__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

SuMMER 2019

summer2019

MAGAZINE

livingcommunityartshoppingdining

CARPINTERIA

CARPINTERIA MAGAZINE

CarpMag CoverFinal_Summer2019.indd 1

5/9/19 12:06 PM


Celebrating the New Cottage Children’s Medical Center

Featuring Acute Pediatrics, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and the Level III Haselton Family Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. • 38 rooms with sleeping areas for family and fun lighting for kids to control • 8 private PICU rooms

CCMC cares for over 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Neonatal and Pediatric ICUs, the emergency department, pediatric trauma center and eight specialized outpatient clinics. Learn more and view other stories in latest edition of Cottage Magazine, visit cottagehealth.org/magazine

Join the Cottage Kids Club and receive

• 22 NICU beds featuring advanced technology

FREE healthy living items, kids activities

• animal footprints on the floors and educational art on display

cottagehealth.org/kidsclub

• waterfront-themed waiting room

and more! Sign up at:


gary goldberg Realtor | Broker | Attorney

Now enjoying my 25th year of serving Carpinteria and Santa Barbara as an estate and beach property specialist with over $725,000,000 sold since 2000.

REAL ESTATE SALES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT VACATION RENTALS gary goldberg, Owner & Broker 1086 Coast Village Road Santa Barbara, California 93108

805.455.8910 | BRE #: 01172139 garygoldberg.net Email: gary@coastalrealty.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 1

Whether you’re buying, selling or vacationing in the Carpinteria or Santa Barbara area, Gary Goldberg provides in-depth assistance for all real estate needs. Gary’s brokerage, locally owned and operated, Coastal Properties has been assisting sellers, buyers and vacationers in the area for nearly 25 years. Our team of experienced and knowledgeable agents specialize in all aspects of real estate, from residential and commercial sales to land development, property management, leasing and vacation rentals. Gary will carefully guide you throughout your search. We invite you to stop in and experience the friendly, professional and confidential service our company provides.

5/9/19 8:19 AM


Left to right: Clyde Freeman, Daniel Estrada, Ben Scott

“We take pride in what we do, and that ’s to serve the Carpinteria community.” - Daniel Estrada VP / Branch Manager For over 40 years, Montecito Bank & Trust has offered our clients personalized banking and customized solutions because we understand that the quality of what you choose matters. Experience for yourself what the Best Bank in town can do for you.

Business & Commercial Lending

Digital Banking

Residential Lending

25th

AWARDS

2013 – 2018

2014 – 2018

2014 – 2018

2017 Bank of the Year - Western Bankers Association 2018 Best Mortgage Company - Santa Barbara Independent

montecito.bank • (805) 963-7511 Solvang • Goleta • Mesa • Santa Barbara • Montecito Carpinteria • Ventura • Camarillo • Westlake Village AD_Carp Mag_Carp Branch_032819.indd 1

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 2

4/2/19 4:03 PM

5/9/19 8:20 AM


Bella Vista Drive A STYLE THAT LASTS FOREVER 4 Bedroom / 4 Bath / 360° Panoramic Views / $8,475,000

tt

LORI CL ARIDGE BOWLES

805.452.3884 · lori @ loribowles.com CalRE#01961570

DANA ZERTUCHE

805.403.5520 · dana@danazertuche.com CalRE#01465425

www.MONTECITO.associates COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates, not employees. ©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.

4:03 PM

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 3

5/9/19 8:25 AM


“the perfect place to stay...”

Enjoy a wealth of activities … the “World’s Safest Beach” is right outside your door! Downtown is only a short, pleasant stroll.

Vacation Rentals

Oceanfront Two Bedroom Condos with Patio or Balcony • Elevator • BBQ Deck • Laundry • Free WiFi • Privacy • Views • Gated Secure Parking 4975 SanDyLanD ROaD • CaRPinTERia, Ca 93013

805-684-3570 800-964-8540

www.carpinteriashores.com info@carpinteriashores.com Weekly & Monthly Rentals

R E A L E S TAT E S A L E S • P R O P E R T Y M A N A G E M E N T

Ocean View Realty Bill Crowley, GRI 805.886.2236

BillCrowleyRealEstate.com BRE# 00775392

LIST YOUR HOME WITH BILL, HE’LL GET IT SOLD! 4 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 4

5/9/19 8:26 AM


Catering for all Occasions Best Bagels Since 1996 • Delicious Salads • Gourmet Sandwiches Grand Parties • Hors D’oeuvres • Social & Corporate Catering 5050 Carpinteria Avenue • To Go 805.566.1558 • Bistro Dining 6:30am-3pm Weekends 7am-3pm 53 S. Milpas St. • 805.564.4331 • Mon-Fri 6am-4pm Weekends 7am-3pm

Catering 805.319.0155 • bagelnet.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 5

5/9/19 8:26 AM


rd 33 annual

October 4, 5, 6, 2019 avofest.com

AVOFEST IS ONE OF THE LARGEST FREE FESTIVALS IN CALIFORNIA PROUDLY BOASTING THREE DAYS OF FABULOUS FOOD, A PREMIER LINEUP OF MUSIC, ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY PRACTICES, AND A GREAT FAMILY EXPERIENCE. 6 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 6

5/9/19 8:27 AM


CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 7

5/9/19 8:27 AM


GranVida is Redefining Senior Living in Carpinteria. “Small town, great life.” That’s what GranVida is all about. Right here along the beautiful Central California Coast. Experience a truly active and energetic lifestyle in Carpinteria’s only senior living and memory care community. Living a Great Life. The quality of life here is defined by the spontaneity between residents and staff. And with bocce, yoga, art, cooking classes, fitness training, Music Thursdays and High Tea, you’ll never have an idle moment—unless, of course, you choose to. Our Series of Inspirational Speakers. From book signings by the original “Gidget” and local favorite Donnie Nair to experts sharing advice on VA Benefits, Downsizing and Aging Gracefully, our speakers add flavor and inspiration to everyone who attends. (Hint: You’re invited!) Health and Wellness Seminars. In addition to Beauty Makeovers, Sleep & Be Fit Seminars, Audiology and Memory Care Screenings, you can also meet “Einstein”, our unique computer/video engagement system that residents can’t wait to get up in the morning to use. Eventful Moments. Veterans Appreciation Day. Hawaiian Luau. Comedy Night. The Spirit of The Fiesta. These and many other special events are free admission and open to residents and to you.

We invite you to come and join us for lunch.

Small town. Great life. GranVidaSeniorLiving.com 5464 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-566-0017 RCFE License # 425802114

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 8

5/9/19 8:38 AM


LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE O C E A N

L U X U R Y

R A N C H

Carpinteria’s most celebrated Real Estate Advocate for both Buyers and Sellers.

Call Yo and Ask her why! Y O L A N D A VA N W I N G E R D E N

805.570.4965 Yolanda@AskYo.com

BRE: 01308141

SUMMER2019 9

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 9

5/9/19 8:39 AM


Your health. Simplified. Sansum Clinic provides complete and coordinated care with more than 30 medical specialties, convenient Urgent Care, and state-of-the-art outpatient surgical care — close to home. Our secure and easy-to-use technology including MyChart electronic health record, mobile access and custom apps, online payment portal and appointment reminders by text keep you connected to your healthcare from anywhere at anytime.

Carpinteria Family Medicine 4806 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 (805) 566-5080 Monday - Thursday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Friday 8:00 am to 12 noon

Providing primary care for you and your entire family in Carpinteria.

10 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 10

Call 1 (800) 4-SANSUM SansumClinic.org

5/9/19 8:39 AM


Carpinteria’s premier destination for the top brands of high quality fashion and performance eyewear.

Shop our huge selection of the latest designer and affordable sunglasses. Our stylish brands include:

CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR EYE EXAM

805.566.0306

1013 Casitas Pass Rd. | Carpinteria, 93013

www.CarpinteriaEyeCare.com

Buying or selling a home with us is like a walk on the beach!

Seascape Realty Shirley Kimberlin

Terry Stain

Nancy Branigan

Leah Dabney

Stephen Joyce

George Manuras

Sylvia's vast experience and innovative marketing strategies help Sellers get the highest possible price in the shortest possible time.

Seascape Realty View our properties Is Proud Tofor Welcome sale at Look4Seascape Realty.com Sylvia Miller

Sylvia Miller (805) 448-8882

And, her complete representation for Buyers can help you realize the perfect home to meet your needs.

Betsy Ortiz

Betty Lloyd

Sylvia's reputation for outstanding customer service makes her -

Sarah Aresco Smith

THE RIGHT REALTOR® FOR YOU TM

4915-C Carpinteria Ave. • 805.684.4161

www.santabarbaraconnection.com - sylvia@sanbarb.com

BRE Lic#: 00558548

DRE Lic. #01484280

SUMMER2019 11

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 11

5/9/19 8:40 AM


Mi Fiesta Market & Deli BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • SEAFOOD • BURGERS • CATERING Creator of the “Best Burrito” in Carpinteria - Adan Morales

NEW MENU!

TO-GO OR PATIO SEATING • CRAFT BEER • WINE • COFFEE • VAPE PENS, JUICES & MORE!

805-684-2235 • 4502 Carpinteria Ave, Carpinteria Market hours 7am -11pm Daily • Deli hours 7am-9pm • Sun. 7am-8pm moralesadan16

Morales Adan

12 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 12

5/9/19 8:40 AM


5566 CALLE OCHO CARPINTERIA, CA

2 BEDROOMS | 2 BATHROOMS | 1,309 SQ FT | .19 ACRES | OFFERED AT $1,395,000 Enjoy living steps from the sea and a short walk to town in this charming, updated Carpinteria Beach home. The property sits on an extra large lot with beautiful landscaping including 15 organic fruit trees and a magnificent Haas avocado tree! A beautiful Redwood deck sits right off of the newly remodeled

kitchen, ideal for family time or entertaining guests. As an added bonus room, this home has a nicely done garage conversion guest unit with permitted bathroom and laundry room. The outdoor shower with hot and cold water adds to the enjoyment of this California beach lifestyle.

Kristina Novak

GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISOR

+1 818 917-5540 | Kristina.Novak@evusa.com | DRE #01140992 Engel & Völkers Santa Ynez • 1090 Edison Street, Ste 102, Santa Ynez, CA 93460 ©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principals of the Fair Housing Act. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. If your property is currently represented by a real estate broker, this is not an attempt to solicit your listing.

SUMMER2019 13

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 13

5/9/19 8:42 AM


14 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 14

5/9/19 8:42 AM


DEbbiE MuRphy

Broker/Property Manager/Notary Sales • Property Management • Vacation Rentals

DRE #00580025

www.murphykingrealestate.com 805.689.9696 or 805.684.4101 • 5441 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013

I don’t just see a customer. I see you. Richard Campos, Agent Insurance Lic#: 0A95703 5565 Carpinteria Ave, Ste 24 Carpinteria, CA 93013 Bus: 805-566-6652

1706838

While other insurance companies just see a customer, I see a neighbor in my community. I’m here to get to know who you really are so I can help life go right. LET’S TALK TODAY.

State Farm, Bloomington, IL SUMMER2019 15

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 15

5/9/19 8:42 AM


compassionate care OF CARPINTERIA

An initiative of Hospice of Santa Barbara

If you or someone you love is struggling with a life-threatening illness or dealing with grief...

Compassionate Care of Carpinteria (CCC) can help! CCC is a local initiative of Hospice of Santa Barbara

Patient Care Services - provides patients with a life-threatening illness and their families with patient care management and emotional and spiritual counseling. We offer medical navigation from initial diagnosis through the death and dying process. Some of the life-threatening illnesses we serve include: Cancer at any stage Neurological diseases

Respiratory disease Late stages of dementia

Failure to thrive Late stages of diabetes

Adult Bereavement Services - provides individual counseling for adults and seniors grieving the death of a loved one and navigating that loss. Child Bereavement Services - provides compassionate support to children, teens, and their families through one-on-one and group counseling. CCC provides services in our offices as well as in schools through a partnership with Carpinteria Unified School District. Community Engagement and Education - provides educational workshops and trainings surrounding issues of death, dying, aging, illness, bereavement and end-of-life preparations.

All services are offered free of charge and are available in Spanish.

Offices located at Carpinteria Children’s Project at Main 805.679.6090 • www.compassionatecareofcarpinteria.org

16 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 16

5/9/19 8:43 AM


Bloom

Aresco-Smith Family

Carpinteria 2019

Where You’re Planted

Aresco Family

Carpinteria 1984

With my love of the Carpinteria Valley and a lifelong connection to the community, it is a joy to help my clients find just the right place to plant their own roots and bloom. Contact me so I can show you what’s possible for you here in Carpinteria or surrounding areas.

Sarah Aresco-Smith Seascape Realty

DRE Lic. #01484280

805.252.3868

LIC#01882574

Sarah@lovecarpinteria.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 17

Available properties at LoveCarpinteria.com

5/9/19 8:47 AM


CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 18

5/9/19 8:49 AM


Fresh Seafood | Coastal Boutiques & Art | boat Rentals | Live Music | Family Fun | Comedy Club

VENTURAHARBORVILLAGE

Dive & Sport fishing | Home of Channel Islands National Park | Escape Rooms | Arcade & Carousel SUMMER2019 19

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 19

5/9/19 2:54 PM


CARP features

Summer2019

57 JUST THE B EGINNING FOR THE #ENDOFMA PL E

Creativity fuels creativity. A collection of artisans and makers who operate out of a shared warehouse are lighting creative fires under one another, and the results do dazzle.

62 MURPHY’S V INYL SHA C K : FOR THE REC ORD

Twist and shout or walk like an Egyptian as you browse the shelves of Murphy’s. Carpinteria’s epicenter of groove is a retail experience that you can cut a rug to.

67 GARDEN· OL OGY: L O C A L L Y SOURC ED HOME GA R D EN T I PS

Following a winter of soil-soaking rain, we tracked down gardening advice from a handful of amateurs and pros with the greenest of thumbs. There’s something for everyone in this how-to.

72 GONE NATIV E

Next time you’re driving along enjoying wildflowers and native grasses on the side of the highway, thank Victor Schaff. The founder and owner of S&S Seeds carved out a business niche around native seed sales.

57

77 UNC OMMON THREA D S

Fiber art is alive and well in Carpinteria Valley. We’ll introduce you to three women whose handiwork is art at its finest.

62

82 THINK GL OB AL , DRUM L O C A L

Music teacher John Knecht gives Carpinteria kids the chance to travel the world to the beat of their own drum. His story will be music to your ears.

90 SIGNS OF THE TIMES

Several Carpinteria streets bear the names of the town’s early residents. We followed their family trees right out to the branch tips. Learn about the streets’ namesakes and meet their living relatives.

96 SURFING: THEN & NOW

So much has changed in the surfing world since 1966. But when we updated an iconic Rincon Point photo, we found that excitement for the sport doesn’t dim over the decades.

103

L ET’S PL AY DRESS- UP

Salad ingredients matter, of course, but the dressing tends to steal the show. We rounded up our favorite dressings from five local restaurants. Now you can dress like the pros. 20 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 20

5/9/19 9:50 AM


P

SUMMER2019 21

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 21

5/9/19 8:50 AM


67

MAG departments 24

FROM T HE E DIT OR

34

93013

41

CARPE DIE M

88

WILD IN CARPINTERIA

100

Q&A: RORI TROVATO

109

RE COMME NDE D E ATS RE ST AU RANT GU IDE

110

RE AL E ST AT E RE VIE W

118

CONT RIBU T ORS

120

FINAL FRAME

ON T H E COVE R

82

LA CARPINTERIA Matthew Glasgow and Crash turn wood into functional art. Photo by Michael Kwiecinski

22 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 22

5/9/19 10:51 AM


G Make this YOUR summer for the arts in Carpinteria! The free Teen Mural Project kicks off summer, followed by the fabulous Arts by the Sea summer camps. Summer arts programs are not just for kids, though. Adults can join a workshop, learn to play an instrument, draw, paint, create. The whole family can enjoy our free summer concerts, poetry readings, our amazing array of classes, workshops, tours, films and more. Finally, don’t miss our gallery exhibitions, including Knit/Knot/Stitch/Sew, a fiber arts show, followed by Peak Summer! which will feature art from all mediums.

Help ensure a bright future for the arts in Carpinteria! For more information, visit CarpinteriaArtsCenter.org or call 805.684.7789 865 Linden Avenue • Downtown Carpinteria

#carpinteriaarts

SUMMER2019 23

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 23

5/9/19 8:51 AM


Bring on the sunshine

CARPINTERIA MAGAZINE SUMMER2019 EDITOR Lea Boyd

Hello Readers, I’m thrilled to introduce you to our summer edition of Carpinteria Magazine. But before I do, bear with me while I reflect on winter. We finally got a wet one. Hooray! After so many years of drought, I’d just about given up on the idea of rain. And then we got Goldilocks rain: not too hard, not too soft, just right. It left avocados fat and happy, wildflowers blooming, and burn scars sprouting green. It also filled Lake Cachuma to 80 percent and soaked into the soil to recharge our precious groundwater. I loved every drop of it. DuGré But here’s the thing. It’s a bit challenging to get in the summer magazine mindset during 60-degree rainy days of winter that are followed by 60-degree cloudy days of spring. Instead of beach play, ice cold treats, and flip flops, I’ve craved heavy blankets, hearty soups, and Ugg boots. Nonetheless, dear readers, I think you’ll find that the Carpinteria Magazine team persevered. These writers, photographers, and graphic designers dug deep into their vault of summery feelings and created 124 pages of glossy sunshine. So welcome to summer. All the components are here: surfing, ice cream, salads, gardens, flowers, and music. If May Gray and June Gloom conspire against us, just pull out this magazine and enjoy the rays. Last but not least, I must underscore the importance of our advertisers. There’s no way to publish a free magazine without a supportive business community. If you like reading about Carpinteria’s cool and quirky people, places, and things, please visit these advertisers and keep the momentum going. Now jump on in, the water ’s fine.

PRODUCTION & DESIGN Kristyn Whittenton WRITERS Christian Beamish Claire Burke Peter Dugré Bryn Fox Chuck Graham Debra Herrick Ted Mills Amy Marie Orozco PHOTOGRAPHERS Beth Cox Joshua Curry Chuck Graham Debra Herrick Robin Karlsson Michael Kwiencinski David Powdrell CONTRIbUTORS Carpinteria High School Carpinteria Valley Museum of History PRODUCTION SUPPORT Rockwell Printing

Lea Boyd, Editor

ADvERTISING Karina Villarreal karina@coastalview.com (805) 684-4428 GET SOCIAl WITH US CarpinteriaMagazine.com Instagram @CarpinteriaMagazine

Published by RMG Ventures, LLC Michael VanStry, President • Gary L. Dobbins, Vice President 4856 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, California 93013 Tel: (805) 684-4428 Email: info@carpinteriamagazine.com

All articles, photographs and artwork appearing in this publication are the copyrighted intellectual property of RMG Ventures, LLC. RMG Ventures, LLC aggressively protects its intellectual property rights. No part of this publication may be reproduced or copied in any form without the express written permission of the publisher. ©2019 RMG Ventures, LLC.

24 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 24

5/9/19 9:52 AM


where shelter and nature converge

3823 Santa Claus Lane • Carpinteria • 805-684-0300 • porchsb.com SUMMER2019 25

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 25

5/9/19 8:52 AM


26 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 26

5/9/19 9:53 AM


A SeNiOr CAre HOMe

Pacific Village

Bellissimo!

Carpinteria

Beautiful 5 Bedroom Home Organic Vegetable Garden Lovely Neigborhood

Contact Cathy Miller 805.729.8347 or 805.220.6234 License Facility # 425801797

FROM THE GRILL, FROM THE SEA, FROM THE GARDEN Join us for Northern & Southern regional Italian cuisine using local ingredients. 666 LINDEN AVE. DOWNTOWN CARPINTERIA giannfrancos.com

since 2007

Weekday Lunch 11 to 3 Weekend Lunch 12 to 3 Dinner 5 to 9 • Closed Tuesday

Reservations 805.684.0720

Farm to Table Chef’s Seasonal Specials Sustainable Meats & Seafood Local & Organic Produce

Lunch 11:30 to 3pm • Dinner from 5pm • Closed Sundays • Catering

805.684.8893 • Casitas Pass Road at Carpinteria Ave. SUMMER2019 27

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 27

5/9/19 9:53 AM


Home Care Organization Lic.#424700020

_fl_

805.284.0221

..£!!:!.?.�� #0147480

Call Us 'J'oday!

Serving Carpinteria, Ojai, The Santa Barbara Communities & The Santa Ynez Valley Home Care Organization Lic.#424700020 PROVIDING QUALITY HOME CARE Home Care Organization Lic.#424700020

805.284.0221 “Quality of Life Today” 805.284.0221

_fl_

IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY ..£!!:!.?.�� #0147480 _fl_ Call Us 'J'oday! In-home care services..£!!:!.? include: .�� #0147480 Call Us 'J'oday!

.. Respite Care for Family -. Hygiene/Personal Care Assistance Serving Carpinteria, Ojai, The Santa Barbara .. Friendly Companionship -. Medication Reminders Serving Carpinteria, Ojai, The Santa Barbara Communities & The Santa YnezHourly Valley -. Assistance with walking Care .. Flexible Communities.. Affordable & The Hourly SantaRate Ynez Valley Home Care Organization Lic.#424700020 -. Meal Preparation

805.284.0221

_fl_ .. WeekendsCARE & Holidays -. Light Housekeeping PROVIDING QUALITY HOME ..£!!:!.?.�� #0147480 PROVIDING QUALITY Call Us 'J'oday! HOME CARE -. Errands,IN Shopping .. Up to 24/7 Care SANTA BARBARA COUNTY ation Lic.#424700020 Care -. Alzheimer's/Dementia CareIN SANTA .. Live-In BARBARA COUNTY #0147480

805.284.0221 Serving Carpinteria, Ojai, The Santa Barbara In-home care services include: Call Us 'J'oday! In-home care services.. include: Respite Care for Family -. Hygiene/Personal Care Assistance Communities & The Santa Ynez Valley

-. Hygiene/Personal Care.. Assistance .. Respite Care for Family Friendly Companionship -. Medication Reminders arpinteria, Ojai, The Santa Barbara -. Medication RemindersHOME .. Care Friendly Companionship PROVIDING -. Assistance with walking QUALITY Hourly .. FlexibleCARE unities-. & The Santa Ynez Valley -. Assistance with walking .. Flexible IN SANTA BARBARA.. Affordable COUNTYHourly Rate Hourly Care Meal Preparation -. Meal Preparation .. Affordable Hourly Rate .. Weekends & Holidays Light Housekeeping careHOME services include: VIDING-.In-home QUALITY CARE -. Light Housekeeping .. Up to 24/7 Care .. Weekends & Holidays -.-. Errands, Shopping .. Respite Care for Family Hygiene/Personal Care Assistance N SANTA BARBARA COUNTY -. Errands, Shopping .. Up to 24/7 Care WELCOMING RESIDENTS -.-. Alzheimer's/Dementia .... Live-In FriendlyCare Companionship We provide attentive loving care for your Medication RemindersCare -. Alzheimer's/Dementia Care services include: .. Live-In Care elderly family who need assistance in a home -. Assistance with walking .. Flexible Hourly Care .. Respite Care for Family onal Care Assistance Home Care Organization Lic.#424700020 environment and garden setting. .. Affordable Hourly Rate -. Meal Preparation 805.284.0221 _fl_ .. Friendly Companionship minders ..£!!:!.?.�� #0147480 Call Us 'J'oday!& Holidays .. Weekends -. Light Housekeeping Call for a Private Tour h walking .. Flexible Hourly Care 805.566.5364 • 4650 Seventh Street • LIC #425801219 -. Errands, Shopping .. Up to 24/7 Care Serving Carpinteria, ion .. Affordable Ojai, HourlyThe RateSanta Barbara -. Alzheimer's/Dementia Care .. Live-In Care Communities & m/ The Santa Ynez Valley eping .. Weekends & Holidays www.visitingangels.co santabarbara ping .. Up to 24/7 Care PROVIDING QUALITY HOME CARE Live-In Care ementia Care IN.. SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

In-home care services include: Home Care Organization Lic.#424700020

805.284.0221

.. Respite Care for Family -. Hygiene/Personal Care Assistance _fl_ ..£!!:!.? . �� #0147480 .. Friendly Companionship -. Medication Reminders Call Us 'J'oday! -. Assistance with walking .. Flexible Hourly Care Lic.#424700020 .. AffordableOjai, HourlyThe Rate Santa Barbara -. Meal Preparation Serving Carpinteria, .. Weekends & Holidays -. Light Housekeeping Communities & The Santa Ynez Valley -. Errands, Shopping .. Up to 24/7 Care 147480 Care -. Alzheimer's/Dementia CarePROVIDING .. Live-In QUALITY HOME CARE

RELAX & LET US DO THE DRIVING.

805.284.0221 Call Us 'J'oday!

IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY www.visitingangels.com/santabarbara pinteria, Ojai, www.visitingangels.co The Santa Barbara m/santabarbara In-home care services include: .. Respite Care for Family -. Hygiene/Personal Care Assistance nities & The Santa Ynez Valley

-. Medication Reminders -. Assistance with walking -. Meal Preparation m/santabarbara www.visitingangels.co -. Light Housekeeping -. Errands, Shopping ngels.com/santabarbara-. Alzheimer's/Dementia Care

DING QUALITY HOME CARE ANTA BARBARA COUNTY rvices include:

.. .. .. .. .. ..

.. Respite Care for Family .. Friendly Companionship .. Flexible Hourly Care m/santabarbara www.visitingangels.co .. Affordable Hourly Rate .. Weekends & Holidays ng 28 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com g .. Up to 24/7 Care entia Care .. Live-In Care

l Care Assistance nders walking

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 28

Friendly Companionship Flexible Hourly Care Affordable Hourly Rate PROVIDES Weekends & Holidays C O N V E N I E N T, E N J OYA B L E & B E N E F I C I A L Up to 24/7 Care T R A NSP OR TATION FOR OUR CUS TOMERS Live-In Care

SANTA BARBAR A AIRBUS

 LAX SHUTTLE  PRIVATE CHARTERS  DAY TRIPS

B O O K Y O U R S E A T E A R LY F O R D I S C O U N T P R I C I N G

CALL TODAY AND USE PROMO CODE: CVN-0319

(800) 423-1618

w w w.sb airbus.com

TCP-1262A

5/9/19 9:54 AM


DANNY’s $2 OFF HanD CarWaSH & DEli

any hand wash* *mention this ad

Unbelievable! Full On Wash & Wax, starts at $55 Super Clean Exterior Wash starts at $16 “World Famous Tri-Tip Sandwich” Daily 9am-6pm 805.684.2711

Celebrated wok master Lee Tsai Wang brings forth the exotic flavors of Szechuan and Mandarin cuisine in his signature recipes. Innovative vegetarian specialties and favorite traditional dishes highlight fresh finds from the local Farmers’ and Fishermans’ Markets. No MSG.

4890 CarpintEria avEnUE DOWntOWn

TAKE OUT • DELIVERY • CATERING 805-566-3334 Dine in • Deliver • Take out • Cater • Gluten free available

Open Monday - Saturday at 11:00 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. • Sundays at 3:30 - 8:30 p.m. 1025 Casitas Pass Road in Shepard Place Shops • unclechencarpinteria.com

We’re proud to use only the leanest meats, tender chicken, fresh seafood, and traditional herbs and spices to create the essence of real Mexican flavor in all our family recipes.

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Catering

EVERY ITEM FRESH AND MADE-TO-ORDER Menudo Saturdays • 7 Types of Soup Breakfast All Day • Chile Rellenos Hamburgers • Tortas • Burritos Carnitas • Champurrado Daily

Homemade Corn Tortillas

13 Meat Choices • Fish Tacos

Dine In or To Go: 805-684-2212 Open Daily 7:30am-8pm

Closed Sundays 4795 Carpinteria Ave. www.reyesmarket.com

SUMMER2019 29

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 29

5/9/19 3:41 PM


CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 30

5/9/19 10:02 AM


Always be on the lookout for the presence of wonder. E.B. White

26 years Offering Personalized Service for Finding Just the Right Gift!

OUR LADY MOUNT CARMEL SCHOOL

530 HOT SPRINGS RD SANTA BARBARA 93108 805.969.5965

Find out how your child can wonder and thrive with a Catholic education! Call to schedule a visit today.

www.susanwillisltd.com

MOUNTCARMELSCHOOL.NET

@MOUNTCARMELSCHOOLSB

SUMMER2019 31

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 31

5/9/19 10:03 AM


The perfect lunch destination to sit, sip, and eat... or take back to the beach.

®

Local and Organic Lunch Offerings, Handcrafted Pastries, Soups, Grab-n-Go Dinners, Gourmet Salad Bar, Craft Beer and Wine. Catering for Clients Corporate and Private. Cooking Classes and Pop-up Dinners.

Counter open Mon-Fri 11am-3pm TheFoodLiaison.com 1033 Casitas Pass Road Carpinteria 805.200.3030 32 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 32

5/9/19 2:37 PM


The Eighth Wonder of the World…

FULL SERVICE MOBILE AUTO DETAILING

DIP CONE!! THE

& PAINT CORRECTION EXPERTS

& lassic

C

961 ince 1

ious s

Delic

OLD FASHIONED FLAVOR PET FOOD & SUPPLIES • GROOMING • HAY & FEED

Quality 0ne A U T O

D E T A I L I N G

CLAY BAR & WAX SUMMER CLEANING SPECIAL Removes damaging contaminants Effectively removes stains Over-spray removal Smooths painted surfaces Shines and protects Small Cars Reg. $155

NOW $100

IT’S MY FAVORITE STORE!

MERRICK, CANIDAE, SCIENCE DIET, SOLID GOLD, HOLISTIC SELECT, NUTRO, TIKI CAT NATURAL BALANCE, TASTE OF THE WILD, DIAMOND CARE, PREY, PURE, PROFESSIONAL +, UNDER THE SUN, MY PERFECT PET, STELLA & CHEWY’S, NORTHWEST NATURALS, SMALLBATCH, FUSSIE CAT, WERUBA BFF, TIKI CAT

89O CACTUS LANE • 8O5-684-9988

Oversize Vehicles Reg. $185

NOW $135

WE COME TO YOU! Call Today 805-844-6133

(next to Smart & Final)

SUMMER2019 33

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 33

5/9/19 2:35 PM


93013 Carpinteria State BeaCh: By thE NuMBErs

summer is Carpinteria camper season. Cars, trucks and rVs bursting at the seams with hot dogs, marshmallows, firewood, and flashlights pour into the campground to enjoy brief residency in our little town. we couldn’t quantify the memories made or the marshmallows burned, but here’s what we could tally when it comes to Carpinteria state Beach.

1

MILE oF CoAstLINE

18 87

VoLuNtEEr hosts

yEArs sINCE It BECAME A stAtE pArk

507

pEopLE AttENdEd hIkEs & tALks IN 2018

600

kIds AttENdEd JuNIor rANGEr proGrAMs IN 2018

1,000,000

14 64 206 1,400

EMpLoyEEs ACrEs

CAMpsItEs

pEopLE AttENdEd CAMpFIrE proGrAMs IN 2018

1,885

pEopLE wENt to thE VIsItor CENtEr IN 2018 ANNuAL VIsItors

C ArpINtErIANs IN thE kNow DON’T…

… turn left from palm Avenue onto Carpinteria Avenue

… expect sunshine on a summer morning … leave their bikes unlocked while they “just pop into the store for a minute” … hover over the grill at the palms … expect to leave the grocery store without seeing someone they know … assume that a pair of flip flops in the sand has no owner … leave for santa Barbara after 3 p.m. on Friday … gush over our celebrities … set up their beach blankets and umbrella too close to their neighbors … forget their dog poop bags or their reusable grocery bags at home … say no when Larry Nimmer asks them a Man on the street question … pronounce the town’s name like the carpet store

34 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 34

5/9/19 10:52 AM


Pride and honor shine through the layers of sunscreen and sand on the face of every kid who wins a Surf Happens summer camp trophy. The trophies validate the hard work each “grom” has dedicated to learning and improving in the sport. And what makes them extra special is that each trophy brings its own unique history of igniting stoke. Surf Happens founder Chris Keet started his trophy recycling program 17 years ago. Some of the hardware comes from kids who return each summer, some comes from top athletes in the sport. Entire collections have been donated by notable Surf Happens alumni including Lakey Peterson, Conner and Parker Coffin, Kilian Garland, Demi Boelsterli, Abby Brown, and Zane Booth.

Surf trophieS reincarnated

To date, over 4,800 trophies have been repurposed and used to build confidence in young surfers. Some of the awards, Keet says, have cycled through the program four times. Many of the trophies first belonged to Keet himself. He started the recycling program in 2002 by honoring the top six surfers in each division of the Santa Barbara Surf Series with a trophy from his own years of competition. He took the old tags off of them, polished them up, and affixed new tags. “At the awards ceremony I explained to all the kids that trophies can mean as much as the achievement itself, especially when you achieve a major goal, but over time they become just a piece of plastic and the real gold is the memories that remain, the experiences had, and the friends and family you shared them with,” he says. Once the shine of a trophy is gone for its recipient, it will likely end up in packed away in a box, sent to Goodwill, or tossed in the trash. Unless it’s rescued by Surf Happens. When Keet honors young surfers at camp or during events for nonprofits such as Transition House and United Way, he reminds recipients that they are now an important link in that trophy’s legacy. ♦

CREATED BY

RESPONSIBLE FARMERS IN 2018 CARPGROWERS.ORG/year1 Photo by Fran Collins

SUMMER2019 35

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 35

5/9/19 10:53 AM


CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 36

5/9/19 10:53 AM


FIFTY SHADES of ROMANCE n 7

6 y

t

4 e 0 ( e

a

THE CLIFF HOUSE INN 8c SHOALS RESTAURANT

Seafood, Steaks e3 Other Scrumptious Dishes -Fine Wines g Cocktails

6 6 0 2 OLD PACIFIC COAST HWY. • MUSSEL SHOALS • 8 0 5 . 6 8 4 . 0 0 2 5

ON THE RINCON MINUTES SOUTH OF CARP. AT THE MUSSEL SHOALS EXIT WWW.CUFFHOUSEINN.COM

PLAYA

Brew by the beach…

Beach Lodging ~ Relaxed Luxury

privaTe parTy room availaBle For evenTS

Taproom open:

monday-Thursday 12-9pm Friday 12-10pm Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 11am-9pm 5049 6th Street - Carpinteria islandbrewingcompany.com

805-745-8272

Carpinteria’s Newest

playalodging.com • Reservations: 805.684-6555 SUMMER2019 37

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 37

5/9/19 10:54 AM


EVENTS • WEDDINGS • PARTIES FESTIVALS & MORE! DJHECKTIK.COM • 8O5-9259-8277 josh@djhecktik.com

Since the Summer of ’58…Carpinteria’s Favorite Burger!

“…worth the drive.” –LA Times

The

SPOT

60 Years at Carpinteria’s Hottest Corner

Burgers • Fries • Chili • Hot Dogs Rings • Shakes • Cones Yummy Mexican Food, too! 389 Linden Ave. 2 Blocks from the Beach To Go 805-684-6311 Facebook.com/TheSpotCarpinteria

38 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 38

5/9/19 10:55 AM


ll Dinners Order Fu ur ing for yo and cater arties Holiday P

…simply fine wines at great prices!

Wines for all occasions

NEW ARRIVALS WEEKLY Stop in and shop our tremendous selection! Breakfast Burritos • Homemade Tamales Quesadillas Enchiladas & More!

4193-1 Carpinteria Ave.

Specialty Breads & Pastries • Cakes for all Occasions

M-F 10-6pm Sat 10-5pm

684-7440

805-684-4981

Take the Carpinteria Avenue exit from 101 South - 4th building on the right

Linden Ave. and 9th St. Downtown Carpinteria

The Palms

Reynaldos_Winter2019.indd 1

10/30/18 3:40 PM

The Arts & Entertainment Center for the Entire Carpinteria Valley

Tradition since 1912

Hungry Locals & Travelers Enjoy Family-Style Good Times

The Alcazar presents

• • • • • • • CARPINTERIA VALLEY MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Steak as you like it because you cook it yourself Original Salad Bar • Filet • 16 oz. T-Bone • Ribeye Steaks Teriyaki Chicken • Beef Kabobs • Norwegian Salmon Halibut • Alaskan King Crab • Rack of Lamb

Cocktails • Happy Hour • Live Bands • Dancing Linden Avenue at 7th St., Downtown Carpinteria • 805.684.3811

First Run Movies Music Concerts Theatre Productions Comedy Showcase Community Events Special Presentations Private Events

and so much more! The Alcazar is such a wonderful asset of our community; one that celebrates music, dance, drama, film and so many other wonderful arts. - David Powdrell

4916 Carpinteria Avenue • 805-684-6380 www.thealcazar.org For questions or to book an event: info@thealcazar.org SUMMER2019 39

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 39

5/9/19 10:55 AM


Experts in all phases of hardwood sales, custom fabrication, installation, stairs, recoats, and finishes

Quality you can stand on sincE 1983

805.650.1900 www.artizenfloorcorp.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 40

5/9/19 10:56 AM


CARpE DIEM D o ers , B el iev ers, t h i n kers , anD D ream ers pH ot oS by JoS H UA CURRy According to ecological principles, diversity improves the health and stability of an ecosystem. Homogenous communities of plants and animals are more likely to collapse when interferences arise. Carpinteria’s strength, likewise, comes from its incredible diversity. Not just ethnic diversity, but our vast array of professional accomplishments, artistic undertakings, pursuit of dreams, and commitment to passions. We are a strong and supportive community thanks to our differences. In each issue of Carpinteria Magazine, we celebrate a few of the individuals who add to the town’s rainbow by doing, dreaming, and believing in ways that are both fascinating and inspiring.

SUMMER2019 41

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 41

5/9/19 10:56 AM


C ARpE D I E M

Million dollar lady By DE BRA H E RRI Ck In Los Angeles in the 1950s, if you couldn’t afford bus fare, you walked to school. As a young girl, Lynda Fairly walked to school. Years later, in the fall of 2018, Fairly walked into the Carpinteria Arts Center and donated $1 million. To date, this is the largest donation the arts center has received from an individual donor. It is a staggering contribution for a nonprofit that affectionately calls its community-based initiative a “modern-day barn raising.” It’s also the biggest donation that Fairly has ever made, by a lot, by around 1,000 percent. Fairly lives in a nicely appointed but relatively modest home in Concha Loma. She’s warm and welcoming. After her father died in Italy during World War II, Fairly was raised by a single mother. “My mom sewed my clothes and I walked to school,” she recalls, “We were very poor, but I was fortunate to have a big extended family.” She went to the University of Southern California on veterans’ benefits. “In those days, you were either a teacher or a nurse; I was going to be an elementary school teacher.” After two years in the profession, she realized that children didn’t just need teachers, they also needed counselors. She pursued a master ’s degree in counseling and later, unable to find a position in an elementary school, Fairly moved to Wisconsin to work at a university. She returned to California a few years later where she began a three-decade career at Santa Barbara City College. Rising through the ranks at SBCC, Fairly became Vice President

of Adult Education, where she grew the program from 35,000 students to 50,000 at the time of her retirement in 2007. While living in Santa Barbara, Fairly was highly active in the community, sitting on three or four boards at a time. When she moved to Carpinteria three years ago, the Carpinteria Arts Center ’s education programs for children drew her attention. She’d seen as a teacher how important art was to children. She joined the center ’s board in 2016, right at the start of its $3.1 million capital campaign to purchase and renovate the neighboring building. “I assumed, wrongly, that somebody important would want their name attached to the arts,” Fairly says, “But it didn’t happen.” So Fairly decided that she would give at the naming level, $1 million. Fairly had been on the 40-person board of the Santa Barbara MOXI during the years they raised $27 million. “A dozen board members gave $1 million. In Santa Barbara, a million dollars doesn’t mean a thing. Quite honestly it feels very good to do something for a small community where it really does make a difference.” As for the new name, The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center, Fairly, who doesn’t like being the center of attention, admits it’s satisfying to know that she has helped the community, particularly, children. The gift was “way over the top,” but Fairly thought to herself, “you have everything you need.”

42 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 42

5/9/19 10:57 AM


SUMMER2019 43

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 43

5/9/19 10:57 AM


C ARpE D I E M

44 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 44

5/9/19 10:58 AM


This guy can really flex By T E d M I l l S “It’s never been on my agenda or my bucket list to own a gym,” laughs Kevin Twohy. But what do you know? He owns one now. Rincon Fitness is one of the first businesses that greets visitors as they exit the 101 at Carpinteria Avenue on the west end of the city. Its pastel Tetris-like exterior and dark windows belie the open workout space within. Twohy found himself a gym owner because he did the sensible thing and listened to the women in his life, his wife and daughter. They were members of the gym when it had a different owner and a different name (TurboFit), but after nine months the gym abruptly shuttered and the Twohys didn’t fancy going anywhere else to stay healthy. “You know the T-shirt that says ‘Happy Wife, Happy Life’?” he asks. Wife Louisa encouraged him to ask the TurboFit owner to reconsider. Instead Twohy drew up a business plan, and after a few false starts, Rincon Fitness was open to the public. It was rough going at first: They opened Dec. 1, 2017, just a few days before the Thomas Fire broke out. That ruined January’s major marketing push, as most people sign up for gym memberships as part of a New Year ’s resolution. “Those months were a mess, literally and figuratively,” Twohy says. “But through it all, people love our gym. We have hundreds of members, the gym is clean, we have

great equipment, and we have a lot of five-star ratings [on Yelp].” Twohy says that he was able to retain many of the former gym’s members. More so than in a big city, he says, in Carpinteria it’s critical to invest in customer loyalty because word travels fast. And the thing is, gym ownership really isn’t Twohy’s day job. Since the UCSB grad moved back to the area in 2003, he’s worked as a senior executive at Planmember Services, which specializes in retirement savings. Currently Rincon Fitness is open 18 hours a day, but Twohy hopes to make it a full 24 hours very soon. He also plans to add childcare soon to make the gym more accessible to busy parents. And though Twohy’s approaching 70, he has no plans to slow down at Planmember or Rincon Fitness anytime soon. He loves watching people of all ages stay healthy and surprise themselves, like the 65-year-old woman who is learning to kickbox, or the 85-year-old who shows up every day, or the gym member who is the Spanish radio voice of the St. Louis Cardinals. “My intention is to let people to become their best selves,” he says. “It’s so cool when people can make a difference in their lives and be inspired.” To underscore his point, he gestures toward the sign hanging near the gym entrance: “Be Better Today Than Yesterday.”

SUMMER2019 45

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 45

5/9/19 10:58 AM


C ARpE D I E M

Master of getting it done By BR y N Fox

The word “average” has never applied to Samantha Bennett. In a former chapter, the colorful actor-turnedcreativity coach shared the stage with the likes of Stephen Colbert and Steve Carell. In the current chapter, she has helped Emmy and Academy Award winners, best-selling authors, and eight-figure entrepreneurs find critical balance between creativity and critical thinking. As Bennett discovered early on, the world is full of people who don’t know how to un-trap their creativity. It’s also brimming with creatives who want to take that next step but don’t know how. Enter Bennett: the master of the right brain left brain convergence. Bennett began her mentoring career by leading a “Get It Done” seminar in a church basement to a whopping crowd of 11. Despite the seminar ’s marginal success, she made the courageous leap to pursue her new path full time. “Entrepreneurship is really not that hard,” she says with the humble ease of someone who is really good at what they do. “If you have authenticity and a good story to tell, you can be of service to people.” Teaching people how to move the meter from hobby to career is where Bennett and her business, The Organized Artist Company, find their opportunity to shine. “Everyone is creative … The more you can lean into your own natural creative tendencies, the more fulfilling your life is going to be.” And fulfilling hers is. “Business is evolving all the time, and I can’t get over how never boring it is.” Bennett is an accomplished author, speaker, and coach. She has worked with everyone, from the uber creative to

those just beginning to grasp their talents. Her books have sold over 40,000 copies in the U.S., plus sales worldwide in Korea, China, and India. This year she’s a finalist for the prestigious Spirit of Entrepreneurship Award. Teaching clients to embrace the world outside their comfort zone—a skill honed in Bennett’s improv days— brings her great satisfaction. “People who identify as creative tend to have a higher tolerance for risk and uncertainty. But there are a lot of dualities. They want new and exciting, and comfortable and familiar all at the same time.” She uses what’s comfortable to a client as a springboard for the next step. “Getting out of your comfort zone doesn’t mean you are plunging into the icy ocean alone. You are bringing your whole self with you.” Given the abundance of procrastinators and I-don’tthink-I-can-ers out there, Bennett’s business has proven to be very lucrative. The ocean swimmer and committed reader works a lot but sets her own hours and lives her dream life in Carpinteria, a town she affectionately calls her soulmate. She spends some amount of time each day outside, and you will almost never find her working Friday afternoons. One piece of advice for everyone with an artistic itch? Bennett says, spend 15 minutes a day, every single day, working on a project that matters to you. It will hopscotch right over your imperfection. No problem if it’s not great because you are going to do it again tomorrow. Eventually, the 15 minutes a day add up, and before you know it, your novel is done, your tattoo art is on a celebrity, or you are incredibly good at the violin.

46 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 46

5/9/19 10:58 AM


SUMMER2019 47

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 47

5/9/19 10:59 AM


C ARpE D I E M

48 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 48

5/9/19 10:59 AM


Shaper of futures By A M y OROZ c O

There’s a sign in the Canalino School office hallway that reads “Work Hard, Be Nice.” Sonia Aguila, the second-grade teacher in room 23, personifies those words. For the “Work Hard” part, there’s her full-time teaching job plus her more than full-time wife-and-mother-ofthree job. In between those duties, she writes educational articles for Santa Barbara Latino and hosts the popular live radio show Festival Infantil on Saturday mornings from 8 to 10 a.m. Aguila always wanted to be a teacher and recalls being 5 years old and sitting her dolls on the sofa, pretending to teach them. She began her chosen profession after earning her bachelor ’s degree from U.C. Santa Barbara in 1997, then her master ’s degrees and teaching credential in 1998. She stumbled onto her show biz career while a student there. “I needed 45 hours of pre-professional work, working with kids, to enter the teacher education program. I lived five minutes from the Radio Bronco station, and I knew they had a children’s show called Festival Infantil. I started volunteering, answering calls, finding topics for the show, and so on,” explains Aguila. “One day, the host informed me she was leaving and left me in charge.” That was 22 years ago. Petrified, Aguila would spend hours writing down every single word she planned to say. Today, her fear is gone, and she opens her show “with a big smile and a heart full of joy! It is really fun.” She claims the best part is that she gets to do the show with her own children. With the motto of Escucha, Aprende y Diviertete (Listen,

Learn and Have Fun), the purpose of the Spanish show is for children to celebrate their culture and language through music. There’s also the subtext of encouragement to be active, to dance, and to sing. Aguila knows a big part of her audience is parents, so she educates them on topics like self-esteem, parent teacher conferences, reading, and common core standards. “Basically, to remind them and encourage them to get involved in their child’s education,” she sums up. “I also record a weekly parenting tip which is played every hour throughout the day.” (Additionally, her Facebook page, Maestra Aguila, offers tips and advice for parents.) For the “Be Nice” part, there’s her description of teaching as, “It doesn’t feel like I am working! I love the hugs, smiling faces, and, of course, when I teach a lesson and my students’ eyes light up and say ‘Oh, I get it now!’” Additionally, she’s dedicated to meeting the needs of all students, not just academically but socially and emotionally as well, and to challenge them at or above grade level. Then, there’s the self-evident distinction of being named Carpinteria Educator of the Year 2018. As for time off? Her soccer-loving family has matches every weekend. Grandparents, aunts, uncles—the whole family attends. “We love going to the movies, too,” she adds. “Or you might find me in my classroom on the weekends prepping, organizing my room.”

SUMMER2019 49

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 49

5/9/19 10:59 AM


C ARpE D I E M

the wave of necessity By Ch RI S t I A N BE A M I S h Nearly every surfer (particularly those who surf amongst the masses at Rincon) has had the same fantasy: being transported to a deserted tropical isle with perfect waves and a board. What more could a guy or gal need then, besides a swimsuit? Just one crucial item: surf wax. That’s where Frederick Herzog, aka Mr. Zog, comes in, having produced the surf world’s premium-quality label, Sex Wax, since 1972. At two bucks a pop, even the bummiest of surf bums can afford to keep their board waxed, and that has made a tidy livelihood for Mr. Zog and his kin. Taken out of context, “Sex Wax” might suggest something other than surfboard traction. But surfers associate those words with surf wax—the tagline “the best for your stick,” notwithstanding. A study in brand consistency, the Sex Wax label has not changed in 47 years, growing steadily by that most effective form of advertising: word-of-mouth. Pop-culture references haven’t hurt either, most notably, Sean Penn’s portrayal of the stereotypical surfer/stoner Jeff Spicoli sporting an era-defining Sex Wax T-shirt in the 1982 film, “Fast Times at Ridgemont High.” Sex Wax started as a backyard business in a shed in Goleta and grew into a tightly run operation with international distribution and approximately $3 million in annual sales. It has operated from a warehouse in Carpinteria since 1984. In the early days, Herzog shaped boards and ran a surf shop, and he first dabbled in surf wax in the late 1960s with chemist Nate Skinner, who came up with the original formula and added scents like coconut and

banana. Sex Wax started as a partnership in 1972 and was incorporated in 1978. Artist Hank Pitcher, a friend from UCSB where Herzog graduated in the late 1960s, came up with the brand name and designed the label. Initially shocked by Pitcher ’s suggested name, Herzog eventually embraced it. “I appreciated the capriciousness of his design and its compatibility with my overall ‘What the Hell’ philosophy of marketing and life in general.” The wax comes in a variety of scents and varying degrees of firmness (softer for cold water, harder for tropical temperatures), but a good source of revenue also comes from surf-wax-scented automobile air fresheners and the T-shirt line—fueled by a vast market of aspiring Spicolis apparently, or more likely, surfers who appreciate a quality product. Indeed, the surf industry generates an estimated $13 billion annually. Selling an inexpensive product that every surfer needs, plus fortuitous timing in the 1991 purchase of the building that houses his business (with a lower monthly mortgage than he’d been paying in rent for commercialspace in Goleta) allowed Herzog to scale up as the larger surf industry grew into a multi-billion-dollar phenomenon. But where the big clothing labels have largely fallen on hard times, unable to carry the weight of production demands versus market realities, Herzog and his son Erick, with a handful of employees, manufacture between 4,000 and 12,000 bars of wax per day, the faintest whiff of coconut in the factory suggesting the tropical climes of surfer dreams.

50 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 50

5/9/19 11:01 AM


SUMMER2019 51

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 51

5/9/19 11:01 AM


52 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 52

5/9/19 11:01 AM


Bound by blood By Cl A I RE BURk E

Marisol and Caroline Alarcon hadn’t planned to go into business together. The two sisters had separate successful careers, but shared a yen for something more. Now they operate a pair of businesses side by side and dedicate themselves to causes that benefit the community. The two strong Latina entrepreneurs are making a difference for this generation and the next. Marisol has a background in biology and worked in clinical research, while Caroline was a clerical supervisor at the Carpinteria Health Care Center. However, after years of working with clinical trials, Marisol decided to go to law school, “I knew [with law] I could help people tangibly.” Marisol chose immigration law as her specialization after becoming inspired through work with a local immigration attorney. As for working together? It was a question of timing and everything coming together just right. Caroline had always wanted to own her own business, an entrepreneurial spirit that she credits to her parents, and so when her sister wanted to open her own firm, Caroline started her own Notary and Live Scan business. Taking such a big step by going back to school and changing careers was made easier for Marisol with her sister by her side: “It was scary to open up my firm on my own, but it was so much nicer knowing that Caroline was going to help me out and support me and I would support her at the same time.” Since opening the shared office doors of Alarcon Legal and Reliant Notary Services in 2016, the sisters have prioritized giving back to Carpinteria. As Caroline notes,

“What we really wanted to do was make a difference in the community for the kids—to leave something better than what we started with, for everyone here.” And so, in 2016 and 2017 they partnered with the city to organize a Child Safety Event, and they continue helping the community through their participation in nonprofit organizations. Marisol is on the board of Carpinteria Children’s Project and Caroline has served as the Chairwoman of the Board for the Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce. For both Marisol and Caroline, family is of utmost importance. One of the main reasons they made the decision to open their office in Carpinteria is that their family lives in town. Born to Chilean immigrants, the sisters are the two oldest of five. They moved several times while growing up, but then, in the mid-1990s, after Marisol attended Westmont College and Caroline went to Santa Barbara City College, the rest of their family moved to Carpinteria. According to Caroline, “To me, it’s always been home base. Even though I didn’t grow up in Carpinteria, it’s been…the place where I can always come back to, and so when we decided to launch into our new businesses it made sense to come back to our community.” Carpinteria is over 45 percent Latino, and Marisol notes that this fact also played a role in deciding where to open their business: “Because I speak Spanish and I understand what it is like to be the child of immigrants, it made sense to start here.” ♦

SUMMER2019 53

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 53

5/9/19 11:01 AM


A team specializing in multi-generational Financial Planning and Wealth Preservation Strategies for Professionals and their Families.

Serving the Central Coast for over 25 years

Jeff Moorhouse CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER TM

CARPINTERIA

VENTURA HARBOR

PO Box 122 1575 Spinnaker Dr. Ste. 201 Carpinteria, CA 93014 Ventura, CA 93001

8O5.684.2245

8O5.586.3636

moorhousefinancial.com Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through Raymond James Financial Services Advisors Inc. Moorhouse Financial is not a registered broker/dealer and is independent of Raymond James Financial Services.

S U N I J O AY ! TOD

PROTECT YOUR HOME & PROPERTY Fire Sprinklers/Extinguishers Fire Suppression Systems Fire Pumps, Hoses, Nozzles Kitchen Hood Systems Wildland Property Assessment Protection Gels, Foams, Paints “Your Fire Protection Connection since 1978”

(805) 684-0805

www.JOYEQUIPMENT.com

Discover Carpinteria’s Rich & Colorful Past at the

Carpinteria Valley MuseuM of History Featured Exhibits: Native American Chumash Summerland Spanish & Mexican Ranchos World War I Carpinteria Pioneers Victorian Homes Agriculture & Tools

Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce The Chamber is a 501 C (6) non-profit organization, funded thru chamber membership investments, sponsors, and fundraisers. We are a passionate team of 16 volunteer Board of Directors, 1.5 paid staffers, and nearly 300 enthusiastic members that generously share their time, talents, and treasures. Together we are dedicated to enhancing the quality of life in the Carpinteria Valley and are proud to offer an energetic and sunny environment in which businesses can joyfully flourish!

WWW.CARPINTERIACHAMBER.ORG 1056-B Eugenia Place, Carpinteria, 93013 • 805.684.5479 • joyce@carpinteriachamber.org

684.3112 956 Maple Ave. Carpinteria Exhibits Hours: Tues.-Sat. 1-4 p.m.

carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org

54 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 54

5/9/19 12:15 PM


Locally owned since 1979

CLEANING & RESTORATION 8O5-687-9898

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

General Contractors License #9824O5

Carpet / Rug Cleaning Water • Fire • Mold Temporary Power

www.Hirecastros.com SUMMER2019 55

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 55

5/9/19 11:03 AM


FAMILY DINING FOR 53 YEARS

Classic Mexican Food • Fresh Chips & Salsa Weekday Lunch Specials Sunday Breakfast 7:30 am HORNITOS GRANDE MARGARITA

FULL SERVICE CATERING MENUDO • CARNITAS • FULL BAR 684-4822 • 4401 CARPINTERIA AVE.

MON. 11:30-8:30 • TUES.-SAT. 11-9 • SUN. 7:30-9

Fine Body Products, Candles, Robes, Loungewear, Jewelry and Purses Unique Gifts From Over Twenty Countries featuring: Kai, Votivo, Pre De Provence and much more

910 A Linden Avenue Downtown Carpinteria

805.684.6695

56 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 56

5/9/19 11:04 AM


Just the Beginning fo r the # EndofMaple By A M y OROzcO Ph O tOS By M i ch A E l KwiE cinSKi

n

o matter what’s going on outside, inside the former warehouse at 500 Maple Avenue is a great place to be. All sides provide an inspirational mountain or ocean view, partly explaining the structure’s new identity as a creative hive with four distinct makers in four separate spaces. there’s a kinship of appreciation for having space to work, for random partnering or tool lending, and a good neighbor policy of respect. Dedicated to labors of love, it is the whitewashed, no-frills kind of place sitting at the dead end of Maple, separating the street from the state park. Details aren’t definite, but for the property’s future, landlord thom Vernon envisions a makers’ market and a small café with seating on the now-loading dock with its ocean views. in the meantime, appointments are suggested to visit an artisan, though you may catch some open doors harnessing the inspirational views at the end of Maple.

SUMMER2019 57

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 57

5/9/19 11:05 AM


Glasgow Woodworks “If you are living in Carpinteria and you’re in a hurry, you’re doing it wrong. You can’t rush a good thing,” says Matthew Glasgow, furniture maker and woodworker. His is a vocation of happenstance. Fifteen years ago, when he was a full-time drummer in between road gigs, he found himself in the family way. A friend got him a part-time job at Roberts Custom Interiors to make extra money. The sanding and general grunt work position grew as his family did. Now, he and his wife, Alia, are the parents of three, and not only is he the lead carpenter at Roberts Custom Interiors, Glasgow Woodworks was born 1.5 years ago. He works both jobs, commuting through an open doorway from one work space to the other. Most of the work for Roberts is cabinetry; for him, it’s furniture. Loving the natural aspect of wood and preferring to stay away from toxins and paints, Glasgow says, “I’m a big fan of traditional furniture because of the intricate work—it helps your work shine.” The one-man shop’s signature piece is a pyramid shelf made of poplar. He works with all types of exotic woods; his customers’ tastes dictate which ones. His future plan is for Glasgow Woodworks not to grow. “I love Carp and how small it is,” he says. @glasgowwoodworks, glasgowwoodworks.com

58 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 58

5/9/19 11:06 AM


PacWest Blooms Events & DIRT Colored with earth tones and accented with flower sprays, vintage furniture, wood textures, and glass accessories, the PacWest Blooms Events’ studio reflects owner Suzie Schneider’s commitment to family, friends, community, and all things floral. “I feel really connected here. It’s a nontraditional shop, and I didn’t want traditional retail,” says the native Carpinterian and mother of three. It’s a multiprong connection she traces partly to her mother, who made family night a plant potting party versus a standard board game activity. Schneider’s business started as a hobby, then special events and weddings followed. She worked out of her home, using her industry connections to refrigerate flowers for big events. Riding the twists and turns of life, like her husband’s stroke two years ago and a budding workshop business, brought her to the end of Maple. Enthusiastic clients forced two business offshoots. There was Petals & Pinot—fun, hands-on floral arranging for party guests. Then sprouted a chance to work with friend and colleague Monica Perez. The two provide workshops for discovering the joy of getting one’s hands in the dirt, called, appropriately enough, “DIRT!” Workshops are always botanically inspired and there is an endless variety, from essential oils to flower crowns. “We like to think of it as ‘bringing Pinterest to real life,’” says Schneider. “A chance to share knowledge and have people connect.” pacwestblooms.com pacwestblooms@gmail.com

SUMMER2019 59

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 59

5/9/19 11:06 AM


Andy Messenger “I’m one of the only people in the world who does this,” says Andy Messenger, beginning to explain coquille d’oef, a finish of applied eggshells to furniture he’s made. (That explains the crates of cracked and empty eggshells lining the studio’s entryway.) The technique originated in Vietnam, and French colonizers introduced it to Paris café society. The time-intensive process— and that’s after the furniture is completed—includes washing endless cratefuls of empty eggshell halves, meticulously breaking them into pieces, laying out a pattern, and applying to a surface. He invented a system for every step of the isolating work and notes, “You can pick up tips, but no one can teach you.” He honed his furniture-making craft at Leeds Design Workshops in Massachusetts, from where he graduated in 1983. His eggshell aha! moment was the sense of the fresh and contemporary feel as well as historical resonance. He does eggshell custom pieces and has created his first collection, a three-piece bedroom set. Catering to the same narrow market as the one for fine art, his pieces are sold through designers and decorators. He’s an artist in the sense that function is secondary to form. “The impact is how the [pieces] look across the room. It’s ‘eye candy.’ Mine is the only furniture collection based on eggshells,” Messenger says. “It’s not often you can claim a material.” Andymessenger.com, 917.282.4416, andymessenger@me.com

Underexposed stUdios

60 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 60

5/9/19 11:08 AM


Madera del Mar Cortnie Alter describes herself as a “casual California girl making home décor.” Alter creates driftwood pieces in a space where she hears the waves, sees palm trees, and watches the sun set. Her business started 12 years ago, as a Christmas gift idea. Freshly laid off, the U.C. Santa Barbara graduate created a driftwood wreath on her living room floor and sent a picture to her aunt, who owns a Laguna Beach boutique. She ordered 10 wreaths, sold them in a weekend, and Madera del Mar was born. “I thought I could make this my job and I did. It fell into my lap, and I ran with it,” Alter recalls. Everything is made to order. Mirror frames of all sizes, whales, seahorses, planters, and whatever else washes up into her imagination. She’s self-taught and attributes “lots of practice and some tips from a couple of nearby carpenters” for her skillset. Her studio’s palette and furnishings echo driftwood. There’s shelving she fashioned from reclaimed siding and hung with tools gifted from her grandpa. Timeworn hand-medown furniture and worktables share the same faded hues. Barrels of driftwood dot the room. Her favorite part of her job is collecting driftwood, and when she finds a piece, she knows exactly what it’ll be used for. Alter also finds joy sharing her love of driftwood and plans to grow her workshops. “People leave here so excited with their piece,” she explains. ♦ Maderadelmar.etsy.com Instagram.com/ madera_del_mar

SUMMER2019 61

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 61

5/9/19 11:08 AM


62 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 62

5/9/19 11:13 AM


M u r p h y ’s V i n y l s h ac k:

For the record B y Pet e r DugrÉ • Ph ot os B y Jos h ua Curry

T

here’s a time capsule at the corner of Carpinteria and Palm avenues. Or is it at the intersection of nostalgia and music appreciation? Murphy’s Vinyl Shack, 5285 Carpinteria Ave., is a tribute to a bygone culture of tactility, filled with retro merchandise that appeals to anyone wishing to wander the halls of rockand-roll memories. There are Beatles albums, movie posters like “Animal House,” copies of old MAD magazines and stickers for the kids. If one theme can be extracted from the creative curating of Murphy’s inventory, it might be browsability and physicality. The collection is rooted in 1970s Americana and is eclectic enough to fuel hours of perusing for forgotten and new material. “We sell a lot of classic rock, some jazz and around-theworld stuff,” says co-owner Kevin Murphy. “We keep a variety of material and pride ourselves on a quality product in clean, good condition. And we provide an enjoyable experience to draw in foot traffic and repeat customers.” Muphy, 62, and wife Cecelia relocated to Carpinteria from Ventura two years ago and opened the shop, confident that Carpinteria and its tourists could sustain a well-appointed record store. Landing on the idea of vinyl didn’t happen in a vacuum. There’s a rising tide of vinyl popularity, not just for originals released in the 1960s and ‘70s, but for remastered records, reissues, and contemporary music. On a weekday morning last spring, regular customer Peter Lemke walked into the shop on the lookout for a classic rock record. He had recently purchased “Let It Be” by the Beatles and was eager for his next acquisition. “Vinyl is so personal,” says Lemke. “You can hold SUMMER2019 63

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 63

5/9/19 11:13 AM


records, touch ‘em, remember what you were doing the first time you heard a song. MP3 is very antiseptic, you don’t have that connection.” Inside Murphy’s there’s always a record spinning, turning out its analogue sound. Customers are struck by the familiarity of the sound and difference from the digital dominance of today. “It’s crisp, clear. I was playing Pink Floyd ‘The Dark Side of the Moon’ one day, and a customer walked in and said, ‘Wow! I had forgotten how clear this is.’” Digital versus analogue quality is a debate that may never be settled, but passionate record collectors swear by analogue and fuel the revived record market. In the eyes of their beholders, records don’t just share a sound that’s unrivaled by digital media, they encapsulate greater artistic dimension than the music. There’s the album cover, no doubt painstakingly designed to set the mood, and the order of the tracks themselves, which make records a complete package for the consumer. “Kids will have grown up around the music, either from mom and dad or grandparents, but they haven’t heard the complete album,” Murphy says. “A record can have a storyline to it, but they’ve only heard the hits.” Murphy sources some of his collection online and some from collectors looking to unload. Often, a family member inherits a great collection, or folks are downsizing and cleaning out the garage. “It can be a loved-one’s stuff and they want to makes sure it goes to someone who will care for it,” Murphy says. Wherever the vinyl comes from, shopping images of old album covers on eBay won’t compare to flipping through the stacks in person. Murphy has seen albums he has in stock for $12 sell online for $150. “It’s not a museum,” he says. Prices vary so “everyone can find something. It’s no fun listening to records if you’re buying them online.” ♦ 64 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 64

5/9/19 11:14 AM


PADARO LANE

SANTA CLAUS LANE

Art & Collectibles

TRA

IN P

LAT

FOR

M

963 Linden Ave • Open Tues - Sun 11-5

Open Daily! 771 Linden Ave.

Records Posters Vinyl Wall Art Themed Apparel & More! 5285 Carpinteria Avenue 805-318-55O6 Open daily at 10am

962 Linden Ave.

Downtown Carpinteria 805.684.1222 Visit whimsyantiques.com or instagram @whimsyantiques

SUMMER2019 65

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 65

5/9/19 11:14 AM


Rainbow Bridge Ranch Palm Growers Carpinteria, California

Look for the Ant on the Door 24 Hour Commercial Services Residential • Commercial Industrial • Agricultural

TERMITES

Huge succulent collection Over 20 Varieties of Climatized Coastal Grown Palm Trees, Tropicals, Bananas, Plumerias & More at Wholesale Prices

WE DELIVER Open to Public by Appointment Bruce Montgomery at (805) 684-7976

Inspection Reports for Escrow/Loans or Property Management Fumigation Estimate at No Charge Same Day Service Hotel/Motel Management Specialists

PEST CONTROL

Gopher & Mole Service Rodent Control & Proofing Bird Control Live Animal Trapping Lawn & Garden Care Written Warranty Open Monday-Saturday

Free Estimate • Call Today

Carpinteria 805-684-5204 Santa Barbara: (805) 684-6644 • Goleta Valley (805) 964-7744

Keep Saving Carpinteria! To reduce water use & your bill: • Check and adjust your automatic sprinkler system every month. • Apply a layer of mulch to increase your soil’s water retention. • Irrigate efficiently by switching to drip or watering by hand. Rebates may be available. Call 805-684-2816 ext. 116 to schedule a FREE water checkup. Learn more at CVWD.net Untitled-3.indd 1 66 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 66

4/10/2019 2:16:02 PM

5/9/19 11:15 AM


Garden•ology Locally-sourced home garden tips

H

STORY A N D PH OT OS BY DE BRA H E RRI CK

aving a green thumb doesn’t always mean being born with a special talent, or even spending copious amounts of time studying horticulture. Sometimes good gardening can be as simple as tuning in to who you are, where you are, and what you like. It might not be easy, but one thing’s certain, cultivating a sustainable home garden means creating the right garden for you. We’ve assembled a gourmet menu of home garden tips from local experts. Try them all or go a la carte. Your home harvest awaits.

SUMMER2019 67

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 67

5/9/19 11:15 AM


Introducing our garden gurus Alena Steen & Danny Meza

Alena and Danny tend to a small production farm at their rental home nestled in Casitas Valley. They are the owners of Earth Tide Botanicals, homegrown and handmade botanical medicines. Alena also manages Carpinteria Garden Park. To learn more, visit earthtidebotanicals.com.

Water~

Flow with the seasons

“Every good gardener knows that the best results come from working with the seasons. In Southern California, this includes taking full advantage of winter rains by building gardens and home spaces designed to capture water.” —Alena

Natasha Elliot

Natasha is a Carpinteriabased, EPA-certified Water Wise designer, certified permaculture designer, and certified Green Gardener. Her landscape design company is Sweet Smiling Landscapes. To learn more, visit sweetsmilinglandscapes. com.

Becca & Jacob Claassen

Becca is an environmental consultant and chiropractor, and Jacob, an arborist, owns and operates Nimble Tree Care. Becca and Jacob raise chickens and home garden with their daughter Hazel and son Henry in a rental house in Carpinteria.

68 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 68

5/9/19 11:19 AM


Homegrown health

Herbal-infused honey recipe

Tulsi (holy basil) relieves stress and tension and has a sweet, earthy taste that pairs well with local honey.

F ill a m as o n j ar h alf full with fresh t u ls i, t h e n f ill it to the top with h o n e y (m ake sure all plant m at e rial is f u lly cov ered) . L e t t h e in f u s io n s it for at least a month. T h e n , h e at it u p on the stov e and s t rain t h e plan t material. St o re in glas s j ars in the dark. This h e rbal h o n e y w ill keep forev er. —Rec ip e fro m Al ena & Danny

Quick guide to growing your own medicine

Rainwater

Lush landscapes are possible if you’re capturing every raindrop. Natasha’s tip: install rain gutters that direct rain from the roof into the garden. Water can be stored in the soil for months. As a result, you won’t need to do as much watering later. If you’re using all low-water-need plants, irrigation might not be necessary at all.

Nerves: lemon balm, milky oats, catnip DigestioN: anise hyssop, ginger, chamomile sleep: lemon balm, chamomile, blue vervain stress: tulsi (holy basil), licorice root BoDy & cell NourishiNg: burdock, calendula, gotu kola

Waterwise irrigation

If you do have to irrigate, make sure you adjust run times depending on weather conditions to avoid wasting water. “One’s irrigation system will run for more time on the long, hot days of August,” says Natasha, “than it will in December when the weather is cooler.”

Greywater

Want another way to fight the dry-weather blues? Set up a home greywater system, a green way of reusing water from dishwashers, washing machines, and kitchen sinks. It’s as simple as putting in a drain pipe, barrels, and a hose, say Becca and Jacob, who irrigate their fruit trees and raised beds with greywater from the laundry (see photo at left). “We’ve created an oasis with greywater.” If you go grey though, make sure you are using cold water (hot water can cook plant roots) and ecofriendly, non-salt-based detergents. SUMMER2019 69

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 69

5/9/19 11:19 AM


Have fun~ Be true to yourself (and family)

“Wild with bits of productive and fun spaces”—that’s how Becca and Jacob describe their garden. They’ve turned their patch of green into a unique haven for their family (seven chickens, one duck, one cat, baby Henry and 7-year-old Hazel). “We do stuff on a whim. If it works, it works; if it doesn’t, we repurpose it to something in the play area,” says Jacob. The play area—entirely built by Jacob and Becca—is a glorious shaded cove that includes a treehouse and recycled-tire play structure. “We try stuff out, experiment and learn as we go.”

The dirt on dirt

“Healthy soil is the backbone of a landscape,” says Natasha. “Whether your soil is sand, silt, or clay, the greater the biodiversity is, the better your plants will perform.” Avoid reducing biota in soil with pesticides, herbicides, and synthetic fertilizers. Instead, use compost, composted manures, and worm castings. Then, get cozy with mulch. “Carbon-based mulches such as wood chips, leaf litter, and straw serve as food to the soil biota and also help retain water and reduce weeds,” says Natasha.

Lasagna composting

An easy way to go about composting is the “lasagna” method. For Becca and Jacob, lasagna composting is as easy as 1, 2, 3. 1. Throw food scraps on soil. (No meat, milk, bananas, or citrus peels.) 2. Top with wood chips. 3. Repeat.

The 411 on interplanting

Want more biota-bang for your buck? Try interplanting. Alena and Danny have made an art of biodiversifying their home-sweet-farm, making the most of their space and boosting soil fertility. Here’s how you do it. Grow lots of different species of plants next to one another, mixing flowers, vegetables, and herbs. Plant diversity slows the spread of plant diseases and insect pests that can’t spread between different species. Go wild. Avoid straight lines and blocks of just one kind of plant. Sow pollinator-friendly plants like marigolds, dill, and flowering cilantro.

70 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 70

5/9/19 11:19 AM


Edible gardens~ You are what you eat

When it comes to your home garden, remember the saying, ‘Right plant, right place.’ “Make sure you are putting each plant where it will have the correct cultural requirements,” says Natasha, “i.e. solar exposure, water needs, and soil type. Plants that are typically grown on farms can be incorporated into the landscape, creating beautiful lush spaces while providing useful goods.”

Salads, veggies, snacks

Lettuce, carrots, celery, corn, green beans, kale, chard, the list goes on and on; Carpinteria gardeners are growing a plethora of hearty, healthy, and delicious vegetables. Worried about getting started? Here’s some advice.

Becca & Jacob’s top five tips for newbie gardeners 1. Put time and energy into pest control on the front-end. 2. Vermiculture. With worms your soil will have a hearty supply of nutrients. 3. Make sure your soil is good quality. 4. If you have kids in your life, think of it as an opportunity to spend time with them. 5. Don’t worry about growing a ton of food. Just being able to grow something super healthy that you can add to your home cooking makes it all worth it.

Cheep, cheep, cluck, cluck

Becca and Jacob wanted Hazel to understand where food comes from, the whole life cycle of animals, so they started raising chickens. “After tasting freshly laid eggs, we were hooked,” says Jacob. Daily time investment: 10 minutes. Yield: three eggs a day. The trick? There’s two.

The chicken tractor: The design of the chicken coop is a wheelbarrow. Every few days, Jacob moves the coop on wheels to give the flock access to fresh vegetation to forage.

Chicken curfew: At dusk, the birds are corralled into the coop and Jacob shuts the door, keeping raccoons, opossums, and skunks out. ♦

SUMMER2019 71

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 71

5/9/19 11:20 AM


Gone native BY PETER DUGRÉ • PH OT OS BY JOS H UA CURRY

72 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 72

5/9/19 11:20 AM


A

s a U.C. Santa Barbara student sitting behind the wheel of a bus in the mid1960s, Victor Schaff had an ambitious plan germinating in his mind. In addition to driving a bus to support himself, he spent part of his time foraging seeds of wild shrubs and flowers across Southern California. Schaff sold his seeds by the pound to Mistletoe Sales, a company that specialized in supplying woody ornamentals to landscapers. It was part-time work, and the student/bus driver soon graduated college with a degree in chemistry and started a career in computer science. His seed collecting gig went on the back burner, but the idea of scaling out a native seed supply business never stopped simmering. After a few years of climbing the corporate ladder, Schaff was out of a job when GE Tempo folded. He went back into the wild to harvest seeds for his lone customer, Mistletoe Sales. “He was hustling,” says Ben Miller, Director of Sales and Customer Outreach at S&S Seeds. “He was the original gig economy guy.” By the time the early 1970s rolled around, evidence had mounted that the niche native seeds market was about to explode. The environmental movement had begun. Planning departments all over the state were getting hip to the idea that when land is developed, lost vegetation must be replaced, and not just by any plants, but by the ones native to the disturbed ground. Schaff started operating a young S&S Seeds from his garage before moving into a facility in Goleta in the early 1970s. Everything was happening at once. Southern California’s population boom begot a housing boom which necessitated a massive infrastructure expansion. In order to complete all of this rapid development, agencies and private developers were required to offset their footprints by replanting native seeds. Almost overnight, revegetation became a condition for development, and S&S Seeds had the market cornered. “For any construction project, in order to get a permit, planning departments insisted that native seeds were planted on disturbed lands,” says Schaff. “[Planning departments] are our sales people.” Particularly for freeway projects, powerlines, or solar projects in far-flung places, drought-tolerant, native seeds were

S&S Seeds owner and founder Victor Schaff with his daughter and S&S manager Jody Miller. SUMMER2019 73

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 73

5/9/19 11:20 AM


Jody Miller checks the stock.

the answer to mitigating loss of vegetation. By definition, native plants have adapted to the local arid climate and can sustain themselves with minimal intervention. “Other companies hadn’t bought into natives like I did,” Schaff says. Rewind to 1964, before the bus driving. While Schaff and his wife, Susan, were moving to California from North Dakota, they stopped in Victorville. He noticed it appeared poised for development. Street signs marked streets, but few houses populated the new roadways. It wasn’t quite an epiphany, but a flag post on the road to discovering the industry. This desert landscape was being prepped for a yet-toexist population boom, but there was no water to support it or new plantings. It was a glimpse into what might be coming in the future, a demand for native plantings that could be sustainable for the neighborhoods and cities of the whole region. “My whole thing was low water plants,” Schaff says. In the early 1980s, S&S Seeds moved to Foothill Road in Carpinteria. Later that decade, Caltrans dedicated itself to all native seeds. In the 1990s, S&S Seeds, which at that time gathered all of its seeds the old-fashioned way—by hand in the wild—made a move to begin farming its own native plants to generate enough seeds to meet demand. It opened a 400-acre farm in Los Alamos and almost instantly doubled its capacity while providing greater consistency in seed availability than can be found in the wild. Foraged seeds became farmed native seeds.

CA R pIN t ER I A A N d b Ey o N d

At its building on the Carpinteria Bluffs, where it

moved in 2005, S&S Seeds houses its executive staff and a warehouse containing millions of seeds in hundreds of varieties. There are native shrubs, flowers, and grasses. In the current composition of seeds, about 60 percent are harvested at company-owned farms and 40 percent are collected in the wild by teams that graze through sites across the region. Since the farm opened, most grasses and flowers are sourced from the farm and seeds from shrubs like wild sage varieties are harvested in the wild, from places like military bases and private lands where S&S Seeds has exclusive rights. When customers like developers or utility companies order their seeds, they typically come in a hydromulch mix that contains a wood pulp, gum and water. The hydromulch binds seeds together into a sprayable medium that’s green, partially to mark areas that have been seeded to avoid over application. While S&S Seeds typically caters to large-scale projects, it pitches in to help beautify its community in a partnership with Carpinteria Beautiful, the local nonprofit whose mission is keeping Carpinteria clean, green, and beautiful. Every winter, Carpinteria Beautiful hands out S&S Seeds California poppy seeds to spread locally, hopefully before the first rains to improve chances of germination. As is the case with natives, seeds supplied by S&S Seeds have adapted to use every drop of water possible in Southern California’s short rainy season to make it through their life cycle. “They have a different mechanism [than non-natives] that’s triggered by the fall and winter seasons,” Miller

74 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 74

5/9/19 11:21 AM


Mi c h ae l Kw i e c i ns K i

says. A gardener hoping to produce blooms by planting in the spring would be disappointed when the seeds don’t take, even if manually watered. The seeds know when the weather conditions signal late fall or early winter, the period ideal for starting their life cycle. They won’t be tricked. Over the years, S&S Seeds absorbed six other seed companies. Owners had either died off or given up, according to Schaff. He purchased his original employer, Mistletoe, which he later sold to his brother who operates what is now called Mistletoe-Carter Seeds out of Goleta. In addition to S&S Seeds, Schaff owns Pacific Coast Seeds, a company that is headquartered in Tracy, Calif. and supplies Northern California Natives and Hedgerow Farms in Winters, Calif. While in concept the native seeds business seems simple, S&S Seeds and other Schaff-owned companies have been

able to stay ahead of the competition. There’s more to it than hiring a team to collect seeds. There’s no blueprint for success, and S&S Seeds is built on relationships with landowners and customers to guarantee delivery of its products. According to Schaff, the future of the industry might depend on supplying hyper-local ecotypes. As the environmental movement progresses, science is suggesting that seeds, even those in the wild that appear the same throughout wide regions, are more specialized. Some planners now require seeds supplied from a tight radius, as little as five miles from development sites. Shifting to narrow ecotypes could require further adaptation for the native seed industry. “I’ve always been interested in challenges,” Schaff says of building an industry from the ground up. “I like to do things you don’t go to school to learn.” ♦ SUMMER2019 75

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 75

5/9/19 11:21 AM


Friends of the Carpinteria Library Used Bookstore

“Always good for an armload. Kids books, too!” 5103 Carpinteria Avenue (Next to the Carpinteria Library) Donations welcomed.

805-566-0033

SPARK45 Fitness and Physical Therapy 466O Carpinteria Avenue • 8O5.275.3OOO www.spark45.com Offering the patented Megaformer workout, Lagree Fitness, indoor cycling and Physical Therapy. SPARK 45 provides clients with a welcoming beautiful environment both for fitness & physical therapy in their studio of just over 22OO ft.

New Client Specials: 30 Day Megaformer Pass: $99 3-Class Pack: $45 1st class: $5 We accept most major health insurances. 76 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 76

5/9/19 2:35 PM


Uncommon threads StoRy AND P h ot oS By DEB RA h ERRI Ck

D

ating back possibly as far as the Paleolithic era, fiber crafts are among humankind’s most essential practices, woven into nearly every aspect of our everyday life. Bedsheets and blankets, rugs and clothes, paper and books, we depend on carefully blended and stitchedtogether fibers to make our lives more comfortable, enjoyable, and beautiful. Inspired by Carpinteria’s mountainous landscape, abundant wildflowers, and tight-knit community, three local artisans celebrate the fiber arts tradition in uncommon ways. From plant-based dyes to a 60-inch loom, artisans Caitlinn McCann, Deanna Ryan, and Susan Jorgensen are threading their unique talents into functional works of art.

SUMMER2019 77 SUMMER2019

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 77

5/9/19 11:22 AM


Susan Jorgensen Knitting is what Susan Jorgensen does to relax and focus. Having learned from both her grandmothers, Jorgensen has been knitting for most of her life. As an artisan, Jorgensen is a generous teacher. She teaches needle work at Roxanne’s, A Wish and a Dream and leads a knitting circle on Saturdays. “Whenever women sit down and knit together, they form such a special community,” says Jorgensen. “My knitting group is a support group.” Along with strengthening community bonds, Jorgensen sees knitting and crocheting as meditative; the process is just as important as the product. She’ll often get lost in the process and find herself not wanting a project to end. Another benefit, according to Jorgensen, is that knitting keeps your brain young. “They always say to learn a second language; well, if you’re reading knitting patterns, you’re learning a second language.” This summer, Jorgensen is looking forward to light silk blends, bamboo, and cotton. “There are so many different fibers now, it’s just fun to try them all.” For Jorgensen, knitting is community-building, brain food, and fun. 78 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 78

5/9/19 11:24 AM


Deanna Ryan For nearly four decades, Deanna Ryan has been weaving on a 60-inch loom, practicing techniques from Scandinavian, Mexican, and Native American traditions. An adventurist at heart, Ryan grew up in London and moved to California in the 1960s when she was 19. “The hippie era was emerging,” she recalls. “People were weaving shaggy, hairy wall hangings.” Ryan purchased a loom from an arts and crafts teacher, and has been weaving rugs, blankets, throws, scarves—pretty much anything—ever since. Principally concerned with color, texture, and shape, Ryan is drawn to geometric, simple designs that portray a sense of depth, warmth, and earthiness. “Shapes just come to me,” she says. Nature has often inspired Ryan’s color schemes. These days she’s weaving yarns in the warm colors of New Mexico’s red mountains and dirt, while in the past she’s incorporated the peachy red colors of roses from her garden. “Weaving is a hobby that will last you your entire life,” Ryan says. “It’s done all over the world and there are hundreds of techniques.”

SUMMER2019 79

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 79

5/9/19 11:24 AM


Caitlinn McCann Caitlinn McCann lives in a school bus on top of a hill with a view of the ocean. She’s surrounded by rolling hills of weeds and wildflowers, inspiration and raw material for her naturally-dyed quilts. “Botanical colors at your fingertips,” says McCann. McCann makes her prismatic Abuela Quilts using organic cotton and batting. Her warm, earthy color palette is derived from wild-harvested plants, fruit skins, berries, and flowers—think fennel, blackberries, pomegranate skins, avocado pits, and oxalis. For mordants (substances that fix the dye into the material), she doesn’t use chrome and tin like commercial brands, which are harmful to soil when dumped; instead she experiments with saltwater and soy milk. “What I do is not just about dying. Everybody talks about their grandma’s quilts or they have an heirloom from their grandmother. It’s the idea that there’s a piece of art that can be passed down that makes you feel good.” Abuela Quilts also care for our grandchildren’s earth by utilizing sustainable techniques. For McCann, the word that best describes her quilts is “nurturing.” “When I gift a quilt, I tell the person that I am wrapping them in my love.” ♦ 80 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 80

5/9/19 11:24 AM


2019 Wedding guide online at CoastalView.com

Consignment Boutique

C oa st al V ie w N ew s 20 19

Wedding G uide Wedding Guide ide dding Gu Coastal View News 2019

C o a st a

We

l V ie w

0 19 N ews 2

Photo

by: tessa

tadlock

PhotograPh y (loPez Wedding)

Photo by: tessa tadlock PhotograPhy (loPez Wedding)

Why Pay Retail $

Monday- Friday 10-5 • Saturday 10-4 • last Sat 8-3 805-684-1808 • 957 Maple Ave Downtown Carpinteria across from the History Museum

by: tessa Photo

Phy Photogra ing) tadlock z Wedd (loPe

“Experience the

Artful Life!”

quilting • Knitting needleworK • arts and gifts

A whimsical store with everything you’ll need for quilting, knitting, needlework, inspired gifts and more… Hours: M-s • 10 to 5 sun. • 11 to 4

919 Maple avenue • Carpinteria, Ca 93013 • 805.566.1250 • roxannequilts.CoM

SUMMER2019 81

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 81

5/9/19 11:25 AM


Think Global

Drum Local B y Christian Bea m i s h • Ph ot os By m i Ch a e l K w i e Ci n s Ki

82 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 82

5/9/19 11:26 AM


John Knecht leads a group of Cate School students and faculty as the sun sets over Carpinteria.

SUMMER2019 83

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 83

5/9/19 11:26 AM


I

t’s a long way from the shores of Senegal to those of Carpinteria, but the rhythms of Africa arrive nonetheless. Through drumming instruction, John Knecht has introduced countless Carpinteria kids to far flung cultures and the myriad benefits of music. Knecht leads drumming workshops at The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center year-round and is the director of Cate School’s music program. “I am fortunate enough to see the impact of music education every day,” he says. “Students are pushed to become big creative thinkers, practice the discipline of hard work, and build empathy by working in collaboration with others.” Knecht also sees the benefits of music education in the way that, “ultimately, musicians take risks by sharing their music with an audience so that everyone can enjoy that moment of creation.” Professor Christopher Johnson of the University of Kansas published the results of a 2007 study comparing academic scores from demographically similar schools that had differing qualities of music programs. The students in schools with high-quality music programs scored nearly 22 percent higher in English and 20 percent higher in math on standardized tests than students from similar schools with low-quality music education. Formal training in music correlates with other cognitive strengths, such as verbal recall. This connection has been useful throughout human history, allowing cultures to pass down knowledge through music and chants. Traditional navigators in the South Pacific, for example, learn the sea routes connecting island groups by memorizing the chants that take in visual cues and catalog an immense amount of information. Knecht’s own music journey has brought him from piano lessons as a 6-year-old boy in Maplewood, New Jersey, to leading a jazz trio at 14-years-old in local restaurants, to intensive drum training in Senegal and Mali—all of which makes a neat parallel to the way that drums in particular have a long history of cross-cultural pollination. “The musical melting pot of New Orleans in

A Senegalese tama, often called a talking drum

A darbuka from northern Africa

84 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 84

5/9/19 11:27 AM


John Knecht with a djembe from Guinea, West Africa

SUMMER2019 85

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 85

5/9/19 11:27 AM


ThE LyNdA FAIRLy CARpINTERIA ARTS CENTER

Summer campers at The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center learn drumming from Toni Mackie. the late 1700s included European marching bands, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, and newly freed West Africans with their own brand of polyrhythms, blues scales and soloing,” Knecht explained. He points to the importance of New Orleans—the birthplace of that most uniquely American form, jazz—and the way it “has influenced American music ever since.” President of the University of North Carolina’s marching band in his college years, Knecht also earned a degree in journalism with a minor in business and jazz music. After college, he worked in Washington D.C. for an arts advocacy firm, which led to a job with the L.A. Performing Arts Center managing arts programs in the L.A. Unified School District. He then earned an Master ’s in business at U.C. Los Angeles. Knecht brings this background to his teaching at Cate, as well as his Art Center programs. “I’m so excited that Carpinteria has a thriving arts center, literally right in the heart of town,” he said. “I appreciate that the Arts Center embraces many art forms. My favorite times are when the class is playing outside in the courtyard and people on the street stop by to clap along, cheer and dance to the rhythms.” Drumming programs for youths and adults are popular at the Arts Center. During the summer, week-long arts camps for children include multi-cultural drumming with Toni Mackie, retired longtime music teacher/ director at Crane Country Day School. The kids perform as an ensemble on the last day of camp, and the effect is extraordinary: children who might be more comfortable on an iPad, or doing any of the other myriad activities that define suburban American existence, tell an African

tale with an array of drums, each one representing an animal or natural element. “Every child gets wide-eyed as they play their respective roles to some complex rhythms,” says Arts Center Board Chair David Powdrell. “Studies show that drumming is a great workout for the brain; it synchronizes the left and right hemispheres. How cool is that?!” Knecht’s interest in African drumming was sparked while living in Chicago and working for consulting firms, where he focused on start-ups, design thinking, and innovation. With one foot in two worlds, he enrolled in a West African drumming class at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Keen to learn cultural music from the experts in their homelands, John and his wife Ashley traveled to 25 countries around the globe to study drumming and dance. This knowledge fueled the couple’s arts education programming in the Chicago Public Schools. In their travels, John and Ashley made a number of trips to Senegal, Guinea, and Mali. “West Africa turned my concepts of music on its head,” John says, “and opened my eyes to see how the arts can be fuel for community-building. Entire villages will come out to sing, drum, dance, and tell stories together, a tradition which still happens today.” And drumming is becoming a tradition in Carpinteria too. In classes at the Arts Center or a drum circle at the beach at the end of Linden Avenue, African rhythms might well fill the air—the heart pulse of the Djembe beating now in the land of the Chumash. A roiling combination of historical and cultural forces have made it so, connecting people in an ancient artform that continues today everywhere people gather to the beat of the drum. ♦

86 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 86

5/9/19 11:33 AM


• Preschool through 8th grade

summer activity Guide online at coastalview.com

• Small Class Sizes • Individualized Learning

Fostering a love of learning for over 100 years

• Carden Curriculum • Art, Music, French, Computer Lab with Coding,Science and PE • Financial Aid Options Available

Coastal

S uCoastal mmer l ta A s a mc S u Com e tri v i Ac t ri G v i tuy i t y d e me u i d Hot se S u mG y u m m t er, cool ki vi ds A c t i Hot summer, cool kids 2019

View New

s

2019

ews

View N

2019

View News

d e i u G ummer, cool kids

Whoo sh! He y!? Did year z you s ipping ee tha by yo t? Tha be ov u. Tha t was er bef t’s rig the sc ore y ht, fo plann hool ou kn lks, sc ing fo hool rassutmh e s c h ooow W h o o s h ! H e y ! ? D i d y o u s e eCtahm at? Th at w l it and will mer. H it’s ti p Gu me to y e a r z i p p i n g b y y o u . T h a tc’ a s r i g h t ,i df eo ilskhs e, rs e c!h o o l wai lvle n o f e a start mps t CVN pr r, the 2019 S b e o v e r b e f o r e y o u k n o w i t a n do ikte’ se pt itmheo t o s t a erste n t s t h ummer is sum se k d mer’s do p l a n n i n g f o r s u m m e r . H a v e n o f e a r , t h e 2 0 1 9 S uim m e rs c o o l h o ttest . Camp Guide is here! CVN presents this summer’s hottest c a m p s t o k e e p t h o s e k i d d o s cooooll . sch s the will t wa ool ? Tha , sch that tart olks u see to s ht, f id yo D time er ? ’s rig ! ey That Summ d it’s sh! H 2019 you. t an i e y h b w Whoo t o , ttest ng u kn fear ’s ho zippi e yo mmer ve no year efor his su r. Ha ver b nts t umme e s s be o e r r o f Np ning ool. e! CV plan dos c is her e kid Guide thos Camp keep s to camp

Hot s

DESIGN PRINT BIND DELIVER

805-684-0013 rockprint.com …EXCELLENT, BEAUTIFUL, AND FANTASTIC…ON TIME, AS PROMISED

4850A Carpinteria Avenue Carpinteria, CA 93013 SUMMER2019 87

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 87

INSPIRATION COMES FROM MANY PLACES. THE PRINTING COMES FROM US.

5/9/19 2:35 PM


Wild In Carpinteria

Coyotes: Wily, Adaptable Neighbors M

WORDS & PH OT OS BY CH UCK GRA H A M

y ďŹ rst coyote encounter in Carpinteria was in the Carpinteria Salt Marsh. At the time I was a little kid living and playing in the coastal wetland. As usual I was barefoot and muddy. I was stunned when I saw the animal emerge from a deep channel that eventually winds its way to the county beach. Its paws were muddy, too, I observed, slowly sinking into the knee-deep mud, completely awestruck.

DID YOU KNOW? 1. Canis latrans are found from Canada to Central America. Savvy, clever, and resourceful, they are one of the few creatures out there that can constantly adapt to a changing world. As we humans continue to encroach into wilderness areas, expect to see more coyotes in urban areas. 2. These crafty predators are not only omnipresent, they are also omnivorous. They are not picky eaters. Deer, rodents, birds, insects, berries, and vegetation are all on the menu. 3. There are 19 subspecies of coyotes. Coyotes in the mountains tend to be larger and darker in color than their lowland counterparts, who are smaller and lighter in color. 4. Coyotes are complex communicators, utilizing a cacophony of high-pitched vocalizations, anything from yelps and squeaks, to wails and, yes, howling at the moon or singing along with police sirens. 5. These canids are fleet of foot and can run up to 40 miles per hour. However, in order to not be detected by predators, they walk on their toes to make as little noise as possible. They’re also good swimmers. 88 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 88

5/9/19 11:33 AM


Torrey Pines: Rare and Rugged They’re a welcome sight while paddling across the Santa Cruz Passage from Santa Cruz Island northwest to Santa Rosa Island. The weathered, windblown Torrey pine grove on the west side of Bechers Bay is what I always aim for once I leave Kinton Point. For those who don’t want to test their sea legs, you don’t have to travel very far to see a Torrey pine. In fact, for most Carpinterians there’s a Torrey pine within walking distance in our cool coastal town. Sprouted from a seedling taken from Santa Rosa Island, the largest Torrey pine in the world stands watch over the Lucky Llama Coffeehouse and Carpinteria Avenue. Way back in 1888, Judge Thomas Ward planted that seedling in front of his home. After 130 years and counting, it’s still known as the Wardholme Torrey pine.

DID yoU kNow? 1. No pine tree species on the planet exists in smaller habitat than the Torrey pine. Two U.S. regions, San Diego County and Santa Rosa Island, part of the Channel Islands National Park, possess groves of hardy Torrey pines. 2. Torrey pines can grow to 100-feettall, but most, due to wind and the salty, ocean air, only grow 40-to-60-feet-tall. Because of this, most Torrey pines grow in a contorted manner. However, a Torrey pine can put down a long tap root that stretches 200-feet-long. The pine needles can grow up to 11 inches long. 3. Torrey pine, Pinus torreyana, was named after American botanist John Torrey. 4. The cone of a Torrey pine is stout and can take three years to fully mature. It produces a pinon nut that is edible but hard, so it can act like a jawbreaker. Nonetheless, it was a source of food for the Chumash. 5. water is life for a Torrey pine, so besides annual rainfall, these endangered trees also rely on coastal fog in spring and summer to supplement low winter rain totals. ♦ SUMMER2019 89

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 89

5/9/19 11:34 AM


of Signs the times BY TED M I L L S • PORT RA I T S BY JOS H UA CURRY

W

hen George F. Wright devised Carpinteria’s street plan in 1887 he followed the naming systems of so many American towns with new-fangled grid layouts: numbers going one way, names of trees going the other. But it’s outside that grid that Carpinteria’s street names reveal their history, families who emmigrated from the old world, who made their ways out West in search of land

and gold, of health and wealth, and all who saw our enclave by the sea and realized, yes, this is the place. You might have seen these signs a thousand and one times but never asked where the names come from. We connected past and present by focusing our lens on Carpinteria descendants of these street namesakes. Let’s trace where the pavement ends and the history begins.

For decades the Shepard’s Inn was one of the most popular stops for travelers on their way back and forth to Los Angeles. The owner, James E. Shepard, was the son of New Yorker John H. Shepard, who had first bought land in the San Ysidro Ranch area in 1874. Two years later, John H. bought more land, this time along Rincon Creek. One of John’s four sons, Simeon Shepard, bought 500 acres between Rincon and Gobernador canyons in 1903. This purchase included what would become Shepard Mesa. Another of John’s sons, James E., and daughterin-law, Belle, lived in a ranch house along Rincon Creek, growing strawberries and oranges. Stagecoach travelers loved these still rare fruits, and the couple added cottages on the property to provide an overnight stay for the more exhausted folks. Soon the Shepards were bringing in more revenue with the inn than the grove. Belle even offered her renowned baked oranges to those who spent the evening.

From left, sisters Allison Van Wingerden and Nola Stucky are the great-granddaughters of John H. Shepard. 90 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 90

5/9/19 11:36 AM


Four years after California became a state in 1850, John Marion Nidever and his wife Mary King Vernon arrived in Santa Barbara after walking (for the most part) from Oregon with their two sons. Originally from Tennessee, but with stints as a Texas Ranger, John came here to see his brother George, a former Navy captain who had settled in Santa Barbara. George’s claim to fame the year before was discovering the “Lone Woman of San Nicholas Island,” whose story inspired the children’s book “The Island of the Blue Dolphins.” The Nidevers purchased land near most of East Beach, including what is now known as Santa Barbara Zoo—at the time its highest point was known as Nidever Hill. Later, the Nidevers purchased 200 acres (at 50 cents an acre) at a location near the current Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club.

From left, siblings Terry Hickey Banks, Michael Hickey and Debbie Lange are the great-greatgreat-grandchildren of John Marion Nidever and Mary King Vernon Nidever.

From left, brothers Sean Patrick Henry and Jack Catlin Henry are the great-great-great-grandnephews of James Kent Catlin.

Once our founding families found fortune in Carpinteria, they tended to stay. James Kent Catlin is the exception. A preacher and a cattle rancher from Illinois, he came to town in 1903 by way of Montana. But for whatever reasons, things did not work out and he returned to Montana for a while either to tend to his congregation or his cows. The second time was the charm, however, as he returned in 1906 and purchased land in 1909. Catlin married well—his bride Elva Higgins was the daughter of P. Clark Higgins, who in 1882 had bought a ranch in town and turned it into the area’s first lemon orchard. James did his father-in-law proud later when he became president of the Carpinteria Lemon Association. SUMMER2019 91

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 91

5/9/19 11:36 AM


Hailing from Baden, Germany, Andrew Bailard (then Boehlart) found his way to the glorious California coast by way of a wagon train heading west out of Cape Cirardeau, Missouri. On that long trip to Half Moon Bay (near San Francisco), he met and fell in love with a woman named Catherine Shoultz. This was fortuitous, for she was related to a Dr. Biggs in Santa Barbara. The good doctor—born in Chile to British parents—had married into a family that owned Mexican Land Grant property, and in 1868, Dr. Biggs sold 500 acres of it to Andrew Bailard and his new wife for $13 per acre. The land was optimal for raising cattle and hogs, but what really cements Bailard (and his 10 children) as a good Carpinterian was the construction of one of Carpinteria’s first schools on the family property.

Andy Bailard is the greatgrandson of Andrew Bailard.

Van Latham is the grandson of Marc and Ina Latham. If you’re wracking your brains to figure out the Spanish translation of “Marcina,” surprise, it’s a portmanteau of two names, Marc and Ina Latham. After graduating from University of Oregon, Marc was hired in 1923 or 1924 by Ambrose Mill and Lumber on Cabrillo Boulevard in Santa Barbara. At that time lumber was brought by ships to Stearns Wharf. Marc founded Carpinteria Valley Lumber in 1929, and he and Ina moved to town that year. The couple initially lived on Maple Avenue, but in the late 1930s, they bought a house on five acres of land off Santa Monica Road. They planted lemons on the property and later avocados. Those five acres would eventually be sold off to developers in the mid-1960s, but this section was named Via Marcina after the Lathams. 92 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 92

5/9/19 11:36 AM


It’s hard to know exactly how many people flooded into California in the mid-1800s when gold was discovered, all looking to make a fortune, but the state moved its capitol inland from Monterey (a nice, sensible port) to Sacramento just to be close to it. Thomas A. Cravens, son of Jesse P. Cravens from Marion, Alabama, was one of those young men who sought gold in them thar hills, but actually wound up making his money by owning a sawmill. After marrying Elizabeth Humes of South Carolina and living in several California towns, Cravens came to Carpinteria in 1869 and bought 60 acres at the top of what is now called Cravens Lane, building what was known as Stewart Ranch, and then adding 70 more acres. The Cravens produced 11 children.

Rodney Cravens is the great-greatgrandson of Thomas A. Cravens (and the great-great-grandson of J.W. Dorrance).

SUMMER2019 93

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 93

5/9/19 11:37 AM


Charles Bell Bates was one of the first doctors to hang his shingle in Santa Barbara, some time in 1882, and turned his wealth into land when he partnered with Benigno Gutierrez to purchase 1,800 acres off of the same Dr. Biggs who features prominently in Bailard history. Bates’ land became known as the Rincon Del Mar Ranch, which over time was split up and sold off until all that was left was three acres and a beautiful adobebrick house overlooking Rincon Point. In earlier times, the Bates family grew lima beans and walnuts until Charles’ son, Edward Bates, figured out a way to bring water to the property and grew lemons. It took him 10 years to turn a profit on that one. Edward’s older brother R.W. was an ambulance driver in the war and returned from the European front with a French bride. The couple built the aforementioned home above Rincon Point and raised their family overlooking the Pacific and much of the sweeping Bates’ family ranch.

Robbie Hutto is the great-granddaughter of Charles Bell Bates.

Reverend John Woods Dorrance arrived in Carpinteria in 1902 with three motherless children. The new pastor of the Presbyterian Church had lost his wife and two other children to a typhoid epidemic in Kansas. Ten years after his arrival, the reverend married Bertha Sears of Santa Barbara, and the couple began traveling for missionary work. Ultimately the Dorrances moved to Cambria, where J.W. spent most of his last years as minister. His real claim to fame in Carpinteria, however, is development of the Dorrance Tract, the town’s first subdivision. Located between 3rd Street and the railroad tracks, the seaside tract was constructed in the 1920s. Lot purchases came with paved streets, electricity and city water! Even when J.W. and Bertha’s primary home was elsewhere, they maintained their home on the corner of Linden Avenue and 3rd Street, which still stands today. ♦

From left, brothers Tristan Robert Cravens and Lucian Marcus Cravens are the great-great-great-grandsons of J.W. Dorrance (and the great-greatgreat-grandsons of Thomas A. Cravens). 94 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 94

5/9/19 11:38 AM


BEACH MOTOR & TIRES • • • • •

OIL CHANGE TIRE REPAIR TUNE UPS BRAKES ALIGNMENTS

805-745-1992 4897 CARPINTERIA AVE

Sales • Repair/Maintenance Rentals • Accessories

RISDON’S

Hand Car Wash: M-Sat 7:30-5 Sunday 7:30-4

Defender T+H

SERVICE

PROPANE•LUBE•TIRE CENTER AND CAR WASH

4401 VIA REAL at Santa Monica Road (805) 684-7676

Repair & Maintenance: M-Sat 8-5

campers NEW GYM IN TOWN! Great equipment cardio/machines and free weights

& classes!

Mention this ad for 1/3 off daily rate only $10!

4859 Carpinteria Ave. 805-242-2554

5am-11pm M-F • Weekends 7am-8pm 4188 Carpinteria Ave • 805-881-4028

www.RinconFitnessUSA.com

C OA S T F O R A L L YO U R AU TO M OT I V E NEEDS 901-C Linden Ave.

805-684-6688 SUMMER2019 95

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 95

5/9/19 11:38 AM


96 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 96

5/9/19 11:39 AM


Surf History 1966 B

y 1966, surfing had captured the attention of a nationwide audience. Movies like “Gidget” and “Beach Blanket Bingo” had introduced millions of landlocked Americans to surfing culture according to Hollywood. In Carpinteria, however, surfing was far more than a silver screen fascination; it was a lifestyle. Young surfers grew up on the waves lapping Carpinteria’s miles of shoreline and found themselves besotted with the thrill of riding curved liquid walls. Carpinteria High School’s 1967 yearbook features this photo, shot in the fall of 1966 at Rincon Point. It depicts a handful of the students who spent most of their free time doing exactly what the photo implies. The boys, from left, are Bernie Baker, Kent Williams, Bill Wheeler, Jeff Boyd, and Mark Campbell. The girls, from left, are Barbara Swing, Sarah Christie, Shelley Milne, Linda Gonzales, Jeanie Russell, and Pam Cleveland.

CARPINTERIA HIGH SCHOOL

SUMMER2019 97

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 97

5/9/19 11:39 AM


DAvID PowDREll

98 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 98

5/9/19 11:40 AM


Surf Future 2019 M

eet the future of Carpinteria surfing. These are today’s teens who live for saltwater experiences, whose beds are sandy most nights, whose shoulder muscles ache at the dinner table. These young surfers face far different circumstances than their 1966 counterparts. Equipment has come a long way—boards have evolved into light, streamlined tools with a capacity for speed and acrobatics that no one could have fathomed in 1966. And today the girls aren’t just sunbathing; they’re shredding alongside the boys. Despite surfing’s many changes, however, its devotees experience the same exhilaration as their forebears. These kids are equally infected by the unique joy elicited by wave riding. Standing, from left, are Averi Alexander, Mac Sharp, Nico Kalin, Luke NahooikaikaAnderson, Shaya Alexander, Arata Tomatsuri, and Logan Curry. Sitting, from left, are Caleb Faoro, Ainslee Alexander, Asher Smith, Catalina Lusk, Reyn Clayton, and Koby Gonzales. ♦

SUMMER2019 99

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 99

5/9/19 11:40 AM


Rori Trovato, founder and owner of Rori’s Artisanal Creamery, chills out with her product.

question & answer

Carpinteria’s ice cream queen

rori trovato R

B y Lea Boyd • Ph ot os B y Jos h ua Curry

ori Trovato’s professional resume is mouthwatering. She authored a cookbook focused on food that both looks and tastes great, wrote enticing recipes and food articles for national magazines such as Fine Cooking and Health, and traveled all over the world with her taste buds as her guide. But as it turned out, all that was just the appetizer course. Over the last eight years, Trovato has tackled the highly competitive

world of ice cream and is now spreading joy by the scoop in Montecito, Santa Barbara, Century City, Santa Monica, Malibu, Westlake, Pacific Palisades, and Carpinteria. This spring Carpinteria Magazine got a peek at where Trovato and her all-women team spin organic cream and sugar into yum for miles. Every scoop of the ice cream that wears a Rori’s Artisanal Creamery label is made in a nondescript industrial building on the west end of

100 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 100

5/9/19 11:41 AM


Carpinteria Avenue, where the only external indication of the magic that’s happening inside is a small mint green logo. C’mon in, let’s meet Rori and her ice cream!

W h A T m A k Es yo u R ICE CR EAm u NI qu E?

Well, let’s put it this way, if I’m going to make fresh mint patty, I want fresh mint. I don’t want mint extract. We take local fresh mint, and we steep it in the cream for three days. Period. Then strain it. And we make our own peppermint patties. The inside is agave. We cover it in Belgian dark chocolate on both sides. We make all the candy that goes in our ice cream, which is very unique I think. Our flavors are really bold, but they’re really clean. We use organic cream from Straus Family Creamery. We don’t use any filler, or stabilizers, or any food coloring, and we get ingredients from a lot of great farmers.

y o u u s E s m A l l b A T Ch P R o d u C T I oN, NoT Co NT I Nu ou s f R E E zIN g . W h A T do E s T hA T mEAN?

Small batch makes small batches. When I started I had a 3-quart machine. It made maybe six pints at a time, and I was supplying all 17 Gelsons [laughing].

A N d yo u o N l y h A d o N E of ThE mAC hI NEs?

One. And my son was young, and I didn’t want to lose time with him, so we’d have dinner, then I’d put him to bed, and then I’d come and spin ice cream here from like 7:30 at night to 3 in the morning. I would hire a babysitter to be there with him until 3 a.m. She would just sleep and do her homework. It was just crazy in the beginning.

W h A T ’s C hA N g E d ?

Now we have two 22-quart machines, which is big time. I can make 400 to 600 pints a day, no problem. But it still makes it in a small batches. Continuous freeze is a whole different process, and you’re very much relying on the mechanics. You could just put milk in there, and it would make it smooth and creamy, whereas with small batch you really have to know your combination of milk to sugar to egg so that every molecule is coated with fat in the right way. If you don’t put in the right quantities you’re going to have either a really hard ice cream or it’s never going to freeze properly. So you have to be more accurate with small batch, but you get a much creamier product. It’s as close as you’re going to get to a hand-churned ice cream.

Mercedes Ortega blends melted butter and graham crackers together to make the crust that goes into Rori’s New York Strawberry Cheesecake Ice Cream.

so u N ds l I k E IT W A s vE R y hARd I N ThE bEgI NNI Ng. d I d yo u h A v E “ W hA T A m I doI Ng?” momENT s? Yah, a lot of those.

W h A T g o T yo u P A s T T h Em ?

I think it was sheer passion. Anyone in the restaurant business will tell you not to go into the business for glamor or for notoriety. I mean, if you aren’t completely passionate about it, get out now. Passion is the only thing that will drive you.

T El l u s A b o u T T h E f u N P A RT .

I had always been in a background service business. Whether it was writing or styling, there was no customer service in my world. And when I opened the Montecito store, it never even occurred SUMMER2019 101

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 101

5/9/19 11:42 AM


Camarillo soon. But I don’t know how to expand this to 20. I don’t have a business degree. We need somebody who’s done that and can catapult us there.

WhAT ARE y ou R mo s T PoP ulAR f l AvoR s?

Salted banana.

caramel

and

brown

sugar

EvER I NT Rodu C Ed A flAv o R yo u T hou ghT WAs d ElICIo us BuT Tu R NEd ou T T o BE A flo P?

to me that ice cream makes people happy. I made their screaming kids stop crying. Or they’d already decided to have a treat, so they would come in excited. That was such a surprise to me and brought me so much pleasure. Your job is really fun when people are happy, and you’ve made them that way.

A R E y o u T h E N E x T B E N & J E R R y’s ?

No. My business plan was to offer a really big experience in a really small space. And that’s why the ice cream is in the old fashioned cases in all my shops, except on Linden because the space was already set up for ice cream. But that makes my employees have to engage you: “What’s the John Martin? Here try it.” And we instantly hand them a spoon. We spend a lot of time on training because I think that 50 percent of it is the product and 50 percent is customer service. But I say we’re not the next Ben & Jerry’s because I think we serve ourselves better when people feel like they’ve just discovered us, like we’re your neighborhood gem. It doesn’t matter if we’re in 45 neighborhoods. I’ve never had visions of being national. I just wanted to see where it goes.

W hA T do yo u l o vE m o s T A B o u T y ou R WoRk ?

I love doing specialty flavors. Then you get to be creative. So I’m still in the kitchen every day, and I manage the kitchen staff. I develop all the new flavors, all the new concepts, which is really great for me. We just hired a CEO so that way I’m not up in my office doing Excel spreadsheets all day.

T hA T’ s N o T W hA T yo u ’R E IN IT f oR?

No. And it’s not my skill set. Granted, great, I took this from nothing to five stores—six, actually, we’re opening in

I can’t say it flopped. I’m not saying that my ego won’t let me say it flopped; I’m saying it had a very specific market. And we’ve done that a few times. One example is the bourbon maple bacon. I cooked the bacon, cut it up and then candied it in maple syrup. So we had little chunks of bacon candy. Then I made a bourbon vanilla ice cream and mixed the bacon in. And it was delicious, but not for everybody. One of my favorites was oatmeal raisin cookie ice cream, which I did at the beginning. I think me and five other people were the only ones who liked that.

Why doN’T y ou WEI gh 350 PouN d s ?

Ha. I’m chubby, but it’s not from ice cream. I really just eat it when I’m tasting it. It’s like anything, you know, if you work at a taco stand, how often are you eating tacos?

y ou hAvE A soN W ho BAs I C Ally g RE W uP IN AN I C E C R EAm f AC T oRy . WhAT WAs ThAT l IkE f oR hI m?

He eats ice cream probably every other day, but I can’t tell you he eats mine. He wants a Magnum bar. And I get it. My mom would make homemade mac and cheese and all I wanted was what my neighbor got to have; it came in a box and it was orange. I buy him Magnums if that’s what he wants. But he knows the difference, and when we go tasting other places, he’s quite the critic. He knows good ice cream.

y ou l IvE I N sANT A BAR B ARA, BuT yo uR C omPANy Is hEAdqu ART ERE d hE RE IN C ARPI NT ER I A. do y ou f EEl l IkE A mEmBE R of ThE C ommu NI T y ?

Definitely, and even more so once I opened the Linden store. We were just a plant here before. We didn’t have a lot of interaction with the community on a day to day basis. We wanted to open the right spot here in Carpinteria, but the places that were available weren’t quite right. When we opened Linden, it was so exciting, because the whole community rallied around. Now we feel really part of the community. ♦

102 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 102

5/9/19 11:42 AM


Creamy BaLsamiC VinaiGrette

mapLe VinaiGrette

Let’s play dressup! S

Lemon BasiL

ummer is salad season. And what better way to celebrate the season than with salads dressed just like the local pros? In this edition of Carpinteria Magazine, five of the town’s favorite eateries shared their secret recipes for elevating a bowl of greens from whatever to wowzers. So embrace the warm weather, the abundance of fresh local produce, and these crowdtested combinations of acid and fat that are going to make the salads you toss at home taste like the feasts you order off your favorite menus.

FiG Kush VinaiGrette

Green Goddess

SUMMER2019 103

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 103

5/9/19 11:43 AM


ZOOKER’S LEMON BASIL DRESSING I N GR ED IE N T S 3 TA B L ES P O O N S R I C E WI N E VI NEGAR 1 TA B L ES P O O N B A L S A M I C VI N EGAR 5 TA B L ES P O O N S L EMO N J UI C E 1. 5 TA B L ES P O O N S D I J O N MUS T ARD ¼ CU P P A C K ED B A S I L L EA VES 1 L A R GE G A R L I C C L O VE 1 C U P O L I VE O I L S A L T A N D P EP P ER T O T A S T E PROC ESS

Put everything in blender except the olive oil. Blend on medium speed. Drizzle in olive oil slowly. If too thick, add water or lemon juice to desired consistency.

Want to let the pros handle it? Visit Zookers Restaurant at 5404 Carpinteria Ave. or zookersrestaurant.com

104 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 104

5/9/19 4:05 PM


NUTBELLY FIG KUSH VINAIGRETTE I N G R E DIE N T S 1 / 2 C UP D R Y B L A C K M I S S I ON FI GS 3 / 4 C UP VER Y H O T N O T BOI LI NG W ATER 6 T A B L ES P O O N S B A L S A MI C V I NEGAR 1 / 2 T A B L ES P O O N O R G A NI C CANE S U GAR 1 / 2 C UP C O L D P R ES S ED OLI V E OI L 1 5 0 MG O R G A N I C R A W CBD OI L BY 1 0 1 CBD* S EA S A L T & P EP P ER T O T AS TE

PRO CE S S

Stem figs and soak in hot water for a hour Blend figs and sugar with the same water figs soaked in until just smooth in a food processor or blender Transfer fig mixture to a mixing bowl Whisk in balsamic vinegar until blended Add salt and pepper to taste While whisking, slowly pour in CBD oil then olive oil to desired consistency * Available at Pacific Health Foods, 101 CBD oil is a hemp-based, non-THC product that adds a light grassy flavor to this dressing.

Feel like leaving this one to the chef? Visit Nutbelly Pizzeria and Deli at 915 Linden Ave. or nutbelly.com

SUMMER2019 105

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 105

5/9/19 4:05 PM


JACK’S CREAMY BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE I NGR EDI ENT S 1 / 4 CU P BALS AMI C V I NEGAR 1 TEAS P OON GARLI C CH OP P ED 1 TEAS P OON GARLI C P OW DER 1 / 4 CU P FRES H BAS I L, CH OP P E D 1 / 2 TABLESP OON BROW N S U G AR 1 / 2 CU P OLI V E OI L P I NCH OF S ALT AND P EP P ER

PR OC ESS

Blend all of the ingredients in a blender except olive oil. With the blender on, add the olive oil slowly to the blended ingredients.

Try this off the menu by visiting Jack’s Bistro & Famous Bagels at 5050 Carpinteria Ave. or bagelnet.com

106 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 106

5/9/19 4:05 PM


TFL GREEN GODDESS I N G R E DIE N T S 1 S H A L L O T , MI N C ED 1 C L O VE G A R L I C , M I N C E D 3 T A B L ES P O O N S WH I T E W I NE VI N EGA R 1 / 2 L EMO N , J UI C ED 1 / 2 L I M E, J UI C ED 1 O R 2 S A L T - P A C K ED A N C H O VI ES (opt ional) 1 / 2 A VO C A D O 3 / 4 C UP O L I VE O I L 1 / 2 C UP C R EA M

(opt ional)

4 T A B L ES P O O N S C H O P P ED I TALI AN P A R S L EY 4 T A B L ES P O O N S C H O P P ED TARRAGON 2 T A B L ES P O O N S C H O P P ED CI LANTRO 1 T A B L ES P O O N C H O P P ED BAS I L S A L T A N D P EP P ER , T O T A S TE

PRO CE S S

Macerate the shallot and garlic in 2 to 3 tablespoons of white wine vinegar, lemon, and lime juice. Add the anchovy, rinsed, boned, and very finely chopped or mashed, and the flesh of the avocado. Mash together with a fork. Whisking or stirring with a wooden spoon, gradually incorporate the olive oil and cream, as if you were making a thin mayonnaise. Use about two parts olive oil to one part cream; the avocado will smoothly absorb up to 3/4 cup of olive oil and nearly 1/2 cup of cream. Flavor with the herbs. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. Thin with a little water if needed. You can also add all ingredients to a mini food processor and blend completely.

Prefer to leave this one to the experts? Visit The Food Liaison at 1033 Casitas Pass Road or at thefoodliaison.com SUMMER2019 107

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 107

5/9/19 4:05 PM


PEEBEE’S MAPLE VINAIGRETTE I N GR ED IE N T S 1 TA B L ES P O O N C H O P P ED S H A L LOT 3/4 TEA S P O O N D I J O N MUS T A R D

PROC ESS

Blend all ingredients except oil in a blender. Slowly add oil while blender is on.

1/4 C UP S H ER R Y VI N EG A R 3/4 TEA S P O O N A GA VE S Y R UP 6 TA B L ES P O O N S M A P L E S Y R UP 3/4 C UP S O I L

Don’t feel like whipping this up yourself? Visit Peebee & Jay’s at 1007 Casitas Pass Road or www.peebeeandjaysonline.com ♦

108 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 108

5/9/19 4:06 PM


B e a ch liq u o R

Best known for their award wining burritos, Beach Liquor has a vast array of snacks, drinks and adult beverages as well as a full Mexican Grill. Must Try: Any of the burritos or tortas 794 Linden Ave, Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-2919

Da n n y’S De l i

Danny’s Deli has been serving Carpinteria for 32 years with Tri-Tip, Turkey and Roast Beef all cooked on site. Must Try: Famous Tri-Tip Sandwich 4890 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-2711

Recommended If you’re looking for anything from a snack to a nice dinner out with friends or family, try some of Carpinteria’s favorite local restaurants.

s t a E

DelGaDo’S Mexican ReSTauRanT

T he Pal MS

T h e f o o D lia iS on

R ey eS MaRk e T

foSTeRS fReeze

Rey nal Do’ S Bake Ry

G ia n n f R a n co ’ S T RaT T oR i a

T he Shoal S Re S TauRanT

ih o P

Si aM e l ePhanT Thai Re S TauR anT

J a ck’S B iS T R o

T he SPoT

Carpinteria’s Classic Mexican Restaurant since 1965, family-run restaurant offering enchiladas, fajitas & other Mexican eats, plus cocktails. Must Try: Traditional Burrito 4401 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-4822 • delgadoscarp.com Catering. Counter. Classes. Utilizing local, organic ingredients. Daily rotating entrees, soups and deserts, seasonal menus and gourmet salad bar. Must Try: Avocado Meets Toast 1033 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-200-3030

Locally owned branch of a longtime Californiabased fast-food chain serving traditional burgers & delicious soft-serve ice cream. Must-Try: Chocolate Dipped Soft Serve 5205 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-3602 Authentic Italian meets Carpinteria chic on this delicioso menu of pasta, salads, and entrees. Must Try: Homemade Lobster Raviolis in Sage Brown Butter Sauce or Our Homemade Rigatoni Bolognese 666 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-0720 • giannfrancos.com Long-standing chain serving a wide variety of pancakes & other American breakfast & diner fare. Must Try: Pancakes of course 1114 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-566-4926 Healthy California Cuisine. Enjoy freshly baked bagels with whipped cream cheeses. Breakfast, lunch, and beyond! Must Try: Blackstone Benedict: w/avo, bacon, tomato 5050 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-566-1558 • bagelnet.com

Mouth-watering steak and seafood you can cook yourself, delicious salad bar with to die for croutons! And live music on the weekends! Must Try: Filet Mignon dinner 701 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-3811 • thepalmscarpinteria.com

Folks come from near and far to eat these burritos, tacos, tortas and other tasty options. Close your eyes and you’re in Mexico. Must Try: Chile Relleno Soup, Chilaquiles, Gordita 4890 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-2711 Mexican & European Bakery. Handmade, traditional Mexican fare to the finest quality wedding cakes & desserts. Must Try: Chile Verde Pork, Eggs & Cheese. 895 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-4981 • reynaldosbakery.com

Fresh seafood selections, steaks, rack of lamb, pasta and many housemade desserts, cocktails, craft beers and fine wines. Must Try: The Banana Reef 6602 Old Pacific Coast Hwy, Ventura, CA 93001 805-652-1381 • cliffhouseinn.com/shoals.htm With it’s reputation of authenticity and excellence, Siam Elephant stays true to the culinary culture and influences of Thailand. Must Try: Pad Thai 509 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-2391 • siamelephantusa.com

Just steps from the beach, The Spot is a classic hamburger stand serving up delicious American and Mexican food at affordable prices! Must Try: Famous Chili Cheese Fries 389 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-6311

P a cif ic h e a l Th fooDS

u nc l e c hen Re S TauR anT

M i f ie S T a M a Rk eT & Del i

zook eR S R eS TauR anT

Pacific Health Foods serves the best smoothies in Carpinteria. Also fresh juices, organic baked goods, sandwiches, acai bowls, coffee & tea. Must Try: Scarlet Begonia Juice 944 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, CA, 93013 805-684-2115 Delicious Mexican grill at an affordable price. Breakfast, lunch and dinner all day. Grab some sides from the market and take it anywhere! Must Try: Asada Burrito 4502 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-2235

Since 1991, Uncle Chen has been proud to serve local produce from the farmers market and homemade recipes. Must Try: Casitas Green 1025 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-566-3334 Local organic produce, fresh fish, and sustainably raised meats. The “FARM TO TABLE” approach ensures the freshest, food in town. Must Try: Bacon wrapped, Filet Mignon 5404 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013 805-684-8893 • zookersrestaurant.com

SUMMER2019 109

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 109

5/9/19 11:50 AM


REAL ESTATE REV I EW

REAL ESTATE SALES BUYING OR SELLING

GARY GOLDBERG Realtor | Broker | Attorney (805) 455-8910 | BRE: 01172139 1086 Coast Village Road Santa Barbara, California 93108

www.garygoldberg.net gary@coastalrealty.com

Bloom

WHETHER YOU ARE BUYING OR SELLING IN THE CARPINTERIA, SANTA BARBARA OR MONTECITO AREA, I PROVIDE IN-DEPTH ASSISTANCE FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS.

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

110 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 110

5/9/19 11:53 AM


REAL ESTATE REV I EW

Roots Planted

Edwards Family

“If it hadn’t been for Sarah we never would have closed escrow on our dreamhouse. Sarah didn’t stop until we had the house we wanted at the price we needed.” ~ Blair and Michelle Edwards

For every house we sell or buy together, I will make a donation in your name to the Carpinteria non-profit of your choice. Just a little way to let the community know you are here and that you care too.

Sarah Aresco-Smith

Seascape Realty DRE Lic. #01484280

805.252.3868

LIC#01882574

Sarah@lovecarpinteria.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 111

Available properties at LoveCarpinteria.com

5/9/19 11:54 AM


REAL ESTATE REV I EW

Looking to vacation in Carpinteria?

Fantastic, fully stocked, 3 bedroom, 2 bath roomy condo with large front yard and private hot-tub area. This condo is perfect for a large family. It is walking distance to the beach and downtown Carpinteria.

Fully furnished condominium available by the month. 2 bedroom, 2 bath Great vacation location with pool and spa. Easily sleeps 4-6 people.

The Beachcomber is located right across the street from Carpinteria Beach, where you can swim or just relax. At night you can enjoy the beautiful sunsets. The downstairs apartments with patios are available for weekly rentals.

805.684.4101 5441 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013

www.murphykingrealestate.com

DEBORAH MURPHY

Broker/Property Manager/Notary DRE #00580025

Z A C A C R E E K E S TAT E S

Welcome to the newest neighborhood in Santa Ynez Valley. Beautiful brand new homes with top quality construction on single acre lots zoned for horses or great for 4H projects. Last three homes to be completed Spring/Summer 2019.

Kristina Novak • +1 (818) 917-5540 • Kristina.Novak@evusa.com Engel & Völkers Santa Ynez • 1090 Edison Street, Ste. 102, Santa Ynez, CA 93460 • DRE# 01140992 ©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principals of the Fair Housing Act. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. If your property is currently represented by a real estate broker, this is not an attempt to solicit your listing.

112 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 112

5/9/19 11:54 AM


RIVEN ROCK ROAD Live. Life. Beautifully. 4 Bedrooms / 6 Baths / Ocean & Island Views / Price Upon Request

LORI CL ARIDGE BOWLES

805.452.3884 · lori @ loribowles.com CalRE#01961570

DANA ZERTUCHE

805.403.5520 · dana@danazertuche.com CalRE#01465425

www.MONTECITO.associates COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates, not employees. ©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 113

5/9/19 11:54 AM


REAL ESTATE REV I EW

Call for your free market analysis of your property

Find out why so many clients have relied on my real estate service for over 26 years

D

L O S

4868 El CARRO lAnE –– Great cul de sac location- turn key 3 bed/3 bath + office. Offered at $1,350,000.00

D

L SO

PAlMEttO DRiVE –– Lovely three bedrooms with two full baths.. Offered at $565,000

D

L O S

226 DAwlish –– San Ysidro style cottage. Offered at $980,000

D

L O S

3150 ViA REAl –– Set on 1/2 usable acreage 3/2 + office. Offered at $1,150,000.00

D

L SO

7050 GObERnADOR CAnyOn ROAD –– 5 acre agriculture land with Mid-Century home. Offered at $1,825,000

4525 CARPintERiA AVE #b –– Located in sought after Beach Grove HOA, 2 bed/ 2.5 bath. Offered at $659,900

Call for your Free Confidential Market Analysis D

Realtor Associate

L SO

D

L SO

BRE# 1080272

Cell: (805) 886-3838 carolynwood@cox.net www.Sothebyshomes.com www.santabarbara-realtor.com 1482 East Valley Road Montecito, CA 93108

1133 VAllECitO ROAD –– Walk to town and beach. Offered at $865,000

316 Ash AVEnuE –– Vintage beach cottage. Offered at $1,495,000

Successfully Serving Carpinteria Real Estate for 25 years 114 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 114

5/9/19 11:55 AM


REAL ESTATE REV I EW

Seascape Realty Buying or selling a home with us is like a walk on the beach!

SOLd!

SOLd!

GREAT LOCATION...access from 2 streets. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, PLUS detached studio with ¾ bath. Living room features vaulted ceiling, kitchen with newer appliances. Laminate flooring and carpet throughout. OffEREd AT $875,000 Shirley Kimberlin at 805.886.0228

2 BLOCKS fROm WORLd’S SAfEST BEACh…Large Concha Loma 3 beds, 2 bath home boasts vaulted ceilings, paneled garage, closet space and a wood burning fireplace. Pelican water system, lap pool and plenty of space for family get togethers. OffEREd AT $1,050,000 Nancy Branigan at 805-886-7593 or Terry Stain at 805-705-1310

SOLd!

dELIGhTfuL BuNGALOW BuILT IN 1900...Light and bright “beach house” with pine floors, a cozy fireplace, 2 bedrooms and 1 bath. The beautiful back yard is completely enclosed for privacy and entertaining. Great location on the beach side of Carpinteria Ave. near downtown. OffEREd AT $959,000 Shirley Kimberlin at 805.886.0228

ChARmING COTTAGE... 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1,400 sq ft. cottage with detached garage and accessory room. On large Lot in Concha Loma neighborhood. OffEREd AT $1,850,000 Leah dabney at 805-509-4496

SOLd!

ExploRE ouR BEACHSIDE VACATIoN RENTAlS AT SEASCApEVACATIoN.Com

4915-C Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria • 805.684.4161

DRE Lic. #01484280

SUMMER2019 115

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 115

5/9/19 3:58 PM


Carpinteria Sales Statistics between 04.01.18 – 03.31.19

87 Total Single Family Home Sales

77 Total Condo Sales

$1,150,000 Median Single Family Home Price

$1,752,557 Average Single Family Home Price

$18,125,000 Highest Sale

$500,000 Lowest Single Family Home Market Sale Sold 5280 Ogan Road $1,050,000

Jon-Ryan Schlobohm

schlobohm-hodson.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 116

— Broker Associate 805.450.3307 jr@jon-ryan.com DRE 01876237

Kirk G. Hodson

— Realtor 805.886.6527 kirk@kirkhodson.com DRE 01908650

Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice.

Do you know what is happening in Carpinteria real estate?

5/9/19 11:56 AM


25

Celebrating

t Daily Updates

Lic. #00623395

aug. 16 – 22, 2018

coastalview.com

Chamber’s Culinary Crawl is back

2

FFA brings home top prizes

10

Surf ‘n’ Suds pours for good causes

12

JGs wrap up summer session

14

JOSHUA CURRY

On Saturday, Aug. 11, Surf Happens Surf School launched its first ever Board Riders Club Surf and Skate Contest. Local 14 and under kids enjoyed a fun day of low-pressure competition while showcasing their skills. The surfing event was held in 2- to 4-foot south swell at Santa Claus Lane offering highly contestable waves for all competitors. “All divisions showcased skills well beyond their years with smiles ear to ear,” said Chris Keet, owner of Surf Happens. Pictured, U10 surfers charge into the first semi-final, from left, Jamie Ittstein, Santino Molfetta and Dominic Arce. Read more on page 15.

BRE#01383773

805.452.3052

Nhussey@ColdwellBanker.com

MAGAZINE

Coastal View News

This week’s listings on the back page

Vol. 24, no. 47

summer2019

805-886-0228 skimberlin@aol.com

Carpinteria

livingcommunityartshoppingdining

Everything I list turns to SOLD!

CARPINTERIA

t Every Thursday

SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN

Stoked for surf and skate

Years

t Summer & Winter

It’s all about you, Carpinteria!

Serving the Community and Local Businesses Since 1994

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 117

SUMMER2019 117

5/9/19 11:58 AM


CONTRIBUTORS 1

1

2

3

5

6

FAVORITE SALAD FROM ANIMAL CHUCK LAY IN WARM LAST TIME YOU SAND OR PLAY A CARPINTERIA SHOULD WRITE ABOUT NEXT? BEAT A DRUM? IN COLD WATER? RESTAURANT?

CONTACT

Carnitas burritos Warm sand after with cabbage at cold water. Don Roge.

Whale

christian@ coastalview.com

Lay in the warm sand

My own salad with ingredients from The Farm Cart!

Skunk

ihlendorf@ gmail.com

A few weeks ago

Salty and sandy

Antipasto salad at Nutbelly

California condor

joshua@ joshuacurryphoto .com

Head for the hills

Constantly a different one

Plunge

Zooker’s nicoise

Salt marsh mullet fish

peter@ 2trumpets.com

Non-dairy Sour Patch Kid. With chunks.

Both!

Is this some sort of innuendo?

Both!

The ahi salad from Corktree. YUM

An interview with the Franklin Trail bear

bryn.e.fox@ gmail.com

Papaya

Super bloom traveler

I’m not a drum beater

Cold water

Roasted beet & grilled pear salad from Zookers

Rough-skinned newt or tree frog

www. chuckgraham photo.com

INVENT YOUR NEW FAVORITE ICE CREAM

SUPER BLOOM TRAVELER OR STAY-HOME GARDENER?

Hawaiian pizza

At-home homie

When Jerry died

Claire Burke

Jasmine orange blossom or sangria

Super bloom traveler. Sadly, I can’t grow anything.

Last week with my kids

Joshua Curry

Coconut curry mango

Stay-at-home gardener

Special brownie

Christian Beamish writer

2

writer

3

photographer

4

Peter Dugré writer

5

Bryn Fox writer

6

Chuck Graham

4

photographer

118 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 118

5/9/19 12:00 PM


7

8

9

11

INVENT YOUR NEW FAVORITE ICE CREAM

7

10

SUPER BLOOM TRAVELER OR STAY-HOME GARDENER?

FAVORITE SALAD FROM ANIMAL CHUCK LAY IN WARM LAST TIME YOU SAND OR PLAY A CARPINTERIA SHOULD WRITE ABOUT NEXT? BEAT A DRUM? IN COLD WATER? RESTAURANT?

Poblano pepper

Michael Kwiecinski

Smoky BBQ Pistachio

Super bloomer

Last week with John Knecht

writer

The Bittersweet Sea Salt Tears of Petra Von Crumble

Staying at home, harvesting limes from the tree for cocktails

Amy Orozco

Carrot and peanut butter

David Powdrell

Kristyn Whittenton

photographer

9

12

Debra Herrick

Ted Mills

Deer

editor@ coastalview.com

Play in the cold water first

Don’t have one, but Reyes Market tacos are amazing.

Owl

Instagram: @WonderTribe

An impromptu jam band in a garage, circa 1998, I think.

Neither

A crouton-filled salad from The Palms

Roadrunner

Tedmills @gmail.com

Wannabe stayhome gardener

This morning

Warm sand

Ceviche

Sea otter

amymarie@ amymarie orozco.com

Mango Swirl Colada Gelato

Super bloom adventurer

Summer Solstice, 1994

Toasty warm sand please

Warm spinach salad at Nutbelly (prosecco on the side).

Snowy egret

Powdrell @gmail.com

Kid-free vacation

Stay-home gardener

Too long ago

Play in the water

Year round farmer’s market salad at Crushcakes

Butterflies

kris @coastalview .com

Super bloom traveler

Rainbow gathering Play in cold water

writer

11

photographer

12

designer

CONTACT

Year round farmer’s market salad at Crushcakes

writer

8

10

SUMMER2019 119

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 119

5/9/19 11:59 AM


FINAL FRAME

PURE GOL D No need to find the end of the rainbow to strike gold in Carpinteria. Ocean, mountains, and ag land surround our paradise. ♦ PHO T O BY BET H COX

120 CARPINTERIAMAGAZINE.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 120

5/9/19 12:00 PM


Do you know what is happening in Carpinteria real estate?

Jon-Ryan Schlobohm

schlobohm-hodson.com

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 121

— Broker Associate 805.450.3307 jr@jon-ryan.com DRE 01876237

Kirk G. Hodson

— Realtor 805.886.6527 kirk@kirkhodson.com DRE 01908650

5/9/19 12:01 PM


Inspiration grown locally

A family owned nurser y in Carpinteria since 1978 Phalaenopsis Tillandsias Succulents Foliage Plants Custom Arrangements Pots, Baskets, Tins

VISIT THE RETAIL SHOWROOM

M o n d a y- Fr i d a y 9 - 4 : 3 0 • S a t u r d a y 1 0 - 4 3 5 0 4 V i a Re a l • C a r p i n t e r i a • C A 9 3 0 1 3 w e s t e r l a y o r c h i d s. c o m • 8 0 5 . 6 8 4 . 5 4 1 1

CarpMag_Summer2019.indd 121

5/9/19 12:02 PM

Profile for Coastal View News

Carpinteria Magazine Summer 2019  

Free glossy magazine about the Carpinteria Valley.

Carpinteria Magazine Summer 2019  

Free glossy magazine about the Carpinteria Valley.

Advertisement