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G O O D

L I F E

M A G A Z I N E

refresh & renew How to move more, cut clutter and create calm PLUS: NATURAL ACCENTS FROM CNY SHOPS, A LIGHT, BRIGHT HOME IN DEWITT AND BEST LAWYERS


EMERGENCY SERVICES

When trust is critical, say,

“Take Me to Crouse.”

Open for You: Our New Pomeroy Emergency Services Department • •

The region’s newest, most up-to-date ER One convenient access and evaluation point for acute care and treatment of minor illnesses and injuries 24/7

Advanced Facility, Advanced Care •

High-quality care delivered promptly and with Carepassion®

Modern design allows us to move patients faster – and more comfortably

All this adds up to superior emergency care from the hospital you trust – Crouse Health.

Official healthcare provider of Syracuse Athletics ®

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crouse.org/ER


LARGEST SELECTION OF QUARTZ COUNTERTOPS

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Our showrooms stimulate all five senses. Six, if you include your sense of accomplishment.

Hear sizzling steak. Taste chef-made bites. See exceptional appliances. From cooking demos to product classes, you’re invited to discover the potential for your kitchen.

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Learn more about the all-new BMW X5, and enjoy exceptional offers at BURDICK BMW.

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PRESIDENT Tim Kennedy VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES William Allison 315-470-2080 ballison@syracuse.com

EDITOR MJ Kravec 315-766-7833 mkravec@advancemediany.com ASSISTANT CONTENT EDITOR Amy Bleier Long 315-470-2146 ableierlong@advancemediany.com

MAGAZINE/EVENTS SALES MANAGER Jennifer K. Queri 315-282-8622 jqueri@advancemediany.com

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Thomas H. Brown 315-470-2053 tbrown@acssyr.com CUSTOMER SERVICE 315-470-6397

DESIGNERS Chris Boehke Kimberly Worner

The Good Life, Central New York Magazine (ISSN 1931-194X) is published six times a year by Advance Media New York, 220 S. Warren St., Syracuse, New York 13202. The Post-Standard © 2019. All material submitted to Central New York Magazine becomes the property of Advance Media New York, publishers of The Post-Standard and Central New York Magazine. It will not be returned. Such a submission, to name a few examples, may be a letter to the editor, a cartoon, a picture, a poem and the like. Any such material may be excerpted, edited for length or content, and may be published or used in any other way. For example, on Syracuse.com or in The Post-Standard.

Our Design Consultation is Complimentary

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Jennifer Pysnack 315-256-0522

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HARTLEYS

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Auto & RV Center

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WORLD CLASS CANCER EXPERTS. CLOSE TO HOME.

If you’re facing a diagnosis of cancer, turn to the experts at the Upstate Cancer Center. We provide the advanced knowledge, skills and leading technology found at the region’s only academic medical university. Your multidisciplinary team of board-certified physicians meet with you to create your personalized treatment plan. Upstate can offer more treatment options including robotic surgery, immunotherapy and clinical trials and the largest array of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapies (SBRT) for precise treatment, fewer side effects and a faster recovery.

UPSTATE PROVIDES ANOTHER SIGNIFICANT BENEFIT TO PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES — CARE CLOSE TO HOME, WITH CANCER SERVICES IN SYRACUSE, ONEIDA AND OSWEGO.

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Editor’s Letter

Springtimer T H IS S E AS O N M OV E S S LOW LY. A N D W E’ L L J U ST H AV E TO WA I T.

EDITOR’S PICKS

WRITE NOW

Things weighing on your mind? Start a journal. Studies show writing down thoughts has mental health benefits. Jot down worries, to-do lists, weekend plans – even a grocery list. Just put it on paper.

F

or the rain to stop. Or maybe the snow (let’s be real). Spring in CNY teaches us to

MINT CONDITION

be patient. And that’s a good lesson in life. In the March/April issue of Central

Make your own milkshake in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. Combine vanilla ice cream, milk and peppermint and vanilla extracts in a blender and beat ‘til smooth. Green food coloring optional.

New York, we’re all about taking a positive approach to the season of waiting by

focusing on good things to do here and now. Our holistic health feature looks at unique classes and treatments to help you refresh after a long winter and checks in with area ex-

perts on creating a stress-free zone at home. (That should be enough to keep you busy). Also in this edition, content editor Amy Bleier Long tours a colorful and creative home in DeWitt and photographer Alaina Potrikus takes us through local shops for fresh, green, natural looks in home and fashion. Don’t miss our regular features highlighting the bright spots in CNY in Caught Doing Good, The Seen, CNY Scout, Art Profile, Farm to Table and more. Be sure to check out our special section on CNY’s Best Lawyers, take a look back at Syracuse’s St. Patrick’s Parade and visit with Syracuse.com/The Post-Standard outdoors writer David Figura. All good things to appreciate living here—waiting and all. Cheers!

SINGING IN THE RAIN

MJ Kravec mkravec@advancemediany.com 315-766-7833

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CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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Ditch the black umbrella and go for splashier colors or patterns or even something vintage. You’ll make your own sunshine.


LIFE SAVING SYNERGY Experience world-class treatment at the St. Joseph’s Health Cardiovascular Institute, as we bring together nationally acclaimed specialists from all facets of cardiovascular medicine to provide the widest range of options in the region. Our commitment to constant self-improvement is strong. And with our ever-growing list of groundbreaking services including our Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery Program, patients recover faster and more safely, because to us...

EVERY BEAT MATTERS.

A H I G H E R L E V E L O F C A R E | visit everybeatmatterssjh.org © 2019 St. Joseph’s Health. © 2019 Trinity Health. All rights reserved.

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Contents Features

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‘Cause You’re a Natural Wood, stone and fresh green accents from CNY shops.

35

Holistic Health Guide Ways to be well, cut clutter and create calm.

48

Color Wonder

Tour Annie Taylor’s colorful home in DeWitt.

72

Special Section A guide to the area’s Best Lawyers.

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Departments 8

Editor’s Letter

13

It’s All Good

20

The Seen

What to savor in CNY now... Downtown Doings, Caught Doing Good...

A pictorial review of Central New York’s social gatherings.

58

Our Town

60

CNY Scout

63

Farm to Table

66

Art Profile

70

CNY Art

82

Flashback

83

Last Word

Live like a local in Marcellus.

Bring home fine art - temporarily - from a local artist.

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A recipe for maple sticky buns from NYSmaple.com.

The Everson Museum receives a game-changing gift.

What’s on display at Central New York galleries.

A history of Syracuse’s St. Patrick’s Parade.

With outdoors writer David Figura.

58 M A R C H /A P R I L

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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For Jack it’s personal!

“She and I were one. What they did for her, they did for me.”

UPSTATE LEGACIES

Have you or your family experienced Upstate’s heart and

hope?

The appreciation is evident in Jack Gorham’s voice when he talks about the way Upstate University Hospital physicians, nurses, physician assistants and staff treated his wife Colleen throughout her 17-year journey with cancer. Jack wants to help maintain this level of care and compassion for future cancer patients. That is why he has remembered the Upstate Foundation in his will. That is his heart and hope.

Understanding firsthand how charitable gifts impact the lives of others can change the lives of those who give and those who receive. Your gifts have an immediate impact on the programs and services you care most deeply about. Thoughtful gift planning can help to minimize costs and maximize future impact of those gifts, helping to ensure your personal legacy continues long into the future. Would you like to learn more about high-impact, low-cost Legacy Gift opportunities that can help you meet your personal and philanthropic goals? For free and confidential information contact, or have your professional advisor contact, our planned giving professionals at 315-464-6490 or email HamiltoL@upstate.edu.

Impacting patient care, education, research, and community health and well-being through charitable giving.

www.UpstateFoundation.org

S9000831-01


It’s All Good

We’re not lion BY M . J . K R AV EC

GENTLY, GENTLY COMES THE SPRING. WE HOPE. WHETHER MARCH COMES IN LIKE A LION OR A LAMB, HERE ARE SOME OF THE BEST WAYS TO RELISH THE SEASON NOW. NO MATTER WHAT THE WEATHER.

WILLOW POWER Nothing says spring like pussy willows. Leave ‘em long and display in a simple container for instant elegance and drama.

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It’s All Good

SHOW TIME Get inspired at The CNY Home & Garden Show March 15-17 at the new Expo Center at the New York State Fairgrounds. Go to hbrcny.com.

HAVE YOU HERB? Pick up potted basil, parsley, rosemary and thyme from the produce department. Place in terra cotta pots on your windowsill and snip for a taste of spring in salads.

FAIRY DUST Syracuse City Ballet presents “Peter Pan” March 16 & 17 at the Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater. See the fun, fairy and high-flying action and dance. For tickets, go to ticketmaster.com.

RAMP IT UP Look for ramps to hit grocery stores in late April. These wild onions combined with olive oil, salt and pepper make a delightfully savory sauce for eggs, meat or pasta.

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EXTRA, EXTRA REEL THING Scan area antique stores for vintage fishing creels and bait buckets to display alone or in groups. They’ll add a rustic, outdoorsy look to your home – just in time for trout season.

Hear John Williams’ magical score of E.T. live at Symphoria’s E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial in Concert. 7:30 p.m. March 23 at Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater. Go to experiencesymphoria.org.

DON’T MISS Based on Victor Hugo’s classic tale of revolution, Les Miserables comes to the Landmark Theatre, March 2631. Visit nacentertainment. com/broadway-in-syracuse

SWEET TIME Savor maple syrup season with a pancake breakfast, 9 a.m. to noon, every Saturday, March 2 – 30 at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville. Pancakes, sausage, and fresh brewed coffee or juice. Cost starts at $3. Be sure to check out the demonstration in the sugarbush with six different stations that introduce visitors to the heritage of maple sugaring. M A R C H /A P R I L

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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It’s All Good DOW NTOW N DOINGS BY DAN POORMAN

Storyteller

HUNTER FOSTER IS THE NEW ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AT THE REDHOUSE ARTS CENTER

Look to the front of the former Sibley’s department store build-

Producers,” “Million Dollar Quartet” and “The Bridges of Mad-

ing on 400 S. Salina St. and you’ll notice a sign for the Redhouse

ison County.” In addition to these credits, he has acted in sev-

Arts Center that acts as the bow on a new gift to downtown Syr-

eral off-Broadway and regional productions.

acuse. The local nonprofit, best known for its diverse theater of-

These days, though, Foster touts himself as a writer-director.

ferings and commitment to arts education, makes a promise in

As a librettist, he’s penned the off-Broadway “Jasper in Dead-

its tagline: “Art is in the house.”

land” and “Summer of ’42,” among other books that have been

Also in the house is the company’s new artistic director, Hunter Foster.

16

produced regionally. It was not until 2013, at the Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, Pennsylvania, that Foster became

At 49, Foster is a veteran Broadway performer, noted for hav-

a proper director. A production of his “Summer of ’42” had

ing originated the lead role of Bobby Strong in the satirical mu-

lost its leader, and Foster was offered the job — one he’d never

sical “Urinetown” in 2001 and for his Tony-nominated turn as

thought he’d take.

plant-loving nebbish Seymour Krelborn in the 2003 revival of

“I never had any dreams of being a director,” Foster said in a

“Little Shop of Horrors.” Since the early 1990s, Foster has also

telephone interview. “I think a lot of people direct for the wrong

starred in Broadway productions of “Grease,” “Footloose,” “The

reasons, whether it’s a power thing or about ego. That cannot

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

M A R C H /A P R I L

PHOTOGRAPH BY LAUREN LONG

Foster has starred in Broadway productions of “Grease,” “Footloose” and “The Producers,” among others.


“I get very emotional about directing; I get almost like a proud parent.” Hunter Foster

come into play when you’re directing. It can’t be about you. It’s got to be about the show. It’s got to be about the story.”

tic director mantle at the Redhouse. Redhouse Executive Director Samara Hannah said that, from

After a healthy amount of thought, Foster accepted the gig,

a pool of 70-plus resumes, Foster’s was an immediate standout.

discovered that directing was his “true passion” and stayed on

It wasn’t until she met him, though, that Hannah knew Foster

at Bucks County Playhouse as an artistic associate. There, he

was the man for the job.

went on to direct productions of “42nd Street,” “Clue,” “Guys

“Besides his professional credentials, it was his personality

and Dolls,” “The Buddy Holly Story” and “The Rocky Horror

and demeanor that fit us,” Hannah said. “Theater is an intense

Show,” among other favorites.

thing, but he’s even-keeled, he’s fun, he’s friendly. He’s just got

Foster has directed a litany of shows at companies across the nation, including the world premieres of the musicals “One Hit Wonder” at his alma mater, the University of Michigan, and last year’s “A Connecticut Christmas Carol” for Goodspeed Musicals in East Haddam, Connecticut. The Wall Street Journal’s Terry

this way about him that’s completely approachable. You just don’t find someone who is that easygoing.” Already, Hannah said, Foster is a hit at corporate events. “People are just so excited that he’s down-to-earth and he’s tangible,” she added.

Teachout recently called Foster one of the best theater directors of

Hannah said that much of Foster’s charm comes from his al-

2018, writing “he’s a wonder-worker who belongs on Broadway.”

ready understanding Upstate New York — his wife, the Broad-

“I get very emotional about directing; I get almost like a proud

way actress Jennifer Cody, is from the Rochester area, and he’s

parent,” Foster said. “I love performing, but there’s nothing like

spent a good deal of time there with her family.

putting a show together and seeing it come to life on stage, know-

“We’re not New York City and we don’t want somebody trying

ing you had a hand in it all. Being the captain of the ship, basi-

to turn us into that,” Hannah said. “We want somebody to ap-

cally — there’s something really wonderful about that.”

preciate who we are as a community. Hunter fits that.”

He grew up in a household that “didn’t have show tunes playing” in it, in rural Augusta, Georgia. His mom stayed at home

And taking Syracuse’s artistic temperature, Foster said, has already proven rewarding.

while his dad worked for General Motors. His younger sister,

“I like these people and I like this town already. I don’t feel

Sutton Foster, would also go on to make a living in musical the-

that way about a lot of towns, because I play a lot of towns where

ater — she’s a two-time Tony-winning actress.

I’m like, ‘Get me the hell out of here,’” Foster laughed. “You can

“It’s weird, no one ever really encouraged us (to pursue the-

go to other places and they don’t want anything outside of the

ater) because they just thought it was another fun thing that

box. They want their ‘Pajama Game,’ their ‘Music Man.’ If you

kids do,” Foster said. “In Georgia, especially as a boy, you play

did ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch,’ they’d revolt. ‘Jesus Christ Su-

football, you play baseball, you play basketball. Sports, sports,

perstar?’ They’d revolt. They just want their Golden Age musi-

sports. The arts were not really something that anyone in my

cals and that’s it, and if you don’t give it to them, they get angry.

family or community thought about as being that important.”

It feels like people here want something a little bit different.”

Good stories, in general, Foster says, have always resonated

Whatever the community wants, Foster said, the Redhouse

with him. His appreciation for storytelling started at the mov-

will be able to deliver it. The amount of potential in the new fa-

ies, with 1972’s “The Poseidon Adventure,” “Jaws” in 1975 (“It

cility is what inspired him to vie for this position.

may be the best third act of any movie,” he adds) and the film

“When I walked in the space, I realized that this is what other

that more or less pushed him into acting classes, “Raiders of

theaters strive to be,” he said. “The Redhouse has a scene shop

the Lost Ark.” A love for movies turned into a love for reading,

and a costume shop. There are tons of different places to rehearse

which Foster still feels today. He tries to make time in his busy

and do things. And to be centrally located, it’s a wonderful play-

schedule to read the Pulitzer Prize winner each year.

ground that anyone would want to have. Not only are we going

“I’m a storyteller first,” Foster says. “Wanting to tell stories is something that has helped me as an actor, helped me as a writ-

to be providing entertainment for the community, we’re going to take care of the community.”

er and is now helping me as a director.” It should help him now, too, as he takes up the full-time artisM A R C H /A P R I L

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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It’s All Good CAUGHT DOING GOOD BY SUSAN KENNEDY

Rick Garrett: The natural way

Rick Garrett is head of Skaneateles High School’s Environmental Club and Envirothon Team.

park police kicked me out,” (of the polluted waters), recalls Gar-

In addition to maintaining the courtyard, the Environmental Club

rett. “It was a powerful moment for me. I remember being upset

builds and distributes blue bird boxes, grows and shares hundreds

with the adults in the world who left this mess for me.”

of garden vegetable seedlings and hosts tree sapling giveaways.

So as an adult he vowed to learn more. He memorized the calls

“We’ve got to teach kids they are not powerless,” says Garrett.

of hundreds of song birds, became a certified arborist and has

In 2017 and 2018, when harmful algae blooms threatened the

spent more than two decades teaching biology and ecology at

water quality in nearby Skaneateles Lake, the students hosted

Skaneateles High School. He also heads the school’s Environ-

community forums. “I’ve tried to teach my students to become

mental Club and Envirothon Team.

scientifically literate,” says Garrett. The students managed talks

“We evolved in nature, but we live in concrete,” says Garrett.

among farmers, water quality experts, homeowners and conser-

“So you really have to teach kids what’s in nature before you can

vationists. “It became clear that we are all part of the problem.

jump to higher level topics like conservation.”

We can’t just blame one person.”

“If they know what a bird’s call is — a red-winged blackbird —

But one person can help make change. Another former student,

when they hear it outside they’re like ‘Oh it’s cool!.’ And then if

Rachael DeWitt, is now the executive director of the Skaneateles

there’s a disease or a decline you hear about on the news, they

Lake Association. “I grew up on the lake. I’m a water baby,” says

perk up. They have a connection.”

DeWitt. “You live in this environment all your life, and then,

Madelyn Halstead made that connection to nature as a student

through Mr. Garrett, I experienced it in a different way.”

in Garrett’s class more than a decade ago. “I grew up outside,” says

“I love when my brightest students enter the environmen-

Halstead. “But Mr. Garrett had a refreshing perspective in the way

tal sciences,” says Garrett. “Because these are the most difficult

he translated the curriculum into everyday life.”

problems to solve.”

As a student, Halstead and others helped transform a gravel-filled area on campus into a courtyard, with a pond that Halstead helped design. 18

“How often do you get to execute an idea that you are drafting in class, for a cause that was so worthy?” says Halstead.

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

Garrett’s advice for all of us? “Take your kid hiking. Get outside. Ask questions, seek answers. Let them experience how important it is out there!”

M A R C H /A P R I L

PHOTOGRAPH BY SUSAN KENNEDY

On the shores of Onondaga Lake, with a fishing pole in hand, 10-year-old Rick Garrett had his first run-in with the law. “The


Bernie Henderson stands in his backyard on Lake Ontario.

I’ve always been civically engaged both as a board member and volunteer for multiple nonprofit organizations. Whether it is basic human needs, literacy, historic preservation or something in between, there is one common thread that connects all of my charitable interests: community.

Rooted Giving: Bernie Henderson

I am a native Oswegonian; my family’s history in Oswego County goes back generations. This – coupled with my upbringing on a farm where I lived the family maxim “work hard and don’t complain” – instilled in me a strong sense of commitment to people and place. It was natural for me to choose Oswego County as the benefactor of my charitable legacy. By directing a portion of my estate to the Community Foundation for the benefit of the Oswego County Community Foundation, an endowment fund that supports community needs in Oswego County, I hope to set an example that will inspire others. This region is worth working to preserve and enhance for generations. Read more of Bernie’s story at Henderson.5forCNY.org

since 1927 cnycf.org (315) 422-9538 S8905393-02


The Seen NEW YEAR’S EVE NIGHT

12.31.18

Live music and entertainment covered all corners of the Marriott Syracuse Downtown on New Year’s Eve night. From the Grand Ballroom with CNY’s premiere party band, Prime Time, to the Atlas Band in the Persian Terrace, the music was non stop until after midnight. The Stan Colella Orchestra got the party rolling in the lobby, along with photo booths and casino gaming tables. New this year were the CirqOvation performers. Now in its third year, the massive multi-room extravaganza brings back the historic New Year’s Eve parties that were held for decades at the former Hotel Syracuse, which closed in 2004.

1 Sora Sol of

CirqOvation performs over the lobby at the Marriott Syracuse Downtown.

2 Dancing in the

Persian Terrace.

3 Jamie Owens in the

Grand Ballroom.

2

1

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4

5

4 Hotel owner Ed

Riley looks out over the lobby.

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL GREENLAR

5 Heather Adams,

at bottom, poses for a picture with CirqOvation performers Ray and Erin Grins, wearing stilts.

6 Revelers in the

Grand Ballroom.

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The Seen

CELEBRATION OF HOPE

11.2.18

HOPE For Bereaved held its annual Celebration of HOPE dinner at the Oncenter. The event was a celebration of HOPE’s 40th anniversary of providing services to the Central New York community. Over 450 people attended the dinner, which was in memory of Mary T. Schoeneck and honored Wegmans for its service to the community. The evening included dinner with a live and silent auction. 1

2

1 Wegmans Community

Relations Director Evelyn Carter-Ingram and her husband, Chino Ingram.

2 Master of Ceremonies Dan

3

Cummings and his wife, Danielle Cummings.

founder Therese Schoeneck and Rev. Joe Phillips.

4 Dr. Joseph Barry, M.D.

4

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF HOPE FOR BEREAVED

3 HOPE Executive Director and


Exclusive stores Luxury brands More than 170 specialty shops

Athleta l LEGO l L.L. Bean l Madewell l Soft Surroundings l Von Maur

I-90 to Exit 45, Victor www.eastviewmall.com (585) 223-4420

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The Seen

TUESDAY BOOK CLUB 90TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON

12.11.18

The Tuesday Book Club, a women’s social group, marked nine decades of celebrating the relationship between life and good literature at Traditions at the Links in East Syracuse. Thirty-four of the club’s members enjoyed lunch while author Chuck D’Imperio spoke about his book, “A Taste of Upstate New York: The People and the Stories Behind 40 Food Legends.” The club began in 1928 and has never been a traditional book club; instead of reading books, the women gather monthly to host authors, playwrights, and local figures with interesting stories to tell. Event co-chairs Tibbi Angelastro and Judy Plumley used the planned December meeting to honor the group’s longevity, which includes members who have been involved for up to 61 years.

1

2

1 Thirty-four of the 36 Tuesday Book Club members came together with 2 Club officers Nan Strickland, assistant treasurer; Dorothy Vents,

corresponding secretary; Betty Massey, president; Barbara Obold, treasurer and Pat Toole, recording secretary.

3 Club committee chairs, from left, front row: Nan Strickland, nominating

committee, Elaine Coppola, reservations committee and Sally Hall, hospitality committee. Back row: Judy Plumley and Tibbi Angelastro, programs committee and co-chairs of the 90th Anniversary Celebration.

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PHOTOS BY AMY BLEIER LONG

author Chuck D’Imperio to celebrate the group’s 90th anniversary.


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The Seen

UPSTATE FOUNDATION GALA

11.18.18

The Upstate Foundation’s 29th Annual Gala was held at the Nicholas J. Pirro Convention Center at Oncenter. Hundreds of people in attendance enjoyed the pre-Gala sponsor and patron party, then continued the evening with dinner and dancing. Proceeds of $330,400 will benefit child and adolescent psychiatric services at Upstate University Hospital. The need for this support is significant: Over the past few years, there has been a five-fold increase in children and adolescents coming to Upstate’s Emergency Department with behavioral health complaints. Rates are rising for suicide attempts and self harm. Currently, there is a five-day wait for children and adolescents to find a psychiatric bed. “Support will also be given to the creation of a new eightbed pediatric psychiatric unit at the hospital’s downtown campus,” said Eiwere Wanda Fremont, M.D., and Marla Byrnes. Dr. Fremont is medical director for Upstate’s child and adolescent psychiatry clinic, and vice chair of child psychiatry for the department of psychiatry at Upstate Medical University. Ms. Byrnes is president of NAMI Syracuse. NAMI is an acronym for National Alliance on Mental Illness.

event co-chairs Marla Byrnes and Wanda Fremont, M.D.

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PHOTOS COURTESY UPSTATE FOUNDATION

leen Pezzi, vice president for development at Upstate. Co-chairs for the event


To care for those who once cared for us is one of the highest honors. Since 1974 the Loretto Foundation has helped support individuals served by the Loretto family of care. Through fundraising initiatives and a variety of giving opportunities, the Loretto Foundation provides additional funding to help enhance safe and secure facilities and deliver enriched programming for over 9,000 individuals in Central New York each year. Help us continue to support our communit b giving a gift or volunteering.

Show ou care b giving a gift toda . Upstate Gala guests included from top, staff from Sutton Real Estate, Elderwood Properties and CNY Fertility Center. Bottom, guests donned colorful accents at the event.

• Give a gift in honor or in memory of a loved one • Give a gift to the Loretto Foundation’s Founders Endowment Fund • Give a restricted gift to any of the 19 affiliated Loretto sites and programs • Give a gift of appreciation toward the 2,500 amazing caregivers of Loretto • Give a the gift of your time and volunteer

For more information, visit us at lorettocn .org/foundation. S8954241-01

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This is the place for you. Imagine hundreds of exceptional bath, kitchen and lighting products from trusted brands, in settings that help you envision them in your own home. You’ll find classic styles alongside the newest trends. A friendly, accessible staff offers guidance and detailed coordination to ensure that your project goes smoothly. Find your showroom hours online and stop by to explore.

SYRACUSE, NY 6792 Townline Road

S8899663-02


‘Cause you’re a natural WO O D, STO N E A N D L E A F Y G R E E N S , FO R E ST A N I M A L S AND OUTDOOR SCENES. C N Y S H O P S H AV E J U ST T H E T H I N G TO CA P T U R E T H E LO O K A N D F E E L O F S P RI N G .

PHOTOS BY ALAINA POTRIKUS

ON TWITTER

Birdcage votive holder, $12.50, The Purple Painted Lady, 1 W. Genesee St., Baldwinsville, 585-750-6056, thepurplepaintedlady.com.

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PRETTY IN PINK

Rose quartz gold pendant, $138, rose quartz bracelet, $36, Imagine, 38 E. Genesee St., Skaneateles, 315-685-6263, imagineskaneateles.com.

GO NUTS

Coconut Bowl, $12.95, 20|East.

SWEET SCENT CUFF ‘EM

Leather bluebird bracelet, $165, 20|East, 85 Albany St., Cazenovia, 315-655-3985, 20-east.com.

A LITTLE SQUIRRELY

Distressed squirrel, $20, The Purple Painted Lady.

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Tokyo Milk perfume in Eden, $32, Skaneateles 300, 2 W. Genesee St., Skaneateles, 315-685-1133, skaneateles300.com.


CITRUS GROOVE

Grapefruit pine-scented driftwood candle, $98, Nest 58, 58 E. Genesee St., Skaneateles, 315-685-5888, nest58.com.

NATURE OF THINGS

Leaf pottery, small $19.95, large $26.95, à la Maison, 25 Syracuse St., Baldwinsville, 315-638-1955. alamaisonaccents.com.

GOOD TASTE

Marble stacking spice tower, $34, Skaneateles 300.

BOOK IT

“Terrain: Ideas and Inspiration for Decorating the Home and Garden,” $35, Drooz + Company, 36 E. Genesee St., Skaneateles, 315-920-8888, droozandcompany.com.

YOU WOOD

Driftwood wreath, $38.95, The Gift Box Shoppe, 4317 Fay Rd., Syracuse, 315-487-9099, thegiftboxshoppe.com.

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BRACE(LET) YOURSELF

Ruffle cuffs, $12, Drooz + Company.

NATURAL SELECTION

Faux magnolia wreath, $90, woven basket, $79.95, à la Maison.

WHITE NOW

Cotton gin wax pottery by Habersham Candle Co., $23, accompanying tile stand, $7, Dazzle, 119 W. Seneca St., Manlius, 315-682-7499.

HANG AROUND

Framed cotton botanical print, $50, à la Maison.

WE’RE LEAVING

Embroidered leaf pillow, $45, Drooz + Company. 32

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HOME TWEET HOME

Simply By Nature wooden birdhouse, by artist Steve Saumure, $65, 20|East.

PUT A CORK IN IT

Cork clutch bags, $110 each, Imagine.

FOREST FRIENDS

Porcupine figurine, $5, Witty Wicks, 190 Township Blvd. Suite 20, Camillus, 315-4156064, wittywicks.com.

FRESH WATER DRINK UP

Stone beverage dispenser, $136, Paola Kay Gifts, 105 Brooklea Dr., Fayetteville, 315-632-2192.

Aromatherapy shower steamer set by Black Kettle Soap Company, $22, Metro Home Style, 689 N. Clinton St., Syracuse, 315-420-2335. metrohomestyle.net.

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MIX UPS

Metal dance hall shoes with succulents, $39, Paola Kay Gifts.

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Beware the barrenness of a busy life. SOCRATES

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Take time to revitalize self and space. Our holistic health feature highlights some fresh ways to be well, cut clutter and create calm.

Ways to Wellness BY SANDI MULCONRY

New Year’s resolutions gone dormant? If one of them involved wellness, it’s time to get moving. “Being sedentary is very unhealthy,” says Reneta McCarthy, faculty fellow at the Cornell Institute for Healthy Futures. “People are getting the message that sitting is the new smoking. To live a long and healthy life, you need to keep moving.” Still need incentive? Here are some novel ways to up your wellness quotient.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF PURPOSE FARM

Goat Yoga

yoga before — they’re here for the experience.”

One of the 10 Best places to do goat yoga, accord-

Classes, which are a fundraiser for the farm’s free

ing to USA Today, is Purpose Farm in Baldwins-

youth mentoring program, are held from June

ville. There, you can substitute downward goat

through November and are $25. Private parties

for downward dog, interact with the farm’s five

can also be booked.

rescue goats and enjoy views of the Seneca River.

The farm has another 40 rescue animals, in-

“There’s just something about goats — they

cluding a camel, donkeys, horses, alpacas, pigs,

make you happy,” says Sandra Seabrook, presi-

peafowl and chickens. “The environment here

dent and founder of the nonprofit Purpose Farm.

is calming, relaxing and enjoyable,” Seabrook

“Goats, by nature, love people and want to share

says. “You can’t leave not happy.”

your space.” First-timers, she says, should “relax and have

More information: purposefarm.org, info@ purposefarm.org

fun. Most people who come have never done

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Barre and TRX At FHIIT Barre and Bodyworks, a boutique fitness studio in downtown Syracuse, you can take a variety of complementary classes — building strength and cardio, Barre, based on the five positions of ballet, was originally developed as a rehabilitation for ballerinas. “Barre is a low-impact, yet intense, series of movements — some large, some very small — that target and fatigue all major muscle groups,” says owner Theresa Eppolito. “We recover by active stretching to elongate muscles and open joints. It’s a really awesome stabilizer and core strengthener.” In TRX, also known as suspension training, “We use our own body weight in different angles to increase the resistance to gravity. Instead of lifting a weight, you lift yourself.” TRX increases strength and balance and engages your core. Eppolito welcomes people at all fitness levels to her studio. “Give yourself a chance,” she says. “Come in with an open mind and learn something new. And if you find something you like, that could be the start to building healthy habits.” More information: fhiitbody.com, 315-256-5847

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PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF FHIIT BARRE & BODYWORKS

stretching with yoga and stabilizing with barre.


ROPE YOGA PHOTO COURTESY VYANA YOGA, SALT THERAPY PHOTO COURTESY BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER

Yoga Rope Wall If goats aren’t your thing, perhaps puppies are. You’ll find them and so much more at Vyana Yoga, PolariTea & Apothecary in Manlius, home to Central New York’s first Great Yoga Wall. The wall, which is 40 feet long, “is wonderful for people who are stiff, but also those who are overly flexible,” says owner Helena Zera, a yoga therapist “steeped in Ayurveda” who opened her studio last summer. “The rope wall is an anti-gravity prop to support and create a natural form of resistance,” she explains. “It tractions the spine, relieves tension from joints and intensifies a yoga practice.” Unlike traditional rope walls, which can be uncomfortable, hers is a “modern interpretation,” offering an experience akin to aerial yoga. “You work hard, like you would on a pole,” she says. Vyana also offers sound journeys, using vibrations from alchemy bowls, gongs and crystals to promote relaxation and healing. An accompanying tea lounge, featuring a range of super-natural drinks, is set to open any day, if it hasn’t already. “Everything I do or sell is about helping people be healthier,” Zera says. “We’re a very compassionate studio, mixing exercise with healing energy.” And the puppies? They’re Zera’s two Morkies and a Maltipoo, who visit classes Tuesday and Thursday mornings. More information: vyanayoga.com, 315-692-4471

Floatation and Salt Therapy

A year after taking his first float and being “deeply struck” by his response to it, David Brickman, and his wife, Pattie Sunwoo, opened Bodymind Float Center in Rochester. In 2017, they opened a second location on Erie Boulevard East in Syracuse. The Syracuse facility offers four private float rooms — three with float tanks and one with an open float pool — in addition to a Salt Room. Floatation therapy helps relieve anxiety and pain, Brickman says, while salt therapy, also called halotherapy, promotes respiratory health. In floatation therapy, you float in extremely dense water, in which 1,000 pounds of Epsom salt has been dissolved. “The environment is perfectly dark; the water and air are skin temperature, so you feel nothing; and you hear nothing beyond your own breathing and heartbeat.” Deprived of sensory input, your brain is relieved of much of its processing burden and enters a state of deep relaxation. Salt therapy is offered in Bodymind’s Salt Room, which has leather chairs and a backlit Himalayan salt wall. “In salt therapy, we infuse the air with tiny particles of pharmaceutical-grade sodium chloride, which settle in your lungs and sinuses,” Brickman says. Salt is anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and hydrophilic. Its hydrophilic property draws water to your lungs and sinuses, thinning the mucous and enabling your body to clear itself of congestion. More information: floatsyracuse.com, 315-992-8656

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“If you’re in a hula hoop, you’re smiling or giggling because it’s such a joyful activity. It makes you feel like a kid. It makes you feel free for a little while.” DENA BERATTA, OWNER OF MANDALA MOON YOGA

Hooping Remember the hula hoops you loved as a child? Now, you can use them for fitness. Well, not those exact hoops — ones that are bigger and heavier. “It’s important to have the right hoop for your size, fitness level and goals,” says Dena Beratta, owner of Mandala Moon Yoga in Marcellus. Beratta, who offers classes in hooping, makes all the hoops herself. Hooping is versatile and can be tailored to specific goals — it can be a slow, meditative exercise or a sweaty workout. “When you start out, you hoop just at your waist,” she says. “Then, I teach you to hoop on your hips, chest, shoulders, hands, arms, legs. The more body parts you hoop with, the more of a workout you get.” A five-week series of classes is $55 ($45, if you sign up early). In the last class, Beratta brings out her LED hoop, to “blow people’s minds.” “If you’re in a hula hoop,” she says, “you’re smiling or giggling, because it’s such a joyful activity. It makes you feel like a kid. It makes you feel free for a little while.”

SHUTTERSTOCK

More information: mandalamoonyoga.com, 315-673-7535.

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SHUTTERSTOCK IMAGE

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Namast’ay home It’s the season to revitalize. So, we sought out area experts for ideas on creating a more relaxing space at home. See? It’s ok to stay in the house. BY M J K R AV EC

Studies show that clutter at home is associated with increased stress levels and unhealthy eating. Liz Bremer, certified professional organizer and owner of Put It Simply Organizing in Manlius, says many of her clients report feeling overwhelmed by clutter and don’t know where to begin to get organized. She says it helps to start by asking yourself: What is your relationship with your stuff?

CUT CLUTTER  Bremer says to consider open shelves and hooks. These work well for visual people and those with attention deficits. Use a basket for the mail on the counter.

“Do you struggle with acquisition? Do you have a hard time letting things go? Identify what is going on for you and you can start to see what holds you back from living the life you want to live,” she says. Bremer tells clients to choose the area that bothers them the most. “I often recommend working in the areas you use daily first versus storage areas,” she says. Once you’ve picked your room or area, figure out how much time you can dedicate to the task. For example, allow yourself one hour for the pantry or one day for the kitchen.

 Don’t wait to put something away. Clear the dishes from the table, clean the bathroom mirror, sort today’s mail.  Place trash and recycling bins throughout the house to make tossing things easy.

Next, ask yourself what you do in the space and what items are essential. Keep what you need in the space and purge or relocate unnecessary items. Finally, get help. Ask a family member or a friend to whom you can return the favor or hire an organizer (NAPO.net is great place to find local professional organizers), Bremer says. To make the task easier, keep trash bags and colored laundry baskets at the ready. Bremer uses a pink bin for items to be moved, a blue bin for items to be donated and a green bin for items to be recycled. “Bins keep us anchored to the room we are working in,” says Bremer who sets time limits for her projects. “We also use a timer (set it for 20 minutes before your end time) to deal with the bins. Bring the trash and recycling out, bag the donations and put them in

 Designate a place to collect recyclables (plastic grocery bags, batteries) and donations (clothing, etc.).  Consider placing small bins or baskets in your entryway closet or near the door.  Check OCRRA.org to find out where to get rid of donations, recyclables and hazardous waste.

your trunk to bring to the Rescue Mission next time you go out. Relocate items you put in the “put elsewhere” bin.”

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Get Zen When it comes to decorating your space, don’t think you have to spend much money, says Kaylea Nixon, co-owner of Nixon Pack Properties and host of the weekly web series Walkthrough Wednesday featuring house tours, design inspiration and budget-friendly DIY’s. “It is absolutely possible to create a Zen feel on a budget. For the past couple of years in interior design, we’ve seen this trend of creating a hygge home (a Norwegian concept for wellbeing), and it’s not going anywhere anytime soon. Imagine layers of cozy fabric, burning candles or diffusers, a sheepskin rug, extra plush towels. These are things you may already have or can pick up for $20 or less at HomeGoods. Coupled together, they instantly add warmth to any space,” she says. To give your room an overall soothing vibe, keep colors neutral. Nixon likes the color “greige,” a grey/beige tone that was popular in 2015 and is making a comeback as a warmer alternative to cooler greys. “I’m sticking with greys for now, especially Reflection by Sherwin Williams. It’s our go-to for a modern, cheerful feel, but blue tones pop up for that calming effect we all need at the end of the day,” she says. When it comes to your furniture, invest in classic pieces with clean lines. Keep your look fresh by adding pillows and throws that change with the trends. Don’t forget to include pieces that help control clutter by offering storage.

To make your home feel Zen consider adding these items:  Burning candles or a diffuser  A sheepskin rug  Baskets with lids so you can tuck aways toy, magazines or even blankets  Furniture with clean lines

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LIVING ROOM PHOTO COURTESY REVETTE STUDIOS

ZEN FOR THE WIN


Above, Kaylea Nixon’s design for JMG Custom Homes at the 2018 Parade of Homes included neutral greys with pops of soothing blue.

“We love to group baskets with tops in a corner (so they) function as both a piece of art, as well as storage. A great place to tuck away the kids’ toys, extra blankets, magazines, etc. We’ve sourced some of our favorite handmade baskets from the CNY Regional Market!” says Nixon. When deciding on furniture arrangement, always keep the room’s purpose in mind. Will you be using it as a TV room with a sectional? A space for family game night with a small sofa and two side chairs? Think about the room’s use, then consider flow or walk-through. “We like to tape out pieces of furniture on the floor, then walk around to feel out the flow,” says Nixon. “All the rules of Feng Shui come back to flow. You don’t want to create any blocks or make a room feel like you’re running in circles to get to the nearest door.” M A R C H /A P R I L

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Keep calm To round out a more relaxed room, keep your overall look clean, fresh and simple. Use greenery for a natural touch, add baskets for texture, bring in a vintage piece for warmth. A copper planter, or piece of pottery from a flea market can add a unique, personal touch, says Nixon.

FOR A RESTFUL LOOK Nixon says to include texture and follow that recipe for every room. Mix in:  Heavy (a vintage rug layered with a jute rug)  Light (wispy linen sheers)  Metallic (matte black rods, champagne bronze light fixture)  Greenery (ferns are big in 2019)  Mirrors (to reflect light)  Vintage or whimsical pieces  Other textural pieces to consider: A chunky knit throw, a faux Mongolian pillow, a leather side chair

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Go natural If there’s a Peace lily in your house, good for you. Literally.

Ballantyne, who co-owns the center with husband Tim. To maxi-

Numerous studies show that house plants can lower stress lev-

mize your space, choose plants with vertical height or hang them.

els and blood pressure and speed healing in patients recovering

“Sansevieria or mother-in-law’s tongue is a nice architectural

from illness. A NASA study published in 1989 showed the ben-

plant. It requires low light and fits in a narrow space,” says Tim.

eficial effects of house plants on air quality, identifying many

Contain your garden space with a room screen or other piece,

common varieties for their ability to remove toxins from the air.

advises Lisa. “It’s the rule of design… place the tall plants in the

So, it makes sense that an indoor garden is an important part of

back, the short in front and enclose your sitting area a bit so you

creating a healthier, more relaxing space.

feel like you’re in nature,” she says.

“(Plants) will actually pull out (toxins like) benzene and form-

The Ballantynes suggest adding a water feature, such as a ta-

aldehyde … in your home,” says Tim Ballantyne, co-owner of

bletop fountain, to add to the sensory experience of your in-

Ballantyne Gardens in Liverpool. “Every time you add a plant

door garden. Other additions to consider include fairy lights, a gazing ball

to your space, you’re taking (toxins) away.” If that’s not enough to entice you to start an indoor garden,

or mirror, statuary, personal mementos or photos.

the beneficial effects of plants on stress levels should. Research

Be sure to use organic potting mix for your plants, don’t for-

shows that just seeing the greenery of plants helps us feel more

get fertilizer and water regularly ensuring the plant has prop-

relaxed and improves mood, while other studies show that plants

er drainage. You might also want to change your garden according to season

help improve concentration at work. To create an indoor garden, consider your space size, its expo-

with new plants or decorative accents. Remember this is your hap-

sure to light and what activities you want to use the space for,

py place and a place to nurture, which is also good for the soul.

whether it’s for reading, meditating or doing yoga, advises Lisa

“It’s also an artform,” says Lisa. “It’s a way to be creative.”

PLANTS FOR A HEALTHY HOME  Peace lily  Sansevieria or Snake plant  Dragon palm  Aloe vera  Spider plant  Succulents

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COLOR WONDER

A PASSION FOR COLOR LEADS TO A HOME AS VIBRANT AS THE FAMILY WHO LIVES THERE

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Above, The Taylor family: Lincoln, 9, Kevin, Nolan, 11, Sully, 7, and Annie with Barley and Olive; not pictured, their third dog Zuzu. Below, The Taylors have been updating and renovating rooms in their house, built in 1940, since they moved in nine years ago.

BY AMY BLEIER LONG

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEXIS EMM

THE FIRST HINT OF WHAT’S BEYOND ANNIE TAYLOR’S FRONT DOOR IS THE DOOR ITSELF. CURRENTLY A SUNNY YELLOW, IT’S ALSO BEEN CORAL AND TEAL. IN A FEW MONTHS, THE DOOR WILL TRANSFORM AGAIN, BECAUSE INTERESTING HOUSES ARE CONSTANTLY EVOLVING. Annie owns Annie Taylor Design, specializing in stationery, art prints and organizational tools for busy moms and their children. She can relate to her clientele: Annie works from her DeWitt home and she and her husband Kevin have three young sons, Nolan, Lincoln and Sullivan (Sully), plus their three dogs. The family also frequently entertains, “I like knowing my kids’ friends and their parents. We have a revolving door of people, which we love,” Annie says. Once through the door, bright colors and eclectic design beckon in every direction. When the Taylors bought the house in 2010, it needed some work, but Annie and Kevin love the charm of old houses and are “project people.” The couple tackled removing old wallpaper, pulling up carpeting and painting dark paneling. “I had to go back through and paint all the walls white so I could decorate with a lot of color,” Annie says.

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Above, White walls, the painted mantel and retiled fireplace provide a neutral counterpoint to the riot of color that comes from the furniture and accessories. Below, Mementos of England appear throughout the house, a nod to the place where both Annie and Kevin studied abroad.

And she has. Furniture, art and accessories are drenched in saturated hues and patterned rugs are cheerful and cozy. Annie’s decorating style is influenced by her mother, who decorated with items that held meaning rather than adhering to a specific aesthetic, and time spent hunting vintage at flea markets. Annie’s appreciation for midcentury style, especially furniture, developed when she married into the Taylor family. Kevin’s grandfather worked at Knoll Furniture in the 1950s and ‘60s and Kevin inherited several architectural pieces, including a Platner Lounge Chair with cherry-red upholstery. In the living room, the Knoll chair and another vintage upholstered chair sit opposite a low-slung mustard-hued sofa. The glass-topped occasional table is also by Knoll. Above the sofa, a variety of Annie’s watercolor art prints hang in gold frames. The colors are echoed by throw pillows upholstered in a fabric that features a teal ground and jewel-toned birds. “It’s light and airy and I can do my thing in here,” she says. Annie hosts her biannual open houses in this space to display new designs and product lines. The family room follows the living room’s lead. The bird-patterned fabric is reinterpreted as floor-length drapes. Colorfully-matted artwork and a reproduction George Nelson Sunburst clock command attention above a grey leather couch. Wood ceiling beams stripped and sanded by Kevin and a brick wall add natural texture. Initially, Annie planned to paint the brick white, but with some convincing from Kevin, realized sometimes less is more. Though the kitchen had been expanded by the previous homeowners – the Taylors are only the third family to own

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Above, Wood beams and exposed brick give the cozy family room additional warmth and texture. Below, Samples of Annie’s note and organizational paper pads. Right, Kevin built the tree house, which has a zipline, with repurposed wood.

the house – it was very dark and dated. Two summers ago, Annie was finally able to put all her saved Pinterest inspiration to good use with a renovation she’d been imagining since they moved in. Out went dark wood cabinets, the laminate floor and a large brass hood in the middle of the room; in came cabinets by Custom Woodcraft, white herringbone tile walls and hardwood floors. Because the kitchen and family room are open plan, Annie wanted to ensure the rooms felt cohesive. The custom wood surround for the vent hood was inspired by the ceiling beams. A wet bar with teal cabinets is an eye-catching use of Annie’s favorite color. Like most families navigating business travel, sports and other activities during the week, the family often eats dinner at the kitchen island. The Taylors focus on slowing down and eat together in the dining room when they can. The wood table and

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Above, After years of living with a dark kitchen, the lighter, brighter renovated kitchen is a much better fit for the family’s lifestyle. Right, Annie and Kevin remodeled the bathroom the boys share a little more than a year ago. The modern update is a big change from the original monochromatic brown scheme.

and chairs belonged to Annie’s grandmother and were refinished by her mother. A modular glass chandelier Kevin selected hangs over the table and gold geometric wire chairs provide additional seating and visual interest. A lamp made by Annie’s aunt and a sculpture left to the couple by a family friend are some of the pieces that have personal connections; she notes that almost everything in the house has a story. Upstairs, the bold use of color continues in more pareddown palettes. The master bedroom is serene in Benjamin Moore’s Hazy Blue. “I want to wake up feeling like every day is a fresh start, no matter what happened yesterday,” Annie says. Mismatched bedside tables are unified by the same lemony paint job. Abundant light from the bedroom windows bounces off a mirrored chest of drawers.

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Above, When the Taylors sit together in their dining room, they’re surrounded by pieces with ties to family and friends. Left, Kevin, who majored in ceramic engineering and has an interest in glass science, selected the modular glass chandelier.

The boys’ rooms reflect their current passions: Nolan’s interest in baseball and science, Lincoln’s enthusiasm for music and the Miami Dolphins, and Sully’s love of dogs. Special touches include Lincoln’s lofted bed built by Kevin, a schoolhouse desk in emerald green that Annie painted for Sully and a Maine-themed embroidered pillow in Nolan’s room referencing the place the family spends part of every summer (and one of Annie and Kevin’s first homes together). Making a house feel like a home isn’t always a smooth or fast process – it was seven years before the Taylors had the kitchen they dreamed of. Just as a family grows and evolves, so does a home. And even though they have a few more projects in mind, Annie says, “I love this house. It’s like a hug, honestly, because it’s so ours.”

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Right, “I like a blue bedroom. It’s very comforting and soothing,” Annie says of the master bedroom. Below, clockwise from left, Annie’s bedside table; a print by Annie, signed by Jim Boeheim in Lincoln’s room; a cheerful message in the kitchen. Opposite, a creative corner in Sully’s room.

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Our Town

The City of Syracuse Highland Pipe Band plays as they make their way through Marcellus during the Marcellus Olde Home Days Parade.

Marcellus BY AMY BLEIER LONG

The bedroom community of Marcellus is a close-knit town (and village) located approximately 12 miles southwest of Syracuse. Formed in 1794, Marcellus is one of the oldest towns in Onondaga County; the natural resources that once fueled industry now provide a scenic backdrop for those attracted to a quieter way of life. Grab a bite

North Street Diner serves up breakfast and lunch favorites. Chow down on classic pies, specialty pizzas and more from Pizza Boise, Marcellus Pizza and Papa’s Express. Dine creekside at Daniel’s Grill for date night or a family night out. Oliver’s Produce sells farmraised beef and pork, plus other farmfresh goodies. Tempt your sweet tooth at nut-free bakery Eat More Sweets and the Chocolate Pizza Company.

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Have a drink

Pull up a chair for cold beer, pub food, live music and trivia at Abbott’s Village Tavern. The Alvord House opened as a tavern in 1815 and is still in operation today; check out their Friday fish dinners and game-time specials. Out on Route 20, Frank’s Moondance Tavern is known for generous portions and a laid-back, friendly vibe.

Shop local

Karen’s Image Boutique is wellknown for style consultations and a selection of women’s fashion and accessories. Lovers of vintage will unearth treasures at Marcellus Mercantile and Rummage Too. Stop by The Wren’s Den and Blooming Gals for home décor and gifts. Patchwork Plus attracts the national quilting community. Find custom woodwork at Pennisi Fine Furniture. Nojaim Bros., a locally owned grocer, has been serving the community for decades.


Exceeding Expectations Sycamore Hill Gardens’ annual Mother’s Day Garden Tour benefits Baltimore Woods Nature Center.

Get outside

Marcellus Park offers pavilions, picnic areas and sports facilities throughout the year, including beach volleyball, horseshoes, baseball and ice skating. Walk or ride along the Nine Mile Creek (stop by the bike fixit station outside the Marcellus Free Library if you need a quick tune-up). Hike the trails at Baltimore Woods Nature Center or participate in nature-focused public programs. Take in the beauty of Sycamore Hill Gardens at the annual Mother’s Day Garden Tour.

Annual events

Olde Home Days, which began in 1914 and continues as a two-day celebration each June, features a parade, local vendors, rides, games, a car show, duck race and fireworks. Each summer, Marcellus Park offers an antique show in May, a family-friendly Summer Concert Series and weekly Market in the Park with crafts and handmade items. The Optimist Club hosts its annual Leon Plochocki Fishing Derby in May. Baltimore Woods holds a Winter Farmers Market.

Delivering World Class Service

Things to do

The Tefft-Steadman House is home to the Marcellus Historical Society.

Pan for gemstones and peruse geodes and fossils at Finders Keepers. Take a fitness class or join a sports league at Ultimate Goal or center yourself at Mandala Moon Yoga. Bowl ‘em over at Marcellus Lanes or tee off at Sunset Ridge or Tuscarora Golf Clubs. History buffs should visit the Tefft-Steadman House, home to the Marcellus Historical Society. The Martisco Station Museum has a variety of railroad history exhibits. The active Marcellus Library hosts an array of activities for all ages.

“Marcellus feels like old-time America with its picturesque Main Street, park with a babbling creek and history dating back 200 years!” — SUSAN DONEGAN, CO-OWNER OF MARCELLUS MERCANTILE

Barbara T. Miller

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CNY Scout

Barrowing time BY AMY BLEIER LONG

From sparkling waters to vibrant fall foliage,

full time in the 1880s, remaining there until his

we Central New Yorkers take great pride in the

death. Very involved in the community, he

natural beauty of our surroundings. It has

frequently advocated for the preservation of

been a source of inspiration for untold art-

the lake and land. He felt citizens should be

ists, including John Dodgson Barrow (1824-

guardians of the area for future generations.

1906). Barrow’s exquisite work depicts the

The John D. Barrow Art Gallery in Skaneateles — designed and financed by Barrow

allure of still recognizable lakes, fields and

himself and accessed through the Skaneateles

forests. Through the Borrow-a-Barrow program, landscape enthusiasts living within ap-

Library — is dedicated exclusively to Barrow’s

proximately 25 miles of Skaneateles can enjoy his art in their own homes.

Lewis-Middleton, the gallery’s director says, “It’s

D O D G S O N BA R R OW

an unusual thing for such a huge representation

his family as a teen. He studied painting in England

PA I N T E D H U N D R E D S

of work by one artist to be on permanent display

and in his 30s, moved to New York City to open a

O F O I L- O N - CA N VAS

in one place.” Another unique detail about the gal-

studio where he specialized in portraiture. As his

WO R KS F R O M T H E

lery: Barrow painted numerous works on panels

interest in landscapes grew, Barrow visited Cen-

S K E TC H E S A N D

which are inset into molding on the lower part of

tral New York each summer and during the win-

M E M O RI E S H E

the gallery’s walls. The gallery opened to the pub-

ters painted hundreds of oil-on-canvases from his

HAD OF CENTRAL

lic on October 8, 1900 and was given in trust to the

sketches and memories. He returned to Skaneateles

N E W YO R K .

Skaneateles Library Association.

Barrow moved to the village of Skaneateles with

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more than 300 landscapes and portraits. Regina A R T IST J O H N

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Concerned citizens formed a committee in the late 1970s to save the gallery and collection after it had gone through decades of deterioration. When Barrow built the gallery, he left his railroad stock in trust to care of the collection in perpetuity. As railroad fortunes declined, so did the trust, so the committee needed to develop a capital fund that could

Barrow’s extensive work includes “A Summer Afternoon,” opposite; this page: “A Skaneateles Lake Glen,” “Lights and Shadows,” “Upon the Beach.” Shown in frames: “Giant of Keene Valley at Sunset,” and “Winter Winds and Snow.”

generate money for future operating expenses. Gwen Birchenough, committee member and later a director of the gallery, devised the Borrow-a-Barrow program with Susan Blakney, Chief Conservator and founder of Westlake Conservators. Since Westlake Conservators was already responsible for the restoration and stabilization of many of the paintings, the women identified a core group deemed safe enough to travel that became available for the community to rent. “Outside of donations, it’s one of our few revenue streams,” says Lewis-Middleton. A selection of landscapes and portraiture is available for two-year periods and rental fees range from $300 to $1,200, based on the size and appraised value of each painting. There are around 75 paintings currently out on loan, most in private homes though several can be found in banks and law offices. Lewis-Middleton tries to balance what is allowed out for private enjoyment with what remains in the gallery for a well-rounded mix of work displayed for public viewing. She helps interested parties identify a suitable spot in their home, regarding space for hanging, light, temperature and humidity concerns, and provides additional guidelines for safekeeping. “The best part is the program is not just a fundraiser, it’s a friend-raiser. Because once you have one in your home, you want to go back and get another one; a loyalty to Barrow develops. It’s easy to get accustomed to a beautiful piece of artwork in a killer frame,” says Lewis-Middleton. To learn more about the gallery or inquire about renting a painting, contact the gallery at 315-679-1764 or barrowgallery.org. M A R C H /A P R I L

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est. 1982

Old-Fashioned Meat Market & Deli Spera’s was founded in 1982 by Tony Spera, who came to the USA from Italy with his family at a young age. His dream was to own his own butcher shop resembling those in Italy. After Tony passed away in 1988, his dream continues to be carried out by his family.

Spera’s sells only top quality products meats • steaks • chicken • pork • turkey deli meats • subs & sandwiches • beer & soda fresh produce • local products • frozen foods

A place where you can truly talk to the butcher

Meet Gary!

6250 Rt 31 Cicero, NY • 315-699-4422 • speras.net 62

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S8702079-04

Gary has worked in the meat industry for 15 years. He came from the backbone of the beef industry, breaking down whole cows and becoming an expert butcher. From there he worked at Sam’s Club and Maine’s before coming to Spera’s. In all his years meat cutting, he’s come to love a good slow cooked chuck roast, which is perfect for his new cozy home on these colder days. But when the sun is out, you’ll find him BBQing some thick cut Delmonico steaks on the grill. Being a 2 time cancer survivor with 23 years cancer-free, Gary enjoys the little things in life and greets each day with a positive attitude. Stop in and ask Gary for special tips about how to cook the perfect chuck roast!


Farm to Table

Ooey gooey good LIVING THE STICKY BUNS DREAM IN MAPLE COUNTRY

BY M . J . K R AV EC

New York State maple syrup is a pure sweetener with a higher nutritional value than sugar and other sweeteners. In fact, maple syrup is a good source of manganese and riboflavin and contains zinc, magnesium and calcium. Since it’s maple season in Central New York, we thought it fitting to include a recipe for maple syrup in all its gooey, sticky glory. Keep a warm washcloth nearby. And don’t let anyone touch the fridge.

M A R C H /A P R I L

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63


Easy Maple Sticky Buns from nysmaple.com INGREDIENTS 2 cups warm water (110° to 115° F) 2 pkgs. active dry yeast 1/2 cup sugar 2 tsp. salt 1/4 cup shortening 1 egg 6-1/2 to 7 cups flour

DIRECTIONS

Dissolve yeast in water. Stir in sugar, salt, shortening and egg. Mix in flour until dough is no longer sticky. Place in greased bowl, cover and refrigerate. About two hours before baking, remove from refrigerator and flatten dough into a large rectangle. Brush dough with 2 tbsp. melted butter. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup pure NYS granulated maple sugar and 1/2 cup chopped walnuts. Roll dough and cut into 1-1/2” pieces and place cut–side up in a greased pan. Cover and let rise for about 40 minutes. Bake at 350° for 15-20 minutes. When rolls come out of the oven, spread pure NYS maple cream on top to frost.

Above, sap buckets on maple trees at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville. Left, sap runs during a maple sugaring demonstration.

TAP DANCE

- It takes up to 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of pure maple syrup. - One tapped maple tree can make between 10 and 20 gallons of sap on average. - Maple syrup contains iron, calcium and antioxidants, plus, it’s an all-natural sweetener. –nysmaple.com

PAIR IT WITH

Hot coffee or milk. What else?

64

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“We elves have to stick to the four food groups: candy, candy canes, candy corn and syrup.”

Above, steam from the evaporator pours out of the smoke stack at the Cedarvale Maple Co. in Syracuse. At left, syrup made at Cedarvale Maple Co.

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65


Everson Museum President and CEO Elizabeth Dunbar with Dr. Paul Phillips and his wife, Sharon Sullivan.

66

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PHOTOS COURTESY EVERSON MUSEUM OF ART

Art Profile


The most significant area to benefit from the Phillips/ Sullivan donation is the museum’s ceramics collection.

A game-changing gift D O N AT I O N TO T H E E V E RS O N M U S EU M ’ S C E R A M I C C O L L ECT I O N C O U L D M A K E SY R AC U S E ‘ T H E P L AC E’ FO R C E R A M I C S

BY

K AT H E R I N E R U S H W O R T H

RAISING MONEY IN SYRACUSE IS NOT AN EASY TASK. THERE ARE APPROXIMATELY A DOZEN ARTS ORGANIZATIONS ALONE VYING FOR DONATIONS ON ANY GIVEN DAY. THAT’S NOT TO MENTION THE SCORES OF ADDITIONAL NOTFOR-PROFITS SERVING OTHER WORTHY COMMUNITIES IN THE CENTRAL NEW YORK AREA WHO ARE TAPPING MANY OF THE SAME RESOURCES. SO WHEN SOMEONE WITHIN OUR COMMUNITY STEPS UP IN A REALLY SIGNIFICANT WAY TO SUPPORT A CAUSE/ORGANIZATION THEY BELIEVE IN, IT IS WORTHY OF RECOGNITION. THIS LEVEL OF SUPPORT DOESN’T HAPPEN EVERY DAY. AND IT CERTAINLY DOESN’T HAPPEN OFTEN ENOUGH, SO WHEN IT DOES HAPPEN, IT IS DEFINITELY A STORY TO BE SHARED AND CELEBRATED. THE HEROES OF TODAY’S STORY ARE DR. PAUL PHILLIPS AND HIS WIFE, SHARON SULLIVAN, AND THE BENEFICIARY OF THEIR GENEROSITY IS THE EVERSON MUSEUM OF ART.

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In September, Elizabeth Dunbar, the Everson’s President and

for the museum, and more specifically, the ceramics collection

CEO, announced a $4.8 million donation to the museum by Phil-

that guided them in their decision to answer her call in such a

lips and Sullivan. A significant portion of the gift is in the form

significant way.

of a bequest, which means funds will be forthcoming upon the

“I talked to them about adding a ceramics curator,” Dunbar

couple’s passing, but a substantial amount is already available to

says. “I talked to them about installing glass doors on the ceram-

assist with programming and operations. Phillips said his years

ics storage area so people can see us working. It’s important to

serving on the Everson’s board of directors helped him to under-

me that people see us actually working and see the curators in

stand how important day-to-day cash flow is to the organization.

action. It’s a more transparent process.”

“I’ve seen a lot of changes and a lot of struggles,” Phillips says about his years on the board. He also served as chair of the Rheumatology Department at Upstate University for 32 years. “I know you need operating income.”

“The community outreach is so much stronger under Elizabeth,” Phillips says. “The more frequent changing of exhibi-

The most significant area to benefit from the Phillips/Sullivan

tions is probably number one,” he continues, “and the variety

donation is the museum’s ceramics collection. Funds have been

of artists and media featured. There’s always something new.”

and will be allocated to the ceramics endowment and to funding

The museum’s refocus on the ceramics collection has been

the Paul Phillips and Sharon Sullivan Curator of Ceramics po-

an on-and-off subject of debate among Everson administrators

sition, a position that was filled in June 2018 with the appoint-

and boards for years.

ment of Garth Johnson. On Feb. 28, the museum officially ded-

Is it too narrow a focus for a small museum? What about the

icated the Paul Phillips and Sharon Sullivan Ceramics Gallery,

museum’s broader mission statement to focus on modern and

a fully renovated, refitted section of the museum that once was

contemporary American art? Will the community support such

home to the education department, but now features a rotating

a narrow focus? On the other hand, this clear focus might be

exhibition of selections from the museum’s collection of more

what gives the Everson an edge when it comes to fundraising

than 6,000 ceramic works.

on a national level. It separates the organization from the pack

Dunbar says a donation of this magnitude is game-changing for the institution.

in a very meaningful way. Dunbar says unequivocally that it’s time for the museum to

“It’s transformative in so many ways,” she says. “It will allow us

return to what it was once was so highly acclaimed for.

to build on the reputation of the ceramics collection. We’ll return

“As Corning is known for glass, we want the Everson and Syr-

to our place of prominence again within the world of ceramics.”

acuse to be known for ceramics,” she states. “We want to be The

It was Dunbar’s vision for the museum and, more specifically,

Place (for ceramics). We used to be The Place.”

for the ceramics collection that brought Phillips and Sullivan to

The generosity of Paul Phillips and Sharon Sullivan and their

the table. They had grown weary of seeing the same works of art

belief in Dunbar’s vision could be the first step in an important

installed in the same galleries and felt the ceramics collection was

repositioning of the Everson. It also could serve as a clarion call

being slighted by the choices of where and how it was installed.

to other members of the community with means to support oth-

“They talked about ceramics,” Sullivan says, “but I found it

er worthy organizations in their own back yard. Phillips says he

depressing to go see it. Things might change in the galleries, but

sees too much money leaving our community to support na-

the ceramics always stayed the same.”

tional organizations.

Dunbar heard the couple’s concerns and put a proposal to-

“It would be nice if families supported local arts organiza-

gether that outlined her plans for the new ceramics gallery and

tions, instead of sending it (donations) out of town,” Phillips

curator’s position. She provided some budget estimates and

says. “Both Sharon and I would like to see lots of other people

asked for Phillips’ and Sullivan’s support.

follow in our footsteps and let this gift of ours be an example of

“I wanted to talk to them about a seven-figure gift,” she says. “I was hoping we’d get a million dollars.” Phillips and Sullivan both say it was Dunbar’s clear vision

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But Phillips says their support was driven by more than just the reintroduction of the ceramics collection.

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M A R C H /A P R I L

how to support their favorite arts organization.” Because as Dunbar affirms, a gift of this magnitude can be game-changing.


Ceramics gallery at the Everson. “As Corning is known for glass, we want the Everson and Syracuse to be known for ceramics,” says Dunbar.

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Galleries ArtRage Gallery, The Norton Putter Gallery

cally modified plants, digital sculpture and installation to large-scale photography and projected video. 1.5° Celsius references the projected increase in temperature between 2030 and 2052 if global warming continues at its current pace and the world fails to take significant action to reverse the increase, according to a United Nations report published in 2018. This subtle yet substantial change in temperature will have seismic implications for climate change, species extinction and toxic degradation. Through April 21.

505 Hawley Avenue, Syracuse, artragegallery. org. 2 to 7 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Kokom Lena of the First Nation Algonquin, The Photographs of Michael Greenlar. Syracuse photographer Michael Greenlar documented four generations of Algonquins in the bush of Quebec, Canada for almost 20 years. The work focuses on the matriarch Lena Nottaway and the knowledge she passed on through her 15 children. Lena taught Kokomville how to utilize every element of the environment to become a self-sustaining community. The series is a testament to the cultural survival of the Algonquin people of Barrier Lake, La Vérendrye Park, Quebec, Canada. Despite broken treaties and clear-cut logging, these First Nation people continue to use the land as their traditions dictate. The exhibition is in partnership with Skä•noñh – Great Law of Peace Center. Through March 23. From Gods to Social Justice: Indian Folk Artists Challenging Traditions. Representing two painting styles of eastern India, this exhibition includes a male tradition of scrolls from Bengal and a female tradition of wall paintings, now done on paper, from the Mithila region of northern Bihar. Both of these art forms have morphed and changed in contemporary India, creating space for artists to use their art to comment on issues facing their lives, their nation and the planet. Their work deals with a variety of injustices such as violence against women, female infanticide, political corruption, climate change and war. From the collections of Geraldine Forbes, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus of SUNY Oswego and Susan Wadley, Ford Maxwell Professor of South Asia at Syracuse University. Opening Reception 7 to 9 p.m., Sat., April 6. Runs April 6 through May 18.

Edgewood Gallery 216 Tecumseh Road, Syracuse. 315-445-8111, edgewoodartandframe.com. 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday- Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday-Monday. Free.

What Is, Can Be: Gary Trento exhibits his still-life series of oil paintings with ceramics by David Webster and jewelry by Judy McCumber. Through April 12. Annual High School Seniors’ Exhibit: A yearly exhibit juried and sponsored by the CNY Art Guild for high school seniors within a 30-mile radius of Syracuse. April 19 through May 3.

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Burning the Bride at ArtRage.

Everson Museum of Art 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. 315-474-6064, everson.org. Noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, noon to 8 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Closed Monday-Tuesday. $5 suggested donation.

Socially Gifted: 75 Years of Gifts from the Social Art Club. Founded in 1875, the Social Art Club is a women’s club dedicated to the study of art in a group setting. The Club has an extensive history of supporting the Everson, including financial support for the acquisition of some of the Museum’s most iconic pieces, such as Adrian Saxe’s Untitled vessel from 1980, which graces the cover of the Museum’s American Ceramics catalog. Through June 30. Key Figures: Representational Ceramics 1932-1972. Dating back to the Ceramic National exhibitions, which began in 1932, the Everson has a rich history of supporting artists who explore the figure. Artists like Viktor Schreckengost, Edris Eckhardt, and Waylande Gregory routinely received awards and critical acclaim for their work. Key Figures examines the larger-than-life artists who shaped an art movement and features select works from a new generation of artists who are building on this legacy by using the figure to explore identity, narrative and allegory. Through June 23. Suzanne Anker: 1.5° Celsius: Artist and theorist Suzanne Anker positions her work at the intersection of art and biology using a wide range of media, from geneti-

Frank Gillette: Excavations and Banquets. The work of pioneering video artist Frank Gillette focuses on humans’ experience of natural phenomena. Using multi-channel video installations with image feedback, time delay and closed-circuit systems, Gillette is of a generation of artists who defined the way video technologies would be used as an art form. Gillette has become increasingly fascinated with the potential of digital media to subvert our obsession with speed and creates work that embraces a Zen-inspired experience of slow time. Through April 21.

Light Work Gallery, Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery at Light Work 316 Waverly Ave., Syracuse. 315-443-1300, lightwork.org. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. SaturdaySunday and by appointment. Free.

Robert Benjamin: River Walking. Light Work is pleased to present Robert Benjamin’s “River Walking,” a solo exhibition of photographs and poems spanning four decades. A self-taught photographer and poet, Benjamin’s work, often centered around his family, offers a simple and honest consideration of what it means to live and to love with intention. Enchanted by color and the beauty of photography itself, Benjamin uncovers poetry in the everyday. March 18 – July 27. Gallery Talk: 6 p.m., Thurs., March 21. Reception: 5-7 p.m., Thurs., March 21.

Frank Gillette, Counter-Statement, video stills from Riverrun, 20162017 at Everson Museum of Art.


Longyear Museum of Anthropology

Munson-WilliamsProctor Art Institute

2nd Floor, Alumni Hall, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton. 315-228-6470, colgate.edu/ longyear. Closed Mondays, major holidays and between exhibitions. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. TuesdayFriday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday–Sunday.

310 Genesee St., Utica. 315-797-0000, mwpai. org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. Free but special exhibitions may have a fee.

Fashioning Africa. Fashioning Africa is a journey into the myriad traditional artisanal techniques found across the continent. There are six textiles and accessories from the African collection of the Longyear Museum of Anthropology on display. Each object provides a point of departure in the evaluation of the contemporary influence and global impact of African crafting traditions. Students from Professor Ntokozo Kunene’s Fall 2018 Costume Design class have used the objects as inspiration to fabricate their own work displayed alongside pieces in the exhibit. Through April 14.

Tommy Brown: Upstate. A retrospective look at the photographer’s decades-long study of his home in rural Central New York. The earliest images in Tommy Brown: Upstate include black-and-white portraits of startling frankness. More recent color photographs resonate with the poetic clarity of paintings by Charles Sheeler, Georgia O’Keeffe or Charles Burchfield. The consistent subject of Tommy Brown: Upstate is the spirit of this place, its natural and fierce beauty, the relationship of people to the land and the marks of the past on present-day life. Organized by Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, this is the first museum exhibition of the remarkable photographs Brown has composed during a lifetime of looking. Through April 6.

Betty Feves, Three Figures, 1954, Stoneware, 17 1/4 x 7 x 9 inches, at Everson Museum of Art.

Picker Art Gallery 2nd Floor, Dana Arts Center, Colgate University. 13 Oak Drive Hamilton. 315-228-7634, colgate. edu/picker. Closed Mondays, major holidays, and between exhibitions. 10 a.m.to 5 p.m. Tuesday– Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 10 a.m.–8 p.m. third Thursday of every month.

Koolanga Boodja Neh Nidjuuk (Children Listening and Looking on Country): Art of the Stolen Children of the Carrolup Native Settlement, Western Australia. In 2013, a collection of 122 artworks made in the late 1940s by the Aboriginal children of the Carrolup Native Settlement were repatriated to the Noongar community of Western Australia. They had been stored in the Picker Art Gallery’s collection since the works were donated by Herbert Mayer ’29 in 1966. The children artists used a vibrant palette to depict the world from their own experiences and started a pictorial landscape tradition that would gain international attention and become known as the Carrolup School. Forty of these artworks will temporarily return to the Picker as part of a traveling exhibition organized by the John Curtin Gallery of Curtin University, which maintains the collection on behalf of the Noongar. This exhibition celebrates the enduring relationship among the Noongar, Curtin and Colgate in the University’s Bicentennial year. March 21–June 30.

“Walker at Pawnee Grasslands” from Robert Benjamin’s “River Walking,” a solo exhibition at Light Work Gallery.

Colgate Alumni Collect. Now in its third year, Colgate Alumni Collect presents the personal collections of Tim Keny ’77 and Bruce Silverstein ’89. Featuring textiles and photographs from the 20th century, each alumnus has carefully built a focused collection that is a reflection of his own personal expression. Curated by Michael Quinan ’19. March 21–June 30.

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Kenneth M. Alweis Goldberg Segalla 315-413-5400 5786 Widewaters Parkway Syracuse Brian J. Butler Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse John H. Callahan Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse David M. Capriotti Harris Beach 315-423-7100 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse Jon P. Devendorf Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse Jonathan B. Fellows Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

M A R C H /A P R I L

Stephen T. Helmer Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse Mitchell J. Katz Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece 315-474-7541 308 Maltbie Street, Suite 200 Syracuse Nicole M. Marlow-Jones Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: GENERAL PRACTICE Edward Z. Menkin Edward Z. Menkin 315-425-1212 555 East Genessee Street Syracuse J. Scott Porter J. Scott Porter 315-568-6136 78 Cayuga Street Seneca Falls CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE-COLLAR

John L . Murad, Jr. Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Daniel J. French Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse

Timothy P. Murphy Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Edward Z. Menkin Edward Z. Menkin 315-425-1212 555 East Genessee Street Syracuse

Douglas J. Nash Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse Louis Orbach Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Alan J. Pierce Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

EDUCATION LAW R. Daniel Bordoni Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Thomas G. Eron Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

CORPORATE LAW

John Gaal Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

James J. Canfield Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse

Laura H. Harshbarger Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Edward J. Moses Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

Larry P. Malfitano Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Linda E. Romano Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-738-1223 501 Main Street Utica Charles J. Sullivan Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Subhash Viswanathan Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse ELDER LAW Cora A. Alsante Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse


Ami S. Longstreet Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse T. David Stapleton Jr. Karpinski & Stapleton 315-253-6219 110 Genesee Street, Suite 200 Auburn EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (ERISA) LAW Stephen H. Cohen Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll 315-671-6000 507 Plum Street, Suite 310 Syracuse Brian K. Haynes Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Thaddeus J. Lewkowicz Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse EMPLOYMENT LAW - INDIVIDUALS Bernard T. King Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse James R. LaVaute Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse Donald D. Oliver Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse Mimi C. Satter Satter Law Firm 315-471-0405 217 South Salina Street, Sixth Floor Syracuse EMPLOYMENT LAW - MANAGEMENT R. Daniel Bordoni Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Thomas G. Eron Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse David M. Ferrara Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000

One Lincoln Center Syracuse John Gaal Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Laura H. Harshbarger Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Peter A. Jones Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Robert A. LaBerge Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Larry P. Malfitano Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Michael J. Sciotti Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse Steven Ward Williams Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse ENERGY LAW Kevin M. Bernstein Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Kevin M. Bernstein Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Thomas J. Fucillo Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece 315-474-7541 308 Maltbie Street, Suite 200 Syracuse Barry R. Kogut Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Andrew J. Leja Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse

Virginia C. Robbins Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

HEALTH CARE LAW Marc S. Beckman Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll 315-671-6000 507 Plum Street, Suite 310 Syracuse

Doreen A. Simmons Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Stephen H. Cohen Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll 315-671-6000 507 Plum Street, Suite 310 Syracuse

Robert R. Tyson Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Michael Compagni Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll 315-671-6000 507 Plum Street, Suite 310 Syracuse

FAMILY LAW Edward B. Alderman Alderman and Alderman, Attorneys at Law 315-422-8131 AXA Tower One, Suite 1220 Syracuse

Raymond R. D’Agostino Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Richard B. Alderman Alderman and Alderman, Attorneys at Law 315-422-8131 AXA Tower One, Suite 1220 Syracuse

Catherine A. Diviney Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Jon W. Brenizer Macht, Brenizer & Gingold 315-849-2319 State Tower Building, Suite 510 Syracuse Deborah K. Field Field & Custer 315-422-0420 4933 Jamesville Road Jamesville Harlan B. Gingold Macht, Brenizer & Gingold 315-849-2319 State Tower Building, Suite 510 Syracuse Howard J. Woronov Melvin & Melvin 315-422-1311 217 South Salina Street Syracuse

IMMIGRATION LAW Thomas G. Eron Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Ramon E. Rivera Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse INSURANCE LAW Donald S. DiBenedetto Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse Stephen T. Helmer Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

FINANCIAL SERVICES REGULATION LAW Richard W. Cook Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PRACTICE Laurence G. Bousquet Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse

Kevin E. Hulslander Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse Alan J. Pierce Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

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LABOR LAW - MANAGEMENT

LAND USE AND ZONING LAW

R. Daniel Bordoni Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Paul J. Curtin, Jr. Curtin Law Firm 315-815-4221 42 Albany Street Cazenovia

John F. Corcoran Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

John R. Langey Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse

Thomas G. Eron Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

C. Daniel Shulman Shulman Grundner Etoll & Danaher 315-424-8944 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 502 Syracuse

David M. Ferrara Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse John Gaal Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Laura H. Harshbarger Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Peter A. Jones Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Robert A. LaBerge Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Larry P. Malfitano Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Michael J. Sciotti Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse LABOR LAW - UNION Nathaniel G. Lambright Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse Donald D. Oliver Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse Mimi C. Satter Satter Law Firm 315-471-0405 217 South Salina Street, Sixth Floor Syracuse

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LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS James D. Lantier Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse Michael Paul Ringwood Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Wendy A. Kinsella Harris Beach 315-423-7100 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse

Louis Orbach Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Charles J. Sullivan Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

LITIGATION - FIRST AMENDMENT

Lee E. Woodard Harris Beach 315-423-7100 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse Joseph Zagraniczny Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse LITIGATION - CONSTRUCTION John D. Allen Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse LITIGATION - ENVIRONMENTAL

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW - PLAINTIFFS

John D. Allen Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

John C. Cherundolo Cherundolo Law Firm 315-449-9500 100 Madison Street, Suite 1701 Syracuse

Kevin M. Bernstein Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

LITIGATION - BANKING AND FINANCE Richard W. Cook Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse Jonathan B. Fellows Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Mitchell J. Katz Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece 315-474-7541 308 Maltbie Street, Suite 200 Syracuse LITIGATION - BANKRUPTCY Stephen A. Donato Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

M A R C H /A P R I L

Thomas J. Fucillo Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece 315-474-7541 308 Maltbie Street, Suite 200 Syracuse Doreen A. Simmons Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse Thomas R. Smith Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse LITIGATION - ERISA Charles E. Blitman Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse John L . Murad, Jr. Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

John L . Murad, Jr. Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse LITIGATION - HEALTH CARE Andrew M. Knoll Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll 315-671-6000 507 Plum Street, Suite 310 Syracuse LITIGATION - INSURANCE Daniel P. Fletcher Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse Timothy P. Murphy Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse LITIGATION - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY George R. McGuire Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse John L . Murad, Jr. Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse LITIGATION - LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT R. Daniel Bordoni Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse John H. Callahan Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Jonathan B. Fellows Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse John Gaal Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse


MEDICAL MALPRACTICE

PRODUCT LIABILITY

CATASTROPHIC INJURIES

Helping People Hurt B Negligence

Helping The Injured Recover Compensation

Fighting For the Rights Of The Injured

WE WIN FOR INJUR VICTIMS

John Cherundolo

Trust our medical malpractice law firm

CONTACT US FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

(315) 505-4031

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100 Madison Street #1701 | S racuse, New York 13202 | Cherundololawfirm.com


Laura H. Harshbarger Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Timothy P. Murphy Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Lindsey Hazelton Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

LITIGATION - PATENT William Greener Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Peter A. Jones Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

George R. McGuire Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Larry P. Malfitano Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

James R. Muldoon Harris Beach 315-423-7100 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse

John T. McCann Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse L . Micha Ordway, Jr. Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse Mimi C. Satter Satter Law Firm 315-471-0405 217 South Salina Street, Sixth Floor Syracuse

LITIGATION - TRUSTS AND ESTATES John D. Allen Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Laura L . Spring Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll 315-671-6000 507 Plum Street, Suite 310 Syracuse

Cora A. Alsante Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Kenneth L . Wagner Blitman & King 315-422-7111 Franklin Center, Suite 300 Syracuse Steven Ward Williams Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

John D. Allen Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

Mitchell J. Katz Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece 315-474-7541 308 Maltbie Street, Suite 200 Syracuse L . Micha Ordway, Jr. Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse

Michael J. Sciotti Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse

LITIGATION - MUNICIPAL

LITIGATION - REAL ESTATE

Robert F. Baldwin, Jr. Baldwin & Sutphen 315-477-0100 126 North Salina Street, Suite 320 Syracuse Michael L . Corp Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse Michael E. O’Connor Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse

John L . Murad, Jr. Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

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LITIGATION AND CONTROVERSY - TAX Jonathan B. Fellows Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS

Jeff DeFrancisco DeFrancisco & Falgiatano Law Firm 315-479-9000 6739 Myers Road East Syracuse Robert F. Julian Robert F. Julian Law Offices 315-475-0990 2037 Genesee Street, Suite Two Syracuse

Paul A. Brown Martin, Ganotis, Brown, Mould & Currie 315-449-2616 5790 Widewaters Parkway DeWitt

Robert E. Lahm Robert E. Lahm 315-472-3434 711 East Genesee Street Syracuse

Mark L . Dunn Martin, Ganotis, Brown, Mould & Currie 315-449-2616 5790 Widewaters Parkway DeWitt

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS LAW

Kevin E. Hulslander Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse Eric G. Johnson Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse Brandon R. King Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Robert K. Weiler Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse NONPROFIT / CHARITIES LAW Christine Woodcock Dettor Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse PATENT LAW William Greener Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

James D. Lantier Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

George R. McGuire Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

George F. Mould Martin, Ganotis, Brown, Mould & Currie 315-449-2616 5790 Widewaters Parkway DeWitt

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION - DEFENDANTS

Michael Paul Ringwood Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW - PLAINTIFFS Michael A. Bottar Bottar Law 315-422-3466 120 Madison Street, Suite 1600 Syracuse

John D. Allen Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Paul A. Brown Martin, Ganotis, Brown, Mould & Currie 315-449-2616 5790 Widewaters Parkway DeWitt John H. Callahan Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Donald S. DiBenedetto Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse


Paul G. Ferrara Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse

John C. Cherundolo Cherundolo Law Firm 315-449-9500 100 Madison Street, Suite 1701 Syracuse

Stephen T. Helmer Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

Jeff DeFrancisco DeFrancisco & Falgiatano Law Firm 315-479-9000 6739 Myers Road East Syracuse

Brandon R. King Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Robert F. Julian Robert F. Julian Law Offices 315-475-0990 2037 Genesee Street, Suite Two Syracuse

Walter L . Meagher, Jr. Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse George F. Mould Martin, Ganotis, Brown, Mould & Currie 315-449-2616 5790 Widewaters Parkway DeWitt Timothy P. Murphy Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse Michael Paul Ringwood Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse Steven Ward Williams Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

David Kalabanka Michaels & Smolak 315-253-3293 17 East Genesee Street, Suite 401 Auburn Robert E. Lahm Robert E. Lahm 315-472-3434 711 East Genesee Street Syracuse Edward S. Leone Bottar Law 315-422-3466 120 Madison Street, Suite 1600 Syracuse Martin Lynn Lynn Law Firm 315-474-1267 M&T Bank Building, Suite 750 Syracuse William F. Lynn Lynn Law Firm 315-474-1267 M&T Bank Building, Suite 750 Syracuse

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION - PLAINTIFFS

Patricia A. Lynn-Ford Lynn Law Firm 315-474-1267 M&T Bank Building, Suite 750 Syracuse

Michael Bersani Michaels & Smolak 315-253-3293 17 East Genesee Street, Suite 401 Auburn

Lee S. Michaels Michaels & Smolak 315-253-3293 17 East Genesee Street, Suite 401 Auburn

Anthony S. Bottar Bottar Law 315-422-3466 120 Madison Street, Suite 1600 Syracuse

Anthony A. Murad Brindisi, Murad, Brindisi & Pearlman 315-733-2396 2713 Genesee Street Utica

Michael A. Bottar Bottar Law 315-422-3466 120 Madison Street, Suite 1600 Syracuse Louis T. Brindisi Brindisi, Murad, Brindisi & Pearlman 315-733-2396 2713 Genesee Street Utica

Eva Brindisi Pearlman Brindisi, Murad, Brindisi & Pearlman 315-733-2396 2713 Genesee Street Utica Jeffrey Pomeroy Greene & Reid 315-492-2222 173 Intrepid Lane Syracuse

Jan Smolak Michaels & Smolak 315-253-3293 17 East Genesee Street, Suite 401 Auburn

Patricia A. Lynn-Ford Lynn Law Firm 315-474-1267 M&T Bank Building, Suite 750 Syracuse

Steven Ward Williams Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION - DEFENDANTS

Kevin E. Hulslander Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Janet D. Callahan Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse

Eric G. Johnson Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Stephen T. Helmer Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

Michael Paul Ringwood Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Kevin E. Hulslander Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse

Robert J. Smith Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse

Judith M. Sayles Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse Robert J. Smith Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse Steven Ward Williams Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet 315-474-2911 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 600 Syracuse PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION - PLAINTIFFS Michael Bersani Michaels & Smolak 315-253-3293 17 East Genesee Street, Suite 401 Auburn

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW - PLAINTIFFS Patricia A. Lynn-Ford Lynn Law Firm 315-474-1267 M&T Bank Building, Suite 750 Syracuse PROJECT FINANCE LAW Kevin R. McAuliffe Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse PUBLIC FINANCE LAW

Michael A. Bottar Bottar Law 315-422-3466 120 Madison Street, Suite 1600 Syracuse David Kalabanka Michaels & Smolak 315-253-3293 17 East Genesee Street, Suite 401 Auburn

Samuel Vulcano Sugarman Law Firm 315-474-2943 211 West Jefferson Street Syracuse

Richard W. Cook Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse REAL ESTATE LAW Alfred W. Popkess Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

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C. Daniel Shulman Shulman Grundner Etoll & Danaher 315-424-8944 250 South Clinton Street, Suite 502 Syracuse John P. Sindoni Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse Francis D. Stinziano Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse SPORTS LAW Philip J. Zaccheo Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse TAX LAW Clayton H. Hale, Jr. Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

Brian K. Haynes Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Anthony P. Marshall Harris Beach 315-423-7100 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse Paul W. Reichel Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Gerald F. Stack Barclay Damon 315-425-2700 Barclay Damon Tower Syracuse TIMBER LAW Jeffrey M. Fetter Scolaro Fetter Grizanti & McGough 315-471-8111 Franklin Square, Suite 300 Syracuse

TRUSTS AND ESTATES Cora A. Alsante Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse Robert F. Baldwin, Jr. Baldwin & Sutphen 315-477-0100 126 North Salina Street, Suite 320 Syracuse Alicia S. Calagiovanni Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse Michael L . Corp Hancock Estabrook 315-565-4500 AXA Tower I, Suite 1500 Syracuse Elizabeth A. Hartnett Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse

James E. Mackin Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse John P. McLane Boyle & Anderson 315-253-0326 110 Genesee Street, Suite 300 Auburn Michael E. O’Connor Costello, Cooney & Fearon 315-422-1152 Bridgewater Place, Suite 300 Syracuse Gay M. Pomeroy Mackenzie Hughes 315-474-7571 Mackenzie Hughes Tower, Suite 400 Syracuse Martin A. Schwab Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse

David A. Holstein Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse

Plain talk. Exceptional expertise.

Continuing our tradition of excellence.

Anne Ruffer, Managing Partner

Congratulations to Anne Ruffer on her new role as our Managing Partner. Learn more at mackenziehughes.com.

M A C K E N Z I E H U G H E S T O W E R , 4 4 0 S O U T H W A R R E N S T R E E T, S U I T E 4 0 0

S Y R A C U S E , N E W Y O R K 13 2 0 2

315 - 474 -7 571 S8990449-01

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James N. Seeley Bond, Schoeneck & King 315-218-8000 One Lincoln Center Syracuse Richard M. Storto Melvin & Melvin 315-422-1311 217 South Salina Street Syracuse Christine Woodcock Dettor Bousquet Holstein 315-422-1500 One Lincoln Center, Suite 1000 Syracuse WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW - CLAIMANTS Paul A. Carbonaro Carbonaro Law Offices 315-252-2352 110 Genesee Street, Suite 310 Auburn Christopher M. Whyland Christopher Whyland Law 315-682-3850 4500 Brickyard Falls Road Manlius WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW - EMPLOYERS Christopher M. Whyland Christopher Whyland Law 315-682-3850 4500 Brickyard Falls Road Manlius

Credit The Best Lawyers in America© is published by BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC, Aiken, S.C. and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-6480300; write 237 Park Ave., SW, Suite 101, Aiken, S.C. 29801; email info@bestlawyers.com; or visit bestlawyers.com. An online subscription to Best Lawyers® is available at bestlawyers.com.

disClaimer and Copyright BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of July 1, 2018, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar association for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney. Copyright 2019 by BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC, Aiken, S.C. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of BL Rankings, LLC d/b/a Best Lawyers and Co., LLC.

methodology for Best lawyers® This list is excerpted from the 2019 edition of The Best Lawyers in America©, the pre-eminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States. Published since 1983, Best Lawyers lists attorneys in 145 specialties, representing all 50 states, who have been chosen through an exhaustive survey in which thousands of the nation’s top lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The 2019 edition of Best Lawyers is based on more than 7.8 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers. The method used to compile Best Lawyers remains unchanged since the first edition was compiled more than 30 years ago. Lawyers are chosen for inclusion based solely on the vote of their peers. Listings cannot be bought, and no purchase is required to be included. In this regard, Best Lawyers remains the gold standard of reliability and integrity in lawyer ratings. The nomination pool for the 2019 edition consisted of all lawyers whose names appeared in the previous edition of Best Lawyers, lawyers who were nominated since the previous survey, and new nominees solicited from listed attorneys. In general, lawyers were asked to vote only on nominees in their own specialty in their own jurisdiction. Lawyers in closely related specialties were asked to vote across specialties, as were lawyers in smaller jurisdictions. Where specialties are national or international in nature, lawyers were asked to vote nationally as well as locally. Voting lawyers were also given an opportunity to offer more detailed comments on nominees. Each year, half of the voting pool receives fax or email ballots; the other half is polled by phone. Voting lawyers were provided this general guideline for determining if a nominee should be listed among “the best”: “If you had a close friend or relative who needed a real estate lawyer (for example), and you could not handle the case yourself, to whom would you refer them?” All votes and comments were solicited with a guarantee of confidentiality a critical factor in the viability and validity of Best Lawyers’ surveys. To ensure the rigor of the selection process, lawyers were urged to use only their highest standards when voting, and to evaluate each nominee based only on his or her individual merits. The additional comments were used to make more accurate comparisons between voting patterns and weight votes accordingly. Best Lawyers uses various methodological tools to identify and correct for anomalies in both the nomination and voting process. Ultimately, of course, a lawyer’s inclusion is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, the breadth of the survey, the candor of the respondents, and the sophistication of the polling methodology largely correct for any biases. For all these reasons, Best Lawyers lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate and useful guide to the best lawyers in the United States available anywhere.

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Flashback

The late Nancy Duffy, organizer of the newly revived St. Patrick’s parade in 1983, speaks to “St. Patrick” on parade day.

A History of Syracuse’s St. Patrick’s Parade Syracuse has long hosted a St. Patrick’s parade, with the first one

with locals looking forward to the parade’s character and trap-

possibly held in 1852. Conceived by prominent Irish citizens, the

pings. But by 1958, that enthusiasm dramatically waned and

parade began as a very modest affair, with national guardsmen

Syracuse’s parade was a miserable failure, barely mustering 45

marching to regimental band music and a dinner served at the Globe

marchers, viewed by only a handful of spectators. The parade

Hotel. Two years later, the national guardsmen were accompanied

then became dormant for the next 25 years. But in 1983, the St.

by the Hibernian Benevolent Society, as the city’s Irish citizens

Patrick’s parade returned with panache. The late Nancy Duffy,

donned holiday attire to commemorate the “Apostle of Ireland.”

a local television broadcaster, is credited with spearheading a

However, the day also could be tempestuous, as some non-

revival of the parade that year. On March 13, 1983, about 35,000

Irish residents mocked fellow citizens with disparaging effigies

cold spectators lined South Salina Street to watch a procession

of St. Patrick with potatoes dangling from his neck; a ridicule

of bands, floats and performers. The parade was a grand suc-

usually resulting in fisticuffs. But the parade persisted, slowly

cess and Ms. Duffy received numerous accolades. South Salina

becoming one of the city’s respectable annual tributes. Repre-

Street subsequently became Nancy Duffy Lane. Since then, Syr-

sentation grew to include additional military, musical, civic, law

acuse’s St. Patrick’s parade has remained a popular event. This

enforcement and fraternal groups.

year, the 37th parade will be held on March 16 with Bernie and

By the 1870s, a grand marshal headed an expanded parade that included separate divisions, marching along South Salina Street. The parade continued to thrive into the 20th century,

82

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

M A R C H /A P R I L

Joanie Mahoney as co-grand marshals. THOMAS HUNTER IS MUSEUM COLLECTION COORDINATOR AT ONONDAGA HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OHA

BY THOMAS HUNTER


The Last Word

David Figura

O U T D O O RS W RI T E R FO R N Y U P.C O M , SY R AC U S E .C O M A N D T H E P O ST-STA N DA R D

We’re really into nature for the spring issue. So, we caught up with David Figura, the outdoors recreation writer for NYUP.com, syracuse.com and The Post-Standard, to find out what it’s like to cover birding, bear hunting and everything in between. WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

ANY FAVORITE STORIES?

I just love talking to people who are passionate about their particular activity and conveying that passion in a fair and unbiased way to readers. In many cases, I get to try their activity myself… I’ve participated in the Montezuma Muck Race (a competitive birding event held each fall in Montezuma); taken glider and bobsled rides; gone orienteering; fished the Lower Niagara in the dead of winter for steelhead; gone rabbit, duck and goose hunting, spent a day with a beaver trapper and participated in a biathlon, among other things.

There’s a column I wrote about being a beginning deer hunter in my mid-50s. Despite the fact that my father hunted all through my childhood and teen years, he never took me along. When he died, my stepbrother gave me his shotgun — a 12-gauge Ithaca Deerslayer. Two years later, after going out every time with it, I got my first deer — a small buck. I felt Dad was with me that day and cried as I held his gun. I still get misty eyed thinking about it.

WHAT’S THE ONE THING THAT SURPRISED YOU THE MOST ABOUT YOUR BEAT?

Well, it wasn’t exactly outdoors, but it was wild. It would have to be last summer’s “Naked in the Cave at Howe Caverns” experience, where I joined nearly 300 others in our birthday suits and went underground to explore the caverns where the temperature was 52 degrees. I’m OK with my body and was among those who took advantage of the free offering to get a picture of myself taken down there. My wife got a good laugh after seeing it (I had a funny pose). Afterward, I decided to go on a diet and lost 10 pounds.

“I joined nearly

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE SEASON IN CNY? (DON’T SAY TROUT SEASON).

the temperature

How politically charged it can get. I do get hate mail occasionally when I write about such things as hunting, trapping, bow hunting for carp, etc. I just want to be clear about one thing. I’m a journalist, not an advocate. My job is to hold up a mirror to what’s happening and what folks are doing in the outdoors in Upstate New York. I don’t judge. I don’t advocate.

WHAT’S THE WILDEST THING YOU’VE EVER DONE FOR YOUR JOB?

The fall. It’s a glorious time to be outdoors in Upstate New York, which by the way, is a fishing, hunting, hiking, birding Nirvana. The weather is cooler, the leaves change colors, the fishing picks up, there’s various hunting seasons, the birds are migrating and the mosquitos cease being a bother.

300 others in our birthday suits and went underground to explore the caverns where was 52 degrees.”

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE OUTDOORS FILM?

Hands down, “A River Runs Through It.” I love the fishing scenes – particularly when Brad Pitt hooks a big trout and takes a swim through some rapids to land it. I’ve never done that. But maybe someday I will. — M.J. KRAVEC

M A R C H /A P R I L

CENTRAL NEW YORK MAGAZINE

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Profile for CNY Magazine

Central New York Magazine, March/April 2019  

Central New York Magazine's March/April 2019 issue - Refresh and renew: how to move more, cut clutter and create calm.

Central New York Magazine, March/April 2019  

Central New York Magazine's March/April 2019 issue - Refresh and renew: how to move more, cut clutter and create calm.