Coastal View News • December 2, 2021

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SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN Everything I list turns to SOLD!

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CARPINTERIA

Vol. 28, No. 11

December 2 - 8, 2021

coastalview.com

View News

Like father, like son

City Council accepts revised Surfliner Inn plans

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Festival of Trees runs through Dec. 12

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Throwback Thursday: Rincon, 1967

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KARLSSON

Carson Hess, center, gets a lesson in hard work from his dad, Trevor, as the two unload trees early Saturday morning at the Carpinteria Boy Scouts Christmas tree lot. Boy Scouts from Troop 50 and Cub Scouts Pack 50 arrived at the St. Joseph Church field at 8 a.m. to unload hundreds of holiday pines. While scheduled to open at noon, with eager holiday tree hunters arriving steadily all morning, the scouts opened the lot to two hours early. The Christmas tree lot is the scouts’ biggest fundraiser, helping fund the Carpinteria scouting program all year-round. See more on page 14.

BRE#01383773

Warriors 2-4 after tourney

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2  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

BRIEFLY

Santa to visit Westerlay Orchids for holiday open house

Westerlay Orchids will hold its third annual holiday open house at its Carpinteria retail shop and showroom on Via Real, on Friday, Dec. 10, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. In addition to wine, goodies and holiday cheer, Santa Claus will be in attendance and ready to hear Christmas wish lists. There will also be orchid raffles every 30 minutes during the event.

Coast Supply announces holiday home remodel giveaway

Coast Supply Co. is calling for nominations for a complete home remodel giveaway. The company hopes to provide one family with all new flooring, cabinets, countertops, furniture and more – “everything but the house.” There are no specific requirements for eligibility, though Coast has suggested “maybe it’s a nurse, or your kid’s teacher, a local firefighter, or maybe a deserving single parent.” Submissions are due by Dec. 16 and the winner will be announced on Dec. 23. To nominate, visit coastsupplyco.com/giveaway.

Rotary Club Talent Showcase will be live at the Alcazar next year

MERRY CHRISTMAS A TOAST TO YOU ALL WITH OUR DARK CHOCOLATE & EGGNOG GANACHE!

The Rotary Club of Carpinteria has announced that its 2022 Talent Showcase will take place at the Alcazar Theatre on April 9, 2022. John Palminteri will return as the talent show’s emcee for the 13th year. To learn more, contact DocRotz@gmail.com.

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CARPINTERIA

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CARPINTERIA

Help us bring in the Holiday Help us bring Season! in the Holiday Sea

See Santa and his reindeer drive v through See Santa town andwith his reindeer your local drive through town with 6161 Firefighters. Firefighters. TERIAtoys for our annual TOY D CARPIN TERIA CARPIN We will also be collecting toysv forWe ourwill annual also TOY be collecting DRIVE! v Fill the boot donations to support v Fill your thecommunity. boot donations to support your community

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Thursday, December 2, 2021  3

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

CARPINTERIA HOLIDAY SPIRIT PARADE DECEMBER 4, 2021 | 4 PM

Everybody Loves A Carpinteria Parade! Come on down to Linden Avenue and support all of our outstanding participants!

Noe Aguilar Vega, center, is presented with the Presidential Award for his work as operations manager at the Summerland Sanitary District by district administrator Marjon Sousa, left, and board president Dave Novis, right.

ALCAZAR THE-

RETURN TO THE Summerland Sanitary DistrictALCAZAR manager wins PLAZA PLAYHOUSE THEATER) Presidential Award(FORMERLY 2018 CAPITAL CAMPAIGN

The operations manager at the Summerland Sanitary District, Noe Aguilar Vega, was recently given the 2021 Presidential Award by the Santa Barbara chapter of the California Special Districts Association. He was(FORMERLY honored for “distinguished service” THEATER) by Marjon Sousa, district administrator, PLAZA PLAYHOUSE and Dave Novis, president of the Summerland Sanitary District board of directors.

ALCAZAR THEATRE VISIT WWW.THEALCAZAR.ORG TO SHOW YOUR SUPPORT!

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria opens gift-giving program to BILLBOARDS local families THREE

OUTSIDE EBBING,MISSOURI

3 PM

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8 PM

Cocktails for a Cause

Wednesday, December 8th 7:00 PM | $25.00 Carpinteria Womans Club

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria has launched its gift-giving program, Operation Holiday Cheer, for the holiday season, which gives gifts to Proceeds will benefit the Alcazar Theatre 7 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS local Carpinteria girls. The program is sponsored by Featuring Cox Communications. Operation Holiday Cheer provides over 500 gifts to to demonstrate the art of 100 families, as well as a crafting original and classic cocktails visit from Santa Claus and a lunch. Carpinterians are in-SPECIALS GUESTS: HOPE AND JUSTIN vited to support the program by picking items to purchase o of the tree in the irls nc. o ce, signing up to bring in a holiday bo or buying a gift from the organi ation’s Guests are invited to bring a dish to share ma on wish list. amie Collins, e ecutive director of irls nc. of Carpinteria, said the organi ation Spaces Limited! is “grateful to Cox Communications.” STARRING: JULIA ROBERTS, OWEN WILSON AND JACOB TREMBLAY Contact carpwomansclub@gmail.com for tickets “ ur team is beyond committed to making a meaningful di erence in the lives of our girls, and we’re proud to engage the entire community with this initiative – All guests must show proof of being fully vaccinated OR supply a negative Covid-19 medical test result (taken within 72 through volunteering, making donations, or signing up as our local partners – to hours prior to each event), along with an official photo ID, Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status except when actively eating or drinking. ensure all families receive gifts,” Collins said. This is Co ’s second year sponsoring the program.

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CHRISTMAS TREES

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4  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

All 18+ should get boosters, CDC advises New Covid-19 variant identified

The Centers for Disease Control recommended Monday that all adults “should” get Covid-19 boosters, an update from last week that advised all adults “may” get the booster. The recommendation applies to those who are 6 months out from their second dose of fi er or oderna, or two months out from their initial Johnson & Johnson vaccine. “The recent emergence of the Omicron variant further emphasi es the importance of vaccination, boosters, and prevention e orts needed to protect against COVID-19,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in a statement. “Early data from South Africa suggest increased transmissibility of the Omicron variant, and scientists in the United States and around the world are urgently exam-

ining vaccine e ectiveness related to this variant,” she added. She encouraged the unvaccinated to get vaccinated “as soon as possible,” because “strong immunity will likely prevent serious illness.” “I also want to encourage people to get a Covid-19 test if they are sick. Increased testing will help us identify Omicron quickly,” she said in the statement. California is “closely monitoring” the new Omicron variant, the state’s health department said in a release. The variant was identified late last week by researchers in South Africa, which prompted flight bans from the area. But the variant was already in Europe before the flight ban, according to Dutch health o cials, in samples take on ov. 1 and ov. 23. The first case of the variant

was identified in the .S. on ednesday. “Vaccines continue to be our best way through the pandemic by safely protecting us against severe illness from Covid-19 and its variants. We are doubling down on our vaccination and booster e orts to ensure that all Californians have access to safe, e ective, and free vaccines that can prevent serious illness and death,” said Dr. Tomas J. Aragon, director of the California Department of Public Health. The department said that all travelers who have been in South Africa, Botswana, swatini, esotho, alawi, o ambi ue, amibia or imbabwe within the last 1 days must get tested three to five days after arrival, quarantine for seven days even if they test negative, and isolate for 10 days if they present Covid-19 symptoms.

s of onday, 62.1 of Santa arbara County residents are fully vaccinated, with 636,2 doses administered. The county reported .3 cases per 100,000 residents on ov. 2 , for a total of ,6 1 cases and 3 total deaths. The current test positivity rate is at 2. . The majority of the cases in the county on onday were seen in the 30- and the 0-1 age groups, with nine cases each, for a total of 26 new cases. The south county unincorporated area – which includes Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria – reported ero new cases on Monday, bringing the total number of cases so far in the area to 1, 1 . The ov. 26 county Covid-1 newsletter was not issued due to the Thanksgiving holiday. It will resume on Friday, Dec. 3.

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Thursday, December 2, 2021  5

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

THE CARPINTERIA SKATEPARK IS GOING TO BID! T HANK

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xx Thursday,December November2,25, 2020 6 Thursday, 2021

MAGAZINE

WINTER2022

CARPINTERIA

The Winter Issue Has Arrived! Sneak Peek inside…

livingcommunityartshoppingdining

CARP MAG

CoastalCoastal View View News • Carpinteria, News • Carpinteria,California California

THESE ARE THE HOUSES THE ARESCOS BUILT Four decades ago, Debra and Paul Aresco were renting a Carpinteria apartment, raising two young kids and dreaming of owning land and a home. Now they have that land and home, and their two grown kids have their own beautiful homes and young kids. It’s the American dream Carpinteria style.

L OCAL BI TE S

Whether it’s atop a home stove or growing in the soil outside the front door, Carpinterians have created atypical income streams from their culinary cleverness. Read about cottage industries that feed entrepreneurial spirit along with loyal customers.

AN AR TI STI C DUO: I NSPI RATI ON I N L I V I NG CO LO R

Paintbrushes in hand, Ginny and Garrett Speirs layer color on canvas within their overlapping lives. Each half of the couple is a successful artist, but their greatest masterpiece of all is their family.

THE G RE AT L ATI N-AMER ICA N PA STIME

In an era when Major League Baseball rejected talent that came in skin shades darker than white, great ball players found other fields to showcase their skills. Carpinterian Alonzo Orozco’s family members were among a number of trailblazing Latin-Americans whose story is finally claiming its rightful place in history.

G ROWI NG UP G ROM

Pure stoke courses through the veins of several young local surfers. These are the groms—too young to drive a car but old enough to charge the biggest set waves. Meet a handful of the kids who make up the next generation of Carpinteria shredders.

PI C K UP Y OU R CO P Y AT B USINESSES T H R O UGH O U T T H E VALLEY OR AT OUR NEW OFFICES, 4180 VIA REAL, SUITE F


Thursday, December 2, 2021  7

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Revised Surfliner Inn plans move forward after tense city meeting r voi e are in i nifi ant i o enter r iner nn ro e t d rin e ia

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At the end of a strained city council meeting on Monday, Carpinteria City Council members narrowly voted 3-2 to accept modified plans for the Surfliner Inn project, a year after the initial plans were presented. The developers must now submit a formal application, which will go through the city’s typical development review process. Monday’s meeting saw strong division in the council on the matter, with “yeses” from Mayor Wade Nomura, Councilmember Gregg A. Carty and Councilmember Roy Lee, and “noes” from Councilmember Natalia Alarcon and Vice Mayor Al Clark. But Monday’s acceptance of the plans is not a final approval of the project, Parks, Recreation and Public Facilities Director att oberts firmly emphasi ed. “I don’t want anyone being misled that the city council is (…) approving the plans,” Roberts said. “Tonight, the city is acting as property owner, and not a development review type of body or regulatory body.” The city owns the land the Surfliner nn would be built on; under the agreement, the developers would lease the land from the city.

Revised Plans

a Cit Co n i over eetin

The revised plans include several changes from the initial plans presented at the Nov. 30, 2020 conceptual meeting. As presented by architect Clay Aurell from AB Design, the inn now includes 39 rooms, compared to a previous 40. Among other changes, it has been bumped down to a maximum height of 35 feet compared to 36.5 feet and has been set back further from the street. The rooftop restrooms, following concerns about building’s height, are also now on the second floor. “We’ve really pulled the building back away from (Linden Avenue) intentionally, just to give it more breadth and more ability to have more open space,” he said. The new design, Aurell said, focuses on more open space, moving the café’s location to make the inn more inviting to the larger city. More landscaping has also been added, and the roofline has been altered. Before the presentation, developer Whitt Hollis – likely sensing the thick tension in the room – reminded everyone watching that the council was the catalyst for the plan, who requested that a hotel be brought to Carpinteria years ago. He noted that the project expects to bring an additional $500,000 in revenue to the city annually, and that it “could reasonably be expected,” per an Oxford University study of the impact of hotel

rendering of the iew of the re ised Sur iner nn pro ect from inden enue, loo ing southwest, shows the old conceptual outline compared to the current plans. he re ised plans include a decreased height, following concerns from the council o er the si e.

Car interia a an ed a ot nd it oin to ontin e to an e en o ra in re ident to ort o r downtown it oin to die

– Councilmember Gregg A. Carty

guests on the local community, to “infuse an additional $2.7 million annual to local merchants and to your local economy.” He added that the project would create jobs and help with Carpinteria’s parking plans. The plans would add 61 parking spaces to the city at the inn’s location, and an additional 83 at a new city parking lot. Jeff Theimer, a partner of the project who said he has been a resident of Carpinteria for eight years, thanked the council for their time and asked attendees to “keep in mind the true si e and scale of this project.” “When you look at or hear about a project sometimes it can sound a lot larger than it is. This is half of Parking Lot 3. It’s two stories,” he said. “I think that the 39 rooms will be one of the smallest hotels in Carpinteria (...) Best Western, which is right down the street on Carpinteria Avenue, is 145 rooms.” Speaking again later, he said the developers are open to a discussion and feedback from the public, calling the Surfliner Inn a “community project.”

“(I want) to have a sit-down discussion and not vitriol, hopefully. That’s what ’m interested in as a citi en. don’t want to walk around and hear (negative) comments,” he said – turning around as one public commentor sco ed and mumbled in the background – “and this is an example.”

Council Discussion

Vice Mayor Clark came out swinging strong prior to the developer’s presentation, asking city sta if tonight’s decision was a “beauty contest.” “Just to clarify, the city is not reviewing or approving a project? That’s later. What we’re doing now is more like a beauty contest, ‘Do you like this building or not?’ regardless of what the project is. Is that one way to look at it?” he said. City sta clarified that tonight’s meeting was held as part of the LDDA, or the lease disposition and development agreement, signed between the developers and the city in July. Part of that agreement required developers to bring the revised

plans for the inn back to the council for approval. Councilmember Carty – with noted sadness – said that Carpinteria needs to support new businesses, after facing a loss of many familiar businesses in recent years. “I appreciate all the input from both sides, no and for the project. We need a balance between tourism and momand-pop stores. And we’ve lost most of the mom-and-pop stores. I could go right down the line and name them all,” he said. “We need to embrace any new business that comes into Carpinteria, and locals, our community, needs to go there and support them. We’re losing that right now.” “Carpinteria has changed a lot. And it’s going to continue to change. I’m encouraging residents to support our downtown. Is it going to die?” Councilmember Alarcon expressed her concern about the si e of the inn for the space of its location, but thanked the developers for being receptive to the feedback in the revised plans. ayor omura also o ered his concerns over the si e, stating he would still like to see a smaller si ed inn, but emphasi ed that something needs to change in the lot. “In looking at what we have right now, if we have no change, people would be stepping o the railroad, ust as said before. We’d be looking at a parking lot, a public restroom, and a liquor store. For that reason, we do have to come up with some sort of solution. I think the hotel would fit well.”

Public Comment

But in the midst of the council’s narrow acceptance is a vocal fight against the inn, led by the Committee to Save the Downtown and Beach Parking Lot. Over the past several months, the group has gathered nearly 1,100 signatures to keep the city’s Parking Lot 3 – the proposed site of the inn – as open space. The petition would put the issue on the November 2022 ballot. The committee submitted its signatures to the city just last week, giving the Santa arbara County ce of lections 30 business days to verify the signatures.

perspecti e of the proposed inn, loo ing north. he s etched outlines show the differences between the pre ious plans and the re ised ones presented on onday.

See SURFLINER continued on page 8


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8  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Rotary Club of Carpinteria donates $20k worth of instruments to CUSD

BY EVELYN SPENCE

The Rotary Club of Carpinteria donated $22,116 worth of instruments to the Carpinteria nified School District, the board of trustees announced at last Tuesday’s meeting. The instruments will be used in the district’s music program at its elementary schools, middle school and high school. The donations were funded by the annual Rotary Talent Showcase, according to Barry Enticknap, past president of the rotary club, who submitted a letter to the board. “The Rotary Club of Carpinteria is pleased to continue supporting the CUSD and the School Music Program,” Enticknap wrote. “ e recogni e the personal, social, and

educational benefits the study of music can provide students. We want every interested student to have the opportunity to study and enjoy music,” he added. The instruments for the elementary schools and the Carpinteria Middle School include 30 recorders, five alto saxophones, four violas, three trombones, a si e double bass kit and 10 keyboards with stands and gig bags, as well as several accessories including strings, rosin, cork grease and rock stops. The donation also includes a number of cello and violin repairs, 95 new music books, the replacement of a broken ¾ cello and new cello bows and protective cases. For Carpinteria High School students, instruments include two trombones, five midi keyboards, a quad drum set and two

County seeks environmental justice art for new program Santa Barbara County is looking for submissions of artwork by area residents that focuses on environmental ustice. The program is organi ed in partnership with the county ce of Arts & Culture and the Environmental Justice Element. “The goal is to expand community understanding and awareness of environmental and climate issues and create an opportunity for community members to share their perspectives and experiences living in the county. Themes may include air, water, transportation, utilities, housing, food access,

and recreation as they relate to justice or injustice,” a press release from the county read. Submissions can be in any medium with a preference for two-dimensional pieces. Artists must live in Santa Barbara and the work must address environmental justice in unincorporated areas of the county. Three artists will receive $500, while two student artists will be given $250 scholarships. The deadline to submit is Jan. 10, 2022 at sbac.ca.gov/environmental-justice. For more information, contact srubin@ co.santa-barbara.ca.us or (805) 568-3992.

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California 20  Thursday, August 31, 2017

Halos Pitchforks

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violins. The donation also will go toward repairing a snare drum and piano. “ t’s ama ing how they support the music program,” board member Andy Shea er said, to the agreement of fellow board members. Board member Aaron Smith was absent from Tuesday’s meeting.

District discusses education effectiveness block grant at $600k

The board went over a $600k block grant from the state at last Tuesday’s meeting and approved a first reading. The Educator Effectiveness Grant, exactly $613,718, stretches across 2021 through 202 . t re uires that the money go toward professional learning for teachers, administrators and some sta who work with students, and includes an additional assistant principal/instructional coach for Carpinteria High School. The grant also allows for the district to reimburse credentialed teachers’ continuing education, up to $500. The district must now develop a specific plan for where exactly the money will go. The matter will return to the board at its Dec. 14 meeting.

Personnel Assignments

The board approved several personnel assignments. Patricia Humbles was assigned as a school counselor at the elementary level, and Deborah Rankin as a special education teacher at Canalino. Jacqueline Martin-Blanchet resigned from her position as an instructional assistant at the preschool level. Several winter coaching sta assignments were also approved. For boys basketball, Scott Sorich, Anthony Trerotola, aron a ues and Carlos ere for girls basketball, enry on ales, eldon Nomura, Noah Gilmert and Harmony eed for boys soccer, eonardo uintero, duardo ivera and ilberto aya for girls soccer, Lucy Carleton, Alfredo Martine -Cisneros and Charles ryant and for girls water polo, ohn tuski, urt Sou a and ordan ere . Salvador ope was also approved as the AG and the FFA advisor, and Noe ome was approved as the advisor.

CHS poets honored

Jocelyn Pena, Sierra Mayoral, Riley Wrought and Kate Cooney were all published in the Santa Barbara Reads contest, Superintendent Diana Rigby announced.

Surfliner meeting Continued from page 7

Many of those against the inn spoke when there is a city sponsored project on passionately at Monday’s meeting, call- city-owned property and the city council ing for the council to reject the revised members are supposed to also approve plans. it,” she said. She read aloud previous im Seefeld was first to speak. ntro- comments made by architectural review ducing herself as a trial attorney of 37 board members and city council members Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California years, she spoke strongly against the inn against the inn. and called it “unsuitable to the commuThose in favor of the project, such A reader sends a halo to Ryan Moore for bringing dirt backc to Carpinteria. nity.” as orraine ntire, said the council “ ’m a strong advocate of private shouldn’t delay the project because of A reader sends halo the to evcaveat eryone who the Playa Del Sur 4-H this year. property rights,awith that de-supported the petition. The members are looking forward to another“successful year. velopment should be thoughtful, should reali e that people do have a right to honor the proposed site, should be en- vote on this if it does get on the ballot. But A reader sends a halo to V alerie the new that volunteer at mean the riends of the vironmental and community sensitive. doesn’t that you can’tibrary move Bookstore, for cleaning anddoes reorganizing self-help section. This development proposal not meet theforward with the contingency that maybe those criteria,” she said. “You should the vote will come in favor of building the reject thissends development.” Andatby stalling this process, you A reader a halo to Desiree the new hotel. masseuse The ym Next oor. She Marla Daly slammed the council for stall the inevitable if the vote does come could have coasted through it, but she worked really hard to relieve my back pain. I what experienced she expressed was its perceived never such a great massage.” out in favor,” c ntire said. inability to listen to the public. David osso pointed out – the first “Never before in the year er history of telling commenter atto the meeting to do so – that A reader sends a halo to 56 whoev left a sign people pick up their dog-waste Carpinteria have so many Carpinterians there are “eight or nine thousand” eligible bags and stop leaving them on Casitas Pass Road. spoken up, rallied against City Hall, to voters in Carpinteria, compared to the fight for preservation ofsends our small town. tonearly signed the bags petition. A reader a pitchfork whoev 1,100 er hasthat been leav ing of dog Never. You’re proceeding with this meet“ don’t think that the 1,100 folksthat that waste on the ground along Casitas Pass Road. “Y es, it’s frustrating ing as though Carpinterians’ don’t signed (the petition) is neither majority the trash cansvoices are gone, but is that really your best way of ahandling matter. ur voices are insignificant,” she of citi ens or e presses the will of the the situation? ” argued. ma ority of citi ens of Carpinteria.” “We will vote. The time has really come e o ered on previous A reader sends a pitchfork to the person whohis hitopinion the reader’s pickup for the mayor, and the city council, to call comments over the inn, that in front of the reader’s house and didn’t stop. “Shame on you,noting and I hope timeoutyou withhave the developers. t’s your reprevious issues identified with the inn karma insurance.” sponsibility, and to publicly acknowledge included views and open space – “those the fact that this issue is going be de- ev ents sort of which a lot ofhostfolks A reader sends a pitchfork to thetobicycle onissues oothill oad.think urposely cided by the good people of Carpinteria. ing huge rides that take up the whole road isunderstand.” irresponsible. There are countless bike The time now.” “ owthis what we find is simply a litany lanes that is were put in with our tax dollars to avoid problem.” Others pointed out concerns with of negative comments as to si e, scale, leasing to a private developer, parking, thingsare – none of A readerpublic sendsland a pitchfork to the lifeguards location, braiding hair whileother swimmers in the such as Salm. which seem to have any fact or evidence pool. “N Amrita ot professional!” “There is a perceived conflict of interest behind them,” he said. A reader sends a pitchfork to the employees of the newer businesses on the Carpinteria Bluffs. earn to share the bike walking path with locals There will be four to five of you walking together and not a single one will scoot over just a tad to let a local pass through? ”

A reader sends a halo to to the womanfor who foundthe the reader’s husband’s A reader sends a halo Burlene making Carpinteria LumberA reader the “Her generous for paying forand the wallet in the sends Albertsons lot the dayperson after Thanksgiving yard N ursery areaaahalo joyparking totovisit. outgoing personality ( Southern reader’s gas when she forgot her ATM card at the gas station. “I’m turned “Thank you and many to you this holiday season!” style)it, in. friendly conversation andblessings plant knowledge make it a pleasure chose the most expensive oil, I’d love to reimburse you, and tosorry visit Iand shop.” thanksends you. I’m deeply moved by yourfor generosity.” A reader a halo to Joe at Goodwill procuring a DVD-to-TV cord fromsends the back room withand e Dayna ciency and a smile. “ ow, that’s goodwill ” A reader a halo to Sean for being wonderful neighbors and helping reader sends a halo tosituation. the 93013 Fund, Uncle Chen Restaurant the reader throughAanother frazzled mom and Marybeth surprise delivery of a delicious complete A reader sends Carty a halofor to the Carpinteria Valley Lumber Co. fordinner donating seeds with to thea fortune candy bar painted “Wonderful kindness quite a in thrill!” Carpinteria Garden Park. “They will rock. be beautiful andleft delicious additions to the the A readercookie, sends a halo to and the anonymous person who a $ 100and donation alreadyoflovely garden!” arpinteria office mail slot this past week. Thank you for your kindness. A reader sends a halo to the staff of Jack’s Bistro for staying open during Covid-19. ahalo smile no matter how busy. A great wayto tohelp start the day.” for and A reader“Always sendsaahalo CARP Growers, Larry Nimmer and Ann Diener supA reader sends totothe Daykas for always being there with anything porting arts journalism on the Central never complaining. “Many thanks to theCoast. best neighbors ever. We love you all dearly.” A reader sends a halo to Mayor Wade Nomura for the city’s beautiful flower wreath at reader the Carpinteria Cemetery theJohn Memorial Day program. A reader sends afor pitchfork toatthose riding electric onsmiles the beach. A sends a halo to Tami and Robitaille’s for their bikes constant and over-the-top“customer The wedding were they loved allfast, andtoo brought ike otherservice. motori ed vehicles that favors are banned, arebytoo heavy reader sends halo to Seattle those to who people disabilities. “When aAbit of Carpinteria to the wedding!” and atoo destructive mixacknowledge with the people and with animals on the beach.” you encounter a person in a wheelchair or walking with a walker, please smile and say hello sends to A that A reader aperson.” halo to L aance L awhon at the Carpinteria Sanitation District for reader sends pitchfork to whoever has Ken’s black Labrador named helping Kim’s Market. Dorothy. “The holidays are coming and she is the only family he has. He A reader sends a halo Carpinteria Beautiful lady picking up trash in a neighwaits dailytoatthe Rincon for her safe return.” borhood near the beach. you! needatallThe theSpot. help we hen can get A reader sends a halo to K“Thank assandra Q We uintero the keeping roof-toptrash flag picked up in the neighborhoods on the beach-side of the tracks.” was twisted and lodged in the rain gutter, Q uintero jumped into action and climbed A reader sends a pitchfork to the couple in the white Toyota driving down Goberup to the roof and untangled it sosoda that it could freely. Way to showproperty patriotism!” nador Canyon Road, tossing out cans intowave the reader’s neighbor’s and A reader sends aCreek. halo to“Be Carpinterians who put out boxes in front of their homes into Gobernador better humans.” full of surplus from“It their “Thankwedding, you for sharing your A reader sends oranges, a halo to E avocados, mma andetc. Justin. wastrees. a wonderful great food, abundance.”location and great people! It was moving and wonderful.” spectacular A reader sends a pitchfork to the L inden planters. “All the mushrooms growing there Coastal News welcomes your letters indicate too much water. View N ice weed farm.” A reader reader sends sends halo to to all the at beachAT community residents. “Thank you for A aa halo ulinary. went to my first class thisparking weekSubmit Halos &Nikki Pitchforks online at coastalview.com. Letters must include your name, address, phone number and in front your home with end withofmy sister, who hasyour been permit.” to four so far. I had the best time! Someone get this A reader sends a pitchfork to a restaurant owner for parking his vehicle in the spots signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words girl a T show should be on the are ood Network already. Allshe submissions subject to editing. right out front of his establishment. “Shouldn’t he leave those parking spots available willcustomers? be edited”in length. Submit online at coastalview.com A reader sends a halo to Diana, a caregiver at Carpinteria Senior Lodge for nearly for his paying three years. A reader sends a halo to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and the local v et for working diligently to save the Rincon Beach bear. “It’s a terrible shame A reader sends a pitchfork to the City of Carpinteria for letting the bluffs turn into reader sendscent a halo to Tomhowever Sweeneywouldn’t for goingwant out on Avenue to lose one ofAthese magnifi creatures it toElm suffer to a an ever-increasing dirt parking lot. That is not what the bluffs were purchased for.


Thursday, December 2, 2021  9

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

A championship community

Any championship effort takes the contributions of so many people and the support of even more to be successful. This fall is a perfect example of community and collaboration, as our two Carpinteria high schools oined e orts to help Carpinteria High’s boys water polo and Cate’s football team find success, with both teams capturing their program’s first ever championship. The Warriors water polo team began their o season with early summer mornings in Cate’s pool. It was a wonderful thing to see so many student-athletes working so hard to better themselves and come together to work towards a dream. Who knew, just a few months later, these boys would have accomplished something no Carpinteria water polo team before them had ever done and given our town something so special to cheer for in the process. For the Cate football team, it took the e orts of athletic director at Cooney, as well as the willingness of Carpinteria High School soccer coaches Leo Quintero, Lucy Carlton and Charles Bryant to yield some field time an e traordinary act of kindness for teams starting their own seasons. In addition, the CHS Booster Club and many others helped create community events during the playo s at Memorial Stadium and helped the Rams win their first ever C football title, led by Ben Soto, a proud Warrior alumnus. Children need reasons to dream, support to chase those dreams, and skilled adults to help guide them on a joyous path to success. As the parent of an 8-year-old Carpinteria Athletic Club Triton, I can attest to the next generation already being here, searching for opportunities to have fun and work towards new and exciting achievements while creating memories that will last a lifetime.

Wade Ransom, director of athletics, Cate School Carpinteria

City Council punts on the Sur iner nn si e

At Monday night’s city council meeting, the Carpinteria City Council had the opportunity to speak for the majority of people requesting a reduction in the size of the proposed Surfliner nn. ack in November 2020, during the conceptual review of proposed plans, eight out of 14 comments from three city departments all voiced their concerns that the proposed plans were too big and had too many rooms for that site on arking ot 3. On Monday, the council reviewed the revised plans, which only reduced the number of rooms from 0 to 3 2. , the overall square footage by 614 square feet 3. and the length of the building by 11 feet .2 . This was not the magnitude of reduction discussed back in 2020. There were also requests for the developers to look at a hotel with 30 to 3 rooms, which Mayor Wade Nomura again voiced Monday night in his comments. A motion was put forth by Councilmember Roy Lee and seconded by Councilmember Gregg A. Carty, for the City Council to approve the modestly reduced sized plans. Opposed were Councilmember Natalia Alarcon and Vice Mayor Al Clark. Councilmember Alarcon asked Councilmember Lee to amend his resolution to include a limitation on the size, and Councilmember Lee declined. This left the deciding swing vote to Mayor Nomura. The mayor had the opportunity to vote down Councilmember’s Lee motion with Alarcon and Clark. Then Councilmember Alarcon could have put up a new motion to approve the developer’s revised plans with some limits on overall size. The hotel size may still be reduced

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LETTERS

“What is relevant is whether the majority of Carpinteria residents are in favor of or against the hotel being built by the railroad tracks. This question could be answered in November 2022, if the ballot measure is voted on. Until then, approval of this project must wait.

––Annie Sly

while it goes through the standard development review process. But what is telling is this was another opportunity missed by the City Council to listen to city residents and their own department members!

Alan and Carol Koch Carpinteria

Do not move forward with the Sur iner

I am Debbie Murphy, broker and owner of Murphy King Real Estate. One day went to arking ot 3 and simply stood there and took in the view: the mountains, the buildings, the community garden, the tracks, the state park and the sky. In taking in the view, I realized that all of that would be gone if the hotel was built. That piece of sky would be gone forever to Carpinteria. For the rest of all of our lifetimes, that particular piece of Carpinteria would never be the same. So, I volunteered to collect signatures for the petition to save ublic arking ot 3. was a little surprised at how eager Carpinterians were to seek me out and sign the petition. They did not want the hotel. In the process I came to think about how, when the City of Carpinteria was formed, we were in a building mode. We needed housing and stores and hotels and it made sense to give those powers to our elected o cials to make decisions on our behalf. Now, I feel it is more important to preserve the wonderful community that we have created. More is not necessarily better. I appreciate all the work that you have put into consideration of this project, yet I ask you to listen to the people of Carpinteria and not proceed with the proposed development.

Debbie Murphy Carpinteria

Proposed changes are a joke

At the risk of being redundant, kudos to Al Clark for his “no” vote at the city council meeting on Monday. Kudos to Natalia Alarcon as well. Thank you both for your votes regarding the Surfliner nn. This letter will address some of the issues raised at Monday’s meeting. A comment was made on how many years the developer has been working on this project. That point is irrelevant. What is relevant is whether the majority of Carpinteria residents are in favor of or against the hotel being built by the railroad tracks. This question could be answered in November 2022, if the ballot measure is voted on. Until then, approval of this project must wait. erhaps 600,000 a year would be added to the city’s co ers. t would be enlightening to know how this number was calculated, and what occupancy rate was estimated to come up with this number. Transparency on this would be helpful.

The height, setback and cafe location are insignificant changes. The si e of the hotel has been an issue from the very beginning and Monday’s proposed changes are meaningless. The hotel has rooms on the first and second floor, and a rooftop. I call the rooftop the third floor. Calling it the rooftop rather than the third floor does not change the facts. Most if not all of us agree that Carpinteria is the last great beach town, and no one wants us to be Orange County. This development will set an undesirable precedent. Calling this hotel a landmark is ludicrous. It is just a hotel.

Annie Sly Carpinteria

Sur iner will be a train wreck

Each week in the Coastal View News readers see a slate of destructive behaviors vividly displayed in the “Commander’s ecap” column. s this any di erent with the Surfliner nn debates n each go around, we see the same city o cials vividly addicted to their economic tourism passion habit, causing mayhem among a citizenry who never asked for and who have explicitly indicated they don’t want the inn. Carpinteria is not and should not be a “ as egas.” The Surfliner nn promises a train wreck for the town.

Lorenz Schaller Ojai

Vaccines work

Many vaccine “naysayers” are no longer with us. I grew up with vaccines. My father was the first epidemiologist from the niversity of Iowa hospital in Iowa City, Iowa. Since then, vaccines have eliminated or greatly reduced epidemics for chicken pox, smallpox, diphtheria, measles, mumps, polio, whooping cough, shingles and more. Get vaccinated and stay with us and protect others against Covid-1 .

Danel Trevor Carpinteria

o on Cresco abs’ new project

Five years into the cannabis takeover of Carpinteria, I am laser focused on the environmental degradation caused by the pot operations nearby. That’s why ’ve started Save the rroyo aredon Watershed, an environmental protection and advocacy group, working alongside Concerned Carpinterians, the Santa Barbara Urban Creeks Council and others. I am worried about what is happening to federally endangered steelhead trout and tidewater gobi, plus other plants and

animals in rroyo aredon Creek. To try to understand these problems, I read “A eview of the ects of Cannabis Cultivation on Fish and Wildlife Resources” by Ange Baker, Senior Resource Scientist for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Baker states that pot operations degrade the habitat for plants and animals through overactive water resource use, pesticides, rodenticides, water diversions, site development and direct ingestion of the plant itself, among many other issues. According to the report, cannabis “…cultivation in sensitive ecosystems means that marijuana cultivation can have environmental impacts that are disproportionately large given the area under production.” Cresco Labs is a perfect example of this “disproportionately large impact.” Here, the Michigan-based corporation plans a new, two-story o ce building and cannabis processing warehouse, right on the banks of rroyo aredon Creek. They will have employees parking and working right next to the creek everyday 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This new corporate headquarters requires the installation of two new septic tanks, just outside an environmentally sensitive habitat, plus two large, new flood control ditches, with massive cut and fill of earth and more. How could we stop Cresco and Big Cannabis’ slow-motion environmental disasters in rroyo aredon atershed I urge the Board of Supervisors to reject Cresco Labs’ project at its Dec. 7 meeting. lease support our e orts and choose the environment over cannabis cash.

Maureen Claffey Carpinteria

No on Rincon Trail

ver a decade ago, Carpinteria arks and Recreation Department proposed a bike path – the incon Trail ro ect – that was supposed to be good for bikes, paragliding and hang-gliding. The current plan, presented by director Matt Roberts, removes massive portions of the blu . This will change the natural airflow, forever ending paragliding and hang-gliding in Carpinteria. Thousands have protested by signing petitions, writing letters, attending city meetings, meeting with Mr. Roberts, and more. The department ignored it all. aragliding and hang-gliding has occurred almost daily at this thriving, growing community for over 40 years at the blu s. The ederal viation dministration has stated that there is nothing illegal about paragliding or hang-gliding at this location. The arks and ecreation Department has also been made aware by the bicycle community that dumping bikes or e-bikes going 30 mph into the incon each parking lot is irresponsible the arks and ecreation Department said that this is the county’s problem, not theirs – a sad and fatal stance for biker safety. The department is rushing this plan, to establish the legacy that they completed a portion of the California Coastal Trail. The ironic fact is, the department’s legacy will not be that they completed 2,800 feet of bike path, but that they spent millions in taxpayer dollars to obliterate a beautiful community. We advocate for a progressive arks and ecreation Department, similar to UC Santa Barbara and Santa Barbara city, which supports diverse communities rather than destroys them. Why not improve the site for paragliding and hang-gliding and build a bike path at the same time lease voice your support for all communities, as yours might be next on the arks and ecreation Department’s chopping block.

Aaron LaPlante Carpinteria


10  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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VIEWPOINT December is ADHD Awareness Month

BY ROLAND ROTZ, PHD, AND AMANDA CARTER, PSYD Imagine a child with a keen sensitivity to rejection, difficulty with emotional control and trouble modulating their behavior. They would likely be labelled by peers as “di erent” within a classroom. This is the experience of many children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Children easily pickup on subtle or not so subtle di erences. They notice when a child has extra support in the classroom or has access to fidgets and/or other assistive devices. Sometimes, ADHD-like behavior may also set children apart from the rest. The feeling of stigma around one’s ADHD behaviors is known to contribute to significant emotional problems in adulthood including depression, anxiety and low-self-esteem. So how can we – parents, educators and professionals – communicate with children about ADHD in a manner that reduces stigma? How can we work to challenge negative stereotypes? ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulty with attention and concentration and deficits in executive functioning. These traits can come with or without hyperactivity or impulsivity. The stereotype of ADHD tends to be a young boy who cannot sit still and is frequently disruptive. However, this image only encompasses one small part of ADHD. This stereotype may be a factor in why so many people with di erent presentations of D D go unnoticed, undiagnosed and ultimately, untreated. In fact, providers who work frequently with the ADHD population will say that no two people with ADHD are quite alike. A useful image to aid in the under-

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standing of ADHD is one of an iceberg, with only the very tip breaching the surface of the water. People typically see the obvious signs: lack of attention and concentration, hyperactivity and impulsivity. ut the “invisible” di culties, such as executive functioning, are harder to see. People with ADHD also often have strengths in creativity, spontaneity, outthe-box thinking and other positive characteristics. Viewing ADHD within the context of specific strengths and weaknesses rather than from a viewpoint of deficit is often referred to as the neurodiversity perspective. This perspective posits that people interact with and interpret the world in unique ways, learning and thinking di erently from one another to varying degrees. People with ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental diagnoses often have larger degrees of di erence from their peers. Many professionals in this area think that communicating about ADHD through a neurodiversity perspective can help to reduce stigma associated with cognitive di erences. They think it can lead to more productive and e ective intervention strategies. Rather than labelling ADHD children as “di erent,” it is more helpful to embrace a neurodiversity perspective, in which each child’s learning and thinking styles are accepted as varying presentations of “normal.” This viewpoint was submitted by Hopenet of Carpinteria, a grassroots suicide prevention non rofit or ani ation o earn ore or to ee e vi it o eneto ar or


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Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

City planning affects local wages

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THE LAY OF THE LAND

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The 2022 Carpinteria Morning Rotaty Calendar can be purchased for $16 each or 3 for $45 in our office.

Consider the following numbers: There are 9,378 jobs in Carpinteria Valley. Of the 20,618 total Carpinteria Valley residents, an estimated 13,897 are employed. That means there are at least 4,519 Carpinteria Valley residents who work elsewhere. (This number is actually much larger once you account for the large number of local jobs held by non-local residents.) What does this mean? Well, most fundamentally it means that well over onethird of the employed people who live here work outside the Carpinteria Valley! This daily mass exodus of local residents to jobs in other places means increased commute tra c, more air pollution and a decrease in residents’ connection to our hometown. This situation is known as a poor “jobs-housing balance.” In an ideal situation, local jobs match the needs of local residents, not just in numbers, but also in the types of obs re uired to a ord to live in the housing available locally. Our situation is clearly far from that ideal. We might be tempted just to sigh and say, “Well, that’s the way it is.” But it doesn’t need to stay that way. As a community, our planning decisions a ect this obs-housing balance. Change takes time, which is even more reason to get started right away. It is frequently stated that something that creates new jobs is good for a community. What is often left out of that discussion is the type of jobs created. Look through the “Employment by Sector” table and see what the average salaries are for di erent types of obs. This data is from a 2019 report which is based on 2018 data and so is slightly dated. But the current data is not much di erent.

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Employment by Sector (2018): Carpinteria Valley Sector Management Of Companies Mining Professional / Scientific / Technical Finance / Insurance Information Manufacturing Private Educational Services Government Wholesale Trade Construction Admin Support / Security / Landscaping Transportation / Warehousing Real Estate / Rental / Leasing Agriculture Retail Trade Other Services Health Care / Social Assistance Arts / Entertainment / Recreation Hotels / Food Services Total, All Industries

Number of workers

Average Annual Salary

273 46 306 189 1,209 1,254 199 545 734 440 359 34 136 1,324 556 135 288 145 1,206 9,378

$129,772 $119,076 $99,617 $94,808 $91,168 $80,763 $68,541 $64,619 $59,962 $59,339 $51,241 $47,775 $43,606 $39,437 $34,315 $32,691 $31,869 $30,404 $22,479 $59,830

Source: 2019 Carpinteria Valley Economic Profile by The California Economic Forecast

Roughly a third of all jobs in Carpinteria Valley are in sectors – such as scientific, technical, finance and information that ha e an a erage salary of 1,4 . his salary is almost three times as much as another third of Carpinteria obs in agriculture, retail and hospitality sectors that ha e an a erage salary of 1,88 . A new business focusing on tourists visiting Carpinteria, such as a souvenir shop or hotel, would create new jobs, but most would provide average salaries near the bottom of this table. It is unlikely one of these jobs would allow an employee to a ord to live here. ut if that new business is instead some type of manufacturing or technical work, or otherwise part of the “information economy,” average salaries would be near the top of the table and being able to live locally is much more likely. Here are a few more interesting numbers drawn from the table: The following sectors make up 33% of Carpinteria Valley jobs and have an average salary of $31,887: Agriculture, Retail Trade, Hotels / Food Services. The following sectors make up 34% of Carpinteria Valley jobs and have an average salary of $91,405 (almost three times as much as the ones listed above): Management of Companies, Professional / Scientific / Technical, inance / nsurance, Information, and Manufacturing. How can we use this data to inform planning decisions? It is pretty simple: we need to prioritize projects that create well-paying jobs over ones that pay near minimum wage. If a hotel is proposed, we need to consider the fact that the average wages probably will not be enough for the workers to a ord to live locally. n alternative use of that land might be o ce space for a company paying wages near the top of the table. Higher-paying jobs increase the ability of local workers to live here and be part of this community. On top of that, since they live and work locally,

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they would do more of their non-housing spending locally too, benefiting local businesses and our local economy overall. These planning choices are heavily influenced by the re uirements laid out in our General Plan, which is exactly what the city of Carpinteria is working on updating right now. Major milestones in this update process are scheduled for early next year, and it is important that community members make themselves heard during the review process. In recent columns, I discussed how housing stock availability and price relate to the concern of “My kids won’t be able to a ord to live here.” lso important is whether local jobs pay closer to minimum wage or somewhere higher in the table. ven if someone finds housing at an affordable price, it doesn’t matter if there are no local jobs with the necessary salary. In my next column, I will discuss the qualifications necessary to get one of these higher-paying jobs. (Spoiler alert: education is the key!) Mike Wondolowski is president of the Carpinteria Valley Association (CarpinteriaValleyAssociation.org), a local organization dedicated to maintaining the small beach town nature of our community. In his 30 years of involvement in planning issues, he has witnessed visionary successes, as well as decisions that were later widely regretted. When not stuck indoors, he can often be found enjoying Carpinteria’s treasures including kayaking and snorkeling along the coast, r nnin or i in on t e or t e ran in Trail, or “vacationing” as a tent camper at the State Beach.

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Thursday, December 2, 2021  13

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ARTCETRA

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STEFANIE HERRINGTON (805) 293-6363 — Lauren Bray Ben Watts, Speed Racer & Mach 5, 2020, Slingshot Alpha Art Studio.

Slingshot Alpha Art Studio opens new show

The Slingshot Alpha Art Studio will showcase work from Santa Barbara and Carpinteria artists in a Dec. 2 opening, including art from Carpinterian Ben Watts. Other Slingshot artists include Erica Miller, Issac Palato, Marc Sucher, Dylan Long, Megan Isaac and Jane Hollick. The show, which will run between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., on Thursday, will highlight artists influenced by pop culture. In a press release from Slingshot, the show was described as “vibrant, humorous, nostalgic and revealing – this body of work is animated with novel expression that complicates simple expectations of familiar iconography.” For more information, visit slightshotart.org.

Arts Center invites submissions for new Rincon exhibit

The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center invites community members to enter its “Queen of the Coast” exhibition, which will celebrate “all things Rincon,” according to the center’s website. The deadline for submissions is ednesday, an. , with a drop-o time on an. 10 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. For more information, visit carpinteriaartscenter.org.

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David Powdrell was instrumental in the publication of the new Carpinteria Arts Center book featuring 100 local artists.

Artists will sign copies of “Small Town Big Art” at book reception

“Small Town Big Art” will make its debut this month at the Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center, where featured artists will be available to sign the book. The $50 oversized art book, which celebrates 100 Carpinteria artists, will be available for purchase at a reception on Dec. 18, noon to 4 p.m., with the featured artists. At the reception, artists will be available to autograph copies of the book and Wrinkled Teenagers will play live music.

© Compass 2021 ¦ All Rights Reserved by Compass ¦ Made in NYC Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California operating under multiple entities. License Numbers 01991628, 1527235, 1527365, 1356742, 1443761, 1997075, 1935359, 1961027, 1842987, 1869607, 1866771, 1527205, 1079009, 1272467. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified.

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14  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Scouts get to work at Christmas tree lot PHOTOS BY ROBIN KARLSSON

Once again, Carpinteria’s Boy Scout Troop 50 and Cub Scouts Pack 50 opened their annual Christmas tree lot the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Scouts busily prepped the lot and unloaded trees on the St. Joseph Church field, as eager customers arrived in search of the perfect holiday pine. In addition to bringing good cheer, the Christmas tree lot is the scouts’ biggest fundraiser, helping fund the Carpinteria scouting program. The lot is located at 1532 Linden Ave. and will be open until all trees are gone.

Ken Ha, left, and scout, Adam Ha, help unload the first truck, which contained 417 trees. A second truck came soon after, with 375 trees.

From left, teens Evan Gregg, Jake Ehlers and Zaiden Juarez stack the larger trees.

Kathy Sheaffer volunteers at the lot, keeping track of trees as they arrive.

Jacob Ornelas, front, and Reece Isaac, near right, worked together to help unload trees.

Working together, from left, scouts Ashton Nystrom, Alex Hansen, Elijah LoMonaco, Phoenix Leef and Reece Isaac help haul trees.

Connie and Danny Varenis were happy with their tree choice.

“I have never seen trees like this before!” said Mila Martinez to her father Adrian.


Thursday, December 2, 2021  15

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Engagement Teter – Carty

More than $20,000 in meat was given out to Carpinterians for free last week. The meat was set to be thrown away, but instead, delivery dri er ufino urillo decided to put it to better use.

St. Joseph Church and local man organize fresh meat giveaway

elly Teter and oel Carty of erkeley, California have announced their engagement. The two were born and raised in Carpinteria, and spent Thanksgiving weekend celebrating in town with friends and family. Teter ’s parents are Stacy and Scott Teter and Carty’s parents are arybeth and artin Carty.

Carpinteria Morning Rotary

St. Joseph Church received a welcome gift last week in the form of $20,000 worth of fresh steaks, pork chops and ground meat from ufino urillo, a delivery driver in the area. ccording to Carpinterian ike ee, a member of the St. incent de aul conference who helped organi e the giveaway, the market that ufino was supposed to deliver to re ected the delivery because the meat’s Dec. 11 e piration date was too close. “The packing company told him to either dump the meat or give it away,” ee wrote. ufino and his wife, licia, contacted St. oseph Church and re uested that the delivery be given to those in need. s word spread across Carpinteria, ufino delivered to the church parking lot just after 2 p.m. “ ver the ne t two hours, orderly chaos is the only word to describe the distribution of the bountiful supply of meat. Those receiving meat were encouraged to take e tra for their neighbors and friends and by p.m. the semi-trailer was empty, and all of the meat was on its way to feed and nourish Carpinteria families,” ee wrote. ee praised ufino’s actions, calling him a “good Samaritan.”

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ON THE ROAD Turning 10 with CVN in Tepoztlán onah

llin trav-

elled to 0-91-100-23. e ico olor is CMYK over the fall break, fied here. visiting his grand-

parents Rafael and Chayo in e ico ave a veteran City. To buried celebrateat his 10th birthday, pinteriathe Cemetery family took a honor him with a flag on trip toor theher majestic town of Tepoztlán. e us a call or send an email on or earby to where before the May 28 stayed, family atop the Tepozteco will place a flag for you. mountains, there ude the person’s fullar-name. is a significant chaeological site, where the remains of a small temple to the Aztec god, Tepo t catl, can be visited.

8 PAGE IS 4.875 INCHES WIDE BY 4.0 INCHES HIGH

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16  Thursday, December 2, 2021

LOCAL

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Thursday, December 2, 2021  17

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Holiday Checklist

Shop Locally • Thank a Neighbor Take care of our Teachers & Essential Workers Support a Nonprofit Clean a Beach • Be Kind to Yourself

BY DEBRA HERRICK

This holiday season, we’re diving into some deep-dished debates that have divided dinner tables for as long as we can remember. Turkey or ham? Apple or pumpkin pie? Eggnog or punch? Y ou be the judge! Each week, we’ll present two dishes – with fun facts and recipes – and let you choose which one will win a place at your holiday table.

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Non-profit retail shop with gifts & products all HANDMADE by local Carp students.. 100% of profits go to the students!

Spend $20 this Dec. & receive a FREE gift*

PUMPKIN

*while supplies last

768 Linden Ave. Open 7 Days 11-5pm

OPEN AIR GYM

FREE EXTRA MONTH 75% OFF REGISTRATION FEE (WITH MEMBERSHIP)

Staff hours: M-F 9 a.m.- 7:30 p.m. • S-S: 9am - Noon

APPLE PIE BITES Ingredients:

NOW AVAILABLE!

Pick one up at the Seal Fountain during Farmers Market

or email jagheterobin @yahoo.com

MURPHY’S

VINYL SHACK RECORDS • POSTERS WALL ART • COMICS • DVD’S BOOKS • CD’S & MORE!

NEW LOCATION 977 Linden Ave.

805-318-55O6 • Open Daily 10am

1 Apple

HAND SHAPED CUSTOM SURFBOARDS

GET YOUR ORDERS IN EARLY LET US HELP YOU FIND THE PERFECT GIFTS FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST! We ' ll even do

805-684-7440

Take the Carpinteria Avenue exit from 101 South - 4th building on the right

Preheat oven to 35 0 and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Wash and slice apple into 16 w edges. Toss apples with sugar and spices. Lay out your crescent dough and add 2 apples to the thick side of the crescent dough and roll up. Place each bite onto a parchment lined baking sheet. Sprinkle each bite with a little raw sugar (optional). Bake for 15 m inutes until the dough is puffed and lightly brown.

1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree

OPEN 10-5 EVERYDAY IN DECEMBER

659 LINDEN AVENUE. 805-684-2413

HOLLY YASHI • CITIZEN WAXING POETIC FOSSIL BRAND

1078 Casitas Pass Rd.

Tuesday - Saturday

1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk

APPLE PIE IS NOT AMERICAN Everyone knows that apple pie is often associated with being American, but this delicious dessert is actually uropean. The very first recipe for apple pie came from England hundreds of years ago. The vast majority of apple varieties are not even native to N orth America.

1 cup white sugar 4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix

Sprinkle dry cake mix over the top, then drizzle with melted butter. Top with walnuts. Bake at 35 0 degrees for 1 hour or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cut, plate and top with whipped cream.

805.684.5110

APPLES ARE 25% AIR

Apples float in water because a whopping 25% of their volume is actually air. Apples are less dense than water, making them the perfect fruit for apple bobbing.

A BUSHEL OF APPLES Have you ever wondered how heavy a bushel of apples really is? Approximately 42 pounds of apples are found in a bushel. All those apples can make about 21 pies, 3 gallons of cider, and 20 quarts of applesauce.

WHAT DO YOU WANT FOR CHRISTMAS? I want a dog. - A ndrew M.

BY ROBIN KARLSSON

My two front teeth. - K arina D.

Stop in & shop our vast selection!

1/8 t sp all spice

Ingredients:

the wrapping

Wines for all occasions

NEW ARRIVALS WEEKLY

M-F 10-6pm • Sat 10-5pm

1/8 t sp nutmeg

1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts

the holidays

…simply fine wines at great prices!

4193-1 Carpinteria Ave.

1/4 tsp cinnamon

3/4 cup butter, melted

FUlly Stocked for

Sandcastle Time

2 tsp raw sugar

GREAT PUMPKIN DESSERT

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. G rease a 9x13 inch baking pan. In a large bowl, combine pumpkin, milk, eggs, sugar and spice. Mix well, and pour into a 9x13 inch pan.

805-881-4028 • RinconFitnessUSA.com

4188 CARPINTERIA AVE. (ACROSS FROM CARP WINE CO.)

1 Crescent Dough Package

3 eggs

RINCON DESIGNS SURF SHOP

GET A JUMP ON JANUARY!

GYM SIGN UP SPECIAL NOW! Offers expire December 31, 2021

APPLE DOGS OF CARPINTERIA Vol. 4

OPEN 24/7

GREAT VENTILATIO N!

VS.

Rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, pumpkin is incredibly healthy. What’s more, its low-calorie content makes it a weight-loss-friendly food. Pumpkin can help boost your immune system, protect your eyesight, lower your risk of certain cancers and promote heart and skin health. What’s more? Our brains like pumpkin treats almost as much as our bellies. Because pumpkin spice is on the sweet side, several areas of the brain light up when we consume it. umpkins are also one of the more resilient fruits finding ways to grow large and bulging even in dry and soil deficit areas. umpkins share nutrients along a connected vine that reaches into the ground to replenish itself. It is perhaps for this reason that pumpkins have become symbols of prosperity, growth and abundance.

Best Gym in Town!

I want Covid-19 to be over. - Conner V .

I want my finals to go well. - Monica D.

Some Coca-Cola memorabilia for my collection. - Ruben B.

G iv e t h e g if t o f A D V EN T U R E! Call us for a gift certificate

LosPadresOutfitters.com or call 805-755-8687

INDULGE YOUR SENSES OPEN DAILY 11AM - 3PM

910A LINDEN AVE 805.684.6695


16  Thursday, December 2, 2021

LOCAL

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Thursday, December 2, 2021  17

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Holiday Checklist

Shop Locally • Thank a Neighbor Take care of our Teachers & Essential Workers Support a Nonprofit Clean a Beach • Be Kind to Yourself

BY DEBRA HERRICK

This holiday season, we’re diving into some deep-dished debates that have divided dinner tables for as long as we can remember. Turkey or ham? Apple or pumpkin pie? Eggnog or punch? Y ou be the judge! Each week, we’ll present two dishes – with fun facts and recipes – and let you choose which one will win a place at your holiday table.

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Non-profit retail shop with gifts & products all HANDMADE by local Carp students.. 100% of profits go to the students!

Spend $20 this Dec. & receive a FREE gift*

PUMPKIN

*while supplies last

768 Linden Ave. Open 7 Days 11-5pm

OPEN AIR GYM

FREE EXTRA MONTH 75% OFF REGISTRATION FEE (WITH MEMBERSHIP)

Staff hours: M-F 9 a.m.- 7:30 p.m. • S-S: 9am - Noon

APPLE PIE BITES Ingredients:

NOW AVAILABLE!

Pick one up at the Seal Fountain during Farmers Market

or email jagheterobin @yahoo.com

MURPHY’S

VINYL SHACK RECORDS • POSTERS WALL ART • COMICS • DVD’S BOOKS • CD’S & MORE!

NEW LOCATION 977 Linden Ave.

805-318-55O6 • Open Daily 10am

1 Apple

HAND SHAPED CUSTOM SURFBOARDS

GET YOUR ORDERS IN EARLY LET US HELP YOU FIND THE PERFECT GIFTS FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST! We ' ll even do

805-684-7440

Take the Carpinteria Avenue exit from 101 South - 4th building on the right

Preheat oven to 35 0 and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Wash and slice apple into 16 w edges. Toss apples with sugar and spices. Lay out your crescent dough and add 2 apples to the thick side of the crescent dough and roll up. Place each bite onto a parchment lined baking sheet. Sprinkle each bite with a little raw sugar (optional). Bake for 15 m inutes until the dough is puffed and lightly brown.

1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree

OPEN 10-5 EVERYDAY IN DECEMBER

659 LINDEN AVENUE. 805-684-2413

HOLLY YASHI • CITIZEN WAXING POETIC FOSSIL BRAND

1078 Casitas Pass Rd.

Tuesday - Saturday

1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk

APPLE PIE IS NOT AMERICAN Everyone knows that apple pie is often associated with being American, but this delicious dessert is actually uropean. The very first recipe for apple pie came from England hundreds of years ago. The vast majority of apple varieties are not even native to N orth America.

1 cup white sugar 4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix

Sprinkle dry cake mix over the top, then drizzle with melted butter. Top with walnuts. Bake at 35 0 degrees for 1 hour or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cut, plate and top with whipped cream.

805.684.5110

APPLES ARE 25% AIR

Apples float in water because a whopping 25% of their volume is actually air. Apples are less dense than water, making them the perfect fruit for apple bobbing.

A BUSHEL OF APPLES Have you ever wondered how heavy a bushel of apples really is? Approximately 42 pounds of apples are found in a bushel. All those apples can make about 21 pies, 3 gallons of cider, and 20 quarts of applesauce.

WHAT DO YOU WANT FOR CHRISTMAS? I want a dog. - A ndrew M.

BY ROBIN KARLSSON

My two front teeth. - K arina D.

Stop in & shop our vast selection!

1/8 t sp all spice

Ingredients:

the wrapping

Wines for all occasions

NEW ARRIVALS WEEKLY

M-F 10-6pm • Sat 10-5pm

1/8 t sp nutmeg

1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts

the holidays

…simply fine wines at great prices!

4193-1 Carpinteria Ave.

1/4 tsp cinnamon

3/4 cup butter, melted

FUlly Stocked for

Sandcastle Time

2 tsp raw sugar

GREAT PUMPKIN DESSERT

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. G rease a 9x13 inch baking pan. In a large bowl, combine pumpkin, milk, eggs, sugar and spice. Mix well, and pour into a 9x13 inch pan.

805-881-4028 • RinconFitnessUSA.com

4188 CARPINTERIA AVE. (ACROSS FROM CARP WINE CO.)

1 Crescent Dough Package

3 eggs

RINCON DESIGNS SURF SHOP

GET A JUMP ON JANUARY!

GYM SIGN UP SPECIAL NOW! Offers expire December 31, 2021

APPLE DOGS OF CARPINTERIA Vol. 4

OPEN 24/7

GREAT VENTILATIO N!

VS.

Rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, pumpkin is incredibly healthy. What’s more, its low-calorie content makes it a weight-loss-friendly food. Pumpkin can help boost your immune system, protect your eyesight, lower your risk of certain cancers and promote heart and skin health. What’s more? Our brains like pumpkin treats almost as much as our bellies. Because pumpkin spice is on the sweet side, several areas of the brain light up when we consume it. umpkins are also one of the more resilient fruits finding ways to grow large and bulging even in dry and soil deficit areas. umpkins share nutrients along a connected vine that reaches into the ground to replenish itself. It is perhaps for this reason that pumpkins have become symbols of prosperity, growth and abundance.

Best Gym in Town!

I want Covid-19 to be over. - Conner V .

I want my finals to go well. - Monica D.

Some Coca-Cola memorabilia for my collection. - Ruben B.

G iv e t h e g if t o f A D V EN T U R E! Call us for a gift certificate

LosPadresOutfitters.com or call 805-755-8687

INDULGE YOUR SENSES OPEN DAILY 11AM - 3PM

910A LINDEN AVE 805.684.6695


18  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Lions Club opens Festival of Trees PHOTOS BY ROBIN KARLSSON

Carpinteria s ion Clu opened its final estival o rees last ee end, inviting Carpinterians to enter ra es or the gi t pac ed trees o their choice. ver t o do en usinesses and organi ations throughout Carpinteria alle donated gi ts and goods to decorate each tree to the theme o their choice.. roceeds rom the event ill go to the Carpinteria S ate oundation to help uild the ne s ate par . he estival ill run through ec. at inden ve. ith the ra e held on the last da , at p.m.

oe kenderian, with his dau hters mma and rankie, write their contact information on raf e tickets in hopes of winnin a tree

Donna Lemere and past club Lions president red emere work the lot as cashiers for the da

ill a er hopes to win ncle hen s tree the restaurant is his fa orite place to eat in arpinteria, he said

THURS.

H IG H : 6 0 L O W : 4 9

FRI.

SAT.

SUN.

H IG H : 5 8 L O W : 4 9

H IG H : 6 6 L O W : 5 3

H IG H : 7 6 L O W : 5 6

SURF & TIDES S U R F D I R EC T I O N W IN D

T H U R S 1ft W 3m ph /W S W

F R I 1f t W S W 3m ph /W S W

MON.

TUES.

WED.

H IG H : 7 7 L O W : 5 5

H IG H : 6 9 L O W : 5 3

H IG H : 6 9 L O W : 5 3

S A T 1ft W S W 6 m ph /W S W

S U N D A Y S un rise: 6: 4 9 am • S un set: 4 : 4 7p m S U N 1- 2 f t W 9 m ph /W

M O N 1- 2 f t W 4 m ph /S W

T U ES 1- 2 f t W 2m ph /S S E

Julia Mayer, with Hallie, Evie and Tate Mayer, show off the Carpinteria kate oundation s tree

Health Insurance Enrollment DEADLINE EXTENDED

P Individual/Family Plans P Medicare Supplements P Covered California Rainbow mask and stuffed animal in hand, Briar Pollack puts a lucky ticket in the tree sponsored anna is the ea a a ine

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www.stevensinsurance.com 3412 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105


Thursday, December 2, 2021  19

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

This month, I thought I’d share a recipe that would make an excellent holiday gift for friends and family. I don’t know about you, but my favorite gifts of all time are homemade. It feels good to know someone puts love and time into what they give you. rittle is a cost-e ective way to achieve all that. What I love about this recipe is that you can really use any nut or seed you desire. Cashews, pecans, peanuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds are ust some of the many ingredients to choose from. To ensure everything goes smoothly, when following any brittle or candy recipe, it’s important to have all the ingredients and equipment ready before you start. This salty crunchy treat is delicious on its own, chopped and sprinkled on ice cream, or even as a garnish for a cake or pastry. Melting chocolate, pouring it on top of your brittle and garnishing with your favorite holiday sprinkles is also always an option. It’s the most wonderful time of the year. Happy holidays! Recipe yields approx 2 lbs.

Equipment needed: Candy thermometer

Process

O

NE

MADE

THURSDAY, DEC. 2 THE FOOD LIAISON

HE

F H E AT H

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Toast sliced almonds on a baking sheet for 5 to 10 minutes or until golden brown and set aside. Line a baking sheet with a 16” x 11” silicone baking mat or parchment paper, sprayed with vegetable oil or brushed with butter. Set aside. In a small bowl, combine salt and baking soda. Set aside. In a medium sized saucepan add water, butter, corn syrup and sugar. Stir to dissolve sugar. Over medium high heat, bring ingredients to a boil and stir with a non-stick spatula occasionally until it has a light caramel color, and the candy thermometer reads 290 degrees. Reduce heat to medium low, stir in baking soda and salt until combined, then stir in nuts. Stir rapidly to ensure you don’t burn the brittle, and once you reach a medium caramel color or a candy thermometer temperature of 300-305 degrees, remove from heat and immediately transfer to the prepared baking sheet. Quickly smooth the brittle out with a non-stick spatula and cool completely. Store in an airtight container or break into pieces, bag and garnish with your favorite holiday ribbon. n oy

Uncle Chen

c a r p i n t e r i a, c a l i f o r n i a 我 愛 吃 飯

SZECHUAN & MANDARINE CUISINE VEGETARIAN SPECIALTIES

WE ARE OPEN!

Breakast Burritos Donuts & Pastries Premium Coffees LUNCH TO GO 684-4981 LINDEN AVE AT 9TH ST

ER

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1033 CASITAS PASS ROAD

FOOD COURT 5:30 AM DAILY FRESH TO GO

B

Y

H E AT H E R G I A C O N E

2 ½ cup sliced almonds 1 t baking soda 1 t salt ½ cup water 4 ounce or 1 stick butter ¼ cup corn syrup 2 cup sugar

C

PASTRIES IN PARADISE

Ingredients

GRAB

CVN

Almond brittle for the holidays

Delivery and Take Out

unclechen carpinteria.com

805-566-3334 1025 CASITAS PASS RD

Recipe by Executive Pastry Chef Heather Giacone. Chef Heather grew up in upstate New or e o owed er drea o ivin in o t ern Ca i ornia and re eived er ertifi ate in Culinary Arts at SBCC. She has worked at many places coast to coast, including Eleven Madison Park in New York City, and earned the Executive Pastry Chef title at San Ysidro Ranch in Montecito. She currently is head of the pastry program at The Food Liaison in Carpinteria and has gained a loyal following from near and far. She is passionate about bringing people joy with her delicious desserts.

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner ORDER TO-GO 1-805-684-2212

Every item Fresh & Made-to-Order

FALL IS HERE!

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Bagelnet.com for Restaurant menu

5050 Carpinteria Avenue • 805.566.1558 ext. 1

FOOD TRUCKS TOO! FRIDAY: DISFRUTA 1-8 PM SATURDAY: SHRIMP VS. CHEF 4-9 PM SUNDAY: TRAMONTO PIZZA 2-7 PM

Pizza Spaghetti Deal Days TUES. & WED. ALL DAY

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6


20  Thursday, December 2, 2021

2021

Honor Roll

The Abe Family John & Nell Able Rick & Kathy Abney Steve & Gale Abram Cli ayle dams Glenn & Valerie Alger David & Susan Allen Hank & Pat Arellanes Andy & Carol Bailard Jim & Jean Bailard Kevin & Donna Baird Alterio A-G Banks Virginia Barrison Marianne Bartholomew Patricia Beals Melinda Bendel ane enefield Don & Vera Bensen David & Barbara Bloedel Christie e oyd Sue Boynton John & Arida Brand Steve Bratcher Family Kathy & Robert Brooks Betty Brown Carol Bury Kelli Butler Sally Ann Camp Geri and Gary Campopiano Jim & Valerie Campos Lois Capps The Caratan Family Carpinteria Beautiful Carpinteria Cotton Co. Carpinteria Seal Watch Carpinteria Valley Association Anna & Gary Carrillo Pamela Christian Larry & Debi Clark e ayle Clay Tim & Janey Cohen Jim & Jolene Colomy Jim & Mary Ann Colson James Conger Mary Conrad Bruce & Judi Conroy Berlyn Cota Norman & Mary Cota Grant Cox Enterprises, Inc. Greenleaf Landscapes Tarpitz Gardening Jane Craven Frank & Sandy Crowe Fran & Roger Davis Ron & Yvonne Davisson Cullen & Dottie Deck Ellen & Rob Denholtz Betsy Denison The DiRado Family Melissa Doyle Glenn & Kathy Dubock Peter Dugré & Lea Boyd Paul Dunham Sally & Terry Eagle Gaby and Selden Edwards Marsha Ehlers Rae & Dan Emmett The Enlow Family Lynda Fairly The Faoro Family Sherrie Fisher Art & Louise Fisher Mr. & Mrs. John Thomas Fly Paul & Mary Foley BER LIN SHIR LEYingKIM I list turns to SOLD! Everyth

805-886-0228

skimberlin@aol.com

on the back page This week’s listings

CoastaNlews Vol. 26, No. 36

May 28 - June

3, 2020

coastalview.com

SUMMER 2021

nityartshopp

MAGAZINE

livingcommu

CARPINTERIA

ingdining

SUMMER2021

MAGAZINE

CARPINTERIA

View

Parents share pandemic stories

24, word afternoon, May ria On Sunday through Carpinte spread quickly Mexican Restaura nt ’s that Delgado table service. its doors for d had opened a Smith celebrate Waitress Samanth letter to the a thank you the news with locals and and before long n to chile community, were tucking-i visitors alike like the good just s verde and margarita distancing eit with social to old days—alb s of safety factors and an awarenes foreseeable future. for the keep in mind 3. More on page

YES! I want to support my free community newspaper. Check

9

Carpinteria re-opens (partially)

Cemetery holds Memorial Dayy ceremon

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Lemonade ts stand benefiity commun

___$50

___$100

___Other

Visa/MC #________________________________ exp____ sec____

NAME_______________________________________________ PHONE _______________

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Community rallies for seniors

On the first Thursday of each month, CVN publishes the Honor Roll to thank readers and advertisers for their generous support. For the past ten years, this support has played a critical role in keeping CVN in the stands each week and full of local news that cannot be found in any other media. The outpouring of support inspired by the Honor Roll has established a deeper connection between the newspaper and its readers. Additionally, the hundreds of names that appear in the Honor Roll send a message to advertisers—Carpinterians are dedicated to their local newspaper. In turn, the staff of CVN is dedicated to its readers. As the publishers of your community newspaper, we appreciate the relationship we have with you, our readers, and we pledge to keep bringing you all the news of the Carpinteria Valley.

Bob & Elene Franco Joe & Kimberlee Franken Anne Fraser & Robert Lehmann Clyde & Diana Freeman John & Christine Frontado Stan & Ellen Froyd Gene & Dee Funkhouser Ann Garcia Kaydance & Kenzington Gardner Gaynor Ranch Roberta Germanetti Jeremy & Calla Gold David nnie oodfield Lorraine McIntire Nancy & Wayne Schoenfeld Bill & Sharon Green Jim & Jennifer McIntosh Stan & Terry Scrivner Lisa Guravitz & Fred Shaw Amanda McIntyre Bob & Shanon Sedivy Karen & Donald Guthrie Carlena McKnerney Arlene & Jack Sega Kellie & Bonnie Hammett Laurie & Steve McMahon Marty Selfridge Louise Hansen & Jim Reginato Chuck & Dolores McQuary Megan Shannon K & M Hanson Greta Meaney The Skenderians Nancy Haviland Sharon & Craig Meister Annie Sly Dottie Hawkins Tom & Laurie Merryman Barbara & Sanderson Smith Bill Hazen David Meyer & Shen Rajan Bob & Marcy Smith Chris Hecox Norma Migliazza Brad & Barbara Smith In Memory of Bob Henry Bradley & Emily Miles Christine Sobell Kathy Henry Carrie Miles John & Marge Soper Reggie Hepp Dave & Louise Moore Ben & Julie Soto Lynda Hershey Terry & Dianne Moore The Sprigg Family Donette Hicks Pat Moorhouse Kim Stackpole & Ken Gluck Hilltop Flowers, Inc. Andrea & Bruce Morden Terry Stain Suzi Hopkins Judy Mulford Steve Starkey & Olivia Erschen Virgil & Lee Huelskamp Peter & Ann Mullins Gordon & Barb Statler Diane M. Huerta Steve & Jane Murray Brad & Carla Stein John & Linda Hurley Richard Nelson Mike & Susan Stephens Nancy Hussey Andy & Yvonne Neumann Greg & Kate Stewart Robbie & Ed Hutto Langdon & Linda Nevens Cherry Stockton Kim Ishida Anh & Ha Ngo Bob & Kathi Stokes Zoe Iverson & Gib Johnson Peter & Carol Nichols Fred & Shirley Strickler Patricia Jersin F. Virginia Nickelsen Tom & Brenda Sullivan Donna & Bob Jordan Nola Treloar Nicklin Eric & Jane Swain Gary & Marge Kelly Weldon & Ann Nomura Jim & Donna Swinford Carroll Ketchpel Michael & Lori Noricks Hisaye Takahashi Michelle Kisor Becki & Doug Norton Diane Thackeray Richard & Chicki Kitagawa Lisa O’Reilly Thario’s Kitchen Alan & Carol Koch Julia Occhipinti Ted & Mary Anne Theilmann Jim & Roz Kohute Peggy Oki - Origami Whales Project Dorothy Thielges Craig & Denise Kono Rick & Trudy Olmstead Bob & Chris Thompson Carol Kutzner Jose & Irene Ornelas Diana & Don Thorn Carla Kroman & Mr. Peach Alonzo & Amy Marie Orozco Kevin & Teresa Till Ron Lafrican & Luzzie Hernandez Barbara J. Orth John Tilton Las Palmalitas Ranch May R. Osher Ruthis Tremmel Laughing Buddha Mary Ota & Family Danel Trevor Roberta & George Lehtinen Lou & Susie Panizzon Elise Unruh Fred & Donna Lemere Marty & Nan Panizzon The VanAntwerps Jon & Sue Lewis Gail & John Persoon Robert & Elizabeth Van Eyck Patricia Lieberknecht The Piltz Family Harry & Michele Van Wingerden John Litsinger Elizabeth Pomeroy Winfred Van Wingerden & Sheila Batson The Lou Grant Parent-Child Workshop B. P. Joe & Alice Vazquez Paula J. Lund Stan & Mary Pottkotter Gayle Ward The Luthard Family Valerie & David Powdrell Nancy E. Warner Sara Lyons Anita & Alex Pulido Paul & Nancy Warner Wendy & Tim MacMurray Roberto Pulido Jerry & Brenda Watkins Charlene Maltzman Ted Rhodes & Joan Pascal Tom & Mary Watts Mrs. Sharon Manges Elizabeth Risdon Dick Weinberg & Family Peter & Elizabeth Mann Marilou Rivera Alan Weiss & Cheryl Smith Harry & Patricia Manuras Greg & Laura Roinson Leslie A. Westbrook Rosa Markolf Tim & Beata Rose Janet Westlund Jacquie Martin Elizabeth Ross Tyson & Betty Willson Bill & Ann Matson Steve & Susan Ruthven Mike & Diane Wondolowski Mariko Matsuyama Saito Family Josh Zannon Marianne & Kevin McCarthy Theodore Sampson & Berdee Sampson - RIP Donna Zehrung Ron & Barbara McClain Dr. Suzanne Savoy Mary & Paul Zeoli Barbara McCurry Wally & Janice Schilling Dr. & Mrs. D. Ziehl

Attached is ___$25

Lic. #00623395

Expires 6 /30 /20

CAR PIN TER IA

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

17

ADDRESS_____________________________________________________________ HONOR ROLL LISTING __________________________________________________

Please mail to 4180 Via Real, Suite F, Carpinteria, CA 93013 • (805) 684-4428


Thursday, December 2, 2021  21

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

December is for counting birds

CVN

IN THE NATUREHOOD NANCY BARON In preparation for the upcoming Carpinteria Christmas Bird Count (CBC) on Dec. 18, I have set up my work computer by the dining room window so I can monitor which birds are coming to our bird feeders, bird bath and fountain. A male, Red-breasted Sapsucker swoops in. He dips his bill deeply into a small hole he has excavated in the pepper tree. Sapsuckers drill sap “wells” in trees and lap up the liquid and insects that come. With binoculars, I can make out his head, dipped in red like raspberry jam, his brown eye gleaming and a white mustache line above his beak. Large white wing patches are another distinctive field mark. Checking my field guide, it tells me a that a group of sapsuckers are a “slurp of sapsuckers.” This is a good sighting! I can only hope he sticks around for the week of the Christmas Bird Count, so I can add him to my o cial list for the day. Organized by the National Audubon Society, the bird count is in its 122nd year, making the longest running citizens science survey in the world. Last year Carpinteria’s count was cancelled due to the pandemic. Now it will resume for its 12th year. On Saturday, Dec. 18, I will join Carpinteria’s annual Christmas Bird Count, prowling my neighborhood with a few friends to spot as many birds as possible, listing each species and their numbers. It’s more than just a game for me. t is part of a much larger e ort that includes some 80,000 people fanning out across Western Hemisphere to provide a snapshot of the relative health of bird populations. According to the Audubon Society, the first Christmas Bird Count (CBC) took place on December 25, 1900 when 2 participants counted and identified about 18,500 birds, mostly in the northeastern U.S.

reen-tailed owhee showed up recently in a friend’s yard, causing a stir. Counts can be held on any day from Dec. 14 to Jan. 5. Each area’s circle is 15 miles in diameter and the count runs midnight to midnight. Typically, people break into small groups and follow assigned routes, which change little year after year, tallying every bird they see. “People can go out for a short time or just report what they spot at their feeders. That’s great too – super useful,” says John Callender, who leads the local Carpinteria birders group and has organized the CBC in recent years. “Our top count number of species has been 158. This year we are shooting for 160.” Beginners are encouraged to join too, and John can connect them with more experienced birders. Since the event is outdoors, and groups are small, it is a low Covid-19 risk event. The purpose of the Christmas Bird Count is to provide population data to monitor how birds are doing in terms of numbers and diversity. This annual “snapshot” assembled over many years and across the entire Western Hemisphere is a way to monitor how birds are doing on a broad scale in order to do a better job of conserving them. Why does monitoring matter? As one scientist said to me, “Conservation without monitoring is like a plane without an altimeter. Without it, we can’t really know where we are.” Monitoring birds is especially important these days. Bird populations have

JOHN CALLENDER

A Red-breasted Sapsucker is one of the hit or miss birds on the Christmas Bird Count. fallen in recent decades due to loss of habitat to development, and because of drought and climate change. The results provide insights into the changing winter ranges of birds. Some birds are only seen occasionally. Often there are surprise visitors as well. On our last Christmas Bird Count, one participant found a Painted Redstart, a velvety black bird with a vivid scarlet

JOHN CALLENDER

A Painted Redstart – which typically winters in Mexico – was a surprise visitor during the last 2019 count.

belly which typically winters in Mexico. And just a few weeks ago, a Green-tailed Towhee showed up in my friend Kim Stackpole’s yard, a bird typically found in mountain chaparral in summer and further south in winter. She called John Callender. He rushed over to verify it and take a picture. Local birders have been out scouting ahead of time – a popular method to maximize the count on the appointed day. There are similar Christmas Bird Counts coming up in Ventura, on Santa Cruz Island and Santa Barbara, which boasts one of the biggest and most productive bird counts in the country. It’s important to pay attention to what is happening to our birds, some of which are quietly disappearing. And the Christmas Bird Count is a lot of fun too – a hunt and competition to keep finding more species of birds. Participation is free, and open to all ages and ability levels. If you would like to participate please fill out the 2021 signup form here: forms.gle/nMinxRy4w7K7V17p See carpbirdwatchers.org/cbc/ for more details, including how to report your birds and plans for a count night compilation Zoom meeting. Nancy Baron is a biologist, naturalist, and author. She and her writer husband live on a small organic avocado ranch near Carpinteria where they share their naturehood with as much wildlife as possible. You can reach her at baron@nceas.ucsb.edu.


22  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Sunday, November 14 1 1 hrs rugs 1 Casitas ass oad

bloc

A man who had ingested drugs became belligerent, making obscene gestures and shouting obscenities at others. He was shirtless and shoeless. This was an ongoing incident. He was arrested.

COMMANDER’S RECAP

Reports from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s ffice

1 4 hrs elony Warrant 44 bloc Carpinteria enue

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. 14

the father responded to the scene to take custody of him.

and a used meth pipe.

1 hrs alse ire larm 1 bloc ar enue

hrs arcotics iolations ailard enue and andamus Street

8 8 hrs ealth and Safety Casitas ass oad

The Carpinteria-Summerland ire Department responded to the report of a fire alarm at a business. pon arrival, a transient was observed leaving the building. hen deputies arrived at the area, the man admitted to entering the building and activating the fire alarm. records check showed he was on probation for arson violations. During a search, he was found in possession of narcotics, paraphernalia and lighters. follow-up will be conducted.

ia

hrs isturbing the eace eal and Santa ne

Three men were contacted after causing a disturbance at -11. Two were arrested and booked into the Santa arbara County ail. t is suspected that the three were involved in a bike theft from Dahlia Court earlier in the evening. victim has not been located, but the theft/attempted theft resulted in a physical fight. follow up will be conducted.

1 hrs arcotics iolations 11 bloc Casitas ass oad

A man was contacted while drinking a beer in the parking lot. He consented to a search, and was found in possession of a small amount of psilocybin mushrooms and a Xanax bar.

Monday, November 15 1 1 hrs and alm

Carpinteria enue

enue

man was stopped for driving without headlights on. e tested at 0.0 C and was released to a sober friend.

hrs alse egistration pper hunderbowl

1 -year-old took his father’s vehicle without permission. He also took the registration tab from his dad’s motorcycle and put it on the vehicle. The uvenile was cited, and the vehicle was towed

Two people were observed in a vehicle at the north end of ailard venue. deputy contacted the pair and discovered that the man had an unserved domestic violation restraining order from entura County and a suspended license. e was informed of the restraining order and notice of the suspended license. During the investigation, the man said there was mari uana in the vehicle and consented to a search. During the search, multiple used methamphetamine pipes and pipes of foil with drug residue were found. A planner, which contained multiple handwritten credit card numbers, was also located in the vehicle. The pair were cited and released.

4 hrs inden oad

arcotics iolations enue and Sandyland

Two people were contacted and found in possession of narcotics and paraphernalia.

Tuesday, November 16 4

hrs bloc

arcotics iolations ia eal

woman was driving through the construction zone when she decided to drive within the “cone one.” tra c stop was initiated and upon contact, the male passenger was observed su ering from a large laceration to his left leg. They stated they were on their way to Cottage Hospital. Medics were requested and the man was bandaged up, but he declined transport. The laceration was supposedly caused when he was in the bed of a truck parked on Eugenia Place. The area was checked, and some blood was located in the area, but it was not consistent with the in uries. fter medics bandaged the sub ect, a vehicle search was conducted, and the sub ects were cited for possession of meth

Wednesday, November 17 reporting party called on ov. 13 to report that at 1330 hours, during a custody e change of her son with her e -husband, she spotted a small glass container with crystal meth on the front seat of her e -husband’s truck. The reporting party took the meth, emailed her attorney and was advised to contact law enforcement. The meth was retrieved and booked.

11 hrs nlawful ri ing of a ehicle hunderbowl

reporting party stated that his friend took his car keys and left in his vehicle without his permission. The two had been previously camping on the lu s.

14

hrs Warrant

ia

eal

A man was contacted, and a records check showed he had a warrant. He was arrested and transported to Santa arbara County ail.

1 hrs ane

urglary Santa

osa

Three men forced entry into an unoccupied home, by shattering a rear kitchen door windowpane. nce inside, they set o an alarm, but still rummage through most of the home. They appeared to have stolen ewelry and other items. security camera captured them prowling around the house and then running away with some type of bag in hand. The same three suspects also burglari ed another residence on Santa osa ane on a ednesday around the same time.

Thursday, November 18 1 1 hrs bloc ia

th

1 hrs Street

inden

enue and

woman was stopped driving eastbound on 7th Street with a headlight and brake light out, as well as e cessive speed. She performed poorly on sobriety field tests, with 0.0 C. She was arrested and booked into ail.

Friday, November 19

man was stopped for a tra c violation. During investigation, it was discovered he had a felony warrant. e was transported to the station for follow-up.

1

otel sta parked the vehicle.

ewd Contact 41 eal

Deputies responded to a local motel for a sub ect who was attempting to rent a room without D, then had broken the window to his vehicle and left the vehicle parked. Deputies located the sub ect passed out in the parking lot, holding an empty bottle of vodka. e was arrested.

hrs raffic Collision Cra ens ane

vehicle making a u-turn collided with a vehicle traveling north on Cravens ane. o in uries were reported.

1 4 hrs Stolen ehicle oint

oon

Deputies responded to the report of a suspect attempting to open the truck of the reporting party’s vehicle while he was sleeping in it, in the parking lot of oon Point. Deputies contacted the suspect while he was walking away from a vehicle which the reporting party observed him sitting in. The vehicle was reported stolen out of orro ay. The suspect was arrested and booked.

Saturday, November 20

hrs 1 1 southbound orth adaro ane

vehicle was stopped for speeding and lane straddling. The driver performed poorly on sobriety field tests, at 0.1 2 C. The driver was booked into ail after a blood draw. The vehicle was released to family, and the passenger got a ride home.

1 hrs rug ossession Carpinteria and Santa ne a enues

vehicle was stopped for failing to stop at a posted stop sign. The driver had a suspended drivers license and two misdemeanor warrants. She was also in possession of .1 grams of heroin, . grams of meth and 2.3 grams of fentanyl. The driver was booked.

144 hrs Warrant ane

orth adaro

tra c enforcement stop was made on a vehicle. The driver had an outstanding warrant and was arrested on said warrant and transported without incident.

Read more reports from the Commander’s Recap online at www.coastalview.com

The berm is back

KARLSSON

ractor crews were out on City each this wee building the sand berm that goes up each winter storm season. he massi e sand wall protects pri ate and public property between sh and inden a enues from the combination of high tides and storm surf.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

20  Thursday, January 23, 2014

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Puppet maker? 5 Mouse catchers 10 Rope material 14 Privy to 15 Hair-raising 16 Medicinal herb 17 Sub station? 18 Cook's wear 19 Actor's quest 20 Major mess 22 Give for a bit 23 Goatee site 24 Cover completely 26 Disreputable 27 Plath novel, "The Bell ___" 30 Some germs 32 Food lover 34 Take back 38 Posh property Caden Lemere, center, pours the liter bottle, Averi Alexander pours liquid into a beaker 39 Tomorrow, e.g. with Braeden McDonald, left, and Marvin vinegar. Come in again 40 Lujuano, right. 42 Mideast money 43 Big nothing 45 Part of MYOB 46 Dorm furnishing 49 Wood overlay 51 Roulette play 52 River's turn 53 Porky's pal 57 Casserole fish 58 Low-budget film, often Mandi de Witte’s honors biology class at Carpinteria High School learned about 60 Parcel (out) endo- and exothermic reactions last week before they went on Thanksgiving break. 61 Clumsy one The ninth-grade students wore lab coats and safety goggles to mix together various 62 Serious reactants, measuring temperature changes. suffering “The science department is grateful for the Measure U sponsored incredible science 63 Kind of rug lab facilities we have on site, and all of the donations that the Carpinteria Education 64 Fabled fast Foundation, Chevron, Lion’s Club, and Agilent have brought in over the last six years starter to make lab experiences such as these possible,” de Witte said in an email. 65 Suit material 66 Rudder's place

Honors Bio students explore endo- and exothermic reactions

Hospice Tree to light up Seal Fountain

DOWN 1 Stout topper 2 Window sign 3 Fountain order 4 Cutlery piece 5 Herbal brew

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Thursday, December 2, 2021  23

by Margie E. Burke

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Sudoku

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Level: Easy

Each Sudoku has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

Level: Hard

9 7 8 5 3

KARLSSON

WIth the help of City of Carpinteria Public Works, Compassionate Care of Carpinteria – a branch of Hospice of Santa Barbara – has installed its annual holiday tree at the Seal Fountain on Linden Avenue. On Dec. 15, the organization will hold its 38th Light Up a Life Ceremony, virtually, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. For instructions on how to create a star for a loved one or to register to attend the virtual event, visit hospiceofsb.org.

6 7 9 2 4 8 1 6 5 7 8 8 3 5 6 6 3 1 9 2 5 9 1 4 4 6 6 3 1 5 1 4 8 6 2

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Last week’s answers:

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Puzzle by websudoku.com

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7 4 1 5 8 9 3 2 6

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Puzzle by websudoku.com

Puzzle by websudoku.com

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24  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Public Notices

_________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as FLORES DE LA COSTA FARMS at 4098 VIA REAL, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Mailing address: 1360 CRAVENS LANE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): ANTONIO MENDOZA NOLASCO at 1360 CRAVENS LANE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/25/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: ANTONIO MENDOZA NOLASCO, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0002992. Publish: Nov. 11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as NATURE’S OWN at 217 C STEARNS WHARF, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): NATURE’S OWN GALLERY INC. at 5390 QUEEN ANN LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93111. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 11/09/2021. The registrant began transacting business on June 24, 1987. Signed: NEIL BRUSKIN, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003123.

Publish: Nov. 11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SANTA BARBARA QUALITY PAINTING at 816 N NOPAL APT 3, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. Full name of registrant(s): FERNANDO SALINAS at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/28/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: FERNANDO SALINAS. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003030. Publish: Nov. 11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as DANS DELIVERY at 1364 CRAMER CIR, CARPINTERIA, CA 93455. Full name of registrant(s): DANIEL J WILLIAMS at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/03/2021. The registrant began transacting business on May 26, 2021. Signed: DANIEL WILLIAMS. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the

original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003078. Publish: Nov. 11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as WANDERLUST DESIGNS at 456 FARMLAND DRIVE, BUELLTON, CA 93427. Full name of registrant(s): CRYSTAL KERRIGAN, at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/09/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Nov 07, 2021. Signed: CRYSTAL KERRIGAN, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003125. Publish: Nov. 11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as INVESTEC REAL ESTATE COMPANIES at 200 E CARRILLO STREET, SUITE 200, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): INVESTEC MANAGEMENT CORPORATION, at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 11/10/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Feb 02, 1999. Signed: KENNETH P SLAUGHT, PRESIDENT. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003141. Publish: Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 9, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as LAWRENCE RAMSTRUM CONSTRUCTION at 5210 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): LAWRENCE RAMSTRUM at 178 EVANS AVE P.O. BOX 877, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/25/2021. The registrant began transacting business on April 01, 1976. Signed: LAWRENCE RAMSTRUM. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0002978. Publish: Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 9, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as DOMINGOS’S CAFE at 5782 HOLLISTER AVE, GOLETA, CA 93117 . Full name of registrant(s): (1) DOMINGO SIFUENTEZ (2) TERESA SIFUENTEZ at 2039 MODOC RD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. This statement was filed with the County 10/28/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: TERESA SIFUENTEZ, CO-OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003026. Publish: Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 9, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as PALMS MOTOR MOTEL at 221 W MAIN STREET, SANTA MARIA, CA 93458 . Full name of registrant(s): (1) SURESH PATEL (2) ANSUYA PATEL at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE This business is conducted by a Married Couple. This statement was filed with the County 11/09/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Aug 23, 1991. Signed: SURESH PATEL. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003129. Publish: Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 9, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1) MONTECITO DOG TRAINER (2) DOGWATCH OF SANTA BARBARA (3) K-9 HIDDEN FENCE at 4475 LA TIERRA LN, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): MONTECITO DOG INC. at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/29/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: ANTHONY SOROSKY, OFFICER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003040. Publish: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 9, 16, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1) LYNX ENGINEERING (2) BLUE WATER BUILDERS at 1316 CLIFTON STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. Mailing address: PO BOX 360, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93102. Full name of registrant(s): ERIC M SCHWARTZ at 1316 CLIFTON STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/16/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: ERIC M SCHWARTZ, FACILITATOR. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003176. Publish: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 9, 16, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as ADMINAGSOLUTIONS.COM at 1225 LA BREA AVE., SNATA MARIA, CA 93458. Full name of registrant(s): RANCHO NUEVO HARVESTING, INC. at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 11/19/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Nov 15, 2021. Signed: JESSICA MANRIQUEZ, PRESIDENT/CEO. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40

days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003208. Publish: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 9, 16, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SEA BREEZE COTTAGE at 222 EAST CARRILLO STREET #304, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): DONNA LYNNE BAIRD at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/16/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Nov 1, 2021. Signed: DONNA BAIRD, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003170. Publish: December 2, 9, 16, 23, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as RIVIERA SMILES at 1187 COAST VILLAGE ROAD SUITE 11, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108. Full name of registrant(s): ANA R MARTINEZ DDS INC at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 11/12/2021. The registrant began transacting business on March 12, 2021. Signed: ANA R MARTINEZ. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003155. Publish: December 2, 9, 16, 23, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as POND MEDIA GROUP at 2287 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067. Mailing address: PO BOX 1304, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067 Full name of registrant(s): JOHN W MUNRO at 2287 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/24/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: JOHN MUNRO. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003235. Publish: December 2, 9, 16, 23, 2021 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as ORGANIC EVOLUTION at 234 OCEAN VIEW AVENUE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Mailing address: PO BOX 14644, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067 Full name of registrant(s): JULIE HALL at 234 OCEAN VIEW AVENUE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/12/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Nov 07, 2021. Signed: JULIE L HALL, FOUNDER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,

except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2021-0003235. Publish: December 2, 9, 16, 23, 2021 ________________________________ SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NUMBER 21FL01167 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: ANDREW MARIO CALZADA You have been sued. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. Petitioner’s name is: DANIELA CALZADA-LORENZANO You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE: The restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party.Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, pr changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or any other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3 transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in the manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of supervisorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. You must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA 93121-1107 The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney are: DANIELA CALZADA-LORENZANO 1607 SAN ANDRES SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 Date: 7/12/2021 Filed by Johnny Aviles, Deputy Clerk, for Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer. Publish: Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 9, 2021 _________________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF FRANCISCO GUTIERREZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NO. 21CV02593 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: FRANCISCO GUTIERREZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FRANCISCO GUTIERREZ Proposed name: JOSE FRANCISCO GUTIERREZ

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING January 14, 2022 at 10:00 am, Dept: 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O.Box 21107, Santa Barbara, CA 93121-1107. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Carpinteria-Summerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated 07/22/2021 by Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. FILED BY the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 11/10/2021. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Spann, Elizabeth, Deputy Clerk. Publish: Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 9, 2021 _________________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JAMIE TRUSCOTT KWAKO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NO. 21CV04185 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JAMIE TRUSCOTT KWAKO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAMIE TRUSCOTT KWAKO Proposed name: JAMIE TRUSCOTT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING December 17, 2021 at 10:00 am, Dept: 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121-1107. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Carpinteria-Summerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated 11/08/2021 by Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. FILED BY the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 11/08/2021. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Spann, Elizabeth, Deputy Clerk. Publish: Nov. 11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2021 _________________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JESUS CATALINA STEVENS ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NO. 21CV04231 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JESUS CATALINA STEVENS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESUS CATALINA STEVENS Proposed name: JACKLYN CATALINA STEVENS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING January 4, 2022 at 10:00 am, Dept: 3, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121-1107. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Carpinteria-Summerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated 11/08/2021 by Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. FILED BY the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 11/10/2021. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Chavez, Terri, Deputy Clerk. Publish: Nov. 25, Dec. 2, 9, 16, 2021

Public Notices continued on page 25

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CITY OF CARPINTERIA 5775 CARPINTERIA AVENUE CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 (805) 684-5405 WWW.CARPINTERIA.CA.US ORDINANCE NO. 749 AN URGENCY ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARPINTERIA AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 744, AS AMENDED BY ORDINANCE NO. 746, TO EXTEND THE TEMPORARY COVID-19 OUTDOOR BUSINESS PERMIT PROGRAM TO ALLOW BUSINESSES TO OPERATE IN THE CITY RIGHT-OF-WAY AND OTHER PRIVATELY-OWNED OUTDOOR SPACES TO ENCOURAGE SOCIAL DISTANCING AND ECONOMIC RECOVERY FROM THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND SETTING FORTH THE FACTS CONSTITUTING SUCH URGENCY WHEREAS, Government Code Sections 8558 and 8630, et seq., Health and Safety Code Section 101080, and Chapter 2.40 of the Carpinteria Municipal Code (“ CMC” ), empower the City of Carpinteria (“ City” ) Director of Emergency Services to make and issue rules and regulations on matters reasonably related to the protection of life and property during proclaimed local emergencies; and WHEREAS, on March 4, 2020, Governor Newsom declared a state of emergency to make additional resources available, to formalize emergency actions already underway, and to help prepare the effects of the Novel Coronavirus (“ COVID-19” ) pandemic; and WHEREAS, on March 11, 2020, Governor Newsom and California Department of Public Health (“ CDPH” ) officials recommended that non-essential gatherings should be postponed or cancelled statewide until the end of March in order to implement social distancing guidelines intended to protect all individuals, particularly those who are at high risk of severe illness from the COVID-19 virus, and to slow further spread thereof; and WHEREAS, on March 12, 2020, the County of Santa Barbara (“ County” ) Health Officer declared a local health emergency exists countywide due to an imminent and proximate threat to public health, within the meaning of Health and Safety Code Section 101080, by the introduction of the COVID-19 virus and directed cities countywide to implement Governor Newsom’s social distancing guidelines; and WHEREAS, on March 16, 2020, Governor Newsom declared in Executive Order N-28-20 that the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have been significant and could threaten to undermine Californians’ housing security and the stability of California businesses; and WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, the CDPH and County Public Health Department directed all bars, nightclubs, pubs, breweries, and wineries to close immediately as well as restaurants and other food facilities offering onsite dining should immediately transition to only offering delivery or tak e-out service as part of the public health effort to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus; and WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, the City Director of Emergency Services issued a Proclamation of Local Emergency by the Director of Emergency Services for the COVID-19 pandemic (“ Proclamation” ); and WHEREAS, the City’s Proclamation was found necessary and ratified by the City Council at its regular meetings on March 23, 2020, via adoption of Resolution No. 5954, and re-ratified by the City Council on April 13, 2020, via adoption of Resolution No. 5954, May 13, 2020, via adoption of Resolution No. 5969, June 8, 2020, via adoption of Resolution No. 5980, June 22, 2020, via adoption of Resolution No. 5985, and July 13, 2020, via adoption of Resolution No. 5989, in order to utilize all resources necessary to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and receive any state and/or federal funds that may be available; and WHEREAS, the Proclamation invoke s in the City all powers and mechanisms set forth in the California Emergency Services Act (Government Code sections 8550, et seq.), City ordinances and resolutions, and all other applicable state and federal laws to be used by authorized City personnel; and WHEREAS, on March 19, 2020, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N- 3320 for all individuals living in the State of California (“ State” ) to stay home or at their place of residence, except as needed to maintain continuity of operation of federal critical infrastructure sectors and additional sectors as the State Public Health Officer may designate as critical to protect health and well-being of all Californians (hereinafter called “ essential businesses” ); and WHEREAS, many events countywide were and continue to be canceled, postponed, or implement social distancing due to the orders and recommendations at all levels of government to restrict large gatherings amid concerns over the spread of the COVID-19 virus, and these cancellations, postponements and social distancing cause a loss in revenue for the associated vendors, organizations and businesses, loss of income for the people who would have staffed the events, as well as lost revenue for surrounding local businesses that rely on such events to bring patrons to their businesses; and

WHEREAS, many businesses citywide were either not permitted to remain open or remain required to severely restrict activities, causing significant adverse financial impacts. Also, State and County heath orders and guidance calling on residents to stay at home and implement social distancing continues to result in a severe decline in consumer spending and tourism, which has had significant negative impacts on revenue for most small businesses in Carpinteria; and WHEREAS, on May 4, 2020, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-6020, which is incorporated herein by reference, to allow re-opening of lowerrisk business and spaces (hereinafter called “ lower-risk businesses” ) in Stage Two of the State’s Resilience Roadmap subject to certain limitations. On May 8, 2020, the County Health Officer issued County Health Officer Order 2020- .1, which further clarified the lower-risk businesses eligible to be open for limited operations countywide; and WHEREAS, on May 18, 2020, the City Council enacted Resolution No. 5977 establishing requirements for wearing face coverings at certain places and in certain circumstances as an additional health protection measure in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in order to protect the public health and safety of members of the public; and WHEREAS, on May 21, 2020, the County Health Officer issued County Health Officer Order 2020-8.2, which allowed essential businesses and lowerrisk business that may remain open with modified operations and social distancing to open or open more fully with self-certification. Although the State and County entered Stage Two of the State’s Resiliency Roadmap, which loosened some public health and safety restrictions and allowed essential and lower-risk businesses to re-open with certain protections in place, these businesses remained severely restricted and experienced corresponding significant adverse financial impacts and WHEREAS, on May 26, 2020, the City Council adopted Ordinance No. 744, enacting the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program (“ Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program” ) to allow business to operate in the City’s right-of-way and in other privately-owned outdoor spaces to encourage social distancing and economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic; and WHEREAS, on August 28, 2020, Governor Newsom announced the Blueprint for a Safer Economy Plan, which replaced the State’s Resilience Roadmap and established new guidelines for business operations to encourage social distancing and economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic; and WHEREAS, the City Council recognizes that the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program, adopted via Ordinance No. 744, has assisted businesses to continue economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic; and WHEREAS, on May 10, 2021, the City Council approved and adopted urgency Ordinance No. 746, amending Ordinance No. 744, extending the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit to remain in effect until 11:59 pm on December 31, 2021; and WHEREAS, as of October 28, 2021, the community transmission level of COVID-19, including the significantly more transmissible “ Delta” variant of COVID-19, in Santa Barbara County was categorized as “ Substantial” based on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (“ CDC” ) indicators; and WHEREAS, to control the spread of COVID-19 and its variants, the County Health Officer issued Order o. 202110.6, Superseding and Replacing Health Officer Order o. 2021-10. , ordering all individuals in the County of Santa Barbara – whether vaccinated or unvaccinated – to wear a Face Covering at all times in all Indoor Public Settings, and while inside any Business, with limited exemptions, and recommends that Businesses make face coverings available to individuals entering the Business; and WHEREAS, the continuation of the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program remains necessary to provide businesses with opportunities to encourage social distancing and economic recovery from the negative impacts resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and its variants; and WHEREAS, the City Council recognizes that the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor usiness Permit Program must be exible and responsive to changing conditions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, the state of emergency, or governmental response, including modifications to public health and safety directives, social distancing guidance, and business operation conditions, in order to effectively achieve the dual public health and safety and economic goals of the City during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARPINTERIA DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Incorporation of Recitals. All the recitals set forth above are true, correct, and valid, and are hereby incorporated and adopted as findings of the City Council as though fully set forth herein. Section 2. Finding s. The Council hereby finds, determines and declares that this Urgency Ordinance adoption pursuant to Government Code Section 36937 is necessary because:

A. Commercial activity and businesses are essential to a vibrant and healthy community, and this Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program provides exibility to local businesses to re-open while protecting the health, safety, and welfare of members of the public during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic; and

ATTEST: Brian C. Barrett Acting City Clerk, City of Carpinteria

B. Without the amendment and extension of the Urgency Ordinance, there is an increased risk of a substantial impact to local businesses, causing further disruption by delaying local economic recovery, and imperiling the lives or property of inhabitants of the City; and

Brian C. Barrett Acting City Clerk, City of Carpinteria

C. The Downtown “ T” Encroachment Permit Program was established for local businesses within the Downtown “ T” in order to apply for a permit to conduct certain business operations within the City right-of-way, which provided a framework for the portion of the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program applicable to the City right-of-way and other privatelyowned property, but requires certain modifications to streamline the approval and implementation of permits with all due speed during the COVID-19 pandemic; and D. CMC Chapter 14.64 establishes a temporary use permit to allow businesses to engage in temporary uses on privatelyowned property that provides a framework for the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program applicable to privately-owned property, but requires certain modifications to streamline the approval and implementation of permits with all due speed during the COVID-19 pandemic; and E. The City Council recognizes the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program may continue to require that certain temporary exceptions to the requirements of CMC Chapter 12.02, the Downtown “ T” Encroachment Permit Program, and CMC Chapter 14.64 may be necessary, as determined by the Director of Emergency Services through, additional rules and regulations, as described in Section 6 herein; and F. For the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, and safety, the Council finds that it is necessary to adopt this Urgency Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 744, as amended by Ordinance No. 746, that established the Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program, for all of the reasons set forth in the recitals above, which and are incorporated herein by reference. Section 3. Urg ency Need. Based on the foregoing recitals and findings, all of which are deemed true and correct, this Urgency Ordinance is needed for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, and safety. This Urgency Ordinance shall take effect immediately upon adoption in accordance with the provisions set forth in Government Code Section 36937. Section 4. Amendment. This Urgency Ordinance hereby amends and supersedes Section 11 of Ordinance No. 744 to read as follows: “ Section 11. Ef f ective Date and Termination. This Urgency Ordinance shall become effective immediately and shall remain in effect until 11:59 pm on June 30, 2022, or it is terminated by the City Council.” This Urgency Ordinance hereby also supersedes and replaces urgency Ordinance No. 746. Section 5. Scope. Except as expressly amendment and superseded by this Urgency Ordinance, all other sections, subsections, sentences, clauses, phrases or words of Ordinance No. 744 remain in full force and effect.

I hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance was duly and regularly introduced and adopted at a regular meeting of the City Council of the City of Carpinteria held on November 22, 2021.

APPROVED AS TO FORM: Jena S. Acos, on behalf of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP acting as City Attorney of the City of Carpinteria Publish: December 2, 2021

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Section 6. Severability. If any section, subsection, sentence, clause, phrase or word of this Urgency Ordinance is for any reason held to be invalid and/or unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this Urgency Ordinance or Ordinance No. 744. Section 7. Ef f ective Date. This Urgency Ordinance shall become effective immediately. Section 8. Environmental Determination. The City Council finds that the adoption and implementation of this Urgency Ordinance are exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (“ CEQA” ) under CEQA Guideline Section 15061(b) (3) in that the City Council finds there is no possibility that the implementation of this resolution may have significant effects on the environment. The Urgency Ordinance would amend Ordinance No. 744, that established a Temporary COVID-19 Outdoor Business Permit Program, similar to existing permit processes, which is solely an administrative process resulting in no change to the environment. SECTION 9. Publication. The City Clerk is directed to cause this Urgency Ordinance to be published in the manner required by law. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on November 22, 2021, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCILMEMBER(S):Alarcon, Carty, Lee, Clark, Nomura NOES: COUNCILMEMBER(S): none ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBER(S): none ABSTAIN: COUNCILMEMBER(S): none Wade Nomura Mayor, City of Carpinteria

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Thursday, December 2, 2021  27

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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Challenge yourself to eat premium food fuels

WELLNESS WARRIOR LEAH HARDING Here’s your mind-bender for the day: there are no “good” or “bad” foods, only fuel. While enjoyable, that’s all food really is – fuel for our bodies. Whether it’s from Christmas sugar cookies or roasted Brussel sprouts, it is fuel. That said, different foods can be like di erent grades of fuel. We can choose regular, mid-grade or premium.

I) Premium

How do you tell the difference between premium and regular? First, if it comes from the earth, it’s premium. This includes veggies, fruits, herbs, fungi and berries. Second, if it’s packaged and lists only one ingredient, it’s premium. Examples include rice, steel-cut oatmeal and most pastas. Fresh meats and seafood are also premium foods, but beef, pork and fowl should be limited to leaner cuts. Trim the fat before cooking, like on chicken thighs, or choose naturally lean cuts, such as flank, top round steaks or boneless pork loins. Ideally, your protein should have less than 10g of fat per 4oz serving

(about 93% lean is a good rule of thumb).

II) Mid-grade

If it’s not processed, it’s at least midgrade fuel. An easy way to recognize processed foods is that they come pre-packaged. They also have more than one ingredient – sometimes a lot of ingredients! They also often have additives to make them more palatable, including salt, fat and sugars. Nutrition labels now list “added sugars.” This is helpful to distinguish processed sugar and sweeteners from naturally occurring sugars, like those found in milk products, fruits and veggies. Now, just because something is processed, doesn’t mean it should be avoided. Cereal is a great example. Lucky Charms: Avoid. Shredded Wheat: A-ok. Sweetened yogurt: Avoid. Plain unsweetened yogurt: A-ok. White bread:

Avoid. Whole wheat bread: A-ok. (Note: I recommend reading the nutrition labels on bread to see what the sugar, fiber and protein contents are. If you see high amounts of added sugars or high fructose syrup, skip it. f protein or fiber is 1g or less, skip it.

III) Regular

There are some easy red flags to watch out for on nutrition labels. Added sugars is one of those things. Hydrogenated oil are another. And so are trans fats – which you always want to be zero. No amount of trans fats should be included in your diet. Luckily the FDA has banned trans fats in packaged foods, though any items with trans fats of less than .5g, can be listed as 0g. Fried foods are also regular grade. Often our foods are a mix of premium, mid-grade and regular fuels, like the apple pie I just made for Thanksgiving.

I bought organic apples and made the crust from scratch using grass-fed butter, organic white flour and a mi of sugar and stevia. I am not going to skip making a pie ust because it doesn’t fit perfectly into the premium grade category. Pie is delicious and I only make it a couple of times a year. It’s special in my house, and I want to keep it that way. After reading this, you might be wondering if eating premium is more expensive. Here are three tips to keep from breaking the bank: Buy frozen veggies if fresh produce is too expensive. Frozen veggies are just as nutrient dense as fresh. You don’t have to buy organic to eat whole foods. If organic is out of your budget, take pride in the fact that you’re choosing better fuel overall. Stock up on lean meats when they go on sale. Freeze what you can’t use immediately. If you put your protein directly into the freezer, it will last for months. Challenge yourself to eat more premium fuels each week, especially veggies and fruits. If this seems like too much, focus on what premium foods will be the easiest for you to introduce. Over time, you can reduce the number of processed foods you buy until you’ve phased them out nearly entirely. I promise you, your body will thank you for it. Leah Harding is a nutrition coach and mobile personal trainer. She specializes in helping people see food as an ally to reach their goals, both in and out of the gym. She previously worked out of Rincon Fitness and owned CrossFit Carpinteria/Foxwing itne Conta t er at ea o win fitne com with questions or with ideas for future wellness articles.

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28  Thursday, December 2, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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THROWBACK

THURSDAY

Rincon moment: 1967 BY VINCE BURNS

The accompanying image captures a golden moment in our local surfing culture. Carpinteria High School students posed in fall 1966 at Rincon Point for a yearbook photo that has surely become one of the most iconic scenes in the Point’s long history. Besides its beauty and color, the image captures the fleeting nature of youth and the speedy passage of time like no other photograph we’ve seen. Perhaps more so because the Vietnam War was raging on the other side of the acific, and 1 -year-old males were ust what the draft was looking for to keep it going, even nice kids from Carpinteria. Besides still hanging on a few Carpinteria walls today, the photograph is also occasionally unearthed to document a long-vanished Rincon surf scene. In an homage, Carpinteria Magazine shot a modern version recently, showcasing a new generation of surfing stars staking their own youthful claim to Rincon. And to bring that modern version into our more representative era, the young women in the new photograph hold their own boards. “I have lived that moment in time all my life,” said Bernie Baker (b. 1949), one of those pictured, referring not so much to that sunny day with friends at the beach in 1966, but to his entire early life in Carpinteria, a youth spent in the waves or riding his bike (and lugging a massive longboard) along the railroad path to get in a quick surf at the Point after school. For Baker and other high school seniors in the photograph, surfing wasn’t ust a youthful pastime but a lifelong commitment. Several of those pictured were top Rincon surfers for many years, including e oyd and ark Campbell. ot pictured but also part of this stellar surfing generation as remembered by Baker: Kevin Sears (class of ’67), Steve Johnson (’70), Matt Moore (’70) and Scott Gaul (’71). Campbell attended college in Hawaii after graduation and several surfing buddies followed him to the Islands. Among them was Baker, who in the yearbook photograph stands (appropriately) behind his tripoded 35 mm camera. Baker turned his love of surf and photography into a storied career in Hawaii becoming a masthead editor for Surfer Magazine, a top surfer in his own right, and a well-connected surf contest director. Baker made good on his promise to his mother to either succeed in Hawaii as a photographer or return home within si months. “ wanted to shoot film the big waves. wanted to cover the orth Shore for Surfer,” he said. The promise was more than fulfilled. aker uickly learned the ropes in Hawaii and eventually settled in at Sunset Beach, where he lives to this day. But back to our iconic photo. Besides beautifully capturing the students, it also showcases material items emblematic of the age. e t to Sarah Christie, there’s a transistor radio. The 1960s were the golden age of the transistor radio. Millions were sold and their “go anywhere”

CHS 1967 YEARBOOK

Carpinteria igh’s surfing class of 1 . he boys, from left to right, are ernie a er, ent Williams, ill Wheeler, Jeff oyd and ar Campbell. he girls, from left to right, are arbara Swing, Sarah Christie, Shelley ilne, inda on ales, Jeanne ussell and am Cle eland. ability provided the soundtrack to so much of ‘60s culture. And what would have been playing on that little radio in the fall of 1 66 aker’s first thought was the Beatles or Moody Blues. “It was probably tuned to KIST-AM out of Santa Barbara.” Other period artifacts in the photograph: Boyd’s longboard bears a “Hope Ranch” inscription testifying to membership in the Hope Ranch Surf Club (HRSC). And in fact, the three boys on the right are all wearing similar trunks with the HRSC double-diamond logo. According to Boyd, “those trunks were a badge of honor for us. It was proof of membership in the club.” ifty-five years after a beautiful day with classmates at the beach was captured forever, some oints may have sti ened and some memories dimmed, but this photograph remains a permanent testament to the surfing commitment and accomplishments of this tight group of friends. I hope to be able to publish a “where are they now” article in in the future with more detail on those pictured here and other members of the surfing class of 1967. Local historian Vince Burns is researching, writing and collecting historical photographs and accounts for an upcoming book on the history of Rincon Point and the surrounding area. He is actively seeking participation from the community in the project and is grateful for submissions of photographs for possible inclusion in the book. If you have historical photos of Rincon Point or additional information to share, get in touch with Vince at vinceburns805@gmail.com or (805) 758-0338.

Do you have a photo from Carpinteria’s past? Contact news@coastalview.com to share it with other readers!

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Upper crust 6 Inside info 10 Walking trail 14 Outer boundary 15 Who follower 16 Nabisco classic 17 Strike down 18 Loan seekers 20 South Pole region 22 Tube-shaped pasta 23 Kournikova of tennis 24 Took off 26 Work on a doily 28 Rock concert equipment 30 Cop's collar 31 The "A" in "CAT scan" 33 Makes a choice 35 Laddie's love 39 Lumber along 40 "___ or lose ..." 41 Ready, willing, and ____ 42 Mail away 43 Houston slugger, to fans 44 Sundae topping 45 Ledger entry 47 Suffix with beat or neat 49 Guggenheim display 50 Felt in the gut 54 Smooch 56 Banded stone 57 Earth orbiter 61 Final demand 63 Energize (with "up") 64 Cut of pork 65 "Nebraska" actor Bruce 66 Touch up, as text 67 Chinese dynasty 68 Outdated expletive 69 ACT and MCAT

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Copyright 2021 by The Puzzle Syndicate

DOWN 1 Schiaparelli of fashion 2 Depict 3 Knockoff 4 Saturn's largest moon 5 Going on and on 6 Borrower's burden 7 Grape-shaped 8 Understanding 9 Make a goof 10 Takeover attempt 11 "___ we all?" 12 Lead and tin alloy 13 In a fix, slangily 19 Fictional city in Tarzan novels 21 Engine part 25 Nuisance 26 Lights-out tune 27 Wagon part 29 USPS manager 32 Like nicotine, for many

34 Pricing word 36 Sandpaper and such 37 Speak unclearly 38 Back-to-school mo. 40 False friend 44 Cast-iron pan, often 46 Overflow (with) 48 Mamie's man 50 Olympics event

51 Dome dwelling 52 Lustrous fabric 53 Linney of "Ozark" 55 Snail trail 58 Crime-fighting turtles, briefly 59 REI purchase 60 Odds and ____ 62 Make sense, with "up"

Answers to Previous Crossword: T H R O W C E D E T R U E

R E E V E

A N G E L

S C A R L E H A T A R T U E L A T C A R O W U D D B E R A S Y

H E L P A R A G T Y H L L E E T A E L I B I

M I S S A L

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A V A I L A B L E

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N O I S E

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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THIS WEEK

IN CARPINTERIA DECEMBER 2-8

Submit Y our Weekly E v ent News O nline at CoastalV iew. com

FRIDAY DEC. 3

HOLIDAY TOUR OF LIGHTS & SANTA GORDO

“WHITE CHRISTMAS” SING-A-LONG

The Parents for Canalino 17th Annual Holiday Tour of Lights will take place this Saturday night. This year, the tour will also visit Santa Gordo, also known as the Dancing Santa, who will be rooftop at 822 Walnut Ave. during the tour. Tickets are limited and available through Eventbrite.

Join Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney in 1954 on the screen at the Alcazar Theatre on Dec. 3 for the White Christmas Sing-a-long. Sing along to lyrics displayed on the screen to classics such as, “The Best Things Happen When You’re Dancing” and “White Christmas.” 4916 Carpinteria Ave. 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $10

SATURDAY DEC. 4 RODS & ROSES

The Rods & Roses Car Show Winter Classic will return to Linden Avenue on Dec. 4. Showcasing American classic and muscle cars, proceeds from the event supports local nonprofits. rodsnroses.com. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

R O TA R Y PA N C A K E BREAKFAST

The Rotary Club of Carpinteria Morning will host a pancake breakfast and raffle on Dec. 4 at the Carpinteria Arts Center. The raffle offers a sevenday vacation for two to Riviera Maya, Mexico. A ticket includes pancakes, sausage, coffee, fruit and juice. 855 Linden Ave. 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.

$15. VISITING SANTA GORDO IS FREE. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

HOLIDAY FESTIVAL

The Carpinteria Arts Center will host a holiday festival on Saturday, inviting Carpinterians to enjoy holiday music, crafts, hot cocoa, cider and Reynaldo’s tamales. The festival will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. with a visit from Santa from 2:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. FREE

SUNDAY DEC. 5 “BEAUTY AND THE BEAST”

In honor of “Beauty and the Beast’s” 30th anniversary, the Alcazar Theatre will screen the original movie, featuring Robby Benson as the voice of the prince and Paige O’Hara as the voice of Belle. Rated G. 4916 Carpinteria Ave. 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. $10.

$8 FOR ONE TICKET OR $30 FOR FOUR

WEDNESDAY DEC. 8 COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE

Submit event news online at coastalview.com

MAGAZINE

WINTER 2022

FREE

CARPINTERIA MAGAZINE

The Lobster Town U.S.A. Gallery at 3823 Santa Claus Lane will hold their grand opening on Saturday, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. The gallery currently features artists John Randall Nelson, Brad Nack and Wesley Anderegg. Also participating in the opening event is the neighboring boutique Cassis, featuring a new exhibition by artist Caroline Hambright.

CARPINTERIA

NEW GALLERY RECEPTION

WINTER2022

FREE

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Join Carpinterians at the Carpinteria Holiday Spirit Parade for festival fun on Dec. 4. The parade will stretch down Linden Avenue, starting at 4 p.m.

livingcommunit

HOLIDAY SPIRIT PARADE

The Carpinteria Woman’s Club welcomes residents to Cocktails for a Cause on Dec. 8, offering lessons on crafting classic cocktails from MixMistresss Mandy. Attendees should bring a dish to share. Proceeds benefit the Alcazar Theatre. Contact carpwomansclub@gmail.com for tickets. 1059 Vallecito Road. 7 p.m. $25.

WINTER 2022 ISSUE Available now in over 100 businesses in Carpinteria, Summerland, Montecito & Santa Barbara

carpinteriamagazine.com


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ylan apata gets ready to dri e past the defender in onday’s home game while C S cheerleaders entertain during halftime.

Warriors pick up win, drop three games in Moorpark Tournament BY RYAN P. CRUZ • PHOTOS BY MIKE DESJARDINS

After jumping out to 1-1 during the first week of play the arpinteria boys basketball team played in the oorpark Tournament winning one out of four games over five days. The Thanksgiving holiday tournament served as a chance for the team to learn its identity and how to play well when leading scorer att arcia was injured for part of the tournament. ast week’s tournament was good for our players to gauge where we are as a team and to help define player roles and our team identity said coach Scott Sorich. ith our point guard att out for two of the games with an injury it gave other players the opportunity to experience different roles. arcia has been a force for the arriors in the beginning of the season along with ainoa lasgow. ither arcia or lasgow has led the team in scoring in each of the first six games. On the tournament’s first day arpinteria faced olden alley. lasgow exploded for out of the team’s total points but the arriors struggled to find offense elsewhere with the team’s secondleading scorer Jared apata scoring three points in the - loss. Against race Brethren arcia and lasgow led the arriors to a - victory. arcia led the scoring with points three assists and three steals lasgow had nine points eight rebounds and three assists. Bryan Alpi ar also played strong

with eight points and four rebounds of his own. arpinteria struggled on riday and Saturday’s games falling - against oothill Tech and - against St. enevieve. lasgow led the team in both games with points and six rebounds against oothill Tech and points and three rebounds against St. enevieve. Alpi ar and Jared apata served as solid support in both games Alpi ar put up eleven points and rebounds in the two games apata dropped twelve points grabbed five rebounds and had seven assists over the two losses. The arriors are now - overall and will be playing in two more tournaments over the month of ecember.

In Tuesday’s home loss against Santa Ynez, the Warriors struggled to keep up with a highpowered Pirate offense and ultimately fell in a 40-70 blowout. A bright spot once again was Carpinteria’s Kainoa Glasgow, who led the Warriors with 20 points in the loss.

ainoa lasgow he Warriors’ ainoa lasgow has stepped up early in the season, scoring more than 20 points in several games last wee . Carpinteria’s Bryan Alpizar rises up for a shot against Santa Ynez.


Thursday, December 2, 2021  31

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SHORT STOPS BY RYAN P. CRUZ

he 1 C Championship water polo team was honored at Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table luncheon.

has had at ate according to coach arl eis and finished at th with a time of 19:21. Weis added that DiSorbo now owns the fastest Cate times on a “mind-boggling” eight courses, including Woodward Park. “It was a spectacular early afternoon in Fresno, and the team channeled all of the positive energy and the presence of their families,” Weis said, thanking the parents for coming and supporting the team. “It was a great end to a long, successful fall, and we can’t wait to get back to resno next November.

onday’s

Water polo champs honored at Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table

The Warriors’ boys water polo CIF Championship tour continued this week, as the squad was invited to the Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table Luncheon on Monday as the honored guest, celebrating the team’s stellar season in the pool winning the CIF Division 5 Championship and placing second in CIF Division 3 State Regional Championships. Coaches J on Otsuki and Stephen Kim spoke at the luncheon, recapping the team’s achievements and acknowledging each member. The coaches praised the “end of the bench” players, and said those players were instrumental in practicing plays for upcoming games. The coaches also acknowledged parents and school administration for all the background work that went into supporting the championship team, and thanked the community for showing the squad support all year long. On Saturday, the boys will take part in the annual Carpinteria Holiday Parade, holding their Championship banner for the whole city to see.

Carpinteria winter events celebrate Warrior Spirit

Thursday Dec. 2 will be this month’s “Warrior N ight” at Rori’s Artisanal Creamery. Come and celebrate your Warriors athletics and get your ice cream fix at the same time. The Lions’ Club Annual Festival of Trees is also offering a chance to win the Carpinteria High School Boosters tree, in- The Lions Club Festival of Trees offers a cluding a huge assortment of chance to win some winter Warriors swag. Warrior swag. Winners will receive authentic jerseys, shirts and more with all proceeds from the festival going towards the Carpinteria skate park.

The Carpinteria AYSO 14U girls championship team, back, from left: Coach Dave Roberts, Ellie Roberts, Sienna Aguilar, Alexandra Wheatley, Charlotte Cooney, Logan Labistour, Lacey Zimmerman, Elsabet Schlobohm, Vanessa Vences and Coach Jon Ryan Schlobohm. Front, from left: Ashlynn Greenburg, Evelyn Lara, Ava Miller, Kaydance Gardner, Salma Balogun, Vivian Huskins, Lindsay Doyle and Yeret Cervantes.

Undefeated 14-and-under Carpinteria squad wins big This fall, the Carpinteria AY SO girls 14-and-under team put together a fantastic regular season, where they went undefeated against some talented local teams. The Carpinteria girls were able to carry that momentum into the Area 10W tournament where they won an impressive five games over the course of the weekend. Their undefeated season was capped with a thrilling 3-0 shutout victory over Santa Barbara’s top 14-and-under team. “This is a talented group of girls,” said coach J on Ryan Schlobohm, regarding the team’s performance. “They all stepped up and contributed to the team’s success both during the regular season and in the area tournament.” n addition to the team’s performance on the field Schlobohm was pleased with the way the girls represented the Carpinteria community. “The girls played hard and won a lot of games this season, but they always showed great sportsmanship in the process. They are a great group of soccer players, but they are even better young ladies and Dave ( Roberts) and I loved coaching them,” he said. The team earned the opportunity to play in the sectional tournament, which will be played in ebruary in Bakersfield.

Cate girls cross country competes in state finals

The Cate girls cross country team, led by senior Anna DiSorbo, represented the school in the ivision state meet in resno finishing their season on a high note with an eighth-place finish. The girls had the fastest time for any Cate team at the rolling Woodward Park at 1:44:07, a full ten seconds faster than the 2019 squad. Senior Anna DiSorbo capped off the ”best career any female cross country runner

CVN

ON DECK

Thursday, December 2

Carpinteria Girls Basketball in Bishop Tournament, 7 p.m. Carpinteria Girls Water Polo at Cate , 3:30 p.m.

KARLSSON

Leopard shark caught off Sandyland Cove

Saturday morning off Sandyland ove Tim hurinskiy caught a five-footlong leopard shark. Dzhurnskiy released the shark back into the wild shortly after this photo was taken.

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Friday, December 3

Carpinteria Girls Basketball in Bishop Tournament, TBA *Carpinteria Girls Soccer vs. Cate, 5 p.m.

Saturday, December 4

Carpinteria Girls Basketball in Bishop Tournament, 2 p.m. *Denotes home game

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32  Thursday,December Thursday, December2,2,2021 2021

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