The Rancho Santa Fe News, Jan. 25, 2013

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JAN. 25, 2013

Report: San Diegans drive more than counterparts in Los Angeles By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — Los Angeles might have more traffic, but San Diego takes the cake for most miles driven. That’s according to a new report measuring San Diego’s quality of life. On average, San Diegans traveled 12.8 miles per day by car in 2011. It’s a slight decline from 2010’s total, but it’s still higher than L.A.’s average of 10.7 and San Francisco’s 7.7. “San Diego’s limited public transportation is a major factor in us being higher,” said Sarah Benson, communications director with Equinox Center, the nonprofit and nonpartisan group that produced the report. Benson said that San Diegans use less public transportation than most cities, largely because we have fewer options. L.A. is better connected by subways, lightrail and shuttles, which data reflects. More than 6 percent of residents in L.A. take public transit to work, compared with only 3 percent in San Diego, according to the

Students in the Rancho Santa Fe School District will begin preparations for taking the new Common Core Standards tests, which will replace the STAR testing. File photo

District preps for new standards By Patty McCormac

Cars travel on Coast Highway 101 in Encinitas. On average, San Diegans drove 12.8 miles per day in 2011, even higher than those in Los Angeles. An Equinox Center study recommends more public transportation and bicycle ridership to bring this number down. Photo by Jared Whitlock

report. Also, when stacked up against other major cities, San Diego’s public transit is concentrated in select spots. “Our public transit does-

n’t reach most parts of the county,” Benson said. “Residents that live far from work have to drive.” The drawbacks from a greater number of hours on

the road? More traffic congestion and eventually an increase in fuel costs, the report states. And then there TURN TO DRIVING ON A14

Roundabouts being met with opposition By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Jack Queen, former Rancho Santa Fe Association president, came to the Jan. 17 meeting to beseech the current board to think twice before approving the three proposed roundabouts slated for three intersections in the Covenant. “This is the most important decision you will make in your term,” Queen said. “This will forever change the entrance of Rancho Santa Fe.” Queen said he wants to make sure the board knows the full impact of the project. “This is industrial size, nothing like the little ones in Encinitas and Solana Beach.” He urged the board to go in person to the sites and do further research before mak-

BREAKING THE MOLD San Diego artist Michael Carini overcomes adversity, and makes giving back to the community one of his top priorities. A11

Plateada; and Paseo Delicias ing up their minds. “See the full impact this and Via de la Valle. Years in the planning, mother is going to have,” the final environmental Queen said. impact reports will be available for view at the Association’s next meeting Feb. 7. Directors anticipating a large turn out have scheduled the regular 9 a.m. meeting at the Garden Club, which can accommodate more people. “To this point, the board has not made a decision and none have weighed in with Jack Queen support or lack of support,” Former RSF Association said Chris Livoni, associate planner. President They will probably wait until the meeting on February The traffic circles are 7 to hear what the community planned for the intersections has to say. At the meeting the of Del Dios and El Camino board will consider whether Del Norte; Paseo Delicias and to certify the findings of the El Montevideo-La Valle EIR or not. No final decision

This will forever change the entrance of Rancho Santa Fe.”

Two Sections, 28 pages Arts & Entertainment . A11 Marketplace News . . . . A13 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A4

to proceed on the project will be made. Queen said considering what the Art Jury goes through to keep Rancho Santa Fe looking rural, the same standards should be applied to the roundabouts. “This is the anti-thesis of rural. These will be big, permanent and ugly,” he said Queen referred to the old adage of putting lipstick on a pig. “It will still be a pig when we get done,” he said. He urged to board to seek a more simple solution that could be instantly removed if it failed. Resident Rory Kendall suggested that since the membership pays for public safety anyway, why not have TURN TO ROUNDABOUTS ON A14

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RANCHO SANTA FE — When the new Common Core Standards are implemented in the Rancho Santa Fe School District next year, it will signal a shift in education techniques throughout the country as well. Students will no longer be able to guess the right answer on a multiple choice test. There will be few 50/50 chances of choosing correctly on a “true or false” test. Students will have to put into practice the critical thinking skills they will have been taught. And in California, STAR testing will be a thing of the past. “Assessment measures in the state of California will also change to reflect the new standards and include performance tasks where students are asked to write and solve complex problems,” said Lindy Delaney, superintendent of schools. “The standards themselves are rigorous and challenge students by testing them on higher level thinking skills.” Under the new standards, state testing results will be available in about two weeks, instead of several months, but Cindy Schaub, assistant superintendent, said she has no idea by what criteria schools will be ranked in the future. It is hoped by the National Governors Association, which initiated the standards, that students will be more equipped to compete in college and careers and will be well-prepared to step onto the world stage. “I can remember the roots of this 20 years ago. Global competition is pushing us,” Schaub said. “This has been a long time coming.” Perhaps the most significant change will be in mathematic learning and instruc-

tion, Schaub said. “There will be more focus on thinking and applying, not just following rules and procedures.” Students will have to make sense of math problems and persevere in solving them, which will teach them how to reason abstractly and quantitatively, she said. Rather than teaching “how to get the answer,” teachers will instead help students access concepts from a number of perspectives, she said. An example of a test question for sixth-graders is: “Jamal is filling bags with sand. All of the bags are the same size. Each bag must weigh less than 50 pounds. One bag weighs 57 pounds and another sad bag weighs 41 pounds. Explain whether Jamal can pour sand from one bag into the other so that the weight of each bag is less than 50 pounds.” In language classes, students will switch from nontext dependent answers to text-dependent. For example, after reading “Casey at the Bat,” a nontext-dependent question asks students to describe a time when they failed at something similar to when Casey struck out at bat. In a textdependent question, students are asked, “What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous?” What does all this mean to students at R. Roger Rowe? Local students are already doing this type of work in language and math. “In Rancho Santa Fe, students continue to think more deeply about content, interactions regarding complex text, and how they apply mathematical reason and problem-solving to reallife situations,” Delaney TURN TO TESTS ON A14


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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

Detectives release composite sketches of two suspects involved in a home invasion robbery in Rancho Santa Fe in December. Diego County Sheriff’s Department

Courtesy San

Dr. Timothy Bilash, a board-certified OB/GYN, supports the opinion that vitamin D provides safer, more effective protection than shots against the flu. He’ll discuss his views in a free lecture titled, “Flu Vaccines: Don’t Let Big Pharma Fool You!” at 6 p.m., Jan. 29 at his office located at 765 Academy Drive, Solana Beach. Photo by Lillian Cox

Detectives seek suspects in North County doctors Rancho Santa Fe home invasion suggest Vitamin D as alternative to flu shot By Lillian Cox

Two local physicians have expressed support for the opinion that vitamin D provides safer, more effective protection against the flu than flu shots. Dr. Timothy Bilash, a board-certified OB/GYN, has elaborated on the argument in free lectures he’s offered this winter titled “Flu Vaccines: Don’t Let Big Pharma Fool You!” “Many baby boomers and younger generations have grown up with a quiet acceptance of the annual flu shot as a necessary part of life without question,” he said. “Flu vaccinations in fact, are ineffective, particularly in women, and can have catastrophic effects among high-risk groups, namely pregnant women, the young and the elderly. My research over the past two decades has revealed that women’s health issues are vastly different than those of men because of the various fluctuations in hormone levels that they experience during the various stages of life, namely pregnancy and during menopause.” Bilash added that pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to reveal this information to the public. “It is important that people become aware of the realities and become educated in order to make informed decisions about their healthcare,” he said. Supplemental amounts of vitamin D, he says, are effective because they compensate for a widespread lack of proper levels already existing in people today. “Vitamin D deficiency is rampant because of lack of sun exposure and dairy products in the diet,” he said. “People tell you to stay out of the sun and to avoid dairy because it causes heart attacks.” The deficiency becomes more of an issue in colder, winter months when populations living at higher latitudes receive even less light

due to shorter days. To prevent transmission of the flu, once infected, Bilash suggests wearing a scarf, or mask, around the nose and mouth because the flu cannot flourish in a warm environment. He also recommends washing your hands and using hand sanitizers. Bilash is dismayed by non-medical professionals, like New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who have made it possible for the public to bypass their physician and get a flu shot from a pharmacist. “There’s a government entity making a medical decision,” he said. “Are legislators capable and equipped to dictate medical care if we are happy to bypass the physician? We are lacking evidence about the safety and effectiveness as well as the advisability of vaccinating everyone for the flu every year and I’m asking for the evidence.” Bilash will present a free lecture in his office at 6 p.m. Jan. 29 where he’ll discuss this year’s flu season, why he feels pharmaceutical manufacturers have a vested interest in keeping Americans sick and related issues. A video presentation will be shown by the New York Academy of Science that explores why there are so many conflicting reports and information about nutrition. A question and answer session will follow with refreshments. Dr. Bilash’s office is located at 765 Academy Drive, Solana Beach. For more information, call (858) 997-0212 or visit drtimdelivers.com. Dr. Michelle Wolford, N.D. is trained as both a natural healer and a Californialicensed medical doctor in Encinitas. She also advises against flu shots. “For patients with flulike symptoms or who are TURN TO FLU ON A14

RANCHO SANTA FE — Detectives from the Encinitas Sheriff's Station are asking for assistance from the public to identify two men wanted in connection with a home invasion robbery in Rancho Santa Fe. On Dec. 20, 2012 between 12:15 p.m. and 12:30 p.m., two men entered a home in the

5000 block of El Mirlo, Rancho Santa Fe, where one of the suspects brandished a black gun (unknown type) and held the housekeeper at gunpoint during the robbery. The housekeeper was not hurt. The men were driving a blue Hyundai Elantra at the time of the robbery that was later recovered by deputies.

One suspect is described as a white male adult, in his late 20s to early 30s, 5 feet 7 inches to 5 feet 8 inches tall, weighting 150 to 160 pounds. He has a long, narrow thin face, thin nose, gaunt face, tan complexion and shoulder length straight blond hair. The second suspect is described as a white male

adult, also in his late 20s to early 30s, approximately 6 feet tall, 180 pounds, with a tan complexion, and black and grey short wavy to curly hair. Crime Stoppers is offering up to a $1,000 reward for information leading to an arrest. Calls may be made anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477.

New golf club member category gets approval By Patty McCormac

A CBP “Midnight Express” high speed boat patrols the waterways. The Border Patrol is asking residents to help in curbing maritime smuggling. Photo courtesy of Gerald Nino

Border Patrol seeks help with maritime smuggling By Bianca Kaplanek

COAST CITIES — Border Patrol agents are asking Del Mar residents for help in curbing maritime smuggling on city beaches, particularly between Fourth and Eighth streets, following two known events in December. “We are actively pursuing this and we are asking for the public’s help because we can’t be everywhere,” agent Edward Cleary said during the public comment portion of the Jan. 14 City Council meeting. “As we gain greater control of our land border, the smuggling groups have moved to the maritime route to continue their practices,” he said. “These panga landings have occurred in Del Mar.” The Coastal Border Enforcement Team, which works with the Coast Guard and local police,patrols beaches and bays 24/7 waiting for events to happen, Cleary said. Most occur between midnight and 6 a.m. “Smuggling events are not random,” he said.“They’re constructed very well.” Cleary said spotters drive around coastal regions looking for areas without law enforcement or a lot of pedestrian

traffic. The pangas are usually offshore with radio communications. Operators get the boats as close to shore as possible. “Everyone jumps out and runs to a van or pickup truck,” he said. “Normally they are close to a major road with freeway access.” Cleary said residents should call 911 or the Coast Guard at (800) 854-9834 if they see suspicious activity, such as “a whole bunch of people running through your neighborhood at 2 or 3 in the morning into a van.” “I know it sounds a little simplistic but yes, that is exactly what’s going on,” Cleary said. “But don’t get involved. Just be a good witness and get all the information you can because you are dealing with cartel members. “There’s a lot of money in human smuggling right now,” he said, adding that smugglers can make between $5,000 and $10,000 per person. “Wherever they’re being successful at is where they’ll keep moving,” Cleary said. “Last month they liked Del Mar.”

RANCHO SANTA FE — The Rancho Santa Fe Golf Course got a green light on a new membership category at the Jan. 17 meeting of the Association. The board approved the Junior Executive Membership with a limit of 10 memberships on a first-come, first-served basis. This new category allows a resident to pay installments on the $50,000 enrollment fee until the age of 48, when he or she would become a full member. “The new category does not directly impact the general membership of the Association and is basically a modification to the method of collecting the established enrollment fee,” said Peter Smith, Association manager. Smith said at the board’s recent retreat, it approved the category with a limitation of 10 memberships. “In order for this community to thrive, we must first offer people the incentive to move here versus other communities and once they are here,we must actively reinforce their incentive to stay,” said Craig McAllister, Association director. Al Castro, the golf club’s general manager, said these new members will be charged the same dues, assessments and other charges as a regular member and will enjoy the same privileges as a regular member. “It is a way for them to join the club sooner then later,” Castro said. This new category is aimed at the younger homeowner who maybe moved to

the Covenant because of the excellent school and has other financial obligations that would keep him away from the golf club for years. “Because Association members have made the commitment to buy a home here, we should make the barriers for their participation in the various Association clubs and activities as low as feasibly possible,” McAllister said. “This can be accomplished through membership programs such as the golf club’s Junior Executive Membership program.” Castro said Association voting members who have not yet reached the age of 48 may apply as a Junior Executive member. The enrollment fee will be divided equally over the years remaining until age 48 but will not be greater than 10 years. He said for instance, if a member is 35 at the time of the application, they will pay onetenth of the current enrollment fee in installments. A member who is 45 at the time of the application will pay one-third of the current enrollment fee. Golf clubs everywhere are losing members faster than new ones can be signed up, but making it more difficult is that Rancho Santa Fe’s pool of possible members is much smaller because it can only sign up people live within the Covenant. The optimum number of members at the club is around 700. Over the past few years, the club has lost about 200 members. “If we are able to do this, the entire Association will benefit not only socially as a community, but financially as well,” McAllister said.


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O PINION &EDITORIAL

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of the Rancho Santa Fe News

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS JAN. 25, 2013

Just how brown is the brownest budget cut? By Thomas D. Elias

COMMUNITY COMMENTARIES The Community Commentary section is open to everyone. Opinions expressed in the Community Commentary section are in no way representative of The Coast News Group. Send submissions, no longer than 700 words, to editor@coastnewsgroup.com with “Commentary” in the subject line. Submission does not guarantee publication. If published, please wait one month for next submission.

Cycling is huge and we love it By Mark Lathrop

Cycling is huge in Encinitas and we love it. We don’t like being called names, but we have all been called something while on the road, so we keep riding out of our passion for the sport. Encinitas gained its national and international reputation in the mid-80s and is still tentatively hanging on to that reputation. Thousands ride through town each week and if anything goes wrong there are seven shops to give professional service. Hundreds of professional and top amateurs train here in the winter and most of the residents of Encinitas welcome them warmly. In the early ‘90s Lance Armstrong lived in an apartment at the top of Encinitas Boulevard; Marianne Berglund (World road champion from Sweden) lived up Chesterfield in Cardiff, Greg LeMond stayed at the Rancho Santa Fe Inn; John Howard (gold medal winner at the Pan Am games) lived in Encinitas and Axel Merkx (whose father was the greatest cyclist ever) showed up every winter to train with Swami’s Cycling Club. Encinitas’ own Swami’s Cycling Club was the nation’s best amateur team in the ‘90s. Their riders won 10 national championships

and represented the United States and Canada in the Olympics, World Championships and top international races. The first rider to break through was Ryan Dahl from Leucadia whose father owns Wax Research. Ryan represented the U.S. at the Cyclocross World Championships in Belgium in 1990. Swami’s latest alumnus to ride for the U.S. was Chris Horner at the London Olympics this year. He joined Swami’s as a happy-go-lucky 19-year-old from La Mesa in 1991. Even though he now rides the biggest races in Europe for Radio Shack, he still will give you a wave and smile. You will probably see him on the road this winter riding the back roads of North County. I don’t want to leave out the triathletes, who have as great, if not greater, impact on riders in Encinitas. Scott Tinley in Olivenhain, Mark Allen and Julie Moss in Cardiff; Paula Newby Frasier and Greg Welch in Encinitas are all Ironman Hawaii winners and trained here full time. They attracted pros and amateurs alike to swim our oceans, ride the world-class roads of North County, and run the trails of Rancho Santa Fe. They’ve come from Australia, Japan, Europe,

Africa, and all over North America. Their intense training, positive outlook, and camaraderie have inspired us all. But, I’m sure you’ve noticed, not all cyclist are elite athletes. A great majority are weekend warriors that love to be outside putting in a hard effort and rewarding themselves with a cup of coffee. Fifteen years ago I knew everyone on the Coast Highway, but now I’m hard pressed to recognize anyone. Cycling has become a mainstream sport with hundreds of thousands of San Diegans participating. Encinitas should renew its effort to enhance our local, national and international cycling reputation. My hope is “the powers that be” will think of the cyclist first when upgrading our streets. They will think of the cyclist first when developing new transportation corridors. They will think of the cyclist first when we want Encinitas to be more intimate, quiet and unique. I know that will attract more cars, bring people who want to escape the chaos (Los Angeles), but over time they too will come to understand what we already know. Cycling is huge in Encinitas. Mark Lathrop is a Leucadia resident.

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It seemed just a bit odd when Jerry Brown, elected to his second go-’round as governor on a strong environmental program, almost immediately abandoned this state’s least expensive and most productive cleanair and environmental preservation law. Well, OK, he didn’t completely ax the Williamson Act, a 1965 law that assures 15 million acres of open California land will not be built over for at least 20 years. Nope, he left $1,000 in the program, just like predecessor Arnold Schwarzenegger did the previous year. Under the Williamson Act, named for former Republican state legislator John Williamson, who thought up the idea in the 1960s, farmers can

crisis because it takes years to work off a Williamson Act pact. But a new study from UC Davis suggests some damage is in the offing because a few counties are already opting out of continuing the tax exemptions on their own and farmers and ranchers have been thinking about contingencies. The Davis study (http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu) found that if current Williamson Act policies continue, owners of about 20 percent of all California ranchland would likely sell, reports author William Wetzel in the peer-reviewed journal California Agriculture. Fully 23 percent of the 700 ranchers surveyed for the report said they were likely or very likely to end their entire businesses if they lose Williamson Act tax relief.

He restored those cuts after this column informed him of a landmark 2003 Purdue University study get property tax exemptions if they commit to keeping their fields and ranges in agricultural use. Most contracts run for 15 or 20 years. In exchange for the property tax revenues they lose, the 53 participating counties were long given state funds. This came to about $37 million at its peak in 2005, even then a mere drop in the state budget bucket. But Schwarzenegger in 2007 started trying to cut Williamson Act funding, one small way to make up revenues lost when he lowered vehicle license fees upon taking office in 2003. He restored those cuts after this column informed him of a landmark 2003 Purdue University study which found that every acre of farmland in that university’s state of Indiana pulls about 0.107 tons of carbon dioxide from the air each year. That’s for all types of farmland, including pastures, orchards, cornfields and more. This is a lowball figure, of course, because it’s based on lands with almost no green plants to remove carbon from the air in winter. But even under those conditions, the math works out to a minimum of 1.7 million tons of carbon taken from the air yearly by Williamson Act acres. That’s 3.5 billion pounds. No program to cut greenhouse gases even comes close to those numbers, but two governors now have thrown this one on the mercy of county supervisors, who have mostly chosen to continue it. But not all. And since farmers can’t predict when the local political climate might change, some are now thinking about selling off ranchland and other property that’s currently protected. There will be no immediate

“Of those who would sell, 76 percent predicted buyers would develop the land for non-agriculture uses,” he said. This means a large share of California’s open space could be lost through penny-wise and pound-foolish public policy and budget decisions. Loss of that open space would impact far more than greenhouse gas problems. Reports Wetzel, “Almost all California’s surface water, including drinking water for millions of people, passes through rangeland — grasslands, oak woodlands, wetlands, shrub lands and desert.” That land accounts for 57 million acres of the state’s 101 million acre total land area. The bad news here is plain: More promotion of climate change just when it’s becoming clear how much weather craziness the current level of change is causing. Worse air quality. Unpredictable consequences for drinking water supplies. The good news is that the damage isn’t yet done and the farmers and ranchers now thinking about selling are years away from being able to do it, under their existing Williamson Act contracts. So Brown, as Schwarzenegger once did, has plenty of time to restore his brownest cut ever. Whether he does it will provide a good test of how much the environment and climate change really mean to him. Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” now available in an updated second edition. His email address is tdelias@aol.com


RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

EDUCATIONAL O PPORTUNITIES

At MiraCosta College, you can start here, go anywhere Oceanside High School graduate Laura Ojeda wanted to go to college, and she really, really wanted to go to a University of California or California State University campus. But she had more than a few misgivings. “I really wasn’t ready for it,” she recalled. “MiraCosta College was perfect for me. It prepared me well for where I am right now.” Where Ojeda is now is Cal State San Marcos, with plans on going to graduate school en route to becoming an academic counselor. At MiraCosta College, Ojeda focused on taking a full load of prerequisite courses in small classrooms for just a few hundred dollars per semester – as opposed to spending thousands of dollars annually for tuition at a fouryear university that would have stuck her in lecture halls with hundreds of other students. With the help of the college’s Transfer Center, Ojeda also started working on an education plan, a roadmap of study that would lead to a successful future. She met with counselors regularly, and she took tours of universities in which she was interested. “MiraCosta College was there every step of the way,” she said. “They held workshops that assisted you, really guided you on what you would have to do to get to

where you wanted to go. They had representatives from universities come to campus all the time. It was the entire atmosphere that exists at MiraCosta that was incredible.” And, Ojeda added, MiraCosta College was a bar-

MiraCosta College was perfect for me. It prepared me well for where I am right now.” Laura Ojeda Cal State San Marcos student

gain. In fact, attending either the Oceanside or Cardiff campus and then transferring to a school such as UC San Diego will save most students more than $24,000 in tuition and fees. Transferring from MiraCosta College to Cal State San Marcos will save nearly $11,000. As if that weren’t convincing enough, full-time workers in 2010 who had an associate’s degree earned 24 percent more than those with only a high school diploma, while those with a bachelor’s

degree earned 83 percent more. Which is largely why MiraCosta College is so committed to getting interested students into four-year universities. Among the programs offered at MiraCosta College are Transfer Admission Guarantees that apply to most University of California campuses. “We have a majority of the UC’s saying that if you follow these (Transfer Admission Guarantee) rules and maintain a specific grade point average, then you will be admitted to our school,” said Dr. Lise Flocken, faculty director of MiraCosta College’s Transfer Center. Students looking to transfer to schools elsewhere in the country can take advantage of MiraCosta’s Western Undergrad Exchange for significant savings. Instead of having to pay out-of-state tuition of $10,344 to attend the University of New Mexico, for example, a MiraCosta College student would only have to pay $4,536. “MiraCosta has some very real, very significant benefits to students planning to go to a four-year university or college,” Dr. Flocken said. “Parents are always asking, `Are you sure? Is this for real?’”

Ninety percent of Pacific Academy students achieve honor roll status Enrolling in a quality college preparatory school enhances students’ chances of attaining the academic and emotional preparation needed to succeed at the university level and beyond. This preparation ideally starts in Middle School. Pacific Academy, established in 1997, has been a private

individual needs and learning styles. Parents receive frequent progress reports and are encouraged to contact staff. As a result, rather than possibly falling through the cracks in a crowded public school, ninety percent of Pacific Academy students achieve honor roll status. In addition, students receive

Our ultimate aim, is to develop ‘Global Citizens’ of the 21st century.” Dr.Erika Sanchez Pacific Academy principal,

school for grades 7-12. In order to best serve students and its community, Pacific Academy is expanding it’s Middle School Program, to serve 6th grade. Middle School Students at Pacific Academy enjoy a 1:10 teacher-student ratio unattainable by today’s public budget strapped schools. Smaller class sizes allow teachers to provide hands-on project-based learning and community based learning that students find relevant and enjoyable. Teachers actively identify student strengths and develop individual education plans that include parents and cater to

individualized college counseling, starting in the 6th grade, to provide all the support needed through the developmental process. This Middle School expansion will allow 6th graders to take advantage of middle school programs and privileges experienced by our students. All of our students, high school and middle school, participate in exploratory education each Friday and may include community service projects, field trips, workshops, guest presentations, or student projects. All teachers have full teaching credentials and bachelor degrees, and many

hold Masters or Doctorates in Education like Dr. Erika Sanchez, Pacific Academy’s principal, who earned a Masters and Doctoral degree in sociology with an emphasis in education. “Our ultimate aim,” stated Erika Sanchez, “is to develop ‘Global Citizens’ of the 21st century, critical thinkers [who] make choices guided by respect for oneself and others.” Character traits like responsibility or cooperation permeate the curriculum each quarter, and students who demonstrate the emphasized character trait, receive recognition. Mr. Vikas Srivastava, this semester’s project-based learning facilitator, and all students collaborated and are planning a three-legged walk that pairs students from diverse backgrounds in an effort to eliminate discrimination and stereotyping. Mr. Vikas explains, “The theory is that everyone is diverse because we all have unique stories, and if we got to know one another’s stories, we would have more understanding and compassion between us.” After participating in numerous projects like this one, it’s no surprise that Pacific Academy students become compassionate, creative, inquisitive, and responsible global citizens.

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JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

EDUCATIONAL O PPORTUNITIES Olivenhain Country Preschool and Infant Center for the Ar ts...

A balance of academics and arts Olivenhain Country Preschool and Infant Center for the Arts mission is to provide your child with a safe, loving, nurturing environment to acquire proper skills and values to prepare them for their future. Here at OCP our teachers provide an environment of many mediums encouraging your child to explore and learn. For example, Cooking, the arts, rhythm and movement, gardening, sign language and Spanish. Beginning a foreign language at an early age, along with our continued use of

these skills throughout our program, allows us to see the benefits of a second language in action. When learning is presented through many mediums, with a balance of academics and arts along with kinesthetic and tactile experiences, children will retain more of this knowledge. Our daily activities include a variety of learning, all wrapped in fun, play and exploration, with your child using their imagination. We look forward to sharing with you the unique advantages of our environ-

ment and programs and we invite you to tour our facility, meet our teachers, and see for yourself how kids are laughing and growing while learning at OCP.

Come and experience what makes us unique: • A safe, loving, nurturing environment • Hands on art & crafts, cooking, gardening • Our family values: politeness, good manners & respect • Art & nature exploration in a cheerful setting

North County’s Premier Catholic Elementary School

Introducing The “New” St. James Academy Rolling Out Our New Brand For over 60 years, St. James Academy has exemplified a higher devotion to excellence. Many things have changed over the years: the building has been completely remodeled, technology is lightning quick, communication is global, access to information is immediate, and now we have a new brand. This spring we are rolling out a new logo, website, slogan and other brand elements. This new brand was developed to update our look and represent us to the highest standards of academic education and our caring Catholic values. The Heart Of Our School Remains The Same We are not changing who we are just our look. Our learning is based on the teachings and philosophy of the Catholic Church and following Gospel values to make a difference in our world. As the challenges of contemporary life evolve, St. James Academy continuously evaluates the best processes to enable our students to meet the current and future needs of our community. The vision for St. James Academy is to enable students, educators, and our community to gain both the desire and the

opportunity to practice Christ-centered action in everyday life. Our Cherished Preschool In living our vision, we have grown to include an outstanding preschool. This program’s goal for three and four year olds is to ensure that your children's

We are not changing who we are, just our look. first school experiences are filled with love, laughter, and learning. One to One iPad Program We are in our pilot year of a one to one iPad program. Next year the program will include fourth grade through seventh. The rest of the school utilizes a school set of iPads as this program is offering our students the opportunity to utilize new technologies and learning techniques in order to give them a greater advantage in their learning and future educational and career choices.

The Junior High Program We have an almost completely new Junior High program. They have some extra minutes in their day, 2 days each week of block scheduling, a choice of electives and a flex period where they can get extra help from teachers, retake or makeup tests, work on homework, and a new surf club! Fully Accredited And Dedicated St. James is a fully accredited, Catholic elementary school (K-8) that has been serving the San Diego North County Coastal community since 1952. St. James employs fully accredited teachers. Students at St. James are blessed with a dedicated teaching and support staff committed to providing a strong educational program that integrates spiritual, moral, academic, social, cultural and physical precepts. The Academy is part of the vibrant St. James Catholic Community. A Hidden Gem St. James Academy is tucked away in a beautiful Solana Beach neighborhood, which gives us a great sense of privacy. If you live in North County, call us for a tour of this hidden gem at (858) 7551777 or visit our website at www.saintjamesacademy.com.

Rancho residents ready upcoming Bishop’s School auction COAST CITIES — Rancho Santa Fe resident Tina and David Thomas are this year’s co-chairs along with Janna and Marco Monroy, for the Bishop’s School Auction Committee. The committee is seeing red; but not to worry, this is a good thing – very good. With an entertainment lineup led by the one-and-only “Red Rocker,” Van Halen’s Sammy Hagar, the school’s upcoming 2013 annual auction, Baja Knights, will rock the campus and “Raise Some Cabo.” Held on the school’s campus on April 20, the annual

auction supports the School’s Need-Based Student Financial Aid and Faculty Professional Growth Programs. The casually cool 2013 event features a premium wine auction, dinner for 500 and both live and silent auctions with an emphasis on items that offer unique experiences. “When we think of the lives touched by the fundraising of the auction, it’s an amazing feeling,” said Janna Monroy. “This is why Marco, Tina, David and I are enjoying the honor of co-chairing this

incredibly important event and also why we are now reaching out to the school community and communityat-large for support.” Several select underwriting opportunities are available, each one playing an important role in the success of the auction’s ability to maintain the excellence of the financial aid and faculty professional growth programs. With Baja-themed levels, underwriting opportunities range from $1,000 to more than $25,000 and offer several benefits to sponsors. From inclusion in all auction

advertising and publicity materials including signage, web site, auction catalog, media outreach and exposure to all parents of The Bishop’s School through the school’s internal communications, to Patron Level Seating and admission to the exclusive Patron Reception, sponsors will gain not only exposure, but an opportunity to truly understand what this party with a purpose does for the school students and faculty. “The School’s NeedBased Student Financial Aid Program helps bring diversity to the campus, which is so

very important,” said Tina Thomas. “The benefits our students receive in a classroom filled with children of varying backgrounds, native languages, beliefs and experiences help them become wellrounded world citizens. Without a program in place that offers the ability for all academically talented children, regardless of their ability to pay, to receive an education at Bishop's would drastically change the face of our School. This is what truly speaks to The Bishop’s School’s mission.”

For information on Baja Knights or to discuss a potential sponsorship or donation, contact the school’s advancement office at (858) 875-0804. For more information, visit bishops.com. Be our fan on

theCoastNews.com and click link


RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

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Travelers will find hiking, lobster and even more in Maine E’LOUISE ONDASH Hit the Road OK, I admit it. I’m directionally challenged, but just look at a map of Acadia National Park in Maine and you’ll understand how it’s easy to lose your way. There are water and mountains no matter where you look, but I’m not complaining. This unique, tiny corner of the country is worth the extra effort that it takes to get there. With lakes and ragged coastline everywhere, Maine’s topography is clearly unlike Southern California’s, but that’s why we wanted to see it. The park consumes the lion’s share of Mount Desert Island, oddly named from a Californian’s point of view because it’s hardly a desert. This fragmented island also is home to the town of Bar Harbor and many other small towns and villages. Where the town boundaries end and the park’s begin is not easily ascertained For instance, the park’s Cadillac Mountain, which at 1,532 feet is the highest point on the Atlantic coast, is technically within the town limits of Bar Harbor. So we quit worrying about the map and followed

the signs, which took us up a winding, 3.5-mile road to the top of the mountain, a pinkgranite mound with a spectacular 360-degree view. Like ants on a picnic, people fanned out all over the expansive, flat-rock summit, just enjoying the panorama, the space and the crisp, lateSeptember air. Later we hiked the Jordan Pond Shore Trail, a 3.3mile loop that hugs the pond and gave us our first glimpse of autumn color — glowing crimson maples and pyracantha bushes with fire-engine red berries. And we finally saw the much-touted Bubble Mountain with two rounded mounds rising about 800 and 900 feet. On a clear, still day, their reflection in Jordan Pond makes a striking scene. Among Maine’s distinctions and delights are the musical, clickity-clack names of the Native American tribes who first inhabited this area: the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet and Micmac, known collectively as the Wabanaki or People of the Dawnland.This name may derive from the fact that Cadillac Mountain is the first land on the Atlantic seaboard to receive the sun’s rays from Oct. 7 to March 6. According to the National Park Service, some Wabanaki still come to the area “to gather sweetgrass, sell handmade baskets, and to show respect for this sacred

The Mount Desert Oceanarium, north of Bar Harbor, is a teaching facility where visitors and locals alike can learn about Maine’s environment, wildlife, sea life and the fishing industry. Here a docent and local lobsterwoman explains lobster fishing and the life cycle of the crustaceans. Photo by Jerry Ondash

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landscape, as their ancestors did for thousands of years.” Like any town on the edge of a national park, Bar Harbor is a busy little burg that provides the usual tourist amenities — hotels, restaurants, souvenir and ice cream shops. Not being much of a shopper, I was delighted to discover the beautiful pier and harbor at the base of Main Street, which often plays host to cruise ships. On this brilliantly clear day, Frenchman Bay looked like a vivid, high-definition backdrop. To keep auto traffic at a minimum around the islands and in the park, frequent free bus transportation is availTURN TO HIT THE ROAD ON A14

The early colors of autumn can be seen on the 3.3-mile hike around Jordan Pond in Acadia National Park. Photo by Jerry Ondash


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JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

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JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Visit us coastnewsgroup.com

Immediately after an auction sign was posted for leftover Valitar equipment at Del Mar Fairgrounds, there was a flurry of interest in the available items, including the 45,000-square-foot red tent, from rental companies, Pala Casino and dealers that buy and sell horse ranches. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

Big red tent up for auction By Bianca Kaplanek

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Anyone in the market for an enormous red tent should save the date. On Jan. 29, beginning at 10 a.m., the 45,000-square-foot infamous structure that’s taken up a large portion of the Del Mar Fairgrounds parking lot for the past several months will be sold at an everything-mustgo auction. All funds collected will be turned over to a bankruptcy court to pay off creditors of Equustria Development Inc., the company created by Mark Remley to produce Valitar, a Cirque du Soleil-type show featuring horses and humans. Originally planned to run in Del Mar from Nov. 16 to Dec. 31 before heading out on a 10-month, five city tour of the United States, the show was unexpectedly canceled after only four public performances. Remley allegedly stopped paying show expenses, including the performers, and Equustria Development filed for bankruptcy in midDecember. Fischer Auction Company was hired to liquidate the company’s assets. In

addition to the main tent, which cost millions of dollars to erect, the 126 additional items that will be auctioned off include stable, performer, concession, entry and VIP tents, a copier, shredder and refrigerator, a variety of furniture, chariots, hoses, construction materials and fire extinguishers. Jeff Bloom, co-owner of the family business, said Fischer has conducted many bankruptcy auctions, but never one with a 45,000square-foot tent. He said there has been interest since the auction sign was posted on the structure last week from rental companies, Pala Casino and dealers that buy and sell horse ranches. A preview of available items will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 28.The auction will be held live and online, with a 15 percent Internet buyer premium. All accounts must be settled at the end of the auction. Only cash or credit cards will be accepted. A pre-auction authorization will be performed to establish available credit. For all items other than the tents, checkout will be immediately following the auction and Jan. 30 and 31 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For the tents, buyers must make prior arrangements and be

ready to have them dismantled and removed from the fairgrounds within seven days. The dismantling contractor must provide proof of insurance. A $1,000 to $5,000 cleanup deposit, due at the time of purchase on the tents, flooring and sand, will be refunded once the lot is left clear of debris. If a tent or large purchase over $10,000 is made, the buyer will have 24 hours to make wire transfer or payment arrangements. Cash will be due by noon Jan. 30 or a credit card will be charged. Buyers must take down, pack and arrange for shipping if needed. All items must be removed by the designated dates. There will be no refunds for items left onsite. Everything is being sold on a where is/as is basis. To say fairgrounds officials will be happy to see the remains of Valitar removed is an understatement since they can’t access the site. “It’s out of our hands,” Linda Zweig, fairgrounds media director, said. “We can’t even go inside the fenced area.” There will be no minimum bids and bidding will continue until all items are sold, Bloom said. “We’re expecting a large turnout,” he added. “It should be a fun auction.”


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RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

A RTS &ENTERTAINMENT

Send your arts & entertainment news to arts@thecoastnews.com

Painter transcends obstacles to share inspiration ARTS CALENDAR Got an item for Arts calendar? Send the details via email to calendar@coastnewsgroup.com.

JAN. 26

MARINES IN CONCERT Get tickets now for the free Marine Band Concert at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 and Feb. 8 at the California Center for the Arts, featuring the 1st Marine Division Band based at Camp Pendleton commemorating the anniversary of the band’s organization during World War II. For tickets, call (800) 988-4253 or visit artcenter.org.

STILL

TIME

FOR

ART

Through Jan. 31, visit the San Dieguito Art Guild exhibit at the Off Track Gallery, Lumberyard Shopping Center, 937 S. Coast Highway 101, Encinitas, showcasing the work of more than 100 artists in a range of media, from digital art and watercolor to sculpture and jewelry. For more information,call (760) 9423636.

JAN. 28

ART HISTORY San Diego Museum of Art, North County Chapter will host John Marciari, San Diego Museum of Art curator of European Art and Head of Provenance Research from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 28 in St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Parish Hall, 15th Street and Maiden Lane, Del Mar. Marciari will talk about the first catalogue of “The Italian and Spanish Paintings in SDMA.” Cost is $5. For more information, call (760) 706-6436.

JAN. 29

MIRACOSTA ART The art exhibit “Head Strong,”featuring the work of artists Carolyn Castaño, Rubén Ortiz-Torres, Iana Quesnell, Vallo Riberto, Gary Singer and Chris Warr, will be on display Jan. 29 through Feb. 21 in the Kruglak Gallery, located inside the student center at MiraCosta’s Oceanside Campus, 1 Barnard Drive. Presentations by the artists and a free reception will be held 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 4. For additional information, call (760) 795-6657.

JAN. 30

FAMILY FUN A special free family music program sponsored by the Friends of the Carmel Valley Library will be presented at 7 p.m. Jan. 30 in the library’s community room, 3919 Townsgate Drive in Carmel Valley. It will feature concert pianist Anna Savvas performing works of J.S. Bach, Mozart, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Ravel, and Debussy. For further information call (858) 552-1668.

FEB. 2

MO’ BLUES Robin Henkel brings the solo blues from 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 2, at Wine Steals, 1953 San Elijo, Cardiff. For more information, call (760) 230-2657. ART PREVIEWS The Oceanside Museum of Art will host a preview reception for both “In Search of Shadows: James Hubbell Sculpture” and “Synesthesia: Manifestations of Energy,” paintings by Ellen Salk and sound by Christopher Adler at 5 p.m. Feb. 2 at OMA, 704 Pier View Way, Oceanside.

FEB. 3

MUSIC WITH F RIENDS Friends of the Encinitas Library invite all to its First Sunday Music Series with "Singchronicity," from 2 to 3 p.m. Feb. 3 in the Encinitas Library Community Room, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas. Call (760) 753-7376 for more information.

KAY COLVIN A Brush With Art They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. San Diego artist Michael Carini has triumphed over adversity as he makes giving back to the community his top priority. Growing up in San Diego, Carini’s artistic talents were apparent before age 13 when his work was selected for a youth art show at the San Diego Museum of Art. As a senior at UNI (now Cathedral Catholic) High School in CarmelValley,his tessellated drawing won first place in the San Diego County fair. Working his way through Loyola Marymount University, where in 2006 he graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in Studio Arts and a minor in Art History, his extraordinary artistic talents were recognized as he apprenticed under acclaimed artists Jane Brucker and Roland Reiss. However, life has not been effortless for Michael Carini. Challenges including neurological disorders such as Tourette’s syndrome and obsessive-compulsive tendencies have often made it difficult for him to function socially and professionally. Additionally, a violent assault in his home in 2009 required many months of healing from physical and emotional trauma. Carini states pensively, “We all have obstacles we have to overcome and times of adversity. Rather than focus on the negative, however, I make a conscious choice to turn it into something positive.” Never allowing them to define his character, Carini states, “My conditions and experiences are significant components of who I am, or who I was at a specific period of my life, and that is undoubtedly reflected in my work.” He continues, “My work shares personal narratives of my own life and experiences, filtered through a broad spectrum of art history of various cultures, philosophy, theology, geometry, and literature.” Carini has courageously risen to his challenges. During the summer of 2012 the obsessive, socially uncomfortable artist faced his fears during a 50-day solo residency program in an extremely small, completely exposed studio space in the middle of

Downtown San Diego. He says of the confrontational experience, “It was very much a sociological experiment — me being in a box with people walking down Broadway all day long looking in at me.”With his door open to the public during the 500 hours in the space, Carini says, “I was there to spark interest, and my responsibility was to make people feel welcome and that art is approachable.” He adds,“It was about me breaking out of my metaphorical box and learning to paint like a child again — intuitively, organically and naturally with just a brush, resulting in a freely expressive new body of work.” He emerged with a 30piece series titled, “The Boy In The Box.” It proved to be a transformative experience on many levels. Carini has escaped the limitations of his “box” with Michael Carini at work on his newest 9-canvas polyptych painting titled “Regenaissance.” Courtesy photo Houdini-like finesse. He is currently focused on Donating his time and tal- from that.” Carini goes on to say,“Our Kay Colvin is an art consultant and ents to nonprofit organizations, working to increase art aware- differences and our unique director of the L Street Fine Art ness, and providing opportuni- experiences are the greatest Gallery in San Diego’s Gaslamp ties and inspiration for other thing we have to offer the Quarter. She specializes in promoting artists, Carini states, “This is world. My hope is that by shar- emerging and mid-career artists and the greatest thing I can offer ing my own, others may find a bringing enrichment programs to elethe world and I could receive way to grow through inspira- mentary schools through The Kid’s no greater gift in return than to tional and creative avenues College. Contact her at know I am making a difference such as painting, or simply dis- kaycolvin@lstreetfineart.com. cover that there is hope.” in people’s lives.” With four distinctive bodHe continues, “I am putting myself out there and never ies of work already to his credhold back. I will always give it, Carini states, “As I continue everything I have to give…and to grow, continuously redefinMichael Carini then I will give everything that ing myself, I will have new boxes to break out of. My work, Artist is left.” One of the most popular undoubtedly, will change in creating an immense 9-canvas entries from Carini’s online the process.” Selected Michael Carini polyptych work based on frac- daily journal of hope and inspitals, the Golden Ratio, and the ration reads, “I will never apol- paintings are currently on disconcept of a Rubik’s Cube with ogize for being me, but I will play at the Merrill Lynch virtually countless orienta- apologize for the times that I Building, 701 B Street. For links to his daily jouram not.” He comments, “The tions. Carini’s attitude about most important thing about nal, monthly “The Painter’s giving back to the community being an artist, in my opinion, Edge” column, and to learn has been a significant aspect of is making sure that you are more about the artist, visit being you. I will never waver MichaelCarini.com. transcending his conditions.

We all have obstacles we have to overcome and times of adversity.”


A12

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

A RTS &ENTERTAINMENT

Send your arts & entertainment news to arts@thecoastnews.com

Casting search continues for RSF’s ‘affluent women’ By Tony Cagala

From left: Isabelle Nelisse, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Megan Charpentier and Jessica Chastain in “Mama,” executive produced by Guillermo del Toro. Photo courtesy Universal Pictures

‘Mama’ is a terrifying tale told tenderly By Noah S. Lee

Pulsating with terror at every twist and tenderness at every turn, “Mama” emerges as a solid genre story that not only sends chills down your spine, but also haunts the depths of your soul. Horror films may have lost a considerable amount of respect nowadays, but that doesn’t mean they are terrible by definition. When given the appropriate treatment, even a genre such as this can experience better days than it usually does. So, what do you get when you have a project with Guillermo del Toro serving as executive producer and Jessica Chastain leading the cast? The end result is “Mama,” a terrifying but touching scary tale that shows just how far a mother’s love for her children goes. Five years ago, sisters Victoria (Megan Charpentier) and Lilly (Isabelle Nélisse) disappeared from their suburban neighborhood, leaving behind no trace. After the kids are discovered alive and well inside a decrepit log cabin, they are placed into the care of their Uncle Lucas (Nikolaj CosterWaldau) and his girlfriend, Annabel (Jessica Chastain), who is not at all enthusiastic about taking care of the children. It soon becomes apparent that the girls are not the only ones the couple has welcomed into their home. As Annabel tries to help Victoria and Lilly readjust to living normal lives, she begins to feel the presence of a sinister force lurking in the house. Are the girls experi-

encing the usual post-traumatic stress, or is a ghostlike entity in their midst? And how could they have survived on their own in the woods? Spanish director Andres Muschietti shows no bounds when it comes to establishing the mood of the film. I liked how the blue, black and gray colors in many of the scenes worked both ways: you can feel dread during one moment, and then warmth in another. Plus, the lingering gaze of the camera heightens the tension and suspense within the narrative as you wonder what kept those girls alive and what will happen to their new parental figures. Your heart pounds as you witness Victoria and Lilly begging Annabel not to venture into a specific area of the house, or when you watch Dr. Dreyfuss talk to the girls about “Mama.” And yet, there’s room for a soft side, most noticeably when Annabel breathes out air onto Lilly’s hands to calm her down, as well as her nailing the windows shut for the girls’ safety. It’s not easy to achieve that sense of balance in the horror genre, but as “Mama” proves, such a feat is not impossible. It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that the supernatural aspect of the film contains traces of del Toro’s “Pan’s Labyrinth,” given he serves as executive producer of “Mama.” Nevertheless, the design of the ghostly entity is hideous yet tragic, and the way it slithers and darts across the environment is eerily mesmerizing. Jessica Chastain han-

dles herself well in spite of her adopted rock musician appearance, proving that looks can be deceiving. Her Annabel humanizes the story in a way that may never have occurred had she not joined this project. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau has his share of moments, but it’s obvious this “Game of Thrones” alumnus is playing second fiddle to the Oscar-nominated actress, and he doesn’t seem to mind. Both Megan Charpentier and Isabelle Nélisse are perfectly cast as the two girls; they steal a good portion of the film. The only complaint I have regarding “Mama” is the pacing of its ending scenes. I can’t say for certain whether the unfolding of the final events should have been sped up or slowed down, but the manner in which the end proceeds isn’t quite what I would define as “smooth.” This downside doesn’t take away from the fact that “Mama” is still a good horror film; it’s just an oversight I feel could’ve been refined. In the end, “Mama” triumphs as a competent genre keeper and is sure to delight horror fans looking for something with far more substance than what is usually available. Even if you’re not one for scary movie nights, this one rises above the slump that most fall into and is worth checking out. MPAA rating: PG-13 for violence and terror,some disturbing images and thematic elements. Running time: 1 hour 40 minutes Playing: General release

RANCHO SANTA FE — “We haven’t tapped into our billionaires, yet,” said Alex Shaw, a casting director with Los Angeles-based Asylum Entertainment. But that doesn’t mean the search is over. Rumors and speculation had been flitting about after it was leaked in December that a reality TV show featuring “affluent housewives,” from La Jolla and Rancho Santa Fe, one of the wealthiest zip codes in the country, was possibly in the works to air on what has only been described as a “major cable network.” Since then, Asylum Entertainment, which has cast shows for several other reality TV shows appearing on HGTV, the Travel Channel and others released a statement earlier this month saying in part: “We are seeking upscale, affluent women living fabulous and glamorous lives.” As of two weeks ago, they had already received about 100 applicants, according to Shaw. With casting still underway, and expecting to continue for the next few months, nothing has officially been announced, Shaw explained. “We’re going down there (Rancho Santa Fe) to be nosy and see what we find,” she said. Shaw, who helped cast women for the “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills,” referenced the Orange County version of the show as an instance into why conservative-minded areas (such as Rancho Santa Fe is perceived to be), was chosen as a possible shooting location. “I think on the outside people thought that a gated community was a little boring, maybe a little ‘Peyton Place,’” she said. “But on the inside, there’s always stuff going on; sometimes the more conservative a community, the more interesting it is behind closed doors.” She added, “Even a conservative person may have interest (in participat-

ing in the show) because they have something they want to promote.” For the past couple of months, Shaw and other casting directors have been making trips down from their Los Angeles offices, scouting out the possible talent for the show, or for something else that might emerge all together. As a casting director Shaw isn’t only out looking for the next on-air talent,

There’s a formula we like to say in reality TV. There are three things that stand out: sex, humor and conflict, so that’s always important.” Alex Shaw Casting Director

but also, as the industry and her role changes, for the possibility of a new show. “What’s happened with casting is, you used to be given an idea and then you’d cast it. Now, you’re almost developing as you cast.” Shaw described the process: If we were out in the field and we found five bearded ghost hunters who work from Mars, we’d say “Oh, my god…they’re incredible,” we would go to a production studio that would instantly start shooting and they would, in turn, pitch the show around to a network. “We’re almost developing as well as casting,” she said. “You can be out there and find all sorts of things and certainly it’s a show.” But Shaw did say it was getting harder to do because everybody has the same idea all at the same

time. “There’s a formula we like to say in reality TV. There are three things that stand out: sex, humor and conflict, so that’s always important.” As for what they tend to look for in the women they may cast — those with layers. “We’d like for them to have something to say,” Shaw said. “If they have jobs, if they come from a past where maybe they’ve struggled or they’ve come from a life of privilege, it definitely adds to the flavor of who they are.” We’re interested in big personalities, Shaw added. “We don’t want wallflowers. We like people that have an opinion and…they’re moving and shaking. They’re not so much a housewife sitting at home, but they have stuff to do. And that doesn’t necessarily mean that they have parties morning, noon and night.” The shows, once cast, are shot around the women’s lives, Shaw explained. “If there’s a party or a fundraiser you shoot there; somebody’s graduating you shoot there; if somebody’s getting married you shoot there. So it’s built really around the women’s schedules and trying to create out of that.” In her opinion, Shaw attributes the successes of these types of reality shows to the “bling.” “It’s the lifestyles of the rich and famous and sometimes the masks that people wear to have that appearance. I’m intrigued and amused by it…. “I think people love to look at pretty things and pretty people having a good time. “But what they love most about it is that they’re real people with real problems underneath, and the fact that those layers do come off, I think that’s what people like.” Those interested in applying can do so by sending their name, age, a brief bio, area of residence and current photos and contact information to Alex@alexshaw.tv.

Celebrate Chinese New Year at 4S library 4S RANCH — 2013 marks the Year of the Snake and the 4S Ranch Library, 10433 Reserve Drive, San Diego, will be celebrating the Chinese New Year from 4 to 6 p.m. Feb. 6. The two-hour event is free and will feature entertainment, activities and light refreshments for all ages. The library celebration will feature the International Culture Learning Chinese School student dancers, followed by the traditional gift of red envelopes, with candy,

for all children, traditional lion dancers and a drum performance by the San Diego Lucky Lion Dancers, violin performances by the Stanley Want Violin Studio, hands-on Lucky Treat Holder and Little Dragons Drum crafts, and light refreshments. The Chinese New Year is one of the most important of all the traditional Chinese holidays, and is a time to celebrate with family and wish peace and happiness to everyone. “The Chinese New Year

Celebration is an opportunity for the community to come together in celebration of family, life and happiness,” said Laura Zuckerman, Youth Services Librarian. “On behalf of the library staff and the Friends of the 4S Ranch Library, we would like to wish you and your family a very happy and prosperous 2013.” For more information on the Chinese New Year celebration at the 4S Ranch Library, contact branch staff at (858) 673-4697.


M ARKETPLACE N EWS BRUCE WILLIAMS Smart Money

Old stocks may need sleuthing DEAR BRUCE: I have read your column for years. I have some old stocks from the 1930s and would like to know if they have any value. I have tried to look up the companies online, and they are out of business. — W.S., Lexington, Ky. DEAR W.S.: Since you have access to a computer, you can search out companies that will research old stocks for you. A good place to start is the Securities and Exchange Commission’s website (sec.gov). It offers suggestions for how to go about tracking down additional information. Also, the Internet has all kinds of websites where you can go for help, sometimes for a fee. By doing some homework, you should be able to find out if the stocks have any value. DEAR BRUCE: My husband and I decided that we were going to build the home of our dreams for our retirement. We hired a builder. During the building process, we noticed several things that we didn’t like. We talked to the builder about them, and he assured us that everything would be all right. Well, everything isn’t all right, and now problems have arisen as a result. We spent a lot of money on this house, and we want it to be right. Can we take the builder to court and force him to make these changes? — Sam and Elaine, via email DEAR SAM AND ELAINE: You can take someone to court for almost any reason. Whether you prevail is another question. The first thing you should do is get a second opinion from someone who is qualified, such as a private home inspector, to see if your complaints are legitimate. You also should determine how much it would cost to have these problems fixed. In a lawsuit of this type, the plaintiff asks for a dollar amount as a remedy, rather than requiring that the builder do specific work. If the costs involved in fixing the problems are modest, it might be to your advantage to pay to have the work done and put the matter behind you. If it’s a significant amount of money, a small-claim action certainly is warranted. You should know, however, that even if you receive a judgment, collecting it may prove difficult. The Bruce Williams Show can now be heard a t brucewilliams.com on the Made in America Broadcast Network.

A13

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

Could this be your solution to numbness, neuropathy or sharp pain? Do you have any of the following symptoms? Pins and needles feeling? Numbness in the hands or feet? Tingling or burning sensations? Weakness in the arms or legs? Sharp shooting or burning pains? If so, you may have a condition called Peripheral Neuropathy. Numbness, tingling, and pain are an extremely annoying problem. It may come and go...interrupt your sleep...and even make your arms or legs feel weak at times. Maybe you’ve even been to other doctors and they claim all the tests indicate you should feel fine. More Drugs Are Not The Solution. A common treatment for many nerve problems is the ‘take some pills and wait and see’ method. While this may be necessary for temporary relief of severe symptoms, using them long term is no way to live. Some of the more common drugs given include pain pills, anti-seizure mediations, and anti-depressants — all of which can have serious side effects. My name is Dr. Jeff Listiak. I’ve been helping people with neuropathy and nerve problems for more than 6 years. Neuropathy can be caused by Diabetes, Chemotherapy, Toxins, etc. It may also be com-

Don’t let numbness, tingling and pain hold you back from enjoying life.

pounded by poor posture or a degenerating spine stressing the nerves. The good news is that NeuropathyDR™ combination treatments have proven effective in helping patients with these health problems. Here’s what one of my patients had to say: “I had been feeling very sharp pains in my feet… they just felt like they were on fire. I just couldn’t stand it… every night for the last year or two.

I’m so excited today to tell Dr Jeff that four days in a row I have felt no pain whatsoever.” — Marilyn You could soon be enjoying life...without those aggravating and life-disrupting problems. Don’t Miss This Limited Time Offer. It’s time for you to find out if NeuropathyDR™ treatment protocols could be your neuropathy solution. For the next 14 days only,

start mapping out your plan to being pain and numbness free. • And, if after the thorough analysis we feel we can’t help you, we’ll tell you that right away. Until Feb. 8th, 2013 you can get everything I’ve listed here for only $20. So, you’re saving a considerable amount by taking me up on this offer. Call (760) 2302949 now. We can get you scheduled for your NeuropathyDR™ Analysis as long as there is an opening before Feb. 8th. Our office is located just off Interstate 5 in Cardiff, just a few minutes from you. When you call, tell us you’d like to come in for the NeuropathyDR™ Analysis so we can get you on the schedule and make sure you receive $20 will get you a complete proper credit for this special NeuropathyDR™ Analysis that analysis. I normally charge $155 for! Sincerely, What does this offer include? Dr. Jeff Listiak, D.C. Everything. • An in-depth discussion P.S. Remember, you only about your health and wellbeing where I will listen…real- have until Feb. 8th to reserve ly listen…to the details of your an appointment.Why suffer for years in misery? case. That’s no way to live, not • A posture, spine, range of motion, and nerve function when there could be help for your problem. examination. Take me up on my offer • A thorough analysis of your exam findings so we can and call today (760) 230-2949.

New ‘communal mall’ building its own synergy It has all of the offerings of mall shopping and then some minus all of the trappings of shopping at the mall. Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa opened its doors in December with a unique and innovative vision that can only be described as having synergy between its vendors and its shoppers. The retail space, which is anchored by a MedSpa and Aesthetician Service under Dr. Jerrel Borup, Kimberly Hottmann, PA and Aestheticians Natalie DiPiero, Cara Vairo (Medical Aesthetician), hosts local vendors and helps to create and build a sense of communal feeling between businesses and shoppers. With the MedSpa offering a wide-variety of beautification services as Restylane and Botox injections, waxing, laser hair removal, “skinny” facials, and the administering of B-vitamin regimens, you’re sure to leave feeling renewed and refreshed. As you emerge from the MedSpa, (there is a separate entrance for those wishing to have a private experience) you’ll want to extend that renewed feeling, bringing it home with you as you browse along the eclectic wares offered by local vendors in the second half of the store. “Chic,” “fluid,” “organic,” are just some of the terms that can be used to describe what are surely to be one-of-a-kind items found in Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa.

Anything from incredibly scented candles by Illume Candles, to Kaila and Stelari Girl clothing designed especially for 2T-6X, to finding hats for racing season and nights out on the town from San Diego Hat Company and Scala Hats; jewelry and yoga-inspired clothing to art are all to be found under this one roof. Carlsbad artist Jay Casey uses his space as his own personal gallery where he’s able to display and sell his artwork. Several other of the brands currently found are Noodle and Boo, Revisions Medically directed Skin Care, Cucina Soaps, Natural Selection, Love Stich and hand crafted unique clothing are also available. This emerging model of a “communal mall,” not only benefits the shopper to find unique items, but also for the entrepreneur who is looking to turn their ideas into an actual business without having to undertake a huge risk. The retail space, which is located in a high-foot traffic area, offers vendors a chance to rent a spot, set up their own “storefront” and jump right into business. Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa will celebrate its grand opening in style with a “Grand Opening” event Feb. 12, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Beginning Feb. 10 through Feb. 17,all vendors will be offering a week’s worth of savings. Each vendor will be offering a 10 percent discount, and there will be specials in the

Kimberly Hottmann, PA and Cara Vairo, medical aesthetician at the MedSpa help provide a variety of beautification services at the new Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa. Courtesy photo

MedSpa area on products and services. A percentage of all sales will be donated to Rady’s Childrens Hospital. Business hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Vendor space is still available. For more information on becoming a vendor, call (760) 944-4206. Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa is at 282 N. El Camino Real in Encinitas. Website under construc- Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa at 282 N. El Camino Real in Encinitas has tion: kailabeauty- unique opportunities not only for shoppers but entrepreneurs looking to barandmedspa.com. start their own business. Photo courtesy of Rob Springer


A13

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

M ARKETPLACE N EWS

Items on this page are paid for by the provider of the article. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737

Could this be your solution to numbness, Old stocks neuropathy or sharp pain? BRUCE WILLIAMS Smart Money

may need sleuthing

DEAR BRUCE: I have read your column for years. I have some old stocks from the 1930s and would like to know if they have any value. I have tried to look up the companies online, and they are out of business. — W.S., Lexington, Ky. DEAR W.S.: Since you have access to a computer, you can search out companies that will research old stocks for you. A good place to start is the Securities and Exchange Commission’s website (sec.gov). It offers suggestions for how to go about tracking down additional information. Also, the Internet has all kinds of websites where you can go for help, sometimes for a fee. By doing some homework, you should be able to find out if the stocks have any value. DEAR BRUCE: My husband and I decided that we were going to build the home of our dreams for our retirement. We hired a builder. During the building process, we noticed several things that we didn’t like. We talked to the builder about them, and he assured us that everything would be all right. Well, everything isn’t all right, and now problems have arisen as a result. We spent a lot of money on this house, and we want it to be right. Can we take the builder to court and force him to make these changes? — Sam and Elaine, via email DEAR SAM AND ELAINE: You can take someone to court for almost any reason. Whether you prevail is another question. The first thing you should do is get a second opinion from someone who is qualified, such as a private home inspector, to see if your complaints are legitimate. You also should determine how much it would cost to have these problems fixed. In a lawsuit of this type, the plaintiff asks for a dollar amount as a remedy, rather than requiring that the builder do specific work. If the costs involved in fixing the problems are modest, it might be to your advantage to pay to have the work done and put the matter behind you. If it’s a significant amount of money, a small-claim action certainly is warranted. You should know, however, that even if you receive a judgment, collecting it may prove difficult. The Bruce Williams Show can now be heard a t brucewilliams.com on the Made in America Broadcast Network.

Do you have any of the following symptoms? Pins and needles feeling? Numbness in the hands or feet? Tingling or burning sensations? Weakness in the arms or legs? Sharp shooting or burning pains? If so, you may have a condition called Peripheral Neuropathy. Numbness, tingling, and pain are an extremely annoying problem. It may come and go...interrupt your sleep...and even make your arms or legs feel weak at times. Maybe you’ve even been to other doctors and they claim all the tests indicate you should feel fine. More Drugs Are Not The Solution. A common treatment for many nerve problems is the ‘take some pills and wait and see’ method. While this may be necessary for temporary relief of severe symptoms, using them long term is no way to live. Some of the more common drugs given include pain pills, anti-seizure mediations, and anti-depressants — all of which can have serious side effects. My name is Dr. Jeff Listiak. I’ve been helping people with neuropathy and nerve problems for more than 6 years. Neuropathy can be caused by Diabetes, Chemotherapy, Toxins, etc. It may also be com-

Don’t let numbness, tingling and pain hold you back from enjoying life.

pounded by poor posture or a degenerating spine stressing the nerves. The good news is that NeuropathyDR™ combination treatments have proven effective in helping patients with these health problems. Here’s what one of my patients had to say: “I had been feeling very sharp pains in my feet… they just felt like they were on fire. I just couldn’t stand it… every night for the last year or two.

I’m so excited today to tell Dr Jeff that four days in a row I have felt no pain whatsoever.” — Marilyn You could soon be enjoying life...without those aggravating and life-disrupting problems. Don’t Miss This Limited Time Offer. It’s time for you to find out if NeuropathyDR™ treatment protocols could be your neuropathy solution. For the next 14 days only,

start mapping out your plan to being pain and numbness free. • And, if after the thorough analysis we feel we can’t help you, we’ll tell you that right away. Until Feb. 8th, 2013 you can get everything I’ve listed here for only $20. So, you’re saving a considerable amount by taking me up on this offer. Call (760) 2302949 now. We can get you scheduled for your NeuropathyDR™ Analysis as long as there is an opening before Feb. 8th. Our office is located just off Interstate 5 in Cardiff, just a few minutes from you. When you call, tell us you’d like to come in for the NeuropathyDR™ Analysis so we can get you on the schedule and make sure you receive $20 will get you a complete proper credit for this special NeuropathyDR™ Analysis that analysis. I normally charge $155 for! Sincerely, What does this offer include? Dr. Jeff Listiak, D.C. Everything. • An in-depth discussion P.S. Remember, you only about your health and wellbeing where I will listen…real- have until Feb. 8th to reserve ly listen…to the details of your an appointment.Why suffer for years in misery? case. That’s no way to live, not • A posture, spine, range of motion, and nerve function when there could be help for your problem. examination. Take me up on my offer • A thorough analysis of your exam findings so we can and call today (760) 230-2949.

New ‘communal mall’ building its own synergy It has all of the offerings of mall shopping and then some minus all of the trappings of shopping at the mall. Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa opened its doors in December with a unique and innovative vision that can only be described as having synergy between its vendors and its shoppers. The retail space, which is anchored by a MedSpa and Aesthetician Service under Dr. Jerrel Borup, Kimberly Hottmann, PA and Aestheticians Natalie DiPiero, Cara Vairo (Medical Aesthetician), hosts local vendors and helps to create and build a sense of communal feeling between businesses and shoppers. With the MedSpa offering a wide-variety of beautification services as Restylane and Botox injections, waxing, laser hair removal, “skinny” facials, and the administering of B-vitamin regimens, you’re sure to leave feeling renewed and refreshed. As you emerge from the MedSpa, (there is a separate entrance for those wishing to have a private experience) you’ll want to extend that renewed feeling, bringing it home with you as you browse along the eclectic wares offered by local vendors in the second half of the store. “Chic,” “fluid,” “organic,” are just some of the terms that can be used to describe what are surely to be one-of-a-kind items found

in Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa. Anything from incredibly scented candles by Illume Candles, to Kaila and Stelari Girl clothing designed especially for 2T6X, to finding hats for racing season and nights out on the town from San Diego Hat Company and Scala Hats; jewelry and yoga-inspired clothing to art are all to be found under this one roof. Carlsbad artist Jay Casey uses his space as his own personal gallery where he’s able to display and sell his artwork. Several other of the brands currently found are Noodle and Boo, Revisions Medically directed Skin Care, Cucina Soaps, Natural Selection, Love Stich and hand crafted unique clothing are also available. This emerging model of a “communal mall,” not only benefits the shopper to find unique items, but also for the entrepreneur who is looking to turn their ideas into an actual business without having to undertake a huge risk. The retail space, which is located in a high-foot traffic area, offers vendors a chance to rent a spot, set up their own “storefront” and jump right into business. Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa will celebrate its grand opening in style with a “Grand Opening” event Feb. 12, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Beginning Feb. 10 through Feb. 17, all vendors will be offering a week’s worth of

Kimberly Hottmann, PA and Cara Vairo, medical aesthetician at the MedSpa help provide a variety of beautification services at the new Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa. Courtesy photo

savings. Each vendor will be offering a 10 percent discount, and there will be specials in the MedSpa area on products and services. A percentage of all sales will be donated to Rady’s Childrens Hospital. Business hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Vendor space is still available. For more information on becoming a vendor, call (760) 944-4206. Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa is at 282 N. El Camino Real in Encinitas. Website under construc- Kaila Beauty Bar and MedSpa at 282 N. El Camino Real in Encinitas has tion: kailabeauty- unique opportunities not only for shoppers but entrepreneurs looking to start their own business. Photo courtesy of Rob Springer barandmedspa.com.


A14

Lederer speaks to Democratic Club COAST CITIES — Richard Lederer, noted writer, speaker, teacher and broadcaster who created “A Way With Words” on PBS public radio, is bringing his wit and wisdom to North County. Lederer, best known for his books on word play and the English language and his use of oxymorons and puns, will be the featured speaker at the Democratic Club of Carlsbad-Oceanside at 10 a.m. Jan. 26 at the Carlsbad Woman’s Club, 3320 Monroe St.

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said. “The role of research, creativity and communication with digital media will also increase with the new standards.” She said the hardest year for the school district will probably be next year when the staff is trying to prepare students for the last STAR test and teaching under the

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The radio personality and historian will offer a treasury of fascinating facts about the feats, fates, families, foibles and firsts of our American presidents. He will also have his latest book available for signing. His column, “Looking at Language,” is syndicated in newspapers and magazines throughout the United States. The event is free, as is parking. For more information, visit DEMCCO.org.

new standards. To help parents better understand the new standards and how they can help their student, Schaub will offer several workshops for them which will be announced. The Common Core Standards have been currently been adopted by 46 states. Only Alaska, Texas and Virginia have not gotten on board. stately historic home that has been converted to accommodate 13 bedrooms and a penthouse. Visit barharbormainehotel.com or call (800) 3362463. About a thousand feet south on Highway 3 is the Bluenose Inn, which sits atop a hill. The outdoor pool and deck (there’s an indoor pool, too) bids visitors to sit and ponder the beautiful Maine landscape below. The purpleappointed Great Room is features crystal sconces and an inviting fireplace — the perfect setting for wine, cocktails and light fare. Evening brings accomplished local talent to the grand piano. A bit of a hike will take you even further uphill to the hotel’s Looking Glass Restaurant, but the effort is worth it. (You also can drive.) The airy dining room and large deck afford expansive views of coastal topography and make you want to linger. Visit barharborhotel.com/ or call (800) 445-4077.

able, thanks to generous funding by outfitter L.L. Bean. (Acadia National Park and L.L. Bean’s flagship store in Freeport are the two most visited attractions in Maine.) The buses, which stop at many Bar Harbor’s hotels, also make long, one-way hikes possible. There are many hotels in the Bar Harbor area, but two of the top choices are the Bluenose Inn and the Atlantic Oceanside. The free shuttle stops right in front of the Atlantic Oceanside Hotel, just a mile north of downtown Bar Harbor on Highway 3. Our spacious room in the new Atlantic View Lodge building gave us a breathtaking view of Frenchman Bay and the hotel boat dock, which sees a lot of action in the summer. The 12-acre property provides plenty of space for play. The hotel also is only minutes from the park’s entry and plenty of restaurants that serve one-and-a-half-pound lobsters and all the fixin’s for $18. (Check out the restau- E’Louise Ondash is a freelance writer livrant catalog in the lobby.) ing in North County. Tell her about your Also on the property is a travels at eondash@coastnewsgroup.com.

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trying to avoid the flu because they are exposed to those who are sick, I recommend three things: 1. Sleep. 2. Fill your bellies with antiinflammatory and heat producing foods (garlic, ginger and green vegetables in a healing, homemade broth) instead of sugar, wheat or dairy; and 3. Hydrotherapy treatments. The combination of hot and cold stimulates the immune system to mount an appropriate response. Then, of course, keep drinking water!” Dr. Wolford also prescribes Sea Buckthorn Bud

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

and CuAuAg (copper, gold, silver) as well as vitamin D in a coconut-oil base administered in drops. “There are a plethora of healing options when someone has the flu, but sometimes I like to suggest to my sunny, San Diego patients to sit in the sun, wrapped in a warm blanket, with a beanie on, and expose their face without sunscreen for 15 to 20 minutes while enjoying a cup of my immune tonic tea,” she added. Dr. Wolford’s office is located at 345 S. Coast Hwy 101, Suite L, Encinitas. For more information, call (760) 230-2270 or visit lifeinmotionmed.com.

See what’s happening at the community center RANCHO SANTA FE — The community is invited to a free Open House and Demonstration Day, from 3 to 5 p.m. Feb. 24. Join members of the Rancho Santa Fe Community Center for a fun afternoon with a live preview of the next session of classes. The instructors will be demonstrating what their classes will offer children in the coming weeks. Some of the classes being previewed include photography, tumbling, video game design, creative clay workshop, Science Matters, basketball, live animal artshop and more. There will be adult fitness class instructors present to answer any questions. The Moms and Tots and Nature Play coordinators will also be there to provide information on the programs offered for the little ones in

the community. There will also be free pizza and water, a free raffle with the winner getting a free class, games and more. Stop by the Community Center right after school to enjoy all the festivities. Children must be supervised by a parent to attend. For more information, call (858) 756-2461. Registeration is open now for Session 3 classes. The next session of youth classes begins the week of Jan. 28. The class schedule is available at the Center or online at rsfcc.org. It will offer lots of new classes including photography, science in action, Zumba Hip Hop, Glam Girls and Tiny Tumblers. Other classes that will be offered include Cultural Creative Cooks, video game design, basket-

ball skills, Kids Act, tennis, Legomation, cheerleading, guitar and more. For more information or to register, visit rsfcc.org or call (858) 756-2461. A Rancho Santa Fe Business and Newcomers Sundowner will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 30 at the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club, 5827 Via de la Cumbre. Mix and mingle with newcomers to the area as well as business people representing local industries and companies in and around Rancho Santa Fe. The cost is $25 for RSFCC members/$35 for non-members. Admission includes appetizers and one drink ticket at the cash bar. For more information or to register, call (858) 756-2461. Rancho Santa Fe Community Center has New

Nature Play. Parents, come along with your children (babies and up) for nature play dates around the community at 9:30 a.m. every Thursday. This is a new program that the Community Center is offering that affords families an opportunity to connect with neighbors and the outdoors by arranging nature play dates in the trails, preserves, local parks and nature areas of the Ranch. Cost is $50 per family, per year (RSFCC membership is required). Residents are also invited to join Jazzercise on Mondays and Wednesdays, Yoga on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Hip Hop on Fridays at the RSFCC. All our adult fitness classes are from 9 to 10 a.m. Cost is $125 for 10 visits or $15 for drop-ins.

Woodward Center race focuses on younger set RANCHO SANTA FE — Helen Woodward Animal Center has always loved its “Old Dogs,” but this year’s fourth annual Puppy Love 5K Run/Walk will pay special attention to its “Young Pups,” too. The family-focused run/walk, which supports the pets and programs at Helen Woodward Animal Center, takes place between 7 a.m. and noon Feb. 10. It will include a Valentine-themed doggy costume contest; Doga Yoga; Doggy Agility Courses and food and canine-loving vendors in the Wagging Wellness

Village. Registration begins at 7 a.m. and the race kicks off at 8 a.m. Race entry is $35 for adult runner and walkers and $15 for junior runners and walker. For more information or to register, visit puppyloverun.kintera.org or call (858) 756-4117, ext. 379. Center staffers have noticed a heartwarming increase in the number of junior animal-lovers dedicating their time, their creativity and even their allowances to orphan animals. With this in mind, the

annual 5K race along Highway 101 in Solana Beach, will dedicate new activities contests and a variety of fun events to the kidcrowd. In the recent months, little animal-lovers with big hearts have come out in abundance. Gracie Rathbun, a 6year-old, set up her very own “boutique” of gently used toys and homemade cookies and cupcakes, raising nearly $1,000 for Center pets. Months later, Rathbun requested Helen Woodward Animal Center donations in lieu of birthday gifts from

party guests. Katherine Resko, 13, the youngest volunteer at the center, spent her Christmas holiday break earning babysitting and pet-sitting money, only to donate it all to the Helen Woodward Animal Center when she set her eyes on a 15-year old orphan feline with few remaining teeth. Stories like these, along with the surprising number of youngsters who registered to run for orphan pets in last year’s race, prompted an additional focus on the younger set at this year’s event.

ROUNDABOUTS

pedestrian and equestrian crosswalks. They will run in size from 45 to 54 feet in diameter. While the county will pay the entire cost of the traffic circles, the Association will provide landscaping for them. All will have splitter islands to slow approaching traffic and align the vehicles to enter the circular flow of traffic. They will all also have center landscaped islands and pedestrian and equestrian crosswalks.

Still, the county will need additional right-of-way to construct the traffic circles and may get it through eminent domain. In some cases, property owners will have the size of their front or side yards reduced or their driveways relocated, said Ivan Holler, Association planning director. Some trees will be removed. The Association’s current traffic issues began more than 25 years ago when the city of Encinitas incorporated pre-

venting the completion of Highway 680 which was to be a major east-west route just north of Rancho Santa Fe. By 2000 the traffic increased to the point where the Association began looking for solutions. Solutions from installing traffic lights to moveable barricades were considered. In 2002, the county began considering traffic circles. After years to work and planning, four Covenant-wide meetings, officials decided to take the roundabout route.

SANDAG should place more emphasis on green transportation. Meanwhile, individual cities within the county are trying to dissuade residents from using their cars. The city of San Diego and the unincorporated areas clocked in the most miles traveled on their roads, according to the report. In North County, Oceanside had the highest figure. Del Mar posted a whopping 93 percent gain in miles driven on its streets, yet it’s total was still lower than most cities. Kathy Garcia, Del Mar’s planning and community development director, said she couldn’t comment as to why miles driven jumped in the area, because the report had yet to be released to the public when she was reached for comment. But to encourage eco-friendly ways of traveling, she noted that Del Mar

widened a major bike lane, has installed more sidewalks and is part of a SANDAG study measuring how many bikes cycle through certain streets. Once complete, the study will inform planners where to invest bicycle infrastructure. “There are exciting things happening,” Garcia said. Although San Diego County’s miles driven ticked down in 2011, the Equinox Center’s report said that’s likely due to gas prices rising, and not necessarily policy initiatives.To that end, the report advocates that officials institute mixed-use development — blocks or even buildings that combine residential, commercial, cultural and industrial purposes — so people have to get in their cars less. Further, the report states, they should also encourage infrastructure for

walking and bicycles. On that note, the report says bicycle infrastructure is key for bridging the “the last mile,” the distance between a public transit hub and a person’s home. For this reason, the report commends the Encinitas Bike and Pedestrian Committee and similar groups for working to improve bicycling. Brian Grover, the chairman of the committee, said the group is looking to install bike racks in downtown Encinitas and Leucadia to encourage ridership. “We’re not plotting exactly one mile around the coaster station or anything like that,” Grover said. “But these are areas where more bike infrastructure could encourage people to ride to public transit, or to simply ride their bike instead of drive when they’re going short distances,” he added.

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an officer direct traffic two hours in the morning and two hours in the afternoon. “One of the simple solutions,” Queen said. The idea behind the traffic circles is to slow cut-through traffic at peak hours. They are designed to function together as a system by requiring vehicles to slow, but not stop as they move through the intersections. Each will also be

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are issues like air and noise pollution as well as greenhouse gases. “We look at air quality in the report, which is negatively impacted by more cars,” Benson said. “We have a lot of interrelated problems where solving one could help fix others.” But Benson believes carcentric attitudes are changing. Recently, she said that many residents and representatives have pushed back against San Diego’s dependence on freeways. Most notably, a judge last month ruled that SANDAG violated state law by failing to account for greenhouse gases and climate change in its long-term transportation plan. Rather than focus so much on infrastructure for cars, the judge argued


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Lederer speaks to Democratic Club COAST CITIES — Richard Lederer, noted writer, speaker, teacher and broadcaster who created “A Way With Words” on PBS public radio, is bringing his wit and wisdom to North County. Lederer, best known for his books on word play and the English language and his use of oxymorons and puns, will be the featured speaker at the Democratic Club of Carlsbad-Oceanside at 10 a.m. Jan. 26 at the Carlsbad Woman’s Club, 3320 Monroe St.

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said. “The role of research, creativity and communication with digital media will also increase with the new standards.” She said the hardest year for the school district will probably be next year when the staff is trying to prepare students for the last STAR test and teaching under the

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The radio personality and historian will offer a treasury of fascinating facts about the feats, fates, families, foibles and firsts of our American presidents. He will also have his latest book available for signing. His column, “Looking at Language,” is syndicated in newspapers and magazines throughout the United States. The event is free, as is parking. For more information, visit DEMCCO.org.

new standards. To help parents better understand the new standards and how they can help their student, Schaub will offer several workshops for them which will be announced. The Common Core Standards have been currently been adopted by 46 states. Only Alaska, Texas and Virginia have not gotten on board. stately historic home that has been converted to accommodate 13 bedrooms and a penthouse. Visit barharbormainehotel.com or call (800) 3362463. About a thousand feet south on Highway 3 is the Bluenose Inn, which sits atop a hill. The outdoor pool and deck (there’s an indoor pool, too) bids visitors to sit and ponder the beautiful Maine landscape below. The purpleappointed Great Room is features crystal sconces and an inviting fireplace — the perfect setting for wine, cocktails and light fare. Evening brings accomplished local talent to the grand piano. A bit of a hike will take you even further uphill to the hotel’s Looking Glass Restaurant, but the effort is worth it. (You also can drive.) The airy dining room and large deck afford expansive views of coastal topography and make you want to linger. Visit barharborhotel.com/ or call (800) 445-4077.

able, thanks to generous funding by outfitter L.L. Bean. (Acadia National Park and L.L. Bean’s flagship store in Freeport are the two most visited attractions in Maine.) The buses, which stop at many Bar Harbor’s hotels, also make long, one-way hikes possible. There are many hotels in the Bar Harbor area, but two of the top choices are the Bluenose Inn and the Atlantic Oceanside. The free shuttle stops right in front of the Atlantic Oceanside Hotel, just a mile north of downtown Bar Harbor on Highway 3. Our spacious room in the new Atlantic View Lodge building gave us a breathtaking view of Frenchman Bay and the hotel boat dock, which sees a lot of action in the summer. The 12-acre property provides plenty of space for play. The hotel also is only minutes from the park’s entry and plenty of restaurants that serve one-and-a-half-pound lobsters and all the fixin’s for $18. (Check out the restau- E’Louise Ondash is a freelance writer livrant catalog in the lobby.) ing in North County. Tell her about your Also on the property is a travels at eondash@coastnewsgroup.com.

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trying to avoid the flu because they are exposed to those who are sick, I recommend three things: 1. Sleep. 2. Fill your bellies with antiinflammatory and heat producing foods (garlic, ginger and green vegetables in a healing, homemade broth) instead of sugar, wheat or dairy; and 3. Hydrotherapy treatments. The combination of hot and cold stimulates the immune system to mount an appropriate response. Then, of course, keep drinking water!” Dr. Wolford also prescribes Sea Buckthorn Bud

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

and CuAuAg (copper, gold, silver) as well as vitamin D in a coconut-oil base administered in drops. “There are a plethora of healing options when someone has the flu, but sometimes I like to suggest to my sunny, San Diego patients to sit in the sun, wrapped in a warm blanket, with a beanie on, and expose their face without sunscreen for 15 to 20 minutes while enjoying a cup of my immune tonic tea,” she added. Dr. Wolford’s office is located at 345 S. Coast Hwy 101, Suite L, Encinitas. For more information, call (760) 230-2270 or visit lifeinmotionmed.com.

See what’s happening at the community center RANCHO SANTA FE — The community is invited to a free Open House and Demonstration Day, from 3 to 5 p.m. Feb. 24. Join members of the Rancho Santa Fe Community Center for a fun afternoon with a live preview of the next session of classes. The instructors will be demonstrating what their classes will offer children in the coming weeks. Some of the classes being previewed include photography, tumbling, video game design, creative clay workshop, Science Matters, basketball, live animal artshop and more. There will be adult fitness class instructors present to answer any questions. The Moms and Tots and Nature Play coordinators will also be there to provide information on the programs offered for the little ones in

the community. There will also be free pizza and water, a free raffle with the winner getting a free class, games and more. Stop by the Community Center right after school to enjoy all the festivities. Children must be supervised by a parent to attend. For more information, call (858) 756-2461. Registeration is open now for Session 3 classes. The next session of youth classes begins the week of Jan. 28. The class schedule is available at the Center or online at rsfcc.org. It will offer lots of new classes including photography, science in action, Zumba Hip Hop, Glam Girls and Tiny Tumblers. Other classes that will be offered include Cultural Creative Cooks, video game design, basket-

ball skills, Kids Act, tennis, Legomation, cheerleading, guitar and more. For more information or to register, visit rsfcc.org or call (858) 756-2461. A Rancho Santa Fe Business and Newcomers Sundowner will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 30 at the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club, 5827 Via de la Cumbre. Mix and mingle with newcomers to the area as well as business people representing local industries and companies in and around Rancho Santa Fe. The cost is $25 for RSFCC members/$35 for non-members. Admission includes appetizers and one drink ticket at the cash bar. For more information or to register, call (858) 756-2461. Rancho Santa Fe Community Center has New

Nature Play. Parents, come along with your children (babies and up) for nature play dates around the community at 9:30 a.m. every Thursday. This is a new program that the Community Center is offering that affords families an opportunity to connect with neighbors and the outdoors by arranging nature play dates in the trails, preserves, local parks and nature areas of the Ranch. Cost is $50 per family, per year (RSFCC membership is required). Residents are also invited to join Jazzercise on Mondays and Wednesdays, Yoga on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Hip Hop on Fridays at the RSFCC. All our adult fitness classes are from 9 to 10 a.m. Cost is $125 for 10 visits or $15 for drop-ins.

Woodward Center race focuses on younger set RANCHO SANTA FE — Helen Woodward Animal Center has always loved its “Old Dogs,” but this year’s fourth annual Puppy Love 5K Run/Walk will pay special attention to its “Young Pups,” too. The family-focused run/walk, which supports the pets and programs at Helen Woodward Animal Center, takes place between 7 a.m. and noon Feb. 10. It will include a Valentine-themed doggy costume contest; Doga Yoga; Doggy Agility Courses and food and canine-loving vendors in the Wagging Wellness

Village. Registration begins at 7 a.m. and the race kicks off at 8 a.m. Race entry is $35 for adult runner and walkers and $15 for junior runners and walker. For more information or to register, visit puppyloverun.kintera.org or call (858) 756-4117, ext. 379. Center staffers have noticed a heartwarming increase in the number of junior animal-lovers dedicating their time, their creativity and even their allowances to orphan animals. With this in mind, the

annual 5K race along Highway 101 in Solana Beach, will dedicate new activities contests and a variety of fun events to the kidcrowd. In the recent months, little animal-lovers with big hearts have come out in abundance. Gracie Rathbun, a 6year-old, set up her very own “boutique” of gently used toys and homemade cookies and cupcakes, raising nearly $1,000 for Center pets. Months later, Rathbun requested Helen Woodward Animal Center donations in lieu of birthday gifts from

party guests. Katherine Resko, 13, the youngest volunteer at the center, spent her Christmas holiday break earning babysitting and pet-sitting money, only to donate it all to the Helen Woodward Animal Center when she set her eyes on a 15-year old orphan feline with few remaining teeth. Stories like these, along with the surprising number of youngsters who registered to run for orphan pets in last year’s race, prompted an additional focus on the younger set at this year’s event.

ROUNDABOUTS

islands to slow approaching traffic and align the vehicles to enter the circular flow of traffic. They will all also have center landscaped islands and pedestrian and equestrian crosswalks. Still, the county will need additional right-ofway to construct the traffic circles and may get it through eminent domain. In some cases, property owners will have the size of their front or side yards

reduced or their driveways relocated, said Ivan Holler, Association planning director. Some trees will be removed. The Association’s current traffic issues began more than 25 years ago when the city of Encinitas incorporated preventing the completion of Highway 680, which was to be a major east to west route just north of Rancho Santa Fe. By 2000 the traffic

increased to the point where the Association began looking for solutions. Solutions from installing traffic lights to moveable barricades were considered. In 2002, the county began considering traffic circles. After years of work and planning, and four Covenant-wide meetings, residents can now see the final EIR.

SANDAG should place more emphasis on green transportation. Meanwhile, individual cities within the county are trying to dissuade residents from using their cars. The city of San Diego and the unincorporated areas clocked in the most miles traveled on their roads, according to the report. In North County, Oceanside had the highest figure. Del Mar posted a whopping 93 percent gain in miles driven on its streets, yet it’s total was still lower than most cities. Kathy Garcia, Del Mar’s planning and community development director, said she couldn’t comment as to why miles driven jumped in the area, because the report had yet to be released to the public when she was reached for comment. But to encourage eco-friendly ways of traveling, she noted that Del Mar

widened a major bike lane, has installed more sidewalks and is part of a SANDAG study measuring how many bikes cycle through certain streets. Once complete, the study will inform planners where to invest bicycle infrastructure. “There are exciting things happening,” Garcia said. Although San Diego County’s miles driven ticked down in 2011, the Equinox Center’s report said that’s likely due to gas prices rising, and not necessarily policy initiatives.To that end, the report advocates that officials institute mixed-use development — blocks or even buildings that combine residential, commercial, cultural and industrial purposes — so people have to get in their cars less. Further, the report states, they should also encourage infrastructure for

walking and bicycles. On that note, the report says bicycle infrastructure is key for bridging the “the last mile,” the distance between a public transit hub and a person’s home. For this reason, the report commends the Encinitas Bike and Pedestrian Committee and similar groups for working to improve bicycling. Brian Grover, the chairman of the committee, said the group is looking to install bike racks in downtown Encinitas and Leucadia to encourage ridership. “We’re not plotting exactly one mile around the coaster station or anything like that,” Grover said. “But these are areas where more bike infrastructure could encourage people to ride to public transit, or to simply ride their bike instead of drive when they’re going short distances,” he added.

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tem by requiring vehicles to slow, but not stop as they move through the intersections. There will also be pedestrian and equestrian crosswalks. While the county will pay the entire cost of the traffic circles, the Association will provide landscaping for them. All will have splitter

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are issues like air and noise pollution as well as greenhouse gases. “We look at air quality in the report, which is negatively impacted by more cars,” Benson said. “We have a lot of interrelated problems where solving one could help fix others.” But Benson believes carcentric attitudes are changing. Recently, she said that many residents and representatives have pushed back against San Diego’s dependence on freeways. Most notably, a judge last month ruled that SANDAG violated state law by failing to account for greenhouse gases and climate change in its long-term transportation plan. Rather than focus so much on infrastructure for cars, the judge argued


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Lifetime Montessori expanding program to elementary students RANCHO SANTA FE — After five years of providing enriching and rewarding preschool and kindergarten programs for local youth, Lifetime Montessori School is ready to expand their program. “We’re very excited about our new Elementary Program!” said Kristin Edwards, director and cofounder. “We always dreamed that Elementary would be the next step and are pleasantly surprised to have the moment arrive so quickly!” Last fall, Lifetime Montessori, located in the nearby community of Santaluz, completed its fifth year of offering a cooperative and enriching environment where each child develops knowledge through self- and teacherinitiated experiences. Since its beginnings in September 2007, the goal of the school has been to prepare children to become life-long learners and independent problem solvers. Children learn about being part of a community and how everyone has their role in the success of the community. After years of receiving requests for continued opportunities for older children, Lifetime decided to add an elementary school component to their program. The expansion of the school is currently under construction with a scheduled completion date of

After five years of providing enriching and rewarding preschool and kindergarten programs for youth, Lifetime Montessori School is ready to expand their program. Courtesy photo

mid-March. Local residents should look for an invitation to the Grand Opening for the end of March. The new classrooms will open their doors this fall in September. With the expansion, Lifetime Montessori will now offer “Excellence in Education” for children ages 18 months through 6th grade. When asked about the Montessori curriculum for the elementary child, Kristin said that the 6-12year-old child is developing

in a different way, so the methodology shifts to accommodate the older child’s needs. “But the main tenets of Montessori’s findings are the same: provide an enriching, hands-on experience for the child, allow for independence and confidence to build and the child’s natural love of learning will flourish!” For more information about Lifetime Montessori and the Open House in March, visit lifetimemontessorischool.com

A checklist for kids’ checkups Health Watch By the physicians and staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas

mended assessments: At birth, 1 week, and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 9 months of age. All children are screened for metabolic and blood problems, development, hearing and oral health. If there are parental concerns, babies may need additional vision screening by a specialist. If lead or tuberculosis exposures are suspected, those children will be tested. • Early childhood (1 to 4 years): Checkups are recommended every three months from 12 to 18 months of age; every 6 months from age 2 to 3; and annually starting at age 3. Screenings during this timeframe include anemia (12 months); lead exposure (1 and 2 years); autism (18 months and 2 years); and vision and hearing (4 years). Blood pressure becomes a part of the annual physical at age 3.With elevated risk factors, screening for dyslipidemia (abnormal blood fats) may also begin at age 2 or 4. • Middle childhood (5 to 10 years): As school and learning move to the forefront, kids’ medical exams will include regular vision and hearing screens at ages 5, 6, 8 and 10. Other risk-associated screenings will continue, including oral health, TB, lead and dyslipidemia.

A recent report by federal health officials revealed that 84 percent of children in the United States are in excellent or very good health. And one of the staples of growing up — the regularly scheduled doctor’s exam – contributes strongly to kids’ health and well-being. How do moms and dads know that their kids are being checked for the right things, at the right time? In addition to relying on the doctor’s expertise and guidance, parents can arm themselves with basic information to make sure their kids are being monitored appropriately and comprehensively during their recommended health exams. The American Association of Pediatrics offers guidelines for age-appropriate care for children and adolescents through its “Bright Futures” educational initiative (brightfutures.aap.org). Following is a sampling of some key areas for parents to be aware of during visits to the pediatrician. • Infancy (0 to 9 months): The first year of life is • Adolescence to a busy time, with seven recom- Young Adulthood (11-21 years):

Puberty marks a new era of health concerns. Parents can expect their kids to want some independence and to expect private time with the pediatrician. Honesty is especially important during these years, as annual checkups begin to include new screens for reproductive and sexual health issues, alcohol and drug use. While physical and developmental milestones change throughout childhood, at least one thing should remain consistent: Truthfulness is critical in all childhood exams. Physicians need accurate information (first from parents, and later from children themselves) to assess risks and determine possible medical interventions. Finally, parents are the best and strongest advocates for their kids’ health. While many questions and concerns are answered during the natural course of an exam, those that remain should always be addressed at the end of the appointment. Doctors and parents should work as a team to ensure a child receives individualized, age-appropriate care. “Health Watch” is brought to you by the physicians and staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas. For more information or for physician referral call 1-800-SCRIPPS.

AAA Member Benefit: Members receive $25 per person discount at time of booking.


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JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Living life’s golden rule JOE MORIS Baby Boomer Peace It was a great seven weeks. I flew home on Jan.18 and came home to some glorious weather. I left on Nov. 30 and the day before was beautiful and warm but a bit chilly the morning of departure. I had many people write to me over the course of my stay in Puerto Vallarta telling me how cold it was here so when I arrived to sunny warm weather I felt like, well, back to San Diego. I feel bad for all of you who were freezing your toes off during your cold snap, but again, in PV I met many people from the upper Northern States and Canada that would try to describe what cold really is. No thanks, I’ll stick with two of the greatest places on Earth — Encinitas and Puerto Vallarta. I’m on the mend after having double knee surgery down there. Unfortunately, an aging body doesn’t heal like it used to so I’m basically on ice for the next four to eight weeks. My surgeon said no more than 10 minutes of continuous exercise a day during this down time. Usually that is a great ingredient for being just about as lazy as I can be, so in essence, that’s what I’ll be but

what better place than to watch the waves and God’s beautiful blue sea at my awaking eyes each day. You have to love it. I want to thank all those people who took the time to write to me while I was gone. To me, that’s pretty special because each of my readers who took the time to write did just that, they took time out of their own lives to pass along kind words of support and there is a lesson there. Kind words are good for the soul. It would be nice if we all learned a little lesson of being kind to someone you don’t know. Sometimes it is just a smile and a “good morning.” In Puerto Vallarta, everyone seems so nice. It is natural to look someone in the eye in the morning and say “Hola,” “Buenos dias,” “Que tal?” or “Como estas?” I went to my church this morning, The Anchor, with Rick Myatt the pastor. Talk about a quaint place to go for service. It is on the campus of Santa Fe Christian in Solana Beach. It is one of those little chapels that looks like something you would see on “Little House on the Prairie” and Rick is a crackup. He might not like this, but he reminds me of Don Knotts. He has a very special way of getting his message across. This morning he spoke of a Jesus parable of how silly it is to take a patch from a new wine skin to repair an old

wine skin and how doing so ruins both skins. The moral is we have all these old habits which are hard to break but trying to apply a new habit to the old habits only makes both useless. It’s either stick with the old or go with the new. We’re in a new time and a new age. My daughter, who is a spiritual intuitive, said that in November of 2011 our earth quietly began moving into a new dimension. No loud booms or voices ringing down from above. But, we are moving into a time when evil will slowly dissipate and be removed from the earth. As she said, 100 years from now our ancestors will look back on us as if we were savages. But with the new year maybe we can all take that time and learn to bring some peace not only to ourselves but to another as well. Maybe it’s time to just be grateful for what we have and don’t worry what anyone else has. And maybe we should all put on the new skin and take a tip from those peaceful loving people to our South and learn to look a stranger in the eye and with a smile say “Buenos dias!” We’re all God’s children and we should treat others just the way we would want to be treated ourselves and to go in peace. Joe Moris may be contacted at (760) 500-6755 or by e-mail at joe@coastalcountry.net.

Sophie saves sister from coyote RANCHO SANTA FE — One very unique 2-year-old Maltipoo has Helen Woodward staffers in awe of her heroic efforts to save her newly-adopted sister. She did what some may consider impossible — the tiny dog took on a coyote to protect the 7-month old puppy she had only just come to know. The East County family who acquired Sophie in June of 2011,say she was an undeniably cuddly pup with the personality of a teddy bear. With no signs of aggression, Sophie lived the life of a pampered pet for over a year when her family decided to bring another Maltipoo pup, named Lulu, into their household. The two bonded fairly quickly and lived together for several months when the unthinkable happened… As the two dogs went running out to play on their large backyard property, a coyote stepped out of the brush and went for the younger puppy. Sophie’s family said that they heard a cry and ran out to see Sophie step in front of her sister and take on the coyote herself. The family was able to scare the coyote away, but not before Sophie suffered surface wounds to her neck, right shoulder and side. Lulu remained unharmed. Sophie’s family took her to a local veterinarian where she was stitched up and put on antibiotics. Sophie’s family, however, had a different sort

Sophie, a 2-year-old Maltipoo manages to save her 7-month-old puppy from the clutches of a coyote. Courtesy photo

of pain to deal with. Due to the rural location of their east San Diego property, Sophie’s family feared that they would not be able to protect their vulnerable dogs from the hungry search of local wildlife. With heavy hearts, Sophie and Lulu were surrendered to Helen Woodward Animal Center last Jan.12. Happily,within only a matter of days, Lulu was adopted by a family who lived in a more residential area and was happy to give her a second chance in a forever home. The heroic Sophie still has more healing to do and is now thriving under center veterinary care where she is being closely monitored. She will be available for adoption at Helen Woodward Animal Center in approximately two weeks. If you would like to adopt Sophie, contact Helen Woodward Animal Center Adoption

Department at 858 756-4117, ext. 313, visit animalcenter.org or stop by at 6461 El Apajo Road in Rancho Santa Fe. If you live near canyons or mountain areas, consider the following precautions agains attracting coyotes: — Use caution at night: Pets should be kept indoors from dusk until dawn. If your dog needs to relieve himself during these hours, accompany him on a short leash. — Avoid taking your dog on a nighttime walk. Nighttime is the prime time Coyotes hunt for food. If you must take your puppy on an evening walk, use a very short leash. — Install a fence: Backyard fences should be at least 6 feet high to prevent coyotes from leaping over. Coyotes are also known to dig, so installing vinyl lattice 2 to 3 feet below ground is suggested to prevent tunneling.

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Serving 4-S Ranch, Del Sur, Santaluz, and Rancho Penasquitos Communities

"Free the child's potential, and you will transform him into the world." - Dr. Montessori


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JAN. 25, 2013

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JEAN GILLETTE Small Talk

To young mothers: It’s all in a name This bit of cheap advice is for every woman about to give birth. Be very, very thoughtful about what you name your child. My motto was: “I had it last, so I get to name it” but that may not be such a good plan, after all. Passing on the name of someone you love may be a kind, flattering thing, but you are just begging for trouble. It is even less wise if you never plan to call that child by that name. Yes, I was born Nancy Jean Hart. The daughter of Nancy Rose Hart. I suspect that because my dad was John Thomas Francis Hart, Jr. and named my older brother John Thomas Francis Hart, III, that someone somehow felt obliged to repeat my mother’s name, as well. But my folks did not take the Southern route and call my Nancy-Jean. Instead they called me Jeannie. For decades I was Jeannie Hart. Then upon seeing my TURN TO SMALL TALK ON B8

SOUND HEALING Scientific research is backing up some beliefs that sound can provide healing benefits, especially sounds from Tibetan singing bowls.

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Dream House in RSF helps families with sick children By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Chuck Day’s office is in the Ronald McDonald House across from Rady Children’s Hospital, so he is not removed from the highs and lows of treating ill children. He is thrilled when kids get to go home and devastated when a little one loses the battle. But his job as president and CEO of Ronald McDonald House Charities of San Diego is to make sure the house, a home-away-from-home, and its services are available to families whose child is being treated at the hospital. It is the goal to keep families together and strong for each other. A hospital stay for a child drains a family’s energy, finances and time, he said. Day said he watches families begin to understand what is in front of them and then learn to handle the uncertainty and the stress they must handle as a family. “I watch the incredible courage they demonstrate almost daily,” he said. If not for the Ronald McDonald House, parents would be sleeping in hospital waiting rooms or even their cars to be close to their child. But it all costs money. Local McDonalds give about 8 percent of

The $3.2 million home in Rancho Santa Fe will be raffled off for the Dream House Raffle for the Ronald McDonald Foundation. Courtesy photo

the budget so more than 90 percent of the budget is left up to community donations. One of the ways to raise money is a raffle where chances are sold to win

In its ninth year, the raffle is for a a gorgeous home at $150 a ticket. “The Dream House Raffle is our beautiful $3.2 million house in the largest fundraiser and absolutely vital Rancho Santa Fe area. The entries to our day-to-day operations,” Day said. TURN TO HOUSE ON B8

Students get learning opportunity with Osuna adobe By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — At its retreat earlier this month, the Rancho Santa Fe Association voted to make the restoration of the Osuna adobe and its grounds a priority during the next few years. “We want to focus on the adobe and make it a real community asset,” said Roxana Foxx, president. Association Vice President Anne Feighner and

the Osuna Committee are leading the charge to get the ball rolling by putting together an outreach program for the community at large and meeting with school officials to bring the historic property into a real-life, hands-on learning opportunity for local students. “We are basically in the planning stages of this partnership of including information of the Osuna Ranch in

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our curriculum,” said Lindy Delaney, superintendent of schools. She said teachers at the school have always been aware of the adobe and its history and have included it in their teaching, but this new plan gives them an opportunity to take the lessons to the next level. “The goal is to take field study trips to the Osuna and study the Osuna property, learn how to make adobe, take a look at the native plants and to incorporate the study of the Kumeyaay Indians and the history of the area prior to 1831,” Delaney said. She said the study of the Osuna Ranch will be incorporated into third grade when students study the area in which they live. The historic Osuna Adobe will allow students to get a real-life, hands-on TURN TO ADOBE ON B8

learning opportunity when area schools begin field trips to the site. File photo


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JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Sound, healing bowls may hold key to wellness By Rachel Stine

COAST CITIES — When working with patients, Dr. Jeffrey Thompson uses electronic sound equipment, EEG machines, and heart rate variability monitors. Diane Mandle, on the other hand, relies on Tibetan singing bowls, tingshas, gongs, and her intuition when working with her clients. One is the founder and director of Carlsbad’s Center for Neuroacoustic Research. The other is a sound energy healer based in Encinitas. While they maintain drastically different approaches, both Thompson and Mandle agree that sound has the power to heal the mind and the body without medication. Thompson said he uses medical equipment and tests including EEGs and blood tests to scientifically measure changes in the body and the brain as they are exposed to different sound frequencies. But while he said his research is some of the first to scientifically prove these effects, he acknowledges that sound healing is nothing new. Thompson said that for thousands of years, people have used instruments like drums and Tibetan singing bowls to put people into trances. “This is what every culture on Earth has been doing

Surrounded by her Tibetan singing bowls, sound energy healer Diane Mandle rubs the rim of one of her bells in her Encinitas studio. Mandle promotes physical and spiritual healing by awakening energies with sound from her bowls, tingshas, bells, and gongs. Photo by Rachel Stine

since the beginning of time,� he said. After researching sound for over 30 years and working with thousands of patients, Thompson said his work proves that sound affects people through physical resonance and brainwave entrainment. According to Thompson,

physical resonance makes it possible to physically adjust specific parts of the body without actually touching it. He explained that the body consists of different densities, and that physical resonance occurs when those densities respond to different sound frequencies. As such, he can target and heal

different parts of the body by making them vibrate when exposing them to certain sound frequencies. Physical resonance is capable of healing including relieving sore muscles and joints, as well as adjusting vertebrae for chiropractic patients, said Thompson. Thompson’s practice

and research also works a great deal with brainwave entrainment. In simple terms, brainwave entrainment involves changing brainwave patterns and states of consciousness with sound frequency vibration patterns. Calling it “a brain gym to enlightenment,�

Thompson said that through brainwave entrainment, sound can alter a person’s state of mind, helping them be more focused or more relaxed, and can even help a person enter a trance-like state. Mandle has her own way of explaining the phenomena of sound’s effects on the body. She specializes in playing authentic Tibetan instruments, and said that when used properly, “You are awakening dormant energies to better balance the wholeness of a person.� Mandle has studied primarily Tibetan teachings about energy and sound healing for about the past 20 years, and with that training and experience she can feel how sound affects people and uses it to promote physical and spiritual healing. She has focused her work on Tibetan instruments and Buddhism because she believes that they are the original and most effective tools for sound healing, calling them “the real McCoy.� Mandle plays her Tibetan singing bowls by rubbing the edges with mallets or striking them gently. She said that as she plays she can sense when energies are awakened and when her instruments indicate that a part of the body is blocked or injured when working with TURN TO HEALING ON B8

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ODD FILES

by CHUCK SHEPHERD

By Jared Whitlock

Updates Almost-extinct vultures may be making a comeback within the Parsi community of Mumbai, India, after a pain reliever (diclofenac) nearly wiped it out. Parsis’ Zoroastrian religion requires “natural” body disposals (no cremation or burial) of humans and cattle, and bodies have always been ritually laid out for the hungry birds, but the community has also come to rely on diclopfenac in hospitals and for cattle. When News of the Weird last mentioned the problems (in 2001), vultures were dying out from kidney damage caused by the drug, and bodies were piling up. (Parsis were exploring using solar panels to burn the corpses.) However, according to a November New York Times dispatch, clerics are reporting modest success in weaning Parsis off of diclofenac, and the vultures appear more plentiful.

Recurring Themes Least Competent Criminals: Peter Welsh, 32, and Dwayne Doolan, 31, weren’t the first burglars to try breaking into a building by smashing through the adjoining basement wall, but they might be the clumsiest. Their target, on New Year’s Eve, was Wrights Jewellers in Beaudesert, Australia, but trying to smash the front window failed, as did smashing the rear doors, which were actually those of another store. They finally settled on the basement option, but absentmindedly broke through the opposite-side wall and wound up in a KFC restaurant. (Undaunted, according to police, they robbed the KFC of about $2,600.) Once again, a public library has been sued for gently asking a patron to leave because his body odor was provoking complaints. George Stillman, 80, filed a $5.5 million lawsuit in October against the New York Public Library for feeling “humiliat(ed)” by the staff of the St. Agnes branch in Manhattan. Stillman said he views body odor (his and others’) as mere “challenge(s) to the senses” and “a fact of life in the city.” Actually, he had also denied that he had any body odor at all, but a New York Post reporter, interviewing him about the lawsuit, said she noted “a strong odor.” Women’s love-hate affairs with their shoes is the stuff of legends, but a Memphis, Tenn., podiatrist told Fox News in November of a recent increase in women deciding on what might be called the nuclear option — “stiletto surgery” — for horribly uncomfortable, yet irresistible, shoes. Either the shoe must go or the foot, and more are choosing the latter (or at least the pinky), to be removed or reduced by surgery. The Memphis doctor said he sees as many as 30 patients a month interested in the procedure.

B3

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

Baled recyclables stacked on the ground at a local business. Businesses that produce 4 cubic yards of waste or more per week must recycle under a new ordinance from the San Diego County Board of Supervisors. Photo courtesy of the Allan Company

Board introduces recycling ordinance By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — Businesses that produce 4 cubic yards of waste or more per week will soon be required to recycle. The San Diego Board of Supervisors introduced an ordinance expanding commercial recycling last week. On Feb. 9, the board is expected to adopt the measure. Under the county’s current plan, businesses that are larger than 20,000 square feet have to recycle certain materials. The new ordinance changes the requirement to follow a 2011 statewide law, which mandates businesses that produce 4 cubic yard cards of waste or more per week must recycle. Four cubic yards is the size of a large dumpster. According to Michael Wonsidler, a recycling specialist with San Diego County, the new ordinance

Event offers ways to be prepared Being prepared could save a life. Register now for the San Diego County Law Enforcement Training Managers Association presentation of Lt. Col. Dave Grossman speaking on “The Bullet Proof Mind – Active Shooter Events,” from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 4 at New Venture Church, 4000 Mystra Way. Registration begins at 7 a.m. The cost is $35 and reservations are required by emailing jane.meadows@calrsbadca.gov or call (760) 9312181. Makes checks payable to: SDTMA, Send checks to Attn: Jane Meadows, Carlsbad Police Department, 2560 Orion Way. The seminar is recommended to teachers, school administrators, school police, law enforcement, fire personnel, dispatchers/support personnel, hospital staff, parents and concerned residents.

will only affect businesses in unincorporated areas like Rancho Santa Fe. He said 10 of the 19 cities in San Diego County, including Encinitas and Carlsbad, have already passed similar recycling ordinances to comply with California law. “I expect more cities to evaluate their recycling goals in the near future and come into compliance,” Wonsidler said. The state has also set a goal of diverting 75 percent of solid waste from the landfill by 2020. Unincorporated areas achieved a 60 percent diversion rate in 2011. According the Board of Supervisors’ staff report, the ordinance will assist the county in meeting statemandated goal requirements, conserving landfill capacity and encouraging investment in the recycling and waste reduction industry.

COAST CITIES — The San Diego County Board of Supervisors approved $324,000 for a program that gauges whether local waters are too polluted to swim in. Currently, the county collects and analyzes 20 samples each week at 15 different sites along San Diego’s coastline. Water samples detect disease-causing pathogens or microbes at places like Torrey Pines State Beach and the San Elijo Lagoon. The tests take 24 hours to analyze. With the help of the nonprofit San Diego Coastkeeper, results are put online for residents to check before going in the water. If high levels of pathogens are detected, the county also posts advisory or closure signs at any affected beaches. The program received the funds from the state for a contract that began last July and runs through September of this year. According to the Board of Supervisors’ staff report, the contract wasn’t voted on sooner because funding was still being sorted out. Although the contract was technically just approved, the program has operated as normal since July, according to Mark McPherson, chief of the Department of Environmental Health’s Land and Water Quality Division. “We were told to continue our work and that we’d be reimbursed,” McPherson said. Of the $324,000 in state funding, $24,000 goes toward fall and winter monitoring, and $300,000 covers summer and spring monitoring, according the staff report. While fewer people are at the beaches in the fall and winter, advisories and

Water-quality monitoring will continue at beaches through at least September due to the San Diego Board of Supervisors approving funds for the program. File photo

closures are more common during this period due to increased urban runoff and untreated sewage from rainfall. Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger axed funding for water-quality monitoring at beaches in 2008 due to the state budget cri-

sis. Temporary funding was obtained from various sources for several years. More than a year ago, Gov. Jerry Brown restored funding by giving the California Resources Control Board the authority to provide up to $1.8 million for beach testing statewide.


B4

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

For family sedans, the Honda Accord leads

The new four-cylinder Honda Accord topped its class in Consumer Reports’ latest tests. Photo courtesy Consumer Reports

In recent months, many of the most popular midsized sedans have received major redesigns or notable freshenings that have altered the landscape in the category, notes Consumer Reports. That includes the three models in its latest report: the Honda Accord, Chevrolet Malibu and Subaru Legacy. Lost in the flurry of shapely redesigns is the Honda Accord, which looks a lot like its predecessor. With a roomy interior, very efficient and refined drivetrains, a fun-todrive character and an attractive list of features, it’s convincing evidence that Honda may be back on track after a string of unimpressive introductions. The new four-cylinder Accord tops its class, edging out the Hyundai Sonata and Toyota

Honda has also kept the Camry, and the V-6 model is challenging the Camry Hybrid Accord’s pricing competitive. and V-6 Camry for the top spot The $21,680 four-cylinder LX and $27,995 V-6 EX-L cost the among pricier family sedans. same as or less than many HONDA ACCORD other similarly equipped famiYou may have to look ly sedans. In the final tally, the twice before noticing it, but the four-cylinder Accord jumped Accord has had a major 10 points in Consumer Reports’ redesign for 2013. And though Ratings to take over the top Honda has slipped with other spot among entry-level sedans. models it redesigned in recent And the V-6 is behind only the years, it nailed this one. The Toyota Camry Hybrid and V-6 new Accord is roomy, nice to Camry among high-end family drive, well equipped and very sedans, and neither Camry drives as well. fuel efficient. Consumer Reports’ other Its 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, when matched with the findings include: smooth continuously variable CHEVROLET MALIBU transmission, squeezes out an excellent 30 mpg overall and 40 You’ll appreciate the mpg on the highway. That’s as redesigned Malibu if you prize good as a tiny Honda Fit and a plush, comfortable ride and a better than most compact cars. very quiet cabin. That’s where The 3.5-liter V-6 is supersmooth this solid, easygoing sedan and quite powerful, snapping excels. It has simple controls, off a 6.3-second 0-to-60 mph decent fuel economy and time that is competitive with sound, secure handling, some sports cars. And its 26 although the Malibu is clearly mpg overall is among the best no sports sedan. You can in its class. expand the large trunk by foldInside, you are treated to ing the 60/40-split rear seatone of the best driving posi- backs. tions available, comfortable But the Malibu is no great seats and terrific visibility. All value. Even the moderately Accords have a standard back- equipped 1LT cost $23,185, up camera, rare among family notably more than higher-rated sedans.Uplevel models include competitors. Honda’s new Lane Watch blind A reasonably refined and spot camera system. powerful 197-hp, 2.5-liter four-

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Tournament special Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery, a sports bar that pays homage to the old public houses of America, England, Scotland and Ireland, has teamed with The Farmers Insurance to bring the pub to the Torrey Pines Golf Course during the Jan. 23 through Jan. 27 event. Tilted Kilt Tartan Terrace daily and weekly ticket packages are available at FarmersInsuranceOpen.com. Daily-Wednesday- $50; DailyThursday–Sunday$70; Weekly-$200; Weekly 8 pack$1,200.

cylinder engine is matched with a smooth and responsive six-speed automatic transmission.That powertrain helps the Malibu get a reasonable 26 mpg overall. SUBARU LEGACY If you want an affordable family sedan with all-wheel drive, the Legacy is the only game in town. It’s also a nice, value-packed ride, with a spacious interior and good fuel economy. Where it falls a bit short is in refinement and performance. For 2013, Subaru tweaked the steering and suspension, which helped make emergency handling more secure and predictable.The trunk is large, and the rear seatback folds 60/40 for more space. The redesigned 173-hp, 2.5-liter “flat-four” engine delivers slightly quicker acceleration and fuel economy of 26 mpg overall, which is impressive for an AWD car. Still, most competing four-cylinder sedans are quicker. The Legacy’s real Achilles’ heel is its continuously variable transmission. It’s well behaved during casual driving, but it tends to exacerbate engine noise when you’re accelerating or merging on the highway, and its performance is a bit rough around the edges.

Wienermobile rolls in

Colleen Van Horn, President-elect of the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers San Diego Chapter for 2013 Courtesy photo

San Diegan elected president SAN DIEGO — The 22nd annual conference of the Western Region Chapter of the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers was recently held in Santa Rosa, Calif. Colleen Van Horn, who is from San Diego, was elected President of the Chapter for 2013. The Western Region of the NAPGCM includes Geriatric Care Managers from around the country. Colleen Van Horn is a registered nurse and CEO of Innovative Healthcare Consultants since 1997. In 2008 Van Horn worked on developing standards and protocols for local units for the National Organization. In 2011, Van Horn received the 1st Dorland Health Silver Crown Award for Geriatric Care Manager and Innovative Healthcare Consultants won for the nonmedical homecare division. She has been a guest Sidekicks at Valley View Casino Arena, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., San Diego. There will be Bony Acai product give-aways, a half-time contest, as well as autographs from the Bony Acai fight team including local fighter Joey Beltran. For tickets, call (866) 799-4625.

The iconic Oscar Mayer Wienermobile will stop in North San Diego County, stopping from noon to 5 p.m. Jan. 23 at the Albertson’s, 2707 Via De La Valle Del Mar and again noon to 5 p.m. Jan. 26 at Albertson’s, 7660 El Camino Real, Carlsbad, piloted by Hotdoggers Jessica Barndt and Theresa Brenner. Better and better Carlsbad-based CCS/PR, There will be games, coupons and handing out of the iconic Inc. moved up three notches to rank as third largest public Wiener Whistles. relations agency in San Diego. These results were published Optimists help Eagle The Optimist Club of in the Nov. 26 issue of the San Carlsbad “The Achievers” Diego Business Journal and provided funding for Boy are based on agency data corScout Liam Gannon Troop roborated by CPA/CFO-attest750, toward his Eagle Scout ed statements. CCS/PR is the Project on the south shore only Carlsbad-based firm on trail at Lake Calavera. the list of 21 San Diego counGannon installed a picnic ty agencies. area with a picnic table. Gannon and his volunteers Helping veterans San Diego area Denny’s contributed 170 hours to comkicked off its third annual plete the project. For more information on the club, con- donation drive benefitting tact Carl Tillinghast at (760) the Veterans Village of San Diego (VVSD). Now through 633-3096. Feb. 14, diners may visit any Denny’s to donate much-needFight night Carlsbad-based compa- ed clothing or make monetary ny, Bony Acai will sponsor contributions. All donations UFC Fight Night at 7:35 p.m. will go toward the VVSD’s Feb. 1 at the San Diego Winter Shelter, an outreach Sockers versus the Dallas and intervention program

speaker for public service classes, educational television and radio programs. In 2012 she was a guest speaker on ESPN 1700am radio, answering questions and contributing information as “nurse in your pocket.” She has also been involved as a guest speaker throughout San Diego County with “It’s Your Estate” programs. Van Horn’s overall goal is to enable senior individuals to maintain the greatest amount of independence and dignity in an environment that is safe and also in line with their financial resources.Van Horn and her company play a pivotal role in linking consumers with providers and individuals with caregivers. They advocate for ethical, competent and effective services to meet the individual needs of each client. The website is innovativehc.com. designed to help local homeless veterans combat life on the street and become selfsufficient.

Best place for critters California remains at the top of the Humane Society of the United States’ annual “Humane State Ranking” report, a national analysis of animal protection laws, grading states on a wide range of animal protection laws, including public policies dealing with animal cruelty and fighting, pets, wildlife, equines, animals in research, and farm animals. South Dakota remained in last place.

Dunkin’s coming Dunkin’ Donuts announced plans to expand to Southern California. Dunkin’ Donuts is now recruiting multi-unit franchisees for San Diego, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura and Orange counties. be our fan on

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B5

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

F OOD &W INE

The essence of Leucadia It’s OK getting stuck in Lodi FRANK MANGIO

DAVID BOYLAN Lick the Plate When I try to describe living in Leucadia, my nutshell version usually goes something like this. Leucadia represents a sleepy, old-school coastal lifestyle that is slowly disappearing. It’s a mix of surfers, yoga/healthy living folks, big money and locals all coexisting rather nicely. Funky shops and established eateries blend in with an emergence of new restaurants in a manner that currently works. Keep Leucadia Funky is the unofficial slogan that can be seen on bumper stickers and voiced by the locals who have been here a while. Change is happening in Leucadia with condos and large homes that seem a bit out-of-place jammed into tiny lots, and an upcoming streetscape project that will forever change the look and feel of Coast Highway 101. Change happens though, and it takes folks like Dave and Erin Thomas, Karen Pankopf, and JP St. Pierre, the partners behind Café Ipe and Surfy Surfy, to embrace it while maintaining what made Leucadia special to begin with. Many of us mourned the loss of the Longboard Grotto when it closed, but who better to give it fresh life than a group of local friends who have been immersed in the Encinitas surf culture their entire lives. They turned it into a one-of-a-kind surf boutique named after the call “surfy surfy” that went out to friends by JP St. Pierre when the waves were good in hopes of generating a group to paddle out. Most surfers have their similar code words or phrases to describe conditions so it only made sense when his opportunity came to open a surf shop to go with the obvious choice for a name and Surfy Surfy was born. Soon after the surf shop opened in 2010, the building next door became available. They had noticed from being in the surf shop that many people came in with coffee so why not make it more convenient for them. The wheels were put in motion and Café Ipe opened in 2011. The two businesses really do complement one another and reflect the common vision of the partners to represent funky Leucadia and the surf culture, but also offer their own sense of style to suite contemporary tastes. Their eclectic mix of patrons is evidence that they have pulled that off and then some. Café Ipe was named after the beautiful Ipe tree in the center of the courtyard. They also did a lot of the finish work within the shop with Ipe wood, a native Brazilian wood that is symbolically known to represent strength. Given the competitive coffee market, they also

Taste of Wine

Café Ipe baristas from left Whitney Lang, Renee Rodriguez and cook Jose Vera. Photo by David Boylan

added another huge draw by bringing Dan Scheibe and his Revolution Roasters in-house. Dan roasts weekly in a very cool looking German Probat roaster and has developed a cult-like following. One of my most discerning coffee friends Pia Giambrone from Italy and most recently Seattle, latched on the coffee culture at Café Ipe immediately and would not go anywhere else. She was sold on the educated and passionate baristas and the tasty roast that provided her daily fix of either espresso, cappuccino, or espresso macchiato. Pia is a coffee connoisseur and I trust her judgment. I’ve taken to buying the bags of fresh roasted beans that Dan produces and enjoy having such high quality at home. I should also note that they offer an extensive selection of specialty teas. The limited kitchen at Ipe manages to produce some very nice breakfast and lunch treats. The Dawn Patrol that combines egg, turkey tomato, and cheese between an English muffin is what a McDonald’s Egg McMuffin aspires to … in a much cooler place to enjoy it. Yogurt with granola, oatmeal and a Euro breakfast are also available along with fresh donuts from VG’s, bagels, muffins and some really nice pastries.

Lunch offers up some tasty salads and sandwiches including the Miracle Mile with ham, turkey, Swiss, cheddar, tomato, red onion, Romaine, sprouts, cucumber, avocado, mayo and Dijon mustard. It’s a monster sandwich and at $7.50 a hell of a value. The lox bagel is delicious and the Hawaiian chicken sandwich is a fun blend of coconut, pineapple, yogurt and bananas. It should be noted that Café Ipe is now home to the world famous Surfing Madonna mural. It’s a fitting location for this iconic piece of art and paintings from local artists rotate through Ipe monthly. Live music happens all weekend in the courtyard and special events are common between Ipe and Surfy Surfy. My suggestion is to check them both out when you have some time to hang out in a slice of real coastal Leucadia. Ipe is at 970 North Coast Highway 101 in Leucadia and Surfy Surfy is right next door. Find them both on Facebook also. Lick the Plate can now be heard on KPRi, 102.1 FM Monday-Friday during the 7pm hour. David Boylan is founder of Artichoke Creative and Artichoke Apparel, an Encinitas based marketing firm and clothing line. Reach him at david@artichoke-creative.com or (858) 395-6905.

In my Rock ‘n’ Roll DJ days, I played everything I could get from Creedence Clearwater Revival — in my mind the best American band to come out of the ‘60s and ‘70s. When their song Lodi came out in 1969, it shot the group into the top 10 and earned them the second highest billing at the famed Woodstock concert in New York. The song is about a musician who sets out looking for “a pot of gold,” and winds up going from bad to worse, getting stuck in Lodi, Calif. Now I can’t vouch for musicians today who try to make it big in Lodi, but what is burgeoning are the number of wineries in Lodi that are making a name for themselves with California style reds. Lodi lies between Interstate 5 and the 99, just north of Stockton and south of Sacramento. Lodi is less about Cabernet and Merlot and instead is dominated by Zinfandel, especially old vine, Petite Sirah and

Camron King is Lodi’s Wine Executive Director, shown with Bob Lauchland, Chairman of the Lodi Wine Commission. Photo by Frank Mangio

Lodi, they don’t mean grafted or transferred. Lodi’s 42,000-planted acres still sit on their own rootstock. Lodi vines are tended by generations of farming families with old world roots. Some could have settled in the much more famous Napa Valley, a short drive to the west, but chose this area more highly focused on everyday, tasty reds. Lodi caught my attention when Cameron Hughes, a shrewd and successful wine entrepreneur, who buys Veladora at Rancho Valencia Resort in Rancho Santa Fe. and bottles quality grapes from attractive wine counPhoto courtesy of Veladora tries, decided to turn to Lodi Carignane. The soil is well- for his latest Zindandel drained sandy alluvial soil. When they say “old vine” in TURN TO TASTE OF WINE ON B8

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B6

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

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B7

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

JAN. 25, 2013

Casting call is out for Volunteers give academy Rancho Santa Fe housewives students a great year MACHEL PENN SHULL Machel’s Ranch Have you heard the newest excitement in town regarding casting directors scouting Rancho Santa Fe for a housewives show? Well, I must say it’s about time. After writing about how perfect this community is as an extraordinary backdrop for the setting for a show, it’s thrilling to see this finally happening. I have it on good author- Casting Directors from Asylum Entertainment connect with women in ity that there are several Rancho Santa Fe for a new reality show. Could one of these women be Rancho Santa Fe women destined for celebrity status in the Ranch? Photo by Machel Shull who were interviewed prior to Christmas and are doing follow-up interviews this very week you are reading my column. I might even drop a hint that I do know a few of the lovely ladies that are being considered, too. I actually contacted the casting directors myself to make sure some of the key women here are definitely not looked over. Asylum Entertainment appears to be a stellar company launching many shows. This looks like a fabulous opportunity for the right women who can snag the part here under the eucalyptus trees in the Ranch. I won’t name names. But sooner than later, I might!

Around town Speaking of reality shows, at the end of December, Priscilla Wood shared with me that she shares a connection with “Dog The Bounty Hunter.” If you don’t know the show, about a bounty hunter, you can find it on A&E cable channel. Well, Ms. Wood just found out on her fabulous trip to Hawaii over the holidays that Duane “Dog” Chapman lives in the house

Oxana and Stanley Cobbald celebrate New Years in high style in Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo

On Jan. 13, I received a gorgeous photo from the hottest newlyweds in Rancho Santa Fe — Oxana and Stanley Cobbald. They just recently just came back from their extended honeymoon in Australia and other parts of the world.These two would be absolutely perfect for the new show coming to town. Don’t you think? They look like regal movie stars and have that flair of style and sophistication those shows are looking for. You might find them out at the piano bar once in awhile singing along with Randy Beecher at Mille Fleurs. On Jan. 17, I found that Cielo may soon become a wedding resort destination. There are whispers of a chapel being added, as well as another restaurant. The Cielo shopping center is exquisitely built with picturesque views of the rolling hillsides. I hope that something wonderful happens soon to this magnificent property. Some may think this Priscilla Wood in Hawaii standing in front of the home she once lived in sounds like a long shot of that now belongs to the Dog Bounty Hunter. Courtesy photo being a popular location. However, with life always being about “location, location, location,” you can bet that this will add to the lure of many soon-to-be nuptials. Check this link for more details on Cielo: cielorsf.com. she grew up in Portlock, Hawaii Kai! I have included a a photo of Priscilla capturing that moment of discovery. You may know Priscilla around town. She is a real estate agent in Mike Taylor’s office just a few doors down from Delicias. Here is her link just in case you might be looking for a home soon: priscillawood.com. I hear that real estate is definitely on the rise!

COAST CITIES — The past season for the Friends of San Pasqual Academy continued to bring a very special dimension to the lives of the foster children who are students at San Pasqual Academy. It began with Shop ‘Til You Drop — Back To School Day, then “Teens, Jeans and Dreams” team penning event, the “Celebration of Friends” evening at John and Gina Daley’s home, Sports Banquets for the football and volleyball players; birthday parties, refurbishing cottages, the annual Holiday Party and New Year's Eve party, and more.

Wig out at Junior League benefit COAST CITIES — Mark your calendar now for the Junior League of San Diego (JLSD) “Wiggin’ Out” wine soiree benefiting the National Alopecia Areata Foundation and JLSD. Guests are encouraged to don their favorite wig for the event. The event will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. Feb. 21 at Fifty Seven Degrees wine bar, 1735 Hancock St., San Diego. In addition to fine wines, craft beers, charcuterie boards and small plates there will be music, dancing and opportunity drawings. “In addition to assisting a noteworthy cause, the event also provides the Junior League of San Diego with an opportunity to train our newest members and

provide the leadership development needed to help create San Diego’s next generation of female civic and community leaders,” said Jennifer Edstrom, president of the Junior League of San Diego. Contact Hillary Henderson at hillaryhenderson79@yahoo.com or (619) 818-9080 for more information or details regarding sponsorship. The Junior League of San Diego, Inc. is a member of an international organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving the community through the effective action and leader-

Cielo Village is in development right now become a premier wedding destination in Rancho Santa Fe. Courtesy photo

ship of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable. The Junior League reaches out to women of all races, religions and national origins who demonstrate an interest in, and commitment to, voluntarism. For more information visit jlsd.org. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) supports research to find a cure or acceptable treatment for alopecia areata, supports those with the disease, and educates the public about alopecia areata. Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune skin disease resulting in the loss of hair on the scalp and elsewhere on the body.

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Karenventura@kirkwoodpartners.net. “Tee It Up For Foster Teens” invitations will go out as soon as they are available. Start putting your foursomes together today. Upcoming activities of Friends of San Pasqual Academy include Valentine’s Day bags, Easter goodies, Prom, Grad Night and Brunch, more birthday parties, sports banquets for the basketball teams, track, baseball and softball teams, athletic uniforms, music, art and agricultural programs, college scholarships, computers for the graduates and the graduation ceremony.

Members are currently planning the “Tee It Up For Foster Teens” golf tournament to be held April 22 at The Santaluz Club. Dave Scherer will be chairperson again this year, joined a group of volunteers already hard at work on the tournament and dinner. If you would like to join the committee, be a sponsor or golf in this tournament, email Joan at joscott24@hotmail.com. Karen Ventura is once again, in charge of the evening’s auction. If you would like to donate an auction item, contact Karen at

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B8

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS Follow us on

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TASTE OF WINE CONTINUED FROM B5

entry, the 2011 Lot 381 Lodi Zinfandel ($14.) He describes his wine as “boisterously aromatic, with jammy raspberry, plum and baking spice aromas with hints of black pepper.” In Lodi, Zinfandel is the singular force for big sales. The household name is Gnarly Head, with vines that resemble wild bushes with intrepid old vines. The 2010 is out ($10.99) with 100,000 cases produced. Gnarly Head is but one brand from the Indelicato family, making wine in the Lodi area for more than 80 years. Michael-David Winery is another name to know, maker of 7 Deadly Zins ($16), indeed a sinful blend! Seven Lodi vineyards were chosen for this fast growing bottle, with over 200 percent growth yearly. Petite Sirah was added for spiced blackberry. Visit lodi-

HEALING

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an individual. By playing her instruments and using guided meditations, she helps people find the core issues needing to be addressed to experience physical and spiritual healing. She bases her sound energy healing practice on the belief that true healing is “a spiritual awakening that impacts the physical body.” While she personally does not have the funds to conduct scientific research

SMALL TALK

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first byline, I shortened it to Jean. Jean sounded ever so much more serious and sophisticated, don’t you know. Then, finally I married and became Jean Hart Gillette. It seemed like a natural

transition to me. But to my parents, as they drew up the family trust, I would always be Nancy Jean and so they wrote me in as Nancy Jean Gillette — which is my name, and yet it is not. Just ask the bank. Once my dad died, the fun began, as I started to wade through transferring

this, inheriting that, changing ownership of the next thing. Who, they asked, as if it were written in Chinese, is “Nancy Jean Gillette?” It’s not Nancy Rose Hart, is it? “No. That was my mom.” Surely you can’t be the same person as Jean Hart Gillette. That is far too great a

meats and produce. We use a wide variety of vegetables that will be exclusive to the entrée it compliments. We keep it different and exciting for the diner,” he said. Veladora and the nearby Pony Room, with small bites and a modern, fun design, bring interesting, naturally made wine to the table, in glass portions customized for the guest. Over 430 selections are offered. The Pony Room has a draft wine program of Cabernet and Chardonnay blends from Paso Robles and Lake County California, served in 100 percent Riedel Crystal. Learn more at ranchovalencia.com.

Cabs, Syrahs, Zins and more. $20. Call (619) 236-0005. Il Fornaio in the Del Mar Plaza hosts a Batasiolo Barolo Wine Dinner Jan. 31 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Cost is $55. A four-course menu will be paired with the wines. Call (858) 755-8876 to RSVP. Fleming’s First Friday in La Jolla is Feb. 1 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Try 20 different wines from Italy. For reservations, call (858) 535-0078. Cakebread vs. Rombauer wines is the matchup at La Costa Wine Company, Feb. 1 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Cost is $35. Call for details at (760) 431-8646.

wine.com so you don’t get “stuck” when you visit. A $30 million renovation has put a new face on the historic Rancho Santa Fe resort, Rancho Valencia. Nowhere on the property is the upgrade more evident than the hacienda-styled restaurant Veladora. “Veladora means wooden candle in Spanish,” said General Manager Simon Chen. “Our treatment of the large, romantic wrought iron candles is a source of great pride and beauty.” In a walk-through, I was struck by the quiet, elegant semi private areas of Veladora, with colors like cobalt blue, orange, red and brown. The décor suggested that the menu would be equally sensuous and inviting — and I was not disappointed. Executive Chef Eric Bauer serves signature “Coastal Ranch” cuisine. “The menu is Mediterranean inspired, with fresh seafood,

Wines from Paso Robles will be spotlighted at Bacchus Wine Market downtown San Diego, Jan. 26 from 2 to 8:30 p.m. A wine specialist will be on hand to guide you through

Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. His library can be viewed at www.tasteofwinetv.com. (Average Google certified 900 visits per day) He is one of the top five wine commentators on the Web. Reach him at mangiompc@aol.com.

about how sound heals people, she said that she encourages her clients to measure the changes in their own bodies. But she said she doesn’t need scientific measurements to know that sound helps people. “Things happen, people get better. I don’t need any more proof than that,” Mandle said. Though one relies on scientific measurements and the other intuition, Thompson and Mandle said that the feedback they have received from clients has been overwhelming. Both

said that they regularly have clients who are amazed by the healing in their own bodies, and both said that they have had people request treatment from around the world. In spite of this, Thompson and Mandle said that sound healing is still being used far too infrequently. Mandle said that when she moved to Encinitas in 2000, “Nobody knew what (sound healing) was.” “Sound healing has a black eye because of all the flaky-wakies out there. So once you announce that you

are doing sound therapy, everyone in the medical field turns away,” said Thompson. To see a video of Mandle playing her Tibetan bowls, visit thecoastnews.com. More information about Thompson’s work can be found on the Center for Neuroacoustic Research’s website at neuroacoustic.com. Mandle will be playing a concert as part of Encinitas’ Wellness Week at the Encinitas Library Jan. 25 at 6:30 p.m. More information about her work can be found at soundenergyhealing.com.

Wine Bytes

leap of logic and besides — and they made this part crystal clear with facial expressions and tones of voice — your are probably just trying to steal this paltry amount of money from some hapless senior and we cannot be liable. I found myself required to practically frame my marriage license and hang it around my neck to prove that Nancy Jean Hart truly and legally became Jean Hart Gillette, and is one and the same person. It’s exhausting. Now for my sad confession. To honor my mother, I named my daughter Nancy Hart Gillette. It seemed so dear at the time. Unwittingly, I set my child up for all this

ADOBE

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“It is already being taught but this will give them a more hands-on, visual approach to what they are already learning in the third grade.” “I am very excited about our work in the third grade with the Osuna committee and how we can connect with our local history,” said Kim Pinkerton, elementary school principal. The 28-acre Osuna Ranch was purchased with open space funds by the Association in June 2006 for $12 million. Its intended use is for education, social events and equestrian activities. Built in 1831, the adobe underwent restoration and expansion in 1924 overseen by Lilian Rice, Rancho Santa Fe’s original

HOUSE

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cost $150 each. The winner, to be chosen on May 18, will have the choice of the house or $1.6 million in cash. Buying a ticket also gives a person the chance at three early bird drawings, the first, Feb. 20, will give away a 2013 Prius or $25,000 cash; a Sea-Do Speedster or $10,000 cash; or a Vespa Motor Scooter or $5,000 cash. The next two early bird drawings in March and April will net the winner cash, cash, cash. “All the winning tickets will be re-entered into subsequent early bird drawings as well as the grand prize drawing,” Day said. “Only 51,000 tickets will be sold, so the odds are good.” Day said organizers hope to raise $2 million from this year’s raffle. And it’s all for such a good cause. There are 47 rooms at the San Diego Ronald McDonald House which are almost always full. “We have 46 families with us right now,” he said. He said one room is occupied by a trauma anesthesiologist who is on call and available to the hospital at any hour. He said the average stay for the resident guests is about 10 days. Not only do they get a room, they can eat meals, do laundry and keep

same legal fun and very probably, a great deal more. Someday, someone will appreciate (as I did until now) that three generations share a special name, but today’s fraud-filled, suspicious, litigious society has sucked all the joy out of such maudlin, affectionate and highly confusing nonsense. I am beginning to finally understand why parents are chosing Zyddnee, Kcristii and Shawneequa rather than Susan, Ann and Mary. Never mind that no one will ever spell them right. The banks are most grateful. Jean Gillette is a freelance writer with a minor identity crisis. Contact her at jgillette@coastnewsgroup.com.

architect. Much work has already been done on the restoration of the adobe and its grounds, but most of it is not visible, including the architectural study, drainage control and work to minimize future deterioration. The next phase will be the actual restoration of the adobe, building on-site quarters for a caretaker, bathrooms and a small kitchen. “We need to let people know how important and how special it is,” Feighner said. “No other community has something like this.” She said there are no plans to open up the adobe or grounds to outside groups. “This is for the enjoyment of our members and guests,” she said. in touch with families and work at the on- site computer room. Also on site for the siblings of a young patient, is a school serving kindergartners through 12th grade. “The idea is to keep a family together, “ he said. “Another unique thing is the fact that we are so close to Rady and Sharp Mary Birch, we have an open house family care center where the family can take a break and have a meal,” he said. They don’t have to be residents of the Ronald McDonald House. “About 96,000 meals have been served and about 18,000 annually,” Day said. “Our Ronald McDonald House is 33 years old.” The original one was founded in 1973 in Philadelphia. There are now 323 worldwide. Each house is independent and is a 501 (c) (3) charity. Tony Gwynn will again be the face and ambassador of the Dream House Raffle. This is a state of California registered raffle so when a person buys a ticket, it is not considered a gift, so it is not tax deductable, but most people who buy a ticket consider it a gift anyway, Day said. More information is available by calling (888) 824-9939 or by visiting sdraffle.com.


JAN. 25, 2013

B9

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MOTHER-DAUGHTER YOGA MOMS Are you looking for a fun, creative way to bond with your daughter in 2013? Join the 8-week class starting on January 27 at Soleil Yoga in Cardiff.Weekly sessions focus on developing your daughterís confidence/ self esteem, Includes art, cooking, journaling, discussion and yoga. $260 per mother-daughter pair. Sundays 1:00-2:30. For more information or to register contact erica@inspirebalance.com http:// inspirebalance4teens.com/?page_id=10 958 (858) 344-6334

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FOUND - SET OF KEYS By railroad tracks in Encinitas on Monday 12.17.12. Please call to identify (760) 839-3115

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Items For Sale 200 Antiques ANTIQUE CATHOLIC BIBLE Heirloom, Printed in 1950, Leather Binding, Best Offer (858) 759-1154

THE COAST NEWS GROUP

PIERRE DEUX LAMPS A Rare Opportunity to Buy This Beautiful Pair of Country French Lamps! The Hand Painted Rooster Lamps are in Perfect Condition and Highly Collectible. The Prestigious Pierre Deux Company No Longer Exists. $149 OBO. Please Call Shelly (760) 809-4657 ROYAL MANUAL TYPEWRITER “Caravan” made in the 1960ís in Holland, Absolute Pristine Cosmetic and Working Condition, A Steal at $69 OBO Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

INDEX F.Y.I..................................... ..100 HEALTH & WELL BEING ....150 ITEMS FOR SALE................200 BUSINESS SERV.............. ...300 FINANCIAL SERV.................310 HOME SERVICES................325 MISC. SERVICES.................350 PERSONAL SERV................375

HELP WANTED................ ....400 JOBS WANTED................ ....450 BUSINESS OPPS.................475 ROOMMATES.......................500 RENTALS..............................600 REAL ESTATE.................... ..700 LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICE.... 800 AUTOMOTIVE..................... 900

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Items For Sale 200

Computer/Electronics

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SATELLITE RECEIVER WITH DISH An adth satellite receiver #8800ir for european programming is for sale with a globe cast dish. Includes wireless remote and memory card. $95 set (760) 758-8344

MUSICIAN LAMP A Wonderful Vintage 14” Piano Table Lamp. Great For Any Room With a Musical Theme. Only $25 OBO Please Call Shelly (760) 809-4657

Furniture UPHOLSTERED HEADBOARD Twin Size and Sky Blue $50 (760) 758-8958

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HAULING I will haul your trash, yard materials, left behind furniture for move outs, construction clean up, help moving, etc. for very affordable rates. call or text Everett at (760) 893-9184

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Real Estate 700

Sporting Goods

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CLAIROL BRAND HOT ROLLERS Clean and in Good Condition $5 (760) 207-8537 FABRICS FOR SALE Brocade, Taffeta and Cottons. 1-3 yard pieces, good for upholstery $1.50 each piece OBO (760) 599-9141

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ENCINITAS 4BR SFD HOME $589K Single story on a cul-de-sac and walking distance to parks, elementary school, sports & play areas. Nicely updated, fire place, spacious kitchen, vaulted ceilings, and ceiling fans. Call 760-720-4488 Agent. Ca DRE# #01302799

Items Wanted JACK DANIELS Collector looking for old jd or lem motlow bottles and advertising or display items. Up to $149 each (760) 630-2480

Automobiles 900

OLD COMIC BOOKS WANTED. Local collector will pay you big cash $$$. (858) 999-7905

Computer/Electronics AMPLIFIED CORDLESS PHONE Hearing Aide Compatible, amplifies to 40 decimals, “Digital Clarity Power” brand. White with large lighted keypads and tone settings $15 (760) 599-9141

IRISH CRYSTAL BY “SHANNON” Square Footed, 7 inch diameter bell shaped compote. Never Used $15 (760) 599-9141

OLYOíS PIZZA MEMORABILIA Anything considered but would love any pictures or t-shirts (adult size). Wanted for my nephewís Christmas present! (760) 994-7265

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WANTED Wanted Used Saxophones, flutes, clairnets, any condition, will pay cash. 760-346-9931 (760) 705-0215.

LIKE NEW HUNTER AIR PURIFIER. $99.00-hunter 30381 hepatech air purifier features a whisper-quiet fan that draws air into the unit without excessive noise. Operational manual included. Pictures available. (760) 842-1970

Help Wanted 400

TENNIS RACQUET Head Crossbow 10 43/8 grip light weight powerful excellent condition $50 (760) 632-2487

Cars 2004 MCCORMICK MTX120 Tractor ($19,000), 2wd, 16 speed power shift, left hand reverser, 120 engine hp, 100 pto hp, air seat, am/fm, rear wiper, 3 remotes, toplink, very good condition!. For more info/photo: rog. Perez@aol. Com 81 AMC SPIRIT BL HATCHBACK Good Condition - $700 (760) 207-8537 MAZDA SPORT Miata, mx, turbo, 2 seater, black soft top with cover, cd stereo, air, manual, (stick 6 speed), performance tires with spare, apprx. 38,000 miles. (760) 207-0073 San Marcos, $15,950.00 0B0.

Wanted To Buy DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED Any Type, Any Brand. Will pay up to $10 a box. Call Ronda at (760) 593-7033.

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DEADLINES

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B10

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS Rentals 600

Automotive 900

Items For Sale 200

Misc. Services 350

Misc. Services 350

Connect 1,000’s of p with oten customers! tial For more in form call Nancy ation 760.436.97 at 37

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Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

Place your own FREE print ad at coastnewsgroup.com If your item is under $150 dollars or is a vehicle for sale, you can place it FREE!


JAN. 25, 2013

B11

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

in your mind, this isn’t likely to be the case. Diverting your attention elsewhere could dilute your efforts.

SOUP TO NUTS by Rick Stromoski

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

CANCER (June 21-July 22) — There is a hard way to do things and an easy way. Even though you might recognize the difference, for some reason you’ll make things tougher than they need to be.

For many years, you might have been of the opinion that fortuitous things happened to others, not you.That is all likely to change in the year ahead, as your luck will take a positive turn that even you can’t deny.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — If you find yourself in the position of being unable to finalize an important project, don’t make things worse by stewing over it. Let those fruits ripen a bit longer on the tree.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Disappointment is likely if someone for whom you do a favor is unable to adequately express his or her thanks. You’ll feel better if you don’t expect anything.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t turn your household into a military installation. Harsh rules and commands won’t be nearly as effective as making polite pleas.

By Bernice Bede Osol

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — A burned child fears the fire, but you’re not a kid anymore. Stop shunning a former collaborator just because he or she erred in the past. Be the bigger person and forgive and forget. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You’re in a better position career-wise than you might think. Though you might see only dark clouds ahead, don’t retreat from doing what you should and can do.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Remember, the mind is a remarkable mechanism for performing wonders. All you have to do is marshal your thinking to conquer doubt and accomplish whatever you wish. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Because of an inability to capitalize on a good opportunity, the biggest problem you’ll have to contend with is accepting your shortcomings.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — It might be wise to analyze your desire TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — for something material. There’s a Because all your focus is placed on chance you may be seeking it for the lofty objectives, it might be difficult for wrong reasons. you to see the multitudes of lesser but CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — still profitable opportunities. Even though you might be truly grateRemember, small things can add up. ful to someone who does a favor for BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce

MONTY by Jim Meddick

ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

COW & BOY by Mark Leiknes

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — you, you might be unable to express Although a joint venture in which your gratitude in a way that you feel is you’re involved should be uppermost adequate. Nonetheless, do your best.


B12

JAN. 25, 2013

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

Tips for cleaning baked-on foods from pans with ease SARA NOEL Frugal Living Cleaning pans can be a tough job. Oftentimes, you can simply fill the pot or pan with soapy water and let it soak, then clean it later, or remove what you can with a wooden or plastic spatula. If scorched marks remain, add a baking soda paste of baking soda and vinegar, or baking soda, dish liquid, a bit of water and a dryer sheet (such as Bounce), and let soak overnight. Scrub with a green Scotch-Brite pad or a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser. If you still have some stubborn marks, you can use oven cleaner or products such as Bon Ami, Cameo or Bar Keepers Friend. The first reader tip shares another idea: Cleaning stainless steel pan: If I think food will be hard to clean from the pan, I’ll heat up some water in it on the stove (not a full boil, but a really good heating), along with a drop or two of dish soap. Once the water is heated, I turn the stove off and

cover the pot. Once I’m ready to clean, it usually comes off with ease. — Libby, Canada Put the word out: I answered an ad for baby clothes on Craigslist when my granddaughter was a newborn. Being an obsessed grandmother, I insisted we get clothes far in advance. The seller was offering clothes from places like the Children’s Place, babyGap, Gymboree — expensive stuff that I wasn’t going to buy new. As it turns out, her baby girl is exactly one year older than my grandchild, so the clothes are all in the right season. And in an amazing coincidence, both their names are Lily Grace, so even the nametags are correct! I bought the whole lot of clothes, and the seller and I now have an arrangement: When she amasses a bin full of outgrown clothes, she sends me an email and I go by to pick them up. My daughter hasn’t had to buy new clothes for her baby since she was born! — F.N, Massachusetts Shop and plan ahead for the year: Here’s a good example of buying with the whole year in mind. Budget $12 plus tax for January. Next, run to the dollar store while you are already out running errands. (Don’t use

extra gas!) Purchase 12 20ounce bottles of non-lotiony body wash at $1 each, of various scents and colors. Now, fill each of your hand soap pumps by combining a bit of water and the soap (leaving room to put the pump back in), and shake. For roughly 25 cents per bottle, you have the entire year’s worth of hand soap, so you can check it off the stockpile list. This is a cheap and effective way of completing one small thing for an entire year. I also save money by buying certain items in bulk, such as a year’s supply of vinegar, from Sam’s Club. For me, that’s 12 gallons. I cook and clean with vinegar; I also use it in the laundry, in the dishwasher and as a rinse in the dog’s bath. The large two-pack at Sam’s Club is perfect for me. I go to Sam’s Club once a month, so I always try to plan well. — Cricket, Texas Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a website that offers practical, moneysaving strategies for everyday living. To send tips, comments or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, MO, 64106, or e-mail sara@frugalvillage.com.