2022 Annual Report: Champions of Change

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2022 ANNUAL REPORT
2 | CENTRAL NEW YORK COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 20 22 CONTENTS CHAMPIONS OF CHANGE 3 YEAR IN REVIEW 4 OUR IMPACT 9 GRANTMAKING 12 COMMUNITY FUND DONORS 15 NEW FUNDS 16 FINANCIAL INFORMATION 18 STAFF & BOARD BACK COVER | MEMBERS AND ATTENDEES AT THE JUNETEENTH FREEDOM FEST, HOSTED BY BLACK ARTIST COLLECTIVE, A BLACK EQUITY & EXCELLENCE FUND RECIPIENT. READ STORY ON P. 6. Confirmed in Compliance with National Standards by the Community Foundations National Standards Board

CHAMPIONS OF CHANGE

When Freddie Mercury penned the lyrics to Queen’s “We Are the Champions,” he was thinking about English football. Not just the players, but the crowd, too. His goal was to write something that would encourage widespread unification and participation. Now a staple at sporting events and competitions worldwide, Queen’s song about overcoming challenges to win hard-fought victories clearly resonates. Queen’s much-fabled performance of “We Are the Champions” during the 1985 Live Aid concert for famine relief at Wembley Stadium in London secured the song’s legacy as an anthem, not just for sportsmanship, but for advocacy, too.

BEHIND EVERY CHAMPION IS A TEAM OF PEOPLE in their corner, cheering them on, supporting their efforts and sharing in their dreams. The same is true of the leaders, advocates and community members fighting to make positive changes in our corner of the world. When our community thrives, we all can thrive.

THIS YEAR’S ANNUAL REPORT CELEBRATES CHANGEMAKERS

across Central New York and all who support them. Its pages are filled with the stories of champions in the areas of health, equity, justice, basic needs, literacy, advocacy and the arts. We applaud their efforts and join them in working toward lasting improvements at home, in offices

and classrooms, on stages and playgrounds, and at all places we gather together to heal, pray, learn, grow, live and play.

IN 1927, a small group of civic champions created the Community Foundation to serve as a stable source of support for our community during uncertain times. Ninety-five years later, we are still going strong: striving to meet the region’s ever-changing needs and opportunities with both support and leadership.

TODAY AND TOMORROW, we will be an agent of change to support and cheer on our community’s champions, perhaps with our own not-quite-as-catchy anthem: “We pledge to be an enduring and compassionate partner in philanthropy, investing in the people and potential of Central New York. We commit to collaborative relationships with the individuals and organizations that are the heartbeat of our region. We support our fellow community members in becoming authors of opportunity and agents of change. We open our doors to everyone and anyone who aspires to build upon the contributions of the past and present to shape our community’s shared future.”

DANIEL J. FISHER BOARD CHAIR PETER A. DUNN, JD PRESIDENT & CEO
CHAMPIONS OF CHANGE | 3

YEAR IN REVIEW

SAY YES SYRACUSE

Say Yes Syracuse released its 2020-2021 Report Card to demonstrate the positive outcomes that the program is having on Syracuse City School District students by providing them new opportunities to pursue a higher education. Since 2009, 5,293 Say Yes Syracuse scholars have enrolled in two- and four-year colleges and universities after high school graduation and a total of $12.9 million Say Yes scholarship funds have been distributed. In 2021, the graduation rate of Black and Asian/Pacific Islander students in the Syracuse City School District (SCSD) exceeded that of White students, signaling that the program is helping students break through challenges historically caused by systemic racism. The SCSD graduation rate increased by 32% over the past 10 years from 45% in 2010 to 77% in 2021.

FUNDING RECEIVED TO CONNECT RESIDENTS TO EXPANDED TAX CREDITS

We received funding to help ensure that as many Syracuse families as possible sign up for expanded federal tax credit benefits. The EITC Funders Network gave us $50,000 from its Community Outreach and Opportunity Fund to conduct hyperlocal, strategic outreach to residents. We also contributed a $50,000 local match toward this effort. The earned income tax credit and child tax credit help families with necessary expenses like household bills and food. We used these funds to support the CA$H Coalition and key partners, PEACE, Inc., and United Way of Central New York.

FIRST GRANTS DISTRIBUTED FROM DR. ROBERT J. VITKUS FUND

When Bob Vitkus died in 2020, his estate named the Community Foundation as the recipient of a $10 million legacy gift to support outdoor parks and recreation areas and programs that involve youth, hunting and fishing, or conservation efforts to improve wildlife habitats and open spaces. This year we distributed the first grants from the Dr. Robert J. Vitkus Fund. Three organizations received a total of $301,000 for projects that will carry forth Bob’s vision.

OUR COMMITMENT TO RACIAL EQUITY

At the Community Foundation, we believe that addressing structural racism and other inequities is essential to reaching our vision for Central New York: to be a vibrant community with opportunity for everyone. Our staff members continue their education around topics of white privilege, implicit bias and institutional racism by engaging in open dialogue in the assessment of internal protocols, policies and hiring practices to ensure they align with our aspiration to be an anti-racist organization. This year, our entire staff engaged in a series of virtual racial equity workshops called Toward Racial Equity: Lead for Change, guided by Dr. Juhanna Rogers, vice president for racial equity and social impact at CenterState CEO. You can follow our progress at cnycf.org/ reflections.

| CAZENOVIA PRESERVATION FOUNDATION, A RECIPIENT OF ONE OF THE FIRST GRANTS FROM THE DR. ROBERT J. VITKUS FUND
4 | YEAR IN REVIEW

REVIEW

DUNBAR DISNEY DREAMS FUND

Betty and Ted Stark had a dream that every child, no matter their circumstances, would have the opportunity to visit Disney World. The couple’s vision was set in motion when they created a donoradvised fund to provide support for the Dunbar Association to send students exemplifying the qualities of kindness and character on an all-expenses-paid adventure to Disney World. Continued support from the Dunbar Disney Dreams Fund will help spark curiosity and motivate our community’s young people for many years to come.

BLACK EQUITY & EXCELLENCE GRANT RECIPIENTS FEATURED IN POST-STANDARD COVER STORY

Since the establishment of our Black Equity & Excellence Fund in June 2020, we have made 44 grants totaling $800,000 to support projects that counteract inequities. Our grantees were recognized in a detailed article that appeared on the front cover of The Post-Standard in print and online. It featured the inspiring stories of Black leaders who are using the fund’s support to break down barriers, change systems and give all members of our community the opportunity to succeed.

10 YEARS OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT LEARNING COMMUNITY

Our Performance Management Learning Community (PMLC) program was designed to help strengthen local organizations’ ability to gather and use data for planning, adapting, and improving programs and services. Upon completion of the program after 10 years, nonprofit staff members from 103 organizations had received $1,642,199 in grant support.

THE SOCIAL & ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF SUPPORTING BLACK-LED ORGANIZATIONS: A RATIONALE FOR THE BLACK EQUITY & EXCELLENCE FUND

In July we published a policy paper, The Social & Economic Impacts of Supporting Black-Led Organizations: A Rationale for the Black Equity & Excellence Fund. Grounded in data, the paper outlines why we are investing intentionally to support and celebrate Black-led organizations and projects in our community. You can read the paper at cnycf.org/equitypaper.

SRI INVESTMENT POOL

This year we launched a new Sustainable Responsible Impact (SRI) investment pool for current and future fundholders who want to generate a competitive market return while also emphasizing social and environmental benefits. Our new SRI pool focuses on Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The goal of our SRI pool is to achieve strong risk-adjusted returns in investments that support specific impact areas ranging from literacy to ending poverty. You can learn more at cnycf.org/investment

AFFILIATE FUNDS

Our four Affiliate Funds had an outstanding year of fundraising and grantmaking to support nonprofits across the region. In partnership with the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust, the Greater Pulaski Endowment Fund distributed $27,499 in grants; in addition, the Cayuga Community Fund distributed $73,708 in grants, the Oswego County Community Foundation distributed $32,400 in grants and the Women’s Fund of Central New York distributed $48,100 in grants.

YEAR IN REVIEW | 5
| YOUTH FROM THE DUNBAR ASSOCIATION DURING THEIR EIGHT-DAY ADVENTURE AT DISNEY WORLD | SAY YES SYRACUSE ALUMNUS, AARICK KNIGHTON

BLACK ARTIST COLLECTIVE PLAYS CRUCIAL ROLE IN LOCAL ARTS COMMUNITY

About 10 days after George Floyd’s May 25, 2020, murder by a White police officer ignited nationwide rallies challenging police misconduct, white supremacy and systemic racism, Martikah Williams found herself at a microphone during a rally outside Syracuse City Hall. “Activists were rallying together to support and provide community for Black and Brown people feeling lost and in pain,” she recalled.

“I spoke to arts organizations in the community to make it known that if we’re to continue creating and existing in your spaces, we have to feel safe there, too,” Williams continued. “We’ve had experiences where we don’t feel safe to be our authentic selves or have the freedom to create. It’s not just the police.”

Soon she was invited to a discussion about creating a community to support Black artists, and Syracuse’s Black Artist Collective CNY, Inc. (BAC) was born. The organization presented its first event, Say Their Names, on Oct. 14, 2020, Floyd’s birthday.

“The first thing we wanted to do was give people in our community who were in pain a place to express their sorrow,” said Williams, a BAC co-founder and a performance artist.

A Nottingham High School graduate, she has participated in shows at CNY Playhouse, Redhouse Theater and Syracuse Stage.

A grant from our Black Equity & Excellence Fund supported public arts events and BAC’s professional development and education programs for Black artists. Projects include Syracuse’s Juneteenth Freedom Fest, summer craft fairs at Salt City Market and a holiday market. Read the full story at cnycf.org/ar

| BLACK ARTIST COLLECTIVE MEMBER PAINTS A CHILD’S FACE DURING THE JUNETEENTH FREEDOM FEST.
6 | BLACK ARTIST COLLECTIVE

JEFF KNAUSS ALWAYS FELT THAT GIVING SHOULD BE DONE WITHOUT EXPECTATION.

“I was fortunate to be adopted by my incredible parents when I was 3 months old,” Jeff said. “We didn’t have much growing up, but they showed me that didn’t matter. From a young age, they instilled in me that working hard, having good values, showing empathy and caring about others was what’s important.”

When Jeff sold his business in 2021, he decided to set up a donor-advised fund with us, which has allowed him to give

back in a more significant way. His fund serves as a vehicle to contribute to the community’s greater good while growing and transforming his giving to reflect his evolving charitable interests.

“This is a long game for me and I want to make a stable and continuous impact in the community that has been so good to me and my family,” he said. “I believe that by creating safer homes for children, a strong foundation of quality education, and helping to provide career pathways for young adults, we can work towards breaking the cycle of generational poverty early in life. Everyone deserves the chance to be successful, no matter the circumstance they’re born into.”

Jeff explained that his children are going to grow up in a very different situation than he did and it’s important to him that they develop the same values that his parents instilled in him. He and his wife, Heta, believe that if you make small acts of kindness a part of your day-to-day life, then it will be built into who you become.

“We have taught our children that giving should encompass all forms — gifts of time, talent and treasure,” he said. “Our fund serves as a way to engage them in philanthropy and the decision-making process of where our money goes and where we volunteer our time.”

Read the full story at cnycf.org/ar

JEFF KNAUSS | 7
| JEFF KNAUSS AND FAMILY

TAKING ACTION TO STOP LEAD POISONING

This year we distributed $299,221 in grants through our LeadSafeCNY initiative to support efforts to end childhood lead poisoning in Syracuse. Understanding that lead poisoning undercuts all community efforts to help children reach their fullest potential, LeadSafeCNY tackles this issue through multiple approaches including funding, impact investing and collaboration. Here’s a look at our work from the past year.

HEAT MAP: A GLIMPSE AT OUR NEIGHBORHOOD INVESTMENTS

We released a heat map that illustrates the neighborhoods where our investments have been made so far. Outcomes include strides in lead-free housing construction, existing home renovations, community outreach and training, workforce development, public policy and more. To view the map, visit leadsafecny.org.

GRANT ASSESSING LEAD POISONING SOLUTIONS WITH RESIDENTS

We provided the Center for Court Innovation (CCI) and Planned Parenthood of Western & Central New York with a $40,000 Performance Management grant to lead Kitchen Table Talks with families who have been identified through our Life Needs Assessment tool as having been impacted by lead issues in their housing. We also provided CCI with a $56,000 LeadSafeCNY grant to hire Community Lead Advocates that join families for meals to provide them with an opportunity to provide personal input on solutions to the lead poisoning problem in Syracuse.

$150,000 GRANT FOR LEAD POISONING EFFORTS

We received a second grant from the Mother Cabrini Health Foundation to put toward the cost of replacing exterior doors and windows in rental units resided in by low-income individuals. The $150,000 grant allowed Home HeadQuarters to expand its reach city wide and remove significant lead hazards from affordable rental units.

LEAD POISONING IN CNY: POST-PANDEMIC PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES EVENT

We hosted a community discussion on the rate of childhood lead poisoning in the region. Chris Bolt, general manager of WAER, moderated the discussion, and has been covering issues around Syracuse lead poisoning since the 1990s. Panelists included community leaders, health professionals and activists who engaged in constructive dialogue on solutions to an issue that has affected many lives for more than four decades. You can view a recording from the event at youtube.com/cnycf

| CLAYTON,
8 | TAKING ACTION TO STOP LEAD POISONING
WILLIE
A SYRACUSE LANDLORD, STANDS ON THE PORCH OF THE RENTAL HOME HE PURCHASED IN 1991. WILLIE RECENTLY RECEIVED FUNDING TO REPLACE THE WINDOWS AND DOORS ON THE PROPERTY AND PARTICIPATED IN HOME HEADQUARTERS’ EPA-CERTIFIED WORKFORCE LEAD REMOVAL TRAINING.

OUR IMPACT

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

REALIZING THAT RESPONSIVE GRANT FUNDING ALONE CANNOT ADDRESS OUR COMMUNITY’S COMPLEX CHALLENGES, OUR STRATEGIC INITIATIVES FOCUS ON ONE COMMON GOAL — TO MAKE A DEMONSTRABLE IMPACT ON OUR COMMUNITY.

The Early Childhood Alliance is a collaboration that promotes a holistic approach to addressing the general needs of children in Onondaga County. We provide grant, management and facilitation support to the ECA.

The Human Services Leadership Council is comprised of human service agencies working together to identify opportunities and provide response to basic human needs. We provide grant, management and facilitation support to HSLC.

Our LeadSafeCNY initiative is a multiyear commitment to help decrease the region’s alarming childhood lead poisoning rates through funding, impact investing, collaboration and improved public policy. This year we distributed seven grants totaling $299,221 to support lead-free housing construction, existing home renovations, community outreach and training and workforce development. So far, 1,040 windows and 136 doors have been replaced to eliminate lead-dustproducing high-friction surfaces in rental units and 163 safe and affordable rental units have been constructed or renovated in target neighborhoods. leadsafecny.org

We provide funding, management and research support to programs in Onondaga, Madison and Cortland counties that address the issue of Literacy across all ages.

Say Yes Syracuse provides opportunities and scholarships to remove financial barriers for Syracuse City School District students to attend college. Say Yes Syracuse is now independently governed and administered by the Community Foundation. sayyessyracuse.org

Local community groups provide career pathways to low-income individuals while fulfilling staffing needs of local employers through Work Train. We provide funding for this program.

GUILLEN, SYRACUSE GRADUATE
OUR IMPACT | 9 | ALEZANDRA
A SAY YES

PROFESSIONAL

BoardSTRONG connects talented Central New York individuals with nonprofit board opportunities and provides online resources for nonprofit board members and leaders. We provide funding for this program.

LeadUP CNY is a professional and personal development program for the next generation of nonprofit leaders. Forty-nine participants have graduated since the program’s inception. cnycf.org/leadup

The Marsellus Executive Development Program is an individualized leadership development opportunity for executive directors of organizations within Onondaga or Madison counties. Thirty-four individuals have graduated since the program’s inception. cnycf.org/executive

NEWS (Nonprofit Essentials Workshop Series)

is an ongoing training series designed for nonprofit professionals to gain knowledge on a variety of tools for professional and organizational development. This year, more than 120 attendees from 88 organizations participated in virtual workshops. cnycf.org/workshop

Nourishing Tomorrow’s Leaders is an eight-week training program focused on increasing the pool of diverse nonprofit board members in our community. We assist with program development, funding and implementation.

Our Performance Management Learning Community (PMLC) was a funding opportunity that we established 10 years ago for nonprofit organizations to improve their ability to track data and measure performance outcomes. In the program’s final year, we distributed six grants totaling $105,000. cnycf.org/measure

Our Staff Advancement Initiative is a development and advancement program for non-management or entry-level management nonprofit staff members. cnycf.org/staffadvance

The Leadership Classroom (TLC) helps residents or grassroots groups learn practical skills that make stronger, more effective neighborhood and grassroots leaders. cnycf.org/tlc

COMMUNITY

5forCNY educates individuals on how they can play a vital role in enriching the future of the Central New York community through legacy giving. 5forcny.org

The Community Data Group is comprised of nonprofit and government sector members who gather to share ideas and data and coordinate efforts to help our community improve more effectively. cnycf.org/ communityresource

CNY Vitals & CNY Vitals Pro are state-of-thecommunity websites that provide a common source of data and interactive visualizations on critical topics that affect the health and progress of our region. cnyvitals.org

BUILDING ON OUR COMMITMENT TO COLLECTING AND ANALYZING LOCAL DATA AS WELL AS THE EXPERIENCE WE HAVE ACCUMULATED OVER MORE THAN 90 YEARS OF SERVICE TO OUR REGION, WE SERVE AS A RESOURCE TO RESIDENTS SEEKING INSIGHTS ON SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY ISSUES.
THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION HAS FOR MANY DECADES BEEN A LEADING SPONSOR OF INITIATIVES TO STRENGTHEN OUR REGION’S NONPROFIT SECTOR.
OUR IMPACT 10 | OUR IMPACT
RESOURCE & KNOWLEDGE
& ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

MADISON COUNTY PROGRAM TARGETS MENTAL HEALTH STIGMA

Madison County Rural Health Council (MCRHC) has a message for teenagers: It’s OK if you’re not OK. You’re not alone. And it’s OK to ask for help.

The Morrisville-based organization is taking that message on the road through Teen Mental Health First Aid. The training program for Madison County’s 10th- to 12th-graders (ages 15-18) aims to provide awareness, education and the ability to recognize signs and symptoms of mental health challenges.

“They don’t have to carry all the weight of the world on their shoulders,” said Christine Paul, executive director of the MCRHC. “We want to reduce the stigma around mental health and give them some tools they may not get otherwise.”

Paul, who joined MCRHC in August 2021, is a certified instructor for Mental Health First Aid. The relatively new teen curriculum follows programs that target specific groups, including older adults, firefighters/ EMS and rural residents with barriers to transportation.

A grant from our Madison County Rural Poverty Fund supported training for two Teen Mental Health First Aid instructors

to bring the program to Madison County youth. The program focuses on warning signs, how to talk to friends about mental health and seek help, when and how to tell a responsible adult, where to find resources about mental illness and how to respond in a crisis. It also will touch on school violence and bullying.

“Being a teen is hard, and over the last two years the pandemic has made it even harder,” Paul said, noting that parents, students and teachers have reported additional stress among teens and the need for more mental health services in the county. Read the full story at cnycf.org/ar

MADISON COUNTY RURAL HEALTH COUNCIL | 11
| PARTICIPANTS HEAR FROM AN INSTRUCTOR DURING A TEEN MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID TRAINING SESSION.

CHAMPIONING A CHANGING A YEAR OF GRANTMAKING

EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS

BETWEEN APRIL 1, 2021, AND MARCH 31, 2022, WE RECEIVED $34 MILLION IN GIFTS AND BEQUESTS AND DISTRIBUTED MORE THAN $18 MILLION IN GRANT SUPPORT TO NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN CENTRAL NEW YORK AND SURROUNDING AREAS.

BLACK EQUITY & EXCELLENCE FUNDING

Our Black Equity & Excellence Fund was designed to help reverse patterns of historic underinvestment and build the momentum necessary to create lasting social change for the community by funding Black-led community-based projects that promote and encourage self-sufficiency, embody excellence and address physical and economic conditions that affect quality of life. The fund also encourages dialogue that will strengthen race-related matters and support social and educational growth in the community. This year we distributed 16 grants totaling $254,000.

COMMUNITY GRANTMAKING

We offer a wide variety of funding opportunities, the largest of which is our Community Grants program. We provide grant funding to nonprofit organizations in Onondaga and Madison counties for projects that promote community impact, capacity building and diversity in the areas of arts and culture, civic affairs, education, health, human services and the environment. This year we distributed 47 grants totaling $1,901,497.

RURAL POVERTY SUPPORT

The Madison County Rural Poverty Fund is our effort to support poverty-related issues and organizations in Madison County. We committed to tackling this issue through multiple approaches including funding, impact investing and community leadership. This year we distributed seven grants totaling $58,521.

ADDITIONAL GRANTMAKING

We also distributed 114 small grants totaling $209,381; 4 literacy grants totaling $154,041 including operational support for Imagination Library; and 3 Strategic Partnership Fund grants totaling $60,000 to support nonprofit mergers and affiliations.

TO VIEW A LIST OF ALL OUR GRANTS, VISIT CNYCF.ORG/AR.

| A CHILD JUMPS ROPE AT THE UPSTATE FOUNDATION’S BLIND SPORTS EXPO DAY, AN EVENT FOR EAGER YOUNG PEOPLE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS, SUPPORTED BY A COMMUNITY GRANT.
12 | GRANTMAKING

COMMUNITY: MAKING

INTERFAITH WORKS FUND WELCOMES DISPLACED AFGHANS TO SYRACUSE

Aaban Nazir had been working with the U.S. government in Kabul for 10 years when the United States military began its withdrawal from Afghanistan last August. As the city quickly fell to the Taliban, Aaban, his wife and their three young children were forced to leave the life and home they had worked so hard to build.

“Once the embassy closed down, it was too dangerous for us,” Aaban said. “We left our jobs and tried as soon as possible to vacate the country.”

The family traveled from Kabul to Qatar to Italy, then Philadelphia and New Jersey before arriving in Syracuse in November. An InterFaith Works caseworker met the Nazirs at the airport, and the Syracuse agency has helped the family set up a home, sign up for school and arrange medical care. Aaban now works for Onondaga County, and he and his wife are studying English.

“We had a really hard situation at the beginning,” Aaban said. “Everything was arranged perfectly, but it was still hard.”

Because the military pull-out was unexpected, Afghans arriving in Syracuse had not been included in the nation’s refugee resettlement budget, so agency’s like InterFaith Works knew they had to find alternate resources to assist the families. We provided the organization with a $65,000 grant to support its Afghan Unmet Needs Fund to provide direct assistance to Afghan evacuees.

“They are working very, very hard to start over,” said Beth A. Broadway, President/CEO at InterFaith Works. When the Afghans arrived, “Many had only had a backpack, a duffle bag, and a cellphone,” she added. “Still, they considered themselves lucky.”

Read the full story at cnycf.org/ar

Names and image have been changed to protect the identity of the family.

INTERFAITH WORKS | 13

When the couple began giving charitably together, they both agreed on one thing: They wanted to address issues surrounding children and families who are experiencing poverty.

By helping to finance early childhood education, child care and literacy, they hope

to champion children’s well-being and help to build more equitable futures for all members of our community.

“Gwen and I believe that helping families to get care for their children at an early age has a double effect on the adults and the children,”

Jef said. “The children get an early head start and an opportunity to form additional social bonds. The parents get a break from child care and the ability to pursue employment and career development opportunities.”

When deciding the most secure and simplest way to continue their giving plan, the pair connected with us to set up a field-of-interest fund called the Kay/Sneider Literacy Fund.

“The Community Foundation has a great reputation for stewardship and we knew the proper due diligence would be taken to assess the biggest needs in the community within the areas of our giving preferences,” they said. “Opening this fund has allowed us to achieve balance by expanding our funding to the broader community while still supporting the Jewish organizations we care about. We hope our giving will encourage others to do the same by seeing how deeply we care about the well-being of the community and contribute to a thriving Central New York.”

Read the full story at cnycf.org/ar

THROUGH THEIR WORK IN THE FIELDS OF MEDICINE AND EDUCATION, JEF SNEIDER AND GWEN KAY HAVE SPENT THEIR LIVES TEACHING AND CARING FOR ADULTS.
14 | JEF SNEIDER & GWEN KAY | JEF SNEIDER AND GWEN KAY STAND WITH THEIR DOG, KATIE, AT THEIR HOME

COMMUNITY FUND DONORS

ANONYMOUS DONOR (6)

ROBERT R. & ALICE E. ANDREWS

STEVEN & LAURIE BERKOWITZ

SCOTT A. & AILEEN P. BERLUCCHI MARILYN MUENCH BITTNER

THE BREUER FAMILY

HAROLD BRISTOL

CHARLOTTE BROWN

JANE BURKHEAD & ROBERT S. SARASON EVAN CAPELLA

FRANK G. & DORINDA CAPELLA

JAMES P. CLARK & YASMINE ILIYA

CAROL & CHARLES CLEARY DR. & MRS. JEFFREY M. DESIMONE

PETER & BRIGID DUNN

ETFIDEA, LLC

MARK L. FELDMAN & CHRISTINE RILEY

EDWARD A. FOGARTY

KATE & NATHAN FRANZ

ALLEN E. & NIRELLE GALSON CARLOS A. GAVILONDO

GAYLORD ESTATE

CAROLYN & ANTHONY GERAKOPOULOS

GRACE B. GHEZZI CONSULTING, LLC

MR. RICHARD GREEN & MRS. DOLORES GREEN MRS. STEWART F. HANCOCK JR.

WILLIAM A. & DEBRA M. HILLER

JOSEPH J. & DONNA J. HIPIUS

ELAINE & STEVEN L. JACOBS

LEWIS & JULIE JOHNSON

THE JACOB & MINNIE KLIMAN FOUNDATION

ROBERT J. & LAUREN LALLEY JAN & PATRICK LANE

LARRY & MARY-LYNNE LEATHERMAN

ZACHARY LEE

DR. DAVIDD AND MRS. JENNIFER LEVY BOB & ZALIE LINN

DEBORAH LIVADAS

JAMES MACKILLOP

GERALD M. MAGER

CANDACE & JOHN MARSELLUS THOMAS MARZYNSKI

SANDY & DAN MASTERPOLO

GEORGE & DOROTHY R. MATTHEWS

JANE SLABOWSKI & PETER MCCARTHY

MARY MORAN & JORDAN KERBER RICHARD & CHRIS MOSESON PRAGYA & MICHAEL MURPHY THOMAS MURPHY JR.

JOHN A. & KAREN D. NOVAK

SHIRLEY & LARRY NOVAK MARION R. NYDAM

MAXWELL PERRIN

DANIEL D. & KATHRYN A. RABUZZI

JEFF & JULIE RUBENSTEIN KIMBERLY & ERIC SADOWSKI

DAVID A. SCOTT

SLOAN DELANEY, P.C. ROBYN & RON SMITH JOHN & KATJA SODJA

FREDERICK STEUL GREGORY R. THORNTON, ATTORNEY AT LAW

JAMES & DEBORAH TIFFT

ALEXANDER J. & CYNTHIA A. TORELLI

NORMA WIDMANN

ELIZABETH A. WILLIAMS

IN MEMORY OF IN HONOR OF

ELLEN BACON

WILLIAM LIVADAS

NANCY MCCURN

SUSAN BLAIR

WALTER & THERESE DANCKS MIKE GOODE CHARLES & CINDY HENDERSON

LINDA MILLER DEBORAH OSTRANDER DAVID WICKS

COMMUNITY FUNDING PARTNERS

55 PLUS MAGAZINE

ALLYN FAMILY FOUNDATION

THE BONADIO GROUP

CREWCIAL PARTNERS LLC

DERMODY, BURKE & BROWN, CPAS, LLC.

EITC FUNDERS NETWORK

ESTATE PLANNING COUNCIL OF CNY

FINANCIAL PLANNING ASSOCIATION OF CNY

LEE GATTA, CLU® , CHFC® , AEP®

PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL

THE GIFFORD FOUNDATION

HEALTH FOUNDATION FOR WESTERN & CENTRAL NEW YORK

MACKENZIE HUGHES LLP

MOTHER CABRINI HEALTH FOUNDATION

NAZARETH COMMUNITY IMPACT FUND OF THE SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS OF THE NEUMANN COMMUNITIES NBT FINANCIAL GROUP

ONONDAGA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

THE DOROTHY AND MARSHALL M. REISMAN FOUNDATION

The donors listed in this section made their contributions between April 2021 and March 2022.

THE RULISON GROUP, MSSB THE JOHN BEN SNOW FOUNDATION

SIGNAGE SYSTEMS

SOCIETY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES PROFESSIONALS

SYRACUSE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL NEW YORK

WAER

WCNY

WRVO PUBLIC MEDIA

COMMUNITY FUND DONORS | 15

NEW FUNDS

ANNE S. CROSS FUND FOR THE ARTS

ROWLAND READING LEAGUE ENDOWMENT FUND

In 1986, Pleasant Rowland founded the American Girl doll collection to inspire children to learn about history through storytelling and play. Each doll in the collection represents a different era, culture or event in American history. Rowland served as president of the Middleton, Wisconsin-based company for 15 years, until she sold the company in 1998 and founded the Pleasant T. Rowland Foundation to provide funds for the arts, education and historic preservation.

With a passion for reading education, Rowland established this fund to support The Reading League to help promote knowledge to reimagine the future of literacy education. Her hope is that support from the fund will accelerate the global movement toward reading instruction rooted in science.

The Anne S. Cross Fund for the Arts was established by Anne’s husband, John Rooney. The fund honors the work and life of Anne, a much-loved Cazenovia resident and artist. Anne wanted the arts to be available to everyone and believed that art enriched and strengthened the life of a community. The fund will continue to provide general operating support for CazArts.

UNBROKEN TIES FUND FOR DAVID CLARK LEARNING CENTER/ACCESSCNY

The Unbroken Ties Fund was established in memory of Charles Serway, a founding member of AccessCNY’s David Clark Learning Center (DCLC). The fund was created by Charles’s sister, Laura Serway, to help meet the social needs of those with acquired brain injuries. The DCLC focuses on using art and music to help individuals regain skills and recapture memories lost as a result of their injury and also gives them the opportunity to have social interaction and develop new friendships. In addition to helping the impacted individuals, DCLC also assists their family members by giving them a few hours of daily respite. The Unbroken Ties Fund helps provide art and music supplies for DCLC members, supports community outings and provides operational support for the center.

The donors listed in this section made their contributions between April 2021 and March 2022.

WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE GENEROUS COMMUNITY-MINDED INDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES AND ORGANIZATIONS THAT ESTABLISHED 48 NEW FUNDS AT THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION THIS YEAR. THEY WILL BENEFIT THE COMMUNITY NOW AND FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.
LIST OF OUR FUNDS, PLEASE VISIT CNYCF.ORG/FUNDS.
16 | NEW FUNDS
FOR A FULL

AGENCY FUNDS

ARTRAGE GALLERY FUND

CLRC INVESTMENT FUND

CORTLAND REPERTORY THEATRE FUND

FRIENDS OF CLARK RESERVATION ENDOWMENT FUND

JAIL MINISTRY FUND

JOWONIO SCHOOL FUND

LIME HOLLOW NATURE CENTER FUND

MAY MEMORIAL UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY ENDOWMENT FUND

SKANEATELES EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER FUND

UNBROKEN TIES FUND FOR THE DAVID CLARK LEARNING CENTER AT ACCESSCNY WCNY SUSTAINABILITY FUND

COMMUNITY FUNDS

LEONARD FAMILY ENDOWMENT

CANDACE & JOHN MARSELLUS COMMUNITY FUND

ANNE L. MESSENGER COMMUNITY FUND

ADELAIDE LOUISE SILVIA COMMUNITY FUND

PETER ZEREBNY COMMUNITY FUND

DESIGNATED FUNDS

ANNE S. CROSS FUND FOR THE ARTS

HANCOCK ESTABROOK ADVISOR EDUCATION FUND

LIVERPOOL CHAPTER OF THE BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY FUND

ROWLAND READING LEAGUE ENDOWMENT FUND

SYRACUSE CORINTHIAN CLUB FUND

MICHELE J. WEST FUND

CONGRESSMAN GEORGE C. WORTLEY FUND

DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS

ANONYMOUS #35 FUND

DIANNE APTER FUND

EDWARD M. & MARILYN G. CAMPAGNA FUND

ELIZABETH F. CLARK FUND

DEBENEDICTIS FAMILY FUND

PETER & TAMIE DERRENBACKER CHARITABLE FUND

EMMAFIELD FUND

JAKE & MAGGIE FELDMEIER FUND

JOHN P. L. AND CORNELIA HATCHER FAMILY FUND

JOAN & JOHN HESSION CHARITABLE GIVING FUND

WILLIAM F. HUTHER MEMORIAL FUND

JORDAN NY CIVIC SUPPORT FUND

RICHARD & BARBARA KNAUL FUND

KNAUSS FAMILY FOUNDATION

KOHMAN/SMITH FUND

BETTY LEVY MEMORIAL FUND

ANNE MECKSTROTH MENTER FUND

JOHN & JUDY ROSE FUND

DOUGLAS G. RUSSELL “GOD’S BLESSING” FUND

PAUL & SUSAN SHUBMEHL FUND

ILENE SIEGLER & CHARLES EDELMAN FAMILY FUND

STEPHEN H. SIMON FUND

STAR FUND

FIELD-OF-INTEREST FUNDS

JOHN WINTER FAMILY FUND

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

HILLROM SCHOLARSHIP FUND

HOW TO GIVE

LET US BE YOUR PARTNER.

WE CAN MAKE YOUR GIVING EASIER

Since 1927, generous Central New Yorkers have relied on the Community Foundation to help achieve more with their giving. Our work with you is personal and individualized. Together, we can help transform your giving passions into lasting, measurable impact.

YOU CAN CONTINUE YOUR CHARITABLE GIVING IN PERPETUITY

There is no time like the present to think about how you want to deploy a portion of your assets to benefit the community after you are gone. Legacy planning at the Community Foundation focuses on helping you transmit your values, identify the issues you care about and capture your personal life story.

YOU CAN GIVE FLEXIBLY THROUGHOUT YOUR LIFETIME

Donor-advised funds are simple to set up and easy to operate. They allow you to address a wide variety of issues and fulfill your charitable interests as they evolve over time. The flexibility of the donor-advised fund makes it a convenient option to manage your giving and enjoy hands-on involvement.

INTERESTED IN EXPLORING OPTIONS FOR YOUR PERSONAL GIVING? CALL US AT 315.422.9538 OR VISIT CNYCF.ORG/GIVE.

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE COMMUNITY BOTH NOW AND BEYOND YOUR LIFETIME.
NEW FUNDS | 17

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

TOTAL

MESSAGE FROM THE CFO

In order to serve as a champion of change for the benefit of the local community, the Community Foundation’s financial decisions and performance must be stable yet flexible during changing times. To that end, this year we introduced our new Sustainable Responsible Impact investment pool to offer fundholders the option to generate a market return while emphasizing social and environmental benefits. We have also led conversations within our Finance Committee around the importance and measurement of investing with diverse investment managers.

What hasn’t changed is our disciplined process of focusing on full market cycle performance instead of short-term market fluctuations. Despite market volatility, we met or exceeded benchmarks in each of the measurement periods that we track (1 year, 3 year, 5 year, 7 year, 10 year, 15 year and since inception with Crewcial Partners in 1994). Our long-term, moderate approach, using diversification consistent with our growing base of resources, positions us to be a force for future generations.

While some of the faces on our staff have changed, the team’s commitment to our community has not. The dollar amount of grants we distributed to the community has increased by 30% over the past five years and the number of grants we processed each year has increased by 18%. Meanwhile, our management and general expenses as a percent of assets have decreased by 10%. This is a direct result of the champions we have on staff and our focus on prudent operational efficiencies, which enable us to continue to increase our investment and impact in the community.

TOTAL

SUMMARY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2022

BALANCE SHEET

ASSETS

Investments

$376, 110,860

Receivables & Other 23,143,042

Total Assets $ 399,253,902

LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS

Funds Held for Other Agencies $ 22,885, 877

Grants Payable 1,506, 626

Other 6,870, 891

Net Assets 367,990,508

Total Liabilities & Net Assets $ 399,253,902

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES

REVENUES

Contributions $ 34,296, 809

Net Return on Investments 18,705,535

Other 192,804

Total Revenues $ 53,195,148

GRANTS & EXPENSES

Grants $ 18,128 ,918

Program Support 1,922,412

Operating Expenses 2,097, 443

Total Grants & Expenses $ 22,148,773

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS $ 31 ,046,375

Net Assets Beginning of Year 336 ,944,133

Net Assets End of Year $ 367 ,990,508

The Community Foundation’s audit is conducted by The Bonadio Group. The complete Consolidated Financial Statements, with accompanying footnotes, as well as Form 990, are available for inspection at the Community Foundation office and online at cnycf.org.

$399 MILLION $34 MILLION $18 MILLION 7.7%
ASSETS TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS INVESTMENT RETURN (SINCE 1994)
GRANTS Fixed Income 18% Private Equity & Real Estate 10% INVESTMENT POOL ASSET ALLOCATION Non-U.S. Equity 32% Hedge Funds 9% U.S. Equity 31%
18 | FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ASSETS BY FUND TYPE

n Donor-Advised $149,360,009

n Community $92,016,365

n Scholarships $55,745,478

n Field-of-Interest $40,809,932

ASSETS BY YEAR

$400,000,000

$300,000,000

250,000,000

200,000,000

$399,253,902

150,000,000

n Nonprofit Agency $22,885,877

CONTRIBUTIONS BY FUND TYPE

DOLLARS n Designated & Special Projects $38,436,241

100,000,000

NET ASSET BRIDGE

IN MILLIONS

n Donor-Advised $20,459,403

n Designated & Special Projects $8,653,901

n Field-of-Interest $2,085,312

n Community $1,862,843

n Scholarships $1,235,350

GRANTS BY FUND TYPE

n Donor-Advised $10,252,078

GRANTS BY YEAR

$25,000,000 20,000,000

n Community $2,298,622

n Field-of-Interest $1,515,334

n Scholarships $1,426,361

$18,128,918 10,000,000

15,000,000

5,000,000

2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 n Designated & Special Projects $2,636,523

2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
$399,253,902 TOTAL ASSETS $34,296,809 TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS $18,128,918 TOTAL GRANTS PROGRAM SUPPORT OPERATING EXPENSES2021 Net Assets 2022 Net Assets$336.9 34.4 18.7 (18.1) (1.9) (2.0) $368.0 CONTRIBUTIONS & OTHER INCOME GRANTSINVESTMENT RETURNS FINANCIAL INFORMATION | 19 Graphs represent financial information for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022.

PHILANTHROPY

431

315.422.9538

BOARD

WILLIAM H. BROWER III

KARIN SLOAN DELANEY, ESQ.

CARAGH D. FAHY, CFP®

DANIEL J. FISHER

STEPHEN D. FOURNIER

KATE FELDMEIER FRANZ

MARK A. FULLER, CPA

SUSAN FURTNEY, MPH

LEE GATTA, CLU® , CHFC® , AEP®

CAROLYN GERAKOPOULOS BEA GONZÁLEZ

DAREN C. JAIME

JOSEPH LAZZARO, CFP® , CLU®

LARRY R. LEATHERMAN**

DR. EMAD RAHIM, PPMP, OMCP, CSM, CM, CKF, CCPM

REBECCA BRONFEIN RAPHAEL

CAERESA RICHARDSON, PMP

KEVIN E. SCHWAB

MARTIN A. SCHWAB, ESQ.*

GENERAL COUNSEL

MARY ANNE CODY, ESQ.

STAFF

PRESIDENT & CEO

PETER A. DUNN, JD

FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION

KIMBERLY P. SADOWSKI, CPA Senior Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

ELIZABETH T. HARTMAN, CPA Controller

KYMBERLE BENDERSKI Accountant

GERIANNE P. CORRADINO Senior Manager of Business Operations

DANA C. FIEL Senior Finance Associate

TERRI M. EVANS Administrative Associate

DAVONA LAWRENCE Finance Associate

DEVELOPMENT

THOMAS M. GRIFFITH, AEP® , CAP® , CHFC® Vice President, Development

MONICA M. MERANTE, CAP®

Senior Director, Philanthropic Services

JAN L. LANE, CAP® Senior Philanthropic Advisor

PRAGYA S. MURPHY, CAP® , MBA Senior Philanthropic Advisor

JENNY E. GREEN Philanthropic Services Officer

SUNDAY KULANG Development Associate

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT

FRANK M. RIDZI, PH.D.

Vice President, Community Investment

DANIELLE M. JOHNSON

Senior Director, Grants & Programs

DARRELL D. BUCKINGHAM Program Officer

QIANA WILLIAMS Program Officer

COLBY CYRUS Program Manager

ELISIA GONZALEZ Program Associate

COMMUNICATIONS

KATRINA M. CROCKER Vice President, Communications

JULIET R. MALOFF Communications Officer

CORY SCHAD

Senior Manager, Events & Communications

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT SUPPORT

AHMEED H. TURNER

Vice President, Scholarships And Student Support; Executive Director, Say Yes Syracuse

DANA E. LYONS-CANTY Scholarship and Student Support Officer, Say Yes Syracuse

CNY
CENTER
EAST FAYETTE STREET, SUITE 100 SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 13202
*Term commenced July 1, 2022 **Board service completed June 30, 2022
| OUR STAFF ASSEMBLES IN WASHINGTON SQUARE PARK IN SYRACUSE. WE RECENTLY PROVIDED A GRANT TO TOMORROW’S NEIGHBORHOODS TODAY (TNT) TO REPLACE THE PARK’S RECREATIONAL SPRAY FOUNTAIN. **