maker dinner, May 22 at 6 p.m. Cost is $65. RSVP at (619) 437-4911. The owner/winemaker will be in attendance. Dynamic Wine & Food Pairing with instructor Deborah Lazear is the kickoff of the next wine series at San Diego State University May 31 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Get complete details at (619) 5945152. The Ramona Valley Vineyard

Wine of the Month By Frank Mangio

2112 Benziger Sauvignon Blanc North Coast

 About this wine: Bright citrus and floral notes, fresh and enduring on the palate. Old world flavor offers subtle minerality and tastes of grapefruit and lime. An elegant balanced acidity. About this winery: A certified sustainable organically grown winery. Natural vineyard management. Located in Sonoma. Jeff Mcbride is the wine maker. The cost: Buy this wine for $12.49 at WINE STEALS, Cardiff. (760) 230-2657.

TURN TO TASTE OF WINE ON B12

I

t’s not often that something new comes along that rocks my culinary world with its originality, simplicity and pure taste sensation. That happened recently when I stumbled upon Spudz Potato at the Leucadia Farmers Market. The first thing I noticed was the line, always a good sign. That and the six guys in the booth working like a finely tuned assembly line cranking out this unique concoction. Who doesn’t like hash browns right? Think of hash browns filled with a variety of savory treats then grilled to a crunchy goodness with the option to top it with a perfectly fried egg or chili. Believe me folks, this is a taste and texture experience like you’ve never had before and as you will learn below, they have already been discovered by a VC who has plans to bring them to the masses so experience them at the intimacy of your local farmers market while you can. Spudz was founded

by Robert Aguilar and I caught up with him recently to learn more about his very cool venture that is on the verge of exploding.

Q

: You have created something totally original with Spudz. What is the history of the dish and how did you end up forming the business? The history of the dish comes from a city in Southern Brazil called Curitiba. In this city they call it Swiss batata and it was made mostly by the poorer people because its main

ingredient was the potato and they could take any leftover food and place it in the middle of this kind of potato pie. In Brazil the dish is made in the kitchen using two medium sized frying pans, you place the shredded potato inside the pan like a pie crust leaving room for the food you would like in the middle while taking the other pan, also filled with shredded potato, ready to place on top of each other to create this beautiful golden brown pizza looking dish. I came up with the idea to start this business almost by luck. My wife Erika, who is from Sao Paulo, Brazil, and I were on our last two days of vacation in her home town of Santo An-

TURN TO LICK THE PLATE ON B12


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FICTICIOUS BUSINESS NAME NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the Fictitious Name of: “A 4th Trimester” located in the City of Oceanside, CA. has registered the said name with the County of San Diego Assessor/Recorder/County Clerks office. Dated at San Diego County on May, 6, 2014. Business Owner: Jennifer Deleon. IN MEMORIAM - CLARA S. KORNHER Clara Kornher was born in Boston,MA on 8/6/1928. She was a longtime resident of Falls Church, VA and later Carlsbad, CA. She passed away on May 4, 2014 in La Jolla, CA. She is survived by her brothers, Louis and John Sbardella, her children, Kevin, Kristin, and Kara Kornher, and her granddaughters Christy, Allison, Janelle and Kayleigh. She is predeceased by siblings Eleanor, Joseph and Theresa. Services were held at El Camino Memorial in Sorrento Valley. FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES AKC. Many colors. $2000 each and up. Health guaranteed. 424-2881413

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May 16, 2014

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Coldwell Banker Rancho Santa Fe, (858)335-770 OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY MAY 18TH, 1-4 PM Pristine & Private Covenant Adobe, 3 BR + office, 3.5 BA. 4448 La Orilla, Rancho Santa Fe, $2,625,000, Janet Lawless Christ/Coldwell Banker Rancho Sante Fe, (858)335-7700 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY MAY 18TH 11AM TO 2PM 699 N Vulcan sp #103, 92024. $69,900 OBO. 2bd 2ba on huge lot,wood floors,fireplace and two porches. 2 blocks to beaches, shopping, more! Serial#S391x/u. Call Kyle 949-701-7776 SUMMER AND LONG TERM SOLANA BEACH RENTAL Beautiful and low maintenance 2 BR/BA in the San Elijo Hills available for summer or long term rental. Visit casasharman.com on the web for all of the details on this pristine home owned by Lane and Randi Sharman. Or, call Randi at 858-342-1771. SELLING? BUYING? INVESTING? Native Realtor wants to earn your business!!!! Lets work together 760-505-4541 THANKYOU! Jeff BRE#01888642

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SERVICES PERSONAL ASSISTANT/HOUSE CLEANER: Reliable, honest, and hard-working San Diego native, English speaker. References available. My Hero Home Services: (760) 2917816 FREE FACIALS! I am offering free facials for any hard working ladies out there who need a pampering session! Call or text. 760-810-6561 Sara B. Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant CAREGIVER LIVE-IN Have over 8 years experience. Prepare meals, shopping, light housekeeping and other domestic duties. Experience with diabetics. Oceanside area. Willa [760] 893-6882 PARKER CONCRETE #1 concrete contractor on Angies List 5 years in a row. All phases of Concrete & Stone. 858-5648826.

REAL ESTATE

SERVICES help with activities of daily living, medications, blood pressure checks.errands, meal preparation, light housekeeping, companionship and more. Call Maia at 760-593-3707 GLASS for all Home and Business needs. Install/Repair/Sales. Shower Doors. Patio & Mirror Doors, Glass Railings. Windows. Mirror. Dual Pane and Tempered Glass in 24 hours. Lic #471954. www.akaglassguy. com. Jeff 858-576-4321. PINNACLE ROOFING, with 20 years of experience, is dedicated to providing superior workmanship and excellent customer service: We pride ourselves on maintaining an outstanding reputation. We handle every project large or small. Workmens Compensation. License #988399. 760-842-7779. SOLAR INSTALLATION Encinitas-based. 100% homeowner satisfaction record. Local references. Zero-down financing options. SanDiegoCountySolar. com (760) 230-2220. LOVED ONE STUCK IN BED OR A WHEELCHAIR? We have a revolutionary lift and support system. Push a finger to rise standing. Be supported while walking with as little as 25# on legs and feet. Go wherever. One free 30-day trial. Email: walkagainco@yahoo.com Website: walkagainco.com 760-317-9969 POPCORN CEILING REMOVAL Popcorn ceiling removal with custom hand texture applied by Grantham Drywall (License 730465). http://acousticremovalinsandiego.com/ Spring special 760 744 6890.

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COMPANION/CARETAKER I am a caring, bonded and experienced companion/caretaker with references. I can live in or out. Preferably in the Carlsbad, Encinitas, Oceanside, Del Mar, Rancho Santa Fe, and La Jolla areas. Pls call Peggy 619-368-1627. Thank You :-) HUMANE BEE REMOVAL - Fast, reliable bee removal. Safe for environment, insured, great rates,. Call HIVE SAVERS for estimate: 760.897.4483 HOMECARE Retired RN available for

PLANT SERVICE Offices, restaurants, or residential plant service. Specializing in flower beds, decorative indoor plants, orchid arrangements, and hanging baskets. Call Devon (760) 696-2957 or email thegreenerthings@gmail.com ASPHALT SERVICES Paving, Grading, Seal Coating & Striping. Patching & Parking Lots. Commercial & Residential. Family owned & operated since 1989. 20 years experience. Licensed/bonded. Free Estimates. License #58124. All Star Paving 760-715-4996. PROFESSIONAL MAINTENANCE Window Cleaning & Carpet Cleaning. Power Washing-Stone Cleaning. Gutter Cleaning. 20 years experience. 760-436-2880.

WANTED PROFESSIONAL COUPLE SEEKS BEACH AREA RENTAL Professional Married Couple seeking a long term rental of a 1-2 bedroom house or cottage west of the 5 in South Oceanside within walking distance of the beach. We have excellent references, excellent credit and a good combined income. We have 2 spayed female (very well behaved) cats and will gladly pay an extra pet deposit if you feel it is necessary. Seeking: Clean, safe area up to $1600/month 1-2 Bedroom Washer/Dryer Hookups Garage Small Fenced Yard Thank you for your thoughtful consideration. UNFURNISHED GUEST HOUSE or Granny Flat in Coastal area. I am positive, spiritual minded, single female and non-smoker. Can oversee your property when away. Willing to pay up to $800/mo for 1 br. Great refs. 858-381-7300. COMIC BOOKS Old or New. Call 619727-0414 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS INSTANT CASH For sealed Unexpired Boxes Pick up avail Leg 760 795 9155

ITEMS FOR SALE LP ALBUMS Best Offer gets over 1000 LP Albums, more information, call Marty 760-433-0334 Oceanside.


May 16, 2014

B13

T he R ancho S anta F e News

ITEMS FOR SALE CARLSBAD GUN STORE Gunther Guns Open Tues-Sun 10AM-6PM 2717 Loker Ave West Suite B Carlsbad www.GuntherGuns.com 760-444-1100 RANGER 26 SAILBOAT - $4,000 Great condition - immediately sail ready for summer! Call Rob 760.533.3877 15 GALLON PLANTS - Some actually much larger & different. 15 gallon Plants-$35 each. Types: Japanese Black Pine, Jade, Crown-of-Thorns, Fan Palm, Loquat, Macadamia Nut. One incredibly large & beautiful Crown-of-Thorns for $250 (two guys to help you transport it). If you have a fence you don’t want anyone climbing over, it’s an answer. We also have two large 125 watt speakers for $50. 760-436-6604 PLANTPLAY GARDENS plants pottery gifts 4915A ElCamino Real Carlsbad Open 7Days 9to5 Web Facebook

HELP WANTED FULL-CHARGE LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER RSF Looking for a full-time, live in, English speaking housekeeper to care for a home. Full charge, hands on housekeeping duties in maintaining and up-keep of a 6,000 sf home. Laundry, light cooking,; shopping/errands will be required. Must Love DOGS - and be prepared to play with, transport and exercise two Labradors in addition to household duties. Supervision of other outside services, ie.: gardiner, and Maintenance personnel. Full time hours from May thru October while owners are in residence; part time hours from November thru April. Valid CA Drivers license required. Salary commensurate with experience level. Benefits available, references required. Please fax resume to T Groat at 760/341-7808, or email to TGroat@hubbardenterprise.com, or mail to 72-650 Fred Waring #202, Palm Desert, CA 92260. PART TIME BILINGUAL SALES/PHOTOGRAPHER OPPORTUNITY Mom365 has an opening for a bilingual sales & customer service oriented person to take photograph newborns at Tri City Medical Center in Oceanside. Please submit your resume to: Careers@mom365.com

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T he R ancho S anta F e News

May 16, 2014 spark. Do what’s necessary to mend differences or move on.

SOUP TO NUTS by Rick Stromoski

By Bernice Bede Osol FRIDAY, MAY 16, 2014

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

THE BORN LOSER by art & Chip Sansom

BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce

MONTY by Jim Meddick

ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

ALLEY OOP byJack & Carole Bender

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- A humanitarian cause will attract you. Your diplomacy will be useful with regards to a friend’s dilemma. Your ability to be objective will help you find amiable solutions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A social or sporting event will put you in the limeEmbrace opposition and the challenges light. You are a strong competitor, and it brings. Assume a leadership role and you’ll wear out the opposition with your engage in activities that will help pump determination and stamina. up your metabolism and get you ready SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If for competition. High energy and good you’re not ready to face up to unpleasorganizational skills will bring you the antness, remove yourself from the sitresults you want mentally, physically uation. You can’t hide forever, but you and financially. can buy a little time and allow the situaTAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t be tion to cool down. caught short by an unexpected bill. Friv- CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Turn olous spending will cause added worry a profit by making a prudent financial and stress. Keep your money in a safe choice. Keep an eye out for promising place to reduce temptation. opportunities. Familiarize yourself with GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You may various investment policies. Enjoy the find that you are on a different wave- company of someone you love. length from your colleagues. Re-estab- AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If lish your position by sharing ideas and you’re feeling stifled intellectually, do being open to suggestions. something about it. Turn your focus to CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You will outside activities that will introduce you discover a job opportunity today. More to refreshing new ideas and stimulating money will come your way if you are people. open to new horizons and a chance to PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Don’t expand your skills. choose to leave your job without having LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t let your another one lined up. Difficulties with flair for drama go to waste. Channel your employer will arise if you overstep your energy in an artistic direction. The boundaries. Do your job quietly and different facets of your personality will competently. Learn from past mistakes. make you a convincing actor and an en- ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Use your tertaining friend. energy wisely. An intense romantic VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Romance encounter will boost your confidence. is in the air. New experiences will open Follow a hunch, and you’ll find success. your eyes to exciting possibilities. Your Improve your profile and increase your current relationship may be losing its social circle.


May 16, 2014

SERVICES

SMALL TALK

To address these issues, theSan Diego County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously on Tuesday to adopt California’s Welfare and Institutions Code 5270. Code 5270 allows doctors and mental health clinicians to continue treatment for those suffering from mental illness for an additional 30 days without a temporary conservatorship. Due process and hearings still occur to protect the patient’s rights during that period. Furthermore, a 5270 does not have to be filed until the seventeenth day of treatment, which allows more time for medications to take effect and for doctors to determine if a patient requires further psychiatric treatment. “It makes a big difference,” said Krelstein. Eliminating unnecessary filings of temporary conservatorships could save the county between $130,000 and $220,000 in conservator costs, but will increase costs for the courts by about $151,000. It also benefits patients, who can avoid having a temporary conservatorship on their permanent record. The move allows more flexibility for patients, their families, and doctors, Jaccard said. “We think this is a really good thing for the county,” she said.

to start with. Compounding the misery is a spreading bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis or citrus canker. This nasty little critter makes the fruit drop off the trees early and makes the surviving limes so ugly no one will buy them. It’s also killing Margaritas in Brazil and the U.S. It makes me want to run out into my backyard and give our little lime tree a sterile hug and then enclose it in a bubble or bring it in the house. The final straw is that the Mexican drug cartels apparently like their Margaritas, too. Those mouth-breathing pinheads are raiding the groves and hijacking limes by the truckload. Really? With their money, they couldn’t just buy them and the truck? One can only hope it means cartel sales are down. I am fighting the urge to race to the store and become a Jose Cuervo hoarder, but I fear it would give the wrong impression. Of course, this column has probably already achieved that. Actually, I think a case or two of the mix might be the perfect addition to the earthquake supplies.

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HOA

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fer to wait until after that to comment. While there was no shortage of people who had concerns with the project, not everyone opposes it. Veronica Seay, a 34year Solana Beach resident and member of the board of the North County League of Women Voters, said state law requires all communities to provide their fair share of affordable housing and this development would be a “small step” for Solana Beach to meet that obligation. “We need to remind ourselves that local residents of Solana Beach may at some time in their lives need to find affordable housing for either the short or the long term,”

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Tee off for hospital’s charity benefit CARLSBAD — Registration is open for the 15th annual Tayler+Friends charity golf tournament July 19. Because of the tournament’s association with the Randy Jones Invitational, the first-, secondand third-place finishers in the Callaway and Open flights will gain a free entry into the second annual Randy Jones Invitational qualifier in January 2015. Register online at taylerandfriends.org. The Tayler+Friends tournaments will be held at Rancho Carlsbad Golf Club, 5200 El Camino Real

Jean Gillette no long does tequila shots. No, really. Contact her at jgillette@ coastnewsgroup.com. Seay said. “They might be elderly, disabled, underemployed or returning veterans who shouldn’t have to leave town in order to find housing.” Former Mayor Margaret Schlesinger, who lived in that neighborhood for 40 years, also supports the complex even though she describes herself as “a fanatic on preserving open space.” She reminded residents about the opposition to condominiums being built along South Sierra, “and we learned to live with them,” she said. Ginger Hitzke, president of Hitzke Development Corporation, said she plans to continue working with nearby residents to address their concerns. “I’m hopeful when it’s built it will add to the appearance of the street,” Ryan said.

. st Hwy N. Coa 101

X

La Costa Ave

with a 7 to 8:30 a.m. registration and a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Entry is $80. Two-person teams play a scramble format and are asked to bring two new unwrapped toys per team to be donated to the kids at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego and Camp Pendleton. The event includes donuts and bagels, tee prizes, range balls, 18 holes of golf, Closest-ToPin contests, $10,000 Cash Hole-In-One prize and lunch. There will also be a silent-auction and a raffle for a new TaylorMade

driver. Toys and 100 percent of the event’s proceeds benefit children at Rady Children’s Hospital, military families through the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and a $1,000

college scholarship for a local high school senior through the Jonathan Tarr Foundation For more information, call Milo at (760) 753-3432 or email TaylerandFriends@gmail.com.


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May 16, 2014

Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations. Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2014 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.

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