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Winter Guide

CONTENTS Winter Guide CNY is published every year by Local News, Inc., which also publishes 55 PLUS, Oswego County Business Magazine and In Good Health—CNY’s Healthcare Newspaper, among other publications.

www.CNYwinter

Editor & Publisher: Wagner Dotto Associate Editor: Lou Sorendo Contributing Writers: Melissa Stefanec, Deborah Jeanne Sergeant Mary Beth Roach Calendar of Events Editor: Deborah Jeanne Sergeant Advertising: Peggy Kain, Shelley Manley  Design & Layout: Chris Crocker Cover Design: Jillian Meisenzahl Office Manager: Alice Davis © 2015 by Local News, Inc.. All rights reserved.

315-342–8020 P.O. Box 276 Oswego, NY 13126

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3 CALENDAR OF EVENTS...23 3 SPECIAL MAP................26-27 Best Bets for the Season .....7 What Do You Know About Snow? ..................10 10 Ways to Keep the Family Sane .............12 Winter Photography .........................14 Embrace Winter with Region’s Trails..........16 Nine Ways to Keep the Family Moving .......18 Winter Bicycling .............................20 Love NYS Parks? Get an Empire Pass.............22 One-Pan Comfort Food .............43 Warm Up to Slow Cooking ...............45 Ice-Fishing: Follow These Eight Rules........46 Ice: How Thick is Thick Enough?........48 The Art of Shoveling...................................50

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Little Sodus Inn................................ 37 Lowville Producers Cheese Store..... 9 Make Sense Shop........................... 33 Maplegrove Bed & Breakfast .......... 37 Metlife / David Mirabito.................... 30 Mimi’s Drive-In................................. 30 Monica’s Pies.................................. 41 NE Classic Car Museum................. 11 National Tractor Trailer School........ 34 Old Forge Sport Tours..................... 40 Oswego County Promotion&Tourism......................... 49 Oswego County Stop DWI............... 30 Oswego Health................................ 28 Parks Alumni House........................ 39 Pole Position Raceway.................... 49

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Port Lodge Motel............................. 33 Pulaski/Eastern Shore Chamber .... 32 Pullens Truck Center....................... 32 RiverHouse Restaurant................... 33 St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce................... 9 Starkey’s Lookout............................ 41 Suggett House Museum.................. 39 Tailwater Lodge................................. 5 The Gingham Patch......................... 11 The Jell-o Museum.......................... 41 Tops Friendly Markets....................... 3 Town of Inlet.................................... 40 Vernon Down Casino Hotel............... 9 Woods Valley Ski Area.................... 35


Lights on the Lake, Onondaga Lake, LIverpool

10 Great Bets 4 for the Season

Dickens Christmas

Skaneateles. Watch a video of “A Christmas Carol.” Then head out to Skaneateles so the children or grandchildren can live it. They’ll be talking about this a long time. Starting on the first weekend in December.

By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

Y

ou don’t need to have sun to have fun. The Central New York winter season boasts numerous festivals, events and activities. Make sure you don’t miss these.

1

Lights on the Lake

Liverpool. The spectacular light show is local, open for more than a month, well-managed and is a bargain, considering the admission rate is by the vehicle. Visitors of any age will share a sense of wonder at the numerous, themed displays. Bring a long a snack for the kids to munch while they gaze at the lights. Daily until Jan.3.

2

Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo

Syracuse. Take a break from winter’s chill perusing the 200 oversized exhibitors’ booths at the 26th annual show, housed at the Horticulture Building at the New York State Fairgrounds. Starting March 12).

3

39th Annual Snodeo Weekend

Old Forge. Check out all the latest snowmobile models, watch (or join!) snowmobile races and meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. The Snodeo offers fun for everyone. Starting Dec. 11.

5

The Nutcracker

Syracuse. Tchaikovsky’s beloved Christmas ballet performed live by Syracuse City Ballet. Don’t miss this holiday classic. Starting Dec. 5

6

Winterfest

Syracuse. The annual, 10-day festival offers many free events and activities, along with live music and local food. Starting Feb. 11.

7

Yuletide in the Country Tour

Mumford. Few experiences will transport you back in time like a visit to Genesee Country Village. Starting Dec. 5.

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8

69th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life”

Seneca Falls. Fans of the classic 1946 Christmas movie should plan to spend the day enjoying activities related to the movie, and meeting visiting stars. Starting Dec. 11.

9

Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and Ice Festival

Oswego. Local, fun and mostly free, this homegrown festival offers a huge number of activities and events to help you shake off the winter doldrums. Jan. 31.

10

Maple Weekends

Throughout the state. Take a tour off the beaten path late this winter. Beyond the sweet appeal of maple syrup, the weekend tours in late March will help you learn how producers make syrup. March 19. Dickens Christmas event in Skaneateles. See events calendar inside.

Visiting a maple farm, such as Stoney Ridge in Farmington, can provide an educational opportunity for all ages.

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The Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo. at the Horticulture Building at the New York State Fairgrounds.


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What Do You Know About Snow? A Q&A with Dave Longley, chief meteorologist with WSYR-TV Syracuse By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

You play in it, shovel it, and drive in it. But what do you really know about snow? Dave Longley, chief meteorologist with WSYR-TV in Syracuse, offered his input on popular snow myths.

Q: Are snowflakes unique?

Dave Longley: When you’re talking trillions and trillions of them in a snowstorm, more than likely there will be a few that are alike. It’s rare to see look-alikes

if you look close enough. With the crystalline nature of them, it’s random in nature. Odds are, there are more than one that are the same.

Q. Is every snowflake symmetrical? DL: No. You’d have different shapes of snowflakes, depending on the temperature of the environment in which it developed. If it’s just below freezing, you may not get shapes that are totally symmetrical.

Q. Does the weather ever get “too cold” to snow?

DL: No. The big problem is not so much the temperature, but as it gets really cold, the amount of moisture in the air goes down. It can be too dry for it to snow. Even at the North and South Poles, they get snow. When you first get an Arctic air mass, it’s very dry and cold.

Q. Does it have to be 32 degrees F. outside for it to snow?

DL: We can have 40 to 45 degrees and still have snow. The warmth is only right near the ground. Temperatures can drop off quickly as you go higher in elevation. Snowflakes

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can survive the trip down — and the thermometer near your house may read 45 though.

Q. Do snowflakes that melt reform their original shape if they refreeze?

Conversation with David Longley helps clarify myths

DL: No. The temperature is going to be a little different. It typically refreezes into sleet. You won’t get that identical structure.

colors in snow banks. That’s due to the light reflected back to your eye.

Q: Is snow white, as it appears?

DL: So often, we’ll have sleet or freezing rain in the winter. Sleet begins as snow in the clouds, encounters a layer above freezing and a layer where it refreezes. They’re ice pellets. It’s like shoveling sugar if it accumulates. Freezing rain starts as snow, but melts as it’s coming down. It freezes

DL: It’s white because the different structure of the snowflake. It reflects all visible light back to our eye, so that’s why it appears white. I’ve not read anything to the contrary. You can sometimes get a bluish hue, depending upon temperature. A wet snow is not uncommon to have blue

Q: What is worse, sleet or freezing rain?

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on contact with the surface. Freezing rain is worse because it forms a glaze on things. If it’s on wires, poles and tree limbs, the extra weight can bring those items down. Freezing rain is more problematic than sleet or snow. We can remove snow, but typically unless it’s a very wet, heavy snow, we don’t have too many problems with snow accumulating on branches.

Q: Is it possible to have a thunderstorm in winter?

DL: People seem shocked that it’s not uncommon to have thunder and lightning in snowstorms. It’s like what we have in the summer: cold temperatures above us and an unstable atmosphere. The snowflakes colliding in the clouds create electrical differences. It’s not rare.

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10 Ways to Keep the Family Sane

... when the weather holds you hostage

By Melissa Stefanec

W

hen the first few snows come, most kids are ecstatic. Playing in the snow is a novelty and provides children with hours of fun. However, after a few too many romps in the elements, sub-zero days, and sledding mishaps, the newness of playing outside wears off. When winter sets in and won’t leave, many children and their caretakers start getting mean cases of cabin fever. The kind that make one curse living in the snowbelt of a temperate part of the country. There is a cure! Here are some activities that can ward off even extreme cases of cabin fever. These ideas will buy caretakers and children some time, and make the cold-weather extremes a little more bearable.

1

Pudding paint

This activity brings together three of childhoods most sacred elements — food, painting and mess. All you need is some vanilla pudding and food coloring. You can divide colors up using cups or a muffin tin. Be creative and make paintbrushes out of household items. Make sure to use old clothes, because the coloring will stain. You may also want to use a catch mat, such as an old table cloth or shower curtain.

2

Blanket and cardboard box forts

You can keep this activity simple or really go to town with it. Use chairs, blankets and various boxes to make forts. You can save large boxes from the holidays and bring them out when the joy of new toys has worn off. You can let your kids decorate their forts using stickers, markers, crayons or

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paints. You can add curtains with old scarves. Let them get lost in their fort while you find your sanity.

3

Flashlight games

Kids love flashlights. Rally up some flashlights and play some various games with them. You can do some simple shadow puppets, tell ghost stories or make cardboard cutouts to shine the lights through. You can also use everyday household items to filter the light through, such as strainers or different fabrics.

4

Make your own cookies

A lot of kids grow tired of helping in the kitchen, but this activity can keep them engaged for a little longer. Take any basic cookie recipe and let your kids decide what they want to put in it. Set out several dishes of candies, nuts, fruits, sprinkles or other items. Let your kids roll their cookies in the goodies, or stuff the goodies into the middles. Voila, baking is fun again.

5

Balloon extravaganza

If your kids are at a safe age, work together to blow up a lot of balloons. Fill a bedroom with balloons and let the kids go wild. Balloons really can make for hours of fun.

6

Indoor bubbles

Lay down a catch or mess mat and bring the bubbles inside. Kids will get a kick out of doing something unusual. If you can’t find bubbles off-season, consult the Internet. There are lots of recipes out there. You can also bring the bubbles outside and catch the frozen bubbles.

7

Winter camp

Camping is best when it’s outside, but don’t let winter stop you from cashing in on the fun. Bring your tent inside. Have a movie night and watch from inside your tent — sleeping bags and all. Roast s’mores on the stove and tell ghost stories.

8

Micro-world

Kids have a lot of small toys, why not let them create a micro-world for all them? Rally up old cereal boxes, paper towel tubes, pots, plastic containers and other household items and have your kids create a town for their toys to play in.

9

Television

Instead of watching television, let your children create it. Have your kids write, direct and act their own cartoon. Record it on your phone or camera. It will make for fun and great memories.

10

The breakout

When all else fails, break out the cabin. There are so many places that offer indoor play for children. There are inflatable playgrounds, indoor playgrounds, trampoline parks, hands-on museums, community crafts, open gyms and so much more.

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Winter Photography Local photographer and instructor says the season is ideal for getting great shots By Mary Beth Roach

T

he rich, vibrant colors of autumn may be gone for another season, but that doesn’t mean you and your camera have to go into hibernation. Winter is one of the most favorite seasons for local photographer Phil Spitze, who offers photography classes through www.Camera-Ed.com, powered by meetup.com. “A lot of people get stuck in the misconception that there’s no color in winter. There’s actually a lot of color,” the Clay resident said. Without the ground cover and foliage, Spitze suggests that you can spot wildlife more easily, and their colors stand out more — cardinals, blue jays, woodpeckers, for example. “I‘ve gotten some of my best wildlife shots in the wintertime,” he said. “They’re out there, they’re easier to spot. I got a coyote last year along the snow drifts. I think most people will find their outings are shorter, but there is a lot to go and explore.” There’s also texture and patterns to be found in the winter landscape, he said, especially close-ups of snowdrifts, frozen waterfalls, and tree bark. Tinker Falls in Labrador Hollow near Tully is one spot he suggests. Trails are open in the winter and the frozen waterfalls can make some remarkable photos. In January and February there are ice-climbing groups

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practicing there that can be fun to photograph. Spitze also recommends the many nature centers in the area as excellent photography venues, with his favorite being the Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville. The expert volunteers at the nature center can help you identify subject matter, and the centers’ buildings can offer a warm respite, where you can take a break, warm up and recharge your batteries. Keeping yourself — and your gear warm — are key during the cold weather. The lenses fog up so you always want to keep your cameras warmer than the temperature you’re going to be shooting in, Spitze said. And rather than carry your spare battery in a camera bag, which can chill quickly, it is recommended that you keep it in an inside pocket in one of the layers

‘Day or night, winter can offer photographers a lot to focus on.’

Photos taken by photographer Phil Spitze, a Clay resident who has done photography for 15 years..

next to your body to keep it charged longer. All camera gear is generally rated down to 0° Fahrenheit, but you should confirm that with your own equipment. All the snow and the sun reflecting off all the white fluff can be challenging. “Your camera is going to try to balance all of that bright white snow. You’ll lose some detail in the shadows or the darker areas of your photo,” Spitze said. “Generally, what you need to do is overexpose your shot to maintain some of that detail in the darker areas. You’re then likely going to lose detail in the snow, but everybody knows what snow looks like,” he joked. Stunning shots can also happen in the winter night skies. During the colder months, it’s a thinner atmosphere, Spitze said, so when doing astral photography, you’ll see a greater number of stars and they’ll be brighter. 2015 / 2016

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Embrace Winter with Region’s Trails By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant Snowshoeing in Oswego County. Photos courtesy of Kelly Jordal

W

inter’s a great time to hike, snowshoe and cross-country ski Central New York’s terrific trails. The exercise, sunshine and fresh air invigorates the body and

the sparkling sites should help shake off winter doldrums. Try these trails for a great day outdoors. Check each trail’s website to ensure the trails are open when you

GET READY TO HIKE • Wrap some duct tape on your hiking pole so you have it available for any emergency. • Throw some dryer lint in a Ziploc baggie to use as a fire starter. Don’t forget matches. • Do you have hand or foot warmers in your backpack? • Don’t wear cotton in the winter, or at any time of the year, while hiking.

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• Do you have enough water? • What about a high energy snack? • Did you tell someone your hiking plans and when to expect you? It’s also a great idea to bring a fully-charged cell phone, whistle, compass and an extra pair of socks and gloves. Source: www.cnyhiking.com

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plan to visit.

Jamesville, Clark Reservation The site offers more than a dozen well-marked trails around Glacier Lake Its 365 acres include a large variety of topography and elevation.

Boonville Black River Canal Trail It boasts a 6.25-mile trail along the canal just north of Rome. The trails are groomed for cross-country skiing and the northern trailhead provides a warming hut and ski rentals. The trail is part of the Black River Trail that fringes the Adirondacks, spanning Rome to Ogdensburg for 111 miles. visitadirondacks.com/attractions/ byways/black-river-trail


Highland Forest State Park, Fabius It includes 20 miles of nicely maintained trails. The park offers multiple means of recreation, including a 300-foot long sledding hill, cross-country skiing, sleigh rides and snowshoe rentals. www.onondagacountyparks.com/ parks/highland-forest

Pulaski’s Sandy Island Beach State Park It lies along the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. Its freshwater dune offers plenty of opportunities for birding. Bring along the snowshoes to enjoy a shoreline walk. (nysparks.com/parks/153/details. aspx)

Battle Island State Park in Fulton Trails provide excellent cross-country skiing opportunities and free admission. (nysparks.com/parks/44/details. aspx)

More Places to Hike? If you want to find more great

places to hike, the Internet offers numerous resources to help you discover trails near and far. • CNY Hiking (www.cnyhiking. com) lists trails by county and includes most counties in the state. Its entries include trailhead locations, trail features, and maps. • The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation site (www. dec.ny.gov/outdoor/87264.html) lists trails across the state that appeal to winter outdoors enthusiasts, and each listing includes a description of the trails, their approved uses, length, nearby attractions, and links for more information. • When visiting the I Love New York website (www.iloveny.com/ things-to-do/outdoor-adventures), select where you want to find trails by region, activity and amenities. Its listings include trail usage, length, maps, contact information and location.

• New York State Trail Finder (www.ptny.org/Trailfinder/index. php) lists few details, but does offer GPS coordinates, open and proposed miles, surface type, and wheelchair accessbility.

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www.Furdi.com 2015 / 2016

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9 Ways to Keep Moving

... when the snow is deep and temperatures are freezing

By Melissa Stefanec

I

f you aren’t into outdoor winter sports, winter in Upstate New York is a really difficult time to stay active. It’s difficult to walk anywhere. It’s difficult to drive anywhere. Ice, snow, wetness and darkness are everywhere. They can really leave your exercise routine out in the cold. Here are some ideas on how to stay fit during the harsh winter months.

1 18

Take the stairs

This is a great way to sneak some exercise into your day. Don’t 2015 / 2016

just take the stairs at work; take them anywhere you go. Take them at the doctor’s office or the store. Make it your mission not to use an elevator or escalator for a few months. Those steps will add up.

2

Take group classes

If you are someone who has trouble with motivation, signing up for a group exercise class can be the proverbial fire you need. So many places offer classes these days, including gyms, schools, recreation centers and senior centers. Putting an obligation on

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your calendar may be all you need to stay engaged.

3

Find a buddy

This is another option if you have trouble motivating yourself. It may be relatively easy to back out of a commitment to yourself, but it’s more difficult to do that to a workout buddy, knowing that person has made schedule accommodations to meet with you. It’s also nice to have someone to talk to while you are exercising. A buddy may be all the motivation you need.


4

Make the most of your teleconferences

5

Re-take your high school physical fitness test

If you are someone who has a desk job, you need to start making the most of your meetings. If you are able to, get up and walk around. Use that time to do anything you feel comfortable doing. If you can shut your office door, plank or stretch during a call. Do some leg lifts while your phone is on mute. It beats sitting in your chair.

A lot of times people get discouraged when they can’t carve out 30 or 60 minutes for a workout. Life demands can make it tough, but that doesn’t mean you can’t fit in spurts of exercise. If you have only five or 10

minutes, do jumping jacks and squat thrusts, or can simply jog in place. If you do four five-minute workouts, you still worked out for 20 minutes, and that’s a lot better than nothing.

6

Get in a pool

If you have access to an indoor pool, use it. Swimming is a great way to get in a summer frame of mind. Swimming will get your whole body moving and liven your senses. It might just make you forget all about winter for a little while.

7

Bundle up and walk

It may be cold outside, but not all winter days are created equal. On the gentler of them, bundle up and head out for a walk. Slippery ice and whiteout conditions aren’t an everyday occurrence, so when it’s safe, capitalize on the nice winter weather and get some fresh air and exercise. You will be amazed at how quickly you want to peel off the layers.

8

Move with the kids (or your pets)

Take a cue from the kids and furry kids in your life and keep moving. Kids and animals are very good at keeping their bodies moving, even when it’s cold, so get join them. If you crawl, jump and wrestle with the little ones, it will make everyone happy.

9

Join a team

There are a lot of indoor team sports that adults can sign up for. These offer not just exercise, but socialization, which can also be hard to come by during the winter months. Run a Google search to see what sports are available in your area. Don’t let the winter months crush your exercise routine. Even small amounts of physical activity add up over time, so try and do what you can when you can and keep moving.

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Winter Bicycling By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

D

on’t hang your mountain bike up in the garage just yet. You can still hit the trails despite the snow if you convert it to a snow bike. Numerous conversion kits on the market can help you take your traditional or recumbent bicycle and transform it into a winter machine. Most include a ski to replace the front tire and a wide tread track mechanism for the back. Benjamin Turner, owner of Murdock’s Bicycles & Sports in Oswego, cautions winter biking enthusiasts to stick with a top-quality conversion kit for the best experience.

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“The inexpensive ones don’t tend to fit as many bikes and they don’t work as well,” Turner said. Turner’s store can order snow bike conversion kits. You could also opt for a winterready, wider tired bike commonly known as a “fat bike” to pedal through winter. Turner said that fat bikes work well on snowmobile trails, as the sleds pack down the snow and make it easier for cyclists to transverse. Fat bikes also allow cyclists to keep pedaling on snowy sidewalks. Boasting tire width ranging from 3.8” to 6”, fat bikes may be ridden

WINTER GUIDE

year-round. Turner said they’re especially good for riding on sand and through swamps. Mark Perrin, store manager of The Bikery in Baldwinsville, said that many customers look for fat bikes at his store for winter riding. He recommends slightly under-inflating the tires for better traction. “The tire has a lot more flotation on the snow,” Perrin said. “You can put more air in them during the summer.” The brakes and shifting mechanism replicates other mountain bikes, but Perrin said that fat bikes are geared low.


“They’re not a fast type of bike,” Perrin said. Maybe so, but at least they keep cyclists pedaling all winter. To improve your comfort, bike fenders can help keep the slush off you. Keep in mind that with limited wintertime sunlight, it’s especially important to use head and taillights and reflectors to improve your visibility on shared trails and roadways. Wash and lubricate your bike’s gears frequently throughout the season to maintain its performance. As you prepare to go riding, dress in light layers, beginning with a moisture-wicking layer. Wear gloves and cover your face with a scarf, ski hat or balaclava. Pick a lightweight had that can fit under your safety helmet. For longer rides, bring along your water bottle to help you stay hydrated.

One way to continue biking in the winter is to use a winter-ready, wider-tired bike commonly known as a “fat bike” to pedal through winter. You may also get conversion kits on the market that can help you take your traditional or recumbent bicycle and transform it into a winter machine. Most include a ski to replace the front tire and a wide tread track mechanism for the back. 2015 / 2016

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Love NY’s Parks? Get Your Empire Pass Exploring NYS parks in the winter can be challenging, fun By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

W

(DEC) forest preserve areas, and the state’s boat launch sites, arboretums and park preserves. Out-of-town guests, baby sitting kids, family friends? Bring them along. As many people can fit in your vehicle are welcome to use your Empire Pass. The annual pass is $65. The 3-year Empire Passport may be purchased for $165; a 5-year Empire Passport costs $260. A lifetime pass is $750, representing a savings after 12 years of use. It never expires and like the annual pass, you may use it as often as you like, any time of the year. If your company wants to purchase Empire Passes for employees,

ant to snowshoe, cross country ski, bird watch, snowmobile and more in state parks without paying to enter each time all winter? Consider purchasing an Empire Pass decal to adhere to your vehicle. The pass offers unlimited access to most of the state’s park and recreational facilities regardless of the number of occupants in your vehicle. This might be the motivation you need to get your family out in the fresh air more this season. And when the weather warms up, the pass is still valid. The 12-month pass includes access to 180 state parks, 55 Department of Environmental Conservation

or you want to give them to your extended family and friends, the state discounts each by $3 for the purchase of 25 or more passes. For orders of 50 or more, you receive a $6 discount per pass. Orders of 100 or more get $10 off each pass. To purchase Empire Passes, visit your local state park office. Most sites accept cash, checks or credit cards. You could also visit http://parks. ny.gov/admission/empire-passport or call 518-474-0458 to place a credit card order during normal business hours. By mail, complete the application and mail a check or money order for “NYS Parks” to Empire Passport, New York State Parks, Albany, NY 12238 The application is available online or at your local park office.

Empire Passport Frequently Asked Questions Is it too late to buy an Empire Passport? No, for your convenience Empire Passports are sold all year. When does the Empire Passport expire? Annual, 3 Year & 5 Year Empire Passports expire March 31st of the following year or as printed on the decal. Lifetime Empire Passports do not expire.

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Is this a 4x4 or fishing permit? No, 4x4 and fishing permits are exclusive to the Long Island Region. Information is available at Long Island Permits or at 631-669-1000 ext. 223 during ordinary business hours. Patriot Plan Benefit What: Pursuant to Executive Order 125 and in recognition of their commitment and sacrifices while in service, a member of the New York State Militia or any branch of the

WINTER GUIDE

New York State National Guard or military reserves who is currently serving on active duty in support of the war on terrorism is eligible for one free annual Empire Passport for use by his or her immediate family during deployment and/or for his or her own use when returning home. For more information, visit parks.ny.gov/admission/empire-passport. Source: the New York State Parks


Events

GUIDE DECEMBER ALL MONTH Liverpool. Lights on the Lake. Lights on the Lake is a two-mile-long drive through a light show featuring large holiday displays, the Land of Oz, Twinkling Fantasy Forest, Colorful Section Arches, Victorian Village, Fairytale Magic Grand Finale, and Animated Scenes. Discount advance sale tickets, $6 per vehicle, available at area Wegmans. Monday through Thursday $10 per car (including motorcycles). Show a Wegmans Shoppers Club Card for $4 off on Mondays and Tuesdays. Friday, Saturday and Sunday $15 per car (including motorcycles). $24 per minibus (capacity 17-24). $75 per motorcoach (capacity 24+). Cash or checks only are accepted at the gate. Check website for special discount dates. 5 - 10 p.m. Onondaga Lake Park, 106 Lake Drive. olp@ongov.net. www.lightsonthelake.com. Auburn. Third Annual Festival of Trees. Museum decorated with more than 25 Christmas trees through Dec. 23. Dress warmly. Weekdays 4 – 8 p.m. Weekends 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. Ward O’Hara Agricultural, 6880 NY-38A. tquill@cayugacounty. us. 315-252-7644. Lyons. Humane Society Tree of Lights for the Animals. Help the organization decorate its holiday tree by purchasing lights and ornaments in memory of a beloved pet. $5 to $10. Tues., Wed., Fri. 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; Thurs. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; closed Sun. through Mon. 1475 County House

Road. www.hswaynepets.org. 315-946-3389. Clayton. 21st. Annual Festival of Trees. Local businesses, organizations and families bring in and decorate trees or other holiday displays. Vote for your favorite display. Free with donation of a non-perishable item for the organization’s “Fill the Boat” campaign which fills its St. Lawrence skiff with food for the local food pantry. Thousand Islands Museum, 312 James St. sharon@timuseum.org. 315-686-5794. Rochester. Sweet Creations (daily through Dec. 16). The 20th anniversary of Sweet Creations, a display of dozens of cleverly designed and deliciously decorated gingerbread houses and objects located throughout the Eastman Museum. The display provides a visual and aromatic treat for visitors of all ages. Sweet Creations complements the holiday decor and festive spirit at the museum, which also displays a supersized gingerbread creation in the museum’s Palm House. All of the confectionery creations will be available for purchase through a silent auction, and winning bidders will be notified on the evening of Dec. 16. Proceeds from the auction will help support future restoration projects of this National Historic Landmark property. Free for members and with museum admission. Display open during museum’s operating hours. Eastman Museum, 900 East Ave. www.eastman.org. 585-271-3361. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. The whole family will enjoy the snow globe of beautiful poinsettias, vibrant colors and lots of playful surprises. Call for times and prices. Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens,

2655 South Park Ave. 716-827-1584. Albany. 19th Annual Price Chopper Capital Holiday Lights. Open nightly for a glowing celebration, lighting the dark winter nights with more than 125 illuminated displays throughout the historic park. At the end of the drive-through, the Washington Park Lakehouse features visits with Santa (through Dec. 23), refreshments, crafts, costumed characters and lots of surprises. Proceeds from the lights benefit the youth and programs of the Albany Police Athletic League (PAL), brightening the lives of about 3,000 young people all year long. 6–9 p.m. Admission $15 per car, $25 for 10-18 passenger vehicle, $50 for vehicles containing 19-28 passengers, $75 for school buses and $100 for commercial coaches. Washington Park. www.albany.com/holiday/capital-lights.cfm.

EVERY TUESDAY Auburn. The area’s only toddler “nightclub” includes free bounce house access. Ages 6 and under. Free. 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Music Room, Fingerlakes Mall, 1579 Clark Street Rd. www.fingerlakesmall.com. 315-255-1188.

EVERY THURSDAY Pulaski. Free Drawing Class. Join the group at the Fine Arts Center every Thursday for a drawing class taught by Patricia A. Tanner. Artists of all ages are welcome and all materials are provided. Free. 6 – 8 p.m. Salmon River Fine Arts Center, 4848 North Jefferson St. 315-298-7007. 2015 / 2016

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Auburn. Family Karoke. All are welcome to this family-friendly event. Free. 5 – 8 p.m. Family Room, Fingerlakes Mall, 1579 Clark Street Road. www. fingerlakesmall.com. 315-255-1188. Geneseo. Candlelight Nights. Enjoy five stations of hors d’oeuvres paired with Deer Run wines surrounded by candlelight. The gift shop is open for unique and local gifts. $12 per person, plus tax. Includes a commemorative wine glass. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Deer Run Winery, 3772 West Lake Road. www. DeerRunWinery.com. 585-346-0850. Clinton. Kirkland Art Center (Indoor) Makers Market. Local artisans will sell their unique gifts. A few of the talented makers this season will include: Fruit of the Fungi, Thousand Island Winery, Ma Ma Rellas, Quarry Brook Farm, Shaw’s Maple Products, Linden Street Paper, the Wooden Pig, Boliver Gold and Silversmith, Weekend Creations and Susie’s Soft Touch. Food will be available by Gyros Express. Free. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Kirkland Art Center, 9 1/2 East Park Row. www.kacny.org. 315-853-8871.

EVERY TUES., WED. and FRI. ALL MONTH (EXCEPT CHRISTMAS DAY) Syracuse. Open Ice Skating. Offered by the City of Syracuse Department of Parks, Recreation and Youth Programs. Children are required to wear helmets. $5. Call ahead to confirm hours. Meachem Ice Rink, 121 W. Seneca Turnpike. www.syrgov.net/parks. 315-492-0179.

EVERY WEEKEND Skaneateles. Dickens Christmas in Skaneateles. Join Charles Dickens, Queen Victoria and their entourage for the 22nd edition of Dickens Christmas, with an abbreviated production (noon – 3 p.m.) Dec. 24. Merriment for the entire family: Scenes from “A Christmas Carol,” sing-alongs, hot roasted chestnuts, puppet shows, appearances by costumed characters: Scrooge, Tiny Tim, Father Christmas, and Mother Goose. Borrow a costume from the Skaneateles Area

Chamber of Commerce and join in the fun. Free. 12 – 4 p.m. Highlights visit the website for details. Village of Skaneateles, 20 Genesee St. www.skaneateles. com. 315-685-0552.

Dec. 1 Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” Enjoy the famous tale of redemption for the most despised man in London presented in a critically acclaimed adaptation of Dicken’s classic novel. Ebenezer Scrooge discovers the importance of generosity and friendship when in one night’s time, three spirits guide him to view the past, present and future and how his actions affect them. Tickets from $25. Various times; check website. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. www.gevatheatre.org. 585-232-4382. Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. Friends of History present their annual Parade of Trees. Stop by the John Wells Pratt House Museum to view the many Christmas trees decorated by various community and business groups and vote on your favorite. Free. 10

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a.m. – 3 p.m. John Wells Pratt House Museum, 177 S First St. 315-598-4616. Auburn. Open Mic Night. Listen to live original and cover music, stand-up comedy and poetry and enjoy light refreshments including wine and beer. Piano, acoustic guitar, drums, bass, congos, amplifiers and full front vocals are always available. Free. 7:30 – 10:30 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. www.auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-6669. Clayton. Clayton Community Band Performance. The Clayton Community Band is the resident ensemble of the Clayton Opera House under the direction of Mr. Richard Badour. $5. 7 – 9 p.m. Clayton Opera House, 405 Riverside Drive. www. claytonoperahouse.com. 315-686-2200. Lake Placid. FIL 2016 World Cup Luge. The best international competitors in the sport of luge come together in Lake Placid to race on the Olympic luge track. Admission TBA. All day. Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Sports Complex Lake. www.lakeplacid.com/ events/fil-2016-world-cup-luge. Ticonderoga. 6th Annual Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas Celebration will bring festive fun for the whole family. Throughout the week many local organizations and businesses will be hosting and sponsoring a wide array of events that are open to the public. Many are free. Check the website for a full schedule. www.adirondack.net. 518-585-6619.

Dec. 2 Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Cazenovia. Christmas at Lorenzo. Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” is the theme of this year’s presentation of Christmas at Lorenzo, and following tradition, The Friends of Lorenzo will again showcase the holiday bedecked mansion at their annual preview party. Hosted by the board of The Friends, members and their guests are treated to a special evening of live music and seasonal delights. Contact for admission cost. 6 – 8 p.m. 17 Rippleton Road. www.lorenzoNY. org. 315-655-3200, ext. 100. Lake Placid. FIL 2016 World Cup Luge. See Dec. 1. Ticonderoga. 6th Annual Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas Celebration. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. View decorated Christmas trees and choose the ones you like best. Trees are decorated by local community groups. Free. 10 a.m. John Wells Pratt House Museum, 177 S. First St. 315-598-4616.

Dec. 3 Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Dream Girls the Musical. Based on the show business successes of R&B acts like The Shrirelles, The Supremes, and James Brown, this musical follows the story of a female singing group from Chicago called “The Dreams” as they become musical superstars. Music by Henry Krieger, Book and Lyrics by Tom Eyen. $20 to $30. Various times; check website. Red House Arts Center, 201 S. West St. www.theredhouse.org. 315-362-2785. Rochester. Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. Celebrate the beloved Christmas tradition with the whole family as 40 world-class Russian artists bring this charming classic to life. Experience Tchaikovsky’s master score this Christmas with the magic of larger than-life-puppets, a growing Christmas Tree and super-sized Matrushka dolls. $28 to $68. 7 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street. Lake Placid. FIL 2016 World Cup Luge. See Dec. 1. Ticonderoga. 6th Annual Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas Celebration. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2. Rochester. A Christmas Carol. See Dec. 1.

Dec. 4 Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. Journey to Neverland in this high-flying family musical. $30 to $53. Check website for times. Archbold Theatre at Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee

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St. www.syracusestage.org. 315-443-3275. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Mexico. Christmas in Mexico. Enjoy this a family oriented weekend to welcome the holiday season. Church bazaars, shop the village with costumed characters from Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol,” tree lighting, parade, visit with Santa and more. carriagehouseshoppe@yahoo.com. www.facebook.com/ ChristmasInMexicoNY. West Monroe. West Monroe Annual Holiday Wreath Sale. Locally-grown greens fashioned into freshly made wreaths. Prices $10 to $100, depending on embellishments and size (12” to 5’). 12 – 4 p.m. West Monroe Historical Society, 2355 state Route 49. 315-676-7414. Pulaski. Theatre Du Jour presents “The Eight: Reindeer Monologues.” Eight reindeer dishing about the real Santa. All those rumors you’ve heard about him and the elves? About Rudolph’s little secret? About Vixen’s story that was leaked to the press? All true. Yes, the reindeer finally speaks up. Call for price and times. Kallet Theater, 4842 North Jefferson St. 315-298-0007. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. Always guest-hosted by talented CNY performers, popular with all ages, and family friendly. Light refreshments for sale. Sign-up sheet with three song / 12 minute time slots. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; Open mic starts at 7 p.m. $2 suggested donation. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo.

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Bedecked in holiday finery, the neoclassical mansion sets the stage for Christmas at Lorenzo. With support from the Friends of Lorenzo, this perennially favorite December program will showcase decorative inspirations and seasonal displays based on the theme of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker. Holiday refreshments and live music will also be offered; sleigh rides (weather permitting) will be available throughout the weekend, and ornamental crafts and holidays treats will also be featured at the Rippleton Schoolhouse on Sunday. 7 – 9 pm. $5 per person, $2 for children 12 and under. 17 Rippleton Road. www.lorenzoNY. org. 315-655-3200, ext. 100. Auburn. Exhibiting artist Victoria Findlay Wolfe Lecture. 6 – 7 p.m. Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center, 205 Genesee St. 315-255-1553. Macedon. Macedon Village Tree Lighting & Santa Parade. Free family event includes refreshments. 7 p.m. Village of Macedon Intermediate School. Newark. Annual RPO Holiday Concert. Hear the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra perform holiday favorites under the direction of Michael Butterman, conductor. The program includes “Fantasia on Greensleeves,” “Sleigh Ride,” “I Saw Three Ships,“ “Gesu Bambino,” “White Christmas,” a holiday singalong and more. $10 adults, $8 seniors, $5 students and can be purchased at the Newark Wegmans Service Desk, Community Bank and the chamber of commerce office. 7:30 p.m. Newark High School Auditorium, 625 Peirson Ave. www.rpo.org/p_446/?cal=1. Lyons. Holiday Boutique. Artisans and crafters fill the museum for two days only. Free admission. Lunch served from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Boutique runs from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Wayne County Museum, 21 Butternut St., Lyons. www.waynehistory.org. Watertown. 2015 Watertown Christmas Parade & Tree Lighting. See Santa and Mrs. Claus ride on a large fire truck into downtown Watertown. The parade includes several musical groups, organizations and businesses offering Christmas festivities. Come see the large pine tree in Public Square lit up and tell Santa Claus what you want for Christmas. Free. 6 – 8 p.m. Watertown Public Square. www.publicsquare.com. Pultneyville. “Footloose.” The Gatesinger Company, Ltd. through YouTHeatre will present “Footloose,” a musical stage production inspired by the movie by the same name. Walter Bobbie, Tom Snow, Dean Pitchford and Kenny Loggins have woven together a series of songs to tell the story of how a town deals with the death of four young students, and a father who becomes distant through grief. In addition to the title song, the audience will recognize such hits as “Holding Out for a Hero,” “Let’s Hear It for the Boy,” and “Almost Paradise.” Directed by Karen Skerrett Nail and Nan Hanna-Paquin, assisted by Allison Saiff. Adults $12; seniors 65 and older $10; students $10. 7:30 p.m. 4107 Lake Road. gatesinger.company. ltd@gmail.com. www.gateshall.com. 315-589-3326. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. This special program is different than a usual daytime visit to the museum. Using the historic village as its canvas, tour guides will lead guests through the snow-covered streets in the year 1849 when New York declared Christmas, Independence Day and New Years Day as state holidays. Enjoy music, dancing and tree lighting as you visit village homes and businesses to see how “residents” react to the news of Christmas

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as a holiday. Reservations are required for this program and are non-refundable (see website to make reservations). Cost is $23/$19 members. $2 discount for tours booked on Friday, Dec. 4, and Sunday, Dec. 6. Tours are booked in groups of 20 and depart every 15 minutes. Tour-goers may also purchase a dinner buffet catered by the Caledonia Village Inn for $30. Reservations are required and non-refundable for the buffet. They may be purchased online. The buffet is served each day from 4 – 8:30 p.m. 1410 Flint Hill Road. info@gcv. org. www.gcv.org/ContactUs.aspx. 585-294-8218. Ithaca. First Friday Gallery Night. Enjoy the monthly community celebration taking place in and around downtown Ithaca. Local galleries and

art houses host special receptions, performances, screenings, and other events showcasing the work of local, national, and international artists. Free. 5 – 8 p.m. Gallery guides with maps of participating locations and show descriptions are available at all participating venues. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. Wander through Christmas Tree Forest where nearly one hundred trees are illuminated in thousands of twinkling lights through two miles of exhibits. The centerpiece of the festival is the North Pole Experience. This 10,000 sq. ft. walk-through adventure leads guests through the North Pole and right to Santa’s front porch. The In Jest Comedy Variety Show, Milk for Health Kids Game Show, One

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Buffalo Express train ride around the Festival grounds, and TOPS Winterland Workshop craft area for children and more are all included in the admission. $25 per carload; $50 per busload. 5 – 9 p.m. The Fairgrounds, 5600 McKinley Pkwy. www.the-fairgrounds.com/festival-lights. Lake Placid. FIL 2016 World Cup Luge. See Dec. 1. Ticonderoga. 6th Annual Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas Celebration. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. The Everson Museum of Art Members’ Council presents the 30th annual Festival of Trees. Each decorated tree, wreath and unique display is donated and all items are sold to benefit the Everson. Take in the beautiful sights, purchase items to decorate your home or office, and pick up tips for your own creations.

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The presentation of art and decor alongside activities and musical entertainment will make the festival truly special. Admission $5; younger than 10, free. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St. www.everson.org/events. 315-474-6064. Rome. City of Rome Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony. Free wagon rides, the Trinkaus Village display, free bike giveaways by Ron Crever and Bikes for Kids, food, fireworks, and live music/entertainment including the Christmas Music DJ, Scott Rutledge & St. Joseph’s Choir, The Knights of the Mohawk Barbershop Choir, Holy Cross Academy Choirs and Anne Gannon & the Strough and Alumni Band. Only severely inclement weather will postpone the event, which has no rain date. 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Veteran’s/ Gansevoort parks on the corner of James and Court streets. www.romechamber.com. 315-339-7654. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 5 Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Mexico. Christmas in Mexico. See Dec. 4. West Monroe. West Monroe Annual Holiday Wreath Sale. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Syracuse. “The Nutcracker.” Tchaikovsky’s classic Christmas ballet performed live by Syracuse City Bal-

let. Enjoy this holiday classic suitable for the entire family. $10 to $55. 1 – 6 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. The Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery St. syracusecityballet@gmail.com www.syracusecityballet.com. 315-487-4879. Syracuse. Magic Circle Children’s Theatre: “Aladdin.” An interactive, comedic fairy tale experience where the kids in the audience help Aladdin find the magic lamp with the comical genie inside, sing and dance along with the princess and much more. Children are invited to wear costumes and to take pictures with the characters after the show. Meals available before and after. $5. 12:30 p.m. Spaghetti Warehouse, 689 N. Clinton St. 315-449-3823. Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents Christmas Desserts. Students will learn to decorate cookies, make Christmas candy construction and a gingerbread house. Students will take items home with them. Instructor is Diane Sokolowski of Treat Me Sweet. Appropriate for ages 7 to adult (ages 7 to 10 must be accompanied by an adult). Class fee is $20 per person. Preregistration required. Must have minimum of four per class. 9:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. CNY Arts Center, 11 River Glen Plaza. Visit www.cnyartscenter.com to preregister. 315-598-ARTS (2787). Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Jacob Johnson. Jacob Johnson performs original songs and Johnny Cash tunes. Light refreshments and homemade desserts sold. $16 advance; $18 door as available. Purchase tickets online or call. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.; show starts at 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St.

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315-342-1733. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. See Dec. 4. Williamstown. Make a Market Basket with Linda Allen. Participants will create a 6” x 10” x 6” market basket. Pack your own bag lunch. $25. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Amboy 4-H Environmental Education Center, 748 Rte 183. 315-963-7286. Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. Santa’s elves will serve breakfast while Santa takes pictures and listens to last-minute gift requests. Kids can make holiday crafts and decorate cookies with Mrs. Claus. Reservations required. Admission: $17. 9 a.m. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place. www.rosamondgiffordzoo.org/santa. 315-435-8511, ext. 113. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 4. Pulaski. Tryx 2015 Reunion Concert. A popular rock band in Syracuse, Tryx has been nominated for a Sammy and recorded an original full-length CD. They regularly appeared at nightclubs in Central New York performing ‘60s to ‘90s music. The band retired after the millennium, but is coming back for this reunion performance. Visit the Facebook page or call for ticket prices. 8:30 p.m. Kallet Theater, 4842 North Jefferson St. www.facebook.com/ events/1634211923501052. 315-298-0007. Utica. Utica Holiday Wine & Chocolate Festival. Sample wines and sweets, plus shop for the holidays. Free wine tastings and complimentary

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commemorative wine glasses for all guests. Free. 3 – 9 p.m. Utica Memorial Auditorium, 400 Oriskany St. West. Geneseo. Holiday Sip & Shop. Join Deer Run’s array of vendors in the event room. Enjoy a free wine tasting while perusing the latest products from multiple independent retailers. Featuring Lemongrass Spa, Dove Chocolate Discoveries, Lovewinx and many more. Free. Noon – 4 p.m. Deer Run Winery, 3772 W. Lake Road. www.DeerRunWinery.com. 585-346-0850. Pultneyville. “Footloose.” See Dec. 4. Lyons. Holiday Boutique. See Dec. 4. Newark. Park Presbyterian Church Christmas Ba-

zaar. Artisans, crafters and treasures; baked goods, books and more. Morning treats from 9 – 11 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. 110 Maple Court. www. parkpresbyterian.org. Newark. Park Presbyterian Church Christmas Ceilidh Band. A group of Celtic musicians usher in the season with a lively performance of Christmas songs from the Celtic nations. For all ages. Tickets $5 in advance, $8 at the door. 7:30 p.m. Park Presbyterian Church, 110 Maple Court. www. parkpresbyterian.org. Newark. Holiday Open House at the Humane Society. Stop in for coffee, cider and cookies to visit the animals and browse the gift area to purchase something for your furry friends. Free. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

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1475 County House Road. www.hswaynepets.org. Sodus Point. Family Holiday Fest. Santa and Mrs. Claus will make a visit. Cookies, hot cocoa, door prizes, games and fire truck rides. Free. 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Sodus Point Community Center, Bay Street. Newark. Pictures With Santa at The Apple Shed. Call for prices. 10 a.m. – Noon. 3391 Fairville Maple Ridge Road. www.thappleshed.com. 315-331-6294. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Various locations. Christmas Around the World with the Lake Ontario Wine Trail. Celebrate the season with festive wine and food pairings from around the world. $15, purchased in advance or at the door of the first stop of the self-guided tour. Noon to 5 p.m. www.lakeontariowinetrail.com. Clayton. 53rd Annual Christmas Parade. Free. 6 to 9 p.m. 315-686-3771. Clayton. 21st Annual Juried Craft Show. Two floors of local crafts on display for purchase. Find unique gifts for everyone on your list. Door prizes are awarded every 30 minutes. Free. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Knights of Columbus Hall, 460 James St. sharon@timuseum. org. 315 686-5794. Lowville. Live Nativity at Maple Ridge Center. Start the holiday off with a walk-through Nativity and refreshments. No tickets required but donations will be accepted. 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. 7421 East Road. www. mapleridgecenter.com. 315-376-2640. Potsdam. Holiday Craft and Vendors. Fundraiser benefits the 2016 after prom party. A variety of arts, crafts, and vendors will be selling their goods. Lunch and snacks will be served. Free. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Potsdam High School. 315-244-6972. Rochester. Build, Drive, Go Exhibit Opening. Explore vehicles of all sorts, from trucks and trains to cranes and boats. Design a race track, build skyscrapers with LEGO bricks, play I-Spy with dollhouses, use computer programs to design a town, work at a construction site using Tonka trucks, and more. View vehicle- and building-related artifacts from the museum collections, including a 1865 tinplate train from George Brown; a 1869 tinplate clockwork boat from Ives, Blakeslee, & Co.; and an Ellis, Britton & Eaton log cabin play house from 1870 (a precursor to Lincoln Logs). An original exhibit produced by The Strong. Included with general museum admission fees. One Manhattan Square. www.museumofplay.org. Corning. 41st Annual Sparkle. Featuring horse and carriage rides, shopping and dining promotions, out-


door entertainment and activities for the whole family. Enjoy craft and food vendors, holiday carolers, and photos with Santa in his Crystal House. This year’s event includes the Selfless Elf 5K and ends with fireworks. Historic Market Street. gafferdistrict.com/ events/sparkle.html. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Nelson. Ruddy Well Band Concert. A homegrown entity formed in Syracuse, the Ruddy Well Band has emerged as one of Central New York’s premier performing string bands. A finely-crafted combination of dynamic rhythms, tight harmonies, and mindful lyrics, the five acoustic instrumentalists bring their audience fun, foot-stomping Americana. $20. 8 to 10 p.m. Nelson Odeon, 4035 Nelson Road. 315-655-9193. Lake Placid. FIL 2016 World Cup Luge. See Dec. 1. Ticonderoga. 6th Annual Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas Celebration. See Dec. 1. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1. Buffalo. 9th Annual Polar Plunge. Benefits Special Olympics Western New York. Raise $100 to jump into icy cold Lake Erie, receive an official Polar Plunge hoodie and support the 3,000 Special Olympic athletes in Western New York. 11 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Woodlawn Beach State Park, 3580 Lakeshore Road. eraepple@nyso.org. www.PolarPlungeNY.org/ Buffalo. 716-909-6444.

Dec. 6 Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. See Dec. 5. Syracuse. “The Nutcracker.” See Dec. 5.

Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4 Pulaski. Light Up Pulaski and Memory Tree. Enjoy activities 1 – 5 p.m., including meeting Santa & Mrs. Claus at the Ringgold Fire Hall. Hayrides will be from the South Park with free hot dogs and hot chocolate from the Lions Club. The Memory Tree Ceremony will take place in South Park and will be lit at 4 p.m. To pay tribute to a loved one on this special tree, make a check or money order payable to Memory Tree and send it to Charlotte DeGaetano, 424 Albion Cross Road, Pulaski, NY 13142 or to Wendy Ballou, care of NBT Bank, 4879 N. Jefferson St., Pulaski, NY 13142. All the money donated will be given to the local food pantries. www.pulaskinychamber. com. 315-298-5117. Various locations. Christmas Around the World with the Lake Ontario Wine Trail. See Dec. 5. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. See Dec. 4. Brewerton. 9th Annual CNY Polar Plunge. Help raise money for the athletes of Special Olympics New York by asking your friends, family and co-workers to support you in taking the plunge. Then, take a dip or slow crawl into the chilly waters of Oneida Shores. Every Plunger that raises $100 receives an official plunge sweatshirt, raise more money and receive more great prizes. Special Olympics New York has 65,665 (2014 census) athletes training and competing year-round in 22 Olympics-style sports. Check-in / pre-party 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Plunge at 1 p.m. Oneida Shores, 9400 Bartell Road. 315-440-0575. Canandaigua. Sonnenberg’s Christmas Gala Ball.

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Step into a Victorian wonderland as the Sonnenberg Mansion will be decorated as a festive home of yesteryear for the Christmas season. The Great Hall and Drawing Room will be cleared for dancing and guests may tour the rest of the mansion. Dress is black tie. Please dress warmly. Cash wine bar available all evening. Heavy hors d’oruvres and light desserts. Limited tickets available. $55 or $45 Sonnenberg member. 5 – 9 p.m. 151 Charlotte St. www.sonnenberg.org. 585-394-4922. Pultneyville. Footloose. 3 p.m. See Dec. 4. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Albany. NYS Holiday Tree Lighting. The Empire State Plaza becomes a winter playground for the whole family including live music, ice skating, visits with Santa, a holiday marketplace, fireworks and more. Free. 1 – 6 p.m. with tree lighting at 5. The Plaza also hosts The Great Train Extravaganza (Convention Center, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.) and the Taste NY Holiday Market (NYS Museum, 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.) the same day. www.winter.empirestateplaza.org. 518-474-4759. Newark. Annual Holiday Open House at Marbletown Schoolhouse. Explore a one-room schoolhouse built in 1876. Holiday cheer and refreshments. Free. 1 – 4 p.m. 6631 Miller Road, Newark. 315-331-6409. www. newarkarcadiamuseum.org. Syracuse. Symphoria presents “Messiah.” Symphoria and the Syracuse University Oratorio Society celebrate the season with this inspiring family tradition. $25-$20; 18 and under free. 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 310 Montgomery St. experiencesymphoria.org. 315-299-5598. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4.

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31


Ticonderoga. 6th Annual Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas Celebration. See Dec. 1. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Society Museum, 12581 Harborview Road. www. hendersonhistoricalsociety.com. 315-955-2800. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2.

Dec. 7

Dec. 8

Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Holiday Classics. Enjoy classics performed by the LeMoyne College Chamber Singers and Orchestra. $15 adults, $10 seniors, $5 students. 7:30 – 9 p.m. Le Moyne College Performing Arts Center, 200 Springfield Road. www.lemoyne.edu/ Arts. 315-445-4200. Henderson. Christmas Open House. The Henderson Historical Society will hold its annual Christmas Party-Open House. Noon – 3 p.m. Henderson Historical

Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Holiday Classics. See Dec. 7. Syracuse. Famous Artist Broadway Theater Series presents Mannheim Steamroller Christmas. Grammy Award winner Chip Davis has created a show that features the beloved Christmas music of Mannheim Steamroller along with dazzling multimedia effects performed in an intimate setting. Check websites for tickets and to confirm times. 7:30 – 10 p.m. Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. landmarktheatre.org/event/

mannheim/. 607-206-6288. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2.

Dec. 9 Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Peter Pan. Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4 Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Auburn. Forever Plaid: Plaid Tidings. For the first time ever, it’s Christmas at Merry-Go-Round Playhouse. The legendary Plaids return to spread yuletide joy with the greatest Holiday hits of the ages. Check the website for show times through Dec. 23 and ticket prices. 6877 E. Lake Road. fingerlakesmtf.com/2015-season/ forever-plaid-plaid-tidings/index.html. 315-255-1785

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Enjoy the thrill of our winter fishery – Steelhead fishing in the Salmon River – New York’s best and most popular fishing destination! Or enjoy the world-class ice fishing on Sandy Pond for perch and northern pike. Bring the family for winter fun time –snowmobiling, cross-country skiing and dog sledding! Top off your stay at one of our fine lodges and excellent eateries.

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2015 / 2016

WINTER GUIDE

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or 1-800-457-8897. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 4. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 10 Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. West Monroe. West Monroe Annual Holiday Wreath Sale. See Dec. 4. Mexico. Theatre Du Jour presents “The Eight: Reindeer Monologues.” The Elis House. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. Big Band Jazz Masters with Jazz Ensemble. The Le Moyne College Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Joe Carello, will perform hits from the big band era jazz masters. $15 adults, $10 seniors, $5 students. 7:30 – 9 p.m. Le Moyne College Performing Arts Center, 200 Springfield Road. www.lemoyne.edu/ Arts. 315-445-4200. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 11 Inlet. American Snowmobiler DynoTech Research Shoot Out. www.inletny.com. Trail riding, food, raffles. Trail riders can run 660’. $10. Gates open at 8 a.m. Shoot Out start at 11 a.m. The Ol’ Barn. infro@inletny.

Join Us for our Open House during “Light Up Pulaski” on Dec. 6 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Steak, Seafood, Chicken, Veal, Pork and Pasta Lunch and Dinner Specials Daily Business Meetings MONDAY - SATURDAY 11 am to 9 pm Seminars FOR YOUR SUNDAY DINING Please Call for Hours Parties BAR SERVICE till 10 pm weekdays Receptions Friday & Saturday till Midnight www.riverhouserestaurant.net • E-mail: riverhouserestaurant@yahoo.com

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Sat., Dec. 5 Sat., Dec. 12 Sat., Dec. 19 com. 585-993-2777. Fulton. Annual Parade of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. West Monroe. West Monroe Annual Holiday Wreath Sale. See Dec. 4. Oswego. Enjoy carolers while shopping downtown. Gingerbread house contest winners announced. 6 – 11 p.m. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Oswego. Oswego Players present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” directed by Jennifer Snow. 8 p.m. $9 to $12. Frances Marion Brown Theater, Fort Ontario Park. 315-343-5138. Seneca Falls. 69th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life” the classic 1946 Christmas movie. Seneca Falls is probably the inspiration for the fictitious Bedford Falls in the movie. The event features special guests “The Bailey Sisters” Karolyn (“Zuzu”) Grimes and Carol “Janie” Coombs, Mary Owen, daughter of Donna Reed, and Monica Capra Hodges, granddaughter of Frank Capra. Events will include a screening of the film, autograph signing, special presentations, “Merry Christmas George Bailey” an old time radio play based on the 1947 Lux Radio Theatre, the annual “Dance by the Light of the Moon,” food, and an “It’s A Wonderful Run” 5K, which last year attracted more than 3,000 participants. The schedule of events and other information may be found by visiting the

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event website. www.therealbedfordfalls.com. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Potsdam. Home for the Holidays. Celebrate this joyful season with a wonderful collection of new and old holiday favorites including “The Night Before Christmas,” selections from “The Nutcracker,” a visit from Santa Claus and more. Visit website to purchase tickets. 7:30 p.m. Helen M. Hosmer Concert Hall, SUNY Potsdam Crane School of Music. www.onny. org/event/concert/2015-2016/home-holidays. Lake Placid. Lake Placid Holiday Stroll. Celebrate the holiday season in the Adirondacks featuring holiday shopping, festive family fun, arts and entertainment. The village of Lake Placid transforms into a winter 2015 / 2016

WINTER GUIDE

33


wonderland full of family activities all weekend long. Join in on the Jingle Bell Run, movies, story time, parade and visits from Santa Claus. Enjoy music, evening skating on the Olympic oval along with wine tastings and dining specials. Free. All day. www. lakeplacid.com/holidays. Old Forge. 39th Annual Snodeo Weekend. Kick-off the 2015/2016 snowmobile season in the Adirondacks. See four manufacturers with their 2016 snowmobile models on display. This weekend events include: Vintage Snowmobile Show & Swap Meet, Kitty-Cat/120cc Races, special appearance by Santa & Mrs. Claus, fireworks and more. Fees for some events. Hiltebrant Recreation Center Pavilion. Call for hours. 315-369-6983. Syracuse. Christmas Craft & Holiday Market. Shop for handcrafted and personalized gift items, holiday decorations and tasty gourmet foods. Admission TBA. 5 – 9 p.m. Horticulture Building, New York State Fairgrounds, www.countryfolkart.com. 248-634-4151. Syracuse. Parade of Trees. See Dec. 2. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

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West Monroe. West Monroe Annual Holiday Wreath Sale. See Dec. 5. Oswego. Oswego Players present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” See Dec. 11. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Phoenix. Christmas Cookie Walk. Purchase a variety of homemade Christmas cookies by the pound. Many different cookies from which to choose. Price per pound TBD. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. First United Methodist Church of Phoenix, 49 Jefferson S. fumcphoenixny@ gmail.com. 315-695-4746. Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. See Dec. 5. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. Magic Circle Children’s Theatre: “Aladdin.” Dec. 5. Syracuse. Holidays with the Animals. In celebration of the holiday season, the animals at the zoo will be given “presents” as a way to enhance their well-being. Zoo-goers can watch the animals play with their new toys and demonstrate natural behaviors. Free for members and with paid admission. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Rosamond Gifford Zoo. 1 Conservation Place. rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events. Cape Vincent. Christmas in Cape Vincent Parade. Floats will be decorated with holiday lights and represent youth groups and civic organizations from the entire 1000 Islands region. After the parade, the children can visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Hot chocolate and donuts will be served at Aubrey’s Inn. Free. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Broadway St. 315-654-2533.

WINTER GUIDE

Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Palmyra. Historic Palmyra Homestead Holiday Candlelight House Tour. Tour of historic homes in the village of Palmyra and two museums. Begin at the William Phelps General Store. Many new homes dating throughout the 1800s. Call for admission cost. 4 – 8 p.m. www.historicpalmyrany.com. 315-597-6981. Syracuse. Vocal Jazz & Broadway Selections. Two of Le Moyne College’s vocal ensembles team up for a performance of jazz classics (with the Jazzuits), Broadway favorites (featuring the LMC Singers), and the combined ensembles performing holiday hits. $15 adults, $10 seniors, $5 students. 2 to 7:30 p.m. Le Moyne College Performing Arts Center, 200 Springfield Road. 315-445-4100. Lake Placid. Lake Placid Holiday Stroll. See Dec. 11. Old Forge. 39th Annual Snodeo Weekend. See Dec. 11. Syracuse. Christmas Craft & Holiday Market. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. See Dec. 11. Seneca Falls. 69th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life” the classic 1946 Christmas movie. See Dec. 11. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 13 Oswego. Oswego Players present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” 2 p.m. See Dec. 11. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. OCC’s Winter Concert. OCC’s music


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students hold their annual winter concert featuring singers and jazz players. Free. 3 – 5 p.m. Onondaga Community College, Storer Auditorium, 4585 W. Seneca Turnpike. 315-498-2256. Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. See Dec. 5. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 4. Utica. “Rejoice” concert. The Mohawk Valley Choral Society, under the direction of Mark Bunce, presents its winter concert “Rejoice!” The concert will include the music of John Rutter, William Billings and André Thomas, among others. The choral society will be accompanied by brass, percussion and Bruce Smith, organist. Tickets may be purchased at Center Stage Pianos in the New Hartford Shopping Center and at the Mohawk Valley Center for the Arts in Little Falls. They may be reserved by calling ahead. $12 in advance or $15 at the door. 3 – 5 p.m. Grace Church, corner of Genesee and Elizabeth Streets. www. mvchoral.org. 315-813-1615. Ogdensburg. Shadows of the 60s, A Tribute: A Motown Christmas. This performance is a tribute to Motown’s super groups: The Temptations, The Supremes & The Four Tops. It includes the music of Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, Martha Reeves, Junior Walker and more, plus your favorite holiday specials. Tickets

Winter Paradise! Groomed trails nearby

• Snowmobiling • Ice Fishing • X-C Skiing, snowshoeing • Modern, heated housekeeping cottages - Up to 6 people • Hot water • Bath & shower • Dishes, pans, utensils • Range & microwave • Elec. coffee pot • Fish cleaning facility w/ elec. & water • Boat rentals, dockage

2538-A County Rt. 6, Hammond 315-375-6541 • 315-778-4022 OPEN YEAR ROUND www.blacklakeny.com/butternutcove

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Live music, Full service bar, Season passes, Gift cards & Ticket packs available

Follow us on Facebook: /woodsvalley and Twitter: /woodsvalley1 24-hour Snow Phone: 315-827-4721

can be purchased online, by contacting the box office. 3 p.m. 1100 State St. ocp@ogdensburgk12. org. 315-393-2625. Wallington. Community Holiday Fireworks. Free. Enjoy refreshments at 5 p.m. Fireworks start at 6 p.m. Wallington Fire Department, 7863 Old Ridge Road. www.wallingtonfd.com. Wolcott. An Afternoon with Jeff Sawyer. Piano music in the celebration of Christmas. Free. 3 – 5 p.m. Wolcott First Presbyterian Church, Main Street. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1. Corning. Home For Christmas Concert With Phil Vassar. Country music star and Nashville recording artist Phil Vassar performs country hits and holiday favorites. $15 to $30. 7 p.m. Corning Museum of Glass. gafferdistrict.com/events. 607-962-8997. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Lake Placid. Lake Placid Holiday Stroll. See Dec. 11. Old Forge. 39th Annual Snodeo Weekend. See Dec. 11. Syracuse. Christmas Craft & Holiday Market. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Seneca Falls. 69th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s

a Wonderful Life” the classic 1946 Christmas movie. See Dec. 11.

Dec. 15 Rochester. Irving Berlin’s White Christmas: The Musical. Enjoy the stage adaptation of the beloved classic film, including classic songs “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep,” “Happy Holiday,” “Sisters,” “Blue Skies,” and the unforgettable title song, “White Christmas.” Music and lyrics by Irving Berlin with book by David Ives and Paul Blake and is based upon the Paramount Pictures film written for the screen by Norman Krasna, Norman Panama and Melvin Frank. Visit website for tickets and times. 885 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Rochester. A Christmas Carol. See Dec. 1.

Dec. 16 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Rochester. Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas: The Musical”. See Dec. 15. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 17 2015 / 2016

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Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Rochester. Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas: The Musical.” See Dec. 15 Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 18 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. Oswego. Oswego Players present The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. See Dec. 11. Syracuse. Symphoria Pops Series: Holiday Joy. Ring in the holidays with Symphoria, dancers, the Syracuse Pops Chorus, Syracuse Children’s Chorus, and special guests, as well as a visit from Santa. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. $80 to $20. 18 and under free. The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters, 421 Montgomery St. 315-299-5598. Rochester. Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas: The Musical.” See Dec. 15. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol. “See Dec. 1. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 19 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. “Dream Girls” the Musical. See Dec. 3. West Monroe. West Monroe Annual Holiday Wreath Sale. See Dec. 5. Oswego. Oswego Players present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” See Dec. 11. Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. See Dec. 5. Syracuse. Magic Circle Children’s Theatre: “Aladdin.“ Dec. 5. Utica. Magic Rocks: Leon & Romy. International illusionist Leon Etienne performs illusions thought lost with Houdini and recreates them with a rock show edge. Visit website for tickets. 8 – 10 p.m. leonetienne.com. Weedsport. Old Tyme Christmas 5K & 1 Mile Run. Join the Village of Weedsport for activities, food, shopping and fun to support the local food pantry. Crafts and vendors. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Various locations. www. weedsportchamber.org. Newark. Christmas Cookie Sale. Cookie Sale in the church dining hall featuring decorated cutouts, fruit and nut-filled, gingerbread, fudge, and many holiday specialties. $7 a pound. 10 a.m. until sold out. The Newark First United Methodist Church, 301 South Main Street. 315-331-3895. Savannah. Wine and Wings-Montezuma Raptor Van Tour. Join Montezuma for a van tour searching for short-eared owls, hunting harriers, bald eagles, and more. The tour will stop at The Montezuma Winery for tastings and to learn how vineyards and important bird areas happily exist side by side. Must be 21 and older. Contact for cost. 1 – 4 p.m. 2295 state Route 89, Savannah. ny.audubon.org/montezuma. Rochester. Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas: The Musical.” See Dec. 15.

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Rochester. A Christmas Carol. See Dec. 1. Rochester. Reindeer Run 5K. A unique, family-friendly foot race produced by YellowJacket Racing and sponsored by Fleet Feet Sports. The all-ages run is downtown Rochester’s only winter 5K event and includes kids’ race series. Fees apply. One Manhattan Square. yellowjacketracing.com/events/reindeerrun-5k-kids-race-benefit-strong-museum/. www. museumofplay.org. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Rome. Family Fun Series: “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Watch the classic 1946 PG-rated movie of a frustrated businessman whose guardian angel saved his life by showing him how life in Bedford Falls would have been if he had never lived. The 129-minute movie will be followed by a holiday-themed reception and a special photo shoot with Santa Claus. Tickets are $5 and popcorn is $1. Tickets are available on the Rome campus in the Student Services Office in the Plumley Complex, Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m., and Friday from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. and one hour prior to the start of the event. Show time is Noon. Festine Auditorium, Plumley Complex, 1101 Floyd Ave. www.mvcc.edu/tickets. 334-7709. Rome. Skate with Santa. Enjoy a very special opportunity to take the ice with Santa Clause just days before Christmas. $3 includes admission and skate rentals. 1 p.m. Kennedy Arena, 500 West Embargo St. 315-339-7654.

Dec. 20 Oswego. Oswego Players present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” 2 p.m. See Dec. 11. Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Dewitt. Schola Cantorum of Syracuse presents: A Christmas Retrospective. Schola will sing music for the season culled from the last 40 years. Carols, villancicos, motets, William Byrd’s moving Mass in Four Parts, and music by Guerrero, Lasso, Stoltzer, Ockeghem, Powers and others. $15 per person, senior/student $10 per person. 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Pebble Hill Presbyterian Church, 5299 Jamesville Road. 315-446-1757. Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. See Dec. 5. Rochester. Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas: The Musical.” See Dec. 15. Rochester. A Christmas Carol. See Dec. 1. Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. See Dec. 4. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 21 Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Rochester. A Christmas Carol. See Dec. 1.

Dec. 22 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4 Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 23 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4.

WINTER GUIDE

Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 24 Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 25 Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 26 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. Magic Circle Children’s Theatre: Aladdin. Dec. 5. Rochester. A Christmas Carol. See Dec. 1.

Dec. 27 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. The Kingsnakes: Blue Wave Records 30th Anniversary Concert. Celebrate the inaugural Blue Wave Records release of “Take A Chance,” the 1985 Kingsnakes album that put Syracuse blues on the national map. $20. 7:30 p.m. The Palace Theatre, 2384 James St. palaceonjames.com. 315-638-4286. Hamburg. Fairgrounds Festival of Lights. See Dec. 4. Rochester. “A Christmas Carol.” See Dec. 1.

Dec. 28 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 29 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4.

Dec. 30 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Syracuse. Magic Circle Children’s Theatre: “Aladdin.“ Dec. 5.

Dec. 31 Albany. New York Eve: Times Square Experience. Go glam with a red carpet entrance, open bar, hand-rolled cigars, NYC-inspired street food vendors, champagne toast, DJ Nate Da Great, Scotch tasting, passed hors d’oeuvres, and more. Overnight lodging (for additional cost) and parking available. Starting at $75, plus tax and gratuity. 9 – 2:30 a.m. City Line Bar and Grill, 1200 Western Ave. 518-504-1200.

JANUARY Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. ends Jan. 3

Jan. 1 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with


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SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Albany. 19th Annual Price Chopper Capital Holiday Lights. See December All month. Lake George. 2015 Lake George Polar Plunge. Every year, hundreds gather on the frosty shores of Lake George for a daring New Years Day swim, known as the Polar Plunge. That tradition continues at Shepard Park Beach where about 1,000 or more participants are expected to take part. Registration begins at 10 a.m. at Duffy’s Tavern the morning of the plunge. Suggested donation of $10. Plunge is at 1 p.m. Shepard Park Beach is located on Canada Street in Lake George Village. www.lakegeorge.com.

Jan. 2 Syracuse. Peter Pan. Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4. Albany. 19th Annual Price Chopper Capital Holiday Lights. See December “All Month” Westernville. Ski-Ride-Tube. Live music, full-service bar, season passes, fireworks. Visit website for times and prices. 9100 State Route 46. www.woodsvalleyskiarea.com. 315-827-4721.

Jan. 3 Syracuse. “Peter Pan.” Stage play co-produced with SU Drama. See Dec. 4.

Jan. 4 Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. Action will be in men and women’s skeleton, two-man and four-man bobsled and women’s bobsled. This race opens the eight-race FIBT World Cup season, which will take its athletes through seven different countries this winter. Admission TBA. All day. Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Sports Complex. www.lakeplacid.com/events/2016-fibt-world-cupbobsled-skeleton.

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Jan. 5

Jan. 10

Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. See Jan. 4.

Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9. Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. See Jan. 4.

Jan. 6 Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. See Jan. 4.

Jan. 11

Jan. 7

Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9.

Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. See Jan. 4.

Jan. 8 Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. See Jan. 4.

Jan. 9 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. The big, trail-wide spring cleaning garage sale where the early bird gets the proverbial worm. Participating wineries take the opportunity to clean out their inventory and drop prices on select items consisting of everything from wine, to wine glasses, clothes and other retail items. Free. Held during each winery’s regular business hours. www.senecalakewine.com/events/trail-events/ bargain-bash.html. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Joe Crookston: artist, writer, singer, guitar picker, painter, claw hammer banjo player, eco-village member and believer in all things possible. Tickets $16 advance; $18 door as available. 315-342-1733. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.; show starts at 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733. Lake Placid. 2016 FIBT World Cup Bobsled & Skeleton. See Jan. 4.

Jan. 12 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9. Utica. Once. Once tells the enchanting tale of a Dublin street musician who’s about to give up on his dream when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs. Tickets $25 to $70. 7:30 – 10 p.m. The Stanley, 259 Genesee St. www. broadwayutica.com. 315-724-7196.

Jan. 13 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9. Utica. Once. See Jan. 12.

Jan. 14 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9.

Jan. 15 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Pasta & Wine Weekend. Enjoy a self-guided tour around Seneca Lake, sampling delicious pasta themed dishes paired with wine at 33 participating wineries. Pick up your gift item at your chosen starting winery then start sampling pasta 2015 / 2016

WINTER GUIDE

37


dishes paired with delicious award-winning wines. Regular tickets purchased in advance are $40 per person. Use discount code FLTA when purchasing your ticket to receive $5 off. Discount codes may not be combined with any other offers. Only valid for online ticket purchases. Discount valid for ticketed events, not Trail Passports. Tickets purchased without a discount code cannot be retroactively discounted later. Restrictions and exclusions may apply. www.senecalakewine. com/events/trail-events/pasta-wine-weekend.html.

Jan. 16 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Pasta & Wine Weekend. See Jan. 15. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Featuring Letizia & The Z Band. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St.

Jan. 17 Baldwinsville. YMCA Acoustic Music Jam. A community gathering of musicians hosted by Steve Pfanenstiel. Traditional, folk, country and rock music welcome. Event is open to all ages and skill levels. All musical instruments welcome (guitar, voice, banjo, flute, and more). Bring a music stand. Come out and play or just listen. Free to members and non-members. No registration needed. 2 – 4 p.m. Northwest Family YMCA, 8040 River Road. 315-303-5966 ext. 225. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Pasta & Wine Weekend. See Jan. 15. Rochester. Mendon Ponds Park Winterfest. Annual celebration of the outdoors and winter. Activities include ice fishing, snowshoeing, ice boating, skiing, nature walks, the Wegman’s ZooMobile, Monroe County Sheriff’s Mounted Patrol, horse-drawn wagon rides overlooking Hundred Acre Pond. Also, free cross-country ski lessons, demonstrations from area outdoor clubs, and more for the kids: clowns and face painting. Free. 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park just south of Rochester, on Route 65. www.mendonpondswinterfest.org. 585-753-7275.

Jan. 18 Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Bargain Bash on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. See Jan. 9.

Jan. 19 Rochester. “The Wizard of Oz.” This new production of The Wizard of Oz is an enchanting adaptation of the all-time classic, totally reconceived for the stage. Developed from the ever popular MGM screenplay, this production contains the beloved songs from the Oscar-winning movie score, all the favorite characters and iconic moments, plus a few surprises along the way, including new songs by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber. See website for tickets and time. 885 E. Main St. www.rbtl.org. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Chocolate & Wine Weekend. Enjoy a self-guided tour around beautiful Seneca Lake. Pick up your gift item at your chosen starting winery then start sampling chocolates, or foods prepared

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with chocolate, creatively paired with wine. Over the 2-1/2 day event, visit 30 unique participating wineries and enjoy a weekend of fun and relaxation. Regular tickets purchased in advance are $40. Use discount code FLTA when purchasing your ticket to receive $5 off! Discount codes may not be combined with any other offers. Only valid for online ticket purchases. Discount valid for ticketed events, not Trail Passports. Tickets purchased without a discount code cannot be retroactively discounted later. Restrictions and exclusions may apply. www.senecalakewine.com/ events/trail-events/chocolate-wine-weekend.html.

Jan. 20 Syracuse. Brad Paisley with special guests Eric Paslay and Cam perform country music as part of Paisley’s “Crushin’ it” tour. See website for ticket prices. 7:30 p.m. The Oncenter War Memorial Arena, 515 Montgomery St. www.oncenter.org. 315-435-8000. Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” Meet Cinderella, Rapunzel, Jack in the Beanstalk and many more favorite fairytale characters as they journey together to learn that getting what you want in life comes with great responsibility. $20 to $30. Visit website for various show times. Red House Arts Center, 201 S. West St. www.theredhouse.org. 315-362-2785. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Chocolate & Wine Weekend. See Feb. 19. Rochester. “The Wizard of Oz.” See Jan. 19.

Jan. 21 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Hermia loves “bad boy” Lysander, but her father wants her to marry “Abercrombie” Demetrius, who’s also the heartthrob of her best-friend-forever, Helena. Threatened with death or a convent if she doesn’t do what daddy wants, Hermia must decide. $20 to $30. 7:30 p.m. Red House Arts Center, 201 S. West St. www. theredhouse.org. 315-362-2785. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Chocolate & Wine Weekend. See Feb. 19.

Jan. 22 Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20.

Jan. 23 Oswego. A homegrown entity formed in Syracuse, the Ruddy Well Band is a performing string band. A finely-crafted combination of dynamic rhythms, tight harmonies, and mindful lyrics, the five acoustic instrumentalists bring their audience fun, foot-stomping Americana led by John McConnell, an Oswego-based singer/songwriter. Light refreshments, homemade desserts sold. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $16 advance; $18 door as available. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733. Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20. Syracuse. Symphoria presents Orchestra Spotlight. Fawzi Haimor, conductor. Symphoria principal winds are showcased in this performance with Mozart’s Symphonia Concertante and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 4. $80 to $20. 18 & under free. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters 421 Montgomery St. 315-299-5598. Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21.

WINTER GUIDE

Rochester. “The Wizard of Oz”. See Jan. 19.

Jan. 24 Rochester. The Wizard of Oz. See Jan. 19.

Jan. 27 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. 28 Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20.

Jan. 29 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Pulaski. Salmon River Winter Festival. Family fun throughout the village includes an opening reception, snowshoe walk/run, skating, sled dogs, children’s activities, vendors, refreshments and more. Presented by Half-Shire Historical Society and Masonic Lodge # 415. Free. Small charge for some activities. www. halfshire.com. www.facebook.com/OswegoCountywintercarnival. 315-532-5919. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. Enjoy a weekend of pond hockey tournaments, open & masters division. Youth competition, live music, food and more. Four rinks will be set up on Fourth Lake near The Woods Inn. Music and food provided by The Woods Inn and Matt’s Draft House/Screamen Eagle Pizza. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Woods Inn, 148 Route 28. www. adirondackicebowl.com Ithaca. 6th Annual Winter Village Bluegrass Festival. Featuring Front Country, the Lonely Heartstring Band, the Molly Tuttle Band and more. Host band Paris Texas featuring Bobby Henrie will also be performing. Wine, beer, cheese and chocolate pairings by Experience the Finger Lakes along with musical pairings (duets) at Coltivare. Weekend ticket packages with lodging available. La Tourelle, 1150 Danby Road and the Hangar Theatre, 171 E. State St., suite 230. wintervillagebluegrass.org. 607-273-ARTS (2787).

Jan. 30 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20. Pulaski. Salmon River Winter Festival. See Jan. 29. Fulton. CNY Arts Center’s Family Fun Snow Day. Children’s carnival, games, prizes, art projects, Cat in the Hat, food, fun and more. Admission is free. Carnival games 3/ $1. From 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. www. cnyartscenter.com. 315-598-2787. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Featuring Gwen Tracy. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. Season tickets: individual $110 (includes one guest pass). At the door, individual $20, family $45. 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 S. State St. Ithaca. 6th Annual Winter Village Bluegrass Festival. See Jan. 29. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. 8 a.m. See Jan. 29.

Jan. 31 Oswego. Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and


Winter

in Cortland County

Ice Festival. Celebrate the annual event that draws hundreds of visitors from the region for the treasure hunt, food vendors, music, snow bowling, fireworks, martial arts demonstration, and many more family-oriented activities and games throughout the city, most of which are free. Check the website for times and activities. www.warmuposwegofestival.com or www. Facebook.com/wuoswego. Pulaski. Salmon River Winter Festival. See Jan. 29. Ithaca. 6th Annual Winter Village Bluegrass Festival. See Jan. 29. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. See Jan. 29.

FEBRUARY EVERY TUES., WED. and FRI. ALL MONTH Syracuse. Open Ice Skating. Offered by the City of Syracuse Department of Parks, Recreation and Youth Programs. Children are required to wear helmets. $5. Call ahead to confirm hours. Meachem Ice Rink, 121 W. Seneca Turnpike. www.syrgov.net/parks 315-492-0179.

EVERY WEEKEND Lake George. The Lake George Winter Carnival. The annual event includes children’s activities, cook-offs, games, outhouse races, music, food, vendors and

more. For complete schedule and map, visit the website. Events are subject to weather. Most activities are free. All day. Activities located around Lake George. www.lakegeorgewintercarnival.com.

Feb. 1 Oswego. Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and Ice Festival. See Jan 31.

Feb. 2 Oswego. Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and Ice Festival. See Jan 31.

Feb. 3 Oswego. Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and Ice Festival. See Jan 31. Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20.

Feb. 4 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Oswego. Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and Ice Festival. See Jan 31. Lake Placid. 2016 Empire State Winter Games. In its 36th year, this event brings together athletes from across the state and beyond to compete in 19 winter sports. The 2015 Games included more than 1,500 participants of all ages, including master divisions. Each ESWG registered athlete is invited to participate in all the festivities especially the opportunity to

march in the “Parade of Athletes” during the opening ceremony on Feb. 4 beginning at 6 p.m. The opening ceremony is open to the public. Visit the website for specific event information. Sport venues are located in Lake Placid, Wilmington, Saranac Lake, Tupper Lake and Paul Smith’s College. Venues include: Herb Brooks 1980 Rink, USA Rink, Ski Jumps, Whiteface Mountain, Paul Smith’s College, The VIC, Saranac Lake Civil Center Ice Rink, Tupper Lake Memorial Civic Center, Olympic Bobsled and Biathlon Center. www.empirestatewintergames.com.

Feb. 5 Syracuse. Syracuse Opera presents “La Bohème.” The Opera, based on Henri Murger’s newspaper serial-turned-novel, Scènes de la vie de bohème, will be sung in Italian with projected English translations. La Bohème tells of the doomed love between a struggling poet Rodolfo, and a seamstress, Mimi. Their love is an all-consuming one, yet it’s ultimately dashed by the poverty which surrounds them. Since its premiere in 1896, La Bohème has grown into one of the most beloved operas in the world. Sung in Italian with projected English translations. Tickets $26-$200-plus. 8 p.m. The Oncenter Civic Center Theater, 421 Montgomery St. 315-476-7372. Syracuse. “Into the Woods”. See Jan. 20. Lake Placid. 2016 Empire State Winter Games. See Feb. 4. Oswego. Warm Up Oswego Presents the Fire and Ice Festival. See Jan 31. 2015 / 2016

WINTER GUIDE

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Winter in the Adirondacks... December 11, 2015

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January 29-31, 2016

Adirondack Ice Bowl AdirondackIceBowl.com February 27, 2016

Frozen Fire & Lights

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Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. The 10-day annual festival features live music, races, indoor and outdoor activities, parade, vendors and games. Visit website for complete times and schedules. www.saranaclakewintercarnival.com.

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Ithaca Children’s Garden, 615 Willow Avenue, Suite G. ithacachildrensgarden.org. ithacachildrensgarden@ cornell.edu. 607-272-2292. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5.

Feb. 6 Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Sultans of String. Hear Spanish Flamenco, Arabic folk, Cuban rhythms, and French Manouche Gypsy-jazz. Light refreshments, homemade desserts sold. Tickets $18 in advance; $20 at door as available. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733. Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20. Syracuse. Syracuse Symphoria presents “Kids: Meet The Orchestra” with Heather Buchman, conductor. Introduce young children to the orchestra and the instrument families within. $15- $10 18 and under free. 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Inspiration Hall, 709 James St. 315-299-5598. Syracuse. Syracuse Symphoria presents “Spark: Live Design.” Explore elements of design in music and visual arts, with chamber music and refreshments through the Warehouse. Tickets $35 to $25, college student $5, 18 and under free. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. The Warehouse Gallery, 350 W. Fayette St. 315-299-5598. Lake Placid. 2016 Empire State Winter Games. See Feb. 4. Ithaca. 4th Annual Festival of Fire & Ice. Fire sculptures, ice sculptures, sledding, hot chocolate, snow fort and den building, the ice laboratory, food-coloring snow mound mural, and more. Dress warm, bring some cash for fiery/icy treats, and bring your own frozen ice creations to add to the collaborative fun. Free. Donations welcome. Sponsored by Mama Goose, with funding from Tompkins County Tourism Program and support from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 3 – 6 p.m.

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Feb. 7 Syracuse. Syracuse Opera presents “La Bohème.” 2 p.m. See Feb. 5. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5.

Feb. 8 Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5.

Feb. 9 Utica. “42nd Street.” Based on a novel by Bradford Ropes and Busby Berkeley’s 1933 movie, 42nd Street tells the story of a starry-eyed young dancer named Peggy Sawyer who leaves her Allentown home and comes to New York to audition for the new Broadway musical Pretty Lady. With a book by Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble, music by Harry Warren and lyrics by Al Dubin, this sparkling new production will be directed by co-author Mark Bramble and choreographed by Randy Skinner, the team who staged the 2001 Tony Award-winning Best Musical Revival. Tickets $25 to $70. 7:30 to 10 p.m. The Stanley, 259 Genesee Street. www.broadwayutica.com. 315-724-7196. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5.

Feb. 10 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Utica. “42nd Street.” See Feb. 10. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5.

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Feb. 11 Syracuse. “Into the Woods.” See Jan. 20. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. Annual, 10-day festival includes games and sports, family activities, food, music and entertainment and treasure hunt. More than 100,000 attend each year. Most activities free. Visit website for times and locations throughout Syracuse. www.syracusewinterfest.com.

Feb. 12 Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Geneseo. Lovers Flight. Stop in to the winery for a flight of three wines paired with three Sweet Sarah’s handmade chocolate truffles. Reservations not required. $6 per person, plus tax. Noon to 4 p.m. Deer Run Winery, 3772 W. Lake Road. www.DeerRunWinery.com. 585-346-0850. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 13 Syracuse. “Into the Woods”. See Jan. 20. Syracuse. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” See Jan. 21. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11. Pulaski. 40th Annual Sandy Pond Sportsmans Association Ice Fishing Derby. Cash prizes with 100 percent payout. Breakfast and lunch are available both days. Register one week before the derby at the club. Entry fee is charged. 6 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sandy Pond Sportsmen’s Association, 3201 county Route 15. 315-387-5421. Syracuse. Symphoria presents Wicked Divas, an evening of showstoppers from the world of Broadway,


opera, and pop featuring Elphaba and Glinda from the Broadway production of Wicked. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tickets $80 to $20. 18 & under free. The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters. 421 Montgomery St. experiencesymphoria.org. 315-299-5598. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Featuring Creole Stomp. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 S. State St. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5. Fulton. Great Eastern Whiteout. Vintage sled drag races, vintage snowmobile show and swap meet, vintage and newer drag races, raffle, and trail ride are all part of this annual event. Hosted by Fulton Area Snow Travelers (FAST). Visit website for ticket price. All day. 609 W. Broadway. www.thegreateasternwhiteout.net. 315-592-4892.

Rochester. 16th Annual Rochester Polar Plunge. Help raise money for the athletes of Special Olympics New York by asking your friends, family, and co-workers to support you in taking the plunge. Then, take a dip or slow crawl into the chilly waters of Lake Ontario. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Ontario Beach Park. 518-586-7400. msimmons@nyso.org. Geneseo. Lovers Flight. See Feb. 12. Saranac Lake. The 2016 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 5. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11. Fulton. Great Eastern Whiteout. See Feb. 13.

Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 19 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11. Syracuse. Karen Oberlin. She brings forth a collection of material from her more than 30 years of following his eclectic, fascinating career to express some of the most intriguing elements of this unique singer/songwriter’s work and life. Tickets $25/$15. 8 – 10 p.m. Red House Arts Center, 201 S. West St. www.karenoberlin.com. 315-362-2785.

Feb. 15 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 16 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 14

Feb. 17

Pulaski. 40th Annual Sandy Pond Sportsmans Association Ice Fishing Derby. See Feb. 13

Feb. 18

Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

... and on the

Feb. 20 Syracuse. Karen Oberlin. See Feb. 19. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11. Lake Placid. 2nd Annual Lake Placid Nordic Festival. Throughout the two-day festival there will be ski, waxing and orienteering clinics, demonstrations, dinners and parties, discounts on demos, rentals and merchandise, sales and touring to include headlamp

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tours on Mirror Lake and the Cascade Cross Country Ski Center. The event culminates at the Mt. van Hoevenberg Cross Country Ski center with the running of the 34th annual Lake Placid Loppet. Admission TBA. All day. Mt. Van Hoevenberg X Country Ski, 189 Bobsled Run Lane. www.lakeplacid.com/events/2dn-annual-lake-placid-nordic-festival.

Feb. 21 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11. Baldwinsville. YMCA Acoustic Music Jam. See Jan 17. Lake Placid. 2nd Annual Lake Placid Nordic Festival. See Jan. 21

Feb. 22

turns in time-honored form. Directed by original lyricist and director Martin Charnin and choreographed by Liza Gennaro, this production of “Annie” will be a brand new incarnation of the iconic original. Featuring book and score by Tony Award-winners Thomas Meehan, Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin. “Annie” includes such unforgettable songs as “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” “Easy Street,” “I Don’t Need Anything But You,” and “Tomorrow.” See website for details. 7:30 – 10 p.m. The Oncenter Civic Center Theater 421 Montgomery St. 607-206-6288. Syracuse. Open Ice Skating. Offered by the City of Syracuse Department of Parks, Recreation and Youth Programs. Children are required to wear helmets. $5. Call ahead to confirm hours. Meachem Ice Rink, 121 W. Seneca Turnpike. www.syrgov.net/parks 315-492-0179.

an enthusiastic buying crowd. $7 adults, VIP weekend pass $8, children 12 and younger, free. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Horticulture Building, New York State Fairground. www.allmanpromotions.com. 315-686-5789 Syracuse. Syracuse Symphoria presents “Spark: Motion Dynamics.” Symphoria partners with CirqOvation for this performance pairing music with acrobatic movement and motion. Tickets $25 to $20; 18 and under free. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), 500 S Franklin St. 315-299-5598. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Featuring Tas Cru. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St.

March 2

Syracuse. Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo. 10 a.m – 4 p.m. See March 12.

Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 25 Syracuse. New York Farm Show. More than 420 exhibitors will display a host of new equipment, plant products and technologies targeted for Northeast farmers and livestock producers at this annual indoor farm expo that spreads across several buildings at the fairgrounds. Landowners may also find many products and services useful for maintaining their property. Food vendors available throughout each day. Free tickets available from many Northeast Equipment dealers. Or get them by writing to New York Farm Show, P.O. Box 3470, Syracuse, NY 13220. www. newyorkfarmshow.com.

Feb. 26 Syracuse. New York Farm Show. See Feb. 25.

Feb. 27 Syracuse. Syracuse Symphoria presents “Shakespeare Celebration.” The 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare is marked in this performance in collaboration with the Syracuse University’s department of drama. Lawrence Loh conducting. Tickets $80. to $20. 18 & under free. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters, 421 Montgomery St. experiencesymphoria.org. 315-299-559. Inlet. Frozen Fire & Lights. Bonfires, sledding, cross country skiing, snowshoeing, cardboard sled race, Noah’s Ark Animal Workshop, face painting, fireworks, and wine & chocolate. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fern Park & Arrowhead Park. info@inletny.com. www.inletny.com. www.frozenfireandlights.com. 315-357-5501. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Featuring Searson. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. Season Tickets: Individual $110 (includes one guest pass). At the door, individual $20, family $45. 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St. Syracuse. New York Farm Show. See Feb. 26.

MARCH March 1 Syracuse. Famous Artist Broadway Theater Series presents “Annie.” The world’s best-loved musical re-

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Syracuse. Famous Artist Broadway Theater Series presents Annie. See March 1.

March 3

March 13 March 19

March 6

Syracuse. Syracuse Symphoria presents “Disney In Concert: Magical Music From The Movies.” A multimedia event featuring the original scores paired with footage from Disney movies. Lawrence Loh, conducting. Tickets $80 to $20. 18 & under free. 7 The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters, 421 Montgomery St. 315-299-5598. Statewide. Maple Weekend. Almost 160 maple producers across New York state open their facilities to show people how maple syrup and related maple products are made from the tree to their table. This family-oriented event takes visitors back to their agricultural roots as they learn how a clear, water-like sap becomes a golden brown nectar. Most sites offer tours of their sugar bush, samples, and evaporator room. Some offer animal petting areas, pancake breakfasts, wagon rides into the woods and more. Most are free but sell the breakfast. Visit website to find locations and details. www.nysmaple.com/nys-maple-weekend. Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. Learn about 19th century and modern maple syrup production, including tree tapping, tubing system, and sap evaporation. Find out how to identify a sugar maple tree, how tall they grow and how big and old they need to be in order to tap them. Try your hand at using some of the metal tools, buckets and spiles used when tapping trees. See what it’s like to manage sap buckets on a shoulder yoke. Maple treats like maple cotton candy and maple popcorn for sale. In addition to the maple sugar camp, visit the Historic Village its many replica and restored homes and businesses. Visit website for more information, fees and times. Free for museum members.

Syracuse. Syracuse Symphoria presents Casual: Civic Morning Musicals’ 125th Anniversary. Pianist Steven Heyman performs Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 and violinist Sarah Crocker performs the Barber Violin Concerto. Tickets $35 to $25, college student $5, 18 and under free. 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 310 Montgomery St. 315-299-5598.

Baldwinsville. YMCA Acoustic Music Jam. See Jan 17. Statewide. Maple Weekend. See Mar. 19. Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. See Mar. 19

March 12

March 26

Syracuse. Famous Artist Broadway Theater Series presents Annie. See March 1. Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Red Red Wine. Embrace the many red wines our region is rapidly becoming better known for, all paired with innovative dishes prepared by the many participating wineries. Check in at your chosen starting winery, pick up your ticket, then enjoy a self-guided tour around beautiful Seneca Lake during this one-day event. Regular tickets purchased in advance are $30 per person. Use discount code FLTA when purchasing your ticket to receive $5 off. Discount codes may not be combined with any other offers. Only valid for online ticket purchases. Discount valid for ticketed events, not Trail Passports. Tickets purchased without a discount code cannot be retroactively discounted later. Restrictions and exclusions may apply. www.senecalakewine.com/events/red-redwine-march-5-2016.html.

March 5 Oswego. Oswego Music Hall presents The Cadleys. Join John and Cathy Cadley for an evening of soulful duet singing and tasty picking on guitar and mandolin. John Dancks on bass and Perry Cleveland on mandolin. Light refreshments, homemade desserts sold. Tickets $16 advance; $18 door as available. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733.

Syracuse. Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo. Entering its 26th year, the event features 200 extra large exhibitor booths in the New York State Fairgrounds Horticulture Building. The show boasts wide variety and

WINTER GUIDE

March 20

Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. See Mar. 19.

March 27 Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. See Mar. 19.


One-Pan Comfort Food Recipes By Melissa Stefanec

T

here is only one thing you can do to comfort food to improve it, and that is to make it easy. Actually, there could be two things, if making it healthy and low-calorie were a viable option. One way to make comfort food easy is to keep it to one dish, pot or pan. To that end, here are some onedish comfort foods that will keep your stomach and kitchen happy.

Chicken, broccoli, and basil Cook one half of a pound of pasta according to the packages instructions. Drain the pasta and set aside. In the same pot, sautĂŠ one half of a diced onion and one teaspoon of garlic in four tablespoons of salted butter. Add two cups of diced broccoli and one tablespoon of chopped fresh basil and the same amount of chopped, fresh parsley. Cook over medium heat until relatively soft. Add one tablespoon of cornstarch and make sure everything is evenly coated. Add one quarter cup of dry white wine and one cup of chicken broth. Bring to a slow boil. Turn down the heat and add one quarter cup of grated parmesan cheese. Add the pasta and some diced, pre-cooked chicken into the mixture. If you like, top with fresh diced tomatoes and shredded parmesan cheese.

Macaroni and Cheese For this dish, you don’t need to cook the pasta. Instead, simply heat the oven to 375 degrees and use one 2015 / 2016

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tablespoon of butter to grease a 9-by12-inch baking pan. Take one cup of full-fat cottage cheese, two cups of non-low-fat milk, one teaspoon of dry mustard, one teaspoon of onion powder, a half teaspoon of salt and a half teaspoon of black pepper and puree them in blender or food processor. Mix this mixture with one and half cups of grated cheddar cheese (or cheese of your choice) and one half of a pound of uncooked pasta. Dump the mixture into your greased pan. Tightly cover the pan with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover the pan, stir gently, top with one tablespoon of butter that has been cut into small pieces, sprinkle with more cheese or bread/cracker crumbs if you want and bake without the cover for 30 more minutes.

plain rice or rice with other vegetables mixed in. Add two tablespoons of flour and one teaspoon of paprika to the sautéing vegetables. Add one cup of milk. Bring the mixture to a very slow boil and add one cup of sharp

Italian Stir Fry Wash three large red potatoes and poke holes in their skins with forks. Microwave potatoes on high for eight to 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Cut one package of pre-cooked chicken sausage into circles. Sauté one small white onion and two teaspoons of garlic in three tablespoons of olive oil in a wok over medium-high heat. Add one cup of diced spinach and one cup of diced broccoli. Add one teaspoon of Italian seasoning. Slice or dice the potatoes and add them to the wok. When everything is warm, add one quarter cup of grated parmesan cheese. Then, crack three eggs into the pan and sauté everything. Finish with salt and pepper. Top with sour cream or plain yogurt.

Cheesy Broccoli Rice In a sauce pot over medium heat, sauté one, small diced white onion and two teaspoons of minced garlic in three tablespoons of olive oil. Add two cups of chopped broccoli. While these items are cooking, prepare two bags of steam-in-the-microwave rice. Use

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cheddar cheese and one half of a cup of plain Greek yogurt. Stir until the mixture is uniform in consistency and add the rice. Finish with salt and pepper.


Warm Up to Slow Cooking By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

I

magine arriving home to the aroma of a hot meal waiting for your family. You don’t need a personal chef. Your slow cooker does most of the work for you. The soups and stews, along with bread on the side, provide an easy meal. For other entrees, a side salad waiting in the fridge rounds out the meal with little effort when you arrive home. Warm up to these fix-andforget recipes this winter.

Savory Bean Soup 3 slices diced, bacon, cooked but not crispy 10 cups chicken broth 2 15-oz. cans white beans, drained 1 15-oz. can red kidney beans, drained 1 14-oz. can diced tomatoes, with liquid 1 large red onion, chopped 10 oz. frozen, sliced carrots 1 sliced stalk celery 2 tsp. minced garlic 1 tsp. dried rosemary 1 tsp. ground black pepper Combine ingredients and cook on low for eight hours. Serves 8 to 10.

Hearty Potato Soup 28 ounces chicken broth 4 small russet potatoes scrubbed and cut in quarters 1 large red onion, chopped 1 sliced celery stalk 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1/2 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup whole milk 1/4 cup flour 1 tbs. butter Combine ingredients and cook on low

for six to seven hours. Serves 6.

Tex-Mex Chicken Stew 1 lb. chicken breast, cubed 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. ground cumin 1 bay leaf 1 jalapeno pepper, minced (discard the seeds for less heat) 1 medium red onion, minced 15-oz. can navy beans, drained 15-oz. can black beans, drained 14-oz. can crushed tomatoes 12 oz. chicken broth 1/2 cup orange juice. Combine ingredients and cook on low for eight hours. Discard bay leaf before serving. Serves 6.

Lentil Soup 14 oz. vegetable broth 14 oz. diced tomatoes, drained 2 medium zucchini, diced 1 red bell pepper, diced 1/2 cup matchstick carrots 1/2 cup red lentils, rinsed 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. sugar 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper 1 tbs. basil Combine ingredients and cook on low for eight hours. Serves 4. Smoky BBQ Beef 2 lbs. boneless beef roast 12 oz. barbecue sauce 1 tbs. Liquid Smoke

1 1/4 cups water 10 hamburger buns Combine ingredients except for buns and cook on low for eight hours. Pull meat apart with two forks and stir before serving on buns. Serves 10.

Venison Tacos 1 tbs. chili powder 2 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp. cilantro 1 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. ground cayenne pepper 3-lb. boneless venison roast divided into quarters 1 medium red onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 cup salsa 12 6-inch flour tortillas Toppings: additional 1/2 cup salsa 1 cup shredded Mexican blend or cheddar cheese 1 cup chopped tomato 1 cup sour cream 3 cups shredded lettuce Blend chili powder, ground cumin, cilantro, salt and ground cayenne pepper. Rub on meat. Place onion and garlic in bottom of food well. Top with meat. Pour 1/2 cup of salsa on meat. Cook on low 8 to 9 hours. Remove meat and shred with two forks. Return to slow cooker and stir. Divide among warmed tortillas and top with remaining salsa, cheese, tomato, sour cream and lettuce. Serves 6. 2015 / 2016

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8

The author’s ice fishing tent on Oneida Lake.

Rules for People Who Are Ice Fishing for the First Time By Brandon Smith

I

am a firm believer that to live in Upstate New York, you have to find an outdoor activity that you enjoy during the winter. Ice fishing is one reason I enjoy living here year-round. If you’re considering your first trip on the ice, I hope you’ll find this packing list (and the rationale for each item) to be helpful.

1

Bring a flashlight. This time

of year there is very little daylight, and long productive days on the ice can quickly lead to darkness. Always bring a small flashlight for inside the shelter, and a large one for navigating back. Don’t use your fancy phone for a flashlight. I witnessed a friend drop his brand new phone inside the shelter, and it slid directly into the hole he was fishing in. The

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light was still on, and he watched it slowly sink to the bottom, while uttering every expletive imaginable.

2

Bring a camera. Remember

the sinking phone? Use a dedicated camera for your fish pictures. I have a waterproof camera with an attachable floatation device that I use exclusively for fishing, and it was not expensive. No, you can’t

WINTER GUIDE

post your pictures to Facebook in real time, but you also won’t risk paying the deductible on your cell phone insurance or buying a new phone when something goes wrong.

3

Bring your phone, but protect it! All your clothes that

claim to be waterproof can still succumb to the elements, especially when the elements are treacherous. I


covers your face, or at least a mask that couples well with a warm hat, you’ll be warm and protect your skin from windburn.

8 Walleye from Oneida Lake. had a phone that never left my pocket, but the snowstorm I walked home in saturated my jacket and drowned my phone. Keep your cell phone in a plastic zip bag or some other waterproof case and keep it in your pocket for emergency use only. If you want to listen to music, you can always pair your phone to a battery-powered Bluetooth speaker that would only be $10 to replace if something happened to it.

4

Bring food. Specifically, bring

food that can be eaten in very cold temperatures. A granola bar sounds like a great idea, until it’s minus 10 degrees and you need a jackhammer to break it in half. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and a bag of chips have always worked well for me. Whatever you do, bring something that won’t be inedible when it’s freezing out.

5

every trip. I have a heavy pair that I use for trekking and setting my ice anchors for the shelter. I have a pair of fingerless gloves that I prefer for fishing within the shelter. I have a pair of convertible fingerless gloves that are ideal for fishing outside the shelter because I can pull the flaps over my fingers when they get cold. Even if you don’t see the value in the varied applications, bring extra gloves anyway. They will get wet after handling fish, clearing holes and being out in the weather. You’ll be glad to remove your wet gloves and put on a dry pair.

7

Bring one hat, if not two.

Keep the heat from escaping your head, and keep a spare in case one gets wet. If you can find a hat that also

Bring the essentials. Ice

fishing is a sport with an endless array of gadgets, but you don’t need most of them to have a good trip. A couple cheap rods with good reels, a dozen jigs and lures, a tackle box, an insulated minnow bucket, something to sit on, a hand auger and a sled are really all you need. Over time, you can accumulate a shelter, heater, fish finder, gas auger and the other items that may improve your experience. I still don’t have it all, but every year I add an item or two to my collection to make my life easier. The shelter and the heater were game changers for me on extremely cold days, but if the ice is thick and the weather turns warm, I don’t bring them (or anything else that isn’t necessary). If you are considering going ice fishing for the first time, I highly recommend packing strategically. I also recommend bringing a safety device such as an ice pick and going with someone who has experience ice fishing on the body of water you’re going to. Ice fishing can be an awesome time, but safety should always be considered as a priority. Tight lines!

Northern Pike taken from Oneida Lake.

Bring drinks. Always bring

water, and store it in an insulated thermos if possible. If you decide to bring beer, remember that beers can easily turn into beer slushies. You’re better off bringing a flask of bourbon. Bourbon won’t freeze and it’s better than beer. Also keep in mind that I pull my sled out on the ice; I am not advocating for snowmobilers to be driving under the influence.

6

Bring gloves, gloves, and more gloves. I bring at least

two to three pairs of gloves on

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It is safe to drive on the ice or set up a small fishing cabin if the ice is eight inches thick or thicker, according to Scott Prindle, aquatic biologist with NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Region 7 Fisheries Office. Stay out of the ice if it’s less than two inch thick, he says.

Photo Courtesy Scott Prindle

Ice: How Thick is Thick Enough In general, stay off the ice if it’s two inch thick or less. Ice that’s at least four inches thick is safe for people on foot, according to expert By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

I

f you love ice fishing, ice skating, snowmobiling or snowshoeing, you need to know how to assess ice safety. Crashing through an unsafe ice thickness happens in mere moments. It doesn’t take long for a person who has gone through the ice to tire from treading water. The shock of the

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cold also affects the person’s ability to survive submersion. Scott Prindle, aquatic biologist with NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Region 7 Fisheries Office, said outdoor enthusiasts frequently call his office about ice safety. Many factors affect ice safety beyond

WINTER GUIDE

its surface thickness. The outside temperature, the distance from shore and other factors make a difference. “It varies so much,” Prindle said. “There’s no hard-and-fast rule.” In general, stay off the ice if it’s two inch thick or less. Ice that’s at least four inches thick is safe for peo-


ple on foot. Add another inch if you want to drive a snowmobile or ATV on the ice. With eight inches, a car or small pick-up truck should be safe. All of these measurements apply to clear, new ice. After ice has experienced lots of wear-and-tear traffic, it may be prone to cracking. Prindle advises outdoor enthusiasts that before they leave, they should tell others where they’re going and how long they expect to be out. Bringing along a friend, cell phone, rope, and a set of ice picks can help should one of you go through the ice. “If that person helping you get out lies flat on the ice to spread out the weight, that can lessen the chances of him going through, too,” Prindle said. He suggests sticking close to shore to test the ice thickness with an ice auger or axe and then gradually going out farther.

What to Do If You Fall Through the Ice First, try not to panic. This may be easier said than done, unless you have worked out a survival plan in advance. Read through these steps so that you can be prepared. • Don’t remove your winter clothing. Heavy clothes won’t drag you down, but instead can trap air to provide warmth and flotation. This is especially true with a snowmobile suit. • Turn toward the direction you came. That’s probably the strongest ice. • Place your hands and arms on the unbroken surface. This is where a pair of nails, sharpened screwdrivers or ice picks come in handy in providing the extra traction you need to pull yourself up onto the ice. • Kick your feet and dig in your ice picks to work your way back onto the solid ice. If your clothes have trapped a lot of water, you may have to lift yourself partially out of the water on your elbows to let the water drain before starting forward. • Lie flat on the ice once you are

out and roll away from the hole to keep your weight spread out. This may help prevent you from breaking through again. • Get to a warm, dry, sheltered area and re-warm yourself immediately. In moderate to severe cases of cold water hypothermia, you must seek medical attention. Cold blood

trapped in your extremities can come rushing back to your heart after you begin to re-warm. The shock of the chilled blood may cause ventricular fibrillation leading to a heart attack and death. From the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (www.dnr.state.mn.us) 2015 / 2016

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The Art of Shoveling By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

As snow season starts, experts caution about danger of shoveling

A

s the white stuff piles up, many of us get busy with the snow shovel. But shoveling snow can present a few physical hazards, especially to people who do not exercise. For starters, it’s physically demanding and sometimes people don’t notice how hard their hearts are pumping as they’re intent upon clearing the driveway, sidewalk and doorways efficiently. Without thinking, an unfit person or one with a heart defect can have a heart attack while shoveling. “Published research in 2011 showed 6.7 percent of snow shoveling injuries seen in an emergency department involved cardiac-related symptoms,” said Laura Donlan, physical therapist at Upstate University Hospital. While that percentage is small, it does indicate that people who are not in good physical shape can place themselves at risk by abruptly engaging in a

50

2015 / 2016

demanding task like shoveling. “Snow shoveling requires coordinated movement of the major muscle groups and requires a high level of simultaneous exertion from the legs, arms and back,” Donlan said. “The relative heart rate can exceed the upper limits of recommended aerobic exercise during a two-minute period of snow shoveling in sedentary men.” Instead of throwing yourself into the task, Donlan advises shovelers to start off slowly and go easy on caffeine beforehand. “This will increase your heart rate,” she said. “Freezing temperatures alone can increased cardiac workload by causing peripheral vasoconstriction and increasing blood viscosity.” Beyond trouble with your heart, shoveling can also result in back muscular strain, lumbar disc injury, and shoulder or elbow strains. One way to prevent injury is to plan the activity.

WINTER GUIDE

Some suggestions from various experts: • Make sure you take breaks • Go slowly. It’s easy to pile as much snow on the shovel as possible; however, doing so can cause muscle strains as the body over-exerts itself. • Push the snow as opposed to shovel it when you can, especially if you’re close to the edge of your sidewalk or driveway • Use a shovel with a curved handle or an adjustable handle length will minimize the degree of bending or prevent overstrain of the back muscles. • Dress warmly for shoveling, but in layers so you can peel off layers as your body heats up. This helps prevent perspiration from chilling you. • Wear sensible boots. They should have rubbery soles and insulation. Even if you don’t see ice, it could be lurking under the snow, waiting to yank your feet out from under you.


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