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T H E

G O O D

CELEBRATE THE SOLSTICE A LOCAL TEEN’S LEGACY OF HOPE OUR ANNUAL GIFT GUIDE

L I F E


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PRESIDENT Tim Kennedy VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING Annette Peters 315-282-8527 apeters@advancemediany.com

EDITOR MJ Kravec 315-766-7833 mkravec@advancemediany.com ASSISTANT CONTENT EDITOR Amy Bleier Long 315-470-2146 ableierlong@advancemediany.com

MAGAZINE/EVENTS SALES MANAGER Jennifer K. Queri 315-282-8622 jqueri@advancemediany.com DESIGNERS Susan Santola Kimberly Worner

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Thomas H. Brown 315-470-2053 tbrown@acssyr.com CUSTOMER SERVICE 315-470-6397

The Good Life, Central New York Magazine (ISSN 1931-194X) is published six times a year by Advance Media New York, 220 S. Warren St., Syracuse, New York 13202. The Post-Standard © 2019.

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Editor’s Letter

Being still

Editor’s picks

N O V E M B E R S TA R T S T H E S E A S O N S O Q U I E T LY.

FIR REAL

B

arren trees. Dark skies. Frosted

feature that honors a Fayetteville teen, his

leaves, glittering and brown. Ear-

family and our community, we look at the

ly November, the calm before the

story behind 13thirty Cancer Connect, a new

COVER UP

storm of holiday commercials,

organization in Central New York that pro-

I’m in the kitchen a lot these days, so whatever the editors at Bon Appetit are into, I’m there. Japanese-style, cross-back-pattern aprons are all the rage, apparently. $19.99 at worldmarket.com.

Black Friday, the pressure to purchase. The

vides support to teens with cancer.

end of the year means so much more — a

In other departments, meet the Harmony

time for contemplation. On a morning walk

Katz, a local singing group that’s raised more

with the dog, I like to pause and think about

than $20,000 for the Food Bank of Central

the last year and all the moments and peo-

New York, get a behind-the-scenes look at the

ple that were a part of it. Time flies. And

annual concert Solstice at the Cathedral, play

sometimes, being still is a good thing to do.

a very special version of Monopoly and hear

To remember.

about The Good Life CNY, a new initiative

It’s the season to appreciate family and

that aims to attract bright talent to our area

home. In this issue of Central New York, we

by spotlighting the positives of living here.

hope to pay tribute to both. In our holiday gift guide, you’ll find truly unique gift ideas for your favorite people from area shops. In a guide to decorating

All good things to reflect the generosity and warmth of CNY — no matter how cold FOR OLD TIME’S SAKE

the weather gets. Cheers,

and entertaining, local experts offer fresh and inspiring ideas to make the most of the

6

season. We also get the inside scoop on the

MJ

Redhouse’s regionally-focused production,

mkravec@advancemediany.com

“A Syracuse Christmas Carol.” In a special

315-766-7833

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

I love vintage kitchen utensils. It’s a good way to force yourself to slow down. Plus, working with my mother’s pastry blender to make her apple pie is a little like having her in the kitchen with me.

PHOTOS BY SHUTTERSTOCK, WORLD MARKET

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WH EN I T C O M E S TO YO U R H E AR T, T H E R I G H T PE O PL E C AN CH AN G E E V ER Y T H I N G . Having a heart condition reminds us how precious life is and how much we cherish those we share it with. Which is why we have assembled the first and only Structural Heart Team in CNY. Our nationally acclaimed surgeons, cardiologists, technologists and nurses work in sync to evaluate your condition, tailor your treatment plan, coordinate your procedures and keep you informed along the way. It’s a more fluid, effective approach that results in the best possible outcomes for our patients. Because, when your heart’s at stake, EVERY BEAT MATTERS.

A H I G H E R L E V E L O F C A R E | visit everybeatmatterssjh.org © 2019 St. Joseph’s Health. © 2019 Trinity Health. All rights reserved.

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Contents Features

33

The Gift of Giving

Our annual holiday gift guide featuring local shops.

43

Scrooged

Redhouse production puts a local spin on the Dickens classic.

46

Cheer Factor

Fresh-for-the-season ideas from area experts.

58

To Make Things Better

With the community’s support, Charlie Poole left a legacy of hope and a place of comfort for teens with cancer in CNY.

66

LET IT SNOW

A New Initiative

Snowglobe lantern, $42, The Rose Cottage, 214 S. Manlius Street, Fayetteville, 315-637-1330, therosecottageny.com.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

The Good Life, Central New York aims to bring bright, new talent to CNY.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


46 Departments 6 Editor’s Letter 13 It’s All Good

What to savor in CNY now... Downtown Doings, Behind the Scenes, Caught Doing Good.

24 The Seen

A pictorial review of Central New York’s social gatherings.

66

68 Our Town

Live like a local in Liverpool.

70 CNY Scout

Syracuse gets its own special version of Monopoly.

73 Farm to Table

The Horned Dorset Inn shares a recipe for Moroccan Lamb Stew.

76 Art Profile

New director aims to expand SU Art Galleries’ reach.

76

80 Galleries

What’s on display at Central New York galleries.

82 Flashback

Channel Eighters: The deliciously different double donut.

83 The Last Word

With Fred Grandy, star of the Redhouse’s production of “A Syracuse Christmas Carol.”

58

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

11


FIRST IN NEW YORK

ONE OF 27 IN U.S.

Upstate University Hospital and its Community Campus Orthopedics program is New York state’s first DNV-certified Center of Excellence for hip and knee replacement - and only one of 27 in the nation with this distinction. The program excelled in a number of areas including the quality of orthopedic surgery, surgical outcomes and post-surgical follow-up. Community Campus Orthopedics — a collaboration between talented and experienced physicians from both Upstate Orthopedics and Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists — features Swift Knee, allowing patients the option of outpatient knee-replacement surgery.

MORE INFORMATION CALL: 315.464.8668 OR VISIT UPSTATE.EDU/COMMUNITYORTHO

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It’s All Good

ALL WHITE NOW Make paper snowflakes and hang in a room or windows — this decoration can stay up all winter long to brighten the season.

Making merry It might be cold and dark, but the mood is merry and bright. Set the scene with the season’s gifts: hot cider, fresh greens and pretty paper snowflakes. BY M J K R AV EC


It’s All Good

 PICTURE IT

 SHEAR GLAMOUR We love a faux sheepskin rug folded over a chair or placed at the foot of a sofa for an extra luxurious, cozy touch.

 ORANGE BOWL Make a festive, natural air freshener with orange pomander balls. Poke whole cloves into an orange and display in bowls throughout your home. If nothing else, it’s good karma for the team.

 WA S S U P In the spirit of a traditional wassail, make this hot cider wassail from NY Apple Country. Combine a half gallon of cider with 2 cups of orange juice, 1 cup lemon juice, 5 cups pineapple juice, 1 tsp whole cloves and 2 cinnamon sticks. Simmer low on stovetop or in a crock pot for one hour. Serve in mugs.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

Go through your favorite photos of the fam from this year and make prints in sepia tones or black and white. Display in small frames around a cluster of candles at your Thanksgiving table for a truly meaningful centerpiece.


 HANG AROUND Cut fresh greens from your yard and place branches on the rungs of a chandelier for a naturally festive touch.

 GO POPS Symphoria hosts its Holiday Pops concert featuring holiday favorites and soon-to-be favorites, with the Syracuse Pops Chorus, dancers and special guest vocalist, Syracuse native and Broadway Star Lizzie Klemperer. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13 and 1:30 p.m. Dec. 14. At Crouse Hinds Concert Theater. Tickets at experiencesymphoria.org.

 CAROL OF THE BELLE

PHOTOS BY SHUTTERSTOCK

Gorgeous sets and costumes, music and a classic story about a wicked curse transforming a young prince into a ghastly beast. To break the spell, Beast must learn to love and be loved. Can Belle save him? Beauty & The Beast runs at Syracuse Stage Nov. 22 through Jan. 5. Tickets at syracusestage.org.

 SLED HEADS Add a nostalgic look to your holiday entrance. Display a vintage or antique sled by the front door.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

15


It’s All Good D OW N T OW N D OI NG S

City sidewalks HOLIDAYS IN THE CITY HIGHLIGHTS THE MAGIC OF THE SEASON IN DOWNTOWN SYRACUSE

BY M J K R AV EC

Downtown shops and venues come together to celebrate the season in the third annual Holidays in the City, Dec. 7. The day-long event features choir performances, holiday shopping, ice carving demonstrations, ice skating with holiday characters and more. Sponsors Advance Media New York and The Downtown Committee of Syracuse bring together local businesses and special attractions to showcase the spirit of the holidays in downtown Syracuse. “Downtown brings the magic of the season to life,” says Merike Treier, executive director of the Downtown Committee of Syracuse. “… we hope to continue this new tradition for families across Central New York.” Additional highlights include: Live reindeer with Santa’s sleigh for photo opps, ice sculptures in Clinton Square and a holiday trolley to connect all the happenings to and from Hanover Square, the Marriott Syracuse Downtown, Armory Square and the Everson Museum. Holidays in the City will also bring back the popular Holiday Window Walk featuring decorated windows of downtown businesses entered in the Downtown Committee’s Window Decorating Contest. Visitors can take a break from the sights and skate with Santa Claus at the Clinton Square ice rink, tour the Gingerbread House exhibit at the Erie Canal Museum and stop by The MOST for a “Polar Express” pajama party. Other ongoing activities include holiday movies at the Landmark Theatre and the Everson Museum’s Festival of Trees. The Onondaga County Public Library in the Galsongs, hot chocolate and more. Visitors who walk to each attraction viewing holiday windows will also

Santa Claus skates in Clinton Square during the second annual Holidays in the City in 2018.

find specials at many downtown shops, restaurants and bars. Look for the event decal in participating downtown storefront windows.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

For more information, go to holidaysinsyr.com.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL GREENLAR

leries will host storytelling, crafts, carnival games,


PHOTOS BY MICHAEL GREENLAR, SANDY ROE

Top, Jack the reindeer gets admired by onlookers. Above, ice carver Jerry Purun smooths the edges on an ice sculpture in Clinton Square. Right, children pose for photos with holiday characters strolling city streets at the second annual Holidays in the City.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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It’s All Good BE H I N D T H E S C E N E S

On a winter’s night SOLSTICE AT THE CATHEDRAL PUTS A MAGICAL SPIN ON THE LONGEST NIGHT OF THE YEAR

In 1995, Peter Constantino went to New York City

the theatrical extravaganza in what musicians have

with his wife to celebrate winter solstice at St. John

called one of the “most extraordinary performance

the Divine in Manhattan, the largest gothic cathe-

venues” in the world with “titanic acoustics and

dral in the world. Here, Grammy-winning musi-

a seven-second reverberation,” Constantino was

cian Paul Winter had been hosting a multimedia

hooked. He decided to start his own winter solstice

concert every winter solstice since 1979, bringing

celebration in Syracuse so that more people could

people together in reverence for humanity’s place

experience the magic of the longest night of the year.

in the larger community of life.

18

“I’m a businessman. I owned a small company

Constantino, a self-proclaimed “wanna-be mu-

making medical electronics, but music has always

sician” living in Skaneateles, had been listening

been an important part of my life,” Constantino

to the concert on National Public Radio for years

says. “I saw this as an opportunity to do something

before venturing there in person. After witnessing

in the world of music.”

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

PHOTO BY JUAN JUNCO

BY NICOLE MOSS UNDERWOOD


Constantino is 76 years old, “two years older than Onondaga Lake,” he quips. He started his first winter solstice concert, which he calls Solstice at the Cathedral, 20 years ago at the Cathedral of the Im-

But it is more than a holiday launch; in fact, it has been a spiritual awakening, even healing, for some.

maculate Conception in Syracuse. Now, it is held in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (formerly, cathedral) in Syracuse the first weekend of December. The event has grown into three days of performances with about 30 musicians, dazzling light shows that sync to the music and a loyal fan base. “We keep it as fresh as possible but maintain the spirit of the original solstice,” Constantino says. “We have a strong, devoted audience that comes back year after year. They say it’s the perfect holiday launch.” But it is more than a holiday launch; in fact, it has been a spiritual awakening, even healing, for some. Several years ago, a woman came to Constantino asking him about the concert. She was grieving the death of her 21-year old son who had been killed in a hunting accident. Her psychologist had advised she attend Constantino’s Solstice at the Cathedral. She handed Constantino a written prescription to be filled with tickets to the concert. He gave her tickets with a good vantage point and, when he checked on her at intermission, he

Above, Five to Life and, left, Ashley Cox and Matt Vacanti perform at the Annual Solstice at the Cathedral.

saw tears in her eyes. “It’s the kind of feeling solstice brings to people,” Constantino says. “The following year she brought 12 people because she was so moved by it. I’d like to think that it helped soothe an open wound.” She comes every year and Constantino believes she associates the concert with her son. “It’s hard not to gravitate towards something that had an impact on you.” When you walk into the church, with its high

PHOTOS COURTESY PETER CONSTANTINO

vaulted ceilings and stained glass windows dimly lit by small lights, you feel something — the tone has been set. “As soon as you cross the threshold into the church after buying your tickets, the per-

Performances

formance begins,” Constantino says. “I don’t want

7:30 p.m. Thurs., Dec. 5

to give too much away, but to use a Broadway term,

7:30 p.m. Fri., Dec. 6

we’ve got the eleven o’clock number. We have ex-

2 and 7:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 7

citable, foot-stomping music that still maintains a sacredness. You’ll remember the show. You’ll want

LOCATION: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Syracuse.

to come back.”

TICKETS: $30-50 and online at

solsticeatthecathedral.com NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

19


Andy Breuer, his wife Amy, and his two children, sledding in Dewitt.

As president of my family-owned business, HueberBreuer Construction, I believe that my responsibilities extend beyond business operations. Supporting the community that my family has called home for generations is always at the forefront of my mind. My father created the Hueber-Breuer Fund at the Community Foundation in 1991 to introduce philanthropy to my siblings and me early on. My wife, Amy, and I do the same with our children by collaboratively choosing which grants will be distributed from our donor-advised fund. We support causes ranging from the arts to the environment. I hope that more families in our community think about the impact of giving multi-generationally. This community has been good to us, our business and our employees, and I want to ensure it remains a great place to raise families for years to come.

Multigenerational Giving: The Breuers

Read more of the Breuers’ story at cnycf.org/Breuer

315 . 4 2 2 .9 5 3 8 | C N YC F. O R G

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It’s All Good C AUGH T D OI NG G O OD

Feeding the hungry with a song SINCE 2010, HARMONY KATZ HAS RAISED NEARLY $20,000 FOR THE FOOD BANK, AREA PANTRIES

BY SUSAN KENNEDY

During a business trip to Denver nearly a decade ago, Pete Carantz was intrigued when he saw hundreds of people in a line that stretched for blocks. “I thought they were waiting for a concert, but it was actually the line for the soup kitchen.” Stunned, Carantz returned to Syracuse, contacted the Food Bank of Central New York and discovered one in six people across 13 Central New York counties suffer from hunger or are food deprived. “Our neighbors don’t know where their next meal is coming from! Retirees, single mothers, children — I knew we had to help,” he says. As chorus director for Harmony Katz, an all-volunteer amateur barbershop chorus, Carantz found that help in music. “We Sing to Feed Them All” is now the group’s motto as the members agreed that money raised through performances, CD sales and donations would go to fight hunger here in CNY. “We value their contribution,” says Kathleen Stress, executive director of Food Bank of Central New York. “Their voices inspire us and move us!” Since 2010, Harmony Katz has raised nearly $20,000 for the Food Bank and area food pantries, which have provided 43,000 meals to families in need. “The meaning of life is to find your gift, and the purpose of life is to give it away,” says Carantz. “Our gift is singing four-part harmony. We can’t feed everybody, but we can generate awareness through song.” The Harmony Katz change lives each time they sing. “Music has a healing power that you cannot imagine,” says Bob Coant, who’s been singing with HarPHOTOS BY SCOTT SCHILD, GARY WALTS

mony Katz for 43 years. “Once [performing] at the VA hospital, this fella was in bad shape — showing no emotion for more than six months. While we sang a Christmas song, all the sudden, tears came out

Top, The Harmony Katz performs holiday selections at the BarnesHiscock Mansion in 2014. Above, the group performs at the 2017 March of Dimes Signature Chef Auction at the Oncenter in Syracuse.

of his eyes and his face filled ear to ear with a grin. The nurses were crying with joy — we were too.”

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

21


“Music has a healing power that you cannot imagine. Once [performing] at the VA hospital, this fella was in bad shape — showing no emotion for more than six months. While we sang a Christmas song, all the sudden, tears came out of his eyes and his face filled ear to ear with a grin. The nurses were crying with joy — ­ we were too.” BOB COANT, HARMONY KATZ MEMBER

Singing for everyone “We’re amateur singers,” says Coant. “A district champion could be singing next to a guy who sings in the shower. It’s a team sport,” he continues. “There’s nothing like getting the four parts to sing as one voice.” Together the nearly 70 members perform year-round, singing classics and Broadway show tunes at nursing homes, hospitals and community festivals, with more than 20 performances slated during the Christmas season. And they are eager to welcome new members. “Everybody can sing,” says Carantz. “If you can speak, you can sing.” Harmony Katz offers continuing music education for its members. Monday is practice night, the best night of the week for Chapter President Matt Fitzgibbons. “It’s my daaaaayyyyy!” he sings. “I get to sing, have fun and fellowship. It’s a great way to start the week.” Fitzgibbons says the holiday season is a perfect time to join Harmony Katz, because the tunes are familiar to most. For him, Harmony Katz and support.

From left, Harmony Katz’ Off the Top Barbershop Quartet members Roger Hiemstra, John Kinney, Rick Luckette and Joe Browne Perform a serenade at the Hal Welsh East Area YMCA in Fayetteville in 2018.

“When you make music together, there’s a bond that forms. That bond strengthens when you have a similar mission to feed the hungry through music.”

To find a show near you, buy a CD and learn more about The Harmony Katz and its musical family including The Katz Meow (all female), The Silver Katz (daytime, all male barbershop) and AcoustiKatz (male and female mixed), go to harmonykatz.org.

22

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

PHOTOS BY N. SCOTT TRIMBLE, GARY WALTS

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The Seen SYRACUSE STYLE FASHION SHOW 9.12 The eighth annual Syracuse Style Fashion Show showcased local apparel boutiques in downtown Syracuse with an open-air runway on the 100 block of Walton Street. Local salons and independent hair and makeup professionals volunteered to prepare models for the runway. Styles were featured from The Changing Room, Showoffs Boutique & Projex214, New York Optometric, Floridella Boutique, Midnight Sun, Xavier Optical and Michelle DaRin Jewelry. The event was free, but VIP tickets, which included an exclusive pre-show party, were available. Proceeds from

PHOTOS BY SCOTT SCHILD

ticket sales benefited the Food Bank of Central New York.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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The Seen

CORA THOMAS’ MS. MARY PHILANTHROPY DAY MEDIA NIGHT 9.21 Cora Thomas’ Ms. Mary Philanthropy Day Media Night honored twelve men in local media before the curtain went up at Syracuse Stage for “Thoughts of a Colored Man.” The event honored Ken Jackson, publisher of Urban CNY News/The Constitution, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary. Other honorees included: Butch Charles, George Kilpatrick, Kenny Dees, Pastor Daren Jaime, Reggie Seigler, Charles Anderson, Dr. Rick Wright, Quindell Williams, C Jack Jackson, Joe Lee and Charles Cannon. Mayor Ben Walsh and Assemblywoman Pamela Hunter ­(128th District) hosted the awards program. 1

2

1 . The event honored Ken

Jackson, editor and publisher of Urban CNY News/ The Constitution, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary.

2 . Mayor Ben Walsh and Former

Common Councilor Charles Anderson who was awarded the Legacy Award in Media.

3. Kenny Dees, Merrill “Butch” Charles and George A. Kilpatrick

were honored with CNY Minority Men Media Awards.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

PHOTOS COURTESY CITY OF SYRACUSE, SYRACUSE STAGE PHOTO BY MICHAEL DAVIS

3


4

4. Jerome Preston Bates (Wisdom) and Garrett

5

Turner (Anger) in the world premiere of “Thoughts of a Colored Man” at Syracuse Stage.

5. Cora Thomas and Mayor Ben Walsh with

the cast of “Thoughts of a Colored Man.”

6. Mayor Ben Walsh, Charles “C Jack”

Jackson and Assemblywoman Pamela Hunter. Jackson was honored with a CNY Minority Men Media Award.

6

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

27


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The Seen

PHILANTHROPIC FOODIES 8TH ANNUAL CULINARY SHOWCASE

7.28

The 8th Annual Philanthropic Foodies Culinary Showcase was held at the Marriott Syracuse Downtown and featured 23 local chefs, local beverage providers and musicians. Guests enjoyed food from 18 tasting stations prepared on site by Syracuse-area chefs, a live and silent auction and live entertainment provided by award-winning singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Ashley Cox. The event raised more than $60,000 for Friends of Dorothy House, which offers home-based care to people with AIDS and terminal illness, and Joseph’s House, which provides a safe home and family environment for homeless mothers and babies. 1

2

4

1 . Extensive silent

auction with items donated by hundreds of local businesses.

2 . Renee Duffy & Latisia

Hall-Cannon.

3. Gin & Juniper Cured Jail

Island Salmon Mousse Crostini with Chive Oil, Pickled Red Onion & Caper from SKY Armory.

3

4. Chef DeAnna Germano

PHOTOS BY JOHN CARNESSALI

of The Chef & The Cook makes Rosemary Dry Ice Ice Cream.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


5

6

7

5. Guests mingle at

Philanthropic Foodies in the Marriott Syracuse Downtown.

6. Desserts from Eva’s

European Sweets.

7. Arianna DeAngelo of

Eva’s European Sweets tries Smoking Hot Frozen Gazpacho prepared by The Chef & The Cook.

8. Philanthropic Foodies

attendees Michael Frame, Alex DeRosa, Kristy Frame, April DeRosa, Matt Read during the live auction.

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S9331214-01 S9330091-01

CAZENOVIA, NY

S9323051-01

presents

The Nutcracker November 30 & December 1

Cinderella March 14 & 15, 2020

The Oncenter - Crouse Hinds Theater Tickets available through Ticketmaster & The Oncenter Box OfďŹ ce

syracusecityballet.com

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BY AMY BLEIER LONG PHOTOS BY AMELIA BEAMISH

When trying to find a meaningful gift for a friend or loved one, consider who they are and how they live.

SEE THE FOREST FOR THE TREES Simon Pearce blown-glass Evergreen trees $155-$325, all at Nest 58, 58 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-685-5888, nest58.com.


For minimalists SIMPLE, THOUGHTFUL, USEFUL

INITIAL IMPRESSION Monogram bar necklace, $45, Emma James Boutique, 3 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-685-2747, emmajamesboutique.com.

HOLD ‘EM, FOLD ‘EM Handmade bifold leather wallets, $60 each, The Local Branch, 4 Jordan Street, Skaneateles, thelocalbranch.co.

CABLE GUY Key fob with charging cables, $20, Fashion Rescue 911 Boutique, 52 Oswego Street, Baldwinsville, 315-857-6690, fashionrescue911.com.

HANDCRAFTED CUPPA Ceramic mug by Victor Convertino, $24, Salt City Artisans, 226 Hawley Avenue, Syracuse, 315479-0400, saltcityartisans.com.

FORM AND FUNCTION Bottle opener by JVS Woodworking, $38, Cazenovia Artisans, 39 Albany Street, Cazenovia, 315-655-2225, cazenoviaartisans.com.

CONTEMPORARY COOL Concrete pinch bowl, 20|East, 85 Albany Street, Cazenovia, 315-815-4540, 20-east. com, and Salt City Flake Salt by Syracuse Salt Company, $8.99 for 4-ounce jar, Metro Home Style, 689 N. Clinton Street, Syracuse, 315-420-2335, metrohomestyle.net.

STAND BY ME Wooden plant stand, $44, Imagine, 38 E. Genesee St, Skaneateles, 315-685-6263, imagineskaneateles.com.

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For maximalists EMBELLISHMENT, TEXTURE, PATTERN

RING LEADER Enamel Dome Sunburst Ring, $350, Michelle DaRin Jewelry, michelledarinjewelery.com.

ABSTRACT ART Ares Sculpture with pivoting arms, $230, Fringed Benefits, 6825 E. Genesee Street, DeWitt, 315-802-4353, fringedbenefitsdesign.com.

SPOT ON Mustard and metallic gold leopard cardigan, $89, Floridella Boutique, 410 S. Warren Street, Syracuse, 315-741-7961.

HIP TO BE SQUARE Kimono Silk Pocket Square by Ginny Spina, $16, Salt City Artisans.

KEEP COOL Silver-plated triple wine cooler, $300, Cazenovia Abroad, 67 Albany Street, Cazenovia, 315-655-3433.

GO WITH THE GRAIN Maple & Black Walnut End Grain Cutting Board by local artisan Sawyer Kerr, $90, Sawyer’s Got Wood, sawyersgotwood.com.

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For inner peace seekers CALMING, INTROSPECTIVE, POSITIVE

NEW PERSPECTIVE Empathy journal, $18, Village Choices, 12 E. Genesee Street, Suite 2, Skaneateles, 315-685-1018.

CELEBRATING SELF “Strong is the New Pretty,” $17.95, and “The Heart of a Boy,” $18.95, Skaneateles 300, 2. W. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-685-1133.

GOOD VIBES Wellness Ritual Kit, $29, 20|East.

GET PHYSICAL Glow yoga mat (for beginners), $39, and Pose yoga mat (for more advanced yogis), $49, Lolë, 46 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-291-7177, facebook.com/loleskaneateles.

MORNING MIST Shower Scent essential oils in Settle Down and Stress Less, $5.50 each, Pomodoro, 61 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-685-0085.

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For party animals

RECIPE REFERENCE

FLAVORFUL, ENJOYABLE, ENTERTAINING

Flavor Thesaurus, $30, Drooz + Company.

CHEESE PLEASE Costa acacia wood cheese board, $39.99, The Gift Box Shoppe, 4317 Fay Road, Syracuse, 315-487-9099, thegiftboxshoppe.com.

DIY DRINKS Camp Cocktails in Butternut, $24, Drooz + Company, 36 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-920-8888, droozandcompany.com.

CONVERSATION STARTER Best Things Ever! Table Topics, $25, Dazzle, 119 W. Seneca Street, Manlius, 315-682-7499, thedazzlestore.com.

MIX IT UP MEAT ME THERE Righteous Felon Bourbon jerky, $7.99, Metro Home Style.

Poppy cocktail shaker, $35, Synple, 70 Main Street, Camillus, 585-615-3934, shopsynple.com.

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For hometown heroes PROUD, LOCAL, NOSTALGIC

GOOD TIMES Long Lost Tees, $32 each, Scholars & Champs, 310 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, 315-560-7430, scholarsandchamps.com.

UNLIMITED SAVORINGS The Eat Local CNY discount card for locally owned restaurants throughout Central New York, $20, Eat Local CNY, eatlocalcny.com.

WATERCOLORED MEMORIES

TASTE THE REGION Finger Lakes stemless glass, $15, Imagine.

Notecards by Assenza Design, $18.99 for set of 10 cards and envelopes, Paola Kay Gifts, 105 Brooklea Drive, Fayetteville, 315-632-2192.

LOVE POEM Poster Project haiku by Erin Stepowany and illustrated by Jamie Ashlaw, $20 for an 11-inch by 17-inch print, Wildflowers at the McCarthy Building, 217 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, 315-546-4919, wildflowersarmory.com.

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JUNIOR VARSITY Infant SU varsity jacket, $31.98, First National Gifts, 2 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 855-810-9076, firstnationalgifts.com.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


For coworkers FUNNY, CLEVER, APPROPRIATE

PAC IT IN Pac-Man mini game, $26, Drooz + Company.

WINE ABOUT IT Wine bag, $12, Nest 58.

TECH SUPPORT Emergency Tech Kit, $9.99, Paola Kay Gifts.

LIGHT MY FIRE Down to Earth Firestarters in Fresh Pine, $15.98, Pomodoro.

GNOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Gnome socks, $14.99, Metro Home Style.

MUG SHOT Enamel mug, $16.25, 20|East.

TEA PARTY Yard of Tea, $22.99 for assortment of 96 teas, Dazzle. NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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For the younger set PLAYFUL, HANDS-ON, FASHIONABLE

FINGER-CLICKING GOOD Texting gloves, $12, Witty Wicks, 190 Township Boulevard, Camillus, 315-672-3110, wittywicks.com.

DINO DECOR Dinosaur wall hooks by Random Acts of Craft, $35, Wildflowers at the McCarthy Building.

ROARING TWENTY-SOMETHINGS “Am I There Yet,” $19.99, Skaneateles 300.

ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

HIP HUGGER Herschel Fifteen hip pack, $29.95, J Michael, 173 Marshall Street, Syracuse, 315-471-4237, jmichaelshoes.com.

Metal Earth Long Nose Truck model, $13, Dazzle.

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GAME ON

SNEAK PEEK

Golf Pool game, $89.99, Chuck Hafner’s, 7265 Buckley Road, North Syracuse, 315-458-2231, chuckhafner.com.

3D sneaker puzzle, $22, Chloe’s Closet, 107 Brooklea Drive, Fayetteville, 315-6372513, facebook.com/chloesclosetny.

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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For new parents

FANCY FEET

ENGAGING, NURTURING, CUTE

Handmade leather baby moccasins, $64, The Local Branch.

HERE COMES… Big Trouble tee, $28, and Little Trouble onesie, $16.50, Cazenovia Abroad.

SAIL AWAY Natural rubber Origami Boat, $17, Pride + Joy, 3 W. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-6857576, prideandjoyshop.com.

SWEET SPOONFUL STORY TIME “Tiny Perfect Things,” $16.95, Chloe’s Closet.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

Pewter baby spoon set, $54, Gallery 54, 54 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-6855470, gallery54cny.com.

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For holiday lovers FESTIVE, DECORATIVE, WARM

TO THE TOP Felted Angel tree topper, $74, Paola Kay Gifts.

CUT IT OUT

SACRED SYMBOL

Holiday Cookie Cutter Set, $18, Fringed Benefits.

Pewter mezuzah, $49.99, Paola Kay Gifts.

AND VIXEN Liza Reindeer, $35, Lillie Bean, 57 Albany Street, Cazenovia, 315-655-0677.

COME TOGETHER Gather platter, $32.99, The Gift Box Shoppe.

BLUE, LIGHT, SPECIAL Blue textured glass votive tray set with white-washed mango wood tray, $44.99, The White Sleigh Ltd, 24 E. Genesee Street, Skaneateles, 315-685-8414.

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R EDHOUSE PU TS A LOCA L T W IST O N C H A R L E S D I C K E N S ’ C L A S S I C TA L E . BY M J K R AV EC

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It’s been done, as Nat King Cole sings, many times, many ways. Versions of Charles Dickens’ classic tale “A Christmas Carol” have been reinterpreted by Disney, Hallmark Channel, the Muppets, even the Skaneateles Chamber of Commerce. Now Redhouse is wrapping up its own version — a gift to the city — in “A Syracuse Christmas Carol,” which will star actor Fred Grandy.


Written just for Syracuse, the show fea-

Fred Grandy stars as Scrooge in “A Syracuse Christmas Carol” at Redhouse.

about the old Sibley’s building?’” Foster says.

tures city landmarks, icons and historical

Leading the cast, Fred Grandy, who played

figures, “hummable Christmas tunes and a

“Gopher” on the television series “The Love

Broadway-style score” with original songs,

Boat,” will appear in his third production at

choreography and puppets.

Redhouse (he previously appeared in “On

The idea came from Redhouse Artistic Di-

Golden Pond” and “I’m Not Rappaport”).

rector Hunter Foster, who had previously

Foster discussed the role with Grandy while

directed “A Connecticut Christmas Carol”

the two worked together on “Rappaport,”

while at East Haddam’s Goodspeed Musi-

which also starred Grandy’s “Love Boat”

cals in Connecticut. Writer L.J. Fecho wrote

co-star Ted Lange.

versions for different cities across the coun-

“I’ve been here since December. So when

try and Foster liked the idea of bringing it

Fred and Ted came to do ‘Rappaport,’ we just

to Central New York.

hit it off. We were out at dinner and we start-

“I said, what if we did one for Syracuse? It would refer to all things Central New York

ed talking about things next year and I asked him about ‘A Syracuse Christmas Carol.’”

and the people from Central New York and

Joining him will be 11 mostly local actors,

the stuff that I’ve learned about Syracuse...”

a children’s chorus of six and puppets from

The project was a go. Fecho wrote the book while Michael O’Flaherty wrote the music and lyrics. “I’m not from here, but I knew a lot of the references. My wife is from Rochester. There are things they have in com-

Open Hand Theater.

T

he show is set on Christmas Eve in 1999. Prominent business man Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by three

mon like Wegmans and Delta Sonic and Di-

ghosts — each a Central New York icon. To

nosaur Bar-B-Que...”

find which icons to feature as ghosts of past,

To find the right references that were dis-

present and future, Redhouse staff looked at

tinct to the area and would work for the story,

prominent people from different eras to de-

the staff went through an organized reading

termine which people could appear as ghosts,

of the script and music together.

yet still have a timeline that made sense.

What also makes the show unique is how

“In doing it, you have to line it up time-

the setting, icons and local references drive

line-wise. You have to go back to [Scrooge’s]

the story and its direction. “There are certain

childhood and when he’s in his 20s and 30s,

things that lend themselves to the storytell-

so all the ghosts have to be dead by the time

ing,” Foster says. “We have L. Frank Baum, so

he’s (the story) is in the present,” Foster says.

now we can do a big Wizard of Oz number.”

Why 1999?

Audiences will also appreciate referenc-

“It was how everything was sort of lined

es to local favorites. Foster particularly ap-

up. We thought it was interesting to be on

preciates the appearance of Sibley’s in the

the verge of the millennium and it worked

show, given that the theater is housed in the

out...” he says.

same building where Sibley’s once stood. It’s an occurrence that wasn’t intentional. “It was a total coincidence that Sibley’s is in it — the writer is not from here. He called me up and said, ‘Do you know anything

The play is set in downtown Syracuse, where Scrooge’s office is located. There’s also a reference to the Redhouse itself. Because, why not? “It’s a really fun show,” Foster says.

“A Syracuse Christmas Carol” runs Dec. 12-22. For more information or tickets, visit theredhouse.org or call 315-362-2785.

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A R EA INFLUENCERS, DESIGNERS OFFER FR ESH IDEAS TO GET FESTIV E STORY AND PHOTOS BY

ALAINA POTRIKUS

Jamesville-based lifestyle blogger Bernadette Holstein suggests keeping holiday decorations consistent with the style of your home. “When you’re shopping, you are always kind of drawn to the same things,” she said. “That’s your true personality, and it will give it a cohesive look, not cluttered.” NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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Linda Bien ETSY: My Vintage Soul, etsy.com/shop/myvintagesoul INSTAGRAM: @lindavintagesoul

Linda Bien’s love of vintage holiday decor began with her grandmother’s Christmas tree, which was strung with mercury glass beads and covered with ornaments she bought at the local department store in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her personal collection started with boxes of ornaments she found at church rummage sales and purchased for 50 cents. “Every once in a while, I’ll run across one that reminds me of one that she had,” says Bien, copywriter at MacKenzie-Childs and former editor of Central New York Magazine. She shares her vintage finds on Instagram and sells some of the items on Etsy, carefully curating the collection for customers who are equally as passionate about decorations from the past. Her Onondaga Hill home is decorated each season with the best of her finds, and her Etsy buyers tell her that her items make them remember their own personal histories. “One of the reasons I like doing this is that it really does tell stories about the past,” she says. “People will buy something from me because their grandmother had something similar, because of the memories associated with it.”

Bien said she finds vintage treasures at yard sales, estate sales and thrift stores.

Free with an appliance: The aluminum tree that bounces light across the room was purchased from a woman in Westvale whose father worked at an appliance store on West Genesee Street. “They would give away an aluminum tree if you bought a washer or dryer,” says Bien.

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Clockwise from left, Bien’s vintage holiday village pieces, Christmas patterned linens and a lifesize cardboard fireplace topped with vintage stockings, reindeer and holiday trees.

Collector secrets Here are some of her tips for finding quality vintage Christmas items to add to your own home. TREASURES ARE EVERYWHERE: Bien can

trace each piece in her collection to thrift stores, antique shows and estate sales. “You find things here and there,” she says. She also keeps her eye out when driving, picking up furniture and other items that have been discarded roadside during heavy trash season. eBay and Etsy are also great sources for specific items. CREATE A COLLECTION: Stockings,

ornaments, snowmen — Bien creates vignettes in her home using groups of items that tell a story. Similarly colored ornaments can be repurposed into wreaths; bottle brush trees look more darling in a group than alone. QUALITY, NOT QUANTITY: When she started collecting, Bien said she was less choosy about what she purchased. Now, she takes her time in selecting items and tries not to go overboard when decorating her home. “You can display them so that each piece can shine,” she says.

A $5 fireplace: Bien acquired the 1960s era cardboard fireplace from a collector in Cato. She paid $5 for the set, mostly because she was unsure that all the pieces were intact. The original directions were difficult to follow, but the finished product makes a delightfully nostalgic piece. 50

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Bernadette Holstein BLOG: bhomewithbernadette.com INSTAGRAM: @bhomewithbernadette

For years, Bernadette Holstein’s friends asked her how she managed to juggle entertaining while raising four young children. She started her lifestyle blog, “The Hive,” to share her tips for cooking, decorating and planning parties with less stress and plenty of style. On Instagram and her blog, she shares her own recipes and creations as well as inspirational images from fellow influencers. What started as a personal project has become a serious side hustle; she has more than 6,000 followers and has partnered with fashion brands like Hunter Boots, Ann Taylor and ASOS. “I believe in living each day fully and enjoying what each season has to offer to all facets of life,” she writes on her blog. “I’d like to share my ideas and tips for creating your best life, for you and those you love.”

Holstein creates festive vignettes throughout her home. She tops her mantle with silver and blue accents, taking her inspiration from the room’s light and bright atmosphere.

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Embrace shortcuts: Holstein’s gingerbread house mug-huggers have a store-bought secret: she uses boxed cookie mix instead of baking from scratch. “There are always shortcuts,” she says. “You can make things easier for yourself.”

Holiday helpers Here are some of her tips for successful entertaining during the holiday season. PLAN, PLAN, PLAN: Holstein enjoys welcoming friends and family into her

Jamesville home and plans ahead to make sure she isn’t stuck in the kitchen. “Entertaining should be fun — you shouldn’t be worried about it or fret,” she says. “It’s all in the planning. Don’t save it all for last minute.” TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF: In addition to cooking and decorating, she also leaves enough time to get ready herself. “Always greet your guests,” she writes on her blog. “You want to exude effortlessness and hospitality. This instantly makes your guests feel welcome.” MAKE SPACE: Holstein suggests clearing out the refrigerator ahead to

time to make room for large platters and leftovers, and emptying the dishwasher so it is on the ready for loading at the end of the night. “You want to be with your guests, not in the kitchen washing dishes,” she says. THINK LIKE A GUEST: Set aside a designated closet or area for coats (preferably not right at the entrance, to avoid a cluttered look) and make sure restrooms are stocked with ample hand towels. ASK FOR HELP: Holstein recruits her own family when she needs extra

helping hands. “My children love to help at parties, and truthfully, they are quite good at it,” she wrote on her blog. “My son usually helps to direct with parking, shoveling walks and hanging coats. My daughters clear away plates and work the buffet and loading dishwashers.”

Pine Cone Cheese Ball INGREDIENTS: 2 8oz. packages cream cheese, room temperature 1 small package Boursin cheese, herbed 2 cups whole almonds Sprigs of fresh rosemary for garnish

INSTRUCTIONS:

Mix the softened cream cheese with the boursin. Shape on a plate into a round with a point. Starting at the top of the pine cone, press the rounded side of the almonds into the cheese in rows to mimic the spikes of the pine cone. Garnish with rosemary. This recipe is enough to make two small pine cones or one large. Source: bhomewithbernadette.com

Holstein says she changes her tablescape design regularly. Her festive red display includes items of different scale to fill the room, as well as cozy candles and vases with poinsettias.

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Lisa Ryan, Smart Move Design WEB: smartmovedesign.com INSTAGRAM: @smartmovedesign

Lisa Ryan of Smart Move Design spends most of her year helping homeowners decorate their spaces for everyday life. But during the holidays, the Liverpool interior designer and home stager gets to dabble in the world of twinkling lights and festive decor to create unique and personalized looks that celebrate the season. Ryan, who has been in business for 11 years, started offering holiday decorating services when her home staging clients asked for help decorating their new homes. Ryan also steps in when clients need their homes or spaces decorated for parties or events. “Sometimes people have so much stuff, they don’t know what to do with it,” she says. “You need to decide where all those special items belong. “Every project, job, and home is different,” she says.

Go like a pro She shared some of her tips for Thanksgiving and Christmas decorating like a professional. SHOP YOUR OWN COLLECTION: Ryan starts by going through each client’s personal collection of holiday decor. “Sometimes it takes another set of eyes to find the perfect spot for something,” she says. Then she mixes in pieces from stores like Marshalls, TJ Maxx and Pottery Barn, as well as Amazon and online retailers. “You can find things everywhere,” she says. USE COLORS TO CREATE A COHESIVE LOOK: Sticking to a similar color scheme, Ryan pulls together fabrics and flowers, ribbons, beads and ornaments to create a textured, layered look for both Christmas trees and Thanksgiving table scapes. “That’s how you create a focal point,” she says. ADD PERSONAL TOUCHES: Ryan decorates one of

her own Christmas trees with doilies made by her grandmother; her son’s first tree included framed family photographs printed from an instant camera. “Christmas should be personal,” she says. She’s also not afraid to rock a theme, like a wine-inspired tree that included cascading grapes and cork ornaments, or a peacock tree adorned with feathers and jewel-toned ornaments. MAKE IT LAST: Recreate the look by taking

and saving pictures of table settings, mantels and trees to reference later, so you aren’t starting from scratch each year. “It helps create traditions,” she says.

Lisa Ryan enjoys decorating for autumn as much as the winter holidays, creating a cozy environment in her Liverpool home with candles, blankets and pillows that suit the season.

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S8899663-06

This is the place for you. Imagine hundreds of exceptional bath, kitchen and lighting products from trusted brands, in settings that help you envision them in your own home. You’ll find classic styles alongside the newest trends. A friendly, accessible staff offers guidance and detailed coordination to ensure that your project goes smoothly. Find details and hours for more than 40 showrooms at frankwebb.com.

SYRACUSE, NY 6792 Townline Road


PHOTO BY PAIGE EVERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

Charlie Poole, of Fayetteville, died in August 2018 from Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), a brain tumor. He was 17.

TO MAKE THINGS BETTER WITH COMMUNIT Y SUPP ORT, CHARLIE P OOLE LEF T A LEGACY OF HOPE AND A PL ACE OF COMFORT FOR TEENS WITH CANCER IN CNY BY JEANNE ALBANESE

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Like any teen, Charlie Poole wanted to connect with someone who understood him. Someone who could relate to what his body was going through. Who had similar thoughts about whether or not they would learn to drive, find a girlfriend or finish high school. Someone who knew what it was like to be a teen living with terminal cancer. For as much love and support as Charlie received from his family and good friends at Fayetteville-Manlius High School throughout two and a half years of treatment for an incurable brain tumor, he still felt utterly alone. He constantly sought the company of teens like him, connecting with some online and at a camp in Montana. He would text and Snapchat with them at all hours. Still, he craved local connections, which proved hard to find. Finally, a doctor told him about 13thirty Cancer Connect, a non-profit group in Rochester that existed simply to “make things better” for adolescents and young adults living with cancer. So

bond was instant, and it was deep.

Charlie and his mother, Lynda, would drive 95 miles to Roches-

When he got too sick to go anymore, the center’s director, Lauren

ter, where Charlie made pancakes, went bowling, played Jenga

Spiker, visited him at his home and made him a promise — that

and just hung out with other teens with cancer. For Charlie, the

she would do everything she could to bring 13thirty to Syracuse. Charlie died in August 2018 at age 17 from DIPG. DIPG, or Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, is a highly aggressive and incurable brainstem tumor that is predominantly found in children. Most are diagnosed between the ages of 5 and 9, and die within a year; Charlie lived for two and a half. In his obituary, Lynda and Keith Poole asked for donations to 13thirty. More than $12,000 poured in. That money, along with funds already earmarked for expansion in memory of another teen, several grants and an online fundraising campaign, enabled Spiker to fulfill her promise less than a year later. In July, 13thirty opened its second location on 7th North Street in Liverpool. Hundreds of people, from Charlie’s friends and faming of a place where adolescents, young adults and their families can find social and emotional support through planned programming or by simply dropping in to talk, laugh, cry or just sit. The new space, painted in bright shades of mostly greens and blues, features comfortable couches in a large program room for game nights, art classes or just hanging out; a full kitchen with a family-sized table for nutrition and cooking classes; a fitness

Charlie loved trees, birds and nature, and often said cancer taught him to appreciate the little things in life. He liked to share his newfound motto during his illness, which was to slow down and smell the roses.

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PHOTOS LEFT COURTESY FACEBOOK; RIGHT COURTESY 13THIRTY

ily to local politicians, crammed in to celebrate the grand open-


Twenty-two months after his diagnosis, Charlie made his first visit to an event at 13thirty’s Rochester location. He and his mother Lynda drove through a snowstorm on Martin Luther King Day 2018 to attend this pancake breakfast. The pancakes were “just okay,” Charlie said, but finally finding local teens living with cancer was priceless.

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room with a stationary bike, elliptical trainer and other equipment for wellness programs. Significant $10,000 grants from Wegmans and the Jim and Juli Boeheim Foundation and $8,900 from the Central New York Community Foundation helped with startup and equipment costs. There’s also a cozy room tucked in the back just for parents. The small sitting room is decorated with sets of paintings created during a parent painting program in Rochester. Four of Lynda’s paintings hang there. While Spiker says the center isn’t for Charlie, it is certainly because of him. On the anniversary of his death, several of his highschool friends showed up there to talk about and remember him. “Charlie stirred the waters,” Spiker says. “He got people think-

Keith, Charlie, Lynda and Tim Poole. This family portrait was taken at Clark Reservation as part of the Gold Hope project, a national program which matches local photographers with kids with cancer for family portraits. Started by a DIPG family in memory of their daughter, the project also raises money for awareness of pediatric cancer.

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ing about what was missing in the Syracuse region and that rePHOTO BY PAIGE EVERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

ally prompted us and propelled us into Syracuse. We just knew there had to be an easier way for kids to find resources instead of driving 95 miles on the Thruway to Rochester. Charlie paved the road for us.” Every year, 82,000 adolescents and young adults are diagnosed with cancer and those ages 13 to 30 are caught in the middle between pediatric and adult medicine. Teens face devastating isolation, loss of peer support, diminished self-image and self-esteem while their life is interrupted and years of potential are lost. Yet little support exists for them. Jack Sheridan, of On My Team16, which provides comfort to pediatric cancer patients and families, helped cut the ribbon at the grand opening. He said he would have loved a place like 13thirty when he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during his sophomore year at Christian Brothers Academy in 2014. “The only time I ever ran into any kids was when I was at the hospital and that’s not really a time or place you want to discuss everything that’s going on with you,” says Sheridan, who now attends and plays baseball at Le Moyne College.“This would have been huge. I’m glad all the kids who are going through it now have a place like this. This is a really, really cool place.” Matthew Capogreco, program and events coordinator for the Upstate Cancer Center, agrees that teens and young adults fall into a gap between pediatric and adult care and that both medical and emotional care becomes tricky for this age group. He speaks from a professional perspective, but also a personal one: He was diagnosed with rare endocrine tumors when he was 25 and his treatment spanned 10 years. He is now 43. “There was not an ounce of support outside of my family and my friends,” he said at the grand opening. Charlie faced the same lack of resources and repeatedly prodded anyone who would listen to find a way to bring local teens with cancer together. Get a pizza and put us in a room, he would say, and he would take care of the rest. It took over a year, but Charlie’s persistence paid off: Griffin’s Guardians hosted a teen night at its location in Cicero and the Upstate Cancer Center and Golisano Children’s Hospital launched their H.O.P.E. events — Helping Oncology Patients and Parents Engage. And now, 13thirty has arrived to offer a permanent source of comfort, interaction and education.

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“Now that it’s open we’re so happy and we hope all the other teens and young adults, we hope it will help them as much as it helped Charlie.” LYNDA POOLE, MOTHER OF CHARLIE POOLE

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PHOTO THIS PAGE COURTESY 13THIRTY, OPPOSITE BY JEANNE ALBANESE

Lynda and Keith Poole stand near Charlie’s portrait that hangs on the wall at the Liverpool location of 13thirty. Keith spent hours painting the walls in the new space.


Lynda Poole said bonding with other teens impacted Charlie in obvious ways and that he cherished their trips to Rochester and the connections he made there. It made him lighter, more talkative, more enthusiastic and positive. She is certain it made a difference — he lived a year and half longer than expected. “I have no proof, but I’ve got to think it helped him, to at least have some hope beyond medicine not being able to fix him,” she says. “Knowing that he has value in his life and that he’s not alone.” Those are the very ideals upon which Spiker founded 13thirty, after making a promise to her own daughter, Melissa Sengbusch, just days before she died of a rare bone marrow cancer. Melissa was 17 and had just been accepted to an Ivy League college when she was diagnosed. She was too old for the Highlights magazines and wooden blocks in the pediatric hospital but too young for the austere setting of a traditional hospital. Her experience brought to light for Spiker the gap in services and support that exists for this age group. “Melissa used to beg me to tell the clowns she was asleep when they came by,” Spiker says. Melissa, described by her mom as bright and creative, fought through multiple treatments, surgeries and debilitating setbacks but still attended college, traveled, planted a garden and learned to crochet and make pottery, living what Spiker calls an extraor-

Lynda Poole hugs 13thirty executive director Lauren Spiker at the grand opening in July. Spiker and other 13thirty employees in Rochester stayed in constant touch with Charlie, Lynda and Keith during Charlie’s treatment. Spiker visited Charlie just a few weeks before he died to make her promise.

dinary life filled with life-affirming opportunities. Three nights before she died at age 19, she said to Spiker: “If you’ve learned anything from me through all of this, do something to make a difference — to make things better.” That following year, Spiker launched Melissa’s Living Legacy Teen Cancer Foundation in 2001, which later grew into 13thirty and has since helped hundreds of adolescent and young adult patients and survivors. “Our mission was simply to help teens with cancer live their very best lives, whether our kids lived or died,” Spiker says. Now that the doors of the Syracuse space are open, the challenges are two-fold: To get teens and young adults in the door and to raise enough money to keep those doors open. Lynda Poole says the center’s opening is bittersweet for her and Keith, who spent hours and hours painting those brightly colored walls. Charlie would have loved the new space, but she

13thirty The Syracuse chapter of 13thirty Cancer Connect is located at 1035 7th North Street, Suite E. ‹‹ It is open for drop-in visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. ‹‹You can reach the center at 315-883-1862 to find out more about specific program information for teens, young adults and parents. ‹‹ For program information, you can also contact Megan Scott at 315-297-3553. ‹‹ For fundraising or volunteer opportunities, contact Katie Lannon at 315-418-2432. ‹‹ Follow 13thirty Cancer Connect on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter or visit 13thirty.org.

says it’s not about him anymore — and that he’d hate all the attention anyway. She hopes the center thrives, and that it is what the community wants and needs. “It took him dying to get it open,” she says. “And now that it’s open we’re so happy and we hope all the other teens and young adults, we hope it will help them as much as it helped Charlie.” NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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We love living here. Houses are affordable and the great schools provide our kids with the skills they will need in the future. (Futures we hope will keep or lead them back to the area!) Communities are friendly and safe. And when we do need a weekend getaway, we’re so close to quaint villages and big cities, we can get there in no time. We love working here. Central New York has a history of innovation and industry, often on the cutting edge – in the past due to the Erie Canal, and now thanks to the unmanned aircraft industry. Our local employers play a big part in our community and work hard to create job and career opportunities here. Networking opportunities abound, helping to create deeper connections between people and ideas. New small businesses are opening every month and we relish the chance to support our neighbors and friends. We love playing here. All year round there are so many activities and events to get involved in. The wide variety of cultural and food festivals represents the rich diversity of the area that we value. When we’re not cheering on our favorite high school and college sports teams, we’re enjoying a touring production of a Broadway show, achieving a personal best in a 5K, or taking in the natural beauty of each part of our region. And, we think everyone deserves a place like you. We know they will see how wonderful you are and fall in love with you, too. That’s why we’re excited to be partnering with local businesses to spread the word about The Good Life in CNY.

TO BE PART OF THE GOOD LIFE CAMPAIGN, VISIT GOODLIFECNY.COM

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S P O N S O R E D

C O N T E N T


NEW CENTERSTATE CEO INITIATIVE SHINES A LIGHT ON THE GOOD LIFE IN CNY. Welcome to The Good Life, Central New York – a new initiative designed to attract job seekers to the region. We know Central New York is a great place to live, work, play and raise a family. When it comes to affordability, ease in getting around and finding joy and celebration in every season, our community is hard to beat. We also know that CNY’s employers have

Pathfinder Bank, Rapid Response Monitoring

more job openings now than at any time in

Services, Inc., Saab Sensis Corporation, Syra-

recent memory. To tell the CNY story, attract

cuse University, Turning Stone Resort & Casi-

talent and fill these jobs, CenterState CEO has

no, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Onondaga County,

partnered with several local companies on a

Syracuse CoE, SRC Inc., AXA, C&S Companies,

project to promote CNY to potential candidates

Fust Charles Chambers LLP, Le Moyne College

outside our community.

and Thompson & Johnson Co., Inc.

CenterState CEO, the region’s business lead-

The goal of the marketing campaign is to at-

ership organization, contracted Advance Media

tract job seekers to Central New York with en-

New York to execute a major marketing cam-

gaging content, stunning photography and en-

paign and create an all-in-one resource for CNY

ticing messages that help to tell our regional

companies who need to sell the area to job can-

story. The campaign includes digital advertis-

didates. Advance Media New York will tell the

ing, print and billboard advertising, a website,

CNY story, illustrating that it’s a great, inexpen-

videos, and, in a supporting role, this magazine.

sive place to live, easy to get around, in a beau-

“Central New York is a community of neigh-

tiful central location, with abundant entertain-

bors who are eager to see this region not only

ment and recreational options. This project is

survive, but thrive – and thrive it has. Our com-

one component of the initiatives CenterState

munity is growing in new and exciting ways all

CEO has developed to address Central New

the time and we hear from employers every day

York’s growing shortage of available workers.

about the need to attract talented individuals

A new website provides potential new Cen-

to their growing workforces,” said Robert Simp-

tral New Yorkers everything they need to know

son, president of CenterState CEO. “We are ex-

about the region, and to entice them to join us

cited about this initiative, which creates new

in the Good Life.

tools for area employers to connect with poten-

“Branding and selling the area is key to bring-

tial workers to grow their business.”

ing new people to our community, for our fu-

Together, these sponsors hope to attract more

ture,” said Tim Kennedy, Advance Local presi-

people to consider working in Central New York

dent. “We have a great regional story that needs

and calling it home. Join the initiative.

to be told better than it ever has. That’s what we

Promote our home town. Act as an ambas-

do best — telling stories and finding and devel-

sador for Central New York and help us spread

oping the right audience ready to hear them.”

the good word. Use #GoodLifeCNY to highlight

These CNY companies are helping to promote

the beauty of our community. Find out more at goodlifecny.com and pre-

CNY and to build our community: INFICON, Inc., M&T Bank, National Grid,

pare to fall in love all over again.

S P O N S O R E D

C O N T E N T

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Our Town

Liverpool BY AMY BLEIER LONG

The friendly community of Liverpool is a popular place to live, with many amenities and activities. It’s also a big hub for businesses due to its proximity to the Regional Transportation Center, Interstate 81, Route 690 and the Thruway. Liverpool encompasses an extensive area; the charming mile-square village and immediate surrounding areas are just a taste of what Liverpool has to offer.

Enjoy a savory brunch at Café at 407 and diner classics at Maggie’s Trackside Diner and Gardenview Diner. At lunch, the franks and Coneys at Heid’s are worth the wait. Limp Lizard’s BBQ is smokin’ or have a deli sandwich from Mazzye’s Meats. For a slice, stop into Amore Pizza & More, Gino and Joe’s Pizza Liverpool and Pizza Villa. Have the char-grilled wings at Original Italian Pizza or the burger of the week at Village Burger. Find Mexican cuisine at Rio Grande and Indian at India House and Sahota Palace. Take out or eat in at King’s Chef Chinese restaurant. AppeThaizing has earned recognition by the Royal Thai Government. Ichiban Japanese Steakhouse’s hibachi dinners are tasty and entertaining. Bring New England seafood home from The Fish Company of Liverpool. Italian fans have plenty of spots to choose from: Francesca’s Pizza & Italian Kitchen, Santangelo’s, Avicolli’s and Nick and Angelo’s. JT’s Creamery & Café and Deborah’s Sweet Treats have many gluten-free options. Vicky’s Tasty Treats dishes up soft-serve ice cream.

Have a drink

Savor a hot cup of coffee and a pastry at Freedom of Espresso. Sip coffee, tea or an emoliente at Hope Café Coffee and Tea House and support a non-profit at the same time. Head to Rocky’s Pub for classic pub fare and cocktails. Watch a game and have a draft at Cobblestone Ale House. Enjoy drinks and more on the outdoor patio at restaurant/ bar The Retreat. Discover a selection of New York State wines and special bottles exclusive to Nichols Discount Liquors. Sharkey’s Bar & Grill serves cold drinks and volleyball leagues.

At left, a dog at Heid’s. Above, the linguini with clam sauce at Santangelo’s Restaurant, a Best of CNY Italian Restaurant finalist.

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Shop local

Brighten your space with every day or seasonal arrangements by D.G. Lawn’s Flower Shop. P.S. Furniture specializes in refurbished furniture. Amateur wine and beer makers can find everything they need at E.J. Wren Homebrewer. Aficionados should visit Kieffer’s Cigar Store. Select something sparkly at Bradley’s Jewelers or Diana Jewelers. Pick up fresh produce, baked goods or cuts of meat at Nichols Supermarket or spice things up at Namaste India Grocery Store. Pamper your pets at Furrever Friends Pet Boutique & Grooming Salon. Treat yourself to gourmet cupcakes and more at CupCakers Bakery. Pop into Kandied Kernel Popcorn Shop for a flavorful gift.

“Liverpool is a very special community; it’s small-town America at its best. It is host to the best park in CNY, some amazing restaurants and passionate, purpose driven businessowners and community members.” Matthew Cullipher, CEO of The People Project and Hope Café Coffee and Tea House

PHOTOS BY SYRACUSE.COM

Grab a bite


Annual events

Onondaga Lake Park is the site of many events big and small, some of the most popular are Lights on the Lake and the LEON Festival. Run the Corporate Challenge with your coworkers and a view of the lake. The Liverpool is the Place summer concert series in Johnson Park takes place every Monday and Wednesday, June through August. Meet friends monthly for Hump Day Lunch at the American Legion. Swap your goods at the annual village-wide yard sale. Enjoy a weekend of family fun, artists, a bounce house and more at the Liverpool Craft Extravaganza.

Things to do

Learn about indigenous heritage at Skä-Noñh Great Law of Peace Center and the industry that gave birth to the City of Syracuse at the Salt Museum. The Liverpool Village Museum and Historian’s Office exhibits artifacts and information, while the Willow Museum highlights Liverpool’s willow basket-weaving past. The Liverpool Public Library’s programming provides opportunities to make connections. Flex your creative muscles at Liverpool Art Center and Bloom Gather Grow. Flex your actual muscles at any number of area fitness clubs including 9Round Fitness, Dharma Yoga or by playing on a team at Syracuse Kickball Park. Go for Cosmic Bowling on weekends at Flamingo Bowl.

Get outside

CENTURY 21

One of the best-known and loved parks in the area, Onondaga Lake Park features Wegmans Playground, a skate park, a dog park, trails for biking, running or walking, game courts and fields and equipment rentals. The Parkside and Lakeside athletic fields in the Wegmans Landing section provide a picturesque setting for softball and kickball. Dock your boat at Onondaga Lake Park Marina for a night or the summer. Long Branch Park hosts many festivals and events. Johnson Park, in the heart of the village, hosts summer concerts and movie nights. Washington Park is the spot for annual events, and you might spot acrobats, too! Members enjoy small boat sailing, kayaking, canoeing and small motorboats at Onondaga Yacht Club. A little further out, Duerr Park is a hidden gem, featuring a swimming pool, playground, basketball court and tennis courts.

Top, Lights on the Lake and Duerr Park.

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CNY Scout

Risk and reward BY AMY BLEIER LONG PHOTOS BY ALAINA POTRIKUS

Hints and private previews, cards (literally) kept close

Thinking that it also would be a great opportunity for a

to the vest. It seems more suited to Clue, but the details

fundraiser, Nicotera linked the sales to benefit another cli-

of the City of Syracuse First Edition Monopoly game have

ent — the Abraham House, a non-profit that serves termi-

been closely guarded. Until now, the gameboard prototype

nally ill patients and their families. The City of Utica ver-

and other components have only been shared on a need-

sion was released to great success in 2018. The demand for the game led Nicotera to explore the pos-

to-know basis. When this officially licensed version is released to the public on November 15, the parts of our city that were immortalized will be revealed. The level of secrecy may seem unusual, but it was just the thing to generate interest when Jeana Nicotera first spearheaded a custom Monopoly project for the city of Utica.

To accomplish all that goes into manufacturing a custom Monopoly game, Nicotera brought on Karie Ballway, an executive vice president in Cooley’s East Syracuse office. They drew up a wish list of local companies and corporate entities they wanted to approach. Because gameplay

Nicotera is a Utica-based brand consultant at Cooley Group,

remains unchanged from the original, the duo had to en-

a company in the print and promotional products industry.

sure that the participants featured fit appropriately, while

She had been germinating the idea of a themed Monopoly

still highlighting hometown treasures and iconic places in

game for a few years; after seeing a law enforcement-themed

the community.

game at a trade show in Las Vegas, she pitched a similar project for a client, but Hasbro denied the request. Undeterred, she tried again, broadening the focus to all of Utica. 70

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Nicotera and Ballway carefully considered their options while exploring potential beneficiaries for the game. They realized that the Food Bank of Central New York


“These funds will help us to acquire and distribute enough food for 600,000 nutritious meals, making a tremendous difference in the emergency food network and in the lives of children, families, and seniors struggling with food insecurity.” LYNN HY, CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER OF THE FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL NEW YORK

would be a partner with a wide geographic

about the project.

Free pick-ups for pre-ordered games take

reach (it covers 11 counties) and an admi-

To drum up interest, they met with lo-

rable, apolitical mission: The Food Bank

cal media and set up at the Syracuse Na-

and on John Glenn Boulevard on Novem-

has been helping to feed hungry Central

tionals and the New York State Fair (both

ber 15, 16, 22 and 23.

New Yorkers for nearly 35 years.

place at Wegmans in Dewitt, Fairmount

participants in the game) to facilitate pre-

Games can be shipped for a fee or found

“How can anyone frown on feeding the

sales and awareness. With confidence in

at other participating locations, including

hungry and helping people in need?” says

the growing number of presales, they

Coleman’s Authentic Irish Pub, Green Hills

Nicotera. Teaming up with the Food Bank

took a chance and submitted an order for

Farms market and Joey’s Classic Italian

also gave them access to Lynn Hy, chief

10,000 games.

Dining, after November 15.

development officer of the Food Bank,

When the 10,000 games are sold, Cool-

Though bringing the City of Syracuse

who has a broad network and helped at-

ey Group will donate $200,000 from the

Monopoly game to fruition involved a long

tract support.

proceeds to the Food Bank.

behind-the-scenes process of legal con-

The three worked their networks to

“These funds will help us to acquire and

tracts, sponsorship requests and pitching

secure underwriters. In a large show of

distribute enough food for 600,000 nutri-

Hasbro on our city, the Cooley Group and

support for the project, Syracuse Univer-

tious meals, making a tremendous differ-

the Food Bank are excited to be connect-

sity signed on to sponsor the entire or-

ence in the emergency food network and in

ed to the most popular board game brand

ange section plus the creation of a spe-

the lives of children, families, and seniors

worldwide and to take it to the next level

cial token.

struggling with food insecurity,” says Hy.

with the fundraising element.

Having the cachet of the university and its

In addition to benefitting from the pro-

“It’s a great community and civic pride

ability to promote the game to its extensive

ceeds, the Food Bank has a featured to-

project that [everyone], we hope, will get

network helped convince other organiza-

ken in the game.

behind and we appreciate the support. It’s

tions who were considering participating.

Games are still available for purchase on-

been a fun project, and it will be iconic for

“No pun intended, it [was] a game chang-

line at $49.99 on syracusemonopoly.com.

people to have over the years,” says Ballway.

er,” says Ballway. In the pink and yellow districts, Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, Laci’s Tapas Bar, Pastabilities, the MOST, the St. Patrick’s Parade and Tipperary Hill’s upside-down traffic light are represented. Other underwriters include Beak & Skiff, Harrison Bakery, deLima Coffee, the Syracuse Crunch and Wegmans. A popular, historic downtown landmark has pride of place as Boardwalk; local auto dealers replace the railroads. To make games available for the holiday season, the order had to be submitted to Hasbro in mid-August. After the initial announcement and website launch in July, Nicotera and Ballway had very little time to get the word out NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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Farm to Table

Moroccan it

Middle Eastern spices make The Horned Dorset Inn’s Moroccan Lamb Stew a standout dish — with or without the lamb. Go vegan with potato, carrot or cabbage. This warming, exotic dish is sure to warm and spice and shake things up at your winter table.


BY M J K R AV EC

At The Horned Dorset Inn in Leonardsville, the seasons drive the kitchen’s creativity so that the freshest ingredients pop up on the menu in a variety of ways. In summer, the restaurant relies on its own organic gardens for salad, herbs and vegetables, while local farms supply root vegetables, squash and other hard crops in winter. “The late fall and early winter months for us are flavors of comfort, looking for warming dishes still fresh with flavors of the harvest. The year culminates in celebratory dishes, fitting the tradition of the holidays,” says Chef Aaron Wratten. For our November/December issue, Wratten shares this Moroccan version of a lamb stew. It’s flavorful, satisfying and exotic and all the ingredients can be found locally, he says. It also makes a great vegetarian dish, when lamb is substituted with carrots, celery, cabbage, celery root or potato. Cook them until they’re just tender. The Ras El Hanout is a Moroccan spice blend available at specialty shops — or you can make this easy version at home. “I have made any number of vegetarian versions in the past harnessing the flavors of tomato with ‘Ras El Hanout’ with great success,” says Wratten. “Every Moroccan spice merchant offers their version of this beguiling spice blend, whose name means ‘best of the shop.’”

Horned Dorset Moroccan Lamb Stew

Keep an eye on the stew, bringing it to a simmer and stirring occasionally to prevent scorching. Meanwhile, sear lamb dice.

Serves 4 For the Stew: 1 ½ pounds local lamb stew or 2 pounds lamb shoulder blade, arm chops, or leg 4 Tbsp. vegetable oil, divided 1 medium yellow onion, peeled, cut in ½ inch pieces 2 cloves garlic, peeled, roughly chopped 1 Tbsp. fresh ginger, peeled and grated 2 tsp. Ras el Hanout spice (see recipe) 14 oz. organic chickpeas, with liquid 14 oz. organic canned plum tomatoes, diced 3 oz. dried apricots cut in half, about ½ cup 1 small bunch cilantro Juice of half a lemon, about 1 Tbsp.

Drain and discard any juices from the lamb. Choose a large sauté pan, preferably nonstick. Working in batches, sauté the lamb dice over a high fire in a splash of vegetable oil, only putting enough lamb in the pan to barely cover the bottom. Let the meat brown undisturbed before turning, a couple of minutes to a side, until mostly browned all around. Drain the meat of excess oil in a colander and add it to the stew. Continue until you have seared all the meat.

Citrus Couscous: 2 cups dry couscous 2 cups orange juice Zest of 1 orange Juice of half a lemon, about 1 Tbsp. ¼ tsp. kosher salt, or to taste 2 Tbsp. butter or olive oil

THE STEW:

If you don’t find prepared “Lamb Stew” already diced, any shoulder or leg cut works well. Cut the lamb into roughly 3/4- to 1-inch cubes, removing any bone and large pieces of fat, leaving some fat for flavor. Set aside. Start with a good 3-quart Dutch oven or heavy pot with a lid. Add a Tbsp. or so of oil and the diced onions over medium fire, and cook just until softened and translucent, about two minutes. Add grated ginger, garlic and Ras el Hanout. Stir for another minute to soften garlic without browning. Add chickpeas, liquid and all, diced tomatoes and apricots. Season with kosher salt, about a half tsp. for now. Rinse cilantro, trim and discard any brown ends from the bottom and chop an inch or more of the stems finely — this should be a generous Tbsp.— and add it to the stew. Save the leafy tops in cold water for garnish later.

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Bring the stew to a bare simmer. Stir, cover tightly and simmer over the lowest possible fire for about an hour, checking every 15 minutes that it does not scorch on the bottom. If the stew seems too dry, add a little water; if too liquid, leave it uncovered for the last 15 minutes of cooking. Finally stir in the lemon juice and check seasoning before serving, adding a little salt if needed. THE COUSCOUS:

About 15 minutes before serving, make the couscous. Place the orange juice in a 2-quart pot. Add the finely grated zest of one orange, fresh lemon juice, salt and the butter or olive oil, whichever you prefer. Bring to a full boil, turn off the fire, add the couscous, stir just to distribute liquid and cover with a lid or foil. Fluff with a fork and re-cover every three minutes, at least twice so it doesn’t compact into lumps. Serve the stew garnished with the cilantro tops and hot couscous on the side. Ras El Hanout: 1 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. ground ginger ½ tsp. ground black pepper ½ tsp. ground cinnamon ½ tsp. ground coriander ¼ tsp. ground allspice 1/8 tsp. ground clove Small pinch cayenne or pepper flake (or more, according to your taste)

Stir everything together. Makes a little more than you will need for this recipe.


CLASSIC ITALIAN DINING

PHOTOS COURTESY THE HORNED DORSET INN, SYRACUSE.COM

Online Ordering, Browse our lunch and dinner menus at myavicollis.com

TO DRINK? “Given the spices, I would pair a red Burgundy, or West Coast Cabernet Sauvignon, an Amber Ale, or something with a hint of fruit or mint tea,” says Wratten.

Avicolli’s can cater your office, school or private events. Online Catering @ myavicollis.com

Moroccan Lamb Stew from The Horned Dorset Inn.

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Art Profile

A broader stroke N E W D I R ECTO R A I M S TO E X PA N D S U A R T G A L L E RI E S ’ R E AC H B Y K AT H E R I N E R U S H W O R T H

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Vanja Malloy is director and chief curator of the Syracuse University Art Galleries.

The museums and galleries composing Syracuse University’s Coalition of Museums and Art Centers (CMAC) make valuable contributions to the Syracuse cultural community. So when there’s a change in leadership at one of CMAC’s leading entities, it leads one to wonder how that change might impact both the university and the broader Syracuse communities. On August 1, Vanja Malloy stepped in to fill the position of director and chief curator of the Syracuse University Art Galleries, a position that opened up in June of last year when long-time director Dominic Iacono retired. Malloy comes to Syracuse via the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College where she was curator of American Art. She recently settled into a home in Dewitt with her husband, Patrick, who is an architect, three-year-old daughter, Gwen, and 18-month old son, Oliver. PHOTOS COURTESY SU ART GALLERIES

Malloy says she is evaluating her new role as director and chief curator at the galleries through both short-term and long-term lenses while maintaining a clear respect for and understanding of why and how things have been done prior to her arrival. In the near term, she says there are nuts and bolts issues that need to be addressed that won’t be visible to the outside. “We need to update the gallery software system to improve the searchability of the collection,” she says. “But we’re also going through an accreditation process, which started in the interim period (between Iacono’s retirement and her hiring). We also need a NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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Clockwise from top left, at SU Art Galleries: Deborah Dhone, Onondaga Lake Project, 2019; Holly Greenberg, “Chair” from the Remains series, 2018 and Yasser Aggour, “Foot”, 2019.

strategic plan, an active collections plan, and an annual report.”

Museum of Art, she oversaw an extensive collection comprising

While none of those actions will outwardly impact the galler-

painting, sculpture prints, and decorative arts representing the

ies’ audiences, they will have an indirect impact by determin-

78

colonial era through contemporary times.

ing, for example, how the collection continues to take shape,

Malloy came to the world of art and, specifically, museum

i.e. what areas in the collection will be prioritized for acquisi-

management and curatorial work via a rather circuitous route

tions. A strategic plan might determine how broadly the galler-

through the sciences.

ies interact across academic departments, or how far the galler-

“In college I was taking biology and pre-med classes, but I took

ies choose to reach into the broader Syracuse community. An

art history classes, too and it came easy to me,” Malloy says. “I’ve

annual report will be, in part, a report card on how the galleries

always loved art, but it never seemed to me to be a stable career.”

are doing — tallies on attendance, acquisitions, donations, etc.

She says it was Calder’s comfort in the worlds of science and

Malloy is no stranger to these aspects of museum management,

art she discovered during her master’s and doctoral studies that

having completed an internship at the Metropolitan Museum of

convinced her she could find a home in the art world. Calder,

Art while an undergraduate at Duke University. She also stud-

trained as a mechanical engineer, designed works that were

ied at Sotheby’s Institute of Art, writing a master’s thesis on the

clearly influenced by the physical world; pieces that were care-

artist Alexander Calder. She returned to the Met as the Chester

fully balanced, suspended and brought to life with a breath of air.

Dale Fellow in the department of Modern and Contemporary

“I loved the science of Calder’s work and his writings,” Mal-

Art upon receiving her doctorate from the Courtauld Institute

loy says. “I could combine my interest and knowledge of the sci-

of Art in London. As the curator of American Art at the Mead

ences with the artwork. It was really exciting to see how I could

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


Interior Renovated Permanent Collections Space at SU Art Galleries.

contribute to the field.” This cross-disciplinary approach goes to the heart of Malloy’s

cuse community, working more collaboratively with the Everson Museum of Art.

longer-term goals for the galleries. She talks about reaching out

“The Everson has a better finger on the pulse of what is going

to virtually every, and any, department on campus that is inter-

on in the community,” she states. “I would like to see opportu-

ested in working with her and the museum’s collections to fur-

nities to share collections and resources.”

ther their own teachings.

She also wants to make the SU Galleries more inviting to a more

“I want to drive more interdisciplinary projects,” Malloy elab-

diverse community, rotate the permanent collection more often,

orates. “I would like to start conversations across disciplines and

and extend the exhibition season into the summer months to

show how art is constantly evolving. I’d like to do things outside

keep the broader community engaged. She speaks of organizing

of the humanities. I’d like to look to technologies.”

Community Days, Family Days and Movie Nights, recognizing

While at the Mead, Malloy mounted an exhibition, to con-

that parking and access are challenges. There are longer-term

siderable critical acclaim, that examined the influence of sci-

solutions in discussion to solve the accessibility issue, but she

ence upon artists in the early- to mid-20th century. She hopes

hopes there are shorter-term solutions that can be considered,

to make those cross-disciplinary connections utilizing SU’s ex-

as well. Malloy says reaching out beyond the campus footprint

tensive permanent collection as a starting point.

is important to her.

“I really want the galleries to become more integral to the campus experience,” she says. Malloy also would like to reach more broadly into the Syra-

To the broader community, Malloy says, “I want to get them to come here and have a great experience and make them want to come back.” NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

79


Galleries ArtRage Gallery, The Norton Putter Gallery 505 Hawley Avenue, Syracuse, artragegallery.org. 2 to 7 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Jerome Witkin: This Time, This World: Jerome Witkin, who after studying art in both the U.S. and Europe, became a professor of art at Syracuse University in 1971. Witkin is one of the most important figurative painters alive today. John Handley, director of the Stephen Austin University Art Galleries, writes “Witkin’s art is not for the faint of heart. Although he renders in pencil and paint as skillfully and theatrically as Caravaggio or Rembrandt — he is a master of drama and light — his work often carries the blunt force of a wartime journalist.” His biographer, Sherry Chayat, once noted that when Witkin enters his studio, “…he leaps into the dark realm of political repression, the Holocaust, the private wars of domesticity, the collision of recurrent nightmares and the evening news.” His work is included in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Uffizi in Florence, Italy, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. Through Jan. 11, 2020.

Edgewood Gallery 216 Tecumseh Road, Syracuse. 315-445-8111, Edgewoodartandframe.com. 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday- Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday-Monday. Free.

Holiday Exhibit: Nature-inspired works by Shawn L. Halperin: This exhibit includes carved cedar sculpture, wood and mixed media wall pieces and jewelry incorporating wood and metal. Opening reception 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, Nov. 22. Through Jan. 3, 2020.

401 Harrison St., Syracuse. 315-474-6064, everson.org. Noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, noon to 8 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Closed MondayTuesday. $5 suggested donation.

Earth Piece: Named after Yoko Ono’s 1963 Earth Piece, a score that invites the reader to “listen to the sound of the earth turning,” this exhibition examines artists who have combined clay and ceramics with performance art, photography, conceptual art and even land art. Far from being used as “just another material,” clay comes freighted with millennia of associations with material culture. Earth Piece highlights the work of well-known figures from the art world, as well as lesser-known artists whose work shaped the field of ceramics into a vibrant discipline that is equally at home in both domestic and contemporary spheres. Through Jan. 5, 2020. On My Own Time: CNY Arts’ 46th annual On My Own Time exhibition connects Central New York businesses in a collaboration that promotes the benefits of the creative process across community sectors. Original works created by amateur artists working in a variety of professions were displayed at their work sites. This professional juried selection recognizes the outstanding works by employees of Central New York companies and organizations. Through Nov. 17.

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“Migrant” by Jerome Witkin at ArtRage Gallery.

Light Work Gallery, Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery at Light Work 316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse. 315-443-1300, lightwork.org. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday-Sunday and by appointment. Free.

Wendy Red Star: Baaeétitchish (One Who Is Talented): Light Work is pleased to present Baaeétitchish (One Who Is Talented), a solo exhibition by artist Wendy Red Star. Red Star works across disciplines to explore the intersections of Native American ideologies and colonialist structures, both historically and in contemporary society. Raised on the Apsáalooke (Crow) reservation in Montana, Red Star’s work is informed both by her cultural heritage and her engagement with many forms of creative expression, including photography, sculpture, video, fiber arts and performance. An avid researcher of archives and historical narratives, Red Star seeks to incorporate and recast her research, offering new and unexpected perspectives in work that is at once inquisitive, witty and unsettling. Reception, 5-7 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 14. Through Dec. 12.

PHOTO BY ELIYAHU LOTZAR

Everson Museum of Art


Onondaga Historical Association 321 Montgomery St., Syracuse. 315-428-1864, cnyhistory.org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free but donations encouraged.

Strolling Down Salina Street: 1940-1980: So many Central New Yorkers have fond memories of coming to Syracuse and taking in the shops, the sights, and the sounds of Salina Street, the heart of Downtown. This exhibit re-creates Salina Street in our large first-floor gallery, using photographs and artifacts from the many shops, so that visitors to our downtown museum can “stroll” down the grand old street once again. Through early 2020. From the Vault: Temple Concord 180th Anniversary Exhibit: In 2019, Temple Concord celebrates its 180th anniversary as an integral component of Syracuse & Onondaga County. As part of its From the Vault series, OHA is marking this momentous occasion with a display of photos and objects from Temple Concord and OHA’s archives. OHA’s display succinctly reviews 180 years of Temple Concord’s presence in the community.

Picker Art Gallery

SU Art Galleries

Dana Arts Center, Colgate University, Hamilton. 315-228-7634, colgate.edu/picker. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. the third Thursday of every month. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Free admission.

First floor of Shaffer Art Building, Syracuse University, Syracuse. 315 443-4097, suart.syr.edu. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, closed Monday. Free.

Original Materials: The Picker Art Gallery and the Building of a Collection: This exhibition celebrates Colgate’s Bicentennial by presenting a look at the past, present and future of the art collections at the Picker Art Gallery. Drawing from the museum’s diverse holdings, along with documents and photographs from Colgate University Archives, the exhibition explores significant moments in the museum’s development, looks at the people who helped to build the collection and examines the ways in which collections and collecting at the Picker help shape a Colgate education. Through Dec. 22.

PHOTOS COURTESY EDGEWOOD GALLERY AND LIGHT WORK GALLERY

Wendy Red Star at Light Work Gallery

Shawn L Halperin, Bluebird Cedar Carving at Edgewood Gallery.

Not a Metric Matters: Features new and recent artwork from 16 faculty members from the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University. The exhibition highlights artists working in a wide variety of media including painting, photography, drawing, ceramics, art video and site-specific installations. Curated by D.J. Hellerman, curator of art and programs at the Everson Museum of Art, this exhibition brings together the eclectic and powerful work of design, studio arts and transmedia faculty. Through Nov. 24. Teaching Methods: The Legacy of Art and Design Faculty: Syracuse University enjoys the distinction of being the first institution of higher education to confer Baccalaureate of Arts degrees. Over the nearly 150 years since its founding, the program has evolved, reflecting different aesthetic sensibilities at different times in its history. One constant has been a talented group of faculty who strive to provide the best possible learning opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students. This exhibition presents a sampling of the work by select former faculty in the permanent collection. Through Nov. 24. Skeptical Gaze: How Photomontage Blurs the Lines of Reality: Explores silver gelatin prints and newsprints which contain the photographic technique of photomontage. This exhibition specifically connects contemporary ideas about skepticism towards visual imagery with traditional darkroom techniques as a way to encourage the audience to assess their trust and belief in what visual representations they are consuming. Comprised of artwork from the Syracuse University Art Collection, Special Collections Research Center, Light Work Collection and Visual Studies Workshop, this exhibition highlights images that use both fine art photography and mass media produced photography as a vehicle to begin this conversation. Through Nov. 24.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

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81


Flashback

Marine Midland Bank President, John T. Sullivan, poses with Miss Channel Eighter and her donuts at the bank in October 1959.

A staff member promotes the Channel Eighter donut at the WHEN-TV station in October 1959.

Channel Eighters T H E D E L I C I O U S LY D I F F E R E N T D O U B L E D O N U T J U ST RI G H T FO R A PA I R TO S H A R E BY TOM HUNTER

During autumn 1959, WHEN-TV, channel 8 in Syracuse,

al people asked the Miss Channel Eighters if the donuts were

launched a promotional campaign utilizing a donut shaped like

free. Others refused to take the donuts because it was too close

the number 8. WHEN-TV partnered with Dunkin’ Donuts in

to their lunchtime. A few men asked the women for dates; oth-

Syracuse to make the donuts, which station executives named

er men offered the women their coats. Station executives also

Channel Eighters. Dunkin’ Donuts sold the eight-shaped do-

offered more than 2,000 free donuts to the Dunbar Association

nuts for $.88 per dozen.

and other children’s centers for their Halloween parties. The

WHEN-TV also used the donuts as a test item to measure the

donuts were a big hit.

influence of television as a sales medium. WHEN-TV staff pitched

A viewer from Trumansburg, NY sent in her idea for modifying

the donut to specific audiences during local programming: as

the donut into an owl as a Halloween treat. Evidently, the pro-

breakfast food during Breakfast Bar; as a snack during The Mag-

motion was quite successful for WHEN-TV and Dunkin’ Donuts.

ic Toy Shop and as a dessert during Gal Next Door. Station executives also sent two young women, each dubbed Miss Channel Eighter, into Syracuse businesses to promote the

By late November 1959, station executives reported that viewers had watched the station’s programs, viewed the advertisers’ commercials and bought the Channel Eighter donuts.

donut and WHEN-TV on October 21 and 22, 1959. The public rela-

Joseph Kaselow, writing in a New York Herald Tribune news-

tions manager at Syracuse Savings Bank said, “This is a tremen-

paper column, commended WHEN-TV executives for their in-

dous advertising stunt for WHEN-TV and Dunkin’ Donuts.” The

novative donut campaign, while also chiding the big city mar-

president of Marine Midland Bank stopped a meeting to have

keting strategists for not developing the promotion themselves.

his photograph taken with the young women and told everyone

PHOTOS COURTESY OHA

to have a Channel Eighter. Around downtown Syracuse, sever-

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

TOM HUNTER IS CURATOR AT ONONDAGA HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION.


The Last Word

What’s your favorite time of year? My favorite time of the year is usually right around Thanksgiving but having done two shows at the Redhouse now I’m also kind of partial to Syracuse in March.

This is your third production at Redhouse, only this time you’re here in December. Did anyone warn you about the snow? Our winters can get pretty brutal. I grew up in western Iowa where we often had snow on Halloween and still went trick or treating. Plus, two years ago when I was doing “On Golden Pond” at the Redhouse, we had three blizzards in four weeks.

Do you have a favorite version of “A Christmas Carol”? The grainy old black-and-white version of Christmas Carol starring that wonderful British actor Alistair Sim is still my fave, although the Muppet version ain’t bad.

Any places in Central New York that you might like to visit while in town? Fred with daughter Marya.

The rehearsal schedule for Redhouse shows is usually pretty intense. I’m lucky if I make it to Dinosaur Bar-B-Que.

Have you been to Wegmans yet? I practically live at Wegmans when I’m in town.

Salt potatoes are a big thing around here (and they’re mentioned in the play), ever have one? I’ve managed to do two gigs in Syracuse without ever having a salt potato. It looks like this time though the jig is up.

With Fred Grandy A F T E R T WO P R O D U CT I O N S AT R E D H O U S E , ACTO R R E T U R N S TO C N Y TO P L AY “ S C R O O G E” I N “A SY R AC U S E C H RIST M AS CA R O L .” BY M J K R AV EC

What’s your favorite thing to do in the snow? These days, get out of it as quickly as I can.

Do you have a favorite holiday tradition? My daughter Marya who has also worked at the Redhouse usually hosts a big Thanksgiving for family and friends at her place in Chicago. Going there is now a hallowed tradition in our household.

Who were your favorite guest stars from “The Love Boat”? (We couldn’t resist.)

A little background: You’ve been a television actor, a politician,

Ethel Merman played my mother on the show. She will

a radio show host and stage actor. What else have you been up

always be my favorite. Vincent Price was also a delight to

to lately?

work with.

In addition to the careers you mentioned, I have also been the Pres-

Anything you’d like to add?

ident and CEO of Goodwill Industries, International, a professor at

The production of “I’m Not Rappaport” which (“Love

the University of Maryland and Belmont Abbey, a small Catholic col-

Boat” co-star) Ted Lange and I performed last spring at

lege in North Carolina and a national security analyst in Washing-

the Redhouse will get a second life when we open the sea-

ton, D.C. I was also on the public speaking circuit for about 15 years

son for the Buck’s County Playhouse next May. Director

lecturing on politics and public service.

Vince Cardinal and cast members Laura Austin and John

What time do you get up in the morning

Bixler will also be part of the show. And currently Ted and

and how do you take your coffee?

I are putting together a podcast tentatively titled Back on

I can’t sleep past 6 a.m. thanks to my days as an early morning radio host and because I am always up at the crack, I take my coffee black.

Board with Fred and Ted. Show biz patter with celebs, ancient and modern.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

83


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Central New York Magazine - November/December 2019  

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Central New York Magazine - November/December 2019  

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