Inland Edition, October 16, 2020

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The Coast News out our Check section l politica n page 11 o star ting

ESCONDIDO, SAN MARCOS, VISTA

VOL. 5, N0. 41

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INLAND EDITION

.com OCT. 16, 2020

County hangs on in red tier

Shades of conflict

The Coast News investigates a Tri-City candidate’s conflicts of interest, accusations of election meddling. Page 5.

Vista Unified allows in-person, virtual learning models By Steve Puterski

VISTA — Students will be able to attend schools in person starting Oct. 20. The Vista Unified School District Board of Education approved two models, in person and virtual, in line with state and county guidelines for COVID-19. While school began on Sept. 8 through distance learning, the board approved the hybrid model during its Sept. 29 meeting. As for the logistics, students two-years and older are required to wear facemasks unless exempted, according to the district’s website. Also, areas of use will be disinfected each day and entering and exiting campuses will be limited to several access points. “This new status report for San Diego County allows Vista Unified to continue with our planned reopening for Vista Classic on Oct. 20 … for all grade levels,” VUSD Superintendent Matt Doyle said in a community update. When entering school sites, parents are asked to pre-screen their children as the district is not conducting temperature checks; although the VUSD has

VISTA UNIFIED School District is advising staff members and students testing positive for COVID-19 not to return until they have met the Centers for Disease Control criteria. File photo

put procedures in place for daily symptom monitoring for staff. The district is also advising sick staff members and students not to return until they have met the Centers for Disease Control criteria to discontinue home isolation.

This criteria includes going three days with no fever, the symptoms have improved and 10 days have passed since the symptoms first appeared, according to the VUSD website. If a student or staff member tests positive for COVID-19,

the district will consult with the county health department to make an assessment. The classroom or office where the patient was based “will typically need to close temporarily,” and standard home isolation is 14 days. As for the curriculum, some classes may not be offered in each model, according to the district. Once virtual sessions can return to campus, those students will remain with their teachers in class, while high and middle school students will receive grades for the 2020 to 2021 school year. The district also plans to ramp up social, emotional and nutritional support programs. For those students in the virtual model, they will still have access to regular meal distribution, the district reported. As for sports and extracurricular activities, those will be available “as health orders” permit. Sports are set to begin on Dec. 14 and there will be just two seasons, December through March 2021 and March through June. The district said students in either model will be allowed to compete in athletics or engage in extracurricular activities.

By City News Service

REGION — San Diego County public health officials reported 303 new COVID-19 infections and four virus-related deaths Oct. 14, raising the region's totals to 51,327 cases and 844 deaths. This comes a day after state data confirmed the county will remain in the red, or substantial, tier of the state’s four-tier COVID-19 reopening plan for at least another week. County supervisors Greg Cox and Nathan Fletcher said staying in red wasn’t good enough. Cox said the red tier's restrictions still made it incred ibly difficult for small businesses to stay open. Fletcher agreed, saying the county needed to drive down positive tests and new case Nathan Fletcher numbers. Board of Supervisors “ T h e overwhelming majority [of county residents] are doing everything right, but we need to see numbers go down,” he said. “We need to get off this weekly cliff we stare down.” For several consecutive weeks, the county has remained in the red tier, but within very close range of that purple tier which would shutter almost all indoor business. According to the California Department of Public Health on Tuesday, San Diego County’s state-calculated, adjusted case rate is 6.8 daily infections per 100,000 residents, up from 6.5 the previous week. The unadjusted case rate was 7.2, up from 6.9 a week ago. The adjusted rate is due to San Diego County’s high volume of tests. The testing positivity percentage is 3%, below last week's 3.5%, and is in the third — or orange — tier. To remain in the second tier of the four-tier COVID-19 reopening plan, the county must continue to have an adjusted case rate

We need to get off this weekly cliff we stare down.”

TURN TO RED TIER ON 6


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OCT. 16, 2020

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City launches effort to back local breweries By Tigist Layne

SAN MARCOS — The City of San Marcos recently launched a San Marcos promotional campaign with the help of local graphic designer Mike Nelson. The campaign, called Sunny San Marcos, is an effort to support local breweries and businesses during the COV I D -19 crisis. Councilmember Randy Walton came up with the idea to create a logo and a slogan to promote San Marcos. To start, he has launched stickers that were designed by Nelson, found The new Sunny San Marcos stickers depict a bright San Marcos with its rolling hills and famous Double Peak Park. The Sunny San Marcos initiative is an effort to promote the city and encourage residents to visit and support local businesses. Photo courtesy of the City of San Marcos. er and creative director of Type G, a branding and design company.

The design features a local breweries Dos Desbright San Marcos, rolling perados, Lost Abbey (both hills next to a body of water San Marcos locations), My Yard Live, Rip Current, Urge Gastropub/Mason Ale Works and Wild Barrel, as well as Old Cal Coffee & Eatery. Residents who want a sticker must visit one of these establishments and pu rc hase food or a beverage. “ I just hoped to use it to not only evoke pride in our city, but to use it to help our local businesses during such a difficult economic crisis,” Walton said. and the city’s iconic Double Walton added that he Peak Park. has been promoting the “I thought it would be stickers through social mecool if we had an image dia, and the feedback from that evoked all the beauti- the community has been ful natural assets that we very positive, so much so have in San Marcos like that he expects to order our hills, our trails, Dou- more stickers soon. ble Peak Park, tons of sunNelson, who used to shine, plus the ocean is not live in San Marcos and now far away,” Walton said. resides in Encinitas, told The stickers have been The Coast News that this made available for free at project meant a lot to him,

THE NEW Sunny San Marcos stickers, above, depict the city’s rolling hills and famous Double Peak Park. The initiative is an effort to promote the city and encourage residents to visit and support local businesses. Courtesy photo

and he had a lot of fun doing it. “My intention was to make it be simple, yet interesting and infuse all of the special features that San Marcos has to offer,” Nelson said. “The water, the sky and the way the landscape lights up around sunset time — I wanted it to be a little whimsical and have a happy, loose feeling.” Walton said he’s considering expanding the project to include other products besides just stickers. He’s also hoping to include more local businesses that may need support from the community.

PEANUT BUTTER DRIVE

The Vista Chamber of Commerce announced the North County Food Bank “Scare Away Hunger” Peanut Butter Drive to collect jars of peanut butter at the Chamber office and Food Bank storefront. Donate peanut butter and other food items throughout October. Photo by Ivonne Kydd

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OCT. 16, 2020

Opinion & Editorial

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of The Coast News

Two rerun propositions that deserve low ratings

T

Vote no on Prop 15

Tax increase on small businesses, farms By Ernie Dronenburg

Prop 15 is a property tax increase on the ballot this November. It is being sold as more money for government and schools. That is true. Unfortunately, Prop 15 hides that it is the largest property tax increase in California history that will crush our neighborhood small businesses and farms. As your elected Assessor, responsible for administering this tax increase, I have read the fine print of Prop 15 and want to share what it really does. The proponents promise billions for government and schools, it will close a “corporate tax loophole,” and only make millionaires, billionaires and big corporations pay with no tax increases on small businesses. Here are the facts: First, Prop 15 is a tax increase. I found Prop 15 will be an unaffordable tidal wave of tax increases that will wipe out small businesses already drowning from the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown.

Second, it does not protect small businesses. To qualify as a small business under Prop 15, you are required to own property in California. The California Business RoundTable found that 78% of small businesses are renters. If you rent and don’t own property in California, then you are not classified as a small business and not protected from Prop 15’s huge tax increases. That’s why the NAACP opposes Prop 15. The NAACP in their Berkley Research study found that minority and women-owned businesses will be disproportionately hurt by the $12 billion tax increase. Even worse, Prop 15 will lead to the loss of an estimated 120,000 private-sector jobs. Third, small businesses will pay the Prop 15 property tax increase. I found the proponents need small businesses and farms to pay this huge tax increase in order to generate the $12 billion in revenue they want. They could

the , s n o i n i p o beliefs

& viewpoints

expressed by various participants on the Op Ed page in this newspaper do not reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of The Coast News. The Coast News will exercise editorial discretion if comments are determined solely to injure, malign, defame or slander any religious group, ethnic group, club, organization, company or individual.

have written the Prop 15 to only be limited to millionaires, billionaires and big corporations, but did not. They talk about Exxon and Amazon paying the bill; in reality I found it to be many of our favorite neighborhood small businesses like Pizza Port, The Original Pancake House, Swami’s Café, and Fred’s Mexican Cafe that will be picking up the tab. I found due to Prop 15, there will be small businesses facing annual rent and property tax increases of $20,000, $30,000 and even $50,000 on a single small business. These are not the billionaires and big corporations, but the face of the small businesses that may close their doors if Prop 15 passes. Fourth, Prop 15 does protect our farmers. The initiative only excludes agriculture land. Their claim of protecting farms is false advertising because it will increase property taxes on barns, dairies, fruit trees, and wineries. Prop 15 will hurt farmers with increased property taxes and leaving consumers to pay more for milk, eggs and wine. The truth is, Prop 15 is a tax increase that does not protect our small businesses, it hurts our farmers, it hurts minority- and women-owned businesses. I even found it to make our housing and homeless solutions more unaffordable. As your property tax expert, I say vote no on Prop 15. Let’s protect our neighborhood businesses and farms. These neighborhood mom and pop shops are the fabric of our community. Small businesses can’t afford to pick up the tab for the badly written Prop 15. This is the wrong idea at the wrong time. Ernie Dronenburg is the San Diego County Assessor

his fall’s California ballot contains definite head-scratchers: Two repeat propositions that — based on their 2018 showings — probably did not deserve a rerun nearly this soon. Just two years ago, voters opted by almost identical margins of 61-39 percent and 62-38 percent to reject the 2018 Propositions 8 and 10, one mandating significant increases in staffing at dialysis centers that preserve the lives of more than 80,000 patients with end-stage kidney disease, the other allowing rent controls everywhere in California. It’s not unusual for initiative sponsors to bring their ideas to the ballot repeatedly, despite the multi-million-dollar costs of petition signature drives and the campaign ads required later on. Only very occasionally does a rerun succeed. The last significant one was the landmark 1978 Proposition 13 property tax limit measure, which was an outgrowth, but not a replica, of another initiative that failed earlier, in a 1973 special election staged by order of thenGov. Ronald Reagan. Today’s reruns are not quite as far reaching as that one, and their original versions lost by much larger margins than the original try at limiting property taxes. This fall, Propositions 21 and 23 are almost identical to their losing predecessors. Prop. 21, again sponsored by the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation, is slightly tougher than its defeated forebear. It would limit rent increases to 5% per year, plus the local rate of inflation in locales which now have no rent control. Existing rent controls would con-

california focus thomas d. elias tinue in places like Santa Monica, Los Angeles, Glendale, Cotati, San Francisco and a few other cities. For what it’s worth, those controls have not ended the housing affordability crisis anywhere; some of the highest-priced rentals in America exist in Santa Monica and San Francisco, both with strict controls for decades. These are also among the densest areas in California, scores of new apartment buildings having risen in recent years to replace older, smaller ones. Most city rent control laws exempt new construction, usually defined as less than 15 years old but extending back to 1978 in some cities. So it pays for developers to buy up older buildings, evict longtime tenants and build newer units where they can charge market rates, which have climbed steadily for many years. A new state law passed in 2019 aims to mitigate this somewhat by making evictions of paid-up renters more difficult. And no one yet knows the long-term effects of coronavirus eviction limits. The arguments on both sides here are the same as they were two years ago, meaning the real question is whether the political climate has changed in California and how far left any such changes may have swung the state. The Prop. 23 dialysis proposition, another big loser two years ago, is at least as flawed as its prede-

cessor. It essentially interferes with the medical care of persons often too weak or debilitated to advocate for their own interests. (Full disclosure: Columnist Elias has had a kidney transplant since 1997. He underwent regular dialysis treatments for many months prior to his transplant.) Sponsored mainly by the powerful Service Employees International Union, this measure would force the more than 550 dialysis clinics which clean the blood of patients in all parts of California to add more staff at the same time it forbids clinics from charging insurance companies for the work of physician medical directors vital to maintaining quality medical care. If this discourages clinic visits by nephrologists and spurs some to stop making rounds there at all, it would severely interfere with medical treatment. The main funding for opposition to this measure comes from two multinational companies — the German-based Fresenius Medical Care and Denver-based DaVita Corp. Together, these firms operate about 70% of California dialysis clinics. Besides owning clinics, Fresenius is among the largest makers of dialysis machines. Both Fresenius and DaVita contend, as they did in 2018, that passage of Prop. 23 would force them to close many clinics, especially in rural areas, thus forcing already disabled patients to travel long distances for vital treatments. Neither of these measures is back by popular demand. Both deserve to lose at least as badly as they did before. Email Thomas Elias at tdelias@aol.com.

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OCT. 16, 2020

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Tri-City candidate’s past reveals potential conflict of interest By Jordan P. Ingram & Catherine Allen

OCEANSIDE — Just weeks before the Nov. 3 election, a Tri-City Healthcare District Board of Directors candidate’s alleged election meddling and past legal entanglements with the hospital have raised questions about a potential conflict of interest and his motivations for seeking a seat on the board. The Coast News has reviewed court documents that shed light on the origins of Oceanside resident Jim Burlew’s employment as Tri-City’s facilities director in 2013 and his subsequent firing from the hospital, revealing Tri-City’s claims of his lack of professional qualifications and alleged criminal conduct in the days shortly after his removal. “They were trying to bully me and bleed me dry, and it didn’t work,” Burlew, a District 1 candidate, told The Coast News. “[Tri-City] started the lawsuits and they ended up settling and paying me because their claims were found to be false.” A spokesperson at TriCity declined to comment about Burlew’s employment history due to privacy rights. According to Tri-City’s legal filings, Burlew was hired in 2013 as Tri-City’s director of facilities, despite a lack of basic job proficiency or previous management experience in a hospital facilities department. Approximately one year later, Burlew was fired in 2014 for violating the hospital’s nepotism and conflict of interest policies after hiring several of his relatives to work under his supervision and lying about it. After hiring his wife’s niece and nephew, Burlew maintained that he did not know he was related to them. Previously, Burlew had been placed on administrative leave for falsifying employee time cards and “mistreatment of employees.” Shortly after his dismissal from Tri-City, Burlew came to retrieve his personal belongings on Aug. 8, 2014, from his office at the facilities department, but left the hospital with a stack of emergency department transfer logs containing the personal information of 35,000 patients, according to court documents. The documents had been temporarily stored on the lower shelf of a cart Burlew used to transport personal items to his car, but the files did not belong to him. When a staff member accompanying Burlew during one of his trips asked him about the folders, Burlew reportedly told him, “They [Tri-City] would really be after me if I took those books.” Burlew allegedly kept the logs in his home for several days and shared them with Luis Montulli, a former member of Tri-City’s Gover-

BURLEW

nance Committee, who was later fired for his role in the patient data breach. Burlew denied taking the files, claiming he discovered the documents in his truck after arriving home. “The records that mysteriously showed up in my truck were from the emergency department,” Burlew said. “They don’t belong in the facilities department. I’ve never seen them. Somebody tried to stick them in my truck.” Burlew denied sharing the documents with anyone and said he returned the records to the California Department of Public Health shortly thereafter. Burlew’s refusal to return the emergency logs violated his confidentiality

agreement with the hospital, according to court documents. Tri-City filed a complaint against Burlew on Oct. 7, 2014, in Vista Superior Court, alleging negligence, breach of contract, receiving stolen property, misappropriation of trade secrets and conversion. Burlew filed a counter-complaint against the hospital for wrongful termination, which ultimately resulted in a settlement agreement. For Burlew, none of his past legal wranglings with the hospital constitutes a conflict of interest with his candidacy for the board. “No, there is no conflict of interest at all because none of that’s actually true,” Burlew said. “I’ve moved on, past that whole thing. You don’t dwell on things like that.” Burlew established a website (tricity2020.com) for his campaign, which includes his policy recommendations for hospital board candidates and a laundry list of allegations against Tri-City. Some of his allegations include falsifying public

financial documents and closing the hospital’s Behavioral Health Unit under “false pretenses” in an effort to secure a hospital mortgage insurance loan from Housing and Urban Development (HUD). According to Burlew’s website, the public “needs to hire a forensic accountant to explain why there appears to be more than $4.5 million in cash and cash equivalents missing from the general fund.” However, Burlew incorrectly juxtaposes two different financial reports — a 2019 Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) financial report for the hospital itself and a consolidated audit for the entire Tri-City Healthcare District and its properties. The Coast News reviewed the correct financial documents and found the Healthcare District’s cash and cash equivalents ($40,281,780) and short-term investments ($5,414,483) — which are combined under state reporting guidelines — in 2018 added up to a total of $45,696,263 — an exact

match. Burlew’s website also claims the public “needs to find out where the $85 million HUD loan money went since leadership has never explained where it went.” Aaron Byzak, Tri-City’s chief external affairs officer, explained the $85.8 million Housing and Urban Development (HUD) refinancing loan was discussed publicly on dozens of occasions and was eventually approved during a 2017 public board meeting. The HUD loan money is reported annually in financial statement reports, which are public records available for review, provided by public accounting firm Moss Adams. Publicly available documents also include the settlement statement which describes exactly where the loan proceeds were distributed, Byzak said. “The (HUD mortgage insurance loan) program is a refinancing program under which Tri-City refinanced its shorter-term, higher-interest debt (along with debt requiring cash restricted collateral) to longer-term, fixed-rate

debt, which released the cash collateral requirement and improved operating liquidity,” Byzak said. Rocky Chavez, current Tri-City Healthcare District board member and Oceanside mayoral candidate, believes Burlew’s allegations are likely steeped in his personal experiences with the hospital. In 2018, Burlew, then running as a union-backed Democrat, lost his bid for the District 2 board seat to Chavez. This year, Burlew was endorsed by the San Diego County Republican Party. “It’s very upsetting when he attacks the hospital, for people like me to hear what he’s saying, because he’s just wrong,” Chavez said. “Burlew has an objective to get on the board and hopefully he’ll have [votes] to fire people who fired him. That’s no reason to get on the board.” In recent years, Burlew has gone into business with former Tri-City CEO Larry Anderson and Medical Acquisition Company TURN TO CONFLICT ON 9

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OCT. 16, 2020

M arketplace News Top 5 reasons to migrate your business to the cloud Marketplace News is paid advertorial content. If you would like to buy space on this page, please contact the Coast News Group.

ATMOSPHERIC RIVER STORMS produce 40%-60% of the West Coast’s annual precipitation and are responsible for the majority of flood damage in the region. Courtesy photo

Scripps collaboration to optimize water management & supply The San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) is partnering with the renowned Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego to better predict atmospheric rivers and optimize water management before, during and after California’s ever-changing seasonal storms. Atmospheric river storms produce 40 to 60 percent of the West Coast’s annual precipitation and are responsible for the majority of flood damage in the region. Predicting and managing this is challenging due to unpredictable and changing snowmelt and rainfall. To study this, Scripps’ Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E) introduced the Water Affiliates Group, which brings together relevant science and water industry expertise to enhance reservoir operations along with California’s changing climate. “This partnership with Scripps Institution of Oceanography underscores our commitment to strategic, science-based decision-making and long-term planning,” said SDCWA Board of Directors Chairperson Jim Madaffer. “By supporting advances in forecasting, we can more efficiently and effectively manage water resources both local and statewide. This ultimately will benefit everyone in California by helping sustain our economy and quality of life.” The Water Authority is working with CW3E to assess how better near-term and long-term precipitation forecasts can improve reservoir planning and operational management in the San Diego region by maxi-

mizing local water supplies and the reliability of water resources through a mix of planning processes and real-time decisions. Other SoCal water authorities joining as founding partners are Orange County Water District and Irvine Ranch Water District. Once finalized, CW3E and its partners will share their findings of best practices in forecast-informed reservoir operations and management of atmospheric rivers and droughts and develop strat-

[W]e will enhance our planning capacity and be ready to adapt to whatever the future brings.” Sandra L Keri General manager

egies for reducing flood risk and increasing consistent water supply. San Diego County Water Authority General Manager Sandra L Keri stated that this collaboration is a “great example of how water agencies are stronger together by addressing major climate challenges that affect everyone across the arid west. By combining forces with some of the leading scientists in the world, we will enhance our planning capacity and be ready to adapt to whatever the future brings.” She also stated that this partnership speaks to Gov. Newsom’s Water Resilience Portfolio, which encourages voluntary agreements, smart water storage strategies and coordination of data collection.

During these changing times, businesses of all sizes are thinking and operating differently. From physical workstations and remote office locations to new IT infrastructure investments and network maintenance – it’s all being reevaluated in this new virtual world. Traditional office settings have rapidly migrated to virtual environments. Employees are moving into work-from-home stations. Most business meetings and presentations are now online. With more virtual activity comes the need for a fast and secure cloud-based solution that ensures businesses run more efficiently than ever before. Moving to a cloud-based solution can feel daunting but partnering with a cloud services provider like Cox Business Cloud Solutions takes away the guesswork and heavy lifting. HERE ARE THE TOP 5 THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN LOOKING AT CLOUD MIGRATION. Enabling Your Mobile Workforce With more employees working remotely than ever before, many companies have struggled to equip themselves properly. Workflows are different. Secure access to company data from various locations presents challenges. The sudden shift to remote work has changed how businesses operate and left them looking to new solutions for how to best move forward without hurting productivity. Cloud services help companies of all sizes find accessible, affordable ways to conduct business remotely. Instead of piecing together a convoluted process based on outdated, insecure

RED TIER

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of less than 7.0 per 100,000 residents and a testing positivity percentage of less than 5%. The county is preparing additional health and safety guidelines as school year moves forward, county Public Health Officer Dr. Wilma Wooten said Wednesday. A survey of the San Diego County Office of Education found that of the 42 school districts, 27 are open to at least some students for in-person learning, six will open later this month, three have a target date of January 2021, one is looking for a start date in October or November and two are still determining a start date. Of the 9,662 tests reported Wednesday, 3% returned positive, bringing the 14-day rolling average percentage of positive cases at 3%. The seven-day daily average of tests was 10,472. Of the total number of cases in the county, 3,710

on-premises hardware, the cloud enables teams to connect securely via a virtual desktop environment and continue their typical work process. The cloud helps your business function as efficiently as it would in a traditional working environment from one or more office locations. This is critical not only during a pandemic when things are unexpectedly shut down, but also during any kind of business interruption - natural disasters, storms, even cyber attacks. Quickly Scaling Your Network Every business is different and moving data to the cloud isn’t one-sizefits-all. Cox Business Cloud Solutions provides customized services to best fit the scale and needs of each individual business. A cloud migration plan considers critical workloads, data and applications, potential obstacles and a desired timeline for implementing tailored solutions. And it’s scalable. Cox Business Cloud Solutions provides enterprise-level services including Managed Cloud Security, Disaster Recovery, Data Backup, Virtual Desktop Environments, Software Defined Wide Area Network (SDWAN), and Enterprise Grade Infrastructure, and works with customers to ensure a safe transition of data. Securing Critical Data One thing that businesses worry about most is security for sensitive data. Most companies don’t want to allocate IT funds elsewhere when they’re focusing resources on continually updating, patching, assessing office systems, and protecting against outdated cyber security mea— or 7.3% — have required hospitalization and 858 — or 1.7% of all cases — had to be admitted to an intensive care unit. Four new community outbreaks were reported Tuesday — two in business settings, one in a restaurant/bar setting and one in a restaurant. In the past seven days, 47 community outbreaks were confirmed, well above the trigger of seven or more in a week’s time. A community setting outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households over the past 14 days. The county uses outbreak to get a larger sense of the pandemic locally, but the state does not include the statistic in its weekly report. Students living in three residence halls at Point Loma Nazarene University were ordered to shelter in place on Tuesday after “an increase of 12 cases on the Point Loma campus,” according to university officials.

sures that could threaten the business. Cloud solutions are inherently more secure than on-premises solutions, and cloud providers manage security issues in the background more efficiently with little to no adverse effect to workloads. By utilizing the cloud, software is more easily kept up to date, backups can be made and recovered more quickly, and documents and access controls are easier to manage. According to a RapidScale study, 94% of businesses say they saw an improvement after implementing cloud security solutions. Cloud solutions can improve the level of your security with Tier 3 data centers that have biometric scanning, security guards, and around-theclock monitoring along with fast threat detection response using a Unified Security Management platform. And all documents are safe and accessible with full redundancy and fully managed firewalls and encryption protection, providing you peace of mind that your business is always protected.

cloud allows lower capital spending on facilities and onsite servers while reducing the overall IT budget. Many companies that move to the cloud downsize their data centers or eliminate them entirely. It supports more regular technology upgrades, reduces ongoing maintenance and staff time, and shifts the burden for time-consuming tasks, like patches, upgrades and infrastructure expenditures to cloud service providers. The Cox Business Cloud Solutions team supports your IT team, as well as your end-users – from device troubleshooting and application integrations to building out new data center requirements. Not only can you reduce IT expenses by reducing physical PC costs, you can also layer in our Cloud Desktop as a Service (DaaS), which is a pay-as-you-go subscription – meaning one monthly charge, which makes budgeting simple.

Realizing Cost Savings and Maximizing Profitability Building and maintaining IT infrastructure is costly, as is the real estate and insurance that infrastructure requires. Expensive hardware, software, and licensing for all devices are just the beginning. Allocating resources to IT for setup, maintenance, security and management tools all add up. Cox Business Cloud Solutions can help reduce costs across the board. The

Saving Time and Valuable IT Resources by Choosing the Right Partner Cloud migration requires finding a cloud services partner that listens to your needs and translates that into a strategic migration plan for your unique business needs. The Cox Business Cloud Solutions team is among the best in the industry with solutions to grow your business and ensure you have 24/7 support from certified professionals for your IT staff and end users. Visit www.coxbusiness.com/cloud to learn more about migrating your business to the cloud.

The latest cases brings the university’s case total to 16, according to the university’s COVID dashboard. No employees have tested positive for the illness. In a news release Tuesday, campus officials said they identified three positive cases in Klassen Hall (3rd North), four positive cases in Hendricks Hall (1st South), three positive cases in Young Hall (4th Floor) and two unrelated cases in Nease Hall. Campus officials also said that 50 students had been identified as “close contacts,” meaning they were within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes, either with or without a face covering. Another metric the state released Tuesday is the health equity metric, which finds the positivity rate of the county's least healthy quartile. San Diego County's health equity is 5.7%, slightly less than double the county’s positive testing average. The metric will be used to determine how quick-

ly a county may advance through the reopening plan. Counties with a large disparity between the least and most sick members of a community will not be punished for the disparity by sliding back into more restrictive tiers, but such a disparity will stop counties from advancing to less-restrictive tiers. To advance to the orange tier, the county would need to report a metric of less than 5.3%. According to the state guidelines, the health equity metric will measure socially determined health circumstances, such as a community’s transportation, housing, access to health care and testing, access to healthy food and parks. Neighborhoods are grouped and scored by census tracts on the Healthy Places Index, healthyplacesindex.org. The California Department of Public Health will update the county’s data next Tuesday.


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San Marcos offering assistance to renters By Tigist Layne

SAN MARCOS — The City of San Marcos has launched a new Rental Assistance Program to in an effort to help renters who have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 crisis. The program, which was approved by San Marcos City Council back in June, aims to provide financial assistance to residents experiencing a loss of income directly related to COVID-19. It provides residential rental assistance (up to $10,000, total) to residents whose incomes are at or below 80% of the Area Median Income, who were current with rent payments prior to March 16, 2020 and who are otherwise in good financial standing, according to the city. Funding for the program comes from the Coronavirus Response portion of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), which is an aspect of federal CARES funding rolled into the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “It was important for us to extend a helping hand to renters that are facing extreme financial hardships,” said Lisa Fowler, City of San Marcos Finance Director. “A lot of the funding that’s provided through the CARES Act is dedicated to other purposes, and we felt that we needed to do some

outreach to our residents and provide them with relief.” The program has set aside $1,051,615 of the grant to help renters, and the city expects that funds will likely be fully expended by June 30, 2021. The city said that Applicants with the lowest income levels will receive priority over other eligible applicants, and residents may receive up to $10,000 per household, per application, for up to six months of partial or full rent. A rent reasonable ness assessment may be conducted by the program administrator to determine the amount of assistance that will be provided. The new program comes a few months after the city’s temporary eviction moratorium lapsed on June 30. The moratorium, which was initially enacted on March 24, temporarily suspended evictions of residential and commercial tenants who were unable to pay rent, however it has since not been extended. “This was really in response to making sure that our low to moderate income residents in San Marcos have support,” Fowler said. “It’s also really preventative of homelessness. The purpose is so that people can stay in their homes.” Residents can learn more about the program through the city’s website.

The program offers up to $10,000 to renters who meet certain criteria.

Boerner Horvath, DA behind ‘landmark’ sex assault law By Steve Puterski

REGION — A new California state law providing amnesty for victims and witnesses in felony sexual assault cases testifying to using or possessing illegal drugs appears to be the first-of-its-kind nationwide. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill 1927, authored by Assemblywoman Tasha Boerner Horvath (D-Encinitas), providing immunity for victims and witnesses of sexual assault from the repercussions of illegal alcohol or drug use occurring at the time of the alleged assault. The bill sailed through the legislature without a single vote against it and will be enacted Jan. 1, 2021. District Attorney Summer Stephan and Boerner Horvath, along with victim-advocate groups, began work on the bill in 2019. “There is so much underreporting that happens,

there’s so much self-blame and so much shame, so I think this bill is a land-mark bill because it takes away a level of that blame on the victim,” Stephan said. “I don’t know of any other state that has a law this.” According to Boerner Horvath, the rate of sexual assault and rape victims is 1.4 per 1,000 residents, but only 0.4 per 1,000 actually report a crime. Many of those victims and witnesses were afraid they will be prosecuted because they were using a substance illegally. For example, many high school students don’t come forward because they were drinking alcohol at a party. Instead of facing charges, those cases go unreported and the suspected perpetrator walks free. “A very big issue for our DA was about ensuring that sexual assault victims get justice from the law,”

Boerner Horvath said. “The statistics are very, very clear that they don’t come forward. They don’t people do not come forward … if people are using drugs or drinking underage.” She said it also removes the fear from “predatory” litigation for the victims or witnesses who committed a crime while an assault was occurring. Boerner Horvath said if those hurdles are preventing reporting, then it was obvious those should be removed so investigations and prosecutions of the alleged assaulter can move forward. Boerner Horvath also cited a study from the Bureau of Justice (DOJ) showing 80% of sexual assaults cases involving college students and 67% of non-college aged individuals go unreported. She said the bill was also needed after the University of California system instituted an amnesty

policy in 2019. According to a 2018 report from the FBI, there were 15,000 reported sexual assault cases in California. “I think anything we can do to remove those barriers for survivors of sexual assault, the better,” Boerner Horvath said. Stephan said many sexual assault and trafficking cases involve alcohol or drugs, which are provided by the perpetrator. For example, restaurant owner Daniel Dorado in La Jolla was prosecuted for assaulting eight women through spiked drinks and then assaulting or raping them. Stephan said college girls are often fed drinks and become unconscious, which is later used against them by perpetrators. This law will allow victims and witnesses to come forward without fear of prosecution.

Escondido Union HSD welcomes small groups back to campus By Tigist Layne

ESCONDIDO — The Escondido Union High School District (EUHSD) is in its second week of its phased reopening plan, which allows small groups including special education students and English learners to return to campus first, while opening campuses to some after school learning workshops for other students. District superintendent Dr. Anne Staffieri announced the phased reopening plan after the county confirmed that San Diego would remain in the red phase for COVID-19 reopening and avoid moving into the more restrictive purple category. “Families of students

eligible to return to campus on September 28 and the following weeks will be receiving further communication and a survey to commit to their student either joining a small and stable group on campus or remaining at home to continue distance learning,” Staffieri said in an email to the district’s families. Staffieri said that the district will continue with distance learning for the next grading period, Sept. 28 to Nov. 6, with the exception of these small groups. In this first phase of reopening, English learners, moderate to severe special education students and self-contained special education classes will be

able to return to campus up to four days per week, with up to 8% of the school population on campus at one time, according to the district’s reopening plan. The district board was set to meet on Oct. 13 to evaluate the progress of campus reopening. “Our Governing Board will convene a Special meeting on the topic of campus reopening,” Staffieri said. “At that meeting we will provide an update and report of progress on both our Distance Learning programs as well as our first 6 days of students returning to campus.” Starting Oct. 9, all students were able to return to campus after school for learning activities. During

this phase, up to 25% of students can be on campus at one time, according to the reopening plan. Once the county enters the orange phase, the district will return all students to campus for a blended learning model, with students on campus for two days per week, and participating in virtual distance learning for the remainder of the week. “As a district, we will continue to work towards transitioning to our twoday blended model on campus, in person, when guidance from local health officials and local conditions support a safe transition back to learning on campus at this scale,” Staffieri said.

A real (Spanish) tongue twister

M

y son used to come to me for help with his Spanish homework. He knew full well that he could get no math assistance, but yo hablo Español. Sort of. Never mind that I chatted through three years in high school and several semesters in college. Somehow, I never got out of the present tense — and my vocabulary needs work. If anyone asks me to translate something, I am sharply reminded of my muchas shortcomings. I love to speak it, but my mastery of Español is such a spotty thing. I once had a professor tell me I spoke like a native when I read out loud in class. It seems I am a silver-tongued devil who can never quite remember whether pato means a duck or my hair, or whether I had just told someone they were cute or a fool. I managed to learn several bits of slang that really made me sound like I had the language down, but it’s all flash and no substance. I have sworn several times over the years I would immerse myself in the language and really master it, but no one has offered me a six-month stay in Puerto Val-

small talk jean gillette larta. There have been plenty of times when I was very glad that I knew as much Spanish as I do. I can stumble along in what linguists scathingly call “Spanglish,” and have done so many times with patient, helpful Spanish speakers. I have managed to help tourists fill out customs cards, gotten students to bring back library books and told secrets to my husband in front of my children. But more often I am desperately frustrated when I can craft a third of what I want to say and then come up empty on the crucial phrase or tense needed. There was, for instance, the time I flew down to Cabo San Lucas on a whim to meet my husband for the weekend. My words of wisdom here are, talk to your travel agent first. An unplanned jaunt to the tip of Baja left me there without the proper paperwork to get home.

I stood in the middle of the Cabo airport, six months pregnant and terrified. I had no idea how long I might be stuck there, but I began thinking up Spanish names for my unborn child. Not only did I not know enough Spanish to explain my problem convincingly, I remember even less when I am in panic mode. (That sort of explains most of my test grades, too.) What phrases do I have down cold? Well, there is “¿Como se dice en Espanol…?” which is probably my favorite. If I can’t remember how to say something, there’s a good chance the person I’m talking to can enlighten me. My other standby is “Habla mas despacio, por favor.” If I am to simultaneously translate, or even belatedly translate, it requires them to speak at the pace of a robot low on batteries. I’ll keep at it, though, in my slow and occasional fashion. But the minute someone offers a “Learn Spanish the Luxurious Way” cruise to Madrid, I’m first in line. Jean Gillette is a freelance writer struggling with future tenses. Contact her at jean@coastnewsgroup.com.

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Who’s

Health Planning and Development. Both are co-coordinators of the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse PracBusiness news and special titioner (PMHNP) program. achievements for North San The grant will provide full Diego County. Send information scholarships for 20 new via email to community@ PMHNP students and fund coastnewsgroup.com. the costs associated with admitting additional students WORK AT CASA DE AMPARO and securing field placeCasa de Amparo is hir- ments. ing. If you or someone you know is interested in work- TRI-CITY STROKE CARE TOPS ing for Casa de Amparo, Tri-City Medical Center see available positions at earned eight certifications casadeamparo.org/about-us/ and awards from the Amercareers/. ican Heart and Stroke Association, including three Gold RESORT NAMES MANAGER Plus Performance AchieveAlila Marea Beach Re- ment Awards for stroke care, sort Encinitas, at 2100 N. heart care, and resuscitation Coast Highway 101, has quality, as well as two Gold named Benjamin Thiele as Level awards for its care general manager of the luxu- of patients with STEMI, or Myocardial ry beachfront resort. Thiele ST-Elevation joins the Hyatt family fol- Infarction, heart attacks. lowing a decade with Kimp- Tri-City Medical Center is ton Hotels — most recently the only medical center in Kimpton Canary Hotel in San Diego County to receive Santa Barbara and Seattle’s Gold Plus in both heart failure and stroke care and to Palladian Hotel. earn more honors than any other hospital in the region. CSUSM FACULTY GET GRANTS Two Cal State San For more information, visit Marcos faculty members tricitymed.org/about-us/acin the School of Nursing creditation-awards. have received a grant of $1.33 million to help fur- COAST GUARD SCHOLARS Coast Guard Foundation ther build the pipeline of psychiatric mental health Scholarships were awarded nurse practitioners in Cali- to Ryane Quintanar, child of fornia. CSUSM’s School of USCG Petty Officer Zachary Nursing assistant professor Quintanar, from San MarCatherine Baker and pro- cos, and Dorian Ashmore, fessor emerita Nancy Romig child of USCG Chief Petty received the five-year grant Officer Charles Ashmore, from the Office of Statewide from Vista.

NEWS?

CONFLICT

CONTINUED FROM 5

(MAC) Founder Charles Perez, creating the company Healthcare Compliance 365. In 2013, Anderson was fired from Tri-City due to alleged conflicts of interest with Perez that resulted in a lawsuit settlement, but with a recent appeal, the case is still ongoing. The Coast News reported in 2015 that Anderson advocated for a lease agreement between Tri-City and MAC — an agreement that would have secured Anderson’s employment for eight more years. During negotiations of the agreement, Anderson allegedly misled the TriCity board about MAC’s experience, while at the same time accepting a number of gifts from Perez. More recently, Burlew’s opponents have accused him of sending campaign emails posing as other candidates. One email sent in September claiming to be from District 1 candidate Colleen O’Harra, an attorney and four-year board member of the TriCity Hospital Foundation, attacked District 1 candidate and former Tri-City nurse Adela Sanchez with false claims. The email included O’Harra’s home address, which she said she never puts on her campaign emails, adding that Burlew’s emails typically include his business address. “I thought, well, this is interesting, because that’s the way Burlew always

ends his emails,” O’Harra said. Though Sanchez says she won’t speculate about who sent the emails, O’Harra believes Burlew sent them. “That’s not the way I run a campaign,” O’Harra said. Burlew said he hasn’t seen the emails. Another phony email sent in October claimed that O’Harra supported District 7 candidate Allen Manzano over his opponent, Dr. Nina Chaya, which O’Harra said is false. The mailing address included on this email matched Burlew’s business address. Additionally, several elements in the suspicious emails also match language found on Burlew’s campaign website, including the phrase, “This candidate is flawed for the following reasons.” O’Harra speculated that Burlew is sending fake emails to split the votes between targeted Democratic candidates, favoring both him for the District 1 seat and his ally, Deborah Vietor, for District 7. O’Harra has sent the fake emails to the Registrar and the Fair Political Practices Commission but has not yet received a response. “This is all just a distraction from the important issues, the real issues, that are affecting Tri-City Healthcare in the district,” Chaya said at a Sept. 30 Chamber of Commerce forum. “ …It’s really a shame when people try to rely on impugning others to win instead of their own qualifications.”

In loving memory of

Mary Bernadette “Pat” Holzinger December 5, 1933 October 6, 2020

Pat Holzinger passed away at her home in Arcata on October 6, 2020. She was born in San Diego to her parents Mary and James Crock and was the eldest of six children. She attended Cathedral Girl’s High School and later graduated from San Diego State University where she was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. During college she met Carl Henry Holzinger and they were wed in 1954. They then moved to Vista, California where they raised their three children, Chris, Claudia and Curt. Both were educators in the local school district

and they remained in Vista until Carl’s death in 1982. Pat subsequently moved to Encinitas, California where she lived for 30 years before moving to Arcata in 2013. As a teacher, Pat was empathetic, but also ‘no nonsense’. She often worked as a substitute teacher, and sometimes taught special needs children at their homes. She loved cooking, baking, dancing, skiing, going to performances, travelling, and playing both bridge and scrabble. In some circles she became known as “Scrabble Pat” for her love of that game. During her life Pat traveled widely, first with Carl and the kids making frequent local trips to Mexico, Anza Borrego Desert and San Elijo State beach. For years, a summer ritual involved several families camping together for a week at the beach. The 5 o’clock parent happy hour sometimes attracted the attention of the park rangers! Before the kids went out on their own, the family travelled all over North America and Europe. Later she and Carl travelled to Mexico, Spain, Morocco, Italy, and the Caribbean.

Linda Lee Christensen, 76 Oceanside September 29, 2020

Claire Patricia Rogus, 77 Escondido September 27, 2020

Louise Bester, 74 Escondido September 24, 2020

Betty Lea Snavely, 97 San Marcos September 18, 2020

After moving to Encinitas, Pat continued to travel with the local Ski Club making trips to Tahoe, Mammoth, and beyond; as well as a yearly boat house party on Lake Powell. She also traveled with close friends to places as diverse as China, Japan, Peru, and Argentina. Pat loved the beach in Encinitas and generously shared her home there, hosting multiple parties, as well as just spending days together on the beach. She found great joy in her friends and large extended family, children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. Pat was a strong independent woman, who was also incredibly supportive and ready with advice and help. Moving to Arcata allowed Pat to spend more time with family in the area, and to be closer as her great grandchildren grew up. She also supported and immersed herself in the performing arts, taking dance classes and attending any and every cultural event she could. She was fond of her close neighborhood, and happy while tending her sunny gar-

den. Pat made several new friends in town and enjoyed hiking and exploring the North Coast with them. Pat shared in the lives of many people and will be deeply missed by family and friends. Her strong spirit and presence will live on. She is survived by her daughter and sons, Claudia Holzinger (Von Tunstall), Chris Holzinger and Curt Holzinger; her grandchildren Melonie (Troy) Parrish, Carl Coates and Mateaus Tunstall; her great grandchildren Hunter, Mallory and Ashton Parrish; her sister Margaret (Duane) Adams; sister Michele Reed; and a wide circle of cousins, nieces and nephews. Family and friends are encouraged to view photos and to post memories and photos on her tribute wall at: www.Paulschapel. com. The family is planning to have a celebration of her life in Spring 2021. Recognizing Pat’s generous spirit, the family suggests that any donations be made to Redwood Raks World Dance Studio in Arcata, where she attended classes and performances: www.redwoodraks.com.

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Three Key Differences Between Nursing Homes, Senior Living SAN MARCOS, CA – October 16, 2020 – As nursing homes around the country continue to be affected by the coronavirus, many families face confusion about the differences between nursing homes and assisted living communities. Typically, families have very little experience with either type of care. Here’s a closer look at the key differences between the two: #1 Key Difference – Personal Choice vs. Medical Necessity The main difference between assisted living and nursing home care is assisted living offers personal care in a home-like, social setting while nursing homes provide medical and personal care in a clinical setting. In general, living in an assisted living community is a personal choice, whereas entering a nursing home usually follows a significant medical event like a stroke, heart attack or surgery. Since assisted living communities maximize quality of life and foster a more independent lifestyle, families often prefer them over nursing home care when possible. #2 Key Difference: Levels of Care & Length of Stay While assisted living communities and nursing homes both offer healthcare services, the levels of care and length of time a senior stays are considerably different. Seniors residing in an assisted living community are often inde-

As always,

pendent or require some assistance with activities of daily living (or ADLs), like medication management, mobility or memory loss. By contrast, care levels at nursing homes, also known as skilled nursing, administer to more serious medical conditions. Patients often require around-the-clock care and monitoring, to oversee more complex health care conditions such as respiratory care, rehabilitation from surgery and physical or speech therapy. Nursing homes usually tend to all or most of the ADLs seniors face each day. About a quarter of people in nursing homes stay for less than three months according to CareConversations.org, a trade association website, which makes nursing homes a necessary option for complex or advanced medical care. #3 Key Difference: Active Lifestyle vs. Isolated Recovery Assisted living usually resembles an upscale apartment community and is built to meet the needs of a more demanding senior consumer. They can feel more resort-like with stylish, contemporary apartment homes that can be personally furnished, decorated and have a key to the front door. These vibrant communities offer events, activities and the opportunity for new friendships all while providing added peace of mind knowing that their future care needs are met. Nursing care centers are more institutional because of the type of care being provided to

the most vulnerable seniors. Patients are more likely to be isolated as a result of their weakened conditioned and even share a room with others. They receive their meals in-room to accommodate recovery efforts, and there is limited engagement in activities and socialization. Assisted Living Communities – A Safe Solution As families learn more about the real differences between assisted living and nursing homes, they can have greater confidence in the safety of assisted living communities for their loved ones. Experienced operators like Silvergate Retirement Residences, an award-winning senior living provider across north county San Diego, have enacted the highest health standards to protect their residents during the stay-at-home order. With daily monitoring, families enjoy greater peace of mind knowing that their loved one is being watched over carefully. Silvergate San Marcos offers independent living, assisted living and memory care apart-ment homes. During the state stay-at-home order, Silvergate is offering Virtual Tours of the community to provide a video view of floorplans and highlights of the community. For advice or assistance with a Virtual Tour, please call community Marketing Director, David Nelson at (760) 744-4484 or visit www.Silvergaterr.com.

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Election 2020

Pages 11-17

AMONG THE CANDIDATES on the Nov. 3 ballot are Rep. Mike Levin, left, who represents the 49th District in Congress; Assemblywoman Tasha Boerner Horvath, who represents the 76th District in the California Legislature; and former Rep. Darrell Issa, who is running against Ammar Campa-Najjar for the 50th District seat vacated by Duncan Hunter. File photos

Levin, Maryott battle for 49th By Samanatha Nelson

REGION — The former mayor of San Juan Capistrano is challenging the 49th Congressional District’s freshman congressman for his two-year seat in office. In November 2018, Rep. Mike Levin (D-San Juan Capistrano) was elected to serve the 49th District in the U.S. House of Representatives, which includes parts of South Orange County and North San Diego County, stretching from Dana Point all the way to just north of La Jolla. Brian Maryott, Levin’s challenger, is a certified financial planner and the former mayor of San Juan Capistrano. According to Levin, his top priority while serving in Congress has been to deliver on the district’s local needs by working across the aisle. During his two years in office, Levin co-sponsored over 356 bills, resolutions and amendments. The majority of those bills were bipartisan. Levin added that one of his top priorities has been passing bipartisan legislation for veterans and their families. “I’ve had the honor of introducing nine bipartisan bills that have passed the house to help veterans, and four more bills

BRIAN MARYOTT

REP. MIKE LEVIN

that were signed into law,” Levin said. Republican Brian Maryott, who is the former mayor of San Juan Capistrano, said Levin is “ill-suited to serve the veterans of this district and the families of those in service,” particularly due to his association with the “progressive caucus.” “Mike’s inclusion in the progressive caucus, a caucus where one of the universally dominant themes is reduced military spending,” Maryott said. Maryott explained that Levin’s association with the progressive caucus, particularly with Reps. Ilhan Omar and Jerry Nadler as well as Sen. Bernie Sanders, suggests Levin will support reduced military spending. According to a spokesperson for Levin, that is absolutely not the case. “It doesn’t sound like Councilmember Bri-

an Maryott has taken the time to study Congressman Levin’s record,” said Eric Mee, a spokesperson for Levin, in an email. “Rep. Levin voted multiple times to increase defense spending — even when the Progressive Caucus opposed those bills — and he successfully secured $128 million in military construction funding for Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).” Maryott also said Levin “fights harder for federal employee unions than he does for veterans.” “His healthcare proposal that he is an original co-sponsor of, which is H.R. 1384, would move our retired veterans from a TRICARE system, a system that they love, in a two-year period to a 100% government-run system under which their eligibility status for care would be ex-

actly the same as any other resident of the country, including an illegal immigrant,” Maryott said. Mee responded to Maryott’s claim by pointing out that Levin wants to strengthen VA healthcare but doesn’t want to privatize it. “He supported an appropriations bill that provided $90 billion for Veterans Medical Care, $10 billion for mental health care, and nearly $2 billion to help veterans get off the streets,” Mee said. “ Mee also added that TRICARE is already run by the government, and military retirees would keep their existing benefits under H.R. 1384. “On the other hand, Brian wants to dismantle the VA and let our veterans fend for themselves within the private insurance marketplace,” Mee said. According to his campaign website, Maryott opposes “nationalizing” the country’s healthcare system and wants to increase competition in the healthcare field, which he believes will lower healthcare costs and improve the quality of care. He also wants to increase healthcare choices for veterans. Maryott believes progressives, noting Levin, are jeopardizing healthcare by TURN TO 49TH ON 15

Race in 50th heats up By Tigist Layne

REGION — Election day is less than a month away, and recent polls suggest that one of the region’s most anticipated races between Republican Darrell Issa and Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar may still be anyone’s game. The 50th Congressional District, which encompasses most of East County, portions of inland North County and a small part of Riverside County, is a historically Republican district. Public polls, however, say that the race is tightening, which means that Republicans could lose their last remaining congressional seat in San Diego County. Camp-Najjar, 31, ran

for the 50th seat back in 2018, but was narrowly beat out by then-incumbent Duncan D. Hunter. “I’ve been campaigning for four years with this district in mind, with these people in mind,” Campa-Najjar said. “For [Issa], all roads lead to Washington, it doesn’t matter if it’s the 49th or the 50th… for me, my roots are very much in this district.” The Democrat was born in East County and previously worked at the Department of Labor during the Obama Administration. “My vision has always been about putting country before party and people over politics,” Campa-Najjar said. “I’m more TURN TO 50TH ON 16


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T he C oast News - I nland E dition

OCT. 16, 2020

Rob Howard Oceanside (Mayor)

Christopher Rodriguez Oceanside (Mayor)

On highest relative priorities “My first duty and highest obligation is to Oceanside’s Public Safety. Illegal homeless encampments and crime/drug use is reaping havoc on thousands of Oceanside residents. I will bring relief through enforcing vagrancy laws, provide a shelter resource that offers vocational job training programs and access to treat mental illness/drug addiction.”

Kellie Davis Oceanside (D3)

Alvin L. McGee Oceanside (Mayor)

David Zernik Oceanside (D3)

On highest relative priorities “We need to address the homeless crisis and the crime associated with it through a compassionate but tough approach that connects individuals with services while simultaneously enforcing our laws and upholding our quality of life.”

Peter Weiss Oceanside (D4)

Ryan Keim Oceanside (D3) On lowest relative priorities “Housing is important. However, the city does not have the adequate infrastructure to support more people. Until the city develops a better traffic plan (improvement of roads, installation of smart traffic lights, widening of the 76, North river road expansion and other major roadways), traffic congestion will increase.”

On improving city finances “Fiscal Stability: following COVID, we need to focus on core services and manage our budget appropriately. Economic Recovery and Growth: streamline the approval and construction of various development projects and new businesses (Inn’s at Buena Creek, OceanKamp, El Corazon Sports Arena) to add construction and permanent jobs.”

Amanda Rigby Vista (D3)

On disagreeing with past decisions “The county grand jury strongly recommended to the City of Oceanside (and others) that a they form a Citizens Oversight Committee for Police Oversight when excessive force was in question. The City Council voted against the recommendation.”

On highest relative priorities “The Mayor of Oceanside selects commissioners. I would ensure that each commission is balanced and not dominated by one special interest. Commissions allow healthy discussions on difficult issues and public input; this is beneficial as Oceanside address housing, energy, public safety and economics.”

Ruben Major Oceanside (Mayor)

On highest relative priorities “The homeless crisis is my top priority. We are not following the law of the land. We are citing and ticketing the homeless, which is a waste of money. If a person is homeless, they are permitted to live in public in front of storefronts and in the riverbed if there are not enough beds for them. I believe tiny houses can help address this issue.”

On disagreeing with past decisions “A previous City Council decision I disagree with is regarding inclusionary housing requirements in the City of Vista. In 2015, Vista City Council, including the incumbent (my opponent) voted to remove inclusionary housing requirements for developers. The resulted in our community missing out on hundreds of potential affordable housing units.”

On lowest relative priorities “We will always have a well maintained, secure, and easily accessible public transit system for all who want to use it and I remain committed to this. We must also recognize the needs of the approximately 97% of the population who use our freeways and roads, including those moving goods and services throughout our communities, balancing the two.”

Elizabeth Perez Vista (D2)

On disagreeing with past decisions “The City Council has approved projects that have ignored community objections about environmental impacts. In 2016, when the City Council unanimously approved the Caruso mall without an EIR, the citizens of Carlsbad voted to overturn the Council decision. As Councilmember, I will listen to the community’s concerns.”

Teresa Acosta Carlsbad (D4)

On lowest relative priorities “There are no low priority issues.”

David Joseph Turgeon Oceanside (Mayor)

Election 2020

On improving city finances “I plan to expand public private partnerships. This can be accomplished with clean energy solutions and this includes building innovative new local technologies. Long-term goals would include developing municipal broadband and Wi-Fi connectivity. Also, leverage and connect Vista’s agricultural assets with private industry and consumers.”

Bill Batchelor Oceanside (D3)

On highest relative priorities “I speak for my community and all those people who agree with me: our number one focus is to bring affordable housing and some kind of rent control to our city. Our elected officials do not care about us, all they want is your vote while the rent keeps going up, while workers’ wages don’t go up. We can’t let the real estate investor control our lives.”

Katie Melendez Vista

On disagreeing with past decisions “It’s too hard to start a business or get a building permit in this town. The city is hurting the economy. The city has created a housing shortage. My goal is that rent should be one week’s pay. Building department review times and permits should be reduced.”

Oceanside (D3)

Fabio Marchi Oceanside (Mayor)

Rocky Chavez Oceanside (Mayor)

Oceanside (D4)

On disagreeing with past decisions “With the passage of Prop. 64 Oceanside had a golden opportunity to become a hub of the emerging cannabis industry. Despite overwhelming support for Prop 64, our council punted on the issue while smaller cities such as Vista cashed in. We need sensible cannabis regulations in Oceanside to protect businesses and consumers and safeguard Amber Newman our children.”

On lowest relative priorities “I have no lowest priority. ‘When everything is a priority’ then things get done.”

Fernando Garcia Oceanside (Mayor)

On disagreeing with past decisions “The response mounted by Oceanside’s City Council to stave off the worst economic effects of COVID-19 has been weak-willed at best. I’m a strong proponent of tapping emergency reserves to help struggling businesses and residents. This support through the worst of times will set us up for a more rapid recovery once the situation Michelle Gomez stabilizes.”

On highest relative priorities “Government transparency/accountability ranks high for me, as I am committed to building the much-needed trust back with our government. One of the ways to do that is through transparency, giving our community the ability to access and comment on important governmental matters, like the selection of our new Chief of Police.”

Lela Panagides Carlsbad (D2)

On lowest relative priorities “In District 2 Carlsbad, historic preservation is not as relevant. The city is almost built out and we are feeling the impacts of reduced revenue due to the pandemic, so during this immediate crisis, we need to focus on higher priority issues and supporting quality of life and public safety services for our residents now and into the future.”

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Questionnaire Map_MUNI

Election 2020 On lowest relative priorities “We currently have open spaces. We need to ensure we keep them. So, while it is rated lower, it is not lower in importance. Public transit is rated lower because NCTD is the primary and we need to work with them to make transit usable for our workers and residents who need transit at different work/entertainment hours.”

OCT. 16, 2020

Vanessa Valenzuela Escondido (D2)

On highest relative priorities “Declare a regional climate emergency. There is a climate emergency which demands a massive-scale mobilization to halt, reverse, and address its consequences and causes. This is an existential threat and San Marcos must do whatever it takes to confront it. Included in Alan Geraci this plan is an affordable housing and 21st cenSan Marcos (D3) tury transportation plan.” On lowest relative priorities “Public transportation is needed, but we are not a community where we grew around this as a primary mode of transportation. It fits for some, but not the significant majority. We need to keep it up and running, but not at the expense of roadway safety, maintenance and efficiency.”

On disagreeing with past decisions “On July 15 the motion to add to the November 3rd ballot a measure to increase sales tax by 1% failed. Considering the growing budget gap, this revenue is vital to our city to avoid bankruptcy. A special election in 2021 to have the residents decide is what would be fair. An increase of sales tax is one strategy to solve our budget crisis.”

Susan Reveles Escondido (D3)

Ed Musgrove San Marcos (D4)

On lowest relative priorities “Not applicable. I think they are all important priorities.”

On improving city finances “Escondido will need to revisit a sales tax initiative. In the meantime, we should be looking at all areas of the budget where savings can be garnered (with budget committee), removing the ban on cannabis, grants, funding, and partnerships with other agencies, and any assets to be leased or disposed of.”

Donald Greene Escondido (D3)

On improving city finances “The most pressing issue facing Escondido in the next few years is the structural budget deficit. I would propose a three-phase approach to addressing the issue. First, full audit of all departmental budgets and reallocation of funds. Second, selling off of superfluous real estate holdings. Third, establishing a Community Choice Energy program.”

On lowest relative priorities “North County is still not ready for public transit. During our current economic crisis, we certainly cannot afford to divert money which can be better utilized elsewhere.”

Rick Paul Escondido (D2) On lowest relative priorities “Recreation/Open Space - it is already included in climate action plans so requires less intervention. We have 6,000 acres of open spaces and parks so that challenge is to maintain great resources, which is easier. The Daley Ranch is already a multiple species conservation zone, for example. So, although important, it is not an Dara Czerwonka immediate challenge.”

Escondido (D3)

On lowest relative priorities “Every issue deserves the same attention and priority.”

April Austin Pugh Escondido (D4)

Sharon Jenkins San Marcos (D3) On improving city finances “I’m proud to continue the city’s commitment to fiscal prudence. The city could benefit from increased partnerships with our nonprofits, philanthropies, private foundations and the local public sector, as well as the state and federal government. There is existing wealth, expertise and know-how that Catherine Blakespear we could better leverage to achieve common Encinitas (Mayor) goals.”

Deputy Mayor Kellie Hinze Encinitas (D2)

On lowest relative priorities “All are important so this is difficult. I would say public transportation is the lowest although Del Mar has worked hard to build a more cycling and walkable town. We don’t have a train station. We do have a bus route which appears to be underused.”

Tracy Martinez Del Mar

Bob Gans Del Mar

On lowest relative priorities “I ranked public transit and social services as high priorities but lesser than top tier due to the fact that these are regional priorities that, while worthy of focus on the city-level, ultimately are determined by agencies such as NCTD and the County Health and Human Services Agency.”

Julie Thunder Encinitas (Mayor)

Susan Turney Encinitas (D2)

On highest relative priorities “State-mandated housing shouldn’t be concentrated in dense projects but woven into zones throughout, and we should demand developers set aside a higher percentage for low-income housing. I’m a staunch defender of our lagoons and ocean and will work for more sand replenishment on our blufflined beaches, protecting the impact zone on the bluffs.”

On highest relative priorities “There’s a better way to achieve mandated affordable units. I propose requiring up to 25% [inclusionary] housing, as other cities do. This way we also preserve neighborhoods and minimize impacts to traffic and on the infrastructure. At 25% rather than the council’s 15%, the need to rezone would drop from 5,587 to 3,352 units. That’s a 40% decrease.”

Tony Kranz Encinitas (D1)

On lowest relative priorities “Del Mar has a vibrant volunteer community that through organizations such as Community Connections provides assistance to those in need. Assistance is important, but since the private sector is providing, it, I don’t believe it is a priority for city government.”

On improving city finances “Del Mar needs to create a master plan to reduce its reliance on Fairgrounds Sales Tax revenue. We need figure out how to leverage technology rather than adding staff. We need to replenish our reserves and pay back Measure Q loan before adding staff.”

Dave Druker Del Mar

On disagreeing with past decisions “On Feb. 20, 2019, the city council voted 4-1 on program 3C of the Housing Element (Item 10A). My colleagues voted to ask a judge to rule Prop A couldn’t be used to preempt state law. I favored asking the voters to make a slight change to Prop A so that the city satisfied state regulators of housing law requirements.”

Alex Riley Encinitas (D1)

Glenn Warren Del Mar

On highest relative priorities “This question poses false choices. All priorities can be pursued in a transparent manner and with fiscal discipline, with the goal of preserving and improving our Community and preserving open space, as envisioned by our Community Plan. Providing for affordable housing is critical to complying with state law and maintaining local control.”

Neil Kramer San Marcos (D4)

On highest relative priorities “We can do better to address the housing needs of our community. I support: more affordable options for our citizens, smart growth, more density, and smaller units. We should be building more within the city, close to the freeway, along transit, and near shopping. I support New Urbanism that includes walkable neighborhoods.”

On disagreeing with past decisions “The vote on Sept 8th to not up-zone the north area of Del Mar to allow for state mandated housing was short term thinking and placed Del Mar in a very precarious position. And most importantly threatened our local control.”

On highest relative priorities “Infrastructure and public safety are the primary responsibilities of local government. Defending our neighborhoods from over-building and prioritizing these two fundamental duties will provide the solid foundation needed to allow us to maintain the high quality of life that we love about Encinitas.”

Supervisor Kristin Gaspar (D3)

County Supervisor Terra Lawson-Remer (D3)

On lowest relative priorities “I support a balanced transportation system that addresses investments in mass transit, while providing improvements to our regional roads. The North Coast Corridor in Solana Beach where I-5 expansion meets Coaster double-tracking and lagoon restoration is a perfect example of the balance we should be achieving.”

On lowest relative priorities “Fiscal management is vital; I rank it lowest because the County prioritized its finances over the actual work it needs to do for decades, and now has reserves far over recommended levels. I’d maintain safe reserves, but we can’t ignore the County’s responsibilities and underserve San Diego in the name of fiscal discipline when reserves are bloated.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Coast News asked candidates several questions in an electronic questionnaire. For this map, we selected what we thought was each candidate’s strongest short-answer response. To see all responses to all questions, visit our web site.

Phil Blair Del Mar

1:288,895


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OCT. 16, 2020

Election 2020 ESCONDIDO

SAN MARCOS

VISTA

Direction of council on line Four candidates vying for Council hopefuls in 2 districts as voters fill 3 district seats council seats in Districts 3, 4 talk economy, transportation By Tigist Layne

ESCONDIDO — Nine candidates are running for three seats on the Escondido City Council, meaning Districts 2, 3 and 4 could soon have new representatives who could cause a shift in the council’s political tone for at least the next two years. Despite the council officially being a nonpartisan office, members’ political leanings and philosophies tend to play a part in the council’s agendas and voting patterns. For eight years, the council had a conservative majority until two Democrats, Mayor Paul McNamara and Councilmember Consuelo Martinez, were elected in 2018, joining Democrat Olga Diaz. The election could flip the council once again, or maintain a liberal majority. One way or the other, the new council will also be responsible for hiring a new city manager after City Manager Jeffrey Epp officially retired in July. In District 2, three candidates are hoping to finish out the remaining two years of the term after Republican Councilmember John

Masson died in March. Democrat Vanessa Valenzuela, Republican Tina Inscoe and self-described nonpartisan Rick Paul are vying for Masson’s seat. Valenzuela told The Coast News that her top priorities if elected are COVID-19 recovery for small businesses and finding solutions for the city’s impending roughly $200 million budget deficit. “I’m invested in the community’s success,” Valenzuela said. “I want to leave an Escondido that my kids can thrive in, and I believe that I have the energy, the fresh ideas and fresh perspective that will be imperative to Escondido successfully moving forward.” Republican Joe Garcia, Democrats Don Greene and Susan Reveles, and Dara Czerwonka are running for the council’s District 3 seat to replace Diaz, who opted to not to run again. Greene, who is endorsed by Diaz, said he wants to bring financial stability to the city by fixing the budgeting process. “We need to build TURN TO ESCONDIDO ON 16

By Tigist Layne

SAN MARCOS — Two San Marcos districts will vote for the first time ever for their own City Council representatives this November, the first election since the city began transitioning to a district voting system in 2018. Districts 3 and 4 are up for election on Nov. 3, with two candidates running for each district seat. Current Councilmember at-large Sharon Jenkins is running for the District 3 seat against Democrat Alan Geraci. Jenkins, a Republican, was elected to City Council at large in 2012 and re-elected at large in 2016. “My focus is doing what’s best for San Marcos. I think the best way to represent our residents is to look at what’s best for everybody and not just a particular district,” Jenkins said. “I think it’s best to stay nonpartisan and focus on our residents.” Geraci, a climate action enthusiast, told The Coast News that, though COVID-19 recovery comes first and foremost, climate action is his top priority.

CARE FOR WHAT’S NEXT

Setting the standard for care in

“I want to work on our climate. There are things we can do locally, regionally, at the state level and nationally,” Geraci said. “I want to do what I can locally to protect our climate and take the action that’s needed when it comes to the city’s Climate Action Plan.” Geraci added that he wants to focus on three issues: clean transportation; affordable and sustainable housing; and climate adaptation and emergency planning. I’m concerned about some of these housing projects. I think the urban sprawl issue is starting to become a problem here in San Marcos,” Geraci said. “I want to make sure we’re building affordable housing for the people that live here. We need to build homes that people graduating from Cal State San Marcos can live in.” In District 4, Democrat Neil Kramer and Republican Ed Musgrove are going head-to-head to replace Councilmember at-large Jay Petrek, who was appointed at large in TURN TO SAN MARCOS ON 16

By Steve Puterski

VISTA — Some are presenting big, bold ideas. Others look into the weeds to see how to address some of the more long-term, pressing issues such homelessness. On Nov. 3, Vista residents in Districts 2 and 3 will choose among a quartet of candidates to represent them for the next four years. District 2 features challenger Katie Melendez and Amanda Rigby, who was first elected in 2012, while District 4 features Joe Green, running for re-election, and challenger Elizabeth Perez. The COVID-19 pandemic has touched all aspects of life, but the candidates also looked at economic recovery and future possibilities for the city once the pandemic subsides. City budget, economy Since the pandemic hit, the city has balanced its budget and done other things such as suspending permitting fees, easing signage restrictions and opening up some public areas to allow businesses to cope with capacity restrictions. The city has been able

to balance its budget, but each candidate said keeping close tabs on the budget is a priority. Perez said looking at state and federal grants for infrastructure and emergency response services, while also leveraging partnerships and funding to improve parks and roads is a priority. Melendez said medicinal marijuana revenue has been a benefit, while it is important to encourage growth so the city can do more. She wants to use surplus funds to benefit the community through various programs or enhanced services. Rigby, meanwhile, said it is important for government to get out of the way and allow businesses the easiest path to success. Also, she said leveraging new policies due to the pandemic can help change the city’s course and spur growth and revitalize downtrodden areas. Green said he wants to continue to “unpack” to make decisions, especially with public safety. He said with limited capacity, even into next year, the city has TURN TO VISTA ON 16

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OCT. 16, 2020

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T he C oast News - I nland E dition

Election 2020

NCTD offering free rides on Election Day

76TH STATE ASSEMBLY race pits Republican challenger Melanie Burkholder, left, against Democratic incumbent Tasha Boerner Horvath. Courtesy photos

Boerner Horvath defends 76th District Assembly seat By Caitlin Steinberg

REGION — In the race to represent the 76th Assembly District, Democratic incumbent Assemblywoman Tasha Boerner Horvath (D-Encinitas) will face-off against Republican challenger Melanie Burkholder, of Carlsbad, offering voters opposing viewpoints on a number of issues. There are roughly 470,000 residents and 270,000 registered voters in the District, ranging from Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton to Carlsbad, Encinitas, Oceanside and Vista. The first Democrat elected to the 76th District seat in nearly 40 years, Boerner Horvath has served in office since 2018, previously holding positions on the Encinitas City Council and Planning Commission. A third-generation Encinitan, mother and businesswoman, Boerner Horvath believes her belief and long-standing connections to the district make her the ideal candidate for the job. “I share the values of our district and I think that’s really important,” Boerner Horvath said to the Coast News. “I am the effective leader we need on sustainability, opportunity, equality and equity issues, delivering results, protecting public health and our economy. I’d be honored to earn their vote.” Boerner Horvath believes issues facing residents are largely interconnected, highlighting her recent efforts to preserve San Onofre State Beach in authoring AB 1426; reducing unemployment with AB 1731, which discourages employers from firing staff by reducing employee hours and compensating employees with federal unemployment, not state funds. “Not only do I represent the values of my constituents, but I can be successful,” Boerner Horvath said. During a year of unprecedented change and uncertainty due to the coronavirus, protests sparked by decisions in Sacramento have illustrated a growing frustration among residents and a fear of misrepresentation. Through this, Boerner Horvath is proud of her representation of the 76th District, citing her fight to keep

funding for schools, personal protective equipment and public health in the state budget, established citizen advisory committees and her commitment to bipartisan cooperation. “We govern best when we work together on solutions,” Boerner Horvath said, citing her work co-authoring a bi-partisan bill strengthening California’s fish hatcheries in addition to her legislation protecting sexual assault victims and witnesses. However, according to Burkholder, Sacramento is out of touch with local needs. “What’s missing right now in Sacramento is a balance of power,” Burkholder told The Coast News. State Assembly Democrats currently hold a majority with 61 seats, with Republicans (17) and Independents (1) holding the remaining 18 seats. A Carlsbad resident and “proud wife and mother,” Burkholder owns and operates a mental health counseling practice, holding a doctorate in clinical Christian counseling and serving as a Secret Service agent for six years prior. “I am running to serve my constituents; to protect our freedom to work; to preserve the middle class and lead us to a brighter future,” Burkholder said. Burkholder sees her conservative beliefs in better alignment with residents, opposing excessive statewide spending and supporting local control of education and business initiatives. “Sacramento has a spending problem and it’s getting worse,” Burkholder said. “I’ll propose a tax cut for working families and demand accountability of how our money is spent, focusing on teaching students and not on political indoctrination.” Burkholder also considers environmental conservation and issues such as fire prevention, public safety, and coastal erosion important, but she believes the current method of funding change with taxpayer dollars isn’t necessarily the correct choice. “My answer is to hold TURN TO 76TH ON 16

By Staff

San Diego County, ensuring residents are able to reach their polling place and exercise their right to vote. “Free Ride Day this year has a different purpose than in past years,” said Nathan Fletcher, MTS Board Chair and San Diego County Supervisor. “We are holding it on one of the most important days for our country – election day. We want San Diego residents to have every opportunity

to participate in our democracy. Free transit rides all day long will help do just that.” NCTD Board Chair and Encinitas Councilmember Tony Kranz said, “North County Transit District is a proud supporter of Free Ride Day because it’s critical to our agency’s effort to promote transit ridership and improve air quality. “However, NCTD is honored this year to provide transportation at no

cost to our residents on Election Day. These rides will help bridge the gap between where people live and where they can cast their vote on Nov. 3.” For more information, visit sdvote.com. Free rides will be honored on all MTS and NCTD fixed-routes services including buses, the Trolley, Sprinter, and Coaster. MTS and NCTD services will operate on a normal weekday schedule.

49TH

“It’s past time that we make a comprehensive investment to repair our country and create millions of jobs,” Levin said. “I passed a bill in the House that includes many of my priorities, including investment for VA (Veteran Affairs) infrastructure upgrades, renewable energy development, and new environmentally responsible water supply projects such as desalination.” Maryott wants to leverage federal dollars that are spent on infrastructure with a focus on public-private partnerships to “cre-

ate services that are in demand and cost-effective.” “We need projects that will provide us with reliable water supply, and efficient transit,” Maryott said. “I will partner with either administration to deliver that.” Levin is particularly concerned about the nation’s debt and how it will affect future generations like his own two young children. “First, we need to reverse Trump’s tax cuts for corporations and the ultra-wealthy,” Levin said. “We also need a new bipar-

tisan Simpson-Bowles style commission to come up with additional solutions to get our fiscal house in order.” Maryott believes deficit spending is necessary when it comes to a crisis like COVID-19, but emphasized the nation really needs work on paying down its debts. “We owe that to our children and future generations,” Maryott said. For more information on these candidates, check out The Coast News’ U.S. Congressional races overview online.

REGION — The San Diego Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) and North County Transit District (NCTD) will host the region’s third “Free Ride Day” Nov. 3. With fewer polling locations, free transit can help bridge the gap between where residents live and where they vote. Fixed-route bus and rail services will be free for everyone to use throughout

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trying to nationalize it. “Once we sideline that irresponsible initiative we can turn our attention to making needed improvements,” Maryott said. “More choices, more innovation, lower costs and a stronger safety net for our vulnerable.” According to his campaign website, Levin wants to work toward a Medicare for All Type healthcare system, but feels that Congress needs to repair and strengthen the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Specifically, Levin is interested in exploring the implementation of a “public option,” an early buy-in to Medicare coverage within health insurance marketplaces and the hiring of full-time federal enrollment assisters to help with the enrollment process. “We need to expand access to affordable health care, particularly for underserved communities that are most susceptible to COVID-19,” Levin said. “We should do that by strengthening the Affordable Care Act and maintaining protections for people with pre-existing conditions.” As part of his priorities, Levin said he is also focusing on creating jobs and investing in infrastructure.

Convenient Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-9pm Sat., Sun. 9am-7pm www.SanMarcos.Care

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OCT. 16, 2020

Election 2020

District 3 Supervisor race will determine board’s political majority By Tigist Layne

REGION — The November elections are just a few weeks away, and two candidates are vying for the District 3 seat in one of the region’s most anticipated races. For the first time in more than three decades, Democrats could flip the county Board of Supervisors’ long-held Republican majority. Districts 1, 2 and 3 are all up for election. District 1 has two Democratic candidates, and District 2 has two Republican candidates. Currently, District 4 is represented by a Democrat and District 5 is represented by a Republican. In District 3, Republican incumbent Kristin Gaspar is going head-to-head with Democrat Terra Lawson-Remer, and whoever comes out on top will deter-

50TH

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of a moderate who wants to bring everyone together and I think that’s how you govern, that’s how you legislate; with everyone’s needs in mind, not just one party over the other.” Former Congressman Issa, 66, is hoping to return to Washington through a new seat. He served as a congressman for nearly 20 years until 2019, when he decided not to run for the 49th District seat again. “I’ve been an effective member of congress for the region and the nation, and I have a desire to serve,” Issa told The Coast News. “I don’t pretend to be a supervisor or a mayor or a

VISTA

CONTINUED FROM 14

to remain creative and forward thinking to ensure those businesses can survive and even flourish. Sunroad Plaza The Sunroad Plaza development project in District 3 is one neither Rigby nor Melendez supports. Rigby voted against the project, which will construct at least four drive-through restaurants at the intersection of Hacienda and Vista Village drives just south of State Route 78. Neither see the upside and discussed how the city is looking forward and drawing in higher-paying jobs in various industries. Melendez said it starts with connecting with civic engagement and said COVID-19 is forcing the city and residents to innovate to secure more higher-paying jobs. She, along with the other candidates, said keeping or expanding some of the new policies relating to outdoor dining, signage and others, will benefit the local economy in the future. Rigby said she also supports fewer restrictions, but at the same time is cautious

mine the political leaning of the board. Although county supervisor is officially a nonpartisan position, the five-member board has been controlled by a Republican majority for more than 30 years and members’ political leanings and philosophies tend to play a part in the board’s policy directions. Gaspar, a small business owner who was elected to the board in 2016, has previously served four years on the Encinitas City Council and was the first elected mayor of Encinitas. She said that her top priority right now is economic recovery for the region. “We have to 250,000 San Diegans out of work … and 900,000 who are food insecure. It’s going to be

KRISTIN GASPAR

TERRA LAWSON-REMER

very important that you have a county supervisor to navigate us out of this economic crisis,” Gaspar said. “As a CFO of a business, someone that comes with three terms in local offices … I know that I’m prepared to do this job and walk

hand in hand with our families and businesses during what will be an incredibly challenging time.” Gaspar, who has been an advocate for a swifter reopening of businesses, criticized Gov. Gavin Newsom for not giving the county

more control of the reopening process. “It’s important that we follow our local data, and we should have the ability on the local level to make decisions that are in response to what we see in our science and our data,” Gaspar said. “One thing that frustrates me is a governor that’s trying to drive an entire state, and this is a big, diverse state, and not every county has been a leader like San Diego has.” Lawson-Remer, an economist and environmental attorney who worked in the Treasury Department during the Obama administration, said that the first step to COVID-19 recovery is increased testing and increased contact tracing. “If you look around the world, the economies that have been able to get re-

started again are the ones that focused on getting their case numbers down,” Lawson-Remer said. “Once they got their numbers down, they helped businesses invest in the equipment they needed to reopen safely, and they were able to reopen and stay open.” Lawson-Remer said that, besides COVID-19 recovery, her top priority is climate action. “I’m a passionate environmentalist and I’m really focused on taking action on climate change. That means protecting our beaches, coastlines and our open spaces, as well as investing in affordable housing, and reducing traffic and congestion because protecting our planet is the most important thing we can do,” Lawson-Remer said. not working, we can find real solutions to problems for everyone.” Burkholder, a former federal law enforcement agent, received an endorsement from the Oceanside Police Officers’ Association and but no campaign donations. “I have put on a badge and I have protected people before so I understand,” Burkholder said. “I tell these folks I am there for you, however, their endorsements already seemed lined up in the primaries. If elected, they would realize how I can help them.” Both candidates openly support an increase in de-escalation training for law enforcement. their building. It should be open for them, they should not fear or have anxiety when they have to come to City Hall and do business. I want to make sure that everyone feels welcome there,” Greene said. District 4 Republican Councilmember Mike Morasco is the only incumbent running for re-election and he faces Republican April Austin Pugh. “He’s had 10 years of past, I want 10 years of present and future,” Pugh said of her opponent. “I’m not the status quo. I’m a small business owner, I’m a single mother, I know what it takes to survive. We need a clearer vision to move our city forward. We need to bring new people in and create that vision and move forward toward a healthier city.” The Escondido City Council elections are Nov. 3.

city councilman, I do the job that you expect someone to do as a representative in Washington; work on national and global issues and make sure that to the extent that there are federal programs available in your home district that we get our fair share of it, and that’s what I’ve done for all of my time in congress.” Isaa added that he is fiscally and socially conservative, as well as consistent, something he claims his opponent is not. “[Campa-Najjar] was for the Green New Deal... he has said that he supports 100% Medicare for all and a single payer plan,” Issa said. “He will say something different today, but he never explains how his

position changed from being absolutely for those in 2018. That’s one of the most important things is: are you consistent?” The 50th District seat was previously held by Duncan D. Hunter, who, despite being indicted on more than 60 counts related to the misuse of campaign funds, won re-election in 2018. After pleading guilty to one count related to the indictment, Hunter was sentenced to 11 months in prison, and resigned from his congressional seat in January 2020, leaving the seat vacant for nearly 10 months. Voters will decide the fate of the 50th District on Nov. 3.

76TH

folks accountable,” Burkholder said. “The answer isn’t always putting more money into something but instead looking at the issue critically. Needs have to be independently assessed by each district and city and that’s the missing piece in Sacramento.” Additionally, in regards to relationships with police unions, campaign donations and civil rights groups, the race for the 76th District seat is particularly unique. Boerner Horvath is currently endorsed by both San Diego and Carlsbad Police Officers associations while simultaneously sup-

porting civil rights groups, speaking at a Black Lives Matter rally for Encinitas 4 Equality in June. In June, the San Diego County Democratic Party asked all candidates to refuse donations from law enforcement unions. Despite the party’s mandate, Boerner Horvath had already received several large campaign donations from police unions during the course of her 2020 campaign, something she does not view as an issue. “I value our law enforcement unions and I value our social justice organizations,” Boerner Horvath said. “It’s not mutually exclusive. When we come together to talk about what’s working and what’s

about access to public parking. Still, she said the idea of looking to spread fewer restrictions post-COVID across the city can help drive the recovery. Rigby said there is vacant space across from the Vista Superior Court, so those areas are a target for the city as well.

like on Interstate 15. Green, meanwhile, also has reservations about the plan, saying it should be revisited as the pandemic has changed the workplace environment. He said North County is trying to come up with a compromise, noting SANDAG’s ridership projections are coming up short. “There’s a lot of things they’ve promised,” he said, “where they said they are allocating money and now going back on. We have to provide adequate infrastructure. Spending all that money on trains and buses doesn’t make sense to me.” Perez said she is in favor of the plan, noting she also supports electrifying the city’s fleet of vehicles. She said SANDAG’s plan is a step in the right direction to fight climate change, meet climate goals and if nothing is done, it’s a missed opportunity to create a robust clean energy economy. Melendez said it is important to invest to grow ridership and connect working people with jobs. She said with no connected transportation, the ability for economic progress cannot succeed, especially with lower-income residents.

SAN MARCOS

ESCONDIDO

2019 by the council to fill a vacant seat. Petrek is not running for re-election. Kramer said his priorities for the city involve limiting big developments. “People are frustrated with the big development projects that have taken place over the last 10 to 15 years,” Kramer said. “They are infringing on our open spaces, they’re not affordable to the people that are working in the community, they are overcrowding our schools and they’re congesting our roadways.” Kramer added that the city needs more affordable housing for those who are already in the community. “If I’m elected, I’m going to protect our hillsides, our open spaces and our parks and trails. I want to fight to curb the big developments and I want to build smarter and more affordable housing going forward,” Kramer said. The San Marcos City Council elections are Nov. 3.

more housing and stabilize our property tax stream,” Greene said. “We also need to attract new businesses to the city. One of the businesses that I’m very strongly in support of is the cannabis industry. … Opening up the cannabis industry would bring safe, reliable access to cannabis to a number of consumers in the area and bring in a large portion of sales tax generated into the city.” Greene also said that, with more than half of the city’s population being Latino, he hopes to make City Hall more welcoming by having meeting agendas translated into Spanish and offering translation services at council meetings. “I want to make sure that everyone in Escondido realizes that City Hall is

5 Big Moves As the pandemic rages on, one regional proposal has been causing controversy for more than a year. The San Diego Association of Governments’ “5 Big Moves” is just that, as the plan is calling for a $177 billion transit project to include more trains, buses, transit hubs and technology to get drivers off the highways. Rigby is one of the biggest skeptics, recalling a meeting she attended with SANDAG officials who were laughing at the Sprinter, the train running from Oceanside to Escondido. She said it was referred to as a “boondoggle” and now SANDAG wants to double-track the lines. She also railed against the proposal eliminating lanes on SR78 and to add a managed lane, or toll lane,

CONTINUED FROM 15

CONTINUED FROM 14

CONTINUED FROM 14

Get the latest news at www.thecoastnews.com


OCT. 16, 2020

17

T he C oast News - I nland E dition

Election 2020

County Board

District 3

Name

Carlsbad Del Mar

4

At Large

Encinitas

2 Mayor

Escondido

4

3

4

Oceanside San Marcos Vista Solana Beach

Social Service / Helps

Environment / Natural Resource Mgmt

Public Transit

Public Safety

Recreation / Open Space 2

1

3

2

2

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

4

2

3

3

1

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Disagree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Higgins, Brian

No Response / Declined Dropped Out

Panagides, Lela

2

4

1

3

3

1

1

3

1

2

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Acosta, Teresa

2

3

1

2

2

1

1

3

1

2

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Urbina, Phil

No Response / Declined

Blair, Phil

2

2

2

1

1

2

1

3

2

2

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Druker, Dave

2

2

2

1

1

2

1

3

1

3

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Gans, Bob

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

2

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Martinez, Tracy

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

3

2

2

Somewhat Disagree

Strongly Disagree

A - mostly a political matter for community

No Response / Declined

Warren, Glenn

2

2

2

2

1

2

2

3

2

4

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Kranz, Tony

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

Somewhat Agree

Strongly Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Riley, Alex

2

1

2

1

2

2

1

2

2

2

Strongly Disagree

Strongly Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Hinze, Kellie

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

2

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Turney, Susan

1

2

2

1

2

2

1

3

2

2

Somewhat Disagree

Strongly Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Blakespear, Catherine

2

1

1

2

1

2

1

3

1

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

Thunder, Julie

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

2

1

1

Strongly Disagree

Strongly Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

No Response / Declined

Paul, Rick

3

2

1

4

1

2

1

4

3

2

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Agree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

Valenzuela, Vanessa

2

4

2

1

1

3

2

3

2

2

Strongly Agree

Strongly Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

1

3

1

2

2

4

1

3

1

2

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit A - mostly a political matter for community

Garcia, Joe

No Response / Declined

Greene, Don

1

3

2

2

2

3

2

4

1

1

Strongly Agree

Strongly Agree

Reveles, Susan

3

3

2

1

1

3

1

4

2

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

Austin Pugh, April

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Somewhat Agree

Strongly Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Morasco, Mike

No Response / Declined

Yanes, Andres

Dropped Out

Batchelor, Bill

1

3

1

3

1

2

1

2

3

2

Somewhat Agree

Strongly Disagree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

Davis, Kellie

1

3

1

1

3

3

1

4

1

1

Strongly Agree

Strongly Disagree

A - mostly a political matter for community

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

3

1

2

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Agree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit A - mostly a political matter for community

Keim, Ryan Mackin, Shari

No Response / Declined

Newman, Amber

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

3

2

1

Strongly Agree

Somewhat Agree

Zernik, David

1

3

1

3

2

1

1

3

2

2

Strongly Agree

Somewhat Agree

D - mostly a private matter for owners

Gomez, Michelle

2

4

2

2

2

3

1

4

3

1

Strongly Agree

Somewhat Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

4

1

3

1

4

3

2

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

1

2

2

2

3

2

2

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Marshall, Jane Mccray, Morgan

No Response / Declined

2

4

1

No Response / Declined

2

2

2

No Response / Declined

Garcia, Fernando

3

2

2

1

1

2

1

2

2

2

Strongly Disagree

Strongly Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Howard, Rob

2

2

1

1

2

3

2

3

2

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Turgeon, David

1

2

1

1

2

1

2

2

2

1

Strongly Agree

Strongly Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Major, Ruben

2

2

2

1

2

2

1

3

2

1

Strongly Agree

Strongly Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Marchi, Fabio

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Strongly Agree

Strongly Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Mcgee, Alvin

1

2

1

1

2

2

1

2

2

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

D - mostly a private matter for owners

Rodriguez, Christopher

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

3

2

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

A - mostly a political matter for community

Uridel, Louis

No Response / Declined

Geraci, Alan

1

3

1

2

3

2

1

1

2

2

Strongly Agree

Strongly Disagree

Jenkins, Sharon

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Agree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

Kramer, Neil

1

2

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

Somewhat Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

1

2

2

1

1

2

1

3

2

2

Strongly Disagree

Strongly Disagree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

Musgrove, Ed Green, Joe

No Response / Declined

Perez, Elizabeth

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Somewhat Agree

Strongly Agree

A - mostly a political matter for community

Melendez, Katie

1

4

2

1

2

4

1

3

3

2

Somewhat Agree

Somewhat Agree

B - balance, but tighten gov't control a bit

Rigby, Amanda

2

2

1

1

1

2

1

3

2

1

Strongly Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

C - balance, but loosen gov't control a bit

1

Zito, David

3

Edson, Jewel

Mayor

Fiscal Mgmt / Discipline 1

2

Sanchez, Esther

3

Gov't Transparency / Accountability 2

1

Feller, Jack

2

Small Businesses 1

Chavez, Rocky

4

D = Land use is mostly a private matter. Beyond minimal constraints for public safety, owners should be able to use their private property how they see fit.

4

Weiss, Peter

3

4 = Lowest Relative Priority

C = There should be a balance. But currently community influence is too favored. I’d like to loosen local government’s control a little bit.

2

Alvarez, Perry

Mayor

3 = Below Average

B = There should be a balance. But currently private economic decisions are too favored. I’d like to tighten local government’s control a little bit.

2

Czerwonka, Dara 3

2 = Above Average

A = Land use is mostly a community-wide matter. Every parcel affects others. Decisions about what to allow/incentivize belong to voters or their reps.

1

Inscoe, Tina 2

1 = Highest Relative Priority

How strongly do you agree: "I favor diverting at least some of the public resources currently budgeted for law enforcement to other social / community services or back to taxpayers."

How strongly do you agree: "Elected officials should strive to discern and follow the popular will, even if they and the technical / professional experts on staff don't personally agree with popular sentiment."

Gaspar, Kristin

Quirk, Daniel

1

Multiple Choice

Which of these statements about local land use constraints on redevelopment or new development (zoning, discretionary review, fee structures) do you most agree with?

Lawson-Remer, Terra Blackburn, Keith

2

Neighborhood / Historic Preservation

Housing Affordability

Relative Priorities

No Response / Declined

Heebner, Lesa

OUR MAIN PURPOSES here are (1) to help readers differentiate candidates (2) within the context of the whole region-wide field. While these issues are nuanced, we tried to compel candidates to take a meaningful “sixty-thousand-foot” position. For relative priorities: “When everything is a priority, nothing is a priority.” We grant these issues all have merit and aren’t always mutually exclusive. But in a world of constraints (money, time, political capital), every issue can’t have high priority relative to the rest. Graphic by Dan Brendel


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ON A3 VISTA — Curren former t ents are students and and pardemanding social studies a teacher Vista lowed to be alkeep his the admin job. Vincen By Aaron Romero istration to keep has workedt Romero, Burgin at Ranch Vista High o for the who REGIO Unified School. Buena Vista ty Repub N — The Coun- Krvaric A protest since 1990,School Distric lican Party Sam Abed’ssaid. “Clear thrown at the school was also held paid admin was placed t ly has its suppor long-ti . Escondido on t behind steadfast commi me and istrative “This from his Republican leave Mayor tment Abed in gry,” wrotemakes me so na Vistajob at Rancho BueSam anprinciples to ty Dist. the race for Coun- values earned of Fallbro Jeffrey Bright and March 7. High School 3 Superv ok, him port of who said on graduated isor. The committeethe suphe Now, of San Republican Party bers and we more than from the school memwith morean online petitio 20 years last weekDiego announced endorse him.” are proud to already ago. tures is than 1,900 signa-n that it endorse ucation fear that our “I Gaspar’s istration asking the admin A social Abed overvoted to reache edcampaign Republican apart. I system is falling d this fellow back to to bring Romer - placed on studies teacher week and Encini pressed disapp the classro at Rancho adminis tas Mayor not goingworry my kids o dents Buena are om. On and parentstrative leave in ointment exwho is also Kristin Gaspar - not receivi education to get a valuab early March. Vista High School to launch ro told his last day, Rome- Romero. Photo in ng the le , nomina at public The an online was anymo supervisor running for by Hoa Quach party’s schools leaving students he re.” petition move prompted seat currenthe several tion, but touted in support stuwas sorry held by David Whidd key endors nization because “the orgaof Vincent tly she I can’t be is seekinDave Roberts, who Marcos ements has receive with the rest change.” decided to make g re-elec called on of San out the campa d throug of the year. you for do “shameful.” a my choice tion. the move Abed, h— we’re It’s not “(They a polariz who has been “While ign. “This confidence ) no longer have it goes.” , but it’s the way until there’s going to fight I’m disaphis two ing figure during pointed not genuinely is a teacher fight with. nothing left know what in me that that terms In the to cares,” get ty endors to wrote. as mayor I plan to Escondido, I ute speech roughly I’m doing,” Whidd for your Romero, ement, the par“Both be back in proud senior year.” secured said I’m very coveted Mr. Romer of my sons on whose to studen4-minto have were record the of Romer remark emotional ts, an the suppor ment by party endors joyed his o and greatly had Mayor students o also urged on Facebo ed and posteds to fight the Romero vowed t Faulco ene- the class.” his to be kind than two receiving more administratio four Repub ner and new A former like what ok. “They don’t “I’m not Counc lican City n. but social studies to their mine studen committee’s thirds of I do. They ing,” like the the tors ilmembers, don’t not said Romer disappear- pal to give “hell” teacher RomerVelare of Vista,t, Jasvotes, threshold Senais what way I do it. So, to Princio Charles the and Bates and Anders said going away.o, 55. “I’m happens. this someth candidate required for teacher.” was “an amazin Schindler. Assemblyman on, Follow ing I’m really This is a Chavez g to receive ing endorsement Rocky nounce ,” “I that’s what I can fight, the the an- get himwas lucky enough party membe over a fellow “I’ve been Gaspar said. we’re goingand ture, a ment of his deparmyself,” to petition tive Repub a very effecto on Petitio “He truly she was “Endo r. lican mayor cares for wrote. a Democ nSite.com, created publican rsing one what he ratic in Re- ing urging quires a over another on balanccity by focusTURN TO ed budget TEACHER — and 2/3 vote thresh re- economic ON A15 s, rarely happenold and GOP quality development, Chairman s,” continu of life Tony Board e to do so and will on the of Superv isors.”

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Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

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OCT. 16, 2020

M arketplace News Beyond belief — Students with severe reading disabilities learn to read in seconds Marketplace News is paid advertorial content. If you would like to buy space on this page, please contact the Coast News Group.

Students of all ages with reading disabilities learn to read like never before, with the help of Dr. David Bloch, an eye doctor and Dyslexia expert in Carlsbad. In a matter of seconds, poor readers can identify words that were previously unrecognizable to them.

Dr. Bloch uses of series of drills to reprogram a reader’s visual and cognitive processing. It works much like reloading software into a computer, so he refers to it as “a brain reboot”. Most poor readers suffer from poor comprehension because they are

She was with him all summer for 18 sessions, and she went from scoring at a second grade reading level to an eighth grade level.” Karyn Kulenovic’s Mother of student

Without Limits is unlike any other program out there. It delivers incredible results in just a few months, not years. Poor readers are able to jump multiple grade levels and exceed grade level reading proficiency by “breaking bad brain habits”. “Poor readers get in the habit of storing and recalling information the wrong way,” Dr. Bloch said. “I take away their confusion by teaching them to look at text in a new and more efficient way” Karyn Kulenovic’s daughter started the program at the end of fifth grade. “She was really at a turning point at schooling and she needed to be able to read and keep up with the curriculum,” Kulenovic said. It wasn’t that her daughter couldn’t comprehend what she was reading, but it would take her a long time to get through one ar-

ticle of reading homework assigned to her. “Her eyes weren’t moving in sync with each other, which was impacting her ability to read,” Kulenovic said. When Kulenovic found Dr. Bloch, things really changed for her daughter. D r . Bloch was able to examine her daughter’s eyes and also found that her eyes weren’t focusing properly, which was another issue. Once she started the program, her issues with reading began to go away pretty quickly. “She was with him all summer for 18 sessions, and she went from scoring at a second grade reading level to an eighth grade level.

“We just wanted her daughter as a major factor to be at grade level and she in her improved reading exceeded that,” skills. Kulenov ic “Dr. Bloch is such a said. nice, humorous, down-toearth guy and I think that made a huge difference in her ability to feel comfortable,” Kulenovic said. Kulenovic described Dr. Bloch as the “Mr. Miyagi” (ala Karate Kid) of reading. “He teaches the kids Dr. Bloch even rewhat exactly is going to entrained and toned Ku- able them to read,” she said. lenovic’s daughter’s eye “There are a ton of kids out muscles so that she doesn’t there that could really use need to use reading glasses his help.” either. Get more information Little by little, Kule- by visiting readingwithoutnovic’s daughter’s confi- limits.com or schedule an dence grew because of her evaluation by calling 760new reading skills. 730-3711. Besides his program, Dr. Bloch’s office is locatKulenovic also credited the ed at 2814 Roosevelt St. Suite way he worked with her B, Carlsbad, CA. 92008.

How this occurs is a complete mystery to most, especially when it is done without phonics, sight reading, picture books, or even verbal cues. “Most people say this is impossible until they see me demonstrate it,” Dr. Bloch said.

unable to read the words, they read the words in the wrong order, or they forget what they read. Correcting these three factors allows poor readers not only comprehend more but to also double or even triple their reading speed. Dr. Bloch’s Reading

CALENDAR

OCT. 17

297-8953

The Fall Seminar presented by North San Diego County Genealogical Society will be held via live Webinar from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 17 in four separate sessions. Fritz Juengling will present, “Names, Places, Dates: Beyond the Obvious.” Fee is $15. For questions e-mail seminars@nsdcgs. org. For registrations, e-mail reservations@nsdcgs.org.

OCT. 28

Know something that’s going on? Send it to calendar@ coastnewsgroup.com

OCT. 16

KNOW YOUR BALLOT

Learn about state propositions and local ballot measures. The League of Women Voters North County San Diego is currently providing a nonpartisan summary of each state and local ballot initiative, the financial impact of the proposition, supporters and opposition, and financial contributions made to date. A pre-recorded version of the presentation is available at http: / / bit.ly/ LW V NCSD_ YouTube. Community members can submit questions about any of the ballot issues and receive a personalized answer at the League website at: https://bit.ly/ LVNCSD_BallotQuestions. SAVE OUR STAGES

Belly Up Tavern and the National Independent Venue Association host Save Our Stages Festival, #SOSFEST, a three-day virtual music festival Oct.16 through Oct. 18, with Jason Mraz, hosted By Reggie Watts with Foo Fighters, Brittany Howard, Dave Matthews, Dillon Francis, The Roots, Marshmello, Demi Lovato, Kelsea Ballerini, Miley Cyrus, Monica, Reba McEntire, Sebastián Yatra, Yg and more. #SOSFEST will stream live on NIVA’S official youtube channel at https://bit.ly/34DYCKR. SUBMIT YOUR ART

Escondido Municipal Gallery/ Escondido Arts Partnership is seeking art for “The Big Little Art Show,” planned for Nov. 13 to Dec. 4. Art will be received from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 16 and Oct. 17. For more information, visit escondidoarts.org.

GENEALOGY WEBINAR

OCT. 31

HWAC TROPICAL GALA

Helen Woodward Animal Center’s largest fundraising event offers an exotic journey from the comfort of your own homes. Join the center at 7 p.m. Oct. 17 for the “Jewels of the Earth Gala – A Tropical Escape at Home.” Tune into the event for free (registration required) or purchase tickets, which will include a home delivery of select wine, entrées and desserts from some of the best local restaurants in San Diego. Register at https://animalcenter.org/spring-fling-gala. Animal-lovers can also tune in on Helen Woodward Animal Center’s Facebook page. MAKE SOME TINY ART

Artists and art enthusiasts of all ages are invited to submit artwork in almost any media for inclusion in OMA’s Teeny Tiny Art Mart. Artwork by novices, professionals, civic leaders, and local celebrities will be available for purchase at prices accessible for anyone, with a twist—buyers will not know the identity of the artist until they purchase the artwork. All artwork must measure exactly 5-inches-by-5inches wide (no smaller and no larger), and no more than 1.5 inches deep. All submissions must be delivered no later than 5 p.m. Nov. 9 to Oceanside Museum Of Art, 704 Pier View Way, Oceanside. All donated artwork

automobile. Vehicles will weave through a mile-long course transformed into scenes from classic horror films and the demented CHAMBER MUSIC Chamber Music Society minds of the Scream Zone’s of Lincoln Center presents imaginative creators. CMS Front Row courtesy of the city of Carlsbad Cultural LEARN ABOUT MEDICARE Arts Office from 8 a.m. Oct. Medicare Open Enroll28 through Nov. 1. For more ment season runs through information, visit https://bit. Dec. 7. During this time, ly/34AL0Qu. Medicare beneficiaries make important choices that affect their medical costs, the doctors they see and preART AFTER DARK scription coverage for next The Oceanside Muse- year. Visit GetToKnowMedium of Art presents “Night care.com to access a virtual Of The Living Art: An Art event, webinars, find a loAfter Dark Fashion Extrav- cal agent and other helpful aganza,” 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 31. resources to help you make Live Stream, $25. Art After confident Medicare deciDark has been reimagined sions. this year as a virtual experience that is equal parts art, GET YOUR VOTE ON fashion, and fun. For sponVerify your voter stasorship and watch party op- tus at http://VoterStatus. portunities, contact Erika D. sos.ca.gov and make sure Williams, (760) 435-3726. nothing stands between you and receiving your ballot. Completed mail ballots can be dropped off Monday - FriHELP END HOMELESSNESS day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on Vista Operation HOPE- Nov. 3, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. at all North County announces County libraries, including the kickoff of its annual in Vista. Mail ballot drop off campaign, Seeds of HOPE. information can be found at The campaign is raising San Diego County Libraries. money to sustain and grow programs for families with ART IN ESCONDIDO children and single womIn October, the Esconen who are experiencing dido Arts Partnership, 262 homelessness. Contact Ni- East Grand Ave., Escondido cole Ketcher at info@op- offers a PhotoArts Group's erationhopeshelter.org for exhibition of photography as information about the cam- seen through the View Findpaign or about the shelter er in the Innerspace Gallery. (operationhopeshelter.org). A group show in Gallery Too Make a one-time gift, be- with Virginia Cole, Linda come a corporate sponsor, Doll and Carol Mansfield. match your employee’s do- In the artist studios and hall nations, or get involved with walls are Renee Richetts, volunteering. Bob Barry, Patrick Brown, Scott Gengelbach, Virginia fAIRGROUNDS’ SCREAM ZONE Cole, Martita Foss, Daniel The Scream Zone: Hernandez, Bettina Heinz, Road Kill is back, Oct. 1 Robert Rose, and Woody through Oct. 31 at the Del Woodaman. "The Society Mar ‘Scaregrounds.’ Tickets for Orphaned and Wayward at https://thescreamzone. Art" is having a sale of docom. This year guests will nated artworks in the Exexperience the frights from pressions Gallery benefiting the dis-comfort of their own EAP's art programs.

ART AFTER DARK on Oct. 31 has been reimagined this year as a virtual experience that is equal parts art, fashion, and fun. Courtesy photo

will be put up for sale at the at 6 p.m. Register at https:// Teeny Tiny Art Mart with classes.luxartinstitute.org/. 100% of the proceeds helping to support OMA’s ongoing education initiatives.

OCT. 21

‘SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR’

OCT. 18

JAZZ EVENSONG

St. Michael’s by-theSea Episcopal Church, 2775 Carlsbad Blvd., Carlsbad is hosting a “Jazz Evensong” program every Sunday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. outside on the parish lawn, with masks, social distancing, sign-in required, free to the public. On drums is Tom Morey, inventor of the boogie board. Keith Bishop on saxophone (played with the Buddy Rich Band), Leonard Thompson on piano, and Dene Davidson on bass.

OCT. 19

VIRTUAL COLLAGE CLASS

Fall Session Youth & Adult Classes virtually through Zoom presented include Intermediate Experimental Collage Mondays at 6 p.m.; Introduction to Acrylic Painting, Tuesdays at 10 a.m.; Beginning Watercolor Wednesdays at 6 p.m. and “What the Heck is Contemporary Art?” Thursdays

North Coast Repertory Theatre presents its latest online production, the romantic comedy, “Same Time, Next Year,” directed by David Ellenstein. The play will begin streaming online Oct. 21 through Nov. 15. Tickets $34 at northcoastrep.org or call (858) 4811055.

OCT. 23

PHANTASMIC POE FEST

Just in time for Halloween, Write Out Loud will host its annual, this-year-virtual, PoeFest with filmed performances of works by Edgar Allan Poe and other authors of the Phantasmic, streaming from Oct. 23 to Nov. 1 in partnership with Save Our Heritage Organisation. Individual programs are $13 each, or all six with a VIP Festival Pass for $50 plus an exclusive live-streamed Opening Night event. Tickets may be purchased at https://writeoutloud.ticketspice.com / poefest or by calling (619)

ONGOING


21

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1. GEOGRAPHY: Which city is known as “The Eternal City”? 2. FOOD & DRINK: What is the name of the bee used in advertisements for Honey Nut Cheerios? 3. LANGUAGE: What does the Latin phrase “ad meliora” mean? 4. MEASUREMENTS: How many inches are in a hand? 5. U.S. STATES: A resident of which state might be called a Buckeye? 6. MOVIES: Who were the three stars of the film “Three Amigos” 7. GAMES: Which “ailment” was added to the Operation board game in 2004? 8. ASTRONOMY: Which two planets in our solar system lack natural moons? 9. MYTHOLOGY: What is a Valkyrie in Norse mythology? 10. TELEVISION: What was the name of the android on “Star Trek: The Next Generation”?

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Some flashes of Aries ire might erupt as you confront an unusually bewildering situation. But you should be able to keep your temper under control as you work through it. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) That marriage ‘twixt the arts and practicality that Taureans excel at once again highlights your enjoyment of much of the week. However, you need to watch any sudden urge to splurge. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Even with all the plusses apparently outweighing the minuses, you still might want to defer an important decision to make sure you have all the facts you need. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) One or two problems might threaten to derail otherwise smoothly running situations at work or at home. But a few well-placed words should help get things back on track quickly. LEO (July 23 to August 22) This could be a good time for all you Leos and Leonas in the spotlight to open your generous Lion’s hearts and share the glory with those who helped you accomplish so much along the way. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might want to get advice from someone who’s been there and knows these situations better than you do, before investing time or money (or both) in a questionable matter.

TRIVIA TEST ANSWERS

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Be careful how you handle a workplace matter that seems out of place in the schedule you’ve prepared. Before you act, one way or another, find out who set it up and why. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your entertainment aspect is strong this week. Besides providing a wonderful break from everyday obligations, sharing fun times brings you closer to those you care for. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Having a weekend fun fest? Your friend or relative who’s down in the emotional dumps could perk up if you find a way to include him or her in your plans. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) If you’re in one of those “the Goat knows best” periods, you might want to ease up and try listening to what others have to say. You could learn something. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) That new challenge is getting closer, and you should be out there now showing facts and figures to potential allies to help persuade them to rally to your support. Good luck. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Getting a head start on holiday plans could help free up some time later to spend on other projects. Meanwhile, a colleague has some ideas that you might find worth discussing. BORN THIS WEEK: You are always there for others, and sometimes you need to be reminded that you need to be there for yourself as well. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.

1. Rome 2. Buzz 3. Toward better things 4. Four 5. Ohio 6. Steve Martin, Martin Short and Chevy Chase 7. Brain Freeze 8. Mercury and Venus 9. A maiden who chooses who may die in battle, and which of the slain are worthy of a place in Valhalla 10. Data

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OCT. 16, 2020

Food &Wine

‘Merlot Month’ honors grape taste of wine frank mangio

F

ifteen years ago, an intoxicating wine movie comedy with little fanfare except word of mouth caught fire. It was “Sideways,” about two frustrated sidekicks on a bachelor’s last days spent guzzling wine along the Central Coast of California. For some unknown reason, the movie savaged Merlot in both words and deeds, resulting in a stunning 25% drop in sales that year. In the movie, Miles, the character who hated Merlot, secretly owned a never-opened world-class Merlot bottle, a very expensive Right Bank Bordeaux French legend named Petrus. In a fit of anger and frustration over a lost book publishing deal and a lost love, he gulps down the Petrus with a burger at a McDonalds. At its best, Merlot is a beautiful round and supple grape. It is sometimes characterized as the flesh on Cabernet Sauvignon’s bones. Proof of this might be the fact that most red blends start out with Cab but make

We are also offering delivery through the TOAST delivery app or on www.mikesbbq.us! We look forward to delivering your next meal. Thank you for your support!

THE MERLOT GRAPE is reported to be the second-leading red varietal after Cabernet Sauvignon. Courtesy photo

sure that the next choice in the blend is Merlot. Some serious top-notch producers make intensely flavored, big, complex Merlots. We will review some below. Merlot’s golden years were the pervasive ’90s. You didn’t buy a bottle of wine for a fine dinner; you bought a Merlot. That “bubble” of production led to copycat bottles by two-bit growers peddling cheap, soft tasting bland Merlots. So “Sideways” was simply the punch-out in a wine balloon that had to burst to be eventually better. And better it got … so much so that in 2017, a Duckhorn with Merlot grapes from their Three Palms Vineyard in Napa Valley, was awarded the No. 1 wine in the world by the most respected wine publication in

the world, Wine Spectator. Spectator praised the wine as “an easy-going red of generous fruit and texture. Its subtle tannins make it perfect for early drinking that allows it to pair with a wide range of foods.” The Renaissance of Merlot is being celebrated in October in a monthlong recognition of its achievements in the wine world. The rallying cry is #MERLOTME, a global movement reaching millions of wine lovers. First, get your hands on some fantastic tasting Merlot. I have a few suggestions. Inspired after a visit to Bordeaux, Dan Duckhorn produced the first vintage of Duckhorn Vineyards Napa Valley Merlot in 1978. A splash of Cabernet Sauvignon in the current 2017 vintage adds notable depth and structure, as well as creative flavors of black cherry, plum and spice. ($56) St. Supery is a Rutherford Merlot in Napa Valley and sports a rich black plum and chocolate tasting sensation for its 2016 vintage. ($50) This was a near perfect growing season as this column has frequently enthused about. St. Supery ages its Merlot for 19 months for added layers of complexity. The wine is sustainably farmed and given optimal hang time. Sorting by cluster, then by berry, ensures a well-balanced Merlot. Up Washington way, a stop at LeEcole No. 41 in Walla Walla is all you need to confirm the quality of Merlot in this district. We tested the 2017 Estate grown Merlot. The winery was a school at one time, and proudly proclaims their Merlot as certified sustainable and salmon safe. The wine delivers great structure, color and balanced acidity. A beautiful Indian summer brought in plenty of sunshine for the October harvest. ($37) Visit MerlotMe.com for more information.

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Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) See Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations. Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2020 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See dealer for program details and eligibility.

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Award Winning Healthcare in our Community Tri-City’s mission is to advance the health and wellness of the community we serve. For nearly 60 years we’ve shown our commitment to fulfill that mission. The caring hands and skilled care of our dedicated nurses, doctors and clinicians have been recognized at the highest levels. We’re proud to have earned these recent honors: Heart & Stroke Care Leader in North County Tri-City is home to one of the top Heart and Stroke treatment programs anywhere. The American Heart Association recently awarded FIVE Gold Awards for our heart and stroke programs—making us the Gold Standard in the care of some of our community’s most critically ill patients.

CBAD Award - Community Impact We are extremely proud to receive the Community Impact – Large Company CBAD Award recognizing Tri-City Medical Center’s community outreach efforts and in-kind support for community organizations to “move the needle” on community health issues and address social determinants of health.

Best Maternity Care Tri-City was recognized by Newsweek and Leapfrog as one of the “Best Maternity Hospitals 2020”. This award is granted to hospitals that meet Leapfrog’s rigorous standards for excellence in maternity care – including low rates of C-section, episiotomy, early elective delivery and following important protocols to protect moms and babies, among other measures. Tri-City has also gone more than TEN YEARS without a PICC line infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), a major milestone.

4002 Vista Way, Oceanside, CA 92009 | 855.222.TCMC (8262) | tricitymed.com

OCT. 16, 2020


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