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SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN Everything I list turns to SOLD! 805-886-0228 skimberlin@aol.com

oastal C

This week’s listings on the back page

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CARPINTERIA

Vol. 26, No. 7

Nov. 7 – 13, 2019

coastalview.com

View News

New Fire Marshal sworn in

Arts Center welcomes new executive director

13

Local churches kick off holiday season

14

4-H Club installs new officers

15

Going the distance

Carpinteria High School senior Savannah Alvarez competes at the Santa Barbara County Cross Country Championships where she and her twin sister, Shaylah, both earned medals. The Alvarez twins hope to qualify for CIF prelims at the Citrus Coast League Finals in Fillmore on Thursday, Nov. 7. For more sports coverage, see page 17.

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2 n Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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Thursday, November 7, 2019  3

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428 The new, shared-use trail would connect Padaro Lane to the west and Rincon Beach County Park to the east as well as improve public coastal access.

City solicits public comments on Rincon Trail

The city of Carpinteria has released a report on environmental impacts of the revised Carpinteria Rincon Trail project which, when completed, would extend from the eastern end of Carpinteria Avenue to the western end of Rincon Beach County Park. A 30-day public review period for the report, a Draft Subsequent Mitigated Negative Declaration, opened on Nov. 1, and will close on Dec. 2 at 5 p.m. The proposed Carpinteria Rincon Trail would be 16-feet wide (10-foot wide path with 3-foot wide paved shoulder along both sides) and approximately 2,800-feet long. The bridge would be approximately 160-feet-long, with a width of between 14 and 16 feet (clear width, measured inside the bridge rails). Earthwork for the trail construction would involve cutting 104,000 cubic yards—10,300 cubic yards of which would be used for fill on-site—and 94,100

cubic yards would be exported off-site. A storm drainage collection system is proposed, with new drain outlets to the ocean. The new, shared-use trail would connect Padaro Lane to the west and Rincon Beach County Park to the east as well as improve public coastal access. Copies of the report may be picked up at the temporary City Hall at 4180 Via Real, Suite B, at the public library, or online at carpinteria.ca.us/videos/ streaming.shtml Comments should be sent to Nick Bobroff, Community Development Department, at 5775 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013 or nickb@ ci.carpinteria.ca.us. Comments will be heard in person at the Environmental Review Committee meeting on Thursday, Nov. 14, at 3 p.m. in the Council Chamber at City Hall.

Air quality alert issued for Santa Barbara County

As the Maria Fire continued to burn thousands of acres in Ventura County, smoke impacted air quality throughout Santa Barbara County. The Santa Barbara County Public Health Department and Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District issued an Air Quality Alert through the weekend, or until conditions improved. In Carpinteria, under the direction of First District Supervisor Das Williams, a fine particulate matter (PM2.5) monitor has been set up at the Main School. High PM2.5 levels indicate an increased amount of air pollutant that may have health impacts. Throughout fire season, levels of smoke and particles, and areas impacted, will vary. “If you see or smell smoke in the air, be cautious and use common sense to protect your and your family’s health,” advised the county. “Everyone—especially people with heart or lung conditions (including asthma), older adults, pregnant women and children—should limit time spent outdoors and avoid outdoor exercise when high concentrations of smoke and particles are in the air.” Symptoms of smoke exposure include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chest tightness or pain, nausea and unusual fatigue or lightheadedness.

The county recommends that when smoke is present, residents stay inside with their windows and doors closed as well as creating a “clean air room” by running a HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) purifier. Purifiers are available online or at home improvement stores and start at approximately $75. HEPA purifiers can reduce indoor particulate levels by up to 90 percent. A less expensive, but similarly effective, option involves attaching a MERV-rated filter to a box fan, which costs $30-$40. If using a mask, the county reminds residents to use N-95 masks correctly. N-95 masks can reduce smoke exposure outdoors by up to 95 percent but only if they fit properly. Scarves, bandanas and surgical masks are not effective and should not be used. Masks must fit snugly around the nose and chin, making them unsuitable for children or people with facial hair. People with heart and lung conditions should talk to their doctor before using an N-95 mask, as the masks can restrict airflow. N-95 masks should not be used to extend time outdoors beyond what is necessary. At press time, air conditions were good and the alert had been lifted. For current conditions and forecasts, visit OurAir. org/todays-air-quality.

aa Make Carpinteria Bloom a Carpinteria Beautiful will distribute it’s sacks of poppy seeds again this year after 1pm on Saturday, November 9th at the following stores... a Sandcastle Time 1O78 Casitas Pass Road a Friends of the Library 51O3 Carpinteria Avenue a Roxanne’s A Wish & A Dream 919 Maple Street a Island Outfitters 873 Linden Avenue a Robitailles 9OO Linden Avenue a Laughing Budda Thrift 771 Linden Avenue a PORCH 3823 Santa Claus Lane Visit carpinteriabeautiful.org

Seeds donated by S&S Seeds


4 n Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

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Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Submit letters online at coastalview.com

LETTERS

Look out for your pets

While I was waiting at the counter for my order at a local restaurant, an employee took a phone call from someone who was asking if a patron there had left a dog in their car in the parking lot. The employee went around the restaurant asking everyone until she found the dog’s owner. He grumbled a bit about having left windows open in his car, but went out to check. Please remember: just because summer is over and the air outside is cooler lately, parking a car in the sun with windows partly open isn’t going to keep a dog’s body in a safe temperature range, not to mention its discomfort and possible fear as its surroundings get hotter. If you

PAIN, BURNING, OR NUMBNESS IN FEET OR HANDS?

think that your car will be cool enough for your dog for whatever length of time you plan to leave him there, try putting on a heavy coat or two, a scarf and warm hat, park your car in the sun with the windows down a bit, and sit inside for 15 minutes. I’ve copied the following paragraph from the American Veterinary Medical Association. Keep in mind that the temperature outside as I’m writing this is 70 degrees. “The temperature inside your vehicle can rise almost 20-degrees Fahrenheit in just 10 minutes. In 20 minutes, it can rise almost 30 degrees... and the longer you wait, the higher it goes. At 60 minutes, the temperature in your vehicle can be more than 40-degrees higher than the outside temperature. Even on a 70-degree day, that’s 110 degrees inside your vehicle! In addition, a study found that cracking the windows had very little effect on the temperature-rise inside the vehicle.” Please be responsible for the health, safety and comfort of your pets—they trust that you will provide that.

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, November 7, 2019  5

CVN

Briefly

Planning Commission approves city’s acquisition of Bluffs parcels for Rincon Trail

At the Carpinteria Planning Commission’s Nov. 4 meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to support the city’s acquisition of three land parcels totaling approximately 3.819 acres within the Carpinteria Bluffs III planning area for the Carpinteria Rincon Trail, a project that will connect the eastern end of Carpinteria Avenue with Rincon County Park. The proposed shared-use trail would be 16-feet wide and approximately 2,800-feet long, and would include a clear-span bridge over the railroad corridor. Caltrans has agreed to relinquish the property for construction of a trail that will function as a key connection in the California Coastal Trail and Carpinteria’s Coastal Vista Trail. Upon completion, the Coastal Vista Trail would connect Padaro Lane to the west and Rincon Beach County Park to the east. The city of Carpinteria recently released a Draft Subsequent Mitigated Negative Declaration for the project. Public comment on the document may be made through Dec. 2. The document and details on how to comment are at http://bit.ly/2Ckjnxi. The trail project itself will be considered by the Planning Commission at a future date; acquiring the Caltrans land is one step toward project approval. Formally, the action by the commission was to determine that the land acquisition was consistent with the city’s General Plan/Coastal Plan.

A rendering of proposed Lagunitas Business Park depicts the new 82,874 square foot complex.

ARB recommends Lagunitas Business Park

The Lagunitas Business Park received a recommendation for Final Approval from the Architectural Review Board on Oct. 17. The complex will be located on the 6300 block of Via Real and will contain 82,874 square feet of new office space with 342 parking spaces, and landscaping on the balance of the 8.63-acre parcel. The developers indicate the building permit application will be submitted soon.

In deal with Chevron, city’s Skate Park could get easement for site

The Planning Commission voted unanimously to allow the city to acquire a 11,114-square-foot easement on property owned by Chevron for use as public parking to serve a future skatepark adjacent to City Hall. In turn, Chevron will be allowed an 1,893-square-foot city easement that provides the company street access onto the portion of its property where the city plans to build public parking. The skatepark project design has yet to be approved and recording the parking easement will not take place without project approval. The easement exchange will require no city funding; however, negotiations are ongoing. Formally, the action by the commission was to determine that the easement acquisition was consistent with the city’s General Plan/Coastal Plan.

Story poles outline the proposed 49,050 square foot development at 5464 Carpinteria Ave.

GranVida proposes Phase II

Gran Vida Senior Living and Memory Care presented Phase II to the Architectural Review Board on Oct. 17. Phase II is a new 49,050 square foot assisted-living facility for seniors that would contain 50 units. The project will be located next to the existing GranVida assisted living facility on Carpinteria Avenue. Story poles for the project were installed on Sept. 30, 2019. GranVida will return to the ARB for additional review on Dec. 12.

State releases revisions to list of mandated reportable diseases

A rendering shows how ample night lighting is included in the city’s skate park conceptual design.

Skate Park seeks funding

The Parks Department is moving forward on the proposed skate park to be located adjacent to City Hall. The night lighting design concept has been completed and the Project Application has been filed with the city’s Community Development Department for review and processing. This project is in partnership with the Carpinteria Skate Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization, that is currently seeking donations to fund construction of the skate park. To make a donation, visit gofundme.com/carpskatepark/donate.

Providing local news and information for the Carpinteria Valley Managing Editor Debra Herrick Editor Christian Beamish Graphic Designers Kristyn Whittenton, Robin Karlsson Sports Reporter Alonzo Orozco Advertising Account Manager Karina Villarreal Publishers Gary L. Dobbins, Michael VanStry Coastal View News is locally owned and operated by RMG Ventures, LLC, 4856 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013, and is published every Thursday. Coastal View News has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of Santa Barbara County, Case No. 210046. Coastal View News assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material.

The California Department of Public Health, in consultation with the California Conference of Local Health Officers, has updated the reportable disease lists in the California Code of Regulations. Changes went into effect on Oct. 1, 2019. Among conditions removed from the list are Amebiasis, Chlamydia trachomatis infections, including lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) and Streptococcal Infections. Now on the list of conditions required to be reported are Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), Paratyphoid Fever, Cannabis Related Illness and Vaping Pulmonary-Associated Injuries.

Cannabis taxes amount to $6.7 million to county

Santa Barbara County reported collecting $6.7 million in taxes from the cannabis industry in the 2018-19 fiscal year, an amount that exceeded estimates by $1.06 million. The fiscal year ending in June was the first year the county collected voter-approved taxes on cannabis. At the Board of Supervisors meeting on Nov. 5, supervisors elected to hold the excess revenue until budget workshops can be conducted. The cost of permitting, project appeals and enforcement consume much of the tax revenues while the county’s cannabis program is being enforced, though cannabis funds are allocated to the county’s general fund and can be appropriated for any county projects or programs. In the 2019-20 fiscal year, the county budget allocates $2.8 million to permitting and enforcement while anticipating $5.6 million in revenues.

No Delay in Trash & Green Waste Pick Up Due to the Veterans Day Holiday E.J. Harrison and Sons will maintain its regular Thursday trash and green waste collection schedule in Carpinteria on Nov. 14, during the week of Veterans Day, Nov. 10-16.

Thank you and Happy Holiday E. J. Harrison & Sons

805-647-1414

To order services & to pay bills online go to www.ejharrison.com


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6  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Obituary

First impressions CVn

the lay of the land mike wondolowski Mark (Marky) Meza, Jr.

Kenneth John Anderson 5/23/1931 – 10/28/2019

11.19.1997 – 11.07.2018

1 year ago today, you gave me a hug and kissed me goodnight. With your back turned, you flashed a two finger peace sign and disappeared ahead of the closing door. That was the last time I heard your voice, saw your smile or felt your warm embrace.

On Monday, Oct. 28, 2019, Kenneth John Anderson, loving, generous, patient husband and father of five Each and every day, the sun still rises and children, passed darkness falls at night. away at age 88. The birds still sing, the flowers grow, the Ken was born breeze still whispers, too on May 23, 1931, But it will never, ever be the same world in Long Beach, without you. California, to August and Beata Anderson. His strong will, can-do attitude, and I will never understand why it was time hard work ethic came from life growing for you to go; up on a ranch in Lancaster. Ken served You were such a bright light, a wonderful our country in the Air Force. He took over son, brother and friend. The Palms Restaurant from his parents in You were taken way too soon, leaving 1967 and turned it into the well-known behind so many with such great pain. and loved cook-your-own steak house in Earth’s loss is Heaven’s gain. Carpinteria. At The Palms, Ken modeled what it meant to work hard, have fun and I love you, Stinker. serve others. Love, Mom Ken was an avid golfer and bridge player. He enjoyed snow and water skiing, loved sports, traveling with Sue and friends, and getaways with his children where they learned the importance of spending quality time together outside of the daily routine. Ken was known for and will be remembered for his kind, gentle, loving and generous nature, his sense of humor and zest for making the most of everyday life. Ken was preceded in death by his father August, his mother Beata and his brother Murt. He is survived by his wife Sue, his five children, Kenya, Bill (Terry), Tod (Debbie), Joanie (Joe) and Carla (Quinton), his nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and his nephews, David (Libby), Murt (Lynn) and niece Judy (Bob). KenCall and for Sue reservations celebrated 50 years of marriage in September Monday throughsurrounded Friday by their family. They were an inspiration to $ from 4:30pm many and8:00am lived a trueto love story. Some of his final words to his children ($15 if you live in the unincorporated were to “slow down,” tell children they area of Carpinteria). are good,Ad and thank God for all.” When courtesy of thanked himService for the father HELP is an all volunteer nonprofit organization. his children Risdon’s he had been—his wishes were to “pay it forward.” A service will be held at a later date.

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Picture yourself driving in slow-andgo traffic toward Santa Barbara on a sunny fall day. Suddenly a little red sports car zooms past you on the shoulder, cuts in front of you, and zigzags its way through the traffic ahead. What thoughts cross your mind? Are you amused? Happy that car is getting somewhere quickly? Probably not. More likely you assume the driver is selfish and arrogant, and you can just picture his smug grin as he cuts you off. You find yourself hoping he gets pulled over and gets an expensive speeding ticket. A little later as you approach the Pueblo Street exit in Santa Barbara, you notice that same red sports car stopped in a line of cars exiting the freeway. As you pass it, you glance over and what you see surprises you. Behind the wheel is a nervous-looking young man. In the passenger seat you see his very, very pregnant wife sitting awkwardly and working to control her breathing. You suddenly realize they are trying to get to Cottage Hospital in time. In that instant, how do your thoughts about the situation change? You probably find yourself hoping they have no further delays and get there quickly. It is the same driver who cut you off just a few minutes earlier—nothing changed about that. What did change was how you perceived that driver. You initially assumed he was a self-centered jerk. But later you discovered his actions had an explanation you had not even considered. A few months later, you read an article in the Coastal View News about a new development proposed in town. The article quotes a successful Orange County developer who describes his plan for a large industrial facility plus a significant amount of high-density housing. He drones on about what a wonderful project it is, how much the community will benefit, yadda, yadda, yadda. You shake your head assuming this is just another get-rich-quick scheme by an outsider who doesn’t care about Carpinteria. You are shocked as you read positive comments by city staff and even City Council members. You decide to go to the next City Council meeting and speak your mind about this travesty. At the City Council meeting, you are frustrated that you must sit through presentations by the city staff and the developer before you can speak. But while you are impatiently waiting, you learn a few things. The residential part is to be low-income housing and transitional housing for local homeless. The industrial part is a nonprofit job training center for the residents, who will train abandoned puppies for search and rescue. The graduate dogs will work at disaster locations worldwide, and the dogs who don’t graduate will

“At the City Council meeting, you are frustrated that you must sit through presentations by the city staff and the developer before you can speak. But while you are impatiently waiting, you learn a few things.” be adopted out locally. The developer is now retired, moving to Carpinteria, and hoping to share the bounty of his successful career. When your turn to speak comes up, you find yourself unable to say anything negative. You have a déjà vu moment as you experience the same feeling you had when you saw the expectant parents trying to get to the hospital. Over the next few days you reflect on these experiences. How was your first instinct so wrong? You recognize that in both cases you assumed the worst motivations of others. You expected that an aggressive driver was just self-centered, and you “knew” that an Orange County developer was only interested in profit no matter what the effect was on the community. It dawns on you that if you assume the worst intentions of others, you will oppose them before you know any of the details. But if you assume positive intent, you are better able to ask questions, gather information and engage in conversation. You might then conclude the other person’s motives really do conflict with your interests and what is good for the community. But that is something you learn rather than assume. For example, imagine someone who plans to make a zillion dollars by replacing Linden Field with a toxic waste dump that could poison everyone within miles. Understanding their motivation to make money to support their family does not mean you have to agree with their proposal. The key is not assuming the worst but being curious and asking questions before forming an opinion. It is also a good idea to do your best to avoid cutting anyone off on the freeway whenever possible. Mike Wondolowski is president of the Carpinteria Valley Association (CarpinteriaValleyAssociation.org), a local organization dedicated to maintaining the small beach town nature of our community. In his 30 years of involvement in planning issues, he has witnessed visionary successes, as well as decisions that were later widely regretted. When not stuck indoors, he can often be found enjoying Carpinteria’s treasures including kayaking and snorkeling along the coast, running or hiking on the bluffs or the Franklin Trail, or “vacationing” as a tent camper at the State Beach.


Thursday, November 7, 2019  7

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Dangerous fire conditions and multiple blazes keep local crews on the move

By CHrisTiaN BeamisH

Even in a region grimly accustomed to wildfires, the blazes throughout Southern and Northern California this October have been notable for the sheer number of incidents. From the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County to the Real, Saddleridge, Tick, Getty, Easy and Hillside fires, along with the most-recent Maria Fire in Santa Paula, crews in Santa Barbara, Ventura and LA counties have been on high alert and near-constant deployment. Firefighters from Carpinteria have also seen their share of action. The season got off to a slow start for local firefighters with few incidents in the month of September. But the Real Fire on Oct. 17 near El Capitan on the Goleta coast brought in Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District personnel. As dangerous fire conditions developed through the month of October, a “Strike Team” consisting of a battalion chief and five engines with four personnel each from across Santa Barbara County was pre-positioned across the “front country” slope of the Santa Ynez Mountains along the South Coast of Santa Barbara County. “We had a wet winter (last year),” explained Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District Battalion Chief Robert Kovach, “which promoted good growth” on hillsides and canyons. Combined with low humidity and Santa Ana winds of 40- to 60-mph, the “alignment is there,” the Chief said of the elements contributing to this year’s high number of fires. “Once something gets going,” Kovach added, “it runs.” Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District firefighters on the Strike Team were deployed from their prepositioning in the Santa Barbara “front country” to the Tick Fire in LA County on Oct. 24. En route, the crew caught and extinguished a brush fire in La Conchita which they humorously referred to as a “warm up.” From the Tick Fire, the 20 personnel and five engines drove directly to the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County on Oct. 27, and assisted with containment efforts there until their return to Santa Barbara County on Nov. 1. Firefighters on Strike Team assignment often work 30 hours without sleep, as the demands of an incident dictate. Before being relieved, a Strike Team can spend up to 14 days on a fire (and sometimes

BEAMISH

strike team members from Carpinteria-summerland Fire Protection District who deployed to the tick Fire in LA County, then immediately to the Kincade Fire in sonoma County, are, from left, Engineer Raul Pantoja, Firefighters Tim Hennigan and Dean Carey and Captain Johan Nielsson. 21 days), with two additional days of travel to and from an incident. “The most grueling part of Strike Team life,” shared Battalion Chief Michael Gallagher, “is the lack of sleep.” Continuing, Chief Gallagher added, “I’d like to say ‘thank you’ to the community—when people stop to tell us thank you, it means a lot.” As of Monday evening, Nov. 4, the most-recent fire, the Maria Fire in Santa Paula, was near complete containment, but not before it had burned nearly 10,000 acres, including valuable lemon and avocado orchards. Kathy Hoxsie, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, announced that Santa Ana winds will remain at bay for the next few days, but strong gusts are forecast to return to Southern California over the weekend of Nov. 9-10.

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Email news@coastalview.com Fire marshall robert rappaport joins the Carpinteria-summerland Fire team.

CoastalView.com Fire district hires new

AVAILABLE IN CAsItAs PLAzA At:

Fire Marshal

CoastalView.com

Albertson’s Carpinteria Laundry Sandcastle Time Tyler’s Donuts • The UPS Store

CoastalView .com

The Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District announced the hiring of Robert Rappaport as Fire Marshal on Oct. 24. Previously working for fire departments in Riverside, Alhambra and Redondo Beach (where he was a Division Chief), Rappaport brings 20 years as a Fire/Arson Investigator to CSFD. Rappaport is in the process of moving to the area with his wife, Amanda. He has two adult children, Nicole, 29, and Taylor, 26. “My wife and I love the outdoors and look forward to experiencing life in the close-knit community of Carpinteria,” said Rappaport.


8  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Making Montecito safer: Building a debris basin at San Ysidro Creek

By Melinda Burns

In the early morning of Jan. 9, 2018, seven homes were destroyed and two people died on Randall Road in Montecito as a raging torrent of mud and boulders jumped the banks of San Ysidro Creek. It was one of the deadliest places to be in Montecito that day. A catastrophic debris flow, triggered by extreme rainfall on the burned mountainside, descended on the sleeping community below, damaging more than 200 homes and killing 23 people. Two of the victims lived just below Randall on East Valley Road and Glen Oaks Drive. Now, the county is designing a debris basin on eight acres at the intersection of Randall and East Valley—effectively, an enormous dirt bowl to help trap the boulders and uprooted trees that can surge over the banks of San Ysidro Creek during the worst storms. It will be 10 times the size of the existing debris basin, which is located higher on the creek, near Park Lane. “I’m really excited to be able to be a part of something this big,” Tom Fayram, deputy director of county Public Works, said after a county design workshop on Monday. “I don’t want to lose the momentum. You don’t see this very often, so you have to grab that and go forward and get it done. If I would have proposed this basin in 2017, you would have seen this room full of mad, screaming people.” The new basin is on a fast track; environmental review is already underway. If state and federal permits can be obtained in time, construction will begin in the summer of 2021, with a finished basin by the fall of that year, county officials said. In addition, they said, they are designing a new dam outlet for the existing basin on San Ysidro Creek so that instead of clogging the basin, fine sediment will flow downstream. On Jan. 9, 2018, the fast-flowing mud, rocks and trees overtopped this small basin by as much as 30 feet. On Monday, county officials ticked off a list of 15 storm disasters that have battered Montecito with major debris flows or debris-laden floods since 1862. On San Ysidro Creek, a major gas line and several homes have been hit more than once. A map by Partners in Community Renewal, a new nonprofit group in Montecito, was displayed on a big screen, highlighting the dramatic change in topography in the Randall/East Valley roads neighborhood, post-Jan. 9, 2018. In some locations, the piles of mud and rocks left behind by the debris flow were 15 feet high.

Celebrating 94 years October 31,1925 Missing his bride but still with his best buddy.

six of seven homes on randall road along san ysidro Creek were destroyed when a catastrophic debris flow engulfed entire neighborhoods on Jan. 9, 2018.

PHOTO BY THE VENTURA COUNTY SHERIFF’S AIR UNIT

“To reach this point is huge,” Curtis Skene, the Partners co-founder and executive director, told the audience. After Skene lost his home on East Valley Lane, he approached Fayram with the concept of a debris basin on Randall and got the property owners – his neighbors – on board. “We are going to work with the county, and we are going to see what else we can do on other creeks to mitigate the risks,” Skene said. Below East Valley, about 95 homes along San Ysidro Creek were destroyed or damaged, and more than 200 other properties took on mud and water. According to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, more debris was deposited along San Ysidro Creek during last year’s catastrophe than along Montecito, Oak, Romero or Buena Vista creeks. “We don’t want another disaster to pass before we make some fundamental change to increase our resilience and our safety,” said county Supervisor Das Williams, who represents Montecito. “We are immensely committed to making a difference and not going back.” The new basin on San Ysidro Creek is estimated to cost $20 million, a price tag that includes land acquisition. On Monday, county officials said they were optimistic that the Federal Emergency

Management Agency would pick up 75 percent of the cost, leaving the county to cover 25 percent. In all, eight properties must be purchased: seven on Randall and one on East Valley. The county purchased the only home still standing on Randall for $4 million last May. “What you’re seeing here tonight is, we have gone all-in,” said Jon Frye, county flood control engineering manager. From the audience came a question: Would the new basin have captured all of the debris that surged over the banks of San Ysidro Creek on Jan. 9, 2018? N o t c o m p l e t e l y, Fayram replied, adding, “We still would have had a significant flow. But it certainly would have helped … All of our debris basins ‘worked’ in the debris flow.” The new basin will be hidden from East Valley by a berm landscaped with shrubs and trees, county officials said. “It’s going to look more like open space than a debris basin,” Fayram said. “There’s no dam, there’s no rock spillway; there’s going to be a trail going through there.” The Ennisbrook Trail from San Leandro Lane presently ends on the south side of East Valley near Randall Road. This trail will be continued northward on what is now Randall Road. Three parking

A large debris basin will be constructed on San Ysidro Creek within two years, county officials say.

spaces for hikers will be provided. Also, Partners in Community Renewal is talking with the Immaculate Heart Community, the Los Angeles-based owners of La Casa de Maria, a former spiritual retreat, about a possible trail easement along San Ysidro Creek, just north of Randall. La Casa lost nine buildings there on Jan. 9, 2018. If the talks are successful, Skene said, the public will be able to hike all the way from East Valley up to the San Ysidro Trailhead on Mountain Drive. Currently, there is a gap in the trail system in this location. Skene’s childhood home at 1709 East Valley Lane was destroyed last year in the debris flow: he barely escaped, he said, “by a foot or so.” And it was the second time around for him. During the massive debris flow of 1969, Skene said, as a boy of 14, he watched, petrified, as the mud rose three feet high along a four-foot-high wall of sandbags he had helped erect around the house. On Jan. 9, 2018, Skene lost everything. “You have a ‘Come to Jesus’ moment,” he said. “You focus on how grateful you are. I said to myself in the days afterward, ‘There’s gotta be something I can do.’” So, Skene, who had never attended a community meeting, did not follow local news, and could not have told you who his county supervisor was or what he did, became a key liaison between the county and the property owners on Randall Road. When he talks about the respect he has for Fayram and Frye, he gets emotional. “I feel like I’ve been through a war with these guys,” Skene said. “This basin will really, really, really make a difference.” The second installment of this two-part series will appear next week. Melinda Burns is a freelance journalist based in Santa Barbara.

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Armendariz and Williams square off over Trump By ChriStiAn BeAMiSh Nimmer/HechtCo Productions organized a live debate at the alcazar Theatre on Sunday, Nov. 3, centering on the question, “Should President Trump be re-elected?” representing the “yes” side was Santa Barbara News Press writer and former Carpinteria Councilmember Joe armendariz, a self-described “ronald reagan/Jack Kemp republican.” First District Supervisor and Democrat Das Williams took the “no” side in the debate. moderated by former County Supervisor Gail marshall, the debate was organized in three, 20-minute segments giving each speaker the opportunity to make opening statements, pose and respond to questions from one another and answer both pre-selected as well as audience-generated questions. Larry Nimmer introduced the speakers and noted that he organized the debate out of the belief that “it’s important to listen to the other side… and come to an informed opinion.” Both speakers remained composed and civil throughout the ensuing debate. responding to the central question regarding whether Trump should be reelected, armendariz described himself as at first being opposed to the Trump campaign. “i was one of the original, hashtag ‘Never Trumpers’… i am aware of some of the idiosyncrasies of this president… but when you look at the metrics… the lowest unemployment in 50 years, the lowest Hispanic unemployment in 50 years (and black unemployment, female Hispanic and black female unemployment) i think the answer to that question is yes.” “Here’s my metrics,” Williams responded: “more criminal indictments per year than the Nixon administration, Charlottesville, the muslim ban, Family Separation, Stormy Daniels, michael Cohen, Bro-mances with Kim Jung Un and Vladamir Putin, suppressing science throughout the federal government, withdrawal from the Paris accord, selfdealing in the ever-growing swamp, inciting violence against the media, tax cuts for the super-rich, rudy Guilliani and a shadow foreign policy, betrayal of the Kurds, blackmailing Ukraine…” Williams said, “i really want to aim my words towards some of the people who are maybe conservative, or ‘middle-ofthe-roaders.’ i know you have doubts, i know you wonder if this is really the right person or message that can pull this country together… i think we all need to be part of the solution, (and) that does not include the continuation of the Trump administration.” armendariz declined to argue either the criminal or moral implications of the current administration’s policies (“i am not a lawyer,” he said) but cited Trump’s campaign pledges to pull the U.S. out of middle eastern military entanglements as an explanation for abandoning Kurdish allies in Syria. Turning his attention to Williams, armendariz asked “…when did you become a neo-hawk?” Williams replied, “i believe that when you break something, you fix it…” referring to the longstanding U.S. involvement first in iraq, and more recently in Syria. “Don’t conservatives have an obligation… to say ‘no,’ and reject (Trump)?” Williams asked. armendariz replied, “We can talk all afternoon about whether or not Donald Trump is corrupt relative to any other politician…” and suggested that no one can attain the office of the presidency without making unsavory compromises along the way. “is Donald Trump corrupt?” armendariz asked rhe-

Larry Nimmer

First District County Supervisor Das Williams, left, and former Carpinteria Councilman Joe Armendariz squared off on the Alcazar Theatre’s stage in a debate centered on the Trump presidency, moderated by former County Supervisor Gail Marshall. torically. “i don’t know, but his policies are a lot less corrupt than what we’ve had.” While Williams agreed with armendariz’s points on some of Trump’s domestic policies (returning manufacturing industry to the U.S., and confronting China on trade issues) the Supervisor brought up wealth inequity in the nation, stating that “wages flat-lined in the 70s.” regarding the ongoing impeachment inquiry, Williams said it “unfortunately favors the President…” asserting that Trump has pushed Congress to legal action against him: “it’s calculated on his part.” The only thing (Trump) has going for him,” armendariz said of the upcoming election, “is the economy.” Questions followed on the efficacy of the electoral College system, and a woman in the audience asked Williams whether it was hypocritical of him to mention Trump’s special interests, given his much-publicized communications with the cannabis industry. Williams pointed to the revenue generated for local schools, improved county enforcement and his efforts to find common ground between constituents on either side of the commercial cannabis issue. responding to an audience-member’s question as to whether or not Trump is a just, honest president, armendariz stated that “Policies can be corrupt…” a concept he’d mentioned earlier in the debate, “and that’s whether it’s fiscal, economic, monetary, regulatory, land use… that result in lost jobs, lost homes, lost opportunities, under-funded schools, is [sic] a corrupt, immoral idea.” Williams said, “i believe america deserves both policy competence and honesty… there are people who have both. i just don’t believe he (Trump) is that.” Continuing, Williams said “even if you agree with (Trump) on many policies… he is dishonest, combative, he is willing to undermine institutions—including the basic traditions of our republic—for short-term gain…” armendariz had the last word in the debate, turning his focus on California and Santa Barbara County: “We (California) have the highest poverty rate in the country… Santa Barbara County has the third-highest poverty rate in the state… that is unacceptable, it is immoral, we have to do something about it, and Das, i hope that is a priority for you—i believe it is—but it has to be a priority for every elected official in this state. We cannot go forward by leaving any families behind. it’s wrong, it’s immoral, and in California, we can do much, much better.”

CITY OF CARPINTERIA NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF DRAFT SUBSEQUENT MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE PROPOSED Carpinteria Rincon Trail Date of this Notice: October 29, 2019 Project 19-2015-CUP/CDP Project Description: The proposed Carpinteria Rincon Trail would extend from the eastern end of Carpinteria Avenue, in the City of Carpinteria, to Rincon Beach County Park, in Santa Barbara County. The proposed shared-use trail would be 16-feet wide (10-foot wide path with 3-foot wide paved shoulder along both sides) and approximately 2,800-feet long, and would include a clear-span bridge over the UPRR alignment. The bridge would be approximately 160-feet-long, with a width of between 14-feet and 16-feet (clear width, measured inside the bridge rails). Earthwork for the trail construction would involve 104,000 cubic yards of cut, 10,300 cubic yards of which would be used for fill on-site and 94,100 cubic yards would be exported off-site. A storm drainage collection system is proposed, with new drain outlets to the ocean, The new, shared-use trail would provide a strategic addition to Carpinteria’s Coastal Vista Trail that upon completion, would connect Padaro Lane to the west and Rincon Beach County Park to the east. In addition to providing critical improvements in public safety, the completion of this trail segment would provide improved public coastal access and recreational opportunities, and enhancement of non-vehicular travel alternatives to the region’s significant coastal resources. Project Location: The proposed Carpinteria Rincon Trail would extend from the eastern end of Carpinteria Avenue in the City of Carpinteria to the western end of Rincon Beach County Park and the Ventura County Line in Santa Barbara County. Comments: The City of Carpinteria Community Development Department is soliciting comments on the adequacy and completeness of the analysis and proposed mitigation measures described in the Draft Subsequent Mitigated Negative Declaration (SMND). You may comment on the SMND in writing prior to the close of the comment period on December 2, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. or You may comment on the SMND by providing testimony at the Environmental Review Committee meeting on Thursday, November 14, 2019 at 3:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber at City Hall and/or submitting written comments prior to the close of the comment period on December 2, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. Environmental Impacts: The Community Development Department has prepared a Subsequent Mitigated Negative Declaration pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Public Resources Code §21000 et seq., the State CEQA Guidelines, 14 CCR §15000 et seq., and the City of Carpinteria Guidelines for the Implementation of CEQA. The MND identifies and discusses potential impacts, mitigation measures, residual impacts and monitoring requirements for identified subject areas. The MND finds the potential for environmental impacts related to Aesthetics, Air Quality, Biological Resources, Cultural Resources, Geology, Hazardsand Hazardous Materials, Hydrology and Water Quality, and Noise, and requires mitigation measures to reduce the impacts to less than significant levels. Document Availability: Copies of the MND and all documents referenced therein are available for a 30-day public review and comment period commencing on November 1, 2019 and may be obtained at Temporary City Hall located at 4180 Via Real, Suite B. Acopy of the MND is also available at the public library as well as on the City’s website at www. carpinteria.ca.us/videos/streaming.shtml How to Comment: Please provide written comments to Nick Bobroff, Community Development Department, at 5775 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013 no later than 5:00 p.m. on December 2, 2019. Separate notice of the dates of future public hearings to consider the SMND and project approval will be provided. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Community Development Department by email at lorenae@ci.carpinteria.ca.us or by phone at 755-4410 or the California Relay Service at (866) 735-2929. Notification two business days prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements for accessibility to this meeting. Date: October 29, 2019 Signed: Steve Goggia Title: Community Development Director Telephone: (805) 755-4414 Email: steveg@ci.carpinteria.ca.us


10 n Thursday, November 7, 2019

20  Thursday, August 31, 2017Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

COMMANDER’S RECAP

Reports from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office

COASTAL BUREAU OPERATIONS OCTOBER 27 – NOVEMBER 2

Sunday, Oct. 27

8:58 a.m. / Warrant Arrest / La Pala Lane and Cameo Road

A man was contacted during a call about a suspicious vehicle. He had two misdemeanor warrants and was arrested and booked into Santa Barbara County Jail.

11:54 a.m. / Found Bike / El Carro Park

A caller reported an abandoned bike. It was booked into the property room.

11:14 p.m. / Possession / 5th Street at Linden Avenue

A man was contacted due to his suspicious behavior. A records check revealed he was on probation out of LA County. A probation search revealed two meth pipes and meth on his person. The man was arrested and booked into Santa Barbara County Jail.

Thursday, Oct. 31

1:38 p.m. / Shoplifting / 1000 block Casitas Pass Road

Subjects shoplifted two big bags of liquor from a supermarket and escaped in a silver Lexus. Witnesses were able to Miscellaneous hand soaps, laundry get the license plate of the vehicle and detergents and candy were shoplifted Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428 the case is pending. The subjects were defrom a supermarket. A Hispanic female scribed as light-skinned Hispanic males in her 30s took the items from the store, carrying two grocery bags of tequila. and a Hispanic male helped her load them into a vehicle. Friday, Nov. 1

1:40 p.m. / Shoplifting / 1000 block Casitas Pass Road

Ron Briggs comes to Carpinteria Middle School 12:39 a.m. / Possession / Carpinteria Avenue at Highway 150

8:33 p.m. / DUI / Linden Avenue and 8th Street

Deputies were dispatched to a report of A man and woman were contacted a possible Continued from pageDUI 1 driver, who was being folsleeping in a van. During a consent lowed by a caller. Deputies contacted the search, deputies located a loaded pistol female driver, and a deputy administered After a somewhat tumultuous era at are other reasons why you’re there.” He and hallucinogenic mushrooms. The man a field sobriety test and determined that Carpinteria Middle School saw more added that he looks forward to expandwas cited and released forthat the violations. the woman was DUI. She was booked at than 75 suspensions last year, Briggs said ing extracurricular activities for students Santa Barbara County Jail, and her vehicle Carpinteria Middle School, includthat was/ interested coming on 3:05hea.m. Bike LightinViolation / as at was towed from the scene. principal the challenge of turning ing some woodshop courses, design Dorrancefor Way things aroundattempted in terms to of stop discipline. A deputy a man and technical classes, and coordinating Saturday, Nov. 2 School Principal “It’s hard for (when students Carpinteria High for riding his teachers bike without a light. The with create programs misbehave) in a class 35 other 8:45 p.m.Cornejo / PublictoIntoxication / deputy ordered thewith man25toorstop and Gerardo would up” with established kids they have to and teach,” Briggs he said, “No,” fled. The acknowlman was that Linden and“line Sandyland Road edged, went on to say that simply as- pathway certificate programs at theaway high locatedbut and cited. A woman was being escorted signing them punishments like detention school, as by culinary and Based other from thesuch beach a malearts subject. disciplines. “doesn’t work.” on her level of intoxication she was Monday, Oct. 28 Havingand grown up inatOjai and going At Hueneme High School, Briggs said, arrested booked Santa Barbara 9:47 a.m.ask / Attempted Burglary / through the public schools there, Briggs he would his colleagues who were County Jail. 300 block Linden having trouble with Avenue certain students if said that his family didn’t put a big emOvernight, an unknown suspect(s) cut phasis on education, but after about five they knew anything about the kids. When 1:54 a.m. / Attempted Burglary / a burger stand’s ATM. The screen and a teacher builds relationships with their years of differing jobs and vocations after Carpinteria Avenue control panel hadthe been forcibly removed school—“ski bum,” commercial students, he said, children then know high A man was observed looking into car from the is ATM. No access made car salesman and martial arts someone advocating forwas them. “A into red fisherman, windows. As a deputy approached, he the ATM’s vault, and no property was among them—he went to Ventura Colflag (behaviorally) means something witnessed the man trying to open the transferred to UCSB he isstolen. happening,” Briggs noted. “When lege doorthen handle of the vehicle. Hewhere was arin environmental studies and you dig deeper, you can get them extra majored rested and booked into Santa Barbara Previously published Police support.” Briggs looks forward to lead- philosophy. County Jail.Intending to pursue a career Reports may be read online ing CMS in part because “with middle in environmental law, a two weeks teachschoolers at thecoastalview.com cement is still wet in their ing engagement changed his trajectory. At 48 years old, Briggs brings more brains” he said. “Going to school is tough,” Briggs than 20 years of teaching experience to noted, “but it makes it easier if there his job at Carpinteria Middle School— Thursday, September 7, 2017  3 those years in the more economically and socially challenged areas of south Ventura County. “I’m interested in kids with emotional, behavioral and academic challenges,” Briggs said. Coming to Carpinteria Middle School, Briggs said that he was not interested in seeing his MOVIE future staffs’ teaching records, preferring instead to start his job with high expectations of both teachers and students. “If you have low expectations of someone,” Briggs explained, “they’re going to meet Non-Denominational Church those, too.” MOVIE

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Thursday, November 7, 2019  11

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Feds continue to push for new oil leases in Santa Barbara County

By DeBra Herrick

campuses; segments of the Pacific Crest Trail; and other areas especially sensitive The Trump administration has final- to environmental and health impacts. ized a study on the environmental and According to the BLM, authors of the public health impacts of fracking, a final report considered the results of peerstep towards opening more than one mil- reviewed studies done by the California lion acres of lands throughout the coastal Council on Science and Technology and interior regions of Central California and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboto new oil drilling and ratory on hydraulic fracking, including a fracturing and well parcel in Carpinteria, stimulation in Calilocated within a halffornia, as well as the mile of the Cate School Kern County Planand parcels adjacent to ning and Natural ReLake Cachuma, one of sources Department’s the sources of CarpinEnvironmental Impact teria’s water supply. Report on oil and gas The action ends a fivepermitting. year moratorium on The BLM’s report new oil and gas leasreceived immediate ing on federal lands in backlash from enviCalifornia. ronmental advocacy The Bureau of Land groups, including Los Management (BLM), Padres ForestWatch a part of the U.S. Dewhich called it a “sham partment of Interior, study,” and Food & oversees the leasing Water Action which of federal lands and called the conclusions mineral estates in Cali“irresponsible.” fornia for oil and gas “If the BLM didn’t production. On Oct. find impacts from oil 31, the BLM released drilling and fracking the final environmennext to schools, under tal impact statement rivers and reservoirs, on potential effects of and in habitat that hydraulic fracturing, harbors endangered paving the way for animals, it’s because new leases on public they didn’t look,” lands and federal minsaid Jeff Kuyper, Forerals across 1.2 milestWatch executive lion acres in the eight director. “The BLM counties governed by has wasted taxpayers’ the BLM’s Bakersfield money and will cause Field Office, includirreparable damage ing San Luis Obispo, with this sham study Santa Barbara and that places our treaVentura counties. sured landscapes and Jeff Kuyper, ForestWatch communities at great In Santa Barbara County, up to 122,000 executive director risk.” acres of land could The BLM held three be opened for new leases. Project-level public meetings and received approxileasing, access rights, additional envi- mately 16,000 comments during the 45ronmental review and permitting would day public comment period from April to be required before any new oil and gas June 2019. Of these comments, the agency development. deemed only 118 comments “unique and The report’s conclusions support the substantive.” ForestWatch contends that Trump Administration’s “priority of 100,000 area residents submitted letters promoting environmentally responsible and hundreds attended public meetings energy development, while creating jobs expressing concern over water and air and providing economic opportunities pollution, public health and climate imfor local communities,” according to a pacts, and damage to protected wildlife statement from the Bakersfield Office. The habitat and sensitive species. Accordreport followed guidelines established in ing to ForestWatch, the BLM refused to an executive order from President Trump. consider most public input by rejecting In 2014, Bakersfield concluded a Re- what it considered form letters, verbal source Management Plan defining 1.2 testimony and comments that did not million acres of federal mineral areas as provide what it termed “substantive” “available for oil and gas development,” information. including 400,000 surface acres of BLMCities, counties, Native American managed public land. tribes and organizations, NGOs, the U.S. A lawsuit brought by Los Padres For- Navy, and elected officials were among estWatch and the Center for Biological those who sent letters opposing the plan Diversity, concluded in a 2017 court order which would allow oil companies to lease for the BLM to halt new oil and gas leases federally controlled mineral rights for oil and to conduct additional environmental development for as little as $2 an acre, analysis of the potential impacts of hy- according to ForestWatch. draulic fracturing. The cities of Carpinteria, Ojai and San Among other things, the 2019 envi- Luis Obispo, and the county of Santa Barronmental impact statement analyzes bara, all passed resolutions opposing the air and atmospheric values, water qual- administration’s plan to allow oil drilling ity and quantity, cultural resources and and fracking that would threaten public Native American values, and social and resources and current land use. The local economic resources. The study found that government and agencies will have little fracking poses “no significant impacts” authority over how the lands are develand recommended no changes to the oped and whether impacts are mitigated plan that allows drilling and fracking on once the federal leases are purchased. federal lands including in and adjacent to The federal government hopes that oil national forests, parks and monuments; and gas development within the Bakersstate, county and city parks and beaches; field Field Office district will generate state and federal wildlife refuges and 3,500 jobs and $200 million in economic ecological reserves; important water- benefit annually. The BLM collects a 12.5 ways like rivers and reservoirs; school percent royalty on every barrel of oil and

“If the BLM didn’t find impacts from oil drilling and fracking next to schools, under rivers and reservoirs, and in habitat that harbors endangered animals, it’s because they didn’t look. The BLM has wasted taxpayers’ money and will cause irreparable damage with this sham study that places our treasured landscapes and communities at great risk.”

LOS PADRES FORESTWATCh

Potential areas for oil and gas extraction projects have been mapped and highlighted by the Los Padres ForestWatch organization. gas produced on federal minerals, which ranges between $65-90 million per year. The BLM shares with California roughly 50 percent of oil and gas royalties collected with the remaining 50 percent in oil and gas royalties being paid to the U.S. Treasury. Public lands in California contribute to less than 10 percent of the total oil and gas activity in the state. “At a time when the climate crisis demands that California move away from fossil fuels to clean, renewable energy, it is the epitome of irresponsibility to expand fracking and drilling in our state,” said Ana Rosa Rizo-Centino of Food & Water Action. “The climate-charged wildfires raging throughout California and the loss of life and billions in damages they create, demonstrate the profound urgency of the crisis.” Rizo-Centino called on Governor Newsom “to counter Trump’s

plans by halting all new drilling on state or private land in California to protect us from proposed oil and gas expansion in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties and throughout the state.” “Every step of the way, the Trump administration declined to do its job to put public health and the safety of the environment before corporate interests,” said Rebecca August, ForestWatch advocacy director. “It’s sad to see such disregard for the future of our public lands and the communities that depend on them.” The Trump administration has also invoked a technical provision which denies the public a formal appeal or public review process to the BLM’s decision. ForestWatch is working with its partners to evaluate “next steps.” “The matter could end up back in federal court,” according to the nonprofit’s leadership.

ABOP

Disposal program

2nd & 4th Saturday each month

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November 9 th 9am-1pm

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WHAT WE ACCEPT

Antifreeze* • Batteries • Used Motor Oil* Paint* • Oil Filters • Florescent Lightbulbs (6 tubes max) Mercury Thermostats • Small Household Electronics** *limit 5 gallons liquid maximum per visit **limit 3 per visit

*2nd Saturday only in November and December Recycle used oil


12  Thursday, November 7, 2019

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Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Fall is for planting: Perennial gardens for year-round abundance

FIELD NOTES

EXPLORING THE VALLEY’S WILD AND CULTIVATED SPACES

ALENA STEEN As we hope for winter rains as nourishing as last year’s, now is the time to prepare perennial garden space. Many vegetable farms and gardens operate on a seasonal cycle of annual plants whose short lives span the longer, warmer days of spring to fall. In contrast, perennial plants have life spans ranging from several years to several decades (or even centuries, in the case of many trees) and provide a host of opportunities for yearround food and forage for the human and other-than-human world alike. Perennials are integral to the design of any garden, and growing long-lived plants is a deep investment in the time and space of your garden. Taking many years to mature, perennials provide diversity of structure, food and shelter throughout the winter months when annuals have reached the end of their lives. Perennials are the shapes and forms a garden is designed around, since they persist through the years. They are the engineers of soil biology, building healthy garden soil over time thanks to the natural processes of leaf drop, fungal partnerships in long-lived root systems, and the pulses of water and microorganisms that plant growth creates. Even a small space can grow a dense garden that provides a living landscape year-round. As human-caused climate change and habitat destruction continue to threaten many precious and unique plant, animal, bird and insect species, we can help counter these losses with urban habitat as refuges of food, water, and shelter. In coastal Southern California, late fall and early winter are the best time to plant perennials while soil is soft and workable from winter rains and plants have a cool, wet period of acclimation before the heat of the next summer. The choices of perennial plantings are almost endless: “low chill” fruit trees for year-round food production, California native plants for food and nesting materials for the many native insects and birds that make coastal California so vibrantly diverse and other edible and medicinal plants that grow vigorously in our mild climate. California native plants are very desirable in a long-lived garden plan. They are the most low-maintenance plants, growing happily in poor soil without supplemental watering. In fact, for many native plants the greatest danger is soil that is too rich or too consistently watered. Most natives prefer well-drained soil and the seasonal watering to which they are accustomed, including more than six months without water. However, if you wish to keep natives showy and abundantly flowering through the summer, just provide low-drip irrigation to thoroughly soak the soil every month or so. For a list of some of my favorite native plants for the home garden, see my previous article from October 2018 on coastalview.com. For all other perennials, including fruit trees and non-native species, it is espe-

BECky MATSuBArA

Toyon, Heteromeles arbutifolia, is one of the best native perennials to plant for winter food. Tart berries ripen in winter when most other food for birds is limited, and one tree in your backyard can attract flocks of cedar waxwings. cially important to take the time to build healthy, living soil capable of sustaining plant growth for many years. The most important step is to add high-quality compost to your soil. If you do not have the time and space to create your own, choose to support local producers of living compost. While there are organic options now available in garden stores, many are sterilized with high heat processes that cook all the microorganisms responsible for soil health. Instead, go to a local farmers market and find the person selling homegrown worm compost, or look for “living” varieties at the store. Even a small amount of compost can make a huge difference in a plant’s vigor and success, although more is always best. In general, I apply three to four inches of compost to the top layer of soil,

turning it into the soil with a shovel or spading fork. Once soil has been gently soaked, it is time to transplant. Make sure plants are firmly pressed into the ground—root to soil contact is one of the primary triggers to growth, so don’t feel shy to step or tamp around a plant’s base. Another important step for a perennial garden is a thick layer of organic mulch such as leaf litter, wood chips, or straw. Mulch serves to protect soil from the harsh effects of the sun and conserves water. There is often free mulch in front of City Hall on Carpinteria Avenue for small-scale pick-up. In addition, Santa Barbara County offers unlimited free mulch if you pick up at the transfer station, or will deliver for a small fee. See lessismore.org for details. And most importantly, let fallen leaves lie—they are

free compost and mulch in a perennial garden, as well as important habitat for many over-wintering insects such as one of our showiest native pollinators, the day-flying sphinx moth. growing a garden of long-lived plants is a choice which holds a lot of hope. Dense, perennial gardens are wishes for a long and healthy garden life, as well as a gift to the many creatures which call our community home. Alena Steen is Coordinator of the Carpinteria Garden Park, an organic community garden located at 4855 Fifth St., developed by the City’s Parks and Recreation Department. Community members rent a plot to grow their own fresh produce. The garden is also a center for public education, with classes on organic gardening, nutrition, and sustainability. For a complete schedule or more information visit carp-garden.com.

Hey, baby!

Roman Richard Direnzi

ECOlOgy ArTISAnS

Native elderberry, Sambucus mexicana, is covered in showy white blossoms in early spring that are pollinator heaven. The tree produces sweet berries in summer and might even bloom once more in the fall for almost year-round wildlife value.

Brianna and Curt Direnzi of Santa Barbara welcomed their newborn roman richard on Aug. 11, 2019. roman weighed 7 lbs and 8 oz and measured 21 inches. roman’s grandparents are lorie and rick Stout of Carpinteria and Joanne and gregg Direnzi of Pittsburgh.


Thursday, November 7, 2019  13

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Paige Van Tuyl brings 18 years of nonprofit management experience to her role as executive director of the Carpinteria Arts Center.

Carpinteria Arts Center names Paige Van Tuyl as executive director

Coming off her first day on the job as the executive director of the Carpinteria Arts Center, Paige Van Tuyl said, “I have just met 25 of the nicest people imaginable,” referring to the staff and volunteers with whom she will be working. A graduate of the University of California, Santa Barbara with a degree in the History of Art and Architecture, Van Tuyl brings 18 years experience in nonprofit work. She has held leadership positions at Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the Jewish Federation of Greater Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara City College Foundation. “I am excited to explore the opportunities to increase our impact as we build momentum as an organization,” Van Tuyl shared. She looks forward to “exploring new ways to craft and enhance our community’s experience, locating greater philanthropic partnerships, increasing awareness and value of the Arts Center’s identity and elevating the conversation around the arts.” Van Tuyl grew up in Mission Canyon Santa Barbara but has lived in Carpinteria for 17 years. Van Tuyl (pronounced “tile” from the Dutch) brings many local connections to her new position.

With the recent completion of the Art Center’s 865 Linden Avenue building, including new galleries, kitchen and studios and a refurbished courtyard, Boardmember David Powdrell said, “Having (Van Tuyl) at the helm will help elevate our nonprofit organization to meet its vision of being among the premier small-town community arts centers in America.” Board Chair Casey Summar added, “(VanTuyl) is exactly the dynamic leader the board was seeking for the Arts Center ’s next chapter. Our tremendously bright future just got that much brighter.” Van Tuyl also said “Getting my degree in the History of Art and Architecture inspired all of the moves in my career that have thankfully landed me at the Carpinteria Arts Center. It’s the smartest thing I’ve ever done.” When asked about her vision for the Arts Center, Van Tuyl mentioned collaborative events involving food, wine and music, opening the Arts Center for private events as a revenue stream and ensuring that “every single student in Carpinteria crosses our threshold at least once a year.” ––ChristianB eamish

Submit your arts news at

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14  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

60th Wedding Anniversary

Art and Magda Overgaag of Carpinteria celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary surrounded by their four children, Leo (Suzette) of Palm Desert, Ellen (Cary) Seyle of Santa Barbara, Pete (Shelley) of Santa Barbara, and Karin (Sean) Connolly of Santa Barbara, their 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family gathered together in Huntington Beach for a relaxing weekend that included a bonfire, a celebratory dinner honoring Art and Magda, a Champaign toast and a time for singing traditional Dutch songs.

Three-church holiday boutique kicks off the shopping season Photos by Robin KaRlsson First Baptist, Faith Lutheran and Carpinteria Community churches kicked off the holiday shopping season with a craftfilled holiday bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 2. Beautiful homemade decorations, gifts and baked goods at affordable prices filled the First Baptist hall, all lovingly crafted by congregants from the three churches. One of the first of many seasonal markets, this is a favorite in the community known for its one-of-a-kind holiday handcrafts and hearty home-cooked lunch.

At the Crafty Ladies’ post, Carol Nichols shows off her handmade cashmere throw.

aboVE: helen Russell and Jeanie Epley sell crotched blankets for cozy couches. at RiGht: With her basket of needles and yarn, Jeanne banner can make her creations from anywhere. FaR RiGht: During the thomas Fire, smoke and soot damaged First Baptist’s slat windows. Congregants like nola Ferguson salvaged the glass to make colorful wind chimes.


Thursday, November 7, 2019  15

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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the BOOK NOOK Carpinteria Library recommends

listens patiently, but there’s no actual information to follow up on. Days later, after midnight, the boy’s father is found in the street savagely beaten, perhaps terminally. Is there a connection to the son’s behavior? The plot of intrigue and secrets leads Brunetti to a very unpleasant moral conclusion. What happens next? Read this novel and learn why Leon fans read all her tales. —Megan Shannon, Friends of the Carpinteria Library volunteer

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Club SCene

“Beloved” by Toni Morrison

“Lucy Dreaming” by Max Bemis

Lucy is a sarcastic loner and much like other 13-year-old kids, she does not feel like she fits in with the rest of society. She’s a voracious reader and would rather get lost in a book than socialize with her peers. One night, she goes to sleep and finds herself as one of the archetypal female protagonists from her books. Every time she goes to sleep, she’s in someone else’s body taking out the bad guys. However, she finds that these dreams are not merely figments of her imagination but something that she is truly experiencing. When she’s in the shoes of a space-princess fighting battles, she’s really in danger of getting hurt and possibly dying. She finds out her best friend (and crush) is also experiencing the same dreams. However, instead of embracing the role of the hero, Welsey decides to take on the role of the villain. The real world and the dream world blur, putting people’s lives in danger. Lucy must put her feelings aside and defeat Welsey in order to restore balance between the real world and dream world. Recommended for teens and their parents who would appreciate a brilliant reference to a No Doubt song. Some may find the story a little convoluted and Lucy a little bratty, but the humor and artwork are worth the read. ––Blanca Ramirez, Librarian, Carpinteria Library

It’s hard to fathom the loss of Pulitzer Prize winning author and Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison. So much of her brilliant, brave and exquisitely beautiful body of work was about including what was missing—filling the gaps, piecing stories together in voices we hadn’t heard and resting them side by side. Before she was an author, Morrison was an editor, a single mother and a student of literature that bristled at reductive depictions of blackness that said more about the white men that created them. She set out to write books she’d like to read, untold stories from the AfricanAmerican community. “Beloved” was one such story not to be told, inspired by a newspaper account of Margaret Garner, a mother who killed her daughter rather than condemn her to a life of slavery. Decades after its publication, people still seek to ban this powerful exploration of the legacy of slavery and other Morrison works. Read or revisit “Beloved” and think of stories that haven’t been told in your community. —Giti White, Friends of the Carpinteria Library volunteer

The Playa Del Sur 4-H 2019-20 youth officers are, from left, VicePresident/Secretary Erika Estrada, Treasurer Alejandra Cruz and President Jasmyn Arroyo.

New officer trio moves 4-H forward

Playa Del Sur 4-H of Carpinteria swore-in its new 2018-19 Youth Officer Team: President Jasmyn Arroyo, Vice-President/Secretary Erika Estrada and Treasurer Alejandra Cruz. The new officer trio looks forward to achieving their goal of growing the club’s membership through exciting projects and fun events. The Playa Del Sur livestock facility is full of project animals including steers, a heifer, breeding sheep and goats. The group is also developing its gardening area with new raised beds for vegetables, fruit trees and a small greenhouse. Along with providing agriculture projects, the club plans to have baking, grilling, hiking, camping and leadership projects. The three plan to get the club out into the community with more service learning projects to help the environment and those in need. Officer Advisor Ron Vieira said, “These three young ladies are returning officers. They have a lot of experience and are very motivated to move this club forward.” For more information on 4-H, visit SB4H.org.

Carpinteria Library Book Club

Friends of the Carpinteria Library recommends

“The Girl Who Smiled Beads” by Clementine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil

“The Temptation of Forgiveness” by Donna Leon

The 27th of Leon’s series of Commissario Guido Brunetti’s excellent police work (despite his obstinate supervisor, Vice-Questore Patta) may be the best. Readers are still treated to the story of Brunetti’s happy family life amidst the hustle of modern life and politics in the beautiful, ancient city of Venice. A colleague of his wife Paola’s, Professoressa Crosera, files a complaint regarding her 15-year-old son’s sudden odd behavior: moodiness and failing grades in his prestigious school. Drugs? Brunetti

The Carpinteria Library Book Club is reading “The Girl Who Smiled Beads” by Clementine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil. Clementine was a child when a horrific civil war began in Rwanda. With her 15-year-old sister, Claire, she spent six harrowing years wandering through seven African countries. Finally, the girls were accepted as refugees into the United States. In Chicago, Claire married and had children, while Clementine was taken in by a well-off family. Eventually, they were able to see their parents again, but while her parents returned to Rwanda, Clementine went on to study comparative literature at Yale. Beautifully written, the book describes her experiences and her efforts to build her own life from her fractured past. —Suzanne Ahn, Carpinteria Library Book Club

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria member Diamond and her mother Courtney Frederick display their Día de Los Muertos masks at Family Literacy Night.

Girls Inc. hosts Día de los Muertos Family Literacy Night

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria held a Día de los Muertos-themed Family Literacy Night in late October for more than 100 guests, including Girls Inc. girls and their family members. The fun-filled evening featured hands-on, literacy-based activities in English and Spanish to help the girls practice common themes with their family members including rhyming, spelling and writing. Each family also received free books from Girls Inc. to help build their own personal libraries. Family Night participants enjoyed dinner, a raffle, unique prizes and the opportunity to make decorative masks. The special evening ended with hot chocolate and pan dulce. Family Nights at Girls Inc. take place quarterly as part of the organization’s ongoing efforts to reach more girls and further cultivate relationships with their families. For more information, visit girlsinc-carp.org.

CoastalView.com


16  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Elsabet, Moses and Olive Schlobohm came all the way from the Jurassic Period to compete in Carpinteria’s costume contest.

Trash was not delayed for Halloween, Ferryn Contreras was on duty all night.

Life is gourd: Costume contest brings community together

Photos by Robin KaRlsson

Before night fell on All Hallows’ Eve, dozens of costume-clad children and their families met at the Carpinteria Arts Center courtyard for the town’s silliest and spookiest event of the season: a Halloween costume contest sponsored by the Howard School. It’s the first year that the Howard School has put on a community costume contest, but when over 100 people came out for the event, they knew that they had started a tradition they’d be continuing for years to come, said Jason Rodriguez, Howard School parent/board member who helped organize the event. “The event went really well—it was reminiscent of the costume contests from my childhood in my hometown,” said Rodriguez. “I grew up in a small community and we would always have a costume contest in the town center. That’s a memory of mine that has lasted into adulthood for me.” Several businesses pitched in for prizes and small delights for kids, and the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office brought McGruff the Dog and a trunk full of treats. “There were people of all ages there and in costume having a good time,” Rodriguez said, “the event really brought everybody together.”

The crowd roared in support of their favorite costumes at the time of judging. From left are Griffin Jacobs, Lucas Jensen, Sully Teel, Ben Terry and Mateo Betancourt.

Sebastian Torres cruises onto the Arts Center courtyard.

The Pangan family, Leo, Josh and Angela, were characters from “Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.”


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SPORTS November 7, 2019

coach sorich preps players before practice begins.

2019-20 Warriors Basketball Preview

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Dylan o’neill speeds across the court.

By Alonzo orozco • Photos By rosAnA swing Last Saturday, Nov. 2, the Carpinteria High School boys basketball team was in the midst of tryouts. For the second season in a row, the Warriors program will be under new leadership, as last year’s coach Corey Adam joined the coaching staff at his alma mater, Santa Barbara High. The 2018-19 season was a memorable one with Carpinteria enjoying one of its most successful journeys, making it all the way to the CIF-SS semifinals, as well as participating in the CIF State Tournament. The team’s new coach, Scott Sorich, has seen his share of successes on the hardwood as well. As an assistant at nearby St. Bonaventure in Ventura, Sorich helped guide the Seraphs to four consecutive TriValley League titles and a trip to the 2018 CIF-SS Four-AA championship game. As the JV coach, his squad went undefeated for three straight seasons. As a studentathlete at Santa Clara in Oxnard, he was a member of the 1997 CIF-SS championship team under the tutelage of coach Lou Cvijanovich. But this season, the new coach will be without the services of 2019 graduates: Ali Hamadi, Myles Morgan, Noah Nuno, Chris Ramirez and David Serrano. Although, Sorich lost some key contributors, he so far likes what he sees from this year’s group. “I’m excited, the players look good, they’ve got good chemistry,” said Sorich. “The fact that they’ve all known each other, and they’ve played a lot together, even in the offseason that helps a lot,” he explained. The Warriors will have eight returners from last season: Jo Jo Gonzalez, Mateo Handall, Gabe Medel, Caleb Nangle, Luke Nakasone, Dylan O’Neill, Ian Reed and Jose Suarez. Four of those returners:

Medel, Nakasone, Reed and Suarez play together with a local club team, the Mavericks. “Staying involved and actively working on their skill set throughout the year is important,” Sorich said. He knows this firsthand from his experience as the director of Ventura County Swoosh, a club basketball program that he started in 2010. Like many Carpinteria basketball teams over the years the squad will rely on the talents of a few key players, with Suarez and Nakasone likely to be called on to win the battle of the boards when it comes to rebounding against taller opponents. Multi-sport standout Tyler Cervantes, who also plays both football and basketball, is expected to provide some muscle as well. Senior Esteban Zapata and juniors Junior Najera and Justin Rogers round out the rest of the squad. Although, he hasn’t looked at film of this year’s competition in the Citrus Coast League, Sorich is familiar with many of the coaches. “I know that Scott Hannah’s been (coaching) a couple years at Nordhoff, and he’ll be able to put his imprint on that program,” he said. “Same thing with Hueneme, I believe they’ve graduated quite a few players, not sure what Marty’s (Meyer) working with over there.” Hueneme won the inaugural Citrus Coast League championship with the Warriors taking second last season. Carpinteria will start a new basketball era on Nov. 22 when they travel to play Channel Islands with the tip-off at 7:30 p.m. On Dec. 4, they’ll host long-time rival Bishop Diego in a showdown at Warriors Gym starting at 7 p.m.

First year warriors coach, scott sorich, looks on as Jose suarez defends the hoop in a one-on-one with Justin rogers.


18  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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PreP News Carpinteria School Girls tennis

October 30 - Carpinteria High School girls tennis participated in the Citrus Coast League Girls Individual Tennis Tournament hosted on the campus courts. “We had a solid showing in singles with Emma Lapidus and Sydney Endow making the semifinals before both lost to Malibu players,” said Warriors coach Charles Bryant. “Jeannette Carrillo/Zahra Porinsh had a great run as well before falling in the semifinals,” said Bryant.

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Sydney Endow, left, and Emma Lapidus, right squared off in an epic battle for third place in the Citrus Coast League Individual Finals.

October 31 - Carpinteria High School hosted the Citrus Coast League Girls Tennis Individual Tournament Finals and third place matches in singles and doubles. The doubles match was over before it started as the Hueneme duo was unable to participate. Number-five seed Jeannette Carrillo/Zahra Porinsh (Carpinteria) beat Number-two seed Alondra Rojas/Maria Espinoza (Hueneme). “What was lacking in actual matches was made up for in the singles third place match as there was a two-and-a-halfhour battle between Warrior teammates and friends Emma Lapidus and Sydney Endow, said coach Charles Bryant. In the end, Endow defeated Lapidus in three sets, 6-2, 2-6 and 7-5. Endow will be the alternate for singles and Carrillo/ Porinsh will be the alternate in doubles for the CIF Sectionals held on Monday, Nov. 25.

Rosana swing

Second from left, Senior Luke Nakasone launches out the gate amongst crowded competition at the SB County Championship Cross Country Meet at River Park Lompoc.

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Cross country medalists are, from left, Savannah Alvarez, Monse Alpizar, Hugo Alvarado, Kate Cooney and Shayla Alvarez.

Cross Country

October 30 - The Carpinteria High School cross country team competed in the Santa Barbara County Championships in Lompoc at River Park. Boys top results included: 25th place for Luke Nakasone with a time of 17:19.29, Hugo Alvarado ran a time of 18:07.66, in 55th was David Celio at 18:11.83, in 75th was Fernando Barahona in 19:23.13 and in 80th was Esteban Zapata with a time of 19:39.69. The girls top results: 10th place finish for Shayla Alvarez in 20:10.04, the 12th place spot for Savannah Alvarez with a time of 20:12.62, and 13th was captured by Monse Alpizar in 22:30.26. In the 15th slot was Kate Cooney in 22:34.52.

Jo Jo gonzalEz

The Warriors beat Vazquez High School, finishing the season 2-7.

Football

November 1 - The Carpinteria High School football team beat Vasquez in their final game of the season on the road in Acton by a score of 40-14. Juniors Diego Mendez and Tristan Kelly each ran for two touchdowns, and senior Ever Santamaria also ran for a score. Special teams tallied a safety on a blocked punt, as the Warriors went up 23-0 in the first half and held a 30-6 halftime lead. Carpinteria added another touchdown to extend the lead to 37-14. Junior kicker Vincent Rinaldi closed out the scoring with a 37-yard field goal. “I’m proud of the team, the biggest thing I’m proud of is the seniors kept the team together,” said Warriors coach Mario Robinson. “With all the injuries we had and even the fires we had in the last two weeks and games being canceled, they could have easily said ‘we’re not into it.’” Carpinteria finishes 2-7 on the year.

PREP NEWS Continued on page 19

ON DECK

Thursday, November 7

Carpinteria Cross Country, League Meet No. Three, Elkins Ranch Fillmore, 3:30 p.m. Carpinteria Boys Water Polo, CIF Round Two, TBA, 5 p.m. Cate Cross Country, Tri-Valley League Finals, 2 p.m.

Friday, November 8

Cate Girls Tennis, CIF-SS, Div. One, Round Two, TBA, 2 p.m. Carpinteria Girls Tennis, CIF-SS, Div. Three, Round Two, TBA, 2 p.m.

Saturday, November 9

Email sports news to news@coastalview.com

*Cate Football, CIF-SS Eight-Person, Div. One playoff game vs. Calvary Chapel (Downey), 1:30 p.m. Carpinteria Boys Water Polo, CIF Quarterfinals, TBA. *Denotes home game


Thursday, November 7, 2019  19

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

PREP NEWS

Rosana swing

Carpinteria High School’s boys water polo team finished undefeated as the Citrus Coast League champions.

Continued from page 18

Boys water polo

November 5 - The Carpinteria High School boys water polo team traveled to Long Beach to take on Millikan in the first round of the CIF-SS Division Four playoffs. The Warriors, who finished the season beating Nordhoff to claim the Citrus Coast League title, fell to the Rams 11-5. “Senior Nathan Endow played a tight defense game and gave the Warriors their first goal to bring some energy to the team,” said Carpinteria coach Sergio Castaneda. “Sophomore Coby Gonzalez also had a strong game, creating a lot of offensive pressure with his two-meter play and scoring a crucial goal after the Warriors were down.” Carpinteria finishes league, 8-0 and overall 12-12.

Cate School Girls tennis

October 31 - Cate School senior tennis players Carol Cai and Grace Fuss defended their Tri-Valley League (TVL) doubles title on Thursday. “The Cate team came out hot, winning the first set 6-1, but faced stiff competition from seniors Alyssa McClain and Jolie Seemayer in a 7-5 second set,” said Rams coach Trevor Thorpe. In the other title match, Helena Insua of St Bonaventure defeated Natalie Cheng of Thacher to take the TVL singles title. Fritze Mayer/Ashi Kamra of Cate beat Maxine Tamas/Ami Wallmark of Thacher, 6-2, 6-3. Jacqueline Kong of Thacher defeated Yuki Kobayashi of Cate, 6-2, 6-2.

Cross country

October 30 - The Cate school cross country team competed in the santa Barbara County Cross Country Championships at River Park. Rams sophomore Anna DiSorbo was county champion, and the school’s first-ever winner, taking the three-mile course in 18:57. Fellow sophomore and co-captain Meena Baher finished in fifth with a time of 19:35. For the boys, Tesfa Asmara captured 11th place in 16:30.

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Girls volleyball

October 30 - The Cate School girls volleyball team fell to Valley View in the CIF playoffs, three games to one with scores of 25-22, 22-25, 21-25 and 21-25. “We played against a very good team, we played well and our stats were good but looking at the scores I would guess Valley View’s stats were just a little bit better,” said Rams coach Greg Novak. Grace Blankenhorn defensively, tallied 27 digs. Elise Hermes led Cate in kills with 14. Grace Johnson had six kills with no errors. The Tri-Valley League champion Rams finish the season, 17-4.

Football

November 2 – The Cate School football team hosted rival Thacher to decide first place in the Mt. Pinos League, dropping the game to the Toads by a score of 48-32. Will Deardorff ran for a score and threw a 24-yard touchdown pass to Khadim Pouye, and a 13-yarder to Scott Holmes in the loss. The Rams finished tied for first in league and will host a CiF-ss Eight-Person Division one playoff game this saturday, nov. 9 against Calvary Chapel of Downey with the kickoff scheduled for 1:30 p.m.

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20 n Thursday, November 7, 2019

Honor Roll

2019

The Abe Family John & Nell Able Rick & Kathy Abney Cliff & Gayle Adams Glenn & Valerie Alger David & Susan Allen Ken & Sue Anderson Hank & Pat Arellanes Sally E. Austin Andy & Carol Bailard Jim & Jean Bailard Kevin & Donna Baird Alterio A-G Banks Virginia Barrison Marianne Bartholomew Dorett Bass Jane Benefield Don & Vera Bensen Jack Bevilockway Bill’s Coins David & Barbara Bloedel Julie A. Boller Christie & Jeff Boyd John & Arida Brand Steve & Linda Bratcher Betty Brown Carol Bury Kelli Butler Sally Ann Camp Gary & Geri Campopiano Jim & Valerie Campos Lois Capps The Caratan Family Carpinteria Beautiful Carpinteria Cotton Co. Carpinteria Seal Watch Carpinteria Seniors Citizens Inc. Carpinteria Valley Association Anna & Gary Carrillo Mark & Josina Carter Pamela Christian Jeff & Gayle Clay Tim & Janey Cohen Jim & Jolene Colomy Jim & Mary Ann Colson James Conger Bruce & Judi Conroy Grant Cox Enterprises Beth & Grant Cox Jane Craven & Don Higley Frank & Sandy Crowe T. Culver Maria J. D’Angelo Cullen & Dottie Deck Ellen & Rob Denholtz Betsy Denison In Loving Memory of Kathryn DiRado Arthur & Carole Dobreski Melissa Doyle Glenn & Kathy Dubock Paul Dunham Sally & Terry Eagle Rae & Dan Emmett Lynda Fairly The Faoro Family Sherrie Fisher Mr. & Mrs. John Thomas Fly Paul & Mary Foley LIN KIM BER SHI RLE Y to SOLD! thing I list turns l.com Every

805-886-0228

skimberlin@ao

on the back page This week’s listings

Coastal CA RPI NT ER IA

Vol. 23, No. 44

Bob & Elene Franco Anne Fraser & Robert Lehmann David & Elizabeth Freed Clyde & Diana Freeman John & Christine Frontado Gene & Dee Funkhouser Marguerite T. Gamo Steve & Ann Garcia Kaydance & Kenzington Gardner Doug & Nancy Garrison Gaynor Ranch Roberta Germanetti Jeremy & Calla Gold David & Annie Goodfield Bill & Sharon Green Lisa Guravitz & Fred Shaw Charles B. Hamilton E. Handall Margo Handelsman Louise Hansen & Jim Reginato Nancy Haviland Chris Hecox In Memory of Bob Henry Kathy Henry Reggie Hepp Lynda Hershey Hilltop Flowers, Inc. Suzi Hopkins Evelyne M. Houdek Julia Hoyt Virgil & Lee Huelskamp Diane M. Huerta Barbara Hurd Robbie & Ed Hutto Kim Ishida Zoe Iverson & Gib Johnson Donna & Bob Jordan Kathy Kaura Wilma Kirk Michelle Kisor Richard & Chicki Kitagawa Brian F. Klinge Alan & Carol Koch Jim & Roz Kohute Craig & Denise Kono KOPSUN LLC Ron Lafrican & Luzzie Hernandez Alice Larsen Las Palmalitas Ranch Laughing Buddha Roberta & George Lehtinen Fred & Donna Lemere Jon & Sue Lewis Patricia Lieberknecht John Litsinger Marge Lorang The Lou Grant Parent-Child Workshop Paula J. Lund Glenna & Thomas Luschei The Luthard Family Sara Lyons Sara Lyons Wendy & Tim MacMurray Bill Mahlke & Bonnie Curtis Charlene Maltzman Mrs. Sharon Manges Peter & Elizabeth Mann Harry & Patricia Manuras Bill & Ann Matson Mariko Matsuyama

Last month marked Coastal View News’ 25th year of publishing—a milestone we reached thanks to the support of the community. On the first Thursday of each month CVN publishes the Honor Roll to thank readers and advertisers for their generous support. For the past ten years, this support has played a critical role in keeping CVN in the stands each week and full of local news that cannot be found in any other media. The outpouring of support inspired by the Honor Roll has established a deeper connection between the newspaper and its readers. Additionally, the hundreds of names that appear in the Honor Roll have also sent a message to advertisers—Carpinterians are dedicated to their local newspaper. In turn, the staff of CVN is dedicated to its readers. As the publishers of your community newspaper, we appreciate the relationship we have with you, our readers, and we pledge to keep bringing you all the news of the Carpinteria Valley. Marianne & Kevin McCarthy Ron & Barbara McClain Joan McCoy Jim & Jennifer McIntosh Amanda McIntyre Lorraine McIntyre Carlena McKnerney Steve & Laurie McMahon Paddy McMahon & Heidi Chesley Chuck & Dolores McQuary Greta Meaney Norma Migliazza Bradley & Emily Miles Judy & Mike Modugno Dave & Louise Moore Terry & Dianne Moore Pat Moorhouse Judy Mulford Peter & Ann Mullins Tom & Kamie Mulroy Jane Murray Donnie Nair Andy & Yvonne Neumann Langdon & Linda Nevens Anh & Ha Ngo Carol & Peter Nichols John & Virginia Nickelsen Nola Treloar Nicklin Weldon & Ann Nomura Peggy Oki - Origami Whales Project Rick & Trudy Olmstead Alonzo & Amy Marie Orozco Mary Ota & Family Wendy & Jerry Paley Lou & Susie Panizzon Marty & Nan Panizzon Steve & Judy Pearce Tony S. Perez, Jr. & Family Gail & John Persoon The Piltz Family B. P. Betty Popnoe Valerie & David Powdrell Anita & Alex Pulido Ted Rhodes & Joan Pascal Elizabeth Risdon Marilou Rivera Greg & Laura Robinson Steve & Susan Ruthven Saito Family Theodore Sampson Ernie & Sally Sanchez Wally & Janice Schilling Thelma Schmidhauser Nancy & Wayne Schoenfeld Stan & Terry Scrivner Arlene & Jack Sega Marty Selfridge Shade Farm Management

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July 27 - Augu

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View News

School district supe welcomes new

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“Fools” makes crowd LOL

Viva La Fiesta!

Flamen co With her fiery dazzlin g smile, dancing and of Fiesta this year’s Spirit ga captiNorma Escarce ants vates the particip of of the Friends Fiesta the Library’s was event. This event 22 y, July Saturda last held and is an anat Seaside Park ’s Santa Barbara for r nual precurso ion, held Days celebrat Old Spanish ga will also to 6. Escarce ’s unoffrom Aug. 2 at this Sunday ón del wow the crowds Recepci La to Fiesta, of Fiesta, ficial kickoff the 2017 Spirit Presidente. As of the charm ent embodim Escarcega is an her stunning Days through of Old Spanish character. dancing and MARCO MEDINA

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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n Garden colum goes on the road

Rick & Trish Shade Diana Simpson The Skenderians Barbara & Sanderson Smith Bob & Marcy Smith Brad & Barbara Smith John & Marge Soper Theri & Gemma Sotelo The Sprigg Family Terry Stain Gordon & Barb Statler Rebecca Stebbins Brad & Carla Stein Evan Turpin Cherry Stockton Bob & Kathi Stokes Fred & Shirley Strickler Tom & Brenda Sullivan Eric & Jane Swain Jim & Donna Swinford Hisaye Takahashi Diane Thackeray Ted & Mary Anne Theilmann Dorothy Thielges Dynise Thompson Bob & Chris Thompson Thario’s Kitchen Diana & Don Thorn Jeff Thuner John Tilton Ruthie Tremmel Danel Trevor Evan Turpin Elise Unruh Steve & Noel Urbanovich Susan & Scott Van Der Kar Robert & Elizabeth Van Eyck Harry & Michele Van Wingerden Winfred Van Wingerden & Sheila Batson Joe & Alice Vazquez In Honor of Our Intrepid Photographer Robin Christiy & John Venable Ariele Brittain & Eric von Schrader Gayle Ward Paul & Nancy Warner In honor of Jon “Fun Fun” Washington Jerry & Brenda Watkins Tom & Mary Watts Dick Weinberg Alan Weiss & Cheryl Smith Woody & Vi White Tyson & Betty Willson Leslie & Carla Wilson Jilla Wolsey Mike & Diane Wondolowski Grace Young Donna Zehrung Mary & Paul Zeoli Dr. & Mrs. D. Ziehl

16

NAME_______________________________________________ PHONE _______________ ADDRESS_____________________________________________________________

Fur balls learn the ropes

26

HONOR ROLL LISTING __________________________________________________

Please mail to 4856 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013 • (805) 684-4428


Thursday, November 7, 2019  21

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Best: I forgive easily. Worst: I’m impatient. -Manuela Aguirre

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Best: My ability to make Best: I’m good at sales. people laugh. Worst: I Worst: I like to buy can’t do math. stuff. -Meri Gyves -Pete “Persnicks” Anderson

W W W. C O A S TA LV I E W. C O M


22  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Public Notices ADVERTISEMENT OF LIEN SALE Notice is given that pursuant to Sections 21701-21715 of the business and professions code, section 2328 of the commercial code, and section 535 of penal code, McCann Mini Storage, 1222 Cravens Lane, Carpinteria, CA 93013, will sell by competitive bidding November 14, 2019 11:00am Auction to be held online at: www.storagetreasures.com, property to be sold is as follows: Miscellaneous household goods, personal property, clothing, furniture, and business items. Name: Matthew Lopez Matthew Lopez Jerry Lindaman Christine Shorrock Christine Shorrock

Unit: A-228 D-229 B-264 E-226 E-236

Size: 5 x 11 9 x 10 5x7 10 x 10 10 x 10

Storage Treasures www.storagetreasures.com For technical matters call: Phone: 480-397-6503 Publish: October 31 & November 7, 2019 ________________________________ ADVERTISEMENT OF LIEN SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 21701-21715 OF THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONS CODE, SECTION 2328 OF THE COMMERCIAL CODE, AND SECTION 535 OF PENAL CODE, THE STORAGE PLACE-CARPINTERIA, 6250 VIA REAL CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 WILL SELL BY COMPETITIVE BIDDING ON MONDAY NOVEMBER 18, 2019 AT 11:30 AM AUCTION TO BE HELD AT ABOVE ADDRESS. PROPERTY TO BE SOLD IS AS FOLLOWS: MISC. HOUSEHOLD GOODS, PERSONAL PROPERTY, CLOTHING, FURNITURE, AND BUSINESS ITEMS. NAME

UNIT NUMBER

Berman, Kazimir G Cameron, Karl C Cameron, Karl C Capra, Deborah Cramer, Patricia Hicks, Deborah L Leonesio, Katie L McNeese, Darren Moens, Brian O’Brien, Thomas M O’Brien, Thomas M Ortiz, Timothy Rios, Brenda Sember, Susan Smith, Joanne C Stevenson, James Tulio LLC

743 724 753 2744 786 2544 2278 214 2795 2686 2689 986 558 2422 737 410 160

JAMES O’BRIEN STATE LICENSE #BN 10067768 (RS88990) PHONE (951) 681-4113 ADVERTISEMENT OF LIEN SALE LIEN SALE PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE SECTION 3071 OF STATE OF CALIFORNIA, THE FOLLOWING VEHICLE TO BE SOLD BY COMPETITIVE BIDDING ON MONDAY NOVEMBER 18, 2019 AT 11:30 AM AUCTION TO BE HELD AT THE STORAGE PLACECARPINTERIA, 6250 VIA REAL CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 2003 Harley Davidson RS Motorcycle LIC: 16N7525 Ca. VIN: 1HD1GHV363K315622 ENG: GHV3315622 Quast John John E. Quast Teresa O’Brien’s Lien Service Reg #88990 O’Briens Auction Service B/N 10067768 951-681-4113 Publish: November 7, 14, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as MYSTICAL ABODE ENTERPRISES at 4672 ELEANOR DRIVE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): (1) KOLBE, JESSICA (2) KOLBE, RAYMOND at BUSINESS ADDRESS: same as above. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. This statement was filed with the County 9/30/2019. The registrant began

transacting business on: 3/8/2012. Signed: Raymond W. Kolbe. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor. No. 2019-0002398 Publish: Oct. 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7, 2019 _______________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO. 19CV05115 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Pet itioner: REINER EDMUND SCHMEGNER for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: REINER EDMUND SCHMEGNER PROPOSED NAME: THOMAS CARL REINER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on November 27, 2019 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on October 11, 2019, by Judge Pauline Maxwell. Publish: Oct. 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7, 2019 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SAHARAN GEMS at 7051 STORY PLACE, UNIT 304, GOLETA, CA 93117. Full name of registrant(s): GAIDI, MONCEF at BUSINESS ADDRESS: same as above. This business is conducted by: an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 9/19/2019. The registrant began transacting business on: N/A Signed: Moncef Gaidi. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor. No. 2019-0002294 Publish: Oct. 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7, 2019 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SANGER SWYSEN & DUNKLE at 125 E. DE LA GUERRA STREET, STE 102, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): SANGER, ROBERT M at BUSINESS ADDRESS: same as above. This business is conducted by: an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/11/2019. The registrant began transacting business on: N/A Signed: ROBERT M. SANGER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor. No. 2019-0002544 Publish: Oct., 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as MOTEL 6 - LOMPOC at 1521 N H STREET, LOMPOC, CA 93436. Full name of registrant(s): VEER DEVELOPMENT LLC at business address: 5100 E LA PALMA AVE, SUITE 201, ANAHEIM, CA 92807. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. This statement was filed with the County 10/14/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor. No. 2019-0002554

Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as TREAD RACK at 520 FARNEL RD SUITE G, SANTA MARIA CA 93455. Full name of registrant(s): PATTERSON, DAVID CLARENCE at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/23/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: David Patterson. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002666

Publish: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1) RELO FUNDING (2) TRULY MORTGAGE at 2020 ALAMEDA PADRE SERRA SUITE 223, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. Full name of registrant(s): AMERIFIRST FINANCIAL INC. at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/21/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five

Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as DDBBS at 4549 VIA HUERTO, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110. Full name of registrant(s): DEL BIANCO, DENISE at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/28/2019. The registrant began transacting business on 9/01/2019. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in

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Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS at 6508 CAMINO CARRETA, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): CHARTIER, ANTOINETTE L. at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/14/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002558

Publish: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as TALARIA VINEYARDS at 4225 N. PALM ST, FULLERTON, CA 92835. Full name of registrant(s): HOUDINI, INC. at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/16/2019. The registrant began transacting business on 10/01/2007. Signed: Deborah Dean. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002588

Coastal View News Name

years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002636

subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002704 Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SANTA BARBARA DETAIL SUPPLY at 4228 #3 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): WANEK, GENE at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/16/2019. The registrant began transacting business on 9/01/2014. Signed: Gene J. Wanek. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002587 Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as THARIO’S KITCHEN at 3807 SANTA CLAUS LANE, CARPINTERIA,CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): MTR 46, INC at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/29/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002714 Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as HARVEST SANTA BARBARA at 3920 VIA REAL, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): AGGRIGATOR, INC at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/28/2019. The registrant began transacting business on 10/25/2019. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any

change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002701 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as GAME SWAG at 321 INGER DR. UNIT L111, SANTA MARIA, CA 93454. Full name of registrant(s): (1) MAESTAS, J.P. (2) WINTERS, SHAWN at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. This statement was filed with the County 10/24/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Shawn Winters. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002673 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019 ________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as DELA WEAR DESIGNS at 180 HOLLY AVENUE #8, CARPINTERIA,CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): GILES, HOWARD at business address: same as above. This business is conducted by an Individual This statement was filed with the County 11/04/2019. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2019-0002751 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019 _______________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT. The following Entity(is) have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s): BORRELLO’S PIZZA & PASTARIA at 3807 SANTA CLAUS LANE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): MTR46, INC at 3807 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria, CA 93013. This business was conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 10/30/2019. Signed: N/A. The registrant commenced to transact business on N/A. I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. Original FBN No. 2019-0000766 Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019

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24 Thursday, 2019 28 Thursday,November March 28,7,2019 24  Thursday, April 7, 2011 Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Coastal View News ••Carpinteria, California Coastal Coastal View View News News • Carpinteria, Carpinteria, California California

THROWBACK THURSDAY

CVN

Long ago Cravens Fighting fire with a for district: gold fire A look The Cravens family has a long and into the history of complex history in the Carpinteria Valley, all of which CSFD, partcan 3 be traced back to

Divine digits: A guide to live by

the 1828 birth of an Alabama boy named Thomas. The ambitious Thomas Cravens Editor’s note: The Carpinteria-Summerout-dreamed the boundaries of his home land Fire District’s long history in the valley stateMIRIAM at a young age and let the magnet LINDBECK is BY recorded in a booklet published in 1984 to of the Gold Rush pull him west. He left miriam@coastalview.com honor the district’s 50th anniversary. Relying home at 21, crossing overland through on information from this publication, Coastal New Mexico, Arizona and Southern Spring has cold/heat, rain/ April 15-21 View News is arrived coveringin the district’s history California. From San Diego, a small boat sun, massive naturalThursday” and manmade in a series of “Throwback articles. As the feminine principle carried him north to San Francisco, the disasters, outreach like the schools globe This series and on Carpinteria’s early embraces duality and draws launch pad for gold miners. has not done as our world originally ran inbefore. CVN inJust 2011. it into harmony, such is the Thomaswith initially mined American is dealing the hand ofthe duality, so case this week. After freeRiver, but later shifted his focus to aboveareThe you1950s this month, Carpinteria, through the 1970s only saw ground resources. Heand worked in the thinking and global awareness, this you do so with seeing embracing tremendous growth in Carpinteria; new next seven days is all about solid founlumber businessand andchoosing eventually those opposites theowned path a dation, stability, calm, right and wrong tracts of homes sprouted up, the shopof saw mills. In 1856, he married ofnumber cooperation. ping plazas at Casitas Pass Road opened Elizabeth Humes, and the couple made and—surprise—tradition! This week, for business, condominium complexes their home in Northern California for Carpinteria, you are a four and you build went up, and in 1965, the bustling town This month everything to last. You anchor security over a decade. of A Carpinteria became a city. Accordtwo for this In 1868, the month, Cravensyou headed south, in your dealings, do honest and good ingly, the Carpinteria-Summerland Fire are over-lit by the feminine wintering in Los Angeles before laying labor, and you are disciplined and sober. Protection District grew prinand modernized infl uence. The female down roots in Carpinteria. Thomas pur- You are not afraid to get the job done, alongside the population it served. ciple cradles allranch dualities chased a 60-acre with a small adobe manage your affairs with endurance and CARpINTERIA VALLEy MuSEuM OF HISTORy Fire inspector and fire marshal concentration, and prove yourself worand them into aofthird Week of 11/4/19 - 11/10/19 CARpinteRiA-SummeRLAnd FiRe pRoteCtion diStRiCt Week ofposi3/25/19 - 3/31/19 andmerges a tangled expanse thickposition: chaparral tions were added in the early 1960s, and With 11 children, Thomas and Elizabeth Cravens had no shortage of workers for their 130-acre Carpinteria thy of holding the world in your arms. harmony and teamwork. The two is all Firefighters struggle to quench flames in a four-business fire that started in the Melody Club on the 700 block and oaks. Over the next several years, the number of firefighters leapt from ranch. of the human experience, you about coordination, organization, unifi11- ofManager Linden Avenue. The 1971 blaze engulfed a welding shop, where exploding gas cylinders intensified the the Cravens worked steadily to improve in 1959 flto 23 a decade later. Two new bring order out of chaos andthe spirit into cation, exibility, adaptability, patience their property. They added 70 acres to difficulty owned aof number of horses, mules and family. In all, Thomas and Elizabeth Descendants of Thomas and Elizabeth extinguishing fire. engines occupied theisCarpinteria and matter. Just as a woman bearing a child, and evolution. This your month to their holdings and built a new house on cows. raised 11 children. still live in Carpinteria today. Summerland stations. of In the his 17 years as teria Water Company, which provided an 1964 created a tornado that wreaked hav- swept through the foothills behind Carof life force coalesces in propyou lower the Following amplitude masculine the land. the agricultural trend all manner While their land expanded and Thomas’ local influence expanded as fire chief, from 1952 to 1969, Frank Floyd inadequate system for supplying sufficient on homes in the 3800 block of Foothill pinteria in 1971, leaving three U.S. Forest you prepare to bring in the ocwell. leadership turn up thebeans power of the day,role theyand planted lima and this ertyweek, valuesasincreased, so did the Cravens By the time he died at age 60, he had To learn more about Carpinteria’s unique and achieved many of the listening, goals he had set out water and pressure to fight fires, was re- Road. Most tragic of all, the Romero Fire Service firefighters dead in its wake. new civilization. on tact, diplomacy, learning served on the school board, on the County interesting past, visit the Carpinteria Valley for district, a long of placed by the Carpinteria Valley Water Disandthe paying closeleaving attention. Leanlegacy on your Board of Supervisors and as a member of Museum of History, open Tuesday through district improvements. in 1941. Overhaul of the water system intuition—it’s flawless and it leads to trict April 22-28 The Weekly Crossword Margie E.Maple BurkeAve. the Knights of pythias Lodge. Saturday from 1 to by 4 p.m. at 956 The Weekly Crossword by Margie E. Burke Jack Risdon wore the chief’s 1950s and 1960s, greatly benefited the understanding and right choice.hat from in the With your abundant nature 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ACROSS 2hetogether 3 4 to 5 6 7 capacity 8 9 of the 10 11 12 13 1969 tois1972, and when resigned, firefighting district. ACROSS This the month to1work ofImprovements attracting wealth through 1 Tapering Claude Welch became fire chief, a position to the district, of course, Bigyour name in care1for community, to partner with 14 15 16 14 15 16 healthy work, your eight hairstyles he retained untilwork 1989.happily as groups did not stop fires from starting, and pineapples each other and reappears for Carpinteria the first time 17 18 19 6 Donations for In5 the 1970s the district new,18 during this era extension 17 a added 19 Valley expewith aHome vision. You have perfectasense this year. This week you resume your the poor modern station on Walnut Avenue and rienced a handful of noteworthy blazes. 10 Thick slice of timing and can enjoy20being the power 20 21 22 23 leadership role with 21 22 renewed insight. 10 Track remodeled the Summerland “Melody Club Fire” burned four 14 Nilethe wader behind throne. The throne station. is your The Working inon concert with your feminine 24 25 assignment Communication improved businesses the 700 15 River by the and 23 of 24 25 block of Linden overall direction, andstaffing taking the role side, you focus now on organizations, 14 Bungling dramatically at this this time—radio systems in 1971, and the Santa Barbara Louvre the right hand month produces far Avenue 26 27 28 29 30 on achievement, on money and material 26 27 28 29 30 31 15 Cut the crop grew, the South Coast System Association packinghouse fire in 16 Insurable item more than grabbing theDispatch reins. So defer to Lemon comforts. Though the eight is driven to 16 One more time 31 32 33 34 35 36 was put into place and a32business reserve firefighter Tupelo, to Elvis proved to be the largest structure the17women, the female associa- 1978 33 34 35 36 fire 37 work hard, to attract prosperity on ev17 Heart chambers program was launched. 19 Monopoly token in Carpinteria history. tions and pamper the ladies at home this 37 38 39 40 ery level, to40succeed and41to be granted 38 and water reli18 Reid of 20 Fixed gaze Firefighting equipment Carpinteria’s more rural areas didn’t month. Your rewards will be untold. 39 power by those around it, you do so with "American Pie" 21 Young bird ability also improved. The private Carpin-43 escape the heat either. The Polo Fire of 43 44 41 42 42 peace at44your core. You 45 are considered 19 "___ la France!" 23 Speak April 1-7 an authority, and 45 46 47 46 47 tie48the infinite to the 20 Antique photo pompously Sudoku Puzzle by websudoku.com Sudoku Puzzle bynourishing websudoku.com fi nite in a forever loop. Your By the time you read this 22 Scam artist 25 Barrel racing 52 48 49 50 51 49 50 51 integrity52 in 53 your work in concert with paragraph, 24 Icy coating venue your first seven Level: Easy Easy the 56 nine’s powers, builds a world of the days willofbePooh done.Level: What 54 55 56 57 25 Eavesdroppers, 53 54 im55 57 58 59 60 26 Pal future aligned with higher consciousness pressed you this week was say 29 Cloudless 58 59 60 61 62 63 mankind. How much and service to all the32number five. Five is61change and risk26 In _____ (not Race anagram more feminine can you get? taking; it’swith progressive, unconventional, 62 63 64 present) 33 Hate a 64 65 66 observant and quick thinking. It is the 30 Moral misstep passion 65 66 67 68 69 power of free thought,67operating out of April 29-30 31 Tuckered out 35 Links standard the38box andJune, continuous movement. Five 32 Sun. sermonizer Ruth, or Copyright 2019 by The Puzzle Syndicate Traversing like2019 a comet, Copyright by The Puzzle Syndicate constantly and a c h quake Sudoku has a 33 EMinor E a cAnita h S improves, u d o k u h acommunicates s a you throw yourself into the pours itself into marketing, advertising, solution that can unique solution that can 37 unique Polish off DOWN 29 Turn away 47 Milk-related 40 Varnish thinner 4 Female hormone cosmos 37 Music Fiji neighbor as character completion,51masbe reached logically 1withnetworking, sales and promotions. The be logically 38 Bitty bouquet Italy-based car 34 Place for a 48 Comic strip 42 reached Put the kibosh onwith5 Cleopatra's 39 Brownish gray 53 Marinara tery and wisdom. A nine out guessing. Enter digits symbol of in humanity public welfare, out guessing. digits 40 She played Jan company hurdle sound 43 Pain theEnter chestand serpent 41 Lacking alternative these last two days, nothing can throw from to sitcom 9 into the blank 1number to 9 into thelife blank it from is for flows andpottery being on a 1 60's 2 "Nay" sayer 35 ____ the edge 49 Put to the test 45the Cultural pursuits 6 Dutch Track event you diplomacy off your course. 55 Burning through Every spaces. Every row must open to what’s And what’s next 41 spaces. 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Thursday, November 7, 2019  25

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

CVN

THIS WEEK

IN CARPINTERIA

Submit Your Weekly Event News Online at CoastalView.com

THURSDAY

7

PRESCHOOLER STORY TIME

BINGO

1 p.m. Veterans Building, 941 Walnut Ave.

FARMERS MARKET AND ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR 3-6:30 p.m. Linden Ave. (805) 698-4536

LIVE MUSIC: CRV

8:30 p.m. The Palms, 701 Linden Ave. (805) 684-3811

FRIDAY

8

ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER COACHING 3-5 p.m. Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave. Call to reserve time: (805) 684-4314.

FREE

VIGIL FOR FAMILIES AND CHILDREN HELD AT THE BORDER

FILM SCREENING: “FAR FROM THE TREE.” The Santa Barbara Reads program and the Carpinteria Library will screen this powerful documentary that depicts parents of children who have Down syndrome, dwarfism, autism and other differences sharing intimate stories of the challenges they face. How do we choose what to “fix” in our children and what to celebrate? Free copies of “Aristotle” and “Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe” by Benjamin Alire Saenz will be given away at the event. The Alcazar Theatre. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. FREE

Submit

event news

THURSDAY • 7

10:30 a.m. Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave. (805) 684-4314. FREE

NOV. 7 - 13

online at

coastalview. com

SUNDAY

10

MOVIE: THE LION KING

3 p.m. The Alcazar Theatre. $7

MONDAY

11

MAH JONGG

1 p.m. All levels. (805) 729-1310

BINGO

1 p.m. Veterans Building, 941 Walnut Ave.

LOCAL ECOLOGY TALK

7 p.m. “Birds.” All ages welcome. Veterans’ Memorial Building. (805) 886-4382. FREE

TUESDAY

12

SENIOR BROWN BAG PROGRAM

9-10 a.m. Veteran’s Memorial Building, 941 Walnut Ave. Contact: (805) 698-1363, Jjimenez@ foodbanksbc.org. FREE

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION UNDERSTANDING DEMENTIA MEETING

4 p.m. Corner of Linden and Carpinteria avenues.

2-3:30 p.m. Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Rd. Call: (800) 272-3900. FREE

THE PEACE VIGIL

5-6 p.m. Corner of Linden and Carpinteria avenues.

CARPINTERIA WRITERS’ GROUP 10 a.m. Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave. Call: (202) 997-0429

LIVE MUSIC: CRV

9 p.m. The Palms, 701 Linden Ave. (805) 684-3811

SANDPIPER DUPLICATE BRIDGE

1 p.m. Friendly game. Call: (805) 684-5921

CARPINTERIA BOY SCOUT TROOP 50 MEETING

FRIDAY • 7

SATURDAY

9

7 p.m. Scout house behind Carpinteria Community Church, 1111 Vallecito Place.

Veteran and Senator John McCain plaque dedication. The city of Carpinteria will host a dedication ceremony for a new memorial plaque in the front yard of Veterans Memorial Building, 941 Walnut Ave. The memorial plaque recognizes the late Senator John S. McCain III for his United States military and congressional services. For more information, contact (805) 755-4400 or daved@ci.carpinteria.ca.us. 11 a.m. FREE

SATURDAY

9

CARPINTERIA BEAUTIFUL MEETING 9 a.m. City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave.

WEDNESDAY

13

KNITTING GROUP

1-4 p.m. Veterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnut Ave. (805) 684-8077. FREE

FIGHTING BACK PARENT PROGRAM

ART OPENING: “VISUAL MUSIC.” Palm Loft Gallery presents a solo exhibition of works by Donald Archer, primarily abstracted landscapes, representing 15 years of the artist’s work in 36 paintings. The exhibit will run from Nov. 9 to Dec. 15. Opening reception: Saturday, Nov. 9, 5 to 7 p.m. FREE

ABOP (ANTIFREEZE, BATTERY, OIL, PAINT DISPOSAL) 9 a.m.-1 p.m. City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave. (805) 684-5405 x 445. FREE

SALT MARSH RESTORATION WORK

10 a.m.-noon. Contact for location: (805) 6848077, carp_parks@yahoo.com.

CARPINTERIA SALT MARSH DOCENTLED TOURS 10 a.m. Walks start at the park sign. (805) 684-8077. FREE

UKULELE JAM SESSION

10:30-11:30 a.m. 850 Linden Ave. (Seal Fountain). (805) 705-7933 FREE

GARDEN CLASS: SOIL

2-3:30 p.m. Led by organic farmer Bill Palmisiano. $10 suggested donation, no one turned away for lack of funds. Carpinteria Garden Park.

5:30-7 p.m. Canalino School, 1480 Carpinteria Ave. (805) 963-1433 x125 or x132

TALK: TONI WELLEN, COALITION AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE

7 p.m. Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Road. Contact: mbcarty@cox.net. FREE

LIVE MUSIC: WHISKEY BUSINESS

9 p.m. The Palms, 701 Linden Ave. (805) 684-3811

MEDICARE ANNUAL ELECTION PERIOD

Co n ce rn e d ?

We Can Help! Call Today 805-683-3636

CA Lic # 0773817

Email your event listings to news@coastalview.com


26  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Those granite spires

cVn

unpredictable wilderness chuck graham The Cow Fire burned brightly to the south, smoke wafting skyward and colliding with billowing, puffy monsoonal clouds hovering above the Eastern Sierra. It was early last September, and I had a great vantage point to watch fire and monsoon. I stumbled upon the perfect plateau and laid out my sleeping pad and sleeping bag tucked between granite slabs buffering from any possible winds my bed for the night. The sun had already set behind me as I sat in my sleeping bag, monsoon and wildfire keeping to the south of me. I was camped at 12,500 feet, well above Chicken Spring Lake—just me, the yellow-bellied marmots and chirping pikas all concealed somewhere within the granite clefts, caves and alcoves. Sierra bighorn sheep were around too, but I had no luck locating their outwardly curling horns and nimble hooves on the steepest, most sheer granite walls and slabs. They could’ve been looking right at me, but they blend in so well in their surrounding habitat, and that makes them difficult to detect. However, the mountains aren’t going anywhere, and I’ll be back before it’s snowed in. I dream about them all the time, those granite spires in the Eastern Sierra. As much as the Santa Barbara Channel and the Channel Islands National Park draw me close every day, I always need that gritty, granite fix. The years just don’t feel complete unless there’s quality time spent on California’s 14ers. Thirteen of the Golden State’s 15, 14,000-foot peaks are in the Eastern Sierra. They are a good training ground, always scenic and my last two excursions at 14,000 feet my camera was always out, bighorn on the brain. Fortunately, I slept well as I always do when I’m outside above tree-line. The aridity, stillness, mind-boggling stargazing and that cool, crisp air always allows

me to be comfortable snoozing amongst the granite. Dawn was spectacular. The highest peaks always look best before sunup. Rising before first light, Cirque Peak, Mount Langley and Mount Whitney jutted prominently to my immediate north. I could hear several backpackers speaking below, their voices carrying up to me 2,500 feet above, making me appreciate my secluded campsite that much more. I quickly scrambled over to Cirque Peak, tapping out on its 12,900-foot summit before heading back down a steep scree slope to Chicken Spring Lake. Back within the trees I was gratefully overwhelmed by chipmunks, golden-mantled squirrels, more marmots, black-capped chickadees and small flocks of mountain bluebirds. After descending Horseshoe Meadow, I looked for herds of Tule elk along Highway 395 before finding a car camp along Movie Road in the Alabama Hills. Lots of fantastic movies filmed within the unique, high desert landscape of those granite clusters. Epic scenes from Clint Eastwood’s “Joe Kidd,” Steve McQueen in “Nevada Smith,” Russell Crowe in “Gladiator,” and Jamie Foxx and Leonardo DiCaprio in “Django Unchained” popped into my head as a trail of dust wafted behind my truck. Eventually, I found a great spot with tall clusters of granite behind me and to the west and sunset views of the desolate Inyo Mountains to the east. A canyon wren and a great horned owl were all that broke the high desert silence as I drifted off to sleep. Again, I was up well before first light. I had a date with an archway, and I couldn’t be late The Alabama Hills are a natural wonder and hidden within that granite fortress are some amazing archways that perfectly frame the North Ridge of Lone Pine Peak, Mount Whitney and Mount Russell. For 45 minutes from before first light and just after the first soft hues of alpenglow drape across the high peaks, the light shifts magically until it becomes to harsh to shoot anymore. It’s less than an hour, time well spent at 5,000 feet watching the light dance across all those iconic mountaintops.

Chuck prepares his sunset campsite at 12,500 feet overlooking Chicken Spring Lake in the Eastern Sierra.

Adventure and travel writer Chuck Graham lives in Carpinteria and contributes his writing and photography to publications far and wide. For more wildlife photos visit chuckgrahamphoto.com or follow Graham on Instagram at @chuckgrahamphoto.

A low-hanging archway in the Alabama Hills frames a smidge of alpenglow on the high peaks.

A yellow-bellied marmot keeps watch on Horseshoe Meadow in the Eastern Sierra.

A juvenile golden-mantled squirrel finds a sun patch between the morning shadows.


Thursday, November 7, 2019  27

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

CVN

On the rOad

CIAL COLI

SUEY CKEN CKEN CKEN

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FRI.

SAT.

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1025 CASITAS PASS RD

566-3334 SURF CVN sports photographer travels with CVN DIRECTION CELEBRATING 50 YEARS WIND CVN sports photographer Rosana Swing, left, took leave of Carpinteria’s sports fields and courts with her mother, Arla Wardell, center, and Laura OFsister, CARPINTERIA & Carroll, right, to visit family in Pennsylvania. In Elysburg, Pennsylvania, the THE AVOFEST, trio enjoyed the Knoebel’s Grove Arts Festival, then made a stop at Rohrbach’s COME BY & CHECK Farm Market. The highlight of their two-week stay was visiting the Gettysburg National Military Park. OUT OUR SPECIALS

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Going on the road?

Snap a photo with your Coastal View News in hand and email it to news@coastalview.com. Tell us about your trip!

CVN

FOOD

COURT

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Spaghetti Deal Days

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SZECHUAN & MANDARINE CUISINE VEGETARIAN SPECIALTIES LUNCH BUFFET With$10.95 this ad LUNCH BOX $2 $9.95 offMON-FRI anY

Dine in, Delivery Take Out pizza &anY size

thru 8/230/17 unclechencarpinteria.com

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spaghetti SUN: RICK REEVESW/Meat 3-6PM or Marinara sauCe

sliCe & salad $6.25 684-8288 1054Cheese 805-745-8272 CASITAS PASS 684-8288 FreeRD. deliVerY Corner of Carpinteria & Linden IslandBrewingCompany.com 10AM-9PM MON-SUN. • 805-318-1388 not valid with delivery Corner of Carpinteria & Linden

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tues. & Wed. aLL daY

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STEAKS • SEAFOOD • LOBSTER SALAD BAR & KID’S PLATE, TOO!

WEEKDAY HAPPY HOUR 3-6PM

LIVE MUSIC!

THURS: CRV FRI: CRV SAT: WHISKEY BUSINESS 684-3811 • 701 Linden Ave.


28  Thursday, November 7, 2019

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Buying or selling a home with us is like a walk on the beach!

Seascape Realty Sylvia's vast experience and innovative marketing strategies help Sellers get the highest possible price in the shortest possible time.

Seascape Realty Is Proud To Welcome

Shirley Kimberlin

Terry Stain

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Sylvia Miller

View our properties for sale at Look4SeascapeRealty.com

Sylvia Miller (805) 448-8882 BRE Lic#: 00558548

www.santabarbaraconnection.com - sylvia@sanbarb.com

And, her complete representation for Buyers can help you realize the perfect home to meet your needs.

Betty Lloyd

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Sylvia's reputation for outstanding customer service makes her -

THE RIGHT REALTOR® FOR YOU TMDRE Lic.

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4915-C Carpinteria Ave. • 805.684.4161

BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED AND UPGRADED… Beautifully maintained and upgraded, with lots of natural light. This two bedroom, two bath condominium has lovely bamboo floors throughout.. The light and bright kitchen has marble counter tops. An end unit with a balcony off the living room. Amenities of the The Homeowners Association include: Pool, Spa, and Clubhouse. Conveniently located to downtown Carpinteria with great shops, restaurants. You may also take a short stroll to the “World’s Safest Beach”. OFFERED AT $545,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228

D!

L O S

PEACEFUL VIEWS OF NATURAL LANDSCAPING AND THE CARPINTERIA CREEK…Two bedroom, one and one-half bath condominium with convenient kitchen. Great location that’s a short stroll to the beach and downtown Carpinteria. Amenities include: Pool, Spa, Clubhouse with Game Room. Excellent property to enjoy as a permanent residence or a relaxing vacation retreat. OFFERED AT $499,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228

ONE-HALF BLOCK TO THE BEACH...Delightful condominium just one-half block to the sand at Ash Avenue Beach and across the street from the Salt Marsh Nature Park. Upgraded one bedroom, one bath with Travertine flooring, granite counters, newer appliances, and plantation shutters. There is a one car carport with private storage. Perfect as a beach retreat or full time enjoyment. Take a short stroll to charming downtown Carpinteria with great restaurants, shops, and more! OFFERED AT $529,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228

LE G! SA DIN EN

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GREAT TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH, CONDOMINIUM IN SINGING SPRINGS VILLAGE…Improvements throughout include: dual pane windows, kitchen and bathrooms upgraded, and more! Fantastic view of the beautiful trees along the creek-side. Association amenities feature: Pool, Spa, Clubhouse and Recreation Room. Take a short stroll to the beautiful Carpinteria Beach and downtown with great shops and restaurants. OFFERED AT $535,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228 or Terry Stain at 805-705-1310

PANORAMIC OCEAN VIEWS…Beachfront two bedroom, one bath located on the beautiful beach. This unit is being sold completely furnished; ready to move in and enjoy full time or as a wonderful, relaxing vacation retreat. Short term rentals are permitted with a license to be obtained from the City. The property being sold is, “A 1/36th interest in the apartment building located at 4975 Sandyland Road, Carpinteria, CA, along with Seller’s rights by agreement with the other co-owners to Unit 206. OFFERED AT $1,350,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228

! D L

SO

SPACIOUS HOME IN RANCHO GRANADA - A DESIRABLE SENIOR PARK…Featuring an open floor plan with two bedrooms, two baths, large living room with dining area PLUS a den/family room. The kitchen has a breakfast bar. Conveniently located to shopping, parks, bus, golf driving range, and the OCEAN! REDUCED TO $269,000 Please call Shirley Kimberlin at 805-886-0228

Thinking of Selling Your Property? FREE MARKET EVALUATION CALL SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN TODAY! 805-886-0228

Find Carpinteria Magazine in Shops Now!


s News Fall 2019

City Hall

City of Carpinteria carpinteria.ca.us

From the CITY MANAGER Dave Durflinger

Counting Carpinterians

Every ten years the U.S. Census Bureau attempts to count every person in the United States. The next U.S. Census count will begin April 1, 2020. A complete and accurate count of the population in California, Santa Barbara County, and Carpinteria, is important because Census data affects the distribution of federal funds to state and local governments, including the City of Carpinteria, influences the redrawing of county and state legislative districts, and determines the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives. The City of Carpinteria is working with both state and county campaigns seeking to ensure that all Carpinterians, along with county and state residents, get their fair share of federal resources and legislative representation by encouraging participation in Census 2020. Census data, by federal law, is confidential and only used to produce statistics. It cannot be shared with immigration or law enforcement agencies or used to determine eligibility for governmental benefits. Census data is used for myriad purposes beneficial to our community. The data

is used to advocate for community resources and ensure adequate public safety and school and public health services. It is also routinely referenced by businesses to decide where to locate, creating local jobs and investment. This Census is particularly important for Carpinteria. In 2010 there was an undercount of Carpinteria’s population that has resulted in a loss of significant revenue for City services over the last decade. For example, federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) revenue is allocated to the City based in part on population. The decline in population reported in the last census negatively affected the City’s CDBG allocation. CDBG revenue is used to support organizations that provide services to Carpinteria youth, seniors, and lower income families. Also, the City will be relying heavily on Census information as a part of the process of drawing district election maps for the new City Council district elections that begin November 2022. California has been identified as a state with a hard-to-count population given a number of demographic factors such as its considerable number of foreign-born residents, renters, and people without internet access (this will be the first census relying heavily on people filling out the form online). For similar reasons, many households in Carpinteria are expected to be hard to count. The City’s population was adjusted downward by about 7% CITY MANAGER cont. on page 3

Holiday Spirit Parade Set for December 14th

KARLSSON

The City of Carpinteria invites you to celebrate the holiday season at the annual Holiday Spirit Parade sponsored by the Downtown Merchants and the Downtown “T” Business Advisory Board. This year the Holiday Spirit Parade will be held on Saturday, December 14th at 3 pm on Linden Avenue. For more information and to register for the parade, please visit holidayspiritparade.com. See you there!

City Welcomes New Human Resource/Risk Manager

The City welcomes Laura Hernandez as Human Resource/Risk Manager. Laura is a Certified Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP). She is also a member of several professional associations, and is on the Board of Directors for Channel Islands Public Management Association for Human Resources as Secretary and is also serving as Interim Treasurer. Laura has a diverse background with private and public sector experience, she is well versed in benefit and HRIS administration, recruitment and selection, employee and labor relations, classification and compensation, training and development, disability management, accommodations and return to work process, and Workers’ Compensation. Before joining the City of Carpinteria Team, Laura worked for the County of Ventura in the County Executive Office-Human Resources where she administered the Supplemental Retirement Program and the Deferred Compensation Program for over 8,000 employees. Prior to working for the County of Ventura she was the Benefits Manager for the City of Oxnard where she administered the Medical, Dental and Vision benefits. She also administered the Leave of Absence program, Long Term Disability, Life Insurance for active and retired employee, CalPERS Retirement, 457 plan, 401(a) plan among other benefits for over 1,600 employees. Prior to working for the City of Oxnard Laura worked for six years with the City of Ventura where she was a Human Resources Technician II handling, among other things, recruitments, benefits, labor relations, risk management, and leave of absence.

ABOP ABOP ABOP July13 13 & & 27 27 July ABOP 9am-1pm 9am-1pm Disposalprogram program Disposal

2nd&&4th 4thSaturday Saturday each each month 2nd month thth

Disposal program

*

*

th th

Disposal program

2nd & 4th Saturday CITY eachHALL month CARPINTERIA

*

2nd & 4th CARPINTERIA Saturday month CITY HALL 9am -1pm 5775 Carpinteria Avenue th each th

July 13 & 27

*

5775 Carpinteria Avenue th th WHAT WE& ACCEPT JulyWHAT 13 27 WE ACCEPT 9am-1pm 9am-1pm

Antifreeze* • Batteries • Used Motor Oil* Paint* • Oil Filters • Florescent Lightbulbs (6 tubes Antifreeze* • Batteries • Used Motor Oil* max) CARPINTERIA CITY HALL Mercury Thermostats • Small Household Electronics**

Paint* • Oil Filters • Florescent Lightbulbs (6 tubes max) 5775 Carpinteria *limit 5 gallons liquid per visit **Avenue limit 3 per visit Mercury Thermostats • maximum Small Household Electronics** CARPINTERIA CITY HALL

WHAT WE ACCEPT

*2nd Saturday only in November and December *limit5775 **limit 3 per visit 5 gallons Carpinteria liquid maximum per visitAvenue

*2nd Saturday in November and December Recycle Antifreeze* •only Batteries • Used Motor Oil* used oil Paint* • Oil Filters • Florescent Lightbulbs (6 tubes max) Recycle ** * Mercury Thermostats • Small Household Electronics Antifreeze* • Batteries • Used Motor Oil

WHAT WE ACCEPT used oil

*limit 5 gallons liquid maximumLightbulbs per visit **limit(63tubes per visit Oil Filters • Florescent max)

Paint* • *2nd Saturday only inHousehold November and December Mercury Thermostats • Small Electronics** *limit 5 gallons liquid maximum per visit **limit 3 per visit Recycle

*2nd Saturday used onlyoilin November and December Recycle used oil

Some of the Wednesday lunch volunteers include, from left, Leah Wagner, Mike Carmel, Gina Cummings, Susanna Green, Mike Lee, Barbara Smith and Sanderson Smith.

Fall Community Partner Award Recipients

The City of Carpinteria is pleased to announce this fall’s Community Partner Award recipients, Home for Good and a group of volunteers who provide weekly hot lunch to Carpinteria’s homeless community. Homelessness is a complicated issue that cities around the nation are struggling to effectively address. Our Community Partner Award recipients work diligently and compassionately to put an end to homelessness. These groups recognize that each individual has a unique set of circumstances, and many grapple with physical and mental health issues. Understanding these diverse needs and meeting them is a necessary step toward permanent housing.

Home for Good

Home for Good, a Santa Barbara County United Way initiative, connects individuals experiencing homelessness with long-term housing, working in collaboration with the City of Carpinteria and the County of Santa Barbara. The initiative, overseen by Santa Barbara County United Way, has a highly active Carpinteria arm led by Housing & Outreach Coordinator Travis Baxter. Baxter manages a full-time Americorps member in Carpinteria and creates a critical nexus of community volunteers and organizations who focus on connecting people that are homeless with the services they need, working alongside Santa Barbara County Behavioral Wellness and Public Health. “Travis and his team have done exceptional work,” said Eddie Taylor, CEO of Northern Santa Barbara County United Way. As the lead agency in Santa Barbara County’s Coordinated Entry System, Home for Good is using a three-phased approach to resolve homelessness. In its first year and a half, the program has focused on phase one, data collection. Annual Point in Time Counts supply critical data about the homeless populations throughout the County. In Carpinteria, Summerland, and Montecito, the homeless population includes 36 individuals, 47 percent of whom are chronically homeless. Home for Good’s second phase, getting individuals “document ready,” is well underway. Having paperwork in order will be necessary for the final phase, which is creation of housing and permanent supportive

City Hall Holiday Hours City Hall will be closed as follows:

Thanksgiving: November 28 & 29 Christmas: December 25, 26 & 27 New Year: January 1, 2 & 3 Best wishes for a Happy Holiday Season from the City of Carpinteria!

housing services. The goals of Home for Good are ambitious, but staff members have already begun to see the results of their hard work and careful planning.

Wednesday Lunch Volunteers

Every Wednesday, a free lunch is served in the Veterans Memorial Building Meeting Room by a group of volunteers who bring much more than just hot food to the table. The meal itself provides a weekly opportunity for regular contact with friendly, trusted volunteers who can connect people in need to key services and resources. This volunteer group—has no official name or nonprofit affiliation—but its members are highly dedicated. They have patiently developed relationships with the people they serve, and these hard-earned relationships have opened doors to improved health and safety. Volunteers include Leah Wagner, Barbara and Sanderson Smith, Mike Carmel, Ruthie Tremmel, Rick Olmstead, Mike Lee, Susanna Green, Gina Cummings, Lisa Rader, and Jaime Whitezman. “None of us does this for acknowledgement,” said Wagner. “We’re all just doing what our hearts are calling us to do.” Volunteers home-cook and deliver meals that range from lasagne to burritos, and once a month Fosters Freeze donates lunch. Each week, a table in the meeting room is set up with donated items available to anyone who needs them: razors, wet wipes, soap, lotion, etc. For people who are hungry but aren’t comfortable attending, volunteers often deliver plates of hot food throughout the community. County health workers attend the lunch periodically to offer medical and counseling services to the five to ten individuals who regularly participate, and Home for Good also helps to meet needs identified at the weekly gathering. “Sometimes what’s needed is as simple as a toothbrush; sometimes it’s paperwork to get housing,” says Wagner. “We feel very strongly about loving these people and helping them without enabling them.”


Carpinteria Harbor Seal Rookery 2020 Pupping Season

CITY COUNCIL Wade Nomura, Mayor Al Clark, Vice Mayor Gregg Carty Roy Lee Fred Shaw

CITY STAFF City Hall (805) 684-5405

AdmiNiStRAtioN David Durflinger, (805) 755-4400 City Manager Fidela Garcia, (805) 755-4403 City Clerk Laura Hernandez, (805) 755-4404 Human Resources/Risk Manager Kevin Silk, (805) 755-4450 Assistant to the City Manager mimi Audelo, (805) 755-4401 Program Manager

Lagunitas Business Park Receives Recommendation for Final Approval

The Lagunitas Business Park received a recommendation for Final Approval from the Architectural Review Board on October 17, 2019. The complex will be located on the 6300 block of Via Real and will contain 82,874 square feet of new office space with 342 parking spaces, and landscaping on the balance of the 8.63-acre parcel. The developers indicate the building permit application will be submitted soon.

PLANNiNG & BUiLdiNG Steve Goggia, (805) 755-4414 Community Development Director Nick Bobroff, (805) 755-4407 Senior Planner Dan Chepley, (805) 880-3409 Chief Building Inspector/ Plans Examiner CodE ComPLiANCE Ron Alonzo, (805) 755-4408 Code Compliance Supervisor StREEtS, tREES & SidEWALKS John Ilasin, (805) 880-3402 Public Works Director/ City Engineer Robert Howard, (805) 755-4443 Public Works Supervisor FiNANCE Licette Maldonado, (805) 755-4448 Administrative Services Director

Gran Vida Phase II Assisted Living Facility

Gran Vida Phase II is a proposed, new 49,050 square foot assistedliving facility for seniors that would contain 50 units. The project will be located next to the existing Gran Vida assisted living facility on Carpinteria Avenue. Story poles for the project were installed on September 30, 2019 and the project received comments from the Architectural Review Board (ARB) on October 17, 2019. It is scheduled to return to the ARB for additional review on December 12, 2019.

Ashley Chaparro, (805) 880-3406 Senior Financial Analyst Louisa Ornelas, (805) 755-4458 Accounting Clerk

Lt. Butch Arnoldi, (805) 568-3388 Sheriff’s Department • (805) 568-3399 911 if an emergency

EditoRiAL BoARd Kevin Silk, Chair Steve Goggia, Ann Meyer, Laura Hernandez

Keep the following numbers handy: Emergency 911 Sheriff’s Department (805) 692-5743 (24/7) Carpinteria Fire District (805) 684-4591 Animal Control (805) 755-4418 (M-F) Code Compliance (805) 755-4413 (Weekends) Carpinteria Valley Water District (805) 684-2816 Carpinteria Sanitary District (805) 684-7214 So. Calif. Edison Co. (800) 655-4555 The Gas Company (800) 427-2200 Verizon Telephone (800) 483-1000 Red Cross (805) 687-1331

New City Plastic Regulations for Businesses Set for January 2020

Don’t forget, on January 1, 2020, new single use plastics regulations for businesses go into effect! Single-use plastic straws and cutlery will be prohibited, and food providers will only be able to provide certified compostable or marine degradable straws and cutlery upon request. Condiments and plastic cup lids will also be provided upon request only. For more information contact City Environmental Coordinator, Erin Maker at erinm@ci.carpinteria.ca.us, or (805)-880-3415.

City Moves Towards Cleaner Energy

PARKS Matt Roberts, (805) 755-4449 Parks and Recreation Director

City HALL NEWS Suggestions and comments welcome. Contact City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave. (805) 755-4450

From December 1 st through May 31st the City beach at the base of Casitas Pier, extending 750 feet east and west, is closed by City Ordinance to all people and animals. Harbor seals can be viewed from the Carpinteria Seal Rookery bluff top, which can be accessed from the Coastal Vista Trail, the Carpinteria Bluffs or Dump Road. The beach closure allows harbor seals (phoca vitulina richardsii) to birth and nourish their pups, which mature between four and seven years and have a lifespan of 30 to 40 years. The Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits disturbances of harbor seals, especially during the birthing season. The entrance to the beach is posted for the closure. Those who disregarded the signs and harass the seals can be fined as much as $10,000. If a harbor seal or pup is on the beach outside of the rookery area, stay away and do not walk between the pup and the ocean. Seal pups are left on the beach while their mothers forage for fish, squid, clams and shellfish; they will return to care for the pup but are extremely shy if humans or animals are close by. If you would like to volunteer for Carpinteria Seal Watch, please call (805) 684-2247, or email: carpsealwatch@gmail.com. There are time slots for as little as two-hours. Seal Watch Volunteers inform the public about the seals and the laws that protect the seals. Volunteers attempt to divert human and dog encroachments as to prevent or minimize the intensity of the disturbances. Volunteers also assist local and federal protection efforts and collect data about seal behavior and seal disturbances. If you observe a hurt or injured mammal and you believe it is an emergency for the animal to be treated, call the Marine Mammal center at (805) 687-3255 if the mammal is north of Rincon. If the mammal is south of Rincon call Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute at (805) 567-1505 or visit cimwi.org. Carpinteria Harbor Seal Rookery brochures are available at City Hall.

Skate Park Moves Forward, Seeks Funding

The Parks Department is moving forward on the proposed skate park to be located adjacent to City Hall at 5775 Carpinteria Avenue. The night lighting design concept has been completed and the Project Application has been filed with the City’s Community Development Department for review and processing. This project is in partnership with the Carpinteria Skate Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization, that is currently seeking donations to fund construction of the skate park. To make a donation, please visit gofundme.com/carpskatepark/ donate

Carpinteria is moving towards cleaner energy. On August 26, the Carpinteria City Council voted to join Monterey Bay Community Power, a Community Choice Energy (CCE) provider. Also called community choice aggregation, CCE programs purchase renewable and carbon free energy on behalf of their customers. Transmission is still handled by the existing investor owned utility, in our case Southern California Edison. Customer enrollment will begin in 2021 and is automatic, but customers can opt-out if they prefer. As customers, most people will see very little difference upon enrollment other than two line items on their bill from Southern California Edison, one for delivery and one for generation. For more information about how community choice energy works and programs that will be available to customers once launched in Carpinteria, visit mbcommunitypower.org/.

City to Receive $1 Million in Transportation Circulation Improvement Funding

The City of Carpinteria was recently granted $1M of Circulation Improvement Funding by the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. The funding provides for transportation circulation improvements which may include sidewalks, bikeways, curb ramp upgrades to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, and traffic control devices. The City’s Transportation Committee will be identifying projects at an upcoming meeting where members of the public will have an opportunity to participate in identifying the specific projects to receive funding. The meeting schedule will be posted on the City’s website at carpinteria.ca.us/, under What’s New? City Public Meeting Agendas prior to the meeting. For additional information please contact John Ilasin at (805) 880-3402 or at johni@ci.carpinteria.ca.us

Report graffiti in Progress to 911 Report all other graffiti to the Graffiti Hotline at 684-5405 ext. 555

HOSTs Danel Trevor, left, and Marguerite Gamo greet visitors on Linden Avenue.

HOST Season Wrap Up

The cool spring weather brought a slow start to the City’s HOST Program. But it didn’t take long for the Kiosk at the Seal Fountain to be buzzing with both new and returning visitors. Several families have been visiting Carpinteria for decades, always bringing the next generation to our community. The HOSTs greeted more than 3,200 visitors, from 39 states, and twelve countries wrapping up a very successful season. Every weekend from Memorial Day through Labor Day, HOSTs volunteer their time at the downtown Visitor Center greeting visitors, answering questions about the Carpinteria Valley and providing information on activities that appeal to a variety of interests. If you would like to join the fun, please contact Mimi Audelo at (805)-7554401 or mimia@ci.carpinteria.ca.us.


City Projects Completed, Planned, and Underway

2019 Completed Capital Improvement Projects

The Carpinteria Avenue Pedestrian Safety Improvements Project, the 2019 Pavement Maintenance Project, and the Carpinteria Avenue and Elm Avenue Bus Shelter Relocation Project were successfully completed this year.

Pedestrian Crossing Safety Improvements Planned

The Pedestrian Crossing Safety Improvements Project consists of constructing sidewalk infill, ADA facilities, curb and gutter along Bailard Avenue at its intersection with Carpinteria Avenue and with Via Real, and also constructing curb extensions and installing a crosswalk at Linden Avenue and Dorrance Way. The project is currently in the design phase and construction is expected to begin in April 2020.

Pavement Rehabilitation Project

The upcoming Pavement Rehabilitation Project will include pavement rehabilitation and upgrading curb ramps as needed for compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act. The project will also incorporate technologies and material recycling that lower greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the cost of pavement maintenance through material choice and construction methods. The streets selected for treatment and approved by City Council include Carpinteria Avenue from Santa Ynez to Sandyland Cove Road, Nipomo Drive from Linden Avenue to Tomol Drive, and Eighth Street from Elm Avenue to Maple Avenue. The project is currently in the design phase and it is expected that construction will begin in February 2020.

City Hall Renovation Project Work Progressing

The City Hall renovation project is well underway. Construction of electrical, plumbing, and mechanical improvements are substantially complete. Structural repairs and installation of the fire sprinkler system are in progress. Improvements still to come include interior structural improvements, office space construction, and exterior landscaping. The project is anticipated to be completed in January 2020.

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training at City Hall

To kick off Emergency Preparedness Month, the City held a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training at City Hall in September. Participants from the community learned about disaster preparedness, basic first aid, and team organization. Thanks to the Carpinteria Summerland Fire Protection District everyone received fire safety and fire extinguisher training. At the end of the twenty hour course, graduates participated in a simulated disaster drill, putting to work their new knowledge and skills. The CERT program is designed to help communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters through training and planning. With training and information, individuals and community groups can be prepared to serve as a crucial resource capable of performing many of the emergency functions needed right after a disaster. If you would like to learn more about the Carpinteria CERT program and future classes, contact Mimi Audelo at mimia@ci.carpinteria.ca.us or (805) 755-4401.

Being Prepared for an Emergency is a Way of Life

Whether it is a winter storm, earthquake, or the latest Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) event, being prepared will help you get through the situation. Listed are a few simple steps and some resources to get you started: • Be aware of your surroundings. Know the risks in your area at home, work, or school. • Make an emergency plan for you and your household. Your plan should include what to do if you are at home when the emergency starts and if you are away. • Include important phone numbers in your plan. Add an out of area contact person. • Build an emergency kit for your home, work, and vehicle. • Sign up for SB County emergency alerts at ReadySBC.org as well as alerts from your power company such as SCE.com It’s never too early to get prepared. There are a lot of resources available to help in your preparedness journey that include the Disaster Ready Resources listed below. And don’t forget to check your emergency kits yearly.

Disaster Ready Resources

City of Carpinteria carpinteria.ca.us/emergency_preparedness/index.shtml Ready Santa Barbara County readysbc.org

Carpinteria Summerland Fire Protection District carpfire.com/

Make a Plan ready.gov/make-a-plan Build a Kit ready.gov/build-a-kit

Radio Ready readysbc.org/storm-ready/radio-ready/ PSPS Preparedness prepareforpowerdown.com/

Be Storm Ready! Santa Barbara County has implemented Ready, Set, Go protocols for storms.

City Beach Prepares for Winter Storms

Each year in November, the City of Carpinteria readies for winter storms along the beachfront by building a sand berm to protect ocean front improvements from wave and flood damage. The berm is made of locally sourced beach sand and provides some protection in the event of a significant ocean wave event. The winter protection berm is scheduled to be constructed beginning in Late November and takes about 5 days to complete. The City reminds everyone that it is important for safety to stay off of the beach and away from the tractor when the berm is being constructed. The project is funded by the beach front homeowners and the City of Carpinteria. For information contact Matt Roberts (805) 755-4449 or email mattr@ci.carpinteria.ca.us

Sandbags Available at City Hall

It’s a good time to begin preparing your home and property for the potential wet weather coming this winter. The City of Carpinteria is offering free sandbags to help residents prepare. Residents can fill up to 20 sandbags per household while supplies last at the Public Works Yard located at 5775 Carpinteria Avenue. The hours are Monday - Thursday, 7:30am to 4pm and Fridays from 7:30am - 3pm. When filling sandbags, fill them only half way, so they are not too heavy and will stack properly. Sand bags can help protect your property during storm events. The City of Carpinteria believes that early storm preparation is critical to helping you deal successfully with possible flooding from potential wet weather this winter. If it starts to flood many resources you will need will already be stressed or unavailable. Traveling to get sandbags during a storm may be problematic. So please take advantage of this opportunity to prepare your home and property. For more information about sandbags, please contact Robert Howard, Public Works Supervisor at (805) 755-4443.

READY -- Advisory storm alert. Given enough time (72-48 hours in advance), the Ready advisory will alert the community about the incoming storm. SET -- Prepare to evacuate. The Set message is an evacuation warning that will go out to the affected areas (48-24 hours in advance) asking residents to prepare to leave. GO – Evacuate. If the storm remains a threat, the Go evacuation order will tell residents to leave now, less than 24 hours before the predicted rain event. If you need assistance evacuating, don’t wait. It may be difficult to reach you once the rain starts. Also, there may be situations when there is not enough time for notifications. Don’t wait for an evacuation order; leave the area if you feel unsafe. To sign up for alerts, go to readysbc.org.

CITY MANAGER MESSAGE: continued from page 1

after the last census, a reflection of what the City concluded was a significant undercount of residents. We will need your ideas and help in order to identify the best ways to ensure that everyone gets counted. In the weeks and months to come before the April 1, 2020 census begins, you’ll be hearing much more about the census and will have the opportunity to help. We hope you’ll join this effort to ensure Carpinterians get needed resources and representation. In the meantime, information about Census 2020 can be found at these California and County of Santa Barbara websites: census.ca.gov and santabarbaracountycensus.org.


PUBLIC POOL HOURS FALL-WINTER 2019-20

The Fun Starts Here

NOVEMBER HOLIDAY HOURS In observance of Veterans Day, Monday November 11th, the pool will be open 10AM-2PM. The pool will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, November 28th, but come and swim off those extra calories on Friday, November 29th 10AM-2PM.

LIFEGUARD CERTIFICATION CLASS REGISTER NOW - WE ARE HIRING!

Mondays & Wednesdays 6AM-3PM & 5:30-7PM Tuesdays & Thursdays 9AM-3PM & 5:30-7PM Fridays 6AM-3PM & 5:30-7PM

Students must register at the pool on or before Wednesday, November 13th , 2019 Students must be at least 15 yrs. old to participate with the ability to swim 300 yards (12 laps) continuously using a variety of two strokes. Skill Sessions: Pre-Course Work Lessons 1,2,3 Lesson 4, 5,6 Lesson 7, 8, 9 & Test

Friday- November, Saturday- November, Sunday- November, Saturday- November,

15th 16th 17th 23rd

6 PM-7 PM 10 AM-6 PM 9 AM-6 PM 9 AM-4 PM

Saturdays 10AM-2PM For Pool Program Information www.Carp-Pool.com CarpPool@ci.carpinteria.ca.us (805) 566-2417

COME PLAY WATER POLO AND SWIM WITH THE TRITONS!

Cost: $150.00 + $35.00 Certificate Fee (certificate fee charged at the time of online registration) per student.

Come to the Carpinteria Pool and join the Carpinteria Aquatics Club Tritons! Our year-round swim and water polo teams are welcoming to athletes of a variety of experience levels, and focus on their safety, growth, and most importantly, fun! Our experienced coaching staff promote fitness, sportsmanship, teamwork, and the skills to compete in and out of the pool. Join us at the Carpinteria Community Pool to hop in and have fun swimming, playing water polo, or both!

Contact the pool (805) 566-2417 or Tamara Cloud TamaraC@ci.carpinteria.ca.us

Swim Team 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm M onday –F riday

Joel Patterson CARPINTERIA GARDEN PARK TWO YEARS STRONG & GROWING

The Carpinteria Garden Park recently celebrated its second year of growth with a community-wide harvest potluck brunch. The garden is full, with a wait list, and currently serves 104 local households with affordable organic gardening space and education open to the public. The garden continues to expand its reach by working with local students, including the maintenance of a vegetable garden for Carpinteria Middle School’s After School Program’s Gardening Club, as well as by hosting tours of the garden for local school kids. Upcoming workshops through the fall and early winter include a class on building soil health for regenerative, long-term gardening a class on home-scale beekeeping for kids and adults, and a class that will use plants from the garden to craft herbal gifts for the holiday season. For more information, including dates and times, visit the garden’s website at www. carp-garden.com or get in touch with Garden Coordinator, Alena Steen at alenas@ci.carpinteria.ca.us

QIGONG & TAI CHI CLASSES Join Instructor Jessica Kolbe on the City beach at Linden Ave. to take part in the practice of Qigong and Tai Chi. For information contact Jessica. Email Jessica@JessicaTaiChi.com QigongSB.com

(805) 705-3426

Youth (14U) Water Polo 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Monday – Thursday

Monthly Charges for Ages 6 – 18 Bronze Membership: $65 per month Silver Membership: $85 per month Gold Membership: $95 per month (Membership level based on age and ability) For any inquiries, contact the Carpinteria Community Pool and ask to speak to Coach Armando Ramos (swim) or Coach Leilani Smith (water polo). (805) 566-2417 or Carp-Pool.com

See you at the pool!

AQUA AEROBICS 10 - 11 AM Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays $9.25/class Monthly Passes available $65 Enjoy all the benefits of land aerobics without the impact on your joints. A great way to relieve tension and stress during lunch. All necessary equipment is provided. Come join the fun!

MASTERS SWIMMING

For Adults with Varying Skill Levels

5:30-6:30 PM Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 12 - 1 PM Tuesdays and Thursdays $9.25/class Monthly Passes available $65 Masters swimming is for all adults with intermediate to advanced swimming ability. Each session participants will receive coaching on stroke technique and endurance. Masters workouts are a great way to complete your day!

Profile for Coastal View News

Coastal View News • November 7, 2019  

Free weekly newspaper for the Carpinteria valley.

Coastal View News • November 7, 2019  

Free weekly newspaper for the Carpinteria valley.