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Fire board approves station location study

This week’s listings on the back page

Let the games begin

By Lea Boyd

Stuck in gridlock for the last several months, plans for Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District’s future may have inched forward at the Oct. 29 board of directors meeting, where four of five members supported a station location study with a $23,000 price tag. By hiring independent consultant Diamonte Public Sector Group, the district should soon have concrete answers to questions of where best to locate firefighting facilities given call volumes, response times, land use restrictions and anticipated future development within the district. Longtime boardmember Craig Price said he is certain that the analysis, which should be complete by late winter, will echo what the veteran board members have said all along, that the proposed locations for new fire stations in downtown Summerland and Carpinteria will best serve residents. Despite his confidence in the findings, Price said, he voted in favor of the analysis because passing a $10 million bond to fund the two stations will require a minimum of two-thirds voter support. “We should do everything we can to eliminate doubt,” he concluded. Doubts have been raised by newer board members Chris Johnson and Bill Taff, as well as CSFPD firefighters and community members. Endorsed by the local firefighters union in their bid for board seats, Johnson

FIRE DISTRICT continued on page 10

BiLL SWiNG

Warrior girls tennis players Lesly Zapata, front, and Natalie Saito grip the hands of their first round opponents in a home CIF semifinals match against Arlington High School on Nov. 13. Zapata and Saito went on to win their first set in the match to help the Warriors forge ahead 4-2 after one round of play. CVN went to press before the second round of play began, when the match was still anyone’s game. A win for the Warriors would mean a third straight CiF Championship appearance. The defending CiF champion Warriors would play Hacienda Heights (Wilson) or Riverside Poly at the Claremont Club on Friday, Nov. 15 for the championship. Find out the results of the Arlington match at coastalview.com.

Purple Heart Trail comes to Carpinteria

Carpinteria’s section of Highway 101 now officially pays homage to United States veterans who have sacrificed life and limb to protect American freedoms. By resolution of the California State Senate, the stretch of highway running through Santa Barbara and Ventura counties has been incorporated into the National Purple Heart Trail, an addition that makes the trail contiguous from Monterey County to the Ventura/Los Angeles County Line, a distance of nearly 240 miles. On Veterans Day, Nov. 11, local veterans joined city, county and state officials to unveil the new sign that will be mounted on the side of the freeway to commemorate the newest link in the trail. Carpinteria City Councilman Gregg Carty said that the new signs will serve as a visual reminder of the important role military men and women have played in our nation’s history. He hopes that the signs will prompt 101 travelers to seek out more information about the trail and reflect on those who earned the Purple Heart medal in their military service. “While we may not all agree with some of the policies that have led us to war and the battlefield, we can and should all agree that we owe a debt of gratitude to our warriors who answered the call and put their nation ahead of themselves,” stated Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, who sponsored the senate resolution.

DOBBiNS

From left, Carpinteria City Councilman Gregg Carty, Councilman Fred Shaw, State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, County First district Supervisor Salud Carbajal, Councilman Wade Nomura and assemblyman das Williams unveil the new Purple Heart Trail sign that will be erected on Highway 101.

2  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Local home cook ranks in world’s top-10 sandwich makers By Peter Dugré

L.J. Washington works as a nurse at Cottage hospital, yet it’s the great care she puts into her sophisticated recipes that has landed the home cook in the limelight. A local champion and national entrant into food-offs, Washington recently returned to Carpinteria from the World Food Championships in Las Vegas, where she ranked seventh in the sandwich category for her gourmet shrimp po’ boy and grilled cheese concocted with prosciutto, mint, berry and dates. Although she did not win the $300,000 grand prize on Nov. 10, Washington reveled in the experience of cooking in front of a live film crew—the championship will be turned into a reality television program—and out on Fremont street with 300 other competitors. “It was massive. It was incredible,” said Washington, who has cooked for as long as she can remember. About 50 people were invited into the competition in the sandwich division of the World Championships, and everybody had equipment and a station in the open air. Asked to create a signature dish in round one, Washington entered her shrimp po’ boy, a gourmet style augmentation of the sandwiches she grew up with in New orleans. Along with the standard fried shrimp, she added goat cheese remoulade, blue crab cole slaw, sautéed sweet onions and tomatoes. For authenticity, Washington sourced her shrimp from Louisiana. Then in round two, she matched grilled cheeses against the competition and gained favor with the judges with her fruity and minty twist. The field was reduced to 10, and although the competition included chefs, restaurant owners and food truck vendors, Washington gained entry into the next day of competition as the ninth-ranked competitor. The final 10 were judged on a sandwich that had to incorporate fish. Washington whipped up a Thai coconut red curry salmon sandwich that included sautéed garlic-basil portabellas and sweet potato

the Boyfriend Burger recipe

PrePareD By L.J. Washington for “the toDay shoW” 1 cup herb stuffing mix 2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce 3 tsp. garlic salt 2 tsp. marjoram 3 tsp. dried Italian seasoning 2 tsp. onion powder 2 tsp red pepper flakes. 2 tsp. olive oil 1/2 onion, chopped 1/2 cup fresh chopped parsley 1 cup diced celery 1/2 cup green onion, chopped 1/3 cup red wine 1 egg 1 lbs ground beef 1 lbs ground Italian sausage 1 lbs ground pork sausage

submITTed phoTo

Local cook L.J. Washington sizzles up a red curry salmon sandwich at the World food Championships in Las Vegas on nov. 9. crisps. As part of the production that night, she was judged live on stage and heard both positive and negative critiques of her creation. Judges loved the curry but felt the mushrooms were an unnecessary addition. The top sandwich maker won $10,000 and advanced to a final round where the winner from each of seven categories vied for the $300,000 pot. The film coverage will air on A&e in the spring. “I got to be on a reality show and be part of the biggest event for competitive cooking that you can do,” Washington said of what she took away from the experience despite falling short of her

ultimate goal. her competitive run began in the spring of 2012 when she entered and won a sandwich showdown sponsored by uCsb Arts and Lectures, Whole Foods and The Santa Barbara Independent. She beat the owners of santa barbara restaurants Three pickles and savoy in the finals with her pork sloppy Joe to earn the crown of the best sandwich maker in the area. she then entered The Independent’s sizzlin’ summer barbecue competition and was a finalist, quite a feat considering she’d never grilled before. “I went on YouTube and started looking up ways to grill. I didn’t know how to do anything,” she said.

That exposure garnered her a spot on KeYT’s backyard barbecue summer series, a competition which the novice grill-woman won. “It was my first time on TV,” she said. she shot from local stardom to the national spotlight when she applied to be part of a Father’s day burger competition for NbC’s “The Today show.” she was sure to garner the attention of producers by naming her burger, “The boyfriend burger,” and guaranteeing that the recipe had the power to produce an engagement ring for any girlfriend who served it. “my phone rang and I looked at it and it said, ‘New York,’ and I thought, ‘I don’t know anyone from New York, it must be a bill collector,’” Washington said. It was the producers, and following a conversation with the affable applicant, producers invited her to New York for the show. she was one of three contestants, and ultimately lost to a Texan who made a larger, spicier burger in the burger-off featuring Celebrity Chef Giada de Laurentiis as a judge. Laurentiis took Washington aside and offered her words of encouragement following the narrow loss. Currently, Washington is happy to take a break. “I don’t even want to see a frying pan,” she said. “Wait a couple of months, then I’ll get the bug again.”

Thursday, November 14, 2013  3

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Santa Barbara film hits Carpinteria theater By Lea Boyd

When the curtains rise on “The Bet” at Plaza Playhouse Theater next Saturday, the audience will be witness to an experiment gone right. The movie, shot in Santa Barbara with a local cast and crew, pairs the feel-good volunteer power of community theater with professional filmmaking technology. It has the look and feel of a big budget production, but the faces onscreen are those you see in the grocery store and the final budget is miniscule on a Hollywood scale. Jack Presnal founded the Community Film Studio Santa Barbara, the nonprofit behind “The Bet,” in an effort to bring the community theater concept to moviemaking. He grew up in a town where theater productions involved “friends and neighbors getting together to put on shows for other friends and neighbors.” Recognizing that contemporary filmmaking could be done without costing a fortune, Presnal launched the organization and selected “The Bet” as the first film. Ticket holders to the Nov. 23 screenings in Carpinteria will watch Santa Barbara neighborhoods, beaches and buildings grace the screen from start to finish. And against these settings, a handful of Carpinterians make their feature film debut. Trina Emami, a local grad student and ESL teacher, plays the role of a policewoman with several lines in the romantic comedy, and Amy Orozco, editor of Carpinteria Magazine, plays the speaking role of a waitress in the film. “For me, it was fun first and foremost, but it was also serious and professional,” said Emami of the experience. “Everyone worked as a team … It felt like Santa Barbara. It felt like a family.” Orozco and Emami learned about the movie auditions at a meeting of the Plaza Playhouse improvisation group over a year ago. Neither had much acting experience but decided to give it a go. Orozco thought she’d made a “pretty good fool” of herself and Emami said that she “tanked” the audition. Both were delighted to happen into speaking roles. Finola Hughes, a Carpinterian with plenty of experience in front of the camera, including a longtime role in soap opera “General Hospital,” volunteered to take the director’s chair for the production. Working with locals to create a film for locals made it an “extraordinary experience,” she said. “The great feeling of making the film was something, I hope, that ends up on the film.” The expertise and leadership of Hughes, Presnal and other industry pros brought a high level of professionalism to the work. On the flip side, many members of the cast and crew were able to use the experience as a learning tool, Hughes emphasized; they reaped new skills while sowing their time and energy. Commenting on the professional-feel of the production, Orozco said that she received multiple color-coded rewrites of the script and was impressed with the presence of a wardrobe and makeup crew in addition to the camera and sound crews. Hollywood parlance abounded, Orozco said. “There was a ton of ‘Take two, The Bet, Scene Three, roll ’em, quiet on the set,’ that kind of thing,” she said. In the seven months since the film premiered at the Arlington Theater, “The Bet” has appeared in film festivals across the country. It recently won Best Feature at the L.A. Femme International Film Festival, which recognizes women for their film work. The Santa Barbara Film Festival is currently reviewing applicants, and Presnal hopes to hear that “The Bet” has been accepted to the local festival come December.

COmmuNITy FILm STudIO SANTA BARBARA

Soap star and Carpinteria resident Finola Hughes found herself behind the camera for the first time as the director of “The Bet.”

Local screenings of “The Bet” on Saturday, Nov. 23 MaTInEE • $10 2 p.m. Screening Plaza Playhouse Theater 4916 Carpinteria ave. PlazaTheaterCarpinteria.com EVEnInG • $50 5:30 p.m. Reception at Crushcakes, 4945 Carpinteria ave.;

COmmuNITy FILm STudIO SANTA BARBARA

In her big screen debut, Carpinterian Trina Emami, as officer Ortega, approaches a car driven by “The Bet” star Scott Hagood. To officially qualify as a success, the film must generate enough income to balance the books. Actors and crewmembers gave their time to the effort, and most of the filming equipment was donated for use by Sony and AJA Video Systems. Nonetheless, location fees, meals and rentals cost about $30,000, and postproduction costs, such as editing, color correcting and sound mixing, required some skilled professionals and amounted to another $30,000. Presnal estimates that the film would have cost close to $500,000 in basic scale wages. The Plaza Playhouse screenings will help close the gap between revenue and costs for the Community Film Studio. Proceeds from the evening screening and reception will be split between the film studio and the theater, which is raising funds toward a new, large movie screen. A matinee screening will benefit the theater exclusively. Though the film studio is still fundraising to pay off “The Bet,” plans are brewing for the next project. Presnal described the next film as a Latino immigration drama in which children are left behind in the Santa Barbara area when their parents are deported. The subject matter chosen for the studio’s features will continue to represent the community, just as their casts and settings do.

www.coastalview.com

7 p.m. Screening Plaza Playhouse Theater 4916 Carpinteria ave., $50 PlazaTheaterCarpinteria.com

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4  Thursday, November 14, 2013

your views Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Obituaries

Ag lighting complaints unjustified

Robert Donald Groves 3/7/1946 – 11/8/2013

Robert “Bob” Groves passed peacefully on Friday with family at his side at his home in Newark, Calif. after a brief battle with cancer. Bob was born and raised in Carpinteria, served in the Navy in Vietnam, worked on the cutting edge of computer programming in the 1970s and had the good fortune to retire early. Growing up by the beach, Bob had a lifelong love of the water and the outdoors and was an avid waterskier. He had a passion for cars and boats and spent much time working on both. Bob is survived by his two daughters, Jessica Groves of Annapolis, Md. and Jaime Jones of Angwin, Calif.; his granddaughters, Mazlyn and Eden Jones; and his brother, Tom Groves of Buellton. Bob was predeceased by his loving wife, Elaine Groves of Patterson, N.J.; his parents Don and Justine Groves; and his brother James Groves all of Carpinteria. Bob was happiest when surrounded by good music, good food, a loyal dog and close friends and family. Those good times are fondly remembered and sadly missed. Friends are asked to remember their favorite cancer charity or Save the Bay (San Francisco) in Bob’s memory.

Garnet Hendrickson

Steve Kosztics Jr. 1/28/1923 – 10/21/2013

On Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, Steve Kosztics Jr. of Ventura, Calif. passed away peacefully in his sleep at his home in La Conchita. Born in Turda, Hungary (now Romania) on Jan. 28, 1923, Steve and his family immigrated at Ellis Island, in 1927. His family settled in Portland, Ore., where he and his brother Louie attended the local schools. Shortly after graduating from high school, Steve enlisted in the U.S. Navy, at the age of 18. A year later, Steve and his brother both found themselves at war in the Pacific. Steve served proudly aboard the USS Neville, APA-9, which carried 24 landing craft. They made amphibious assaults at Tulagi, (Guadalcanal) Tarawa, Saipan and many others. He also served in the European Theater, at the invasion of Sicily. When the war ended, he married his sweetheart Jean Terry, on Nov. 18, 1945. They lived in Gardena for several years before eventually settling in Canoga Park, where they resided for about 30 years. Steve was employed by the Los Angeles Board of Education as a grading and paving inspector for approximately 40 years. In 1985 he retired to La Conchita, where he built their home, and has lived there for the past 28 years. He is survived by his wife, Jean Kosztics; his brother, Louie; and by his three daughters and their spouses: Ilona and Mike Hemperley, Lisa and Bill Taff, and Lorraine and Brian Thompson. He and Jean have seven grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. He was a loving and caring husband and father who always put his family first. His many talents and hobbies included woodworking, fishing, gardening and walking in La Conchita. Steve lived a full life and was a blessing in the lives of all who knew him. He is remembered by many as a loyal friend and an honorable and charitable man who was full of genuine love for all. He was the best of all of us. We will miss him greatly, but his legacy will live on eternally.

Garnet Hendrickson, 96, died peacefully in her sleep in Santa Barbara on Oct. 17. In 1957 Garnet, her husband, the late Cecil Hendrickson, and their daughter, Barbara, moved to Carpinteria. Reminiscing about living here, Garnet related, “Cecil took me to see a little restaurant he was interested in buying. It only had a counter and three stools. I said, ‘It’s such a tiny spot.’” Hence, the hamburger stand they opened in 1958 was, and still is, called The Spot. With Cecil’s outstanding hamburgers and Garnet’s delicious chili, The Spot became an immediate success. On Nov. 1 a memorial for Garnet was held in Carpinteria at Russ Salzgeber’s Butterfly Farm, followed by lunch at Delgado’s Mexican Restaurant.

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Email news@coastalview.com

Regarding recent county inspections at local agricultural operations prompted by complaints about exterior lighting: Agriculture has very special requirements in order to grow food, plants and flowers to accommodate you and millions of others. To demand the county, at considerable cost, inspect whole neighborhoods for possible violations is unnecessary and ridiculous. Whatever you have seen has been going on for years, so close your drapes, cover your eyes and don’t buy food, plants or flowers.

Carroll Ketchpel Carpinteria

Affordable Care Act is unsustainable

I agree with Diana Thorn’s Nov. 7 letter “Obamacare dead on arrival.” However, I put the blame on the health insurance companies having written the bill for their own benefit and for our elected officials not daring to discuss an “improved Medicare for everyone” type of reform for fear of losing the multi millions of dollars in health insurance industry campaign contributions. Currently, 60 percent of healthcare is paid by government through Medicare, Medicaid and other programs. Under the Affordable Care Act an even higher percentage will be paid in expanded Medicaid and subsidies to the private insurance companies for lower- and middle-income people and tax credits for businesses. This does not count the private insurance plans bought with tax dollars for government employees. Too much of our private premium and tax dollars fund the insurance companies’ multimillion dollar CEO salaries, wasteful administrative costs, shareholder dividends and competitive marketing. An improved Medicare for everyone provides anyone needing healthcare the freedom to choose any private doctor anywhere. Now the insurance companies choose the doctors that charge them the least rather than allowing you to choose the one that best suits you. Single-payer is sustainable over time. It is financed and administered by not-forprofit managers who have the fiduciary responsibility to work in the patient’s and the medical profession’s best interest. Learn more at pnhp.org or healthcareforall.org.

Paulina Conn Santa Barbara

On Obamacare, Tea Party clouded by hatred

In response to “Obamacare dead on arrival,” Coastal View News, Nov. 7: People in America die every day because of the high cost of medical care. The Tea Party loves America just not the people in it who do not look, think or believe like they do. Their hatred of one lone, intelligent, articulate, charismatic black man has blinded them to reason and truth. They go to protests on buses paid for by the big money corporations that use their bias and fear to influence Republican politicians to block any legislation that helps the poor and middle-class by keeping laws that keep the money flowing to the very wealthy. Tea Party people say socialism and big government are evil, yet they enjoy the benefits of public roads, schools, parks, agencies that oversee our food, air, water, workplace safety, our Armed Forces, the Post Office, Social Security and Medicare, to name a few. Ironically, letter writer Diana Thorn cited the Heritage Foundation’s negative view of the Affordable Care Act they call “Obamacare” now, ignoring the fact that Heritage Foundation was the architect of the framework of this plan, which it formulated to combat universal coverage for all. President Obama’s agenda is a better country for all by ensuring everyone has a “fair shot at the American Dream.” Hate or healthcare?

Eva Vallejo Carpinteria

Obamacare needs nurture

In response to “Obamacare dead on arrival,” Coastal View News, Nov. 7: Once again Diana Thorn is baying out a warning on the impending disaster of the Affordable Care Act. We are warned of the imminent bankruptcy of the entire country, not to mention the dark forces of socialism lurking around every corner. The constant din of negativism is sapping the strength of our great nation. Imagine the power we could employ if we pulled together, if we rallied around the flag and said, “We will make this law work.” Together we could be constantly improving and refining it, strengthening weak areas and sharing concepts that work well, not dragging it down with false and misleading statements. What happened to American Exceptionalism?

Michael Vitullo Carpinteria

Providing local news and information for the Carpinteria Valley Managing Editor Lea Boyd Associate Editor Peter Dugré Sales Manager Betty Lloyd Sales Associate Dan Terry Graphic Designer Kristyn Whittenton Student Intern Joe Rice Publishers Gary L. Dobbins, Michael VanStry Coastal View News is locally owned and operated by RMG Ventures, LLC, 4856 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013, and is published every Thursday. Coastal View News has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of Santa Barbara County, Case No. 210046. Coastal View News assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material.

Thursday, November 14, 2013  5

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

school notes

Lou Grant Auction draws droves PHoToS BY JESSiCA MAHER

Submitted photo

Aliso School students, from left, Kaia Greenburg, Ruby Cluderay and Brennan Paty dine on local restaurant fare with Principal Holly Minear as a reward for their fundraising efforts in the Aliso Jog-a-thon.

Jog-a-thon standouts visit principal’s office

Stamping a ticket to the principal’s office is often associated with class clowns testing a teacher’s tolerance, but Aliso School turned the tables by awarding top Jog-a-thon participants with a little one-on-one time with Principal Holly Minear. Kaia Greenburg, Ruby Cluderay and Brennan Paty each raised over $300 during the school’s fundraiser in October in order to earn a special lunch with Minear. A special menu of each girl’s choice was donated by Sushi Teri, Siam Elephant and The Spot.

Submitted photo

Alan Rose talks precipitation and predictions with Aliso students.

KEYT weatherman visits Aliso

Special guest Alan Rose forecasted a bright future for Aliso School students during a recent visit to the school. The KEYT weatherman shared his educational background with students before delivering a lesson on the science behind predicting weather. The fifth-graders have been studying meteorology for several weeks. “Our students enjoyed hearing about how Mr. Rose became interested in weather and all about his career with KEYT,” stated Principal Holly Minear.

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The sun slips low as auction bids climb during the annual Lou Grant Parent-Child Workshop Auction, the school’s biggest fundraiser of the year. Held on Nov. 2, the event brought hundreds of supporters to a home on Shepard Mesa where they wined and dined in the name of positive child development.

Bryce Jackson, a Lou Grant alumnus, passes hors d’oeuvres in an old timey waiter getup topped off with modern shades.

6  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

City extends life of electric car charging station By ERin LEnnOn

The Carpinteria City Council pushed the city’s eco-conscious reputation up a notch on Nov. 12, opting to keep the city’s electric-car charging station and adding Carpinteria’s stretch of the California Coastal Trail to a statewide network of oceanfront hikes. Instead of pulling the plug on the city’s electric vehicle charging station in parking lot 3, at the Amtrak Station, the council followed staff’s recommendation to renew its contract with ChargePoint. The online network tracks station usage such as kilowatts of energy, greenhouse gas emissions and the total number of vehicles charged. ChargePoint also provides information to users that can help them locate other stations. “Anybody who has the application in their phone can look it up and map out their trips around Southern California,” said Environmental Coordinator Erin Maker. “There are many charging stations around, now that we’re part of this greater ChargePoint America grant program.” The city, along with a collection of Santa Barbara and Ventura agencies, received the $5,000 charging station at no cost under the ChargePoint America grant program, as well as a free network subscription that was scheduled to expire on Dec. 31. But now Carpinteria will pay $580 to extend its subscription for three years. Staff will also begin charging users for the electricity that drivers had been receiving for free since the station went up in July 2012. With a bit of debate, the council agreed on charging users $.30 per kilowatt-hour, which translates to between $.99 and $1.98 per hour. Carpinterians with a Nissan Leaf can expect to pay $7.20 for a full charge. Tesla Model S owners can expect to pay $18 for a full charge. Through all of this math, the city expects to generate $106 in revenue from the station every month. That’s enough to cover half of the station’s anticipated monthly operating tab. “It is a rate that would be competitive

in the region, and our concern, as we looked at this was, if we tried to recover our full costs, people would drive right by Carpinteria and go into Santa Barbara,” said City Manager Dave Durflinger. Still, the council questioned whether that rate was high enough to deter visitors from just parking their vehicle at the station for long, unsupervised periods that would deter others from charging their vehicles. But staff was reticent to go higher. Experts agree that charging more than $2 an hour makes it more expensive to charge one’s electric car than to pay for gasoline. With no intention of inhibiting locals’ use of electric vehicles, the council accepted the suggested rate but asked that staff explore a possible flex rate that would increase as cars sit at the station for longer than average periods. Councilmembers also voted to add Carpinteria’s oceanfront trails to the California Coastal Trails Association’s growing consortium of municipal trails, running 1,200 miles from Northern to Southern California. Coastwalk, which has been monitoring the public’s access to coastal areas for 28 years, received a 2012 State Coastal Conservancy grant to begin the CCTA and connect coastal stakeholders’ portions of the California Coastal Trail. The aim is to inch closer and closer to creating one continuous trail stretching the full length of California’s coast. “The Coastal Trail Project in Carpinteria is one of our premiere projects and also one of the jewels in our parks system,” said Parks & Recreation Director Matt Roberts. Roberts believes that by connecting this jewel with the other members of the CCTA, Carpinteria could not only highlight its natural beauty but access grant opportunities at the federal and state levels while sharing trail information and resources. The next regular Carpinteria City Council meeting will be held on Monday, Nov. 25, at 5:30 p.m. in the council chambers, 5775 Carpinteria Ave.

Do You Have a Family Member with Memory Problems? You Are Not Alone - We Can Help.

“Come and Learn Caregiver Tips and Tools” Carpinteria Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group MEETINGS 1st & 3rd Wednesdays, 2-4pm NEw 2nd Wednesday Evening, 6-7:30pm Faith Lutheran Church ~ Vallecito Place at Ogan Road Questions? Donnie Nair 805-684-9328 • alz-caregiver-support.org

Blue Dream goes up in smoke

A woman who encountered a small mason jar with green buds in it on Granada Way on Nov. 5 quickly phoned sheriff’s deputies to report what she believed were drugs. According to reports, the deputy “indeed recognized it as marijuana” and booked the jar and its herbal contents, which had a “Blue Dream” label on its lid, for destruction.

Beautiful bandits

Two men and a woman accused of ripping off $876 worth of Loreal and Revlon cosmetics from a Casitas Pass Road drugstore on Oct. 23 were suspected by store security of conducting similar thefts at stores in Camarillo, Ventura and Goleta. The suspects allegedly entered the store and “cleared out” many of the items along with a sweatshirt that was used to conceal the stolen items.

Rat a tat tat

A deputy was called to investigate a handful of gunshots heard on Paquita Road on Nov. 3 at 6:30 a.m. and found six .22 caliber shells along with a couple of witnesses who were shacked up in a vehicle. The man who reported the shots said he had seen an unfamiliar late model car with a spoiler departing the dead end road following the shots. At the dead end, the deputy found the handful of bullets and noticed two slumbering figures in an SUV. He questioned the man and woman, and they asked him if he was there about the man who had shot the BB gun. The deputy informed them it was a bullet gun. The couple explained they were crashing in the car because the woman’s stepmother forbids the man from spending the night at her nearby residence. That morning, the woman was returning to the vehicle when she saw a man drive up in the car with the spoiler. He inquired if she lived in the area before wandering off past the dead end and into the brush. The woman climbed into the car with her boyfriend. After a short time, the man returned from the brush. He opened the trunk of his vehicle, removed what the witnesses thought was a assault rifle replica BB gun and fired off several rounds toward the brush.

The deputy put out a “be on the lookout” notice for a vehicle matching the description given by the witnesses. No suspects were tracked down for questioning regarding discharging a firearm within 150 yards of homes.

Bad call

Deputies investigating a cell phone and computer theft ended up arresting the victim for allegedly possessing crystal meth on Via Real on Nov. 2. The woman, 41, called after seeing a man who had spent the night with her wander out of her motel room in the morning with her electronics. Deputies arrived at the room reported by the caller but soon discovered they were knocking at the wrong room at 7 a.m. where they disturbed a slumbering guest. A check of the registry landed deputies at the correct room, which was wide open and teeming with the brighteyed activity of the 41-year-old woman. Trash, food and clothing littered the floor, and the woman rambled incoherently, noted deputies. Suspicious of what substances might be feeding the woman’s jitters, deputies asked if she was on drugs. She said she’d long been sober since quitting meth years ago. The deputy continued to pry, and told her it was obvious she was on a stimulant. She then admitted to using days before. For full disclosure, she also told deputies she’d been posting ads online to meet men, since she was a single woman. Deputies learned from dispatch that the woman was on probation with search terms so they began looking more closely at the contents of the room. A bindle of meth was inside a container on the television, and another bindle was in the woman’s purse. At that point, the woman told deputies she no longer needed their services and she wished to speak with her mother and her attorney. When deputies instructed the woman to stand up, she did so and turned and voluntarily placed her hands behind her back in handcuff position, even though she hadn’t been asked to do so. Deputies arrested her for possession of synthetic drugs, which put a damper on the theft investigation since the woman had gone silent.

Other reports:

Burglary: Via Real Theft: Azalea Drive, Maple Avenue, Cindy Lane, Via Real

What are you learning?

man on the street LARRY NIMMER larry@nimmer.net

There is no courage without vulnerability. --Sherri Mendenhall

About jewelry and people skills. --Tania Reyes

I’m learning how Carpinterians use their life experiences to help develop the community… like opening the Franklin Trail. --Pat Saragosa

Larry’s comment: I’m learning that old dogs, like me, can learn new tricks.

I’m learning about getting older every day. --John F. Frontera

I’m learning Spanish and my numbers. --Isla Gonzalez

Thursday, November 14, 2013  7

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

club scene Submitted photo

From left, Carpinteria Seniors Inc. members Steve and Ann Garcia, Club President Billie Wilding and Vice President Hank Arellanes document the food collected by club members for delivery to Catholic Charities.

Seniors feed the hungry

Submitted photo

Carpinteria Seniors inc. members recently cleared out their cupboards to help local families in need put food on the table this holiday season. At the Nov. 1 meeting of the club, several boxes of non-perishables were collected and delivered by Steve and Ann Garcia to Catholic Charities for distribution to qualifying residents. Club Vice president hank Arellanes said that the club intends to hold food drives twice a year now. Meetings of the 55-and-over group are held on the first Friday of the month at 1:30 p.m. at the Carpinteria Community Church, 1111 Vallecito Road.

Calendar contest-winning members of the Carpinteria Boys & Girls Club display their artwork selected for the 2014 Unemployment Services Trust calendar.

Boys & Girls Club members win calendar contest

Artwork created by members of the Carpinteria boys & Girls Club will grace eight of the 12 pages of the 2014 calendar produced by unemployment Services trust in support of health and human services. uSt received over 100 submissions to its annual calendar contest, for which children were asked to draw pictures in categories such as after school programs, meal delivery programs, literacy advancement efforts and animal advocacy. “i was really excited i won, because i never thought i was that good at drawing and i really wanted the Amazon gift card,” said tristan Kelly, who won with his drawing “dinosaurs at the museum.” Winners and participants also enjoyed a pizza party donated by uSt. over 2,000 copies of the calendar will be distributed across the nation.

Stroke prevention fuels NYC Marathon finish Stroke survivor david powdrell ran the New York City marathon on Nov. 3 in an effort to increase the rest of the world’s chances of avoiding a stroke altogether. the Carpinterian raised $6,270 for the National Stroke Association and was part of a 27-member group that collectively fundraised $93,000 for the leading national organization for stroke prevention. “There’s an adage in the surfing world that goes something like this: the best surfer in the water is the one having the most fun,” he reported after the event. “i decided to hang my hat on that for the NY marathon.” Rather than striving for an overly poWdReLL ambitious finishing time, Powdrell, Sweaty but smiling, David Powdrell who suffered a stroke in 2004, established a different goal. he set keeps it fun on his way to completing out to cross the finish line in under the New York City Marathon as five hours with the proviso that a powerhouse fundraiser for the he would smile as he went and National Stroke Association. high-five as many people as posout, Powdrell finished the event in four sible along the 26.2-mile route weaving hours and 46 minutes. he credited his through New York City’s five boroughs. wife, Valerie, with his ability to run the he also toted his camera along and entire distance. Valerie, an experienced snapped photos of hundreds of the 2 marathon runner, had designed a sixmillion spectators taking in the race. month training schedule for both of “For the first 4 feet, I was tied with them, but foot injuries sustained along the Kenyans,” powdrell wrote in a the way kept her out of the race. follow-up email to the 106 friends and “my only regret is that Valerie wasn’t family members who contributed to his able to run with me,” david said. fundraising effort, “i opted to let them “maybe, just maybe, she’ll want to run run ahead of me hoping that they’d hit the NY marathon next year, in which the wall and that i’d pass them at mile case i’ll either run with her or be her 24. Such was not the case.” biggest fan.” maintaining his good humor through--Lea Boyd

Submitted photo

From left, Matt Organista receives an achievement award from Tyler Powell of the Rotary Club of Carpinteria Morning.

Morning Rotary honors champion triathlete

Still beaming from his September win of the sprint triathlon at the London Age Group World Championships, Carpinterian matt organista shared his experience with the Rotary Club of Carpinteria morning on Nov. 6 and received an international rotary achievement award in honor of his athletic accomplishment. morning Rotary member tyler powell described organista as being typically humble as he relayed the highlights of the 750-meter swim, 20-kilometer bike ride and 5-kilometer run to club members. “the swim started strong,” powell reported, “but at the buoy turn he found himself in a blender of bodies all fighting for the lead. After being kicked, pushed under and pulled he managed to stay close behind.” organista’s strongest leg of the event was the bicycle portion, during which he passed his field of competitors. in addition to receiving an award, organista will have a brick created in his honor for installation on Linden Avenue, adjacent to tomol park.

Smuggling expert presents to Noon Rotary

At their Nov. 7 luncheon meeting, the members and guests of the Rotary Club of Carpinteria heard from film documentary expert Jesse Aizenstat, whose presentation, on the trail of mexiSubmitted photo can boat Smugglers, was a hit. Aizenstat From left, Rotarian Donna Treloar thanks Jesse discussed the drug Aizenstat for his presentation to the noontime club. and human trafficking from mexico into California by way of panga boats arriving along the Santa barbara County coastline.

8  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

“Captain Phillips” It is the ambition—maybe even the the power to the engine. And meanwhile sole ambition—of “Captain Phillips” the plight of the sailors draws the attento capture a certain real-life drama that tion of the American government. A U.S. occurred a little while ago. There have Navy destroyer is sent to intercept the been a lot of movies like this lately. It’s as pirate-controlled ship with instructions if we really want to see what happened, to keep the ship from reaching shore at and it’s not on Youall costs. Tube, so we have to There is a lot make a movie. And of back-and-forth while we are at it, here. At points it we might as well looks like Captain really play up the Phillips is doomed. whole hero aspect At other points it of it. So we end seems obvious up telling our own that the pirates ongoing history are going down. MATT DUNCAN pretty much as we Of course, anyone like it. who hasn’t had his Here it is. Capor her head burtain Richard Phillips ied in the sand for (Tom Hanks) has a the past few years dangerous job. He knows what’s going knows it, too. He to happen. But still, is an American in there is drama to be charge of a cargo had here. Captain ship traveling off Phillips tries to esthe coast of Somacape at one point. lia. And that’s not The pirates get testhe best place to do ty. The Navy Seals business. The iscome in. All very sue is not with the exciting. weather, or with iceOr at least the bergs or reefs that ending of “Captain are difficult to naviPhillips” is very gate, or even with exciting. The rest the local wildlife. of the movie is just The issue is with all right—mostly a pirates. bunch of buildup. And we are not There is some inexactly talking teresting dialogue about Captain Hook between Captain and Smee here. We are talking about men Phillips and Muse, and of course Tom with AK-47s who were plucked from their Hanks does a nice job throughout the impoverished homes with the promise of movie. But the whole thing is built for the a new life free of worry and want. These ending. We want to know what it looked pirates really have something on the line. like. We want to see how it all went down. Captain Phillips is aware of the threat, So we do. And it is interesting. And it but he pushes on. Then the pirates come. is exciting. Perhaps it is even worth the Four pirates under the command of Ab- wait. However, there is nothing especially duwali Muse (Barkhad Abdi) go after noteworthy about “Captain Phillips” Captain Phillips’ ship, the MV Maersk from a purely cinematic standpoint. There Alabama. At first Captain Phillips man- is nothing much added here beyond the ages to outrun them. He thinks that he has real-life story, except for the fact that dodged a bullet; he thinks that all is well. Captain Phillips is portrayed as an unThen the pirates come again. This time qualified hero. If not for the fact that this they have a faster boat and the equipment event—or at least something kind of like necessary to track down Captain Phillips’ this event—really did occur, the movie ship and get on board. Most of Phillips’ would be pretty pedestrian. crew flees to the engine room, but Muse “Captain Phillips” is rated PG-13 for and his cohort manage to capture Phillips. sustained intense sequences of menace, The plan is to hold Captain Phillips and some violence with bloody images, and his ship ransom for millions of dollars— for substance use. such is the goal of modern day pirates. It turns out to be not so easy. Captain Matt Duncan, a former Coastal View Phillips and his crew do various things News Editor, has taken physical but not to foil their pirate captors, such as cutting emotional leave from Carpinteria to attend University of Virginia for a graduate degree in philosophy. In his free time from philosophizing, Duncan enjoys strumming on the mandolin, watching movies, updating his movie review blog, duncansreeldeal.blogspot. com and writing for ReelGuys.net.

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EVELYN CERVANTES FILE PHOTO

Scott Ellinwood and Jaye Taylor perform some smooth moves on stage at the 2013 Carpinteria Talent Showcase.

… audition for the talent show

Talented Carpinterians seeking the spotlight should apply now to audition for the 5th Annual Carpinteria Talent Showcase put on by the Rotary Club of Carpinteria. Auditions will be on Thursday, Nov. 21 and Sunday, Nov. 24 at the Plaza Playhouse Theater, 4916 Carpinteria Ave. Organizers will consider talent in just about any form, and 20 of the applicants will be chosen to perform shows on Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Applications and additional information are available at CarpinteriaRotary.org. Proceeds from the talent show benefit local programs, including performing arts in Carpinteria schools. The Plaza Playhouse Theater Presents...

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Thursday, November 14, 2013  9

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

… boot scoot with Howard

The Howard School is offering up a rip roaring good time with its fall fundraiser, the Howard Hoedown, on Saturday, Nov. 16, from 3 to 8 p.m. at the Montecito Country Club, 960 Summit Lane, in Santa Barbara. Live country music, whiskey tasting, an old time photo booth and line dancing are all on the afternoon agenda, as well as a silent and live auction. Funds raised from the Howard Hoedown go directly to student activities, with this year’s focus on a major upgrade to the school’s technology hardware and curriculum. Tickets start at $75 and can be purchased online at thehowardschool.org. The event is open to the public, and country attire is encouraged.

… meet some reptiles

Aiming to dissociate scaly and scary, Reptile Family will bring its lineup of coldblooded creatures to a free event on Thursday, Nov. 21, at 3:30 p.m. at Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave. The program, which is best for ages 4 and up, will introduce attendees to reptiles in a manner both entertaining and educational. To find out more, call 684-4314.

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… leaf peep with a plant expert

Native plant authority Andrea Adams-Morden will lead a free Lion Canyon Fall Colors Plant Hike for the California Native Plant Society on Sunday, Nov. 17, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Participants will meet at Ojai Park and Ride parking lot, at 987 W. Ojai Ave. to caravan to Lion Canyon. Morden plans to leisurely walk up the canyon to see the plants in their fall glory. In a press release, she stated, “We will have lunch by the creek and decide how much farther we want to go.” Participants should bring hiking boots, layers of clothing for changing temperatures, water and lunch. Call Morden for more information at 684-8077.

The fate of the city’s empty park property on 5th Street will be discussed at a SkateGarden Community Forum on Wednesday, Nov. 20, from 6 to 7:15 p.m. at Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Road. A site feasibility study will be presented, and community members will have an opportunity to voice their concerns, interests and desires for the proposed 5th Street Skate Garden development project.

…Chalk your Walk

To leave a marked trail from the past to the present, Curious Cup bookstore will hold Chalk your Walk on Saturday, Nov. 16, from 10 to 11 a.m. Participants will depart from the store’s former location at 929 Linden Ave. with sidewalk chalk and make their way on foot to the new location at 5285 Carpinteria Ave., chalking the route as they go. Bagels and cream cheese will await participants at the Carpinteria Avenue location. For more information, call 220-6608.

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10  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Topping off a well-rounded wardrobe wardrobe wisdom LORI COOPER Sketches by Camille Cooper I devoted a couple of columns recently to a few must-have items for men and women. I tried to think of what people would get the most wear out of for their money, and was mindful of different lifestyles. Now it’s time to make those lists more complete. Once you’ve read my suggestions, you will be armed with information to shop wisely. This month I will concern myself with a shopping list for women. In August, I suggested that women look for a good jacket, comfortable and versatile shoes, classic slacks, tops that would be suitable for various activities and a dress. Before listing items today that can round out this wardrobe, I want to emphasize the value of seasonless fabrics. By seasonless, I mean a fabric in a lightweight wool or a heavier cotton blend that is smooth and won’t wrinkle. If you buy your basics in this kind of fabric, you can wear them year-round. Keep heavy tweeds and flowy linens to a minimum unless you live somewhere that has extreme weather seasons. Starting from the bottom, a terrific pair of boots is a wardrobe staple. If you l i k e c u r re n t trends, look for an ankle boot that you can wear with jeans, skirts or dresses. These come in various heights and styles; the most versatile ones will be in gray, black, beige or brown suede with a 1.5- to 3-inch heel. On the other hand, a standard tall riding boot never goes out of style. Look for one with a one to two inch heel in black or brown leather with a slightly rounded toe. Keep your boots in good shape by taking them to a cobbler at the end of each season and store them in a dust-free place. Jeans shopping can become a marathon adventure, but stay focused by looking for two styles: everyday ones and dressier ones. Each style needs to be comfortable and stylish and very flattering! Yes, this is a tall order. By flattering

I mean it highlights body parts you like and skims over ones you are not so fond of. Shop in a store where a salesperson is helpful and tell him or her what you like and don’t like in jeans. Furthermore, do not be welded to your size: I have jeans from size 0 to 8 in my closet and they all fit well. For everyday jeans, look for a medium wash in skinny or bootleg. Dressier jeans mean a dark wash in a trouser or classic 5-pocket style. Think of Levi’s but fancier. Wear these out at night with a striking top, blazer or sparkly necklace. Speaking of sparkly: Do you have a top with sequins or glittery details? It can be a silk camisole or tank top, a bejeweled sweater or a satin blouse. Shop for one in basic black, bronze or silver or a jewel tone such as emerald or ruby. This is a top to wear out to dinner, to a holiday party, or to a special event. You can wear it with simple black slacks or your dressy jeans. This kind of top will always make you feel festive. There are a few things that I always include on my clients’ shopping lists. These include a pair of hoop earrings in either gold or silver (or mixed metals), a pretty shawl or coat for chilly nights and a good quality purse. The latter gets more use than most things in your wardrobe, so buy one that goes with most everything in your closet. Today’s “neutral” bags are not just brown and black. Red, green, cobalt and mustard yellow are remarkably adaptable colors. Leather is the most practical material for a purse because it is durable. Building a wardrobe that represents who you are and that works well for you on a regular basis takes time and effort. The payoff is feeling good in your clothes, every day! Former writing teacher Lori Cooper has turned her love of shopping and style into a career. Through her consulting company Wardrobe Wisdom, Lori works with her clients to update their style for their professional and personal lives. She can be reached at 6802640 or loricooper@wardrobewisdom.com.

FIRE DISTRICT: CONtiNuED FrOM PAgE 1

and Taff have applied the brakes on the full-speed-ahead plans to relocate the too small, too old Summerland station to the corner of Lillie Avenue and Temple Street and to rebuild the aging Carpinteria station on its current Walnut Avenue site. The firefighters have also been reluctant to embrace the dual station plans, but firefighter Arnold Brooks said that the union is pleased with the board’s decision to conduct a location study and will support the findings of the independent analysis. The union has advocated for a large-scale operational study to assess the overall health of district and guide its future, but Brooks said that the location study will provide important input for the facilities side of the agency. “There’s been no factual data put out to the community,” Brooks said of the study’s need. predictions for the results of the analysis are mixed. price, who lives in Summerland, argues that the densely populated community with its prevalence of steep and narrow streets should have a fire station in its midst. “Delays mean life or death to those folks,” he said of Summerland residents. Brooks, in contrast, pointed out that a Summerland station concentrates district resources on the far west end of the district. Full coverage, he said, might be best achieved by remodeling the existing Lillie Avenue Summerland station and adding a small squad of firefighters to the Santa Claus Lane area or relocating the Summerland station closer to Carpinteria. Firefighters are also interested in the possibility of consolidation with other agencies, an idea that the board is less keen on. At the Oct. 29 meeting, board members

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

biz briefs SuBmITTED phOTO

Doctors Janice Sugiyama, orthodontist Page Hudson, Bob Berkenmeier, John Marsh and pediatric dentist Daniel Nobel pitch in for the good of local children.

Dentists uphold tradition of giving

Local dentists recently continued a charitable tradition that began close to 50 years ago with Dr. James Gray. Since that time, dentists have provided free dental screening to every student in the Carpinteria Unified School District elementary schools to see that dental problems are detected early and referred for appropriate care. On Nov. 8, dentists John marsh, Bob Berkenmeier, Janice Sugiyama, orthodontist page hudson and pedodontist Daniel Nobel screened students at Canalino School, while Dr. michael harrington screened students at Summerland School. On Dec. 6, students at Aliso School will be screened by doctors Loren Churchman and J.p. hughes.

Area chambers present on tourist promotion

Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce CEO Lynda Lang joined leaders of the Goleta and S a n t a B a r b a r a re gional chambers of commerce on a panel discussion hosted by Visit Santa Barbara on Oct. 30 at the Fess parker ’s hotel and Conference Center. The trio presented on how the chambers are SuBmITTED phOTO working to promote From left, Lynda Lang, Ken Oplinger and Kristen tourism and travel in Miller represented area chambers of commerce at a their specific areas. Visit Santa Barbara discussion. Lang spoke regarding the outreach that the chamber and the City of Carpinteria have done in tandem since 2009 with First Friday and Saturday events. In addition she explained how the CVCC and Visit Santa Barbara have worked to promote Carpinteria outside the area by using the Santa Barbara South Coast TBID stipends from the tourism district hotel assessments. The audience represented more than 100 hotels and restaurants from throughout Santa Barbara County.

Edward Jones brightens holidays for needy

Leading up to its Friday, Dec. 6 holiday Open house, the Carpinteria Edward Jones office will collect toys and non-perishable foods to make the holidays merrier for those in need. Contributions can be dropped off at the office, located at 5320 Carpinteria Ave. Suite J, anytime before, during or even after the open house, which will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. Toys for Tots accepts only new, unwrapped toys. They can be geared for any age, but gifts for older teenage toys are especially needed. Cookies, punch and holiday treats will be served during the event.

considered writing a letter to montecito Fire protection District to broach the topic of consolidation. The matter was tabled for a future meeting, after it was agreed that the district is more interested in greater potential agency collaboration rather than consolidation. Results of the location study should be in district hands in time for a spring decision on whether to move forward with a bond election in November 2014. proponents of the downtown Summerland station are concerned that if the district does not secure funding in the near future, the current owner of the proposed property, the mosquito and Vector management District Board of Santa Barbara County, will seek out another buyer. In order to obtain sufficient voter support to pass a bond, Price acknowledged that district leaders, both on the board and among the firefighting staff, must get behind the station projects. “It’s going to be very important to get those folks on board,” he said.

Thursday, November 14, 2013  11

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Stuffing it all in November makes me think of food. Shipping food over long distances Well, I think about it all the time, as all of means more vehicles on our rails and my friends know (hey, I love to cook and roads, which in turn means more fossil eat), but winter really gets me thinking fuels being used. And non-organic foods about warm meals and holiday get-to- are often sprayed with pesticides and gethers. The holiherbicides, which day season means run off during something differrain events into ent to everyone. local water bodies Most holidays, reand can harm the gardless of your wildlife there. background, are Now, all of that associated with being said, I, like sharing meals everyone else, buy with friends and things that are out ERIN MAKER extended family. of season or came But all that eating and gift giving can from a long distance. I’m particularly a come with environmental impacts. sucker for mangos, which don’t come It is no coincidence that foods such as from anywhere near where I live. But I squash, brussel sprouts and potatoes are try to buy local; the food tastes better, it staples at a lot of winter holiday meals. reduces fuel emissions and the amount of These foods are in season in late fall food that spoils in transport, and it also and early winter, and for people living helps support local farmers. in northern climates when meals were Much of the food at our farmers mardictated by the time of year, these veggies kets, and the local and organic sections kept well over the colder months. of our grocery stores, comes from the Eating local, especially eating local surrounding area. Some of these farms organic foods, has many benefits. We are small, family owned businesses that all know that eating fruits and veggies have been in the family for many years. is good for our body, but eating local This year, while preparing your menu, is also good for the land, air and water. regardless of the holiday, consider shopOften, food in grocery stores travels long ping locally to reduce your environmendistances before ending up on shelves. tal impact. Can’t make it to the farmers

living the green life

market? Visit a farm stand or even the local grocery store. Most grocery stores have a “local” section with produce from farms in the area. Don’t feel limited to produce; seafood, poultry and other meats, spices, herbs and even honey can all be purchased from local businesses.

Green holiday habits

Food isn’t the only area we can improve our impact on this big, beautiful planet we live on. Going out of town for a few days? Save some energy by unplugging everything that is non-essential. I don’t suggest unplugging things like the refrigerator—I once came home from a trip after a long power outage and it was not pretty. Class up your meals a bit with cloth napkins and tablecloths instead of paper products. Not only does it look nice, but it helps save old growth forests, fossil fuels and other resources used in paper production. It being the holidays, sometimes we overlook some of our regular practices. It can be hard if you have a house full of

relatives, who may or may not get along, to get everyone to recycle or put the food scraps in the compost. And who has time to make their own wrapping paper? There are many ways you can green up your holiday season, only a few of which I mentioned. My friends and I have potlucks instead of giving gifts, with the emphasis on local foods. So while we get to spend some quality time together, we are also helping out the environment in our small way. You don’t have to change all of your traditions, but start small with little things like napkins. Each small thing we do can have a large, positive impact on the planet. Erin Maker is the Environmental Coordinator for the City of Carpinteria. She studied biology after discovering her love of nature and science while growing up in Vermont. Always interested in improving water quality and recycling, she currently oversees the City’s Watershed Management and Solid Waste Programs. For more information, contact Erin at erinm@ci.carpinteria.ca.us, (805) 684-5405 x415.

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12  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Athletic heroes inducted into Warrior Hall of F Photos by bill swing

The who’s who of Carpinteria High School athletics past and present swapped out their running shorts and letterman’s jackets for skirts and ties last weekend to attend the CHS Athletic Hall of Fame Banquet on Nov. 9 at the Carpinteria Boys & Girls Club. Inductees Kevin Purcell, Peter Ruiz, Micheline Sheaffer White, DeeAndra Pilkington McGuff and Coley Candaele were honored for their record-shattering contributions to Carpinteria sports. Carpinteria High School celebrates its 100th anniversary this year, and the Hall of Fame event served as a kickoff to a $100,000 fundraising campaign for the CHS Athletics Centennial Fund. Final numbers are still being tallied, but event coordinator Christie Cooney estimates that the event raised $20,000 toward the endowment fund.

hall of Fame inductee Micheline sheaffer white, at right, shares a laugh with lari who won a CiF championship under the tutelage of white. white, who still holds threw the discus to secure the CiF Championship in 1988. she credited the stella brother, Andy sheaffer, for setting her up for success as a thrower.

Coley Candaele stands with fellow inductees to accept proclamations from the city and county for his athletic accomplishments at Carpinteria high school. Records toppled left and right during Candaele’s swiftfooted tenure on the football and track teams. Most notably, he claimed the state champion medal in the 1600M race during his 1990 senior season. At the hall of Fame ceremony, Candaele spoke about his commitment to strive for success in every situation. Currently, he coaches football and track at Vista Murrieta high school. A2-Response Card.ai

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hall of Famer lou Panizzon, right, introduces Foresters baseball coach bill Pintard for the fundraising portion of the night’s program.

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I/WeCandaele cannot attend but like to makePilkington a tax deductibleMcGuff donation to the CHS Coley • would DeeAndra Athletics Centennial Fund in the amount of $ Kevin Purcell • Peter Ruiz • Micheline Sheaffer White Total enclosed: $

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Return to CHS Athletic Hall of Fame, c/o CEF, P.O. Box 9, Carpinteria, CA 93014 Venoco, Inc. • Kruger Bensen Ziemer Architects • Rudy Perez Painting • Robitaille’s Candies Carpinteria Education Foundation is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt charitable corporation. Agri-Turf Supplies, Inc. • Albertsons • Garibay Drywall • Reynaldo’s Bakery • Vons

Chs band teacher Elise Unruh, right, and her students prepare to perform the na

Thursday, November 14, 2013  13

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Fame

Above, Peter Ruiz, second from left, brought a dedicated cheering section to the nov. 9 ceremony. introduced by former teammate and fellow hall of Fame inductee Kevin Purcell, Ruiz was described as a leader on the basketball court and off. During his days as a warrior, 1970 to 1974, Ruiz played varsity basketball for three years and averaged 14 points a game. his skills clinched him all tVl honors in his sophomore, junior and senior seasons.

issa godkin Feramisco, a Chs thrower tVl records in the shot put and discus, ar Chs coaching staff, her parents and her

ational anthem for the packed house.

At left, Kevin Purcell humbly accepts a spot in the warrior hall of Fame. now a veteran ironman triathlete, Purcell was recognized on nov. 9 for his contributions to the Chs basketball teams of 1970 to 1974. During his senior season, Purcell captained the squad and led the team in scoring, rebounding and free throw percentage. his legacy on the court made him a standout even within a family that included athletic parents and two talented basketball-playing brothers.

while being honored for her new position in the warrior hall of Fame, DeeAndra Pilkington Mcguff, in turn, honored those who helped her to achieve phenomenal success on the softball field. Jacque geary, who coached Mcguff at Chs from 1982 to 1986, described the exceptional softball player as being goal driven and dedicated. the youngest of six siblings, Pilkington attributed her athletic achievements to a supportive family and many years of childhood baseball in the street. she was named league MVP her junior and senior years and used her softball skills to obtain a full ride scholarship at California lutheran University.

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14  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Apple of my eye

As the days get cooler and we approach the holidays, my thoughts turn to desserts, in particular those I can serve at Thanksgiving. I adore this holiday. A chance to get together with family and friends; to reconnect and take time to gather around a table with no other agenda than just enjoying each other’s company. It’s a holiday I have wholeheartedly adopted since I moved here from England more than 25 years ago. One of my favorite desserts is an apple tart (I wrote about one in this column last year), but really I love all apple desserts: puddings, cakes, apple bars, etc. So to celebrate this beautiful autumn season and the plethora of apples that are at the market, here are a couple of recipes for you. Happy Thanksgiving to all.

from provence to the pacific

Roasted spiced apples with manchego

PASCALE BEALE

Ingredients

3 Tablespoons butter 1 Tablespoon light brown sugar 3 whole cloves ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 4-5 grinds black pepper 1 pinch allspice 6-8 apples—peeled, cored and thinly sliced Wild honey Manchego cheese—you’ll need a 4-6 ounce piece that you can cut shavings from Sea salt Thick Greek yogurt (optional)

Process

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Melt the butter, sugar and spices all together in an ovenproof dish placed over medium-heat. As soon as the sugar has melted and the butter is foaming a little add in the apple slices and toss to coat well. Place the dish in the oven and roast for 30 minutes. Remove the dish from the oven and divide the apples evenly onto eight dessert plates. Drizzle a little of the alpine or wildflower honey over the top of the apples, then top this with the Manchego shavings. Add a sprinkle of fleur de sel and serve.

Recipe serves eight people. Note: You can also add a spoonful of thick yogurt on top. It’s delicious.

Apple, almond and amaretti crumble

Ingredients for the apples

6-8 large apples—peeled, cored and chopped into 1-inch pieces 1 lemon’s zest and juice 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/3 cup raisins ¼ cup sugar 1/3 cup water

Ingredients for the crumble


10 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour 1/3 cup almonds, chopped 10-12 ameretti cookies, crushed 9 ounces butter, cut into little pieces 1/3 cup sugar

Process

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Place all the apple ingredients in a deep baking dish (at least 1 ½ inches deep) and toss to combine them well.

To make the crumble, place all the flour in a large bowl. Add 8 ounces of the butter and mix it with the flour using the tips of your fingers until it resembles coarse breadcrumbs. Don’t worry if you have little lumps of butter left—it should look like that. Add in the sugar and mix to combine. Add in the chopped almonds and crushed amoretti and mix to combine. Cover the apples with the crumble mixture. Sprinkle a little extra cinnamon and sugar over the crumble. Dot the surface with the remaining butter. Bake in the center of the oven for 40 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with vanilla ice cream or a dollop of crème fraiche. Recipe serves eight people. Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that is passionate about food, wine and the arts. In 1999 she opened Montecito Country Kitchen, a Mediterranean-style cooking school based in Santa Barbara. Her company continues to expand and has launched a new product line of culinary herbs, spices salts and oils and cookware. Pascale’s new cookbook, “A Menu for all Seasons – Autumn” was released this year by Olive Tree Publishing. More information about the cooking school, products and cookbooks is available at www. pascaleskitchen.com.

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Cate School football players, from left, senior Max Vasquez and sophomore Max Vasquez, share a name and big roles on the 2013 Rams squad. BILL SWING PHOTOS

Senior Max Vasquez “Big ’Squez”

Position: Running back/ Outside Linebacker Dimensions: 5’ 10” 160 pounds Hometown: Chicago, Illinois

Maximum Vasquez

Double-dose of Max Vasquez helps advance Cate in playoffs BY PETER DUGRÉ

Teammates call them Big ’Squez and Little ’Squez, but their parents named them both Max Vasquez without knowing they were both destined to attend high school and play football together at Cate School. Now, even though the two Max Vasquezes, one a senior and one a sophomore, on Cate’s football team are a nightmare to report about—and their names deserve plenty of mention in football write ups—coaches and teammates have figured out how to communicate to them while they play integral roles on Cate’s 2013 Condor League championship squad, which is currently preparing for the second round of 8-man Division 1 playoffs. The elder, Big ’Squez, is a touchdown machine from Chicago, Ill. He scored four times last week in CIF round one and three the week before in the Condor League championship win over Thacher School. Assistant coach David Soto said it was evident from the moment he set foot on campus that he was going to be a difference maker. “He had all the talent in the world as a freshman, and now he’s finally seeing what kind of impact he can have,” Soto stated. A leader on and off the field, Vasquez is a senior prefect in the freshman dorm. The younger, Little ’Squez, proved himself valuable enough through special teams play to earn a starting role on defense as a sophomore. The opportunistic Covina, Calif. native even

turned an onside kick recovery into a touchdown. “He has a fantastic personality that makes him a natural candidate for leadership roles as he gets older,” according to Soto. He has quickly become one of the team’s most reliable and fearless tacklers. Big ’Squez has taken Little ’Squez under his wing at Cate, and they get along well. When Little ’Squez first arrived at Cate as a freshman, his immediate connection to an upperclassman served him well. He said, “It was actually kind of nice, to tell the truth. I got to meet a lot more people than I might have.” Big ’Squez said people tried to make more of a new Max Vasquez treading on his territory, but he was unfazed. “Last year with the new Max Vasquez coming everyone was trying to start some tension, but I already knew nothing was going to happen. He was going to be another freshman and just another kid who happened to have the same name as mine. We adapted to it.”

Sophomore Max Vasquez “Little ’Squez” Position: Outside Linebacker/ Tight End Dimensions: 5’ 8” 155 pounds Hometown: Covina, Calif.

Warriors fall in 42-35 thriller against #1 Oak Park BY PETER DUGRÉ

Just as quickly as Carpinteria High School football snatched a fourth-quarter lead from Oak Park High School at Carpinteria Valley Memorial Stadium on Nov. 8, the Eagles stormed back to show why they swept through Tri-Valley League this season. The Warriors had edged ahead, 35-34, on a 5-yard Bryson Frazer touchdown run with 2:30 remaining in the contest, but the Eagles needed just a minute to cover 80-yards for a touchdown to seal the 42-35 Warrior loss. “I said from the beginning I didn’t think anybody in league was going to go undefeated, because we have so many good teams,” Warrior coach Ben Hallock said. “We were within a whisker of that happening here tonight.” Going toe-to-toe with the top-ranked team in Northwest Division added another impressive line to the Warriors’ (7-3, 1-3) resume and sealed their at-large acceptance into CIF playoffs. All five Tri-

Valley League teams, the toughest league in the division based on polling, are part of the 16-team playoff field. Oak Park (9-1, 4-0) gained a 34-14 lead after scoring three unanswered touchdowns in the third quarter. That’s when Warrior senior quarterback Ian Craddock refused to roll over. On a 70-yard touchdown drive, Craddock evaded constant pressure to connect on passes of 15 yards to Ruben Garcia and 25 yards to Kevin Stein. Craddock then ran the ball on two consecutive downs to cover 15 yards and score a touchdown to help the Warriors climb to within 34-21. In total, Craddock completed 15-of-18 passes for 171 yards and a second quarter 11-yard touchdown strike to Duncan Gordon. Oak Park star quarterback Chandler Whitbord attempted to match arms with his counterpart but was intercepted by Garcia in the Warrior end zone with 11:18

Warrior Bryson Frazer proved dangerous wherever he lined up against Oak Park. He scored on a punt return, on a run from the tailback position and grabbed an interception on defense.

BILL SWING PHOTOS

Warrior quarterback Ian Craddock scored on the ground and through the air in a 42-35 Warrior loss to top-ranked Oak Park. left in the fourth quarter. Peter Ramos carried the next touchdown across on a 1-yard, fourth-down plunge to cap off an 80-yard march and reduce the deficit to 34-28 with 3:43 left in the game. Set for the onside kick, the Warriors reached into their bag of tricks. The Warrior kickoff team lined up to the left of the kicker but suddenly motioned to the right. At kicker, Craddock began to trot forward as if he was going to direct the ball right—where the team had reset— but he booted it left. Frazer remained camouflaged on the left sideline unnoticed by Oak Park. He easily recovered the ball on the Warrior 40-yard line to set the stage for the Warrior comeback. Craddock soon found Garcia on a 50yard pass that advanced the Warriors to the 5-yard line. Then Frazer, known

more for being nimble, powered the ball 5 yards up the gut to accomplish a once unthinkable comeback with 2:30 left in the game. Frazer had also scored in the second quarter on a 84-yard punt return, and he had a punt return touchdown negated by a penalty in the first quarter. Frazer also hauled in an interception in the second quarter in the Warrior end zone to preserve a 15-14 Warrior deficit entering halftime. Alas, 2:30 was too much clock for Oak Park to work with. A 32-yard touchdown pass from Whitbord followed by a successful two-point conversion put the Eagles up 42-35. The Warriors had another chance with 1:20 left, but on first down Craddock was swarmed and hit from the backside and coughed up the football. Oak Park recovered.

16  Thursday, November 14, 2013 Warrior Football

prep news

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

La Salle scouting report

The Warriors travel to Pasadena to play La Salle High School on nov. 15 at 7 p.m. in round one of CIF playoffs. La Salle (9-1) won the Del Rey League and has won seven straight games since losing 43-16 to Bishop Diego High School on Sept. 13. La Salle finished the season ranked fifth in northwest Division, ahead of the seventh-ranked Warriors.

Carpinteria High School

Boys water polo

Nov. 6 – In the final competition of the season, Warrior boys water polo dropped a home match, 17-5, to Oaks Christian High School. Noah Reed scored three goals and Thomas Fly and Zack Clayton had one apiece. Goalkeeper Zeke Hart had 14 saves. “We had an up and down season, but we learned a lot and each player grew in their individual skills. This experience should pay dividends for us in the years to come, as we are only graduating three seniors from our group of 18 players,” commented coach Bryan Swarm. The Warriors finished 7-16 overall and 2-8 in Tri-Valley League.

Cross country

Nov. 7 – Warrior boys and girls cross country teams competed in the Tri-Valley League championships at Lake Casitas. Boys finished in sixth place of 11 teams, and girls took eighth out of 12. Warrior boys were led by Giovanni Rodriguez’s 29th place in 17:54, followed by teammates Anulfo Basave (33rd, 18:05), Francisco Arroyo (34th, 18:12), Roberto Alvarez (35th, 18:12) and Eduardo Rodriguez (39th, 18:37). For the girls, Leticia Cruz finished 39th in 23:01, followed by Gaby Fantone (40th, 23:24), Lupita Saldana (50th, 26:24), Grace Delk (51st, 26:49), and Brandy Rocha (54th, 27:21). Oak Park won both girls and boys races.

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Weekend Weather Station Thursday

Friday

suNNy

High: 70 Low: 49

Saturday

suNNy

High: 67 Low: 46

HIGH TIDE

LOW TIDE

Sunrise: 6:33 am FRI 15

SAT 16

SUN 17

12:32 AM 1.2 ft. 1:47 PM 0.1 ft

1:10 AM 1.5 ft. 2:27 PM 0.2 ft

1:45 AM 1.8 ft 3:04 PM -0.4 ft

7:01 AM 5.8 ft

7:34 aM 5.9 ft

8:05 aM 5.9 ft

8:50 pM 4.0 ft

9:36 pM 3.9 ft

partly Cloudy

partly Cloudy

High: 63 Low: 44

THU 14

8:00 pM 4.1 ft

Sunday

High: 65 Low: 44

Sun s et: 4: 5 4 pm MON 18

TUE 19

WED 20

2:18 AM 2.0 ft 3:41 PM -0.5 ft

2:50 AM 2.3 ft 4:17 PM -0.4 ft

3:21 AM 2.5 ft 4:54 PM -0.3 ft

3:54 AM 2.6 ft 5:33 PM -0.1 ft

8:36 aM 5.9 ft

9:06 aM 5.8 ft

9:38 aM 5.6 ft

10:11 aM 5.4 ft

10:20 pM 3.8 ft

Cate School Athletes of the Week

11:04 pM 3.7 ft

11:48 pM 3.6 ft

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BILL SWInG

Cate water polo player Alex Brown unleashes a strike in a 13-7 Rams loss against Nordhoff to end the season.

Boys water polo

Cate School

Nov. 6 – Cate boys water polo lost to nordhoff, 13-7, to close the season. Zack Allen had four goals; Alex Brown had two; and senior Matthew Firestone managed a goal despite an illness that kept him at half strength in his final game for the Rams. Coach nathan Alldredge commented, “It seemed as if nothing could go right for the Rams.” The team, which dropped to 4-9 on the season and 2-8 in Tri-Valley League, was coming off its best match of the year, a win over Carpinteria, but could not duplicate the performance. The Rams ended with a season split against the Rangers. “Cate returns the core of this young team next year, and will look to build on a season that was filled with some great victories and good memories,” Alldredge said.

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK Bryson Frazer (senior) Football

Scored two touchdowns and intercepted a pass against Oak Park.

Summer Christensen (Freshman)

Kate Dehlendorf (Junior)

Girls tennis

The #1 doubles team picked up three crucial wins to help Cate top Windward in their playoff match.

Ian Craddock (senior) Football

Threw and ran for touchdowns against Oak Park.

CORNERSTONE PHOTOGRAPHY

Cate School’s Delaney Mayfield (#15) reaches for a ball in a Condor League championship loss to rival Laguna Blanca.

Girls volleyball

Nov. 6 – In a clash of Condor League and Division 4A titans, Cate girls volleyball lost 3-0 (25-19, 25-23, 25-19) at Laguna Blanca. Cate entered the match as the top-ranked squad in Division 4A—having swiped the spot from second-ranked Laguna Blanca in their last meeting, a 3-1 Cate win—but had trouble handling strong Laguna serves. The teams share the Condor League championship due to the season series split. Cydney Pierce had 12 kills, and Delaney Mayfield had nine. “Laguna’s tough serving caused trouble with our passing,” commented coach Greg novak. “We couldn’t get the ball to the net to run our middles, which is where we were converting.” The Rams led game two 20-18 but could not hold off Laguna.

Thursday, November 14, 2013  17

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Rams rally in round one, 59-18, over Upland Christian

Kelsie Bryant and the Warrior girls tennis team will have hosted Arlington High School in the semifinals on Nov. 13 after press time. The girls won handily through three playoff rounds of their CIF championship defense.

BY ALONZO OROZCO

Warrior girls tennis stampedes to semifinals

BILL SWING

have to be at our best to win this one.” In the quarterfinals, freshman Odessa Stork won her two sets, including a 6-1 win over Beaumont’s previously undefeated top player. Stork swept three sets in round one, and in round two shifted to doubles to earn a three-set sweep with teammate Emily Saito. Bryant commented that doubles play was most impressive in the quarterfinals. Merissa Souza/Gabi Montes De Oca swept three sets including a comeback from a 5-2 deficit to win 7-5. “If we can just keep them on that level, they are a hard team to beat,” stated Bryant. They are 8-1 in the playoffs. Lesly Zapata/Natalie Saito went 2-0 in the quarterfinals and are 6-0 together in the playoffs. And Makenna Pike/Emily Saito went 2-1 in the quarterfinals and bounced back following a tough loss in their first set of the day. The Warriors improved to 21-2 on the season heading into the semifinals. --Peter Dugré

Three straight lopsided wins to open Division 5 CIF playoffs have landed Carpinteria High School girls tennis in the semifinals for the third straight season. The defending CIF champion Warriors opened playoffs with a 17-1 win over Sierra Vista High School on Nov. 6; they then traveled to Moreno Valley to defeat Vista Del Lago High School, 17-1, on Nov. 8. On Nov. 11, the team picked up a 15-3 win in the quarterfinals at previously undefeated Beaumont High School. The Warriors have ridden balanced, steady play from all over the roster to their victories. Top singles player Kelsie Bryant has yet to lose a game in her 9-0 streak over the three matches. Also in singles, Kassandra Ni had been playing near perfect tennis through the quarterfinals but suffered an injury in her last set, making her presence uncertain for the semifinals on Wednesday, Nov. 13, against Arlington High School at CHS, after press time. Ni was 2-0 in the quarterfinals before forfeiting her last set. Of the impending match with Arlington, coach Charles Bryant stated, “This will be an incredibly tough and close match. They are very strong, and we will

Editor’s note: See page 1 for press time coverage of semifinals

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Playing some good, old-fashioned, smash-mouth football, the Cate School Rams ran through, over and around the visiting Upland Christian Academy (UCA) Eagles en route to a 59-18 victory during the first round of the CIF 8-Man Division 1 playoffs. Senior running back Max Vasquez bested his three touchdowns last week by scoring four in the game played on Nov. 9 at Thayer Peck Athletic Field on the Cate campus. Vasquez credited offensive linemen Kian O’Connor, Zach Ell, Peter Kim, Abraham Tall and Keller Mochel for their key contributions to the win. But it was the Eagles who got on the scoreboard first. On the third play of the game, UCA quarterback Erik Dahler found tight end Caeden Barnes. After making the catch, Barnes eluded the final defender on his way to the end zone, completing the 65-yard touchdown play to give the Eagles a 6-0 lead. However, the Rams countered right away, running downhill with Vasquez and fullback Nik Pajouh to earn a first and goal at the UCA 7. Oddly enough, Cate took the lead on the only pass play of the drive with quarterback John Basar finishing with a 7-yard shovel pass to Pajouh for the touchdown and a 7-6 lead. The Eagles answered the call with a drive of their own, ending with Dahler hooking up with fullback Beau McCombs on a short touchdown pass to put UCA back on top 12-7. “The guy’s (Dahler) 6-4 and 210 (pounds); the guy can throw the ball,” explained Cate coach Ben Soto of the opposing quarter-

back, who threw for three touchdowns on the afternoon. On the very next play from scrimmage, the Rams recaptured the lead when Vasquez got outside the edge, racing down the sidelines for a 65yard touchdown run and a 14-12 lead. With the quarter coming to an end, it was the Cate defense that came up with the big play, as Pajouh from his linebacker position, pulled down Dahler’s floater for an interception. The turnover led to Oliver Welch’s 36-yard field goal early in the second quarter to make it a 17-12 game. After the defense forced the Eagles to punt, the Rams started the next drive at their own 15. A trick play, utilizing quarterback Michael Nettesheim as a receiver, gave Cate a first down at the UCA 26. This led to Vasquez’s 26-yard burst for a second touchdown to widen the margin to 24-12. With the score still 24-12 in the third quarter, the Eagles drove down to the Cate five. That would be as far as they would advance, as the Rams defense stiffened, forcing UCA to give up the ball on downs. Vasquez added a touchdown reception and another 45-yard jaunt off tackle for a score. Tight end Abraham Tall also ran one in on a 30yard reverse, and running back Isaiah Washington scored on a 25-yard run. The defense contributed to the scoring deluge when Andrew Smith scooped up a fumble for the final score. Cate travels to Faith Baptist for a second rough match on Friday, Nov. 15, at 2:30 p.m. in Canoga Park.

Second-ranked Rams win playoffs opener Cate School girls volleyball rolled over Rolling Hills Prep, last season’s champion, in the Division 4A CIF playoffs on Nov. 12. The Rams won 3-0 (25-13, 25-6, 25-8) at home and put their Nov. 6 loss to topranked Laguna Blanca out of mind. In a near flawless performance, the Ram attack started with setters Ellen Lempres and Brenna Geiger, whose smooth passing benefited the big hitters. Delaney Mayfield led with eight kills; Peyton Shelburne had seven; Maddie Becker had six; and Cydney Pierce and Tamsyn Walker had five apiece. Coach Greg Novak noted that tough serves by the Rams produced points as well. In total, 20 of the Rams’ 72 serves were aces to only two service errors. The Rams play again on Thursday, Nov. 12, at St. Mary’s Academy in Inglewood.

Xandrine Griffin and Cate School volleyball overpowered Rolling Hills Prep in CIF Division 4A round one. The second-seeded Rams play again on Thursday, Nov. 14 at St. Mary’s Academy in Inglewood.

18  Thursday, November 14, 2013

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_________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as sally’s alley at 201 Valhalla Drive, Solvang, CA 93463. Full name of registrant(s): (1) Macfadyen, Donald A. (2)Macfadyen, Sally R. both at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a a married couple. This statement was filed with the County 10/14/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 1/1/1974. Signed: D. A. Mcfadyen. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by N/A, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003136 Publish: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Surveying services at 5450 Granada Way, Carpinteria, CA 93013 (PO Box 989, Carpinteria, CA 93014). Full name of registrant(s): Jahns, Dan at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a a individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/25/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 1/1/1982. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003263 Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013. _________________________________ OR R O SH SE FOR C

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Public Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1)Green Cab (2) Green Taxi (3) Green Yellow Can at 3340 McCaw Avenue #214, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Full name of registrant(s): Santa Barbara Green Taxi Co. at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/15/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 8/30/2013. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Danielle Gomez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003157 Publish: Oct 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Bail hotline bail bonds at 4390 Calle Real, Suite B, Santa Barbara, CA 93110 (3601 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92501). Full name of registrant(s): DMCG, Inc. at business address 3601 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92501. This business is conducted by a corporation. This statement was filed with the County 10/02/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: DMCG, Inc. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003031 Publish: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as game seeker at 537 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): Gerr, Lisa at business address 71 Vista Del Mar, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 9/25/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 9/1/2008. Signed: Lisa Gerr. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by N/A, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0002982 Publish: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2013.

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TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Cynthia Ellen Fairbanks (2005 Alameda Padre Serra #B, Santa Barbara, CA 93103) for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Cynthia Ellen Fairbanks PROPOSED NAME: Cynthia Ellen Davis

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on Dec. 4, 2013 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Oct. 22, 2013 by Publish: October 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Freefall press at 6940 Casitas Pass Road, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Strube, Jennifer at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/25/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Jennifer Strube. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Andrea Luparello, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003276 Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as tacklebox creative at 2896 Hidden Valley Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. Full name of registrant(s): (1) Jones, Sandra (2)Maynard, Hal both at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a Jount Venture. This statement was filed with the County 10/24/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Danielle Gomez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003256 Publish: Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as VC Contruction at 1316 De La Guerra Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 (PO Box 1051, Santa Barbara, CA 93102). Full name of registrant(s): Chavez, Victor at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/09/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 5/1/1992. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement gener-

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ally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003097 Publish: Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1)Copyright printing systems (2) copyrightsB (3) Ecoursereaders.com at 5710 Hollister Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117. Full name of registrant(s): Mansur, Phebe at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/14/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Phebe Mansur. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003127 Publish: Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013. _________________________________ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE NO.1438090 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Carolyn Jean Damon (PO Box 21425, Santa Barbara, CA 93121) for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Carolyn Jean Damon PROPOSED NAME: Carolyn Chyna Wojciechowski

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court on Jan. 08, 2014 at 9:30 am to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. The address of the court is 1100 Anacapa Street, Dept. 6, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Filed at Santa Barbara Superior Court on Oct. 21, 2013 by Publish: November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Acorn business services at 1735 Gillespie Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): Voigt, Marlene at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 10/31/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Marlene S. Voigt. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The

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filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam Leon, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003340 Publish: Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as FG4U LLC at 1092 Palmetto Way unit G, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): FG4U LLC at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. This statement was filed with the County 10/15/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Hector Gonzalez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003148 Publish: Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Ditec Mfg. at 1019 Mark Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Stonecelt, Inc. at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a corporation. This statement was filed with the County 11/06/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 3/22/2000. Signed: Don L. Cooper, President. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Danielle Gomez, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003384 Publish: Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1)Ocean homes (2)Santa Barbara Estates at 1072 Casitas Pass Road, #139, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Page, Christopher Alan at business address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/06/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: Christopher Alan Page. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify

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this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003389 Publish: Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Cozy Fox at 623 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (419 St. Andrews Way, Santa Maria, CA 93455). Full name of registrant(s): Yimax Clothing, Inc at mailing address same as above. This business is conducted by a corporation. This statement was filed with the County 11/07/2013. The registrant began transacting business on 11/7/2013. Signed: Cozy Fox. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Ruiz, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003394 Publish: Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2013. _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Merit Office cleaning at 1546 Myra Street, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): Hollander, Howard at mailing address same as above. This business is conducted by a individual. This statement was filed with the County 11/12/2013. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: N/A. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello, Deputy County Clerk, Recorder and Assessor, No. 2013-0003431 Publish: Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2013. _________________________________

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20  Thursday, November 14, 2013

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A reader sends a halo to Frank James for repeatedly requesting a fix for the rattling manhole cover on Carpinteria Avenue near Franklin Creek, and to Southern California Edison for following through with the repairs to quiet the clatter.

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Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate

28 Work well together 30 Bugs, for one 33 Cream of the crop 34 Upping the ante 35 Earhart or Lindbergh 36 Cuban coin 37 On edge 38 Blog update 39 Diner staple 40 Dye ingredient 41 Atomic center

42 Courtroom evidence, sometimes 47 Right-hand page 48 Gold digger? 50 River sediment 51 Frat party garb 53 Give the go-ahead 54 Ebay action 55 Hour after midnight 56 Filming site

Answer to Last Week's Crossword S P A R

T O M E

E P I C

B U S H

U N T O

P R I C K

R U N O N

R E O R G A N I Z E

M S E W D E I P E C A T T E A R N R I E R O R A T Y V H I T I A E N A D

5 3 1 4

T A Y I R E M M A W B R O W A L K E N Y E D M D M A C A N M E L E A N T A N T T T I V E E M I R L E E S

G R A S P N O B L E A T S O N W T O N R I P E C A N O D E S T R I N E R T I C L E E E L K G E E N N I S D O T E O V E R N A M E

8 4 1 5 2 9 3 8 1 6 7 1 5 2

A reader sends a halo to the man who found the reader’s wallet in the street and brought his son to the reader’s house to return it. “There was a lot of cash in that wallet, and he wanted no reward. He taught a valuable lesson to his young son, and I hope he reads this to know how grateful I am.” A reader sends a halo to Bikesmiths for a fantastic tune-up. “It feels like I am riding a new bike. Thank you!” A reader sends a halo to John Wullbrandt for the most amazing mermaid/neptune combination this side of the Mississippi. A reader sends a halo to Karen, Julie and Lisa who were hugely helpful in the reader’s crosstown move. “Awesome karma to them.” A reader sends a halo to everyone who helped make the ribbon cutting and grand opening of Curious Cup and Carpinteria Toy Co. a huge success. “Thank you.” A reader sends a halo to Michelle Villegas for her HopeNet presentation on the Power of a Compassionate Heart. A reader sends a halo to Canalino School teacher Alice Bingham. “You gave our children a wonderful educational experience in preparing and performing the Character Counts play. We greatly appreciate all the effort.” A reader sends a halo to all the kind people who look after our downtown friend Richard. “He remembers you. Special gratitude to the folks who let him visit with their friendly dogs.” A reader sends a halo to Pat Cooney of Carpinteria High School for his continued efforts as a teacher, baseball coach and athletic director at CHS. He spends countless hours working for the sole benefit of the athletes and athletic staff on campus. A reader sends a pitchfork to the young man who allowed his beautiful grey pit bull to poop on a neighbor’s lawn, looked around to see if anyone was watching and then walked away. “You should be ashamed of yourself. You are a poor example of a resident of Carpinteria.” A reader sends a pitchfork to the person(s) who tried to egg the reader’s house and broke the window on Halloween. “If the curtains hadn’t been closed, the dogs would have been covered in glass. And it cost us money to replace the window.” A reader sends a pitchfork to the inconsiderate and irresponsible dog owners with off-leash dogs on the brand new Franklin Trail. “Your blatant disregard for the law could mean closure of a new local treasure.” A reader sends a pitchfork to the renters on El Carro Lane for having a mess all over the front of the yard. A reader sends a pitchfork to whoever egged our house. “Really? Grow up.”

7

6 9 8 1 2 3 3 7 4 6 9 8 5 1

5 8 6 3 7 9 4 5 8 6 8 7 3 6 3

A reader sends a halo to RiteAid’s pharmacy staff, Rick, Andre, Barbara and Sin, for great service and answering all of the reader’s questions. A reader sends a halo to Debbie at RiteAid for ordering the reader’s special request and being so courteous. The reader also sends a halo to Manager Bruce and all his great staff.

48

7

1 3

10

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Level: Hard

6

9

15

Sudoku

Each Sudoku has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

Halos Pitchforks

by Margie E. Burke 5

ACROSS 1 Dressed for a 14 joust 16 8 Did a lutz 14 Major or little 18 follower 21 15 South African leader 25 26 16 Nimbly 30 17 "Arabian Nights" 29 character 32 18 Stein fillers 34 35 36 19 Button alternative 43 20 ___ be an 46 honor... 21 Stately trees 49 50 22 Easy to break 52 53 24 Black gold 25 Stretch the truth 57 26 Sparkly 59 headpiece 27 Crack up 29 Marvelous 31 Lemon peels, DOWN 1 Carte lead-in sometimes 32 Umpire's call 2 Trappings of 33 Commuter's royalty 3 Cliff Clavin's option coworkers 34 Burger extra 37 Position of 4 Looks up and control down 43 Big occasion 5 Wishes undone 44 Library taboo 6 Snakelike fish 45 One with a habit 7 Martini order 46 ___ Lizzie 8 Evergreen (Model T) shrub 47 Odometer button 9 Sack starter 48 Flaky rock 10 Dipstick word 49 Body art, briefly 11 Boring 50 Usher's offering 12 Snobby sort 51 Work the soil 13 Bounces a baby 52 Tilted type 15 "Flashdance" tune 54 Rural area, 19 Calcutta wrap slangily 57 Stocking stuffer, 21 2003 Will Ferrell maybe film 58 Babe in the 22 Solidarity woods symbol 59 Picturesque 23 Stool pigeon 26 Talk trash cave 60 1981 film, 27 Color of a "Mommie _____" cloudless sky

Level: Easy

&

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

1 2

8 5 9 3 2 6 5

Puzzle by websudoku.com

A reader sends a pitchfork to the grocery store that makes its customers enter and exit through a windstorm. “It is extremely unpleasant.”

5 9 7

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Last week’s answers: 2 5 3 6 7 9 8 4 1

9 1 8 4 5 3 6 7 2

7 6 4 8 2 1 3 5 9

3 9 1 7 4 2 5 8 6

8 2 6 9 3 5 7 1 4

4 7 5 1 6 8 9 2 3

6 3 2 5 8 4 1 9 7

1 8 7 2 9 6 4 3 5

5 4 9 3 1 7 2 6 8

7 3 9 1 2 8 5 4 6

6 5 8 4 7 9 3 1 2

2 4 1 6 3 5 7 9 8

1 7 4 2 8 3 6 5 9

5 8 3 9 1 6 2 7 4

9 2 6 7 5 4 1 8 3

4 1 2 8 6 7 9 3 5

3 9 7 5 4 2 8 6 1

8 6 5 3 9 1 4 2 7

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Civic Calendar

Thursday, November 14

Carpinteria Unified School District Board of Education meeting, 5:30 p.m., Council Chambers, City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave., 684-4511

Friday, November 15

SB S. County Architectural Board of Review meeting, 9 a.m., 123 E. Anapamu St., Rm. 17, Santa Barbara

Tuesday, November 19

City of Carpinteria Architectural Review Board meeting, 5:30 p.m., Council Chambers, City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave., 684-5405

Ongoing

County Supervisor Salud Carbajal drop in office hours, Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Carpinteria Children’s Project at Main, 5201 8th St. Rm. 101, 568-2186

Thursday, November 14, 2013  21

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

calendar hindsight

Thursday, November 14

Library preschooler story time, 10:30 a.m., Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 684-4314 Rotary Club of Carpinteria meeting, 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., Lions Park Community Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428 building, 6197 Casitas Pass Road, non-members RSVP to 886-6463 Bingo, 1 p.m., Veterans building, 941 Walnut Ave. Free Stress Relief Veteran’s Acupuncture Clinic, 6-7 p.m. drop in, 4690 Carpinteria Ave. Ste. A, 684-5012 Carpinteria Community Church Choir Practice, 7-9 p.m.,1111 Vallecito Road, 745-1153 Karaoke, 8 p.m., Carpinteria & Linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria Linden Ave. The Youngster, 8:30 p.m., the Palms, 701 Linden Ave., 684-3811

Thursday, March 14, 2013  25

calendar hindsight

Friday, November 15

The Peace Vigil, 5-6 p.m., corner of Linden & Carpinteria Ave. Rude Mood, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 Linden Ave., 684-3811

Thursday, March 14 Saturday, November 16

Library preschooler story time, 10:30 a.m., Carpinteria library, 5141 Carpinteria Chalk Walk, 10-11 a.m., former Curious Cup bookstore, 929 Linden Ave. 220Ave.,your 684-4314 6608. Rotary Club of Carpinteria meeting, 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., lions Park Community Carpinteria Salt Casitas Marsh docent led non-members tours, 10 a.m.,rSVP free walks start from the park Building, 6197 Pass road, to 566-1906 sign, 684-8077 Bingo, 1 p.m., Veterans Building, 941 Walnut Ave. John Daly talk, 11 a.m.-1 Porch, 3823 Santa Claus Lane,Ave. 684-0300 Farmers Market and Artsp.m., & Crafts Fair, 3-6:30 p.m., linden downtown, Craft Energy Balancing, 2-4 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 Linden Ave., Free fair: 684-2770 Virginia McCracken artist reception, 3-5 p.m., Porch, Lane, 684-0300 Free Stress Relief Veteran’s Acupuncture Clinic, 6-73823 p.m.Santa dropClaus in, 4690 Carpinteria Uptown Brothers, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 Linden Ave., 684-3811 Ave. Ste. A, 684-5012 Karaoke, 8 p.m., Carpinteria & linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria linden Ave. Sunday, Dusty Jugz November Country Night,17 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden Ave., 684-3811 Scrabble, 1-4 p.m., Shepard Place Apartment Clubhouse, 1069 Casitas Pass Road, free, 453-2956 Friday, March 15 CVCC Lunch & Learn, noon-1 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., 684-5479 x10. Monday, November 18 of linden & Carpinteria Ave. The Peace Vigil, 5-6 p.m., corner Music in our1Schools Month Concert, 7:30 p.m., CHS cafeteria, 4810 foothill road, Mah Jongg, p.m., Sandpiper mobile Village clubhouse, 3950 Via Real, 729-1310 684-4701 Bingo, 1 p.m., Veterans building, 941 Walnut Ave. Back Track, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden Ave., 684-3811 Celebrate Recovery (Hurts, Hangups, Addictions), 6 p.m., First baptist Church, 5026 Foothill Rd., 684-3353

Saturday, March 16 Tuesday, Salt November 19 led tours, 10 a.m., free walks start from the park Carpinteria Marsh docent

sign, 684-8077 Carpinteria Writers’ Group, 10 a.m.-noon, Carpinteria Library multipurpose room, Magicarp PokemonAve., League, 11 a.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., (619) 972-3467 5141 Carpinteria 684-7838 Energy Balancing, 2-4 p.m., Curious 929Sandpiper linden Ave., free Village Clubhouse, Sandpiper Duplicate Bridge Club, Cup, 1 p.m., mobile “The Quiet Man,” 8 p.m., Plaza Playhouse theater, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., $5 3950 Via Real, 684-5522 The Groovie Line, 9club, p.m.,3:30 thep.m., Palms, 701 linden 684-3811 Battle of the Books Curious Cup, Ave., 929 Linden Ave., 220-6608 Al-Anon Meeting, 7-8 p.m., Faith Lutheran Church, 1335 Vallecito Place, 331-4817

Monday, March 18 Wednesday, November 20 p.m., Girls inc. of Carpinteria, 5315 foothill Women of Inspiration, 11:30 a.m.-1:30

road, $70, 684-6364 Morning Rotary meeting “Avofest”, 7-8 a.m., Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Rd., $10 Basic Bridge,10:30-noon, 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile Village club, clubhouse, 3950 ViaRd., real, 684-5921 Meditation, Carpinteria Woman’s 1059 Vallecito 861-8858 Mah Jongg, 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile Village clubhouse, 3950 Via real, 729-1310 Food Distribution, 12:30 p.m., St. Joseph Church, 1500 Linden Ave., 684-2181 Bingo, 1 p.m., Veterans Building, 941 Walnut Ave. Knitting Group, 1-4 p.m., Veterans memorial hall, 941 Walnut Ave., free, 684-8077 Celebrate Recovery (Hurts, Hangups, Addictions), 6 p.m., first Baptist Church, Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group, 2-4 p.m., Faith Lutheran Church, 13555026 Valfoothill rd., carpcaregivers1@gmail.com, 684-3353 lecito Place, 684-0567 CVCC’s Cuba Trip Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Carpinteria library Multi-Purpose room, 5141 Middle School book club, 3:30 Curious Cup, 929 Linden Ave., 220-6608 Carpinteria 684-5479 x105:30-7 p.m., Canalino School, 1480 Carpinteria Ave., Fighting BackAve., Parent Program, A Community Toolbox: 963-1433 x125 or x132 How to Serve the Depressed Person with Understanding, 7-8:30 p.m., Carpinteria Club,memorial 1059 Vallecito 684-2509 Kiwanis Club Meeting, 6 Woman’s p.m., Veterans hall, road, 941 Walnut Ave., 368-5644 SkateGarden Community Forum, 6-7:15 p.m., Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Road Tuesday, March 19 Coastal ViewCops, Book9-11 Club meeting, 7:30 p.m., Library, x437 684-4428 Coffee with a.m., Crushcakes, 4945Carpinteria Carpinteriabranch Ave., 684-5405 8 Ball Tournament, 7:30 p.m., Carpinteria & Linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria Writers’ Group, 10 a.m.-noon, Carpinteria library multipurpose room, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 684-7838 ONGOING Sandpiper Duplicate Bridge Club, 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile Village Clubhouse, 3950Hopkins Via real,art 684-5522 Irene show, island brewing Co., 5049 6th St., 745-8272 Battle of the Books club, 3:30 p.m., 929 linden Ave.,Ave., 220-6608 Edgar Landeros photography show,Curious CorktreeCup, Cellars, 910 Linden 684-1400 Beginner Meditation Workshop, 6:30 p.m., Curious Cup back meeting Virginia McCracken art show, Porch, 3823 Santa Claus Lane, 684-0300 room, 929 linden Ave., art 705-4703 Rosa Markolf show, Friends of the Library used bookstore, 5103 Carpinteria Al-Anon Meeting, 7-8 p.m., faith lutheran Church, 1335 Vallecito Place, 331-4817 Ave., 566-0033 ESL 7 p.m., first Church, 5026 foothill road, free, 684-3353 TanaClass, Vivian abstract artBaptist show, Lucky Llama, 5100 Carpinteria Ave., 684-8811 Go Figure, Palm Loft Gallery, 410 Palm Ave., 684-9700 Homework Center Masks Wednesday, March 20show, Carpinteria Library multipurpose Room, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 684-4314 Morning Rotary meeting with Cyndi Macias, The Gym Next Door, 7-8 a.m.,

Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito rd., $10 Meditation, 10:30-noon, Carpinteria Woman’s club, 1059 Vallecito rd., 847-208-6520 Knitting Group, 1-4 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnut Ave., free, 684-8077 Fighting Back Parent Program, 5:30-7 p.m., Canalino School, 1480 Carpinteria Ave., Freemasonry is the world’s first and largest fraternal organization, 963-1433 x125 or x132 based on the belief that each man has a responsibility to make Kiwanis Club Meeting, 6 world p.m., aVeterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnutin Ave., 368-5644 the better place. The fraternity originated the Middle Coastal View Book Club Ages meeting, 7:30 p.m., Carpinteria Branch library, 684-4428 with stonemasons who built castles and cathedrals, 8 Ball Tournament, 7:30 p.m.,Freemasonry Carpinteria &today linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria linden Ave. provides men with opportunities

Questions about Freemasonry?

for fellowship, community service, philanthropy and leadership. The Masons of California have more than 62,000 members and about 340 lodges located throughout the state. ONGOING For more information, visit freemason.org. Lani Garfield photography show, island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., 745-8272 Carpinteria Lodge 444 • Call 684-4433

Michael Fisher Fish art show, Corktree Cellars, 910 linden Ave., 684-1400 Liz Brady art show, Porch, 3823 Santa Claus lane, 684-0300 Arturo Tello art show, friends of the library used Bookstore, 5103 Carpinteria Ave., 566-0033

Submitted Photo

A teenaged John Wullbrandt performs magic at Santa Barbara’s Parma School, a special education facility. Wullbrandt, was CArPiNteriA VAlley who MuSeuM of HiStory trained in magic by Bill Adams (aka Ling Lee), earned top junior As the nation gears up for March Madness (starting March 19), CVN awards it inwould the Senior Maldo Assembly ofthe Society American with an thought be appropriate to stoke fire ofofexcitement Magicians. He went on to perform with Dai Vernon, Dick Zimermon image of Carpinteria’s version of highly competitive basketball. Sports and Harry Blackstone Jr. and others who started the Magic Castle rivals Carpinteria and Bishop Diego high schools vie for a piece of in the Los Angeles. ball at this Feb. 7, 1978 game.

Readers– • Caption this photo •

He said, she said

Bring on the funny! Send us your best caption for this photo by Monday, March 25. Coastal View News is ready to get a little silly with Carpinteria history, and we’d like readers to join us by coming up with clever captions for photos from the past. At the end of each month we’ll publish our favorite caption submissions from readers. Get creative, get goofy, but keep comments brief and don’t expect CVN to print any inappropriate language or innuendo. All submissions will be edited for grammar, punctuation, length and content. Please send captions to news@coastalview. com. Caption writers selected for publication will receive the following grand prizes: bragging rights, name in ink) for andthis photo by Friday, Nov. 22. Send uslights your(well, bestblack caption a free copy of Coastal View News from any rack Carpinteria Coastal ViewinNews is readyValley. to get a little silly with Carpinteria history, and we’d like readers to join us by coming up with clever captions for photos from the past. At To learn about Carpinteria’s unique and interesting past,submissions visit the Carpinteria Valley the end more of each month we’ll publish our favorite caption from readers. Museum of History, Tuesday through Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at 956CVN Maple Get creative, get open goofy, but keep comments brief and don’t expect to Ave. print any inappropriate language or innuendo. All submissions will be edited for grammar, punctuation, length and content. Please send captions to news@coastalview. com. Caption writers selected for publication will receive the following grand prizes: bragging rights, name in lights (well, black ink) and a free copy of Coastal View News from any rack Thursday, March 14 in Carpinteria Valley.

He said, she said Bring on the funny!

Civic

City of Carpinteria Architectural Review Board meeting, 5:30 p.m., Council ChamTo learn more about Carpinteria’s unique and interesting past, visit the Carpinteria Valley bers, City Hall, 5775 Carpinteria Ave., 684-5405 Museum of History, open Tuesday through Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at 956 Maple Ave.

Friday, March 15

SB S. County Architectural Board of Review meeting, 9 a.m., 123 e. Anapamu St., rm. 17, Santa Barbara

22  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

snapshots

Going nuts CHRISTIE BOYD

carpe carpinteria Retired firefighter Bill Green, right, enjoys a free hot dog courtesy of Bill “Hot Dog Man” Connell, pictured at left, who handed out free dogs to military vets on Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

With the evenings lengthening, it seems everyone is spending more time indoors and hunkering down, getting ready for the real darkness of winter. Even here in the moderate climate of Carpinteria, evenings inside can bring back childhood memories of family and time-passing strategies to cope with the colder and longer nights. My memories include hours with multiple nutcrackers and a large bowl of varied nuts in shells that, we as children, would sit around, passing the nutcrackers, tasting each of the different varieties. Those memories stir me to think about what kinds of nuts would grow here in our fairly warm winters and mild summers. Tree grown nuts generally require hot summers and a certain amount of chill hours (temperatures at or below 45 degrees), but there are quite a few varieties that will grow here successfully.

used in floral arrangements. The hardiest of the macadamias for Southern California is a hybrid named “Beaumont” that will produce nuts three to five years after planting. Macadamia nut husks are tough and hard to crack. They are best harvested after they drop to the ground in the fall. The nut itself is buttery and rich; well worth the effort of cracking.

Almonds

Almonds are the number one farm crop in California. Seventy five percent of the world’s almonds come from California, with Northern California being the stronger regional producer. The Southern California coast is generally thought of as being too mild and moderate to grow almonds, but one varietal, the “All-in-One” almond tree, is very successful in our area. The All-in-One is a self pollinating tree that is diminutive in stature (15 feet) but produces a large, soft-shelled nut that is very sweet and delicious. Needing only 500 chill hours, the All-in-One is a good choice for Carpinteria.

DAN TErry

Walnuts

DOBBINS

“The Corner of Toys and Books” met the Carpinteria Valley Chamber of Commerce’s super-sized scissors on the evening of Nov. 8, and the rest is grand opening history. The chamber ribbon cutting launched a weekend of festivities at the newly merged Curious Cup and Carpinteria Toy Company, two businesses under one roof at 5285 Carpinteria Ave.

Perhaps the largest in size of the coastal nut trees, walnuts (Juglans) are not an uncommon sight in our area. As a genus, they can grow to an impressive 65 feet. Native to Southern California, the species Juglans californica is a single or multitrunked tree that typically grows from 15 to 30 feet tall. It is very drought tolerant and happy in poor, dry soil. While their size may be medium to large, walnuts tend to be a delicately leafed tree that is often planted as a shade tree. Take care in your planting location as the tree is known for dripping a sticky sap that can be difficult to remove from cars parked underneath. Used by the Chumash as a food source, the nut of the californica is smaller than other walnut tree nuts, but with its thin husk, is easy to crack and quite tasty.

Peanuts

Peanuts are an anomaly. Unlike the other nuts, peanuts are actually grown in the soil, not on a tree. Arachis hypogaea, as peanuts are known botanically, are actually a vegetable in disguise—they are most closely related to the pea family. Originally from South America, peanuts are easy to grow, but sandy soil is a must. “Jumbo Virginia” is a good choice for home gardeners and should be planted in the spring after any danger of frost has passed. Approximately 120 days after planting, the 10 to 20 inch plant tops should yellow and pull up easily with multiple peanuts attached to the roots. Let the peanuts dry on the vines for a couple of weeks before shelling and then dry the individual nuts again before eating. Peanuts and peanut butter are the most popular of all nuts and nut butters consumed in the United States. So, if the electricity goes off and your television and computer are as dark as the nights, consider the fun of cracking your own homegrown nuts. Spring is the planting time for nut trees, and it will be here before you know it. Christie Boyd is the co-owner of Porch home and garden store, located at 3823 Santa Claus Lane. She is a plant lover and long-time Carpinterian whose interests reach far beyond the garden.

Macadamia Nuts

DOBBINS

Fosters Freeze is now a hot spot for classic cars every second Friday of the month. On the evening of Nov. 8 the burger joint looked like a scene from “American Graffiti,” with shiny chrome parked on every patch of pavement.

Another nut that is seeing some popularity in this area is the macadamia nut. Macadamia integrifolia and Macadamia tetraphylla are the two species commonly grown. These trees are native to Australia and grow from 30 to 40 feet tall. Their foliage is thick and leathery and is sometimes

www. coastalview. com

Thursday, November 14, 2013  23

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

on the road Holiday Ta-Da!! Saturday, November 16th, 10-5 We’ve unwrapped our holiday magic! Join us for a day of frolicking, festivities, & finery. 11-1 pm John Daly, Book signing and spirited discussion on Holiday Etiquette 3-5 pm Artist Reception with Virginia McCracken Milk & cookies available to all good girls and boys

CVN gains Nicaraguan following

Coastal View News touched down in Nicaragua on a mission to promote community health along with Alexis Siegel, an employee of rural health nonprofit, AMOS Health and Hope. Siegel made it to over 25 rural communities throughout the country, where she helped support and train community health promoters and implemented household water treatment systems. CVN made its cameo when Siegel visited her friend Brie in San Onofre where they applied fluoride to school children’s teeth. When not on duty, Siegel made it to the volcanic island of Ometepe and took surf lessons in the balmy beachtown of San Juan del Sur.

CVN takes bite out of Big Apple

Reggie Hepp ushered Coastal View News to as many sites as time allowed on a recent weeklong adventure in New York City. Hepp was catching up with four friends whom she met in 1998 during the first annual 60-mile Avon Breast Cancer Walk in Santa Barbara. The fivesome had no trouble putting their feet to pavement in NYC to put checkmarks on their must-see list, including the 9/11 Memorial where they unveiled CVN. They’ve walked in 15 Avon events around the country—that’s 900 miles and many dollars in the fight against breast cancer.

Going on the road?

Snap a photo with your Coastal View News in hand and

email it to news@coastalview.com. Tell us about your trip!

3823 Santa Claus Lane • Carpinteria • 684.0300

Girlfriend Guru Dear Girlfriend Guru, A good friend and I had children about the same time. We have been friends for years, and although we have had our issues, we have always been very close. She is a great person, but as a parent she’s a nightmare! She has no boundaries, her kids run wild everywhere, she has no schedule, and her children are wild little monsters. I have tried talking with her about it, but she either gets mad or just blows me off. I really want to keep our friendship, but her parenting “style” just keeps getting in the way and is frankly making me question her as a person. What do you do when you disagree with a friend’s parenting? Sincerely, Worried Mom Dear Worried Mom, The good news is there is no one right way to raise children, contrary to what anyone might say. The other good news is that you are both going to mess up. If you try too hard, you become overbearing helicopter parent, if you are overly relaxed, then you risk having feral, jungle children. The best that any of us as parents can do is to try and find a happy medium. Luckily for us, children are resilient, amazing,

BY RIVEN BARTON, PhD. rivendruien@gmail.com

little creatures, and if your friend is not abusing or neglecting her child, it will probably be OK. All things considered, maybe you ought to just let it go. Nobody likes to be told how to parent, and what works for one family may not work for another. Children aren’t born with instruction manuals (although at times I really wish they were). We are all bumbling along trying to see what fits. As writer Anne Lamott once said in her book “Traveling Mercies,” “I always imagined as a kid that adults had some kind of inner tool box full of shiny tools: the saw of discernment, the hammer of wisdom, the sandpaper of patience. But when I grew up I found that life gave you these rusty, bent, old tools—friendship, prayer, conscience, honesty—and said ‘do the best you can with these, they will have to do.’ And they usually do.” Perhaps, Worried Mom, it’s time to stop worrying about your friend’s parenting style, and use the rusty tools that you already have: pray that she figures it out, listen to your conscience, be honest when she asks your advice, and remember that friendship is a very powerful thing. Good luck! And try not to worry. Take care, G. G.

Riven Barton, PhD. Mythological counseling and coaching rivendruien@gmail.com • (805) 453-4680

Read the news online at www.coastalview.com

24  Thursday, November 14, 2013

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

www.coastalview.com

Seascape Realty Buying or selling a home with us is like a walk on the beach!

Maria Nova • Nancy Branigan • Shirley Kimberlin • Patsy Cutler • Lynn Gates Darrell Wade • Terry Stain • Betsy Ortiz • Jackie Williams • Leah Dabney

greaT value…Large one bedroom, one bath home in Rancho Granada. Inviting front porch to enjoy the beautiful mountain view. Spacious, low maintenance yard. Two side by side parking spaces, one covered. Carpinteria’s most affordable space fee. oFFered aT $129,000. Please call Shirley Kimberlin at (805) 886-0228

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!

D L O S

SPaCiOuS TWO BeDrOOM, TWO BaTh home in Sandpiper Village. Large yard for outdoor entertaining. Children and pets welcome. Great location near the pool, tennis courts and Clubhouse. oFFered aT $174,900. Please call Shirley Kimberlin (805) 886-0228

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JuST TWO BLOCKS FrOM The “WOrLD’S SaFeST BeaCh”… Two bedroom, two bath mobile home in Silver Sands, a resident owned park, adjacent to the Salt Marsh Nature Park. Take a short stroll to the beach or to charming downtown Carpinteria with unique shops, restaurants, and more! A perfect vacation retreat or a home to enjoy everyday. Amenities include pool, clubhouse. OFFereD aT $349,000. Please call Shirley Kimberlin (805)886-0228.

SaN rOque SPeCiaL… Beautiful upgrades. All new laminate floors throughout this 2000 Cavco, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Gorgeous mountain views, wood burning fireplace,updated kitchen. Backyard for BBQ”s and family fun. Pet friendly reDuCeD TO $185,000. Please call Nancy Branigan (805) 886-7593

BeauTiFuL MOBiLe iN ViSTa De SaNTa BarBara, large and in excellent condition, in great park location. Park close to beach and bluffs. oFFered aT $205,000 Please call Patsy Cutler or Nancy Branigan (805) 886-0969 Nevada duPleX... One acre across from the Lakeside Casino RV Park, 45 minutes northwest of Las Vegas. reDuCeD TO $140,000 Please call maria Nova (805) 450-4712 amaziNg , Never lived iN!… Model home, now approved B&B on Winery Rd. in Nevada walking distance to NV’s 1st winery! 4 bd/5ba 4k sq.ft. 1/2acre, Themed rooms, Casitas, courtyard, media room, 4+car garage, top of the line appliances and fixtures, sensored lighting, Built 2003. View of Mt.Charleston. See virtual tour at www.gotmaria.com. oFFered aT $499,000. Please call maria Nova (805) 450-4712

View properties For sale: look4seascaperealty.com

4915-C Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria • 805.684.4161

Service Directory Con ne C ti ng C ar p i n t e ri a

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only $150 for 13 weeks!

Contact Kris at 805.684.4428 or kris@coastalview.com


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