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SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN Everything I list turns to SOLD! 805-886-0228 skimberlin@aol.com

oastal C

This week’s listings on the back page

Lic. #00623395

CARPINTERIA

Vol. 27, No. 24

March 4 -10, 2021

coastalview.com

View News Bird’s eye view

Phyl Hansen turns 98

9

Local photographer Bjoern Freiherr uses a drone to achieve stunning aerial shots and capture Carpinteria’s natural beauty from a new perspective. This photo of a double rainbow washing over downtown was taken in between January’s late rain showers. See more of Freiherr’s unique captures on pages 12-13.

FREIHERR

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

14

Warriors return to action

16

Get to know the Acorn Woodpecker

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5182 Concord Place $985,000 • Charming Seacoast Village www.47404th.com

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2  Thursday, March 4, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

Your Carpinteria Realtor DRE# 02118814

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Keller Williams Realty

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CAN I HAVE DENTAL AND VISION COVERAGE ADDED TO MY PLAN?

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Cottage quality. Urgent care. Now Open in Ventura County

BRIEFLY Chamber of Commerce to host Legislative Update

The Santa Barbara South Coast Chamber of Commerce – from Goleta to Carpinteria – will host their first Legislative Update on Friday, March 12, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Featured speakers will include Congressman Salud Carbajal, Senator Monique Limón, Assemblymember Steve Bennett and First District County Supervisor Das Williams. Assemblymember Bennett will discuss legislative priorities, bill package highlights and the state’s response to Covid-19. Supervisor Williams will present an update on all Covid related matters, including vaccine issues and Central Coast Community Energy (3CE). The Legislative Update is an information-packed program, designed to brief the business community on the latest business trends, legislative updates, economic development and relevant issues that affect the South Coast. The Zoom webinar is free. Register at SantaBarbaraSouthCoastChamber.com.

Hass Avocado Board calls for nominations

With a new year comes a new opportunity for passionate avocado industry members to consider serving on the Hass Avocado Board (HAB) in one of 12 board positions. Annual board nominations provide industry members with the opportunity to take an active role in helping HAB to promote the consumption of Hass avocados in the United States. HAB has played an important role in making avocados the envy of the produce industry by increasing consumption to 8.32 lbs. per capita for 2020 in the U.S. – up from an average of 1.6 lbs. per capita in the 1990s – an increase of 420%. Consumption in the total fruit category increased by only 9.4% over this same period. The deadline to submit a nomination form is March 30. The new term will begin on Nov. 1, 2021 with members and alternates officially seated at the board meeting on Dec. 1, 2021. To submit a nomination and for additional details, visit hassavocadoboard.com/nominations.

Mosquito District Board has vacancy

The city of Carpinteria is currently accepting applications from residents who are interested in serving on the Mosquito and Vector Management District Board of Trustees. The eight-member board meets on the second Thursday of every month to discuss the administration and operations of the district – which include monitoring for mosquitoes and vector-borne diseases (such as the West Nile Virus), review of the district’s financial transactions, discussing potential implementation of new administrative or operational techniques and policies, providing direction and guidance to the district general manager, review and approval of the district’s annual budget, and other such duties. All activities of the board are governed by the Brown Act – California’s Open Meetings Law. Trustees are also required to take biannual ethics and harassment prevention training and submit a conflict of interest form every year. Trustees receive $100 monthly compensation. The existing board vacancy must be filled by a resident of the city of Carpinteria. Knowledge of mosquitoes, mosquito-borne diseases, etc. is not a requirement. Currently, meetings are held via videoconference but will return to in-person attendance at the Hope School District Office in Santa Barbara when it is deemed safe to do so. Meetings generally last two to three hours. To apply, contact Maria at (805) 684-5405.

See BRIEFLY continued on page 9

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  3

Two applicants pass to next round for a cannabis retail storefront on Santa Claus Lane

Two applicants for a retail cannabis storefront on Santa Claus Lane have successfully passed Phase 2 of the merit-based selection process conducted by Santa Barbara County’s Planning and Development Department. Business operations proposals submitted by the applicants were reviewed by a third-party evaluator, HdL, and the county’s Business Licensing Team. In this review, only two applicants were approved to move to Phase 3 in the selection process for the Toro Canyon/Summerland Community Plan Area (CPA). Only one or less retail

shops will be given a permit for this area. Both applicants seek to open cannabis storefronts in the Padaro Village Shops. The applicant named 3823 SCL, LLC has applied for 3823 Santa Claus Lane; and the other applicant, Haven XV, LLC, has applied for 3825 Santa Claus Lane, Unit B. These applicants achieved an aggregate score of 85% or higher and will advance to Phase 3, where applications will be reviewed, scored and ranked based on the Neighborhood Compatibility Plan and site inspections.

The result of Phase 3 will be a ranked list of applications in each of the CPAs. Per the ordinance, only the number one ranked applicant in each of the CPAs will be invited to start the permit and business license application process. Santa Barbara County hosted six virtual community meetings in July to receive feedback and answer questions about the amended Cannabis Business License (Chapter 50) regulating cannabis retail storefront licensing. Chapter 50 (b) limits the number of storefront retail licenses to no more than

one in each of the county’s six CPAs. CPAs are located in unincorporated Santa Barbara and do not reflect zoning and permitting within the cities of Buellton, Carpinteria, Goleta, Guadalupe, Lompoc, Santa Barbara, Santa Maria and Solvang. The public can continue to submit feedback by sending questions or comments in writing via e-mail to cannabisinfo@countyofsb.org, by leaving a voice message at (805) 568-2777 or by visiting cannabis.countyofsb.org/retail.sbc and filling out the online survey.

“I’m so excited and grateful to have received my last vaccination and almost feel as though I’m invincible.” – GranVida resident

At Carpinteria’s only Senior Living and Memory Care Community, we’re safe, secure and vaccinated! We’re pleased to announce that all staff and residents have been given the opportunity to receive both doses of vaccinations. Everyone will continue to be tested weekly per Santa Barbara County Health Department and CDC safety protocols. We’re getting through this, together. It’s a great life here at GranVida. For more information or to schedule your personal or virtual tour, please call 805.881.5474.

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4  Thursday, March 4, 2021

COVID UPDATE

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Mobile Covid-19 testing unit moves to Carpinteria

Starting this week, Santa Barbara County’s mobile Covid-19 testing unit will be available to support the expansion of testing in the Carpinteria community. The mobile testing unit will be located at Procore in Carpinteria at 6267 Carpinteria Ave. This test site will be available from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday for a minimum of two weeks and available to all community members. To request an appointment, visit lhi. care/covidtesting. If you need assistance registering, call 2-1-1. “We are happy to report the mobile testing site will now be supporting our South County Region with an additional testing opportunity in the city of Carpinteria,” said Van Do-Reynoso, Santa Barbara County Public Health Director. “We are working our way together and continuing to decrease positive cases. Testing is such an important piece in slowing the spread of the virus as well as a critical metric used to reopening our community. Testing is a solid strategy in helping us to reopen schools and local businesses, allow sports to play again and allow indoor dining.” For additional updates about testing, visit publichealth.org/testing or call 2-1-1 for information and testing appointment registration assistance.

New first dose vaccine appointments available

Covid-19 cases continue downward trend, nearly 100,000 vaccine doses received

Cases of Covid-19 in Santa Barbara County remain very high but have decreased over the past two weeks. The daily 14-day average per 100,000 people that reached 102 in mid-January is now around 19, down from 24 last week, according to the New York Times. There have also been 26% less hospitalizations in the past 14 days, according to the Santa Barbara County Department of Public Health. As of Feb. 27, the county had received 99,220 doses of the Covid-19 vaccine and had administered (including CVS and Walgreens) 94,874 to Santa Barbara County residents. On Feb. 27, 7.4% of Santa Barbara County residents had been fully vaccinated with both their first and second dose. Santa Barbara County has now reported 32,087 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 416 deaths since the start of the pandemic. In the South County communities of Carpinteria, Montecito and Summerland there have been 1,282 confirmed cases and 19 deaths. In the city of Santa Barbara, there have been 5,972 cases and 93 deaths. For more information, visit publichealthsbc.org.

Earl Warren Showgrounds

RENOVATION PROJECT

NEEDS YOU!

Since 2000 we have had over 20 natural disasters and mandatory evacuations. Earl Warren has provided a base for first responders, evacuation victims and animal rescue. Our goal is to restore the fairgrounds to the world class community / equestrian event center that it is intended to be.

YOU CAN HELP BY MAKING A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION TODAY! Please Make checks payable to SB Equine Earl Warren Restoriation Project PO Box 60535, Santa Barbara, CA 93160 or Venmo: SBEquine-Evac Team

With the arrival of additional vaccine supply, first dose vaccine appointments will now be available at Public Health vaccination sites. These appointments will be open to local Santa Barbara County residents who are emergency services workers, grocery workers and Phase 1A health care workers. Special outreach for separate clinics for educators, childcare workers and workers in the agricultural/food industry are also taking place at clinics next week. Approximately 2,800 total first dose appointments will be available at Public Health vaccination sites in Santa Barbara and Santa Maria. To learn more, visit publichealthsbc.org or call 2-1-1.

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Submit online at coastalview.com

Photos by Brendan Daly Photography

As we approach our 90th year in business, as your local trash/recycle hauler, we have one thing to say to all our customers, employees and partners:

Thank you

Together we are making the world a better place. Harrison Industries is meeting our environmental goals because of each and every one of you. Without our residential customers’ understanding and cooperation; without our commercial customers’ allegiance to recycling; without our dedicated drivers’ and tremendous team’s environmental commitment; without the shared goals of our governmental partners in Carpinteria as well as the expertise of our business partners at Gold Coast Recycling and Agromin … without each of these – without every one of you – our years of service simply would not have been possible. Our commitments to community and the environment have been constant and will continue into the next generations. Together, we are making a difference. Together, WE are making our world a better and more sustainable place for our future generations.

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  5

944 Linden Ave. • Carpinteria • pacifichealthfoods.com • 805-684-2115

YOUR LOCAL, ORGANIC MARKET Juices • Smoothies • Açaí Bowls Sandwiches • Cof fee & Tea Baked Goods • Fresh Salads


6  Thursday, March 4, 2021

Obituary

CVN

Barie pursued new interests in holistic healing, which led him to study at the Center for the Healing Arts in Santa Monica and then travel to the Philippines to further his knowledge. While overseas he bought a 37’ sailboat, the Arunta Princess, and embarked on a single-handed journey from the Philippines to Santa Barbara that took eight months. He returned to Carpinteria and began a business consulting firm that incorporated his business experience with the spiritual components he had learned. Together with two colleagues, they formed a consulting strategy called Corporate Wisdom that was decades ahead of its time. It brought mindfulness Barie Evan McCurry and communication tools into executive level corporations to improve work 1/16/1941 – 2/18/2021 culture and relationships. In his final Barie was born work chapter, Barie became a Licensed to Jeanne and General Contractor and founded his Ernie McCurry company Mold Remediation Services i n Av a l o n , of Santa Barbara. Together with his crew Catalina Island, of workers, they restored and beautified where the family homes mostly in the Montecito area. He made their home. specialized in treating water damage. They moved to Barie’s focus outside of work was the mainland always on spending time and making and settled in wonderful memories with his children. Summerland, and later Carpinteria. Barie graduated They went on annual ski trips and from Carpinteria High School and traveled widely to many exotic destiearned degrees from UCSB and UCLA. nations such as the Pyramids of Giza, He played the trumpet and was in the Angel Falls, Venezuela, Istanbul, Athens UCSB Brass Choir. Early on he took time and Bali; it was always an adventure to travel around the world, and for much to remember! Barie loved to share his of three years he lived in Hawaii, New interests in sailing and traveling with Zealand and Australia where he found them. He was a truly devoted father and grandfather and would drop everything work, surfed and explored. after his return he28, met 2020 his future to be on the sidelines cheering or helping 20Soon  Thursday, May wife, Jenifer Anderson. Two years later in any way he could. He was a loyal and they married and in 1967 they joined supportive friend to those fortunate to the Peace Corps. They spent two years be close with him. Barie is survived by his loving famin Honduras. Barie learned Spanish and loved his work, helping establish fishing ily; (step)mother Barbara McCurry; and bus co-ops. Their first child Hilary sister Diane Beamer; daughter Hilary McCurry; daughter-in-law Carmen was born in Tegucigalpa. After the Peace Corps, Barie entered McCurry; grandsons Andrew, Ian and the UCLA Anderson School of Business Sebastian McCurry; daughter Sarah Reports from the where he earned an MBA. During this and husband David Paolini; grandchilSanta Barbara County time, their son Jack was born. Barie was dren Sophia, Gabrielle and Dominic Sheriff’s Offinephews; ce then hired by Procter & Gamble to work Paolini; many nieces and dear friend Jenifer. He was predein Modesto and then Germany where and COASTAL BUREAU OPERATIONS they moved in 1973. Their youngest ceased by his beloved son Jack, brother 17 and – 23,parents. 2020 He will be dearly Jack, daughter Sarah was born there and they MAY enjoyed four years living abroad. Soon missed. The family wishes to thank after returning to the States in 1976, Barie’s devoted caregivers at Pacifica recovered andAssisted booked Hospice. into SantaA Sunday, Senior Living and Jenifer andMay Barie 17 split up, but remained was Barbara Sheriff’s Offi ce property. private memorial will be held due to lifelong friends and allies inFirearm raising their 9:54 a.m. / Unregistered / Covid restrictions. children cooperatively. 1400 block Sterling Avenue 6:15 p.m. / Theft / 3200 block Via Deputies responded to a call about a Real firearm and contacted a man who reportA caller reported that she believes her edly had an unregistered Kimber 1911 laptop and credit cards were stolen by firearm in his possession. The firearm was a female neighbor who lives at the Polo taken from the man and secured into the Field apartments. Follow up by deputies. Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Office property department for safekeeping.

COMMANDER’S RECAP

Previously published obituaries may be read online at coastalview.com

Pacific Village

11:44 a.m. / Misdemeanor Hit and Run / 6500 block Rincon Road

Tuesday, May 19

6 p.m. / Towed Abandoned Vehicle / 2200 block Lillie Avenue

Carpinteria

Deputies responded to a misdemeanor Deputies received complaints about hit and run call, but the male subject an abandoned vehicle parked near Sandfled the scene traveling southbound on piper Liquor. The vehicle was tagged and Rincon Road. The man continued south- marked on Thursday, May 14. The vehicle bound on the northbound off-ramp of was checked and was not moved. The Beautiful Neighborhood • Six Beds Highway 101 at Rincon Road. Deputies vehicle was towed. checked the area and were unable to locate the subject. License Facility Wednesday, # 425801797 May 20

A Senior CAre HoMe

Contact Cathy Miller 805.729.8347 or 805.220.6234

2:12 p.m. / Narcotics / 4600 block Carpinteria Avenue CARPINTERIA

Coastal View News

Deputies responded to narcotic activity and contacted a woman who had two outstanding warrants: one out of Hermosa Beach but was non-extraditable, and the other out of Santa Barbara. The woman Providing local news and information was arrested for the outstanding warrant for the Carpinteria Valley out of Santa Barbara County.

8:28 p.m. / Meth Possession / 1100 block Casitas Pass

Managing Debra A manEditor drove intoHerrick a parking lot not Graphic Kristyn A Whittenton wearingDesigner his seatbelt. traffic stop was Photographer Karlssonto being in posinitiated, andRobin he admitted Reporter Odessa Stork session of a meth pipe. During a search Advertising Manager Karina Villarreal

of the vehicle, his meth pipe was located, but also aGary baggie with 3.7Michael grams VanStry of meth. Publishers L. Dobbins, The subject was cited for the violations.

Coastal View News is locally owned and operated by

10:12 / Weapon andCIRCULATION Dope 4180 Via Real Suite F, Carpinteria, CAp.m. 93013, 3RMG p.m.Ventures, / 015F LLC, / Linden Avenue and VERIFIED BY Violations / Hales Lane and Via and is published Malibu Drive every Thursday. Coastal View News has been adjudged aA newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of Santa Barbara Real black purse was found at Linden and

of County, Case No. 210046. Coastal View News assumes no responsibility A woman and man wereAssociation contacted as

Malibu, then booked for safe keeping. The for unsolicited material. owner was not contacted.

Sunday, May 17

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Community Publishers

their vehicle was getting dropped off by a tow truck. The woman is on active probation and a search of her property showed she had meth, a meth pipe and a container ADVERTISING

LETTERS

Care for the seals

If you care about the environment you are probably aware that harbor seals live here. Some do not care. On Saturday, a fisherman did not care, nor did he care that he was violating a City Code by entering the closed section of beach that the seals call home. Nor did he care that he was violating a Federal Law by disturbing the seals. Nor did he care that his young son was learning to ignore the law. He was informed that his actions could well lead to the harm of newborn pups so there was a reason for the law, and he still did not care. I wonder if he would care if he learned that the next morning there was an abandoned pup calling for its Mom, and two days later that pup was too weak to call, or to fight the waves as it was washed down the coast. Someone cared enough to call Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute but by then it was too late. We have a great many in this town who do care about our wildlife, and about loss. Many care enough to learn that rules and laws have a reason. But here, in this small town that is fighting desperately to hang on to its unique heritage of beaches, mountains, creeks and wildlife, laws seem not to be enough. We must all care.

Susan Mailheau Carpinteria

Our open spaces are priceless

Attention City Council members and citizens of Carpinteria: You may wonder why many of us are adamantly opposed to the hotel planned for our quaint train depot parking lot. I ask you to take a moment and sit down to study the photography in recent issues of Coastal View News and Carpinteria Magazine. You will notice in these photos that vistas abound. Then, drive north to Goleta and Pismo Beach on surface roads. Where are their views? Take note that their views are obstructed by concrete buildings and cars. Carpinteria is one of the few little coastal gems left.  When we trash it with too many “resorts” as a last resort toward gaining tax dollars, we’ve destroyed our gem. Let Carpinterians vote on this issue as it is our home and our city.

Megan Shannon Carpinteria

Submit letters online at coastalview.com

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California 20  Thursday, August 31, 2017

Halos Pitchforks

&

A read

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A read Books

A read could readersends sendsaahalo haloto toCHS Burlene forJohn making the Carpinteria Lumber- never AA reader dads Persoon, Duke Loundsbury ABrian reader sends halo the generous person paying for the yard Nursery areaaafor joybeing totovisit. “Her personality (Southern and Yamaoka rock staroutgoing helpers at thefor e-waste recycling reader’s gas when she forgot her ATM card at the gas station. “I’m A read style), friendly conversation and plant knowledge make it a pleasure event. “We couldn’t have done it without you!” chose the most expensive oil, I’d love to reimburse you, and bags a tosorry visit Iand shop.” thanksends you. I’m deeply by your A reader a halo to allmoved her friends andgenerosity.” family who participated in Aher reader sends a halo to Sean and Dayna for being neighbors and flowers.” helping drive-by 98th birthday celebration. “Thank youwonderful for all the kind words and reader sends a halo tosituation. the 93013 Fund, Uncle Chen Restaurant the reader throughAanother frazzled mom and Marybeth fortothe delivery of a delicious dinner complete with aa A reader sendsCarty a halo hersurprise dear friend Christie Cooney. “Thank you for being fortune cookie, candy bar and painted rock. “Wonderful kindness and quite a thrill!” A reader sends a halo to the anonymous person who left a $100 donation in the friend in every way; your example inspires me. You’re truly the best.” HELP of Carpinteria office mail slot this past week. “Thank you for your kindness.” A halo to toMark the staff Jack’s Bistro for staying openbeing during CoA reader reader sends sends aa halo fromofCity Market Center for always so kind vid-19. “Always a smile noDaykas matter busy. A great start the day.” A reader sends and a halo to the for always being totohelp anything and and amazing friendly with hishow customers. “Hethere isway a friend towith all of Carpinteria! never complaining. “Many thanks to the best neighbors ever. We love you all dearly.” We love you Mark.” A reader sends a halo to Mayor Wade Nomura for the city’s beautiful flower wreath at the Carpinteria Cemetery for theJohn Memorial Day program. A sends to and at Robitaille’s their constant and Areader reader sendsaahalo halo to Tami the Sealwatch volunteers for for their hard work insmiles keeping all A read over-the-top customer service. “The wedding favors were loved by all and brought ing hu the seals and new pups safe and protected from disruption and danger. reader sends a halo to Seattle those who acknowledge people with disabilities. “When lanes t aAbit of Carpinteria to the wedding!” you encounter a wheelchair withused a walker, please smile and A reader sendsaaperson halo toinhis son-in-lawor inwalking Texas, who his boy scouts training say hellohis to family thataperson.” A sends halo Lancethe Lawhon at preventing the Carpinteria Sanitation for A read toreader keep safe to during storm by the pipes in theirDistrict home from helping Market. pool. “ freezingKim’s and not losing water pressure. A reader sends a halo to the Carpinteria Beautiful lady picking up trash in a neighborhood near beach. “Thank you! We theSpot. help went we can get trash A reader sends a halo to Kassandra Quintero atallThe “When the keeping roof-top flag A the reader sends a pitchfork to need the people who around stealing cat- A read picked up inalytic the lodged neighborhoods on the beach-side of the tracks.” was twisted and in the rain gutter, Quintero jumped into action and climbed converters. “It’s very expensive and that’s not how Carpinterians teria B up to the rooftreat andeach untangled so thatfor it could wave freely. Way to show patriotism!” to five other. it Thanks nothing.” A reader sends a halo to Carpinterians who put out boxes in front of their homes a local full of surplus oranges, avocados, from their “Thank you for sharing your A reader sends a halo to Emma andetc. Justin. wastrees. a wonderful wedding, great food, A reader sends a pitchfork to “It teachers who assign so much work they abundance.”location spectacular and great people! It was moving and wonderful.” A read can’t keep up on grading. indica A reader reader sends sends aa halo halo to to Nikki all the at beach community residents. “Thank you for A HEAT Culinary. “I went to my first class thisparking weekSubmit Halos & Pitchforks online at coastalview.com. in front your home with end withofmy sister, who hasyour been permit.” to four so far. I had the best time! Someone get this A read submissions areNetwork subject to editing. girl a TV show, sheAll should be on the Food already.” right o A reader sends a halo to Diana, a caregiver at Carpinteria Senior Lodge for nearly for his three years. A reader sends a halo to the California Department of Fish andAND Wildlife and the RECORDS • POSTERS • VINYL WALL ART • CDS MORE! local vet for working diligently to save the Rincon Beach bear. “It’s a terrible shame A read NOW OPEN! STOP IN I&wouldn’t SEE WHAT’S STOCK! reader sends a halo to Tom Sweeney for going out on Avenue to lose one ofAthese magnifi cent creatures; however, want it IN toElm suffer to a an eve by the beach to clean up plastic bottles, bags, dirty gloves and masks. miserable death.” Post N

MURPHY’S MUR

A reader pitchfork toSwing the new zones. the “no parkA reader sends a halo sends to Billaand Rosana forparking spending their“All Saturday taking photos for Junior Warriors appreciate all you doneighborhood. for our families, playing/two hour”Football. signs just“We made people park in my Seventh ers and program. Youneighboring rock!” and the streets are a packed parking lot.”

VINYL SHACK

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Submit Halos & Pitchforks online at coastalview.com.

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A read morni the sp


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  7

CUSD projects reopening of high school and middle school in late March

BY EVELYN SPENCE

Carpinteria High School and Carpinteria Middle School are aiming to reopen in a hybrid learning schedule beginning after spring break, Superintendent Diana Rigby confirmed at the Carpinteria Unified School Board of trustees’ meeting on Feb. 23. All secondary schools – including CHS and CMS – can reopen for partial in-person instruction once Santa Barbara County enters the red tier and remains in that tier for five days. To qualify for the red tier, the county must see less than seven positive Covid-19 cases per 100,000 residents. As of Feb. 23, Rigby said the county is seeing 16 positive cases per 100,000 residents. “We’re making good progress,” Rigby said. “We are expecting that the county will move into the red tier mid-March. We have our spring break, and then on March 29, we hope that we will be able to open in a hybrid schedule at the middle school and the high school.” She added the administrators are in the process of discussing what hybrid schedules might look like for students returning to in-person learning at CHS and CMS.

Currently, the plan is for students to be divided into two cohorts, A and B. Cohort A will be attending in-person learning on Monday and Tuesday mornings while Cohort B will be learning over Zoom. On Thursdays and Fridays, the two cohorts will switch. Rigby clarified that the two cohorts will still be learning simultaneously. “I really hope we do open up after spring break, that we’re back in the red, that we can get our secondary students back in the classroom,” said Board member Andy Sheaffer.

Aliso principal to be reassigned, decided in closed session vote

In a closed session, Carpinteria Unified School Board voted 4-0 to reassign Dr. Michelle Fox, removing her from her position as principal of Aliso and Summerland elementary schools. Dr. Fox will be reassigned to a separate position for the 2021-2022 school year beginning June 30, 2021. Also during closed session, CUSD trustees voted unanimously not to keep on four employees currently on probation.

CVN

SCHOOL NOTES Summerland School prepares for temporary relocation to Main School campus

For the duration of the 2021-2022 school year, Summerland School’s 45 students and 8.5 staff members will temporarily relocate to the Carpinteria Main School campus. The temporary relocation, which was discussed at the March 1 City Planning Commission meeting, will allow for the demolition and reconstruction of the Summerland School campus.

Bleecker named to Biola’s Dean’s List

Carpinterian and Biola University freshman Cameron Bleecker was among the 1,800 high-achieving students named to the Biola University Dean’s List for the Fall 2020 semester. The Dean’s List honors students who have attained a semester GPA of 3.6 or higher while enrolled in 12 or more credits and whose cumulative GPA is at least 3.2.

Cate School remembers Luella Zerr

The Cate School community spent the past several weeks paying tribute to Luella Zerr since her passing on Jan. 29, with many alumni and current students reflecting on Zerr’s loving personality and profound impact in their lives and the larger Cate community. Cate School students and teachers got to know Zerr while she lived at Shepard Place Apartments in Carpinteria. Students would visit with the residents and play Bingo games together during weekly volunteer trips into town every Wednesday night. Cate School’s Director of Community Engagement Will Holmes said that each visit with Zerr was one to remember, and that she was known to Luella Zerr plays Bingo with Cate greet each Cate group with a hug. th student Maki Kobayashi (2018) at “Whether it was someone’s first or 20 time visiting Shepard, Luella made each Shepard Place Apartments. individual feel special and encouraged others to eat her freshly baked peanut butter cookies. She would often share stories of her family and friends near and far and cheer for others to win Bingo. Luella was the ultimate host,” Holmes said. Zerr left Shepard Place and moved to Santa Barbara the week after Thanksgiving in 2019 to be closer to family, and her absence was felt both around Shepard Place and during Wednesday night Bingo. Cate students stayed connected with Zerr after her move with weekly phone calls to her new residence.

Parent expresses concern regarding principal removal

Monica J. Solorzano, a parent of two children at Aliso Elementary, spoke strongly against the board’s decision not to keep Dr. Michelle Fox – principal at Aliso and Summerland elementary schools – in her position. “As an active CUSD parent, I would like to strenuously object to this course of action, and request that parents and teachers be given time to express their voices on this important matter,” Solorzano said. “(Dr. Fox) has been an exemplary advocate for students and families at Aliso and a present and always visible symbol of the school’s support for our families ... She’s responsive to parent outreach, thoughtful about issues of inclusion and always open to feedback and constructive criticism. Most importantly, the students know and trust her,” she added. “It has been a year of so much upheaval for so many of us. For our kids who have been forced to adapt to so many changes, one constant – sometimes the only constant – has been their teachers and their principal ... To shatter the consistency of our school leadership seems ill-advised and certain to only cause further challenges for CUSD families.”

Solorzano further encouraged the board to give parents the opportunity to voice their opinions on the matter. “This is the future of our children in our community, and we deserve the right to have more of a say in it,” she said.

County to set aside vaccines for schools

Beginning March 1, each county will set aside 10% of the vaccine doses for school staff, according to Rigby. “County Public Health is trying to determine what the logistics are related to the 10% of the vaccines, and who is in the school group, the childcare group, which will have priority to receive the vaccines first,” she said. “What I would like to note is that we all know the vaccine supply continues to be limited, and we were notified that the allotment of the Moderna vaccine was delayed due to severe weather conditions ... We all know currently that the vaccine supply is limited, but we are anxious to ensure that our educators and our childcare providers can be vaccines.” Editor’s note: Following the meeting, Superintendent Rigby confirmed a March 29 reopening date for CHS and CMS in an announcement to parents.

Vaccine distribution begins for TK-12 educators in SB County

Governor Newsom announced last week that beginning March 1, each county will set aside 10% of their vaccine doses for school staff. That process has begun, and during the week of March 1, public school districts, charter and private school education staff in Santa Barbara County have had access to approximately 1,100 vaccination appointments set aside by the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department in conjunction with Lompoc Valley Medical Center, according to a release from the Santa Barbara County Education Office. Individual appointments must be made upon invitation from a school district, charter or private school and are being coordinated with all public districts, charters schools and private schools in Santa Barbara County by the Santa Barbara County Education Office. Specific invitations for vaccine appointments are being distributed through the local school districts, charter and private schools this week. Due to the vaccine shortage,  the first grouping of vaccines has been allocated for those individuals serving the county’s most vulnerable students who require support that does not allow for physical distancing, are medically fragile and are often unable to wear masks. After those appointments are filled, a second round of vaccine appointments will be provided for eligible staff with significant contact with others in-person, and/or close proximity to others, and mixing across multiple stable groups and/or locations.  Each district, charter or private school will determine, for their context, which staff are included in this group. This process will continue for this week until the approximately 1,100 vaccine appointments have been scheduled. Invitations to schedule an appointment

Due to the vaccine shortage, the first grouping of vaccines has been allocated for those individuals serving the county’s most vulnerable students who require support that does not allow for physical distancing, are medically fragile and are often unable to wear masks.

will be distributed by districts, charter and private schools. Once an invitation is received, instructions on how to schedule and register will be provided. There may be information circulating that an alternate path for making appointments is by calling 2-1-1. This information is inaccurate, the release says. Vaccination plans for TK-12 education staff have not yet been announced for appointments after March 4, 5, and 6. Vaccination appointments for childcare staff and higher education employees are being handled through a separate process and more details will be released by the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department at a later date.


8  Thursday, March 4, 2021

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CoastalView.com CoastalView.com CoastalView .com CoastalView What’s new at the harbor.com seal rookery?

KARLSSON

The pandemic has reduced the number of volunteers at the overlook. Sealwatch reminds visitors to protect others by wearing a mask, staying distanced and limiting time at the viewing area when it is crowded. This report covers Feb. 22 - 28.

High Adult Count

91

Pup Count

27

27 by Sunday evening, when several visitors were treated to a birth.

Natural History Notes

Pups learn to catch shrimp and other small invertebrates as they begin weaning. They stay close to adults when young and soon learn to catch fish. Harbor seals grow so quickly that a pup is not readily distinguishable from a small adult after two or three months. Females tend to range smaller in size and weight than males: about 4 to 5 ½ feet and 110 to 330 pounds compared to 4 ½ to 6 ½ feet and 150 to 375 pounds for males. Because of the overlap in size, it’s not possible to tell the sex unless their bellies are visible.

Harbor seal protection

The federal Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits harassing or disturbing marine mammals in the wild. Disturbance refers to acts that have the potential to disturb a marine mammal in the wild by disrupting behavioral patterns, including, but not limited to, migration, breathing, nursing, breeding, feeding or sheltering. Harbor seals need rest on the beach, but they are relatively defenseless on land and flee promptly from threats. This law provides for a substantial fine or imprisonment for violations. The city of Carpinteria reinforces harbor seal protection for six months of the year; the beach closure ordinance helps avoid inadvertent disturbances by people who may not be aware of the seals.

Info

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

The Carpinteria harbor seal rookery is located immediately east of Casitas Pier, between the Carpinteria Bluffs Nature Preserve and Carpinteria State Beach. Please remember not to bring dogs, bicycles or loud voices to view the seals. Harbor seals, when disturbed, may flee and become separated from their pups. Volunteers ask that dogs remain outside the rope area at all times. Volunteers needed. Call (805) 684-2247 or email carpsealwatch@gmail.com. To find out more, visit carpinteriasealwatch.org.

THE LAY OF THE LAND MIKE WONDOLOWSKI Sometimes a problem is so huge and so far beyond our immediate control that it seems impossible to tackle. Why bother doing anything when our tiny effort can’t have any real effect? Besides, change is hard. One such problem has been in and out of the news for decades – depletion of the ozone layer. Almost 50 years ago, scientists around the world figured out that the ozone layer was being damaged by a family of “wonder chemicals” called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). These chemicals were used in all types of products from military systems to refrigerators to cans of hairspray. At first, of course, there was disagreement and disbelief by some. Then in 1985 a paper was published in the journal Nature that shocked the scientific community and the world by reporting evidence of an ozone hole over Antarctica. At ground level, ozone is a pollutant that is damaging to people’s health and is the main ingredient in smog. However, about 20 miles above the Earth in the stratosphere there is a layer of ozone that is critical to protecting our health by filtering the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Without that protection, we would be subject to increased skin cancer, cataracts and weakened immune systems. We would also see reductions in crop yields and damage to the marine food chain. So once it became clear that the ozone layer was being damaged by our actions, it was obvious this was a serious threat to people all around the world. In a remarkable demonstration of effective global cooperation, the Montreal Protocol was finalized in 1987. It is a global agreement to protect the stratospheric ozone layer by phasing out the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) including CFCs. I won’t get into the chemistry of how CFCs and other ODS react with ozone (even though it is really interesting!), but an important point is that once we reduce our emissions of these chemicals, the ozone layer will recover in about 50 years to its full natural level and continue giving us its critical protection. This recovery is measurable, and progress was being made, but then we hit a snag. Starting in 2014 there was an unexpected increase in emissions of a chemical named CFC-11, even though it had been banned since 2010 by the Montreal Protocol. Researchers determined about half of that illegal pollution was from eastern China. This increase continued until 2017. Since 2017, there has been a significant decrease in illicit CFC-11 production, most likely due to increased rigorous regulation enforcement in China and elsewhere. Now we are back on track for the ozone layer to be healthy again and the ozone hole to be closed in the next 50 years. I look at this entire story as a learning experience for the world, summarized like this: First, there was scientific understanding of a problem and its cause, which generated a global collective will to make

We don’t need to wait for more global treaties. We can take meaningful actions ourselves now to reduce our own carbon footprint. We can take direct actions such as installing solar panels, converting from gas to electric appliances, increasing vehicle fuel mileage (or going hybrid or electric) and increasing energy efficiency at home.

the necessary changes. Then action was taken that included regulation and changes to how we do things. The process put in place worked, including identification and elimination of “cheating.” At the beginning there were some who did not believe the science or said the change would be too hard or too expensive. They were wrong. We now face the nasty big brother of ozone depletion: climate change, which has potential impacts even more severe than increased UV radiation, threatening the health of nearly every human, animal and plant on Earth. Addressing climate change is the biggest challenge faced by our generation and the next. We have a scientific understanding of the problem and its cause. Now we need to work to create the collective will to make the necessary changes. We don’t need to wait for more global treaties. We can take meaningful actions ourselves now to reduce our own carbon footprint. We can take direct actions such as installing solar panels, converting from gas to electric appliances, increasing vehicle fuel mileage (or going hybrid or electric) and increasing energy efficiency at home. We can also take meaningful, less direct actions like buying local products that require minimal shipping and buying products with the least amount of disposable packaging. We can also support city, county, state and national programs for reductions in carbon emissions. Change can indeed be hard. But the solution to climate change is for everyone to make changes for ourselves. These tiny efforts summed up are the only way we can achieve the necessary global change. Mike Wondolowski is president of the Carpinteria Valley Association (CarpinteriaValleyAssociation.org), a local organization dedicated to maintaining the small beach town nature of our community. In his 30 years of involvement in planning issues, he has witnessed visionary successes, as well as decisions that were later widely regretted. When not stuck indoors, he can often be found enjoying Carpinteria’s treasures including kayaking and snorkeling along the coast, running or hiking on the bluffs or the Franklin Trail, or “vacationing” as a tent camper at the State Beach.

online. community. news.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  9

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BRIEFLY

Phyl Hansen turns 98

Continued from page 2

Former Carpinteria Middle School secretary Phyl Hansen celebrated her 98 th birthday on Saturday, Feb. 27, with a drive-by birthday party at the Carpinteria Community Church parking lot. Hansen is a familiar face for many lifelong Carpinterians and enjoyed distanced visits from friends and family on her birthday.

Jedd Hewitt joins the Epstein Partners at Keller Williams

Real Estate advisor Jedd Hewitt has joined the Epstein Partners at Keller Williams Realty. Hewitt brings a wealth of knowledge on the housing market from Carpinteria to the Santa Ynez Valley. Hewitt and his team are experienced working with clients to achieve first-time home buying, investment properties, dream homes and more. Hewitt and his wife Emlynn live in Carpinteria with their two children. Keep your eye out for Jedd as you might see him biking around Carpinteria with his family, working out at Empower Fitness and relaxing on the beach. To learn more, contact Jedd@TheEpsteinPartners.com Jedd Hewitt or (805) 850-9277.

Cancer Foundation holds annual Barbara Ireland Walk for Breast Cancer

The Carpinteria Children’s Project will host a virtual benefit on March 11.

Carpinteria Children’s Project to host All in for Carp Kids event

The Carpinteria Children’s Project invites friends and supporters to a virtual event benefitting children and families of the Carpinteria Valley. Community leaders and keynote speaker Senator Monique Limón will highlight local critical issues, efforts to support children and families and how comprehensive family support services are making a difference locally. Longtime advocate Jon Clark of the James S. Bower Foundation will be honored for his commitment to creating a systemic network of support for children in our region. Due to Covid closures, the organization was unable to collect tuition for six months. Teachers pivoted to providing emergency relief through the Carp Cares phone line, virtual lessons and support to young children in the community and frequent food distributions and delivery. Since reopening, Carpinteria Children’s Project has had a dramatic increase in the number of scholarships requested due to family hardships. Guests at the event will learn how they can support CCP’s children and programs. All in for Carp Kids will be held virtually via Zoom on March 11 from noon to 1 p.m. To RSVP call (805) 566-1600 or register online at carpchildren.org/all-in. There is no cost to attend.

Join Barbara Ireland, her family and other champions of breast cancer as they rally for the 21st Annual Barbara Ireland Walk and Run for Breast Cancer on Saturday, March 13. This year, the Barbara Ireland Walk and Run offers five virtual course options: Shamrock Shuffle - 1 Mile Walk/Run; Leprechaun Leap - 5K Walk/Run; Happy St. Paddy - 5Mile Walk/Run; Irish Jig - 10K and the Pot of Gold - 15K. All funds raised from event registration fees and pledges benefit local breast cancer research and programs at the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center at Sansum Clinic. These programs include clinical research, which provides access to cutting-edge therapies locally; genetic counseling, which provides patients with the chance to determine their genetic risk for cancer and possibly have their treatment modified as a result; and navigation, which offers patients a consistent care coordinator during their experience with breast cancer. To register, visit cfsb.org/irelandwalk2021. The registration fee is $50 for adults and includes a bandana and goody bag. The cost for children 12 and under is $20. Participants who raise $100 or more will have their registration fees waived. The team that raises the most money will have its name engraved on the Pink Ribbon Barbara Ireland Walk trophy. An award will also be given to the largest team and the Spirit Award will be given to the participant who is dressed most festively. Several new awards will be announced on Facebook and Instagram following the event: Most Creative Route; Best Quaren-team; and Social Media Influencer Award.

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#CarpCares

AN IRISH CREAM LIQUOR CARAMEL IN A DARK CHOCOLATE SHELL

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CoastalView.com

For many, this past year has been a reminder that Carpinteria has a deeply rooted culture of caring. In this 10-week series, photographer Ingrid Bostrom captures portraits of some of Carpinteria’s most compassionate citizens.

CoastalView .com

CoastalView .com

BY INGRID BOSTROM

When my mom was sick with Covid-19 in Washington State, her neighbor – also infected but with a milder case – stepped up to check on her regularly. She took breaks from her sick children and husband to ensure that my mom was breathing. She checked her oxygen levels and called an ambulance when they dropped critically low. With pandemic fatigue wearing on, I longed for new inspiration. I want to meet and highlight everyday heroes like my mom’s neighbor. I started the #carpcares portrait project as a personal way to honor the people giving back in our community. It’s a way to remember that there is selflessness, beauty and love amidst the tragedies of this past year. I asked for nominations on the Carp Swap Facebook page and through my Instagram. One of the first nominations I received was from Autumn Fiore Palm for Carly Harrod Bass and Aja Forner. Carly and Aja saw the needs of children at Canalino Elementary School for clothing items and new shoes. They created The Closet @ Canalino Facebook group to request specific donations. They receive the donations and distribute them to the children and families in need. During the pandemic, they have expanded their services, sourcing equipment to keep children active at home and providing supplies for teachers, food items and more.

Carly Harrod Bass

Know someone who is giving back in a powerful way or bringing joy to others? Send nominations to ingrid@ingridbostromphotography.com.

Aja Forner


10  Thursday, March 4, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Assessing water security vs. water marketing Should local supplies from the state aqueduct be sold outside the county?

Contract extension

BY MELINDA BURNS

It’s not long ago that Lake Cachuma, the main water source on the South Coast, was in danger of going dry in a seven-year drought. Water agencies from Carpinteria to Goleta spent millions of dollars scrambling to buy surplus state aqueduct water from around the state to avert a local shortage. They did so not only because their groundwater levels were plunging and Cachuma was failing, but because their yearly allocations from the aqueduct had dropped to zero. Yet this week, on Tuesday, March 2, the water managers serving Santa Maria, Buellton, Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Montecito and the Santa Ynez and Carpinteria valleys asked the county Board of Supervisors to grant them the right to sell their state water allocations outside the county – not permanently, but potentially for years at a stretch. “As water purveyors, we need to have the flexibility to do what we need to do,” said Joshua Haggmark, Santa Barbara water resources manager. “The county, up to now, has said we can’t sell water out of the county. If we can’t use it, we just lose it. It creates an additional financial hardship for our customer.” For Santa Barbara and Montecito, the big change since the last drought is that they are jointly paying for a $72 million desalination plant that the city built on its waterfront in 2017. With plenty of that water on hand, they don’t need so much state water for the foreseeable future. “We need to offset that cost somewhere,” Haggmark said. “This isn’t selling our state water forever; it’s leasing our allocation.” Together, the eight water agencies make up the Central Coast Water Authority, which owns and operates the pipeline from the California Aqueduct in Kern County to Lake Cachuma. Because the county, not the CCWA, holds the pipeline contract with the state Department of Water Resources – a sore point with Haggmark and other water agency managers – they have to get the county’s permission to loosen the water marketing rules. Currently under the contract, only exchanges of state water, and not outright sales, are allowed: the price is limited by the state and buyers must return the water to the sellers. South Coast water

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

Eight public water agencies from Carpinteria to Santa Maria import water from the California Aqueduct, shown here in Kern County. They want the right to sell some of their surplus state water outside Santa Barbara County. agencies are still on the hook for the extra state water they bought during the last drought. Water managers want the flexibility to sell state water in wet years because, they say, they have nowhere to store it. But a county staff report for Tuesday’s meeting advises the board not to allow sales of state water outside the county, noting that allocations from Cachuma to the South Coast and Santa Ynez Valley were severely cut during the drought of 2011 to 2018. “We’re really frustrated with the county’s position,” Haggmark said. “They don’t have any knowledge of water planning or responsibility to ratepayers.” Supervisor Das Williams, who represents eastern Santa Barbara, Montecito and the Carpinteria Valley, said the managers won’t say whom they want to sell their state water to. “The response we get is, ‘It’s none of your business,’” he said. “Is this really going to help the water supply, or could this potentially hurt it? “There is plenty of storage in Cachuma. We don’t want short-sighted decisions to be made that could lead to water being transported out of the county when we might need it here. When you are tempted to liquidate water for money, it

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puts additional stress on the groundwater basin that sometimes you cannot afford. Without the county, there’s no way to guard the interests of the whole region.” Up north, Santa Maria, the largest state water contractor in the county, has an entitlement twice as large as the South Coast’s and has long sought more flexibility in water marketing rules. During the recent drought, Santa Maria sold state water to the South Coast. Twenty-four of the 29 state water contractors in California have already approved the new water marketing rules; Santa Barbara County is one of the last holdouts. That may make it harder for CCWA members to buy extra supplies of state water in the next drought, said Shad Springer, Santa Maria’s director of utilities. “It’s not that the city has immediate plans to sell water out of the county or anywhere else,” he said. “An important aspect of this is that as these (rules) are being adopted by other water contractors, the old tools may not be available to us. There may not be a market out there where we could import additional water from the existing exchange program.” Last month, in a bid to win the Board of Supervisors’ approval, the CCWA agreed that each member would have the “first right of refusal” if another wanted to sell state water outside the county. Lavagnino said he likes that idea. “I have no beef with the CCWA,” he said. “I want to make sure that somebody else inside the county gets the offer first.”

RISDON’S

At Tuesday’s hearing, the board also considered whether to extend the county’s contract with state Water Resources for another 50 years. The current contract is set to expire in 2038, when the eight water agencies – that is, the ratepayers – will pay off their debt for the $575 million aqueduct branch to Cachuma. The CCWA favors extending the contract so that any future costs connected to the aqueduct can be spread out over decades. But the California Water Impact Network (C-WIN), and AquAlliance, two watchdog groups, are suing to stop the 50-year extension. They say that the state’s environmental review failed to consider the cost of future aqueduct-related projects for ratepayers. Over several decades, the department has considered different plans for improving the health of the fragile Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, where massive pumps divert water into the state aqueduct. Most recently, the department is proposing to build a $16 billion tunnel under the Delta to protect this critical water source from climate change and seismic threats. The C-WIN lawsuit notes that historically, the state aqueduct was built on “paper water” and has failed to reliably deliver even half of what the contractors, including Santa Maria and the South Coast agencies, are paying for. A Delta project would not provide a single drop of new aqueduct water for Santa Barbara County, said Carolee Krieger, a Montecito resident and the founder of C-WIN. “We would be vulnerable to anything the Department of Water Resources wants to build, and we would have to pay our share of it,” she said. “We don’t need to do this. By 2038, we will have paid off the pipeline, and we’re entitled to the water we’ve paid for, indefinitely. There is no new water in the system.” The CCWA has voted to opt out of the Delta project, but Krieger is not convinced: the project itself has not been approved yet. “What if they change their mind?” she asked. Melinda Burns volunteers as a freelance journalist in Santa Barbara as a community service; she offers her news reports to multiple local publications, at the same time, for free.

See related story on page 11

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Thursday, March 4, 2021  11

Deputies recover two stolen vehicles and arrest seven suspects

On Tuesday, March 2, Sheriff’s deputies arrested seven suspects at two locations for a string of theft related crimes in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara and Goleta. At approximately 6:30 a.m. on March 2, deputies responded to a report of a suspicious vehicle in the area of La Meza Plaza and Santa Rosa Lane in Carpinteria. When they arrived, they contacted 23-year-old Jason Orth of Carpinteria near the vehicle that was not registered to him. Deputies in the Santa Barbara area checked with the registered owner in the 5300 block of Traci Drive and found that the vehicle had been stolen, but not yet reported. Orth was arrested for possession of controlled substance (misdemeanor), possession of stolen property (misdemeanor), vehicle theft (felony) and three warrants violations of probation. Deputies in Carpinteria connected Orth to a hotel in the 5200 block of Calle Real and responded there for follow-up where they contacted six additional suspects. During that contact, deputies found hundreds of dollars’ worth of stolen items including mail, luggage, bicycles, tools and electronics. Deputies arrested all six suspects at the hotel, and they are identified as: 28-year-old Jaclynn

VILLA DEL MAR CONDO

Tyler Adams, left, and Jaclynn Blackwell, both of Carpinteria, were among the seven arrested for a string of theft related crimes. Blackwell of Carpinteria; 25-year-old Corey Thomas of Lompoc; 30-year-old Luisa Urive of Santa Barbara; 32-yearold Alissa Diessner of Santa Barbara; 22-year-old Tyler Adams of Carpinteria; and 31-year-old Edgar Beltran of Long Beach. All six were transported to the Santa Barbara County Southern Branch Jail and booked for possession of stolen property (felony), conspiracy (felony), possession of drug paraphernalia (misdemeanor), and possession of a controlled substance (misdemeanor). Thomas and Adams were booked for the additional charge of possession of a narcotic controlled substance (misdemeanor).

Supervisors delay a decision on how and where surplus water can be sold The Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to approve an extension of the county’s state water contract for 50 years, saying it would ultimately save ratepayers money. “The ability to stretch costs over time is a real benefit,” said Supervisor Gregg Hart, who represents the Goleta Valley and western Santa Barbara. Eight water agencies in Santa Barbara County, from the Carpinteria Valley to the city of Santa Maria, presently import water through the California Aqueduct. By 2035, their ratepayers will have paid off the $575 million construction debt for the pipeline that county voters approved in 1991 on the heels of a six-year drought; it extends from the aqueduct in Kern County to Lake Cachuma. But reconstruction and maintenance of the aqueduct system itself costs the state Department of Water Resources $350 million per year, and those costs will inevitably continue past 2035, Ray Stokes, executive director of the Central Coast Water Authority (CCWA), representing the eight agencies, told the board. The share of those costs for Santa Barbara County ratepayers after 2035 will likely be only about 1%, Stokes said. Board Chairman Bob Nelson, who represents Lompoc and Orcutt, cast the sole vote against the 50-year extension. “It was not worth it to me to subject county taxpayers to that risk on their behalf,” he said after the hearing. “The county is the backstop for liability. What is the potential blank check that we’re giving the state?” Carolee Krieger, a Montecito resident and the founder of the California Water Impact Network, a watchdog group, told the board that a contract extension would pave the way for the Department of Water Resources to impose billions of dollars in new debt for “unwanted infrastructure” on state water contractors – including the cost of a proposed $16 billion tunnel

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County extends state water contract to 2085 BY MELINDA BURNS

SALE PENDING

through the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. C-WIN has sued the state to stop the contract extension. Also, on Tuesday, the board postponed a decision on whether to allow temporary sales of surplus state water outside the county, pending further negotiations with the CCWA. Currently, the water can be leased but not sold outright. To date, with the exception of Santa Maria, the water agencies in this county have been buyers, not sellers of supplemental state water. Supervisor Das Williams, who represents the South Coast from eastern Santa Barbara to Carpinteria, asked whether Santa Maria planned to sell water to developers in Nipomo, just across the county line, a move he suggested would increase urban sprawl and exacerbate the county’s jobs-housing imbalance. Nelson said the city was required to sell water every year to Nipomo under a groundwater basin court settlement: both communities share the same basin. Nipomo developers have approached the city in the past, looking to buy state water supplies, but no such deal has been made yet. In an interview after the hearing, Nelson said that Santa Maria, the largest importer of state water in the county, has sometimes refused to supply water to new development in Orcutt unless the property is annexed to the city. If Santa Maria now wants something from the county, Nelson said, it should stop stifling growth in unincorporated areas. “They’re happy for us to continue to be their bedroom community,” Nelson said. “I’d appreciate it if they were a better neighbor.” At Tuesday’s hearing, Joshua Haggmark, Santa Barbara’s acting Public Works director, told the board that his city wants the right to sell state water outside the county not for development, but to help other agencies replenish their

See WATER CONTRACT continued on page 22

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Deputies loaded the stolen property into a patrol truck and are in the process of identifying to whom the recovered items belong.

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Later in the day at approximately 12:30 p.m., deputies responded to Kingston Avenue in Goleta after a vehicle was reported stolen. Two hours later, deputies located the stolen vehicle in the area of Princeton and Somerset in Goleta, not far from the hotel. Deputies located items in the stolen vehicle that linked the cases to the previous calls and suspects. All suspects were released without bail pursuant to the local court’s extension of Emergency Rule 4, which sets bail for all misdemeanor and low-level offenses at $0 for the duration of the statewide Covid-19 state of emergency. Deputies are combing through the recovered stolen property to identify the owners/victims. If you have any information about these suspects, contact the Carpinteria Sheriff’s Office at (805) 568-3399.

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12  Thursday, March 4, 2021 Spotlight on Carpinteria photographers

In this weekly series, local photographers share their recent work and inspiration with CVN readers.

View from above

PHOTOS BY BJOERN FREIHERR In between late January’s rain showers, I was able to use my drone to capture Carpinteria. From above, the organization of Carpinteria’s city center takes shape. Roadways, schools and neighborhoods appear as geometric forms and grid-like designs. Can you tell where these photos were taken? To find the answer and see more of Freiherr’s drone photography, visit coastalview.com.

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  13


14  Thursday, March 4, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Open for Business BY ODESSA STORK

The heart of Carpinteria is in its local and family-owned businesses, but it’s also in the strength and giving spirit of the community. As we approach the one-year mark of the Covid-19 pandemic, local businesses are in need of community support. Each week, CVN will highlight a selection of local restaurants, mom and pop shops and more. Follow along for up-to-date information on the businesses around town and the services they offer.

Carpinteria Eye Care

Owners Nathan and Whitney Noll took over the store in 2015 after several generations of Nolls before them.

Pacific Health Foods

Pacific Health Foods has perfected the art of fresh, healthy and tasty eats, making it easier than ever to do right by your body and your taste buds. Get energized with a smoothie, juice or acai bowl, or make it a lunch with one of their made-to-order salads, sandwiches or fresh baked desserts. All the menu and grocery items at Pacific Health Foods are crafted from clean, organic ingredients. In addition to in-store shopping and pickup at 944 Linden Ave., Pacific Health Foods is currently offering home deliveries with a $50 minimum. The store is open on Monday to Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and the juice bar closes at 6 p.m. Call (805) 6842115 to learn more or visit their website at pacifichealthfoods.com.

Carpinteria Eye Care provides eye exams, contact lens exams, LASIK and cataract evaluations as well as a wide range of high-quality eyeglass frames and designer sunglasses. The team takes a patient-centered approach in finding unique solutions for each customer, whether you’re looking to take care of your eyesight or simply stay in style. Father and son duo Dr. Steven R. Kleen and Dr. Steven M. Kleen bring generations of experience and expertise to the business. Carpinteria Eye Care is located at 1013 Casitas Pass Road. and is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call (805) 566-0306 to learn more.

Eye of the Day Garden Design Center

Dr. Steven M. Kleen is an optometrist at Carpinteria Eye Care along with his father, Dr. Steven R. Kleen.

With all the time spent indoors, now is a great time for home improvement, and a piece from Eye of the Day will ensure that your patio, backyard or garden looks elegant and refreshed. Eye of the Day holds the largest inventory of fine European garden design décor in the country, including a wide selection of Italian terracotta pottery, French Anduze pottery and Greek terracotta planters. In addition to pottery, the garden design center also offers planters, fountains, accessories and more. Eye of the Day will be open every day until April 2 for their 23rd annual Getting Ready for Spring sale at 4620 Carpinteria Ave. All sales will take place outdoors, and guests looking to shop the indoor store must make an appointment at least 24 hours in advance. Sale hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Call (805) 5666500 to book your appointment or learn more.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  15

Jill Marie and Jean Michel Carre own Chocolats Du Calibressan.

Chocolats Du Calibressan

With his extensive experience and creative culinary skills, it’s no surprise that Chocolats Du Calibressan owner Jean-Michel Carre is known as the French chocolatier of the American Riviera. The shop is a chocolate lover’s delight, serving up bon bons, soft caramels, French truffles and even custom chocolates. Carre’s most recent creation, a Saint Patrick’s Day inspired treat, is an Irish cream liquor caramel in a dark chocolate shell. Visit 4193 Carpinteria Ave. #4 to see what all the buzz is about, or shop online for gift boxes, party favors and more at chococalibressan.com. Chocolats Du Calibressan is open on Monday to Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call (805) 684-6900 to learn more.

KARLSSON

Doralee Jacobson owns Jack’s Bistro & Famous Bagels.

Jack’s Bistro & Famous Bagels

There’s not much that a good bagel can’t fix. Putting a California twist on classic breakfast and brunch, Jack’s Bistro & Famous Bagels is open for pickup and in-person dining at their outdoor patio. Prefer to stay in? Enjoy delivery service straight to your door Monday through Friday and choose from their selection of omelets, breakfast burritos, burgers, signature bagels and more. Best of all, the breakfast menu is served all day long. Jack’s is open from 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. seven days a week and is located at 5050 Carpinteria Ave. #2047. Call in your order at (805) 566-1558 and browse the full menu at bagelnet.com.

AUTHORIZED CONCESSIONER TO THE

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Channel Islands National Park

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Lemos Feed & Pet Supply was founded by Mike Lemos over 40 years ago, and today the store is known all across the Central Coast for its friendly, family atmosphere. Offering food, supplies, bedding, toys, treats and more for every pet, Lemos is a one-stop shop for picky pet parents, and its friendly staff members are always happy to help. Self-service dog washing and grooming services are also available onsite. Lemos is located at 4945 Carpinteria Ave. The store is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Call (805)-566-9700 to learn more.

PH

Lemos Feed & Pet Supply

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Lemos Assistant Manager Michael Gossett thanked the Carpinteria community for the ongoing support amid the pandemic.

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CVN

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We Are Proud Supporters of Warrior Athletics Locally Owned. Lic. # 375514

Warrior student-athletes Hugo Alvarado, Eduardo Vences and Kate Cooney were the first to break a yearlong stretch of athletic inactivity for the CHS Warriors. They completed a three-mile course at this weekend’s Citrus Coast League cross country time trials.

Warriors return to action in a monumental team effort Saturday, Feb. 27, marked a milestone in the Warriors’ return to athletic competition. Carpinteria High School studentathletes broke an almost year-long streak of Covid-related inactivity when they competed at the Citrus Coast League cross country time trials at the Fillmore Farm. The opportunity to represent CHS on the course went from impossible to possible within a matter of hours on Saturday. In a positive and professional showing of support, administrators and coaches came together and ensured that every aspect of the day ran smoothly for the student athletes. At 9:45 a.m. on Saturday morning, Ventura County Public Health granted Carpinteria High School permission to cross counties, something previously not allowed due to Covid restrictions, and participate in the time trials at Fillmore.

Between then and the start of the race at 1:50 p.m., many hands worked quickly behind the scenes enabling the runners to take their marks at the start of the course. CHS Principal Gerardo Cornejo, Athletic Director Pat Cooney and CHS athletics staff across the board all worked together to gain permission from all parties both at home and away, secure travel arrangements for the students, distribute uniforms and collaborate with Fillmore administration to ensure that every logistical detail of the event was coordinated. Before long, the Warriors were off, and athletes Hugo Alvarado, Eduardo Vences and Kate Cooney set foot on the course for the first time since March 13, 2020. All teams were scheduled to race at different race time slots, and ran in wave starts instead of competing head to head. Overall times were combined after

all individual teams competed, and due to short notice, only a handful of student athletes were able to compete. Kate Cooney came in eighth place at 26:10; Eduardo Vences came in 10th at 20:16; and Hugo Alvarado came in 15th at 21:29. “It was both exciting and emotional to see our kids competing and enjoying Kate Cooney came in eighth place overall at themselves after al26:10. most a full year away More action is soon to follow as CHS from competition,” said CHS cross country coach Angel Silva. “The cross is now cleared to resume inter-team country gods were on our side on Sat- competitions and outdoor high-contact sports, football and water polo. urday morning.”

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Hugo Alvarado turns a corner, followed by Eduardo Vences.

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  17

Walking for good health

CVN

WELLNESS WARRIOR LEAH HARDING Have you heard the recommendation that we need 10,000 steps a day for good health? Guess what? Just like the eight cups of water a day recommendation, it was made up! In fact, not only was it made up, but it was also a marketing ploy from a 1965 Japanese pedometer. The company name was Manpo-Kei which translates to “10,000 steps meter.” Since it was the first of its kind, the number stuck. Lucky for us, there are researchers out there who like to look at things like longevity and step correlation to see what the data actually says. A 2019 study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association looked to see if 10,000 steps really is the magic number. It was conducted over four years with 16,741 women aged 62 to 101, with an average age of 72. Here are the main points:

• Sedentary women averaged 2,700 steps a day • Mortality rate significantly decreased for women who averaged 4,400 steps per day • Mortality rates continued to decrease the more steps women averaged per day • Mortality rates leveled off for women who had steps averaging over 7,500 per day.

While this study was particular to older women and mortality and did not look at steps and weight loss, I still recommend most of my clients get at least 10,000 steps a day. You may be thinking, “Leah, you just said the data states anything over 7,500 doesn’t decrease mortality rates.” Great job paying attention! I still recommend 10,000 steps though, because getting that many steps means you are more active than not. Being more active will not only keep you healthier, but it will also help you get closer to your goals, which most often involves weight loss or getting “leaner.” Moving more, even at a slow pace, will burn more calories than just sitting on the couch. If you don’t have a fitness tracker, 10,000 steps can be hard to hit every day without focusing at least a bit of time and energy on it. To put it in simpler terms, 10,000 steps is the equivalent of walking about five miles. Fitness trackers are getting cheaper and better each year and are a helpful tool in the road to fitness. If you’re not ready

well. Which tracker is best depends on which features you’re looking to have. I think the Apple watch is much more of a watch or mini phone than a fitness tracker. The Fitbit is easy and can go high or low tech, although the software algorithms are not as accurate as a Garmin, Oura or Whoop. There are many more styles and types of trackers out there, of course. The last thing to consider when you start upping your walking is good old recovery. “From walking?!” you say. Yup. Even walking might be too much for some people. If you’re going from 1,000 steps a day to 10,000, it will be extremely new and taxing for your body. So, start small when upping your steps and shoot for an increase of about 1,000 steps per week. That means some days you may do 4,000 or 8,000 and some days you may still do 1,000. Overall, just keep walking to get a boost of health! Remember though, too much of a good thing can be bad. If you are walking more than 10-12,000 steps a day, plus a workout, that might be too much. Happy walking!

The author and her best fourlegged friend Kuma get their 10,000 daily steps in.

Leah Harding is a nutrition coach and mobile personal trainer. She specializes in helping people see food as an ally to reach their goals, both in and out of the gym. She previously worked out of Rincon Fitness and owned CrossFit Carpinteria/Foxwing Fitness. Contact her at leah@foxwingfitness.com with questions or with ideas for future wellness articles.

to commit to a smart tracker like Fitbit, a simple $15 pedometer from Amazon will do the trick just fine. If you have a phone and carry it around often, there are apps that can give you a good estimate of where your steps are. I have owned four Fitbits, an Apple watch and I now have an Oura ring as

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OFFER VALID THROUGH 6/30/21 ONLY AT 4610 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA. Coupon not available with 3rd party vendors or delivery (or delivery partners). Delivery prices may be higher than in restaurant. Tax not included. One coupon per customer per visit. Limit one discount per coupon. Original coupon must be presented and surrendered at time of order. Not valid with any other offer, discount, or combo. Price may vary. Cash value 1/100 of 1 cent. Not for resale. © 2021 Carl’s Jr. Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved.

To our lifelong patrons, friends and family:

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The Palms misses each and everyone offriends you. While have andwe family: not reopened, due to our unique operation, we are still alive The well. PalmsWe misses and our everyone of you. While we have and will each continue tradition, offering quality not reopened, to our operation, we are still alive food for value, due as soon as itunique is safe for you and our employand Hope well. you Weare willallcontinue our tradition, offering quality ees. well. ~Stay safe, Bill & Tod Bennett

food for value, as soon as it is safe for you and our employees. Hope you are all well. ~Stay safe, Bill & Tod Bennett


18  Thursday, March 4, 2021

Public Notices ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as RESTORATION PHYSICAL THERAPY at 809 W. PEDREGOSA ST, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101, (mailing address: P.O. BOX 2030, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93120) Full name of registrant(s): GRACE LYNN HARTELL at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 1/14/2021. The registrant began transacting business on 1/01/2006. Signed: GRACE LYNN HARTELL. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000109. Publish: Feb. 11, 18, 25, March, 4, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as 3 SISTERS PARTNERSHIP at 4488 FOOTHILL RD, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013, Full name of registrant(s): (1) JEANETTE O DE LUCA at 414 ARDEN AVE, BUELLTON, CA 93427 (2) GEORGINA M OCCHIPINTITOLEDO, at 48 MOUNTAIN VIEW ST . OAKVIEW, CA 93022 (3) JOANNA OCCHIPINTI at 1210 CARLSBAD PLACE, VENTURA, CA 93003. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. This statement was filed with the County 2/05/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Feb. 01, 2021. Signed: JEANETTE DE LUCA, GENERAL PARTNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000347.

this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000262. Publish: Feb. 18, 25, March 4, 11, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SBTIMING at 4534B AUHAY DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110. Full name of registrant(s): PAUL J WILLIAMS at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/23/2021. The registrant began transacting business on 2/25/2021. Signed: PAUL WILLIAMS In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000501. Publish: Feb. 25, March 4, 11, 18, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as GRAY CAT FRAME SHOP at 410 PALM AVENUE #B9, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): MICHAEL J VAN OSTERHOUDT at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/18/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: MICHAEL VAN OSTERHOUDT. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000446.

Publish: Feb. 11, 18, 25, March, 4, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as ON THE BOOKS TRAVEL & CONSULTING SERVICES at 6353 LAGUNITAS CT, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): MICHELLE S MCMAHON at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/03/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: MICHELLE S MCMAHON. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000305.

Publish: Feb. 25, March 4, 11, 18, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as TRAVELING PANTS at 929 LINDEN AVE, SUITE E, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): (1) STEVEN M SOLANO (2) SUSAN E SOLANO at 116 GERARD DR, GOLETA, CA 93117. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. This statement was filed with the County 2/25/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Sept 01, 2016. Signed: SUSAN E SOLANO. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000527.

Publish: Feb. 18, 25, March 4, 11, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as OLD COAST PROPERTY MANAGEMENT INC at 1811 STATE STREET, SUITE H, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): OLD COAST PROPERTY MANAGEMENT INC at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 1/29/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: ARNULFO GONZALEZ In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify

Publish: March 4, 11, 18, 25, 2021 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as VAN BUREN ELECTRIC at 6794 RINCON ROAD, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): KEVIN V. CLARK at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 2/23/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Jan 01, 2001. Signed: KEVIN V. CLARK. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0000500. Publish: March 4, 11, 18, 25, 2021 _________________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF GREGORY THOMAS DAVIES JR. AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NO. 20CV03748 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Gregory Thomas Davies Jr. filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: GREGORY THOMAS DAVIES JR. Proposed name: TRUMAN THOMAS DAVIES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING April 12, 2021 at 10:00 am, Dept: 5, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Carpinteria-Summerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated February 25, 2021 by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. FILED BY the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 02/25/2021. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Spann, Elizabeth, Deputy Clerk.

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Field Engineering Technician I $5,619-$7,582/MO DOQ The District is seeking an individual to perform routine engineering office and field work. Responsibilities include, collection of data and information through reconnaissance and monitoring, compiling and storing data for use with data management systems and assisting the Engineering Department with field tasks. This is a technical, subprofessional level class that will perform tasks of an engineering nature related to the monitoring and management, of the District’s water resources and infrastructure Education: Four-year degree from an accredited university is preferred. Computer skills including AutoCAD, word processing, spreadsheets, graphics and databases are a plus. Successful candidate shall have the ability to obtain Water Treatment and Water Distribution Operators Certification Grade T1 & D2 within 2 years of employment. Application period ends March 19, 2021. Applications may only be obtained online at: www.cvwd.net

Email completed application and resume to: norma@cvwd.net

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You may call 805-684-2816 to request an application be mailed to you.

Publish: March 4, 11, 18, 25, 2021 COASTAL VIEW NEWS DOES NOT KNOWINGLY ACCEPT advertising which is deceptive, fraudulent, or which might otherwise violate the law or accepted standards of taste. However, this publication does no66t warrant or guarantee the accuracy of any advertisement, nor the quality of the goods and services advertised. Readers are cautioned to thoroughly investigate all claims made in any advertisements, and to use good judgment and reasonable care, particularly when dealing with the persons unknown to you who ask for money in advance of delivery of the goods or services advertised.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Thinking about installing a new shower? American Standard makes it easy. Free design consult.1-888-674-3005 today to see how to save $1,000 on installation or visit www.newshowerdeal.com/display HughesNet Satellite Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-863-4478 GENERAC Standby Generators. The weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. Free 7-year extended warranty ($695 value!) Schedule Free in-home assessment. 1-844-3348353 special financing if qualified. AT&T Internet. Starting at $40/month w/12-mo agmt. 1 TB of data/mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1-888-796-8850 Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, most advanced debris-blocking protection. Schedule free estimate. 15% off Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-855-995-2490 Dental insurance - Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance - not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1-888623-3036 www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 Directv Now. No Satellite. $40/mo 65 Channels. Stream news, live events, sports & on demand titles. No contract/ commitment. 1-866-825-6523 Attention oxygen therapy users! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. Free info kit. Call 877-929-9587 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21.1-833-872-2545 New authors wanted! Page Publishing will help self-publish your book. Free author submission kit! Limited offer! 866-951-7214 2/25/2021 Cars/trucks wanted!!! 2002 and newer! Any condition. Running or not. Competitive offer! Free towing! We’re nationwide! Call now: 1-888-416-2330.

Please note: You will not be able to obtain or return applications in person. CVWD 1301 Santa Ynez Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 E.O.E.

Purchase Robin Karlsson's

dogs OF CARPINTERIA

at Tidepools 619 Linden or Animal Medical Clinic 1037 Casitas Pass on sale now @ Tidepools 619 Linden Avenue and @ the Seal Fountain during Farmers Market

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888445-5928 Hablamos Espanol Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 Cash for cars: We buy any condition vehicle, 2002 and newer. Nationwide free pick up! Call now: 1-800-864-5960. The Association of Community Publishers (ACP) is searching for an Executive Director. If interested, visit afcp.org or ifpa. com and click on the “Executive Director Search” link for more details. Attention: If you or a loved one worked around the pesticide Roundup (glyphosate) for at least 2 years & has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, you may be entitled to compensation. 855-341-5793 Life Alert. One press of a button sends help fast 24/7! At home and on the go. Mobile Pendant with GPS. Free first aid kit (with subscription.) 877-537-8817 Hearing aids! Bogo free! High-quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45day money back guarantee! 833-669-5806 The Generac PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1-855-270-3785 Thinking about installing a new shower? American Standard makes it easy. Free design consult.1-888-674-3005 today to see how to save $1,000 on installation or visit www.newshowerdeal.com/display HughesNet Satellite Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-863-4478 GENERAC Standby Generators. The weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. Free 7-year extended warranty ($695 value!) Schedule Free in-home assessment. 1-844-3348353 special financing if qualified. AT&T Internet. Starting at $40/month w/12mo agmt. 1 TB of data/mo. Ask how to

bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1-888-796-8850 Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, most advanced debris-blocking protection. Schedule free estimate. 15% off Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-855-995-2490 Dental insurance - Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance - not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1-888-623-3036 www.dental50plus. com/58 #6258 Directv Now. No Satellite. $40/mo 65 Channels. Stream news, live events, sports & on demand titles. No contract/ commitment. 1-866-825-6523 Attention oxygen therapy users! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. Free info kit. Call 877-929-9587 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21.1-833-872-2545 New authors wanted! Page Publishing will help self-publish your book. Free author submission kit! Limited offer! 866-951-7214 Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.


Thursday, March 4, 2021 n 19

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What is normal?

CVN

MAN ON THE STREET LARRY NIMMER Larry’s comment: People with egos that get hurt.

Nature. - Jean Rogers-O’Reilly

Apple pie. - Helen Scott

Seeing Jack at Courtside. - Dean Drabin

Playing tickle bug with my 4-year-old granddaughter. - Karen Andrea Poulter

98.6.

- Jeff Warner


20  Thursday, March 4, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

COMMANDER’S RECAP

Reports from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office

The Commander’s Recap was not available at press time on Wednesday, March 3.

2021

Honor Roll

The Abe Family John & Nell Able Cliff & Gayle Adams Glenn & Valerie Alger David & Susan Allen Hank & Pat Arellanes Andy & Carol Bailard Jim & Jean Bailard Kevin & Donna Baird Alterio A-G Banks Virginia Barrison Marianne Bartholomew Melinda Bendel Jane Benefield Don & Vera Bensen David & Barbara Bloedel Christie & Jeff Boyd Sue Boynton John & Arida Brand Kathy & Robert Brooks Carol Bury Sally Ann Camp Jim & Valerie Campos Lois Capps The Caratan Family Carpinteria Beautiful Carpinteria Cotton Co. Carpinteria Seal Watch Carpinteria Valley Association Anna & Gary Carrillo Pamela Christian Jeff & Gayle Clay Tim & Janey Cohen Jim & Jolene Colomy Jim & Mary Ann Colson James Conger Bruce & Judi Conroy Berlyn Cota Norman & Mary Cota Grant Cox Enterprises, Inc. Greenleaf Landscapes Tarpitz Gardening Jane Craven Frank & Sandy Crowe Fran & Roger Davis Cullen & Dottie Deck Ellen & Rob Denholtz Betsy Denison The DiRado Family Melissa Doyle Glenn & Kathy Dubock Peter Dugré & Lea Boyd Paul Dunham Sally & Terry Eagle Gaby and Selden Edwards Marsha Ehlers Rae & Dan Emmett The Enlow Family Lynda Fairly The Faoro Family Sherrie Fisher Paul & Mary Foley Clyde & Diana Freeman 805-886-0228

skimberlin@aol.com

on the back page This week’s listings

Coastal

Lic. #00623395

Expires 6/30/20

CAR PIN TER IA

Vol. 26, No. 36

May 28 - June

3, 2020

Parents share pandemic stories

9

Carpinteria re-opens (partially)

CARPINTERIA

24, word afternoon, May ria On Sunday through Carpinte spread quickly Mexican Restaura nt ’s that Delgado table service. its doors for d had opened a Smith celebrate Waitress Samanth letter to the a thank you the news with locals and and before long n to chile community, were tucking-i good visitors alike s just like the g verde and margarita distancin social eit with to old days—alb s of safety factors and an awarenes foreseeable future. for the mind in keep 3. More on page

Cemetery holds Memorial Dayy ceremon

MAGAZINE WINTER 2021

Livin g Artfu l Loft HOUG

RE COFF EE CULTU

Unav erag e

Joes

GTON ACE RIVIN s

Goo d Jean

Call Today: 805-683-3636

E bi-lingual FREVIP Concierge

+

Customer Service

www.stevensinsurance.com 3412 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

On the first Thursday of each month, CVN publishes the Honor Roll to thank readers and advertisers for their generous support. For the past ten years, this support has played a critical role in keeping CVN in the stands each week and full of local news that cannot be found in any other media. The outpouring of support inspired by the Honor Roll has established a deeper connection between the newspaper and its readers. Additionally, the hundreds of names that appear in the Honor Roll send a message to advertisers—Carpinterians are dedicated to their local newspaper. In turn, the staff of CVN is dedicated to its readers. As the publishers of your community newspaper, we appreciate the relationship we have with you, our readers, and we pledge to keep bringing you all the news of the Carpinteria Valley. Dr. Suzanne Savoy Wally & Janice Schilling Nancy & Wayne Schoenfeld Stan & Terry Scrivner Bob & Shanon Sedivy Arlene & Jack Sega Marty Selfridge Megan Shannon The Skenderians Annie Sly Barbara & Sanderson Smith Bob & Marcy Smith Brad & Barbara Smith Christine Sobell John & Marge Soper The Sprigg Family Kim Stackpole & Ken Gluck Terry Stain Steve Starkey & Olivia Erschen Gordon & Barb Statler Brad & Carla Stein Greg & Kate Stewart Cherry Stockton Bob & Kathi Stokes Fred & Shirley Strickler Tom & Brenda Sullivan Eric & Jane Swain Jim & Donna Swinford Thario’s Kitchen Ted & Mary Anne Theilmann Dorothy Thielges Bob & Chris Thompson Diana & Don Thorn Kevin & Teresa Till John Tilton Elise Unruh Robert & Elizabeth Van Eyck Harry & Michele Van Wingerden Joe & Alice Vazquez Nancy E. Warner Jerry & Brenda Watkins Tom & Mary Watts Dick Weinberg & Family Alan Weiss & Cheryl Smith Janet Westlund Tyson & Betty Willson Mike & Diane Wondolowski Donna Zehrung Mary & Paul Zeoli Dr. & Mrs. D. Ziehl

___$50

___$100

___Other

 Check  Visa/MC #________________________________ exp____ sec____

11

Community rallies for seniors

IC IAKE PA TR HTON CLAR

P Individual/Family Plans P Medicare Supplements P Covered California

John & Christine Frontado Stan & Ellen Froyd Gene & Dee Funkhouser Ann Garcia Kaydance & Kenzington Gardner Gaynor Ranch Roberta Germanetti Jeremy & Calla Gold David & Annie Goodfield Bill & Sharon Green Lisa Guravitz & Fred Shaw Karen & Donald Guthrie Kellie & Bonnie Hammett Jim & Jennifer McIntosh Louise Hansen & Jim Reginato Amanda McIntyre K & M Hanson Carlena McKnerney Nancy Haviland Chuck & Dolores McQuary Dottie Hawkins Greta Meaney Bill Hazen Sharon & Craig Meister In Memory of Bob Henry Tom & Laurie Merryman Kathy Henry David Meyer & Shen Rajan Reggie Hepp Norma Migliazza Lynda Hershey Bradley & Emily Miles Donette Hicks Carrie Miles Hilltop Flowers, Inc. Dave & Louise Moore Suzi Hopkins Terry & Dianne Moore Virgil & Lee Huelskamp Pat Moorhouse Diane M. Huerta Andrea & Bruce Morden John & Linda Hurley Judy Mulford Nancy Hussey Peter & Ann Mullins Robbie & Ed Hutto Richard Nelson Kim Ishida Andy & Yvonne Neumann Patricia Jersin Langdon & Linda Nevens Donna & Bob Jordan Anh & Ha Ngo Gary & Marge Kelly Peter & Carol Nichols Carroll Ketchpel F. Virginia Nickelsen Richard & Chicki Kitagawa Nola Treloar Nicklin Alan & Carol Koch Weldon & Ann Nomura Jim & Roz Kohute Michael & Lori Noricks Craig & Denise Kono Becki & Doug Norton Carla Kroman & Mr. Peach Lisa O’Reilly Ron Lafrican & Luzzie Hernandez Julia Occhipinti Anonymous Peggy Oki - Origami Whales Project Las Palmalitas Ranch Rick & Trudy Olmstead Laughing Buddha Jose & Irene Ornelas Roberta & George Lehtinen Alonzo & Amy Marie Orozco Fred & Donna Lemere Barbara J. Orth Jon & Sue Lewis May R. Osher Patricia Lieberknecht Lou & Susie Panizzon The Lou Grant Parent-Child Workshop Marty & Nan Panizzon Paula J. Lund Gail & John Persoon The Luthard Family The Piltz Family Sara Lyons Elizabeth Pomeroy Wendy & Tim MacMurray Stan & Mary Pottkotter Charlene Maltzman Ted Rhodes & Joan Pascal Mrs. Sharon Manges Elizabeth Risdon Peter & Elizabeth Mann Marilou Rivera Harry & Patricia Manuras Greg & Laura Roinson Rosa Markolf Tim & Beata Rose Jacquie Martin Elizabeth Ross Bill & Ann Matson Steve & Susan Ruthven Mariko Matsuyama Saito Family Marianne & Kevin McCarthy Theodore Sampson & Berdee Sampson - RIP Barbara McCurry

Attached is ___$25

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View News

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 YES! I want to support my free community newspaper.

BER LIN SHIR LEYingKIM I list turns to SOLD! Everyth

Health Insurance Enrollment

16

NAME_______________________________________________ PHONE _______________ ADDRESS_____________________________________________________________

Lemonade ts stand benefiity commun

17

HONOR ROLL LISTING __________________________________________________

Please mail to 4180 Via Real, Suite F, Carpinteria, CA 93013 • (805) 684-4428


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, March 4, 2021  21

CVN

THROWBACK

THURSDAY

Editor’s note: This nugget of Carpinteria history was originally published in the Summer 2016 edition of Carpinteria Magazine.

A city of two tales

In 1930, Carpinteria High School published a yearbook called the Chismahoo. The thin collection of black and white images showcasing the little school’s staff and student body contained a romantic tale entitled “The Legend of the Chismahoo.” Beneath the legend is the author’s name, Marjorie Lewis, class of 1930. Seemingly concocted in Lewis’ imagination to elicit drama and excitement around the school’s Warrior mascot, the “legend” inserts characters the likes of a dime store Western into a Romeo and Juliet-style tragedy. But teepees, warring tribes, braves, and maidens are the stuff of the Plains Indians, not the Chumash people native to Carpinteria. The inspiration for Lewis’ romantic tale, in which a fallen warrior leaps from Chismahoo mountain to be reunited with his love, is now long lost, but the tale has been reprinted in several CHS yearbooks and retold on the athletic fields. Its roots in local lore stretch 85 years deep. According to Julie Tumamait, who is dedicated to preserving the history of the Chumash, the Chumash do have a legend of Chismahoo, better known as the Legend of the Rainbow Bridge. It is their creation story, a richly colorful explanation for how the people came to be. A focal point of the legend is Chismahoo Mountain, or Tzchimoos in the Chumash language. Tumamait retold the story to Carpinteria Magazine.

The Legend of Tzchimoos

Hutash, the mother earth, planted seeds in the soil of a large island that later became the individual Channel Islands. She waited and soon enough people began to sprout from the earth. The earth mother provided the people with all the resources they needed to thrive—plants, animals, and water. Hutash’s husband, Sky Snake, who was the Milky Way, shot down a lightning bolt in order to give the people fire for warmth and cooking. Having all their needs met, the people multiplied and eventually the island became too crowded. Hutash decided she would build a bridge so that the island people could cross to the mainland, which was empty of people, and spread out comfortably. She created a rainbow that stretched from the island to a high mountaintop, called Tzchimoos (Chismahoo), near Mishopshno (now known as Carpinteria). Before inviting the people to cross, Hutash warned them not to look down. Many did, however, and became so dizzy that they fell into the water. To save them, Hutash transformed them into dolphins. Those that did not fall crossed the sea successfully and arrived at Tzchimoos. They climbed down the mountain and populated the area.

The Legend of Chismahoo

Imagined by Marjorie Lewis, Carpinteria High School 1930 Long ago, an Indian lived alone in his teepee on a high mountain. His was a lonely existence, and he often sat in front of his doorway smoking his long pipe, thinking sadly of his past life. Once he had been a great chief, head of a powerful tribe, but no longer was he looked up to by his people. In fact, few of them even knew he was alive and only a few of these ever paused in their work or pleasure to think about the old chief.

2006 CARPINTERIA MAGAZINE FILE PHOTO BY TED RHODES

The Citizens for the Carpinteria Bluffs holds its annual Sunrise Ceremony near dawn each March on the Sunday morning closest to the spring equinox. Held in Mishopshno Meadow̶ (Mishopshno is the Chumash Indian name for the Carpinteria area) the ceremony is based in Chumash custom and attendees are encouraged to share an ancestral tradition of their own during the ceremony. This year’s ceremony will take place virtually and be announced in the coming weeks. He was the last of a long line of illustrious chiefs, known for their honesty and fairness. His father and his father’s father, back as far as he or even the oldest members of the tribe could remember, had always brought their warriors home from victories until that terrible day when everything and everyone had gone against him. On that momentous day, on which his tribe was to go out to meet an equally strong and powerful tribe, if he returned victorious (and it was understood that he would return victorious or not at all), he was to marry the maiden whom he loved and who loved him. She was the most beautiful maiden in any of the tribes and every brave there longed to do wonderful feats so that he could claim her for his own. This certain chief, whose name was Chismahoo, started out confidently, promising his maiden that he would return before long, thinking little of the calamities in front of him. Right in the thick of the fight, the leader of the other tribe pretended he was escaping. Chismahoo started in pursuit, leaving the two tribes fighting. Soon he was out of sight of the battle and, just as he was passing through a dense thicket, four braves rose up, braves of his own tribe, who had long resented his power and whose leader coveted Chismahoo’s bride-to-be for himself. They had purposely laid this trap for Chismahoo so that they could go back to the tribe and boast that he had deserted his braves. For they had bound him securely. Also they were very influential members of the tribe and no one

would dare to doubt their word. CARPINTERIA Later on, Chismahoo, having been found and freed by a young lad of a neighboring tribe to whom he had been kind once, returned to his people. No one would believe him. In vain he asked them to remember his past bravery and to disbelieve the other braves. They would Submit announcements, not believe him and threatened to kill advertising and more online: him if he did not depart. He was not even allowed to see the maiden he was to have married. So he made his way to a high mountain and there he lived many, many years, until he was an old, old man. One day he chanced upon the lad who Email us for a quick had freed him before and he asked this response: lad, who was now a brave, about the maiden of his youth. The brave said that she had sorrowed for him until she had fallen ill and in spite of the frantic efforts of all the medicine men, she died within a short time. This had happened several years ago, butCoastal the oldView chief had•not News Tel:heard (805) 684-4428 it until then. He thought there was no use in his living a solitary life when he could join his beloved in the happy hunting Leave a non-urgent message grounds. So one evening just when the for one of our staff: sun was going down, he threw himself over a steep cliff. Thus the mountain came to be called Chismahoo.

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22  Thursday, March 4, 2021 Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California 24  Thursday, May 9, 2013

WATER CONTRACT: Continued from page 11

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THE BOOK NOOK

depleted ground water basins. The sales would be for 10 to 20 years at a stretch; if another drought came along during that time, the city could buy back some of that same water, Haggmark said. The city and the Montecito Water DisFriends of the Library trict are jointly footing the $72 million recommends bill for the desalination plant that the city “The Vanishing Half” built on its waterfront in 2017, toward the by Brit Bennett end of a seven-year drought. If the city “The Vanishing Half” is an extraordiwants to create a future supply of potable recycled water as well, Haggmark said, nary tale of truth and lies, race and gen“We will need to reduce current water der, hurt and healing. In a small village costs to make the leap.” Water managers, in the Deep South, beautiful twin girls he said, “need to keep all options open lead a charmed life – until they don’t. and on the table … We want to do the A brutal racial crime murders best for our customers.” Williams and Supervisor Joan Hart- their father and mann, who represents Isla Vista and the l e a v e s t h e i r Santa Ynez Valley, said that if the county m o t h e r u n allows local agencies to sell state water able to support outside the county, the proceeds should them, forcing be earmarked for conservation and local them to leave supplies such as potable recycled water school and go to work. On top for residents here. “Without that, I’m a ‘No, no way,’” of the trauma Williams said. “There are many examples of seeing their of situations where it’s in the individual beloved father water district’s short-term interests to sell die, they must water, but I have never yet in 20 years give up their dreams of college and all the advancement Week of 3/1/21 - 3/7/21 an education promises. seen that it is in the interest of the people One sister decides they must run away of Santa Barbara County.” and convinces the other to join her, and Melinda Burns volunteers as a freelance the two teenagers head to the nearest journalist in Santa Barbara as a community city, where they work and live together service; she offers her news reports to multiple for a while. They are fired from their local publications, at the same time, for free. jobs, and in the process of finding new

The Weekly Crossword

by Margie E. Burke

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ACROSS 1 Boat's berth 14 15 16 5 Part of a repair 19 17 18 bill 10 Skewed view 20 21 22 14 Multinational money 23 24 25 15 Come about 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 16 A while ago 17 Flashcards 33 34 35 36 subject 37 38 39 40 19 Kind of ID 20 Renter 42 43 41 21 Courting music 44 45 46 47 48 23 Put up, as a picture 49 50 51 25 Flinch, say 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 26 Varied 30 Biased against 60 61 59 seniors 33 Bird feeder filler 62 63 64 34 Small sample 66 67 36 80's group who 65 sang "Take On Copyright 2021 by The Puzzle Syndicate Me" 37 Melville setting 2 Tackle box item 43 Mistake in print 54 Spanish 38 Talk like Porky 3 Blue flower 45 Runway figures sparkling wine Pig 4 Cheap insult 47 Safe from 56 Monetary 40 Slot machine 5 Sing the blues hackers penalty icon 6 You-here link 48 "Fame" singer 57 Type of list 41 Pop-ups, e.g. 7 Tiny amounts 50 Fare with onions 58 Winter coat? 42 Cheyenne 8 Willow for 52 Aquatic plant 61 Conducted shelter basketmaking 53 TV cable, for 43 Ticklish Muppet 9 Craft anew short 44 Navy clerk 10 Pep in one's step 46 Tactful 11 Impossible to fill 49 Koontz creation 12 Got an A+ on 51 Within earshot 13 Parched Answers to Last Week's Crossword: 52 Ivory tower 18 Try, as a case F R O M B A C K S C I T E inhabitant 22 Raring to go L A R A A W A I T O N Y X 55 Etsy wares 24 ____ and go A V A N T G A R D E R O L E 59 Piercing site 26 Test, as ore B E L I E R E D P E P P E R 60 Assessment 27 Glove leather C R U D I N S E R T 62 Chutzpah 28 Like some S T R U N G C A N T E R 63 Now or _____ temperatures L A I R H O A R S E A M C 64 Edit menu choice 29 Old-fashioned O C T E T G I G R E B E L 65 Gives the 31 Cause of a red B O A H A R R O W A L G A heave-ho face M A I D E N I N S E A M 66 WTO's concern 32 Medium's card A B O U N D O N I T 67 Pound sound 35 Oktoberfest F O R G E R I E S S W A Z I souvenir O G E E E N V I S I O N E D DOWN 38 Forestall, with U L N A S T E E P O N T O 1 Close, as an "off" L E O S S O R R Y D E A L envelope 39 Urban housing

employment, one sister is hired because the employer thinks that she is white. The Weekly Crossword And soon she is passing – out of her life 3 a person 4 with her sister, out of 1her 2life as ACROSS of1color. She vanishes. She is gone from Box-office bomb 14 her sister who winds up going home to 5 Wound covering care for their mother. 9 Hoops game for 17 Brit twoBennett is a wonderful writer. 20 21 Her language is rich and moving and sound 14 Stadium her plot is a page-turner. We are24given 15 Tarentino's deep"____ insight Bill"into a myriad of worlds. We 27 28 29 30 meet complicated characters, the twin 16 Concerning sisters and the daughters they each37have, 36 birds and their cousins. Somebody along the call 17 Canyon 40 way says, about “kin is kin” and indeed, after 18 Crazy decades incredibly 44 hurtful alienation – 19 MGMofopening? twin from twin, mother from daughters 20 Hitchhiker's 48 – they are reunited. Paradise is regained. need Somehow, they all find their back to 22 Unrivaled 52 each 53 other. Read “The Vanishing Half” to find 24 Miniseries, often 56 57 58 out It will not disappoint. 26 how. Dunderhead volunteer, Friends of NauticalAnderson, 64 27 –Susan the Library direction 30 Carpentry stock 68 32 Schools of 71 Library Carpinteria thought recommends 36 Sneeze “Aquicorn Cove” 73 byScholarship Kay O’Neill response “Aquicorn Cove” by Kay 38 Winter hat basis O’Neill is a sweet, impactful story about taking extension care of yourself and the environment. 40 Gossipy gal DOWN Lana and her to their bite father return part sea41 Puppy 1 Guitar side hometown to help Aunt Mae clear 43 Tennis tie 2 Ness, for one out debris from 44 Elmo's street 3 Waikiki's island a46storm. Lana Inexperienced 4 Senior dances lovessailor being near 5 Tackle moguls the water and 48 Choreography 6 Apple pie spice her aunt, bit but the 7 Chorus member setting 49 On a brings higher 8 Flaxen-haired up plane memories 9 Muslim porter of mother 51 her Delay, with "off" 10 Wears out who has passed 52 ____ we 11 Bar mitzvah, e.g. a w aforget... y. W h i l e 12 Hindu garment exploring the 54 Alpine goat 13 Double-bound b56 e aAncestry ch, Lana compound finds an injured 60 Subject of some 21 Fragrant fir seahorse with a23 colony of magical HGTValong shows Dermal opening seahorse people known as “aquicorns.” 64 Belgian city on 25 "My ___" (Mary AunttheMae has had a longstanding relaMeuse Wells classic) tionship with especially APRthe aquicorns, pit 65 Part of 27 Bottomless their leader, Aure. warnedcharge Aunt 67 Scrapped, as aAure 28has Admiral's Maemission of the community’s overfishing 29 Lacking slack and the detrimental effects it has on the 68 Intense dislike 31 Put together coral reef and the aquicorns’ home. The 69 Reunion bunch 33 Dry spell frequent storms the seaside town is expeveggie gambling 70 Gumbo 34 Asian riencing coastal living, 71 Abe'saren’t coin just part ofmecca but are also worsened35byWiped the depletion 72 Embraced out of coral reefs.

With themes of grief and environmentalism, Aquicorn Cove is recommended by Margie Burke on for middle grade readers and E. available 5 Hoopla 6 7 with 8 your library 9 10 card. 11 12 13 –Blanca Ramirez,16librarian, Carpinteria 15 Branch Library 18

19

Diversify23 Our Narrative recommends 26

22 25

“Allegedly” by Tiffany D. Jackson

31 32 33 34 35the “Allegedly” takes readers into world of Mary Addison, a Black girl whose 38 39 life was turned upside down after she was 41 42 of 43 found guilty killing a baby – 46 47 45 allegedly. Mary 49was 50 only nine 51 years old when 54 55 the tragedy took 60 61 62 63 place, 59and no one thought to 65 66 67 question wheth70 er 69 she was involved in the 72 73 murder or not before deeming Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate her guilty. A white child had been found 37 Upholsterer's 56 Unceremonious dead while under the care tool fallof a Black woman and her daughter, and that was all it House 39 Confused 57 White took. Atof nine the media, society 42 Lobe theyears old, worker and those working on brain Bridle case did not 58Mary’s question her guilt because she was Black. 45 Steinbeck title attachment After the incident, Mary spentwind years in starter 59 Powerful group homes and facing the consequenc47 Apprehend 61 Rum partner es Laundry of her conviction. Now, Marymonster is 16 and 50 room 62 Mythical pregnant. She had never felt the need to item Swayze 63 Patrick speak herself, child of her 53 The for Penguin, to but with film, a"____ own in her womb and the support of her Batman House" boyfriend, Ted, she decides to lacks speak her 55 TV tube gas 66 A circle truth. one Jackson’s storytelling demonstrates Answer to Last Week's Crossword and the lack of resources, representation S T I R P O S S E A color L L are Y empathy that young children of T with Y R when O Adealing C T Owith R government L I E U met S H A Ma Echilling O V depicA L E P I C agencies. She provides P of E the S Kgroup Y E B Bwhere S Mary U E D E tion home lived B O A R R A I D with predominately minority girls: “The A S S O R T H E I R A L E group home is always muggy, like we live in E R R S P A N M I N U E T an old shoe, smelling like corn chips mixed A N O N A G L O W P A S T with roach spray.CI O never callA the group home O V E R S E S C U D ‘home.’ house S E It’s T not W aHhome. A T No V E Cwhere T O you R fear for your life can be considered a F E E L S E A T home.” R“Allegedly” I P E N byLTiffany A P D.L Jackson A N C isE a great interested in thrillers O Dnovel O R for those V I T A L C E L L orBthose want to Dlearn A N O E more L E about O S O O who R E S P Y racism T E in P the E Ejustice E D G E institutional system. –Laura Flores, DON Carpinteria

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Thursday, March 4, 2021  23

The importance of home

CVN

IN THE NATUREHOOD NANCY BARON Since we moved into our home in the hills above Carpinteria more than a decade ago, we have had a large boisterous family of Acorn Woodpeckers as neighbors. They have lived here for many generations – much longer than us. Acorn Woodpeckers live in a colonial nest where they pile in and sleep together at night. On our property, their home happens to be in the top of a support utility pole at the foot of the driveway. In the evenings, I like to walk down the driveway, pick up the mail and look up at them sticking their heads out of their nest, peering down at me. “Waka waka waka,” they call. They never run out of things to say. Acorn Woodpeckers are unusual woodpeckers that live communally, stash acorns and breed cooperatively. At first glance, they look like a troupe of clowns, all alike, but with a little attention you can sort them out. The males have red crowns while females can be distinguished by a small red patch that looks like a pill box hat on the back of their heads. Their white eyes add to their clownlike appearance. Acorn woodpeckers love to party, swooping through the oak trees, swinging wildly on our feeders and splashing in the bird bath like kids at a pool – always making us laugh. They are noisy, gregarious and highly social. In fact, they literally cannot live without each other. “I love the colonial aspect of woodpeckers,” says Jesse Grantham, a retired biologist for US Fish and Wildlife Service, who lives in Ojai. “They help each other. There’s a reason for that. They need all the birds working together to collect and store acorns to survive through the winter.” The competition for acorns is fierce. “Everyone wants them.” The success of Acorn Woodpecker colonies depends on two things: a healthy stash of acorns for the winter and a nesting cavity in a tree (or power pole) that they have laboriously excavated with their jack-hammer beaks, one peck at a time. In winter they sleep together then spread out in spring when the breeding pairs take precedence. Acorn Woodpeckers are known for pockmarking trees and power poles with small holes to stash acorns – a communal cache known as a granary. In fall, they make forays over long distances looking for ripening acorns and keeping an eye on the neighbors, as they are territorial. Each colony has several “managers” who guard the granary while other members of the colony are out hunting and gathering. They fiercely protect the assembled acorns and dive bomb intruders. Managers move up and down the granary making sure each acorn fits snugly, so it’s not easily extracted by crows, jays, squirrels or other acorn lovers. Such granaries are carefully tended through generations. The record – an estimated 50,000 holes in one tree – probably took more than 100 years to make, according to bird expert David Sibley. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology notes that the two main threats to Acorn Woodpeckers are the loss of oak woodlands in California along with the removal of dead trees and nesting sites. Increasing

drought, fire and fierce windstorms all take their toll. The accumulated loss of dead trees means a loss of homes for many animals and no place to raise their young. And so, Acorn Woodpeckers make their homes in power poles, which look and feel much like dead trees to them, much to the chagrin of power companies. Four years ago, Southern California Edison (SCE) tagged the support pole in our yard and the colony’s home for removal. The nest hole is located about 10 feet above the guy wire (at mid staff) that supports the utility pole on the other side of the street. Aside from the nest, the pole appears solid, making it unclear why SCE would bother with the expense of replacement. My husband and I talked to many people up the levels at SCE. We wrote letters and explored options including removing the nest and reattaching it, or simply installing a new pole beside it and leaving the old pole letting us assume responsibility since it is on our property. One day in 2016, a SCE truck and workers showed up with a new pole and started digging. Alarmed, we went out to talk to them. They examined the pole – with the woodpeckers watching. They agreed that the pole was structurally sound. They left and we celebrated. We walked down to the mailbox, looked up and toasted the woodpeckers looking down on us from the entrance to their nest. Over the years, various SCE officials and contractors have noted that they have saved nests by leaving the old pole next to a new one or slicing off a section with the nesting cavity and attaching it to a new pole. But this is currently not their policy. Legally they must only leave active nests with chicks. Jesse Grantham argues that SCE’s policy of nest removal is expensive and time consuming, especially in a time of declining revenues for SCE due to Thomas Fire lawsuits and increasing use of solar panels. “Since the woodpeckers are not going to go away, unless we kill them all off, why not just remove the existing nest site and re-attach it to the new pole?” Grantham asks. He asserts cutting an 18-inch section of the pole with the cavity nest and attaching it to a new pole would be far cheaper than constantly replacing poles. “Acorn Woodpeckers hate to waste time and energy excavating nest sites. This seems like such an incredibly easy solution. It saves the pole and the woodpeckers.” Last December, a new round of SCE contractors once again tagged the pole. When we asked one if the pole really needed replacing, he sized it up, kicked it with solid work boots, offering an opinion the pole had at least another good 10 years in its functional life. He assured us that he would note in his report. But he added, “Edison won’t necessarily pay any attention to me, I am just a contractor.” Now I am as concerned as anyone about fires, but this pole was sound. It is hard to see it as a priority for removal. On Dec. 17, we wrote to six SCE staff members we had communicated with over the years asking to discuss options for saving the nesting cavity. No one from SCE responded. Christmas came and went. The woodpeckers continued about their business and we with ours. On a recent day, my husband and I returned home and were stunned to find the pole was gone, the woodpeckers missing. In its place loomed an imposing black pole wrapped in wire mesh around the bottom third – which is perplexing. I phoned and emailed SCE’s Avian Program Manager to ask, “What happened? And why has Edison never bothered to respond to us?” So far, not a peep. I wonder where our local colony of

JOHN CALLENDAR

Female Acorn Woodpeckers have a little red “pillbox hat” on the back of their heads.

JOHN CALLENDAR

Acorn Woodpeckers are territorial. “Managers” from within the colony keep an eye out for acorn poachers and make sure the acorns are securely stashed.

JESSE GRANTHAM

Excavating a nesting cavity is a time and energy consuming task. When an existing nest site is removed, a human-made nesting site can substitute. Woodpeckers will take the new home, do their own remodeling and use it year after year.

JESSE GRANTHAM

JOHN CALLENDAR

A male Acorn Woodpecker works on making a substitute tree section nest “home” while a female supervises.

A male Acorn Woodpecker, distinguished by his red crown, guards his colony’s granary of stashed acorns.

woodpeckers has gone. Did they have an alternate cavity? Have they found a new place to excavate a nest? Or did the colony fracture and disperse? As I pondered the loss of the woodpeckers, I reached out to Gillian Martin, the director of the Cavity Conservation Initiative cavityconservation.com. Saving tree cavities, snags and branches is one of the best things we can do for wildlife. They need them for their homes, and she provides advice on how to do so with safety for humans in mind. “Birds face mounting challenges. The loss of one active nest matters. It represents the loss of all the future generation

that those birds might have produced if they continued,” Martin said. “This is how populations decline.” The soundtrack in our naturehood has changed. A walk to the mailbox no longer is greeted with the garrulous chatter from above. What’s left is little more than unsettling quiet, our own Silent Spring. Nancy Baron teaches communication to environmental scientists. She was a biologist in Banff National Park and has written two books: Birds of the Pacific Northwest and Escape from the Ivory Tower. She can be reached at baron@nceas.ucsb.edu


24  n Thursday, March 4, 2021

Coastal View News• •Carpinteria, Carpinteria, California California Coastal View News

Local artist recreates Casitas Plaza in sculpture form

Carpinteria artist Ben Watts’ sculptural rendition of Casitas Plaza is currently on display at SlingShot art studio and gallery in Santa Barbara. Looking to take on a new artistic medium and delve into the world of sculpture, Watts decided to recreate Casitas Plaza, a cityscape that has grown familiar to him as he commutes past it every day on his bicycle. Watts lives and works in Carpinteria and has been an artist at SlingShot for around five years. The 25”x 29”x 16” piece is crafted from hand-cut foam core board, acrylic paint and paper scraps, and is visible in the SlingShot gallery window at 220 W. Canon Perdido St. Suite A. SlingShot is an art studio and gallery for artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities who want to create and sell art. The studio provides space, materials and facilitation for each artist to immerse themselves in their artistic practice. While the studio remains closed due to Covid-19, the gallery is open by appointment. “Casitas Plaza” is priced at $300 with half the proceeds going to SlingShot.

Artist Ben Watts holds up a painting he created for SlingShot art studio and gallery. Throughout the pandemic, SlingShot has delivered supplies to artists’ homes and Watts has created countless pieces. Watts’ “Casitas Plaza” sculpture is made from hand-cut foam core board, acrylic paint and paper scraps with a scrap wood base. Those interested in purchasing Watts’ sculpture or making an appointment to visit the gallery should call studio manager Kelly Cottrell at (805) 770-3878. To learn more about SlingShot, visit alphasb. org/slingshot.

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FANTASTIC BEACHFRONT LOCATION WITH OCEAN AND ISLAND VIEWS...Wonderful location on the sand at the “WORLD’S SAFEST BEACH”. The balcony on this second level two bedroom unit is a great place to enjoy the fabulous ocean views. An elevator is available for convenience. This property is a perfect vacation retreat or wonderful to enjoy full time and is being sold completely furnished. Take a walk on the boardwalk nearby or take a stroll to charming downtown Carpinteria. OFFERED AT $1,350,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228

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BRIGHT WEST SIDE COTTAGE IN SANTA BARBARA...Charming 2 bedroom, 1 bath home located on a corner lot. Features a cozy fireplace, inviting patio/garden area surrounded by beautiful tall hedges; a perfect place for relaxing or entertaining friends.Located near parks, shopping, and freeway access. Take a short drive or bike ride to downtown Santa Barbara or the beach. OFFERED AT $889,000 Please call Terry Stain (805) 705-1310 or Shirley Kimberlin (805) 886-0228

Thinking of Selling Your Property? FREE MARKET EVALUATION CALL SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN TODAY! 805-886-0228

Profile for Coastal View News

Coastal View News • March 4, 2021  

News and information from Carpinteria Valley, California

Coastal View News • March 4, 2021  

News and information from Carpinteria Valley, California

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