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COLUMBUS NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 1400 25TH ST, COLUMBUS, IND. CNHSMEDIA.COM

PAGES 10-13

self(ie) esteem

TWO TEENS CAPTURE THEIR FLAWS WITHIN THEIR SOCIAL MEDIA HABITS. PAGE 20

SOPHOMORE HANNAH JENKINS FINDS A COMMUNITY THAT ENJOYS CHALLENGING THEMSELVES THROUGH MID-AIR EXERCISE. PAGE 19

meet the coaches THESE COACHES LEAD THE PLAYERS ON AND OFF THE FIELD AND MAT. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE LEADERS OF THESE CNHS SPORTS TEAMS

VOLUME 95 / ISSUE 5 / JAN. 29 2016

thetriangle

a flying personality

cover by lillyanne pham


snap!

our policy

MENTALLY PREPARING TO hurl the ball down the bowling lane, senior Blair Bledsoe warms up on lane one at the Columbus Bowling Center Jan. 23. The Columbus North Bowling team participated in the Sectional bowling tournament. “This weekends bowling tournament was a bunch of fun! I am very proud of how I bowled on Saturday because I bowled a 138, which is 28 points higher than my previous pr. As a team, I am very proud of our performance. I like being a part of the bowling team because it really isn’t a team, it’s a family. We joke around and have a bunch of fun!” “Oh I also got to sing the national anthem which was amazing to be able to perform,” Bledsoe said. by hannah frey

our staff EDITORS-IN-CHIEF

Eva Yezerets Laura Pierson

Kristen Dager online news

EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL BOARD

Danielle Sharp unity editor

Lauren Jines Maddie Marks Sarah Tran managing

Emily Vo business manager

Hannah Frey Paige Grider photo

Shelby Tays Emily Waskom social media coordinators

Lillyanne Pham indepth Emily Nelson Katie Prall copy

ADVISERS

Ryan Gunterman Rachel McCarver

STAFF

Hannah Abts Maya Baker Kate Bennett Rylie Day Karol Espinoza Kyla Foley Maddie Gaskill Shreya Hurli Alex Kelley Tazwell Long Tessa McKenney Brooklynn Moore Elijah Peters Albert Schumaker

Zachary Simo Justin Spoon Karen Torres Emily Waskom Tori Wilkerson Ruth Yezerets

THE TRIANGLE IS the designated forum for student expression at Columbus North High School. The student staff chooses all content. Signed columns published in The Triangle express the writer’s personal opinion and not the views of The Triangle, student body, BCSC, administration, board of trustees or faculty of Columbus North. The Triangle practices ethical journalism by providing balanced and fair coverage as determined by community standards. The Triangle strives to achieve 100 percent accuracy by checking sources, spelling and quotes and attaining multiple sources. The Triangle encourages letters to the editor, but reserves the right to reject them for reasons including, but not limited to, lack of space, multiple letters of the same topic and personal attacks contained in the letter. The Triangle will not edit for content, but reserves the right to edit for grammar and length. Letters should be submitted to edit for grammar and length. Letters should be submitted to room 1507 or sent via e-mail to administrator@ cnhsmedia.com. All letters must be signed by all persons involved in writing the letter, which the staff will check for validation. A letter sent via e-mail must be validated with a signature from the writer before The Triangle will publish it. If responding to a publication, letters must be turned in within one week of that publication’s distribution. In the event of death, The Triangle will run a standard obituary. Pertaining to work submitted via social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.), The Triangle will only accept written submissions from the original poster and owner and will only publish entries with the permission of the original poster and owner. The Triangle will not edit submissions for content and reserves the right not to publish them for reasons including, but not limited to, lack of space, multiple submissions of the same topic, vulgar or incendiary content. The Triangle will not publish photographs from Facebook. Posts on The Triangle’s social media pages by readers are owned by the readers and do not necessarily express the views or opinions of the staff. The Triangle is not responsible for their content and reserves the right to delete and report any inappropriate and unnecessary posts. By posting on The Triangle’s social media pages, the poster grants The Triangle permission to publish the contents of that post. In cases when a source’s information may bring ridicule or incrimination upon himself or herself, the editorial board reserves the right to cite the source as anonymous. The Triangle will never use composite sources and pass them off as anonymous sources.


BY THE NUMBERS WE SURVEYED 50 PEOPLE REGARDING THEIR THOUGHTS ABOUT FORMAL 2016. CHECK OUT THE STATS ABOUT THE THEME, PRICE AND HOURS SPENT TO PREPARE THIS EVENT

5 THINGS YOU PROBABLY DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT GROUNDHOGS illustration by shreya hurli

1. A groundhog’s breathing can

slow down to around 16 breaths per minutes and as low as two breaths per minute. 2. The heart rate for a hibernating

groundhog can be around 60 beats per minute to 5. 3. A groundhogs goes 150 days

without eating during hibernation and loses no more than fourth of its body weight.

6% ALONE 52% WITH FRIENDS 42% WITH A DATE

$50$100

4. An average groundhog can grow about a sixteenth of an inch each week.

10%

WILL SPEND $100+ ON DINNER

BALLOONS DROP Sandstorm Darudes

New York, New York Frank Sinatra

LAST SONG

Do you like the theme, “May the Formal Be With You”?

3

5. There are two entrances and as deep as 20 feet or more for a typical groundhog woodchuck burrow. http://blog.nwf.org/2011/01/10-things-you-may-not-know-aboutgroundhogs/

what’s inside? key to college page 6

planning ahead page 8 INDEPTH page 10 -13

(APPROXIMATELY HOW MANY HOURS STUDENT ASSEMBLY SPENT SETTING UP AND TEARING DOWN DECORATIONS) compiled by sarah tran design by maya baker

rivalry recap page 17 meet the coaches page 19


Stop in for lunch or meet friends for dinner! Two convenient local locations: EAST

2353 Beam Road 372-2300

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EVA YEZERETS

resolved to reform

WE ARE HALFWAY through the winter now, and snow days and two-hour delays have played their usual role in the chaos of the publications process. In order to add to the chaos, as journalism nerds, we have decided that we need to change things up a bit, because what’s the fun of sticking with the tried-and-true? We are navigating our current website redesign — look forward to a chic, clean, photo-centric style that will show you the stories you want to see. Check CNHSMedia.com often for updates on upcoming games, performances, stories about your classmates, and even a pod cast. We want our publications to reflect

4/5

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

THE NEWS MEDIA MUST EVOLVE IN ORDER TO BEST KEEP UP WITH THE NEWS AND THE STUDENTS WE SERVE

your views and interests; as a result, we are doubling down on our efforts to get as many informed, balanced, authority opinions as possible on important issues. Check out the News section for pro-con debates with students, politicians, activists and local experts on all sides of the issues. We want your input! Please tell us if there’s something you want us to cover, or an interesting question you would like us to research. We would also like feedback about how we cover the news that matters to you. Is it fair and balanced? Is it interesting? Is it entertaining? Is it useful? Change is good. We like change. Want to write or create an

illustration for the Triangle or CNHSMedia.com? Just ask me or Laura Pierson, my co-editor-in-chief. If you want to get in touch with us, you are welcome to talk to our staff members directly, leave a note in rooms 1507 or 1535, or use the Internet — Twitter, Facebook, email, or leave a comment on the website. My New Year’s resolution? Lose 5 pounds. Wait, no, scratch that. Make The Triangle and CNHSMedia.com an exciting place to work and an even more exciting topic of discussion. Did you see the latest issue of The Triangle? It was about ducks! No, wait, that’s wrong…

ONE-THIRD OF ALL FOOD PRODUCED IS THROWN AWAY IN THE U.S. HOWEVER, 32 PERCENT OF NORTH STUDENTS ARE ENROLLED IN THE FREE AND REDUCED MEAL PROGRAM, AND MOREOVER, STUDENTS HAVE VARIED DIETARY NEEDS AND TASTES. SENIORS BEN THOMPSON AND CHASE MCQUEEN FOCUSED THEIR SENIOR PROJECT ON SETTING UP FOOD SHARING TABLES THROUGHOUT THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN ORDER TO COMBAT BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE

What is the scope of your project? Thompson: The scope of my senior project was to increase awareness of the food sharing table at North. Food sharing tables are helpful in reducing the amount of food wasted but most importantly it provides an opportunity for excess food and beverage items to be consumed by students that are still hungry.

Posters and flyers were hung in the cafeteria as a daily reminder to donate. When speaking to the students, Chase and I wanted to emphasize that it was totally OK for anyone to get food from the table. The sharing table is for anyone and everyone! If there are ever leftovers, they are donated to the Bull Dog Pantry.

What inspired you to make this your senior project? (…) Chase and I began contacting schools across the country that created sharing tables, to get ideas on the best way to implement the project. We presented to the Food Coalition Board on a monthly basis. It was also important to meet with the cafeteria staff, lunch monitors and janitor to talk about the process and work through some of their concerns. I also spoke to the students during both lunch periods to inform them on how the table works and let them know the items that could be donated. For convenience, we positioned the table near the trash can. This made it easy to donate food as it was on the way to the trashcan.

What has the impact of your project been so far, and what do you hope to see? I think the sharing table has had a positive impact on the students there is now an extra source of food. If needed, any remaining food is donated to the Bull Dog Pantry. There has been a total of one ton of food donated in schools in the district. My goal was to have at least 10 items donated each day. Most days we reach that goal but some days the food was all consumed. At North, the amount of food netted at the end of the day is not as much as other schools but still the number of items donated is great. This is due to a couple of reasons: only the freshman class (about 450 students) eats in the cafeteria as opposed to

THE FOOD SHARING table is located near the trash cans in the cafeteria, and any student may take or donate food. photo for The Triangle

an entire (kindergarten through sixth grade) elementary school so the numbers are not in our favor. Another factor is the students almost always eat every food item donated; thus nothing is left after the lunch period. compiled by eva yezerets // design by ruthie yezerets and maya baker

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5/ JAN. 2016 / LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

waste not, want not


SENIOR MADI STANTON has been directly admitted into Indiana’s Kelly School of Business. She will be able to declare her major as a freshman and be able to gain advice to her field of study. Stanton plans to study finance and graduate in 2020.

key to college SENIORS MADI STANTON AND MEREDITH ONDREJACK TALK ABOUT WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE DIRECTLY ADMITTED TO COLLEGE CONGRATULATIONS! year,” Ondrejack said. Ondrejack shares why she decided to study nursing. up. You have been directly admitted into the Indiana “I’ve already been exposed to the field because my University Kelley School of Business. Your hard work has mom is a nurse and I also really enjoy anatpaid off. Working hard to get a GPA of a omy and seeing inside the human body,” 3.8 or higher and an SAT score of 1270+ Ondrejack said. or an ACT score of 33+ was worth it; you While Ondrejack wants to study nursing made it in. Stanton wants to study the field of finance, This was senior Madi Stanton’s experiwhich she has been influenced to pursue ence when she was admitted to Kelley by her upbringing. earlier this school year. Direct admission “My mother and father are both in the allows a student to declare a major as field of finance so I have grown up around a freshman and to have access to an it and fallen in love with it,” Stanton said. adviser in her chosen field of study. Stanton decided she wanted to study Stanton knows that this achievement finance when she was in accounting her SENIOR MADI STANTON will help her to succeed in college. freshman year. She has taken all the busi“(Being directly admitted) means I ness classes offered at Columbus North will be able to further educate myself and is currently doing an independent in order to achieve my dreams,” senior study on Financial Services (Accounting Madi Stanton said. “(My dreams are) to II). excel in the field of finance.” “An independent study requires responsibility to get Another student who has been directly admitted is sework done on your own account and on time,” Stanton nior Meredith Ondrejack to the University of Indianapolis said. story by lauren jines // design by maddie gaskill // photo by paige grider school of nursing.

You have been accepted! A few weeks later an email pops

“(Being directly admitted) means I will be able to further educate myself in order to achieve my dreams.”

“It means I don’t have to test into the program and I can go right into the nursing program after my freshman


6/7 WHETHER YOUR DEVICE BE A PERSONAL COMPUTER, A MACINTOSH, AN IPHONE OR AN ANDROID, THEY ALL HAVE THE SAME USE: TO RUN APPS

WHAT IS AN APP? Q&A WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE TEACHER MICHAEL SPOCK

Q: WHAT, ON A BROAD SPECTRUM, IS AN APP? Spock: App is short for “application”, that could run on any computing device. Though the term app came into use for apps on phones or tablets but Applications have been running on computers for years. Q: WOULD YOU SAY THAT WITH THE SKILLS SOMEONE MIGHT LEARN IN YOUR CLASS THAT THEY COULD CREATE AN APP? Spock: Yeah, there were actually two teams of students who went and made apps won money doing it. In my second year programming

class we spent about six weeks at the start of the year learning how to program Android apps and they were capable of creating their own game apps. In the competition they creating a game in one day. Combined, I think they earned 600 dollars in money and a few thousand dollars in scholarships to go along with that. Q: DO YOU HAVE ANYTHING TO COMMENT ON ABOUT THE APP INDUSTRY? Spock: If you learn not only how to- so many people are users of programming

code and apps. But you become so much more powerful and so much more marketable if you are someone who can create or help design or- you don’t have to be the highest level programmer but having that skill is super valuable on so many degrees. There is going to be a shortage of like a million programming jobs in the economy so people who can create and write apps are going to be able to pick their own job wherever they want it and get paid a lot of money.

TOP 5 APPS NUMBER ONE: SNAPCHAT

STARTED ORIGINALLY AS AN IDEA FOR A SIMPLE QUICK PHOTO SHARING APP BY A FEW STUDENTS IN THE CLUB ‘KAPPA SIG’ AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY (TECHCRUNCH).

NUMBER TWO: INSTAGRAM

INSTAGRAM WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED AS A FOURSQUARE KNOCKOFF APP, ALL IT DID WAS CHECK LOCATION AND UPDATE NEWS STATUS; JUST A SMALL TIME PROJECT BY A SILICON VALLEY WORKER (INC).

NUMBER THREE: FACEBOOK MESSENGER

MESSENGER IS THE SEED OF NUMEROUS CONSPIRACY THEORIES. THOUGHT THESE THEORIES HAVE NEVER BEEN PROVEN DURING DATA ANALYSIS, ACCORDING TO PCMAG SPECIALISTS AND FACEBOOK’S ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF.

NUMBER FOUR: TWITTER

ONLY 30 PERCENT OF TWITTER ACCOUNTS ARE IDENTIFIED AS ACCOUNTS CREATED IN THE U.S., WITH CHINA LEADING IN THE AMOUNT OF NATIONALLY ACTIVE TWITTER ACCOUNTS (THE TELEGRAPH).

NUMBER 5: PANDORA

IN 2014, PANDORA HELD THE AVERAGE ACTIVE SESSION RECORD OF 2.12 MILLION PEOPLE LISTENING ON THEIR SERVICE AT THE SAME TIME. WHICH WAS OVER 1 MILLION USERS LARGER THAN THE SECOND PLACE HOLDER (STATISTA).

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 /JAN. 2015 / NEWS

modern appeal

school survey:

Out of 122 students surveyed … 62% OWN AN IPHONE 38% OWN AN ANDROID

compiled by tazwell long and ab shumaker designed by maya baker


planning ahead scheduling

e-learning days

Current freshmen and sophomores will learn about their scheduling options within the next month.

E-Learning days start on the sixth snow day, teachers will have their assignments posted by 9 a.m. and are available from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. It ensures that students will maintain momentum throughout the snow days.

SOPHOMORES

FEB. 2 PRESENTATION IN THE AUDITORIUM FEB. 9-12 SCHEDULING IN ENGLISH CLASSES

FRESHMEN

E-Learning Hotline 812-418-0252

FEB. 25 PRESENTATION IN THE AUDITORIUM FEB. 29-MARCH 4 SCHEDULING IN ENGLISH CLASSES compiled by eva yezerets

compiled by brooklyn moore

STAY ON TOP OF DELAYS, COLLEGE PLANS AND SCHEDULING

free money In order to apply for need-based financial aid for college, students should have taxes and income data from 2014 and 2015, especially for the CSS Profile, which is required by some colleges and is often due as early as Feb. 1. All students should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is due March 10 for Purdue, Indiana and Ball State Universities.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER, GO TO FAFSA.ED.GOV AND

STUDENT.COLLEGEBOARD.ORG/CSS-FINANCIAL-AID-PROFILE

compiled by eva yezerets

gendered bathrooms INDIANA SENATE BILL 35, WHICH RECENTLY DIED IN COMMITTEE, PROPOSED TO MAKE IT ILLEGAL TO USE THE RESTROOM OPPOSITE OF ONE’S SEX AT BIRTH, WHICH CAUSED TENSION IN THE TRANSGENDER COMMUNITY

Annette Gross, transgender activist: There is a lot of misunderstanding and misinformation about what it means to be transgender. I believe many people are scared of what they don’t understand. I believe that this bill is a reaction to that. Transgender teens become homeless more than any other teen population. They also are more apt to become addicted to drugs and alcohol because of their circumstances … I’m very happy that the bill won’t be passed. It is a flawed bill and not grounded in reality. The transgender community needs full statewide protections - hopefully those will be granted very soon. Senior transgender student: People should be allowed to use whatever bathroom matches their gender identity the best. It doesn’t matter if that gender identity doesn’t match your biological sex at birth. Why should it? We’re all doing the same thing in the bathrooms so I don’t even see a point in separating them by “gender.” When contacted, Sen. James Tomes, who authored the bill, declined to comment. compiled by kate bennett

the right foods

WITH THE COLDER MONTHS UPON US, STAYING INSIDE OFTEN ALSO MEANS CONSTANT SNACKING. A SCHOOL CAFETERIA WORKER WEIGHS IN ON PROPER PORTIONING OF SCHOOL LUNCHES TO KEEP STUDENTS HEALTHY

On healthy “MyPlate” proportions in school lunches:

(Plates should have) 4 oz fruits and veggies, a little main dish. Everything has a measurement. Each mostly weighs 4 ounces. (That’s) kind of know how many ounces things weigh, no matter what. Milk, juice, fruit and a main entre are a good balance ... We’re constantly keeping up with the changing guidelines

On proper nutrition for teens:

It’s very important. Teens are going through muscle growth, brain growth, bone and growth spurts. They need everything to help keep up with body growth.

NYOKA KING CAFETERIA WORKER

compiled by kate bennett // design by ruthie yezerets


SOPHOMORE MATT HARTMAN

SENIOR CHLOE JORGENSEN On the executive order What I understand about the president’s order is that he made it mandatory for a background check to take place before any firearm can be purchased. I don’t think any law abiding citizen should have a problem with that. He isn’t ‘taking guns away’ nor is he in any way breaching the Second Amendment. With so many mass shootings happening here recently, he had to make a baby step

8/9

anticipating new gun laws

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S EXECUTIVE ORDER TO EXPAND BACKGROUND CHECKS WAS QUICKLY FOLLOWED BY AN INDIANA BILL THAT COULD ALLOW ANYONE OF LEGAL AGE TO CARRY A HANDGUNS ON PUBLIC LAND WITHOUT A PERMIT, INCLUDING AT STATE GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS AND PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES

in some direction. This order was probably one of the most moderate I would have expected to see. On the Indiana bill America does not live in a vacuum and the countries that now practice limited gun distribution are some of the safest countries globally. However, I can accept that this country thrives on individual liberty. I think guns in public areas should be limited to highly trained carriers.

On hunting My family has been hunting as long as I can remember, but I’ve really picked it up in the past few years. On buying guns I always look around at different places on who’s got the best guns and what are the best prices, and I usually just either get them [online] from a store, or I’ll go in and pick it up. On the executive order As a minor, (I) can’t purchase guns, you have to be at least 18, so with the new background checks in place, they take a lot

longer and it’s a lot more information, so it’s harder to get them. On the Indiana bill I heard about it on the news. It should be open carry for anyone … over the legal age and you should be able to carry it anywhere. On carrying guns I’ve heard stories from my dad saying, you know, used to, they would have them in the back of their trucks in gun racks, and every teacher and student had one, and the schools were safer. compiled by eva yezerets

legally limiting smoking HAWAII

14.1 percent of the population smokes #3 in the nation 10.4 percent of Hawaii high school students smoke

INDIANA

22.9 percent of the population smokes #22 in the nation 13.7 percent of Indiana high school students smoke

compiled by brooklynn moore // design by ruthie yezerets

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 /JAN. 2016 / NEWS

WITH HAWAII’S RECENT DECISION TO CHANGE THE LEGAL SMOKING AGE FROM 18 TO 21, INDIANA IS SET TO LAG BEHIND HAWAII EVEN FURTHER WITH REGARDS TO DECREASING SMOKING RATES


self(ie) esteem TWO TEENS CAPTURE THEIR FLAWS WITHIN THEIR SOCIAL MEDIA HABITS

story, photos and design by lillyanne pham compiled by emily nelson and justin spoon


“I’m ok” is senior Zach Smith’s Twitter bio versus “Zach Smith, Indiana, Proud Gay” on his Instagram. He believes that future employers are more likely to check his Twitter than his Instagram. “I always hear these horror stories, if you post this and that, you won’t get a job. That’s why I stated my sexuality on Instagram and not Twitter,” Smith said. “As sad as it is, it could be a deterrent for an employer.” But it failed to stop coworkers and peers to judge him based off his sexuality. “I think people that look at my Instagram % of the students say 57 or some of my tweets immediately think ‘Oh, homosexall their selfies are realistic ual,’” said Smith. “One, because it’s in my bio and two, because there’s a photograph of me in heels with a friend of mine.” Even though he is public about his sexuality, Smith points out what people fail to see. “I don’t like when (my sexuality) is the first thing that people think of me, when they see who I am, because I am more than that.” His personality is also judged through social media. “People think I am really preppy. This girl who started working with me was like ‘I checked your Instagram before I started here and you looked really preppy.’” Smith stated that preppy is not a bad description, but it is far from

“YOU CAN POST WHAT YOU WANT; DO WHAT YOU WANT. YOU JUST HAVE TO KNOW THAT YOU COULD GET CRAP FOR IT.”

*OUT OF 300 STUDENTS SURVEYED

68% of the students

have seen a few realistic selfies

10 / 11 JANE PHILLIPS With a pink fur coat, while applying mascara in the car, junior Jane Phillips’s sister captured Phillips in a post-worthy selfie. The caption is, “On my way to my third husband’s funeral.” “I was debating between two (captions) and texted three different people. It was either that or ‘My sugar daddy and I are going to Malibu for the weekend,’” Phillips said . That is not the only advice she asks from her friends. “I’m not going to lie. I’ll take 30 selfies and send them all to my BFFs and be like ‘which one?’” “WHY WOULD There is a certain look she wants to YOU POST achieve through her SOMETHING social media. “I want to be seen THAT MAKES as stylish, cool, funny, YOU LOOK but carefree, like effortlessly cool, that’s STUPID ON the goal.” SOCIAL Phillips states that MEDIA? THEN people have described her appear- YOU WANT ance as “indie.” She TO PUT ON A mocks this term, but appreciates people FRONT.” attempting to compliment her. “If someone wants to talk to me because of how I look on social media, then that’s cool; new friends,” she said. “I think I’m a lot more, like, strange and silly than I show on social media. I look more put-together.” She believes that everybody aims for a flawless look. “Why would you post something that makes you look stupid on social media? Then you want to put on a front.” Moreover, she states that social media is hectic for everyone and an outlet for teens to compare each other.

CONTINUE TO NEXT PAGE

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5/ JAN. 2016 / INDEPTH

ZACH SMITH

his definition of himself. He took no offense to the comment and continued his posting habits: 5 a.m. selfies, poses with his sister and dog pictures. “When you post something that’s not authentic and true, people see that and they start to think about that every time they meet you,” Smith said. “Like ‘Oh, well you didn’t have flawless skin when I saw you the other day, but you did on Instagram.’” He stated that before posting to remember that people know the “real you”. “Social media is your choice. You can post what you want; do what you want. You just have to know that you could get crap for it.” From pictures with marijuana to underage drinking, Smith has seen teens do the opposite of what adults warned them not to post. “I don’t think there is anything you can tell teenagers to change their minds. You have to let them come to the realization. They can only help themselves.” Smith states that creating different personals on different social media platforms does not matter. “No matter how many pictures you post with charities (on Instagram) that doesn’t change the fact that you called a girl a slut on Twitter.” He believes that he sounds like a “hypocrite” because he catches himself doing a similar thing. “Even though I am professional on Twitter, I’m still the gay kid from Instagram that posts pictures of his dogs and himself a lot.” Smith discovered the root of his social media presence. “I just didn’t connect them because they’re two different platforms. I thought because it had a different name — it had different meaning.”


“...EVERYONE WANTS TO PUT ON A MASK AND DISGUISE THEMSELVES AS THEIR IDEAL SELF.”

“Everyone wants to look, as perfect as this person, or have a lot going on, so they have to post a picture if they do anything remotely exciting.” Phillips thinks teens easily fall into their impulses. “I don’t think sitting down and thinking about it comes naturally. People do it on purpose like ‘Look at her selfie, she’s so fake.’ Everyone is really judgmental.” By obsessing over celebrities, she states that social media has inspired teens to have another life other than their own. Phillips sees a solution in people who avoid social media, do not judge, or post mundane routines. Besides that, she relates and sees that teens curate their online persona. “I wouldn’t post about bad grades, broken friendships or manipulated relationships because it’s nobody’s business and it’s too heavy for social media,” she said. “I don’t want people to view me as anything that’s not cute and happy.” She believes that social media is all about people’s outside self. “They’re just looking to see pictures of your dog. They don’t want to hear about your depression or struggles. They don’t want to hear about your parents getting divorced, your sister having cancer or something like that.”

The fact that people know social media is strategized does not change the fact that teens get jealous or depressed about it. Phillips states that if teens took the time to think about it then nobody seems perfect. “They aren’t partying with their friends every day or doing this and that. Everyone lives a pretty average life.” She believes that social media is a tool for people to be seen “in the light they want to be seen in.” Also, she mentions that this is neither good nor bad. The point is to stray away from assumptions. “Not the message would be social media is bad, everybody is a hypocrite, no one can post, no one can post cute pictures with your friends because you’re being stupid.” Her message is for teens to just understand their actions. “Everyone does it. Everyone is fake on social media. ‘Why?’ would be because everyone wants to put on a mask and disguise themselves as their ideal self.”

THE PURPOSE OF SELFIES “They enjoy looking at themselves.” SENIOR TYLER HEATHCOTE “People take selfies because they want to be recognized. Selfies are a chance for them to make themselves look the way they want to look (not like themselves.)” FRESHMAN ANNA HOLLE “I mean if you look good, you gotta share it! Also, if people find good lighting.” SOPHOMORE EMMA WOLFORD “They live life as Varus, the Blighted Quiver does; they seek to spread the chain of corruption.” SENIOR ADITYA MANTRI

IS PERSONALITY SEEN ON SOCIAL MEDIA? “Yes. Most are tools.” FRESHMAN SAM HORAK “Yes, if they are insecure they will use filters and take pictures at like half their face.” FRESHMAN RACHEL SMITH “Absolutely not. People are different in all kinds of ways, and are very complex. Some choose to hide sides of them on social media. FRESHMAN COLE BENNETT

Q&A WITH KERRY CRAWFORD

DIRECTOR OF MEDIA AND STRATEGY

WHICH PARTS OF THE BRAIN ARE AFFECTED BY DEPRESSION?

KEEP YOUR ENEMIES CLOSER


12 / 13

*out of 300 students surveyed

39%

SIXTY-THREE STUDENTS

OF THE STUDENTS

use social media hourly

tell their friends to like their posts

110 STUDENTS

77 PERCENT OF THE STUDENTS

DO NOT TAKE SELFIES

24 STUDENTS

NEVER USE SOCIAL MEDIA

do not own a selfie stick

21 PERCENT

delete their photos with less likes

1 OUT OF 3 STUDENTS VALUE THEIR

NUMBER OF FOLLOWERS ON AVERAGE

48 people SPEND

10 minutes maximum

Q: What is your professional experience with social media? A: I have a degree in journalism and I have a lot of practical experience. My work since I graduated college has been for the internet either as a content creator or strategist. I also teach at the University of Memphis. Q: What is your go-to lesson for your students? A: I tell them that all there is to remember is that social media is just people talking to people. Behave as you would as a human talking to humans. That’s all the internet is. Q: Do you believe in selfies? A: Yes, absolutely, I think it’s really cool that we have the ability to document ourselves as we adjust in time and when we feel good about ourselves. Q: Can you comment on hiding your sexuality on social media for professional reasons? A: I have two female friends who are a couple, and when they started job searching (for engineering jobs), they deleted their relationship

on Facebook just in case it was a factor against hiring them (into an already competitive, male-dominated field). I think that Facebook and Twitter are the most well-known social networks, so they're the most likely to be checked by an employer. For more demographic info for social networks, I highly recommend this: http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/10/08/social-networkingusage-2005-2015/ Q: Do you believe social media can cause depression or the way teenagers perceive social media causes their depression? A: I don't know that I would say it causes depression. I'm not a psychologist. But I think that it can lead to some anxiety and stress. Sometimes, too, it can feel like a burden to feel like I have to post things that are always beautiful and on-brand (for at least my personal brand). Also, FOMO (fear of missing out) is real. I think that even when you approach things critically, comparing yourself to others can lead to negative feelings (even though comparing yourself to others is a very human thing to do).

AMYGDALA - activated by recall of vivid memories. higher activity when sad/depressed HIPPOCAMPUS - stress can repress the production of new nerve cells in the hippocampus THALAMUS - receives and sends sensory information to cerebral cortex PREFRONTAL CORTEX - makes perceptions meaningful CINGLUATE CORTEX - less active in depressed people

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5/ JAN. 2016/ INDEPTH

FOR A SELFIE SESSION TOTAL: 8 HOURS


our deepest

fear

THE PERFECT IMAGE with the perfect angle, the perfect filter, and the perfect pose. That is what is dominates views on social media sites. And while we watch our phones for hours watching the likes come in (or not) thinking that we will get pleasure out of acceptance from others, all we are doing is cultivating the fear in our lives. The fear that if no one likes our post or picture, that we aren’t liked at all. The fear that no one wants us around or wants to spend time with us. This fear feeds into the belief that we are one in a million. We believe that we are the only ones that can’t balance a job, soccer, journalism staff, spending time with family and friends and taking three AP courses at the same time. “Why me?” or “Why can’t I?” are the thoughts that roll through our heads as we scroll through others’ happy posts with their family while they stay in the top of their class and lead the band to state finals. Social media is a strong contributor to what Stanford University has coined “Duck Syndrome”, that feeling

AS SOCIAL STANDARDS GROW PERSONALLY AND ACADEMICALLY, THE TRIANGLE ANALYZES THE MENTAL EFFECTS THAT THESE EXPECTATIONS ARE HAVING ON STUDENTS THROUGH THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA

STAFF EDITORIAL of being alone, being the one in a million that is wrong with the world because we stress out too much or can not balance everything, like so many appear to. This feeling of not fitting in can lead to depression, anxiety, or in the worst cases, suicide. And although social media may be a great mode for sharing your life with others, it is a common venue for the destruction of the mentality of our age group. Although some researchers say that this syndrome is only present on college campuses, many of the same symptoms are being found in high school students across the nation. Suicide is the second largest leading cause of death among young adults ages 15 to 24, according to national data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Feelings of stress, depression and anxiety are the most common emotions leading to the planning of self-harm. In an experiment to combat the effects of duck syndrome, we, the CNHSmedia staff, put together a social media drawing, asking people to submit pictures of

themselves when they wake up in the morning. We created the hashtag #actuallywokeuplikethis for the drawing on Twitter. In addition to tagging cnhsmedia, students are required to tag three other CNHS friends in the post, asking them to do the same. The goal of this experiment was to create non-perfect photos on social media profiles. So that others can understand that social media can conceal our imperfections. Just because you may not look the greatest in a photograph doesn’t mean you are going to lose all your followers. The pressure to be perfect in all aspects of our lives is becoming too overbearing. This situation has gotten out of hand and needs to be stopped before more people get hurt. Ask for help instead of running yourself into a corner of fear, fear that no one likes you because your photo did not get enough likes. Your life is worth more than the fear of rejection. You control your own life.

This publication is YOUR forum. Do you have something to say to the student body? Do you have an opinion to share? Do you want students to learn about something that hasn’t been covered in The Triangle?

Lett er CNH to the E S um bus media ditors Nor Staf t h f Roo H m 1 igh Sc 507 hoo l

Col

This is your space to talk about what you want. Let us know by sending a letter to the editors, in room 1507 with your name and grade.


14 / 15

worth the ride “RIDE ALONG 2” IS A CLASSIC COMEDY THAT IS A CONSTANT LAUGH WITH A FEW ACTION SCENES AND A COUPLE TEARS THAT WILL APPEAL TO ALL AUDIENCES WITH 20 MINUTES to spare, I walk in

expecting to have plenty of options for a seat, but I am suddenly taken off guard when I see that the theatre is packed with people. When I finally find a seat in the front, I sit down with my slushy and candy, eager for the movie to start. The premiere for “Ride Along 2” was Jan. 15. The movie was a sequel to “Ride Along,” which came out Jan. 17, 2014. The first movie stars Kevin Hart, who is known as Ben and is a security guard at a local school, but that quickly changes once he gets accepted into the police academy. James (Ice Cube). who is a top police officer for Atlanta, takes Ben on a 24-hour ride along so Ben can prove that he is worthy to date his sister. The sequel starts off with James and his other partner at a car meet trying to find a top drugdealer. When Ben, who is on the radio, thinks James is in trouble, he

JUNIOR MADDIE MARKS

intervenes and things go downhill from there. Trying to find who is supplying the dealers of Atlanta with product, James decides to go to Miami. Ben is still eager to prove that he can be a detective so he wants to tag along. Right before Ben’s wedding, James and Ben head out for Miami searching for a dangerous drug-dealer. There were moments in the movie that were over-dramatized for sure and couldn’t happen

in real life, but it just made the movie funnier. Despite the comedy, there were also emotional parts. The movie shows the developing bond between the two partners and future brothers. From the beginning, to when James didn’t approve of Ben, to Ben’s wedding, the movie shows how different their relationship is and how it has changed since the beginning. The first movie definitely had me laughing more, but this movie was just as good. Between the car chases, explosions and intense fights, I was on the edge of my seat the whole time. Sometimes action movies can be pretty intense, but “Ride Along 2” had good comedic relief so it wasn’t too much at one time. “Ride Along 2” is a great movie that would be a nice date night movie or just a night out on the town with friends. by maddie marks // design by ruthie yezerets

AS PEOPLE COMPETE TO SHARE THE “COOLEST” SELFIES, THEY OFTEN PUT THEMSELVES IN DANGER. OF LATE, MANY COUNTRIES HAVE HAD TO BAN SELFIE-TAKING IN CERTAIN LOCATIONS BECAUSE OF THE RISKS comic by shreya hurli

design by ruthie yezerets

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 /JAN. 2016 / OPINION

sinister selfies


TUES

16 JAN

winter sports update

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Basketball, wrestling, swimming, diving and gymnastics have participated in many events the past month. Check the outcomes below

won against bloomington south final score: 61-48

1. GOING UP AGAINST two Bloomington North defenders Jan. 16, junior Ashlyn Huffman leaps for a layup.

2. BEFORE ENTERING THE pool, senior Ben

Thompson dives headfirst to begin his event Jan.14.

3. LEANING ON AN East wrestler, junior Cortez Bandy attempts to pin down his opponent Jan. 13.

4. FOCUSING INTENTLY ON his defense, junior NathanVanDeventer prevents Perry Meridian from scoring Jan. 23.

5. POSING ON THE floor, senior Katrina May performs her routine Jan. 11 against East.

1.

THURS

14 JAN

23 JAN

4.

13

SWIMMING/DIVING

won against franklin central final score: 119-64

JAN

WRESTLING

lost against columbus east final score: 12-58

3.

2. SAT

WED

MON

MEN’S BASKETBALL

11

won against perry meridian final score: 47-39

JAN

5.

GYMNASTICS

won against columbus east final score: 111.95-106.55 compiled by sarah tran design by maddie gaskill


WHILE NATIONAL COLLEGE ENROLLMENT DEPOSIT DAY IS MAY 1, SIX SENIORS HAVE ALREADY DECIDED TO ATTEND UNIVERSITIES AROUND THE COUNTRY DUE TO THEIR ATHLETIC OPPORTUNITIES

16 / 17

making the commitment

SMILING AFTER OFFICIALLY committing to play a sport Nov. 11 , (from top-left) seniors Elle Williams, Brice McDaniel, Collin Lollar, (from bottom left) Cori Taylor, Tommi Stowers, and Sierra Lax pose for a picture.

SECOND SEMESTER MARKS a time of great decision making for high school seniors. As other students prepare their schedules for their next year of high school, seniors must now make a much bigger decision in choosing what their future entails. Choices range from college to the military, to going straight to the workplace. For those interested in pursuing a higher education, then the question no longer becomes what will I do, but where will I go. For student athletes, they must factor in what the college can offer them sports-wise. The process these athletes must take begins early on in their high school careers and sometimes in middle school when colleges begin the recruiting process. “There are now middle school athletes who are giving a verbal commitment to play for a certain schools,” athletic director Jeff Hester said. Hester explains the process to which school attempt to recruit athletes, “Depending on your sport and how heavily you’re being recruited, the college athletic recruiting process can vary widely. Top level recruits, especially in the high profile sports of football and men’s basketball, will be sent tons of letters, receive tons of phone calls, and may be offered athletic scholarships before they even enter high school. They won’t have to take much initiative in their recruiting process. For recruits who are not as well-known nationally, they will have to be more proactive in the recruiting process, and they’ll often have to sell themselves to college coaches to get a scholarship or a guaranteed spot on a team,” he said. The steps one takes to commit also varies depending on the sport the athlete plays. “In some sports, there are literally over a thousand colleges with a team in that sport. If you’re being recruit-

ed in one of those sports, you want to know what you’re looking for in a school and narrow down your college list early in the process to avoid being overwhelmed. For other sports, your options are already limited based on the number of colleges with that sport,” Hester said. After a college shows interest in recruiting one of these athletes then its up to the athletes to determine which is the best fit for them by visiting each of the schools. Committed Athletes (as of Nov. 11) Sierra Lax: cross country and track at Belmont Brice McDaniel: baseball at Purdue Tommi Stowers: softball at Western Kentucky, Cori Taylor: swimming at Indiana State Elle Williams: basketball at Academy of Art (Calif.), University Collin Lollar: baseball at Ohio State

“They have visited the colleges and have gotten to know the college coaches. Up until a student’s senior year any visit to a college is considered an “unofficial” visit. That means that a college may invite the athlete to attend a game and even provide complimentary tickets, but nothing else. A student can take an unlimited amount of “unofficial” visits. Senior year the athlete and family should only be visiting schools where this is substantial mutual interest. At this time you may begin to receive offers for “official” visits. You are allowed a maximum of five “official” visits,” Hester said. By the end of their junior year most athletes already know where they would like to attend. Senior Collin Lollar explained how he came to decide

on attending Ohio State. “I visited a couple other schools and Ohio state was the best fit for me. So after about a month after being offered a scholarship. I called the coach and told him I was going there. I liked the coaches and they had really good facilities. They gave me the best offer. I liked the big school, I didn’t want to go somewhere small,” he said. He looked at other schools such as IU, Notre Dame, NC State, Purdue, and Miami of Ohio, before officially deciding, “I wanted to go to IU, but they got new coaches right when I was being recruited and I didn’t like the new coaches so I didn’t want to go there. They were the hitting coaches at Louisville and I’m a pitcher, so they didn’t really suit my needs. I didn’t really like it.” Narrowing down the options requires the students to assess many factors. “The single most important factor when committing is whether the college is the right fit for you academically. One great question to ask is, “Would I enjoy attending this university even if I was not an athlete?” Other factors to consider….Where does the coach see you in the lineup….what is the coach’s coaching style like…..do you see yourself liking your new teammates,” Hester explains how many athletes narrow down the options. After deciding where to commit to this whole process culminates in the official signing of the contracts. Lollar expresses his reaction to finally completing to commitment process. “I was very relieved, because I had my decision out of the way. I didn’t have to think about it for the next two years, while everyone else was thinking about it, so it was very nice. I’m excited, because I’m taking my next step and because I love baseball. I’m really excited to play it in college.” story by hannah frey // design by shelby tays

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 /JAN. 2016 / SPORTS

photo courtesy of columbus north athletics


rivalry recap

THIS PAST MONTH HAS BEEN FULL OF RIVALRY GAMES. CHECK OUT THE RECAP PHOTOS AND UPCOMING GAMES OR MATCHES FOR OUR ATHLETES

1. 1. Trying to pin his

opponent, senior Evan Stavnheim attempts to wrestle to a win Jan. 13. photo by paige grider

2. Leaping on the

balance beam, senior Katrina May finishes off strong with a win against East with the score of 111.950 - 106.550 Jan. 11. photo by hannah frey

3. Leading against East, junior Ashlyn Huffman prepares to make a move towards the basket resulting in a 63 - 21 win for North Dec. 17. photo by sarah tran

3.

4. Hoping to gain

2. WHEN

another two points, freshman Trenton Kelley goes up for a layup for a lost against East Dec. 18. photo by sarah tran

TIME

WHERE

Feb. 5 Feb. 6 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Feb. 13

8:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. TBA

Bloomington North Bloomington North Home

Feb. 2 Feb. 13 Feb. 16

7:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:30 p.m.

Home Connersville Home

Jan. 29 Jan. 30 Feb. 4

7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Jennings County Home Hamilton Southeastern

Jan. 30 Feb. 6 Feb. 13

9:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m.

Jennings County Jeffersonville, Ford Center Evansville, Ford Center

GYMNASTICS

MEN’S BASKETBALL

4.

WRESTLING compiled by sarah tran // design by tessa mckenney


18 / 19

meet the coaches THESE COACHES LEAD THE PLAYERS ON AND OFF THE FIELD AND MAT. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE LEADERS OF THESE CNHS SPORTS TEAMS

What is your favorite thing to do on the weekend or when you have free time?

COACH KYLE TODD What is your favorite thing to do on the weekend or when you have free time?

(I like to) play with my kids.

I like to make puzzles.

Do you have a favorite band or type of music that you like to listen to?

Do you have a favorite band or type of music that you like to listen to?

What is your favorite part about coaching?

What is your favorite part about coaching?

I like most music. It just depends on the mood.

My favorite part of coaching is being present and a part of a young man’s growth as a human being. Athletic growth is fun for a short period of time.

There is no such thing.

How did you get started in coaching?

I was working at the athletic NCAA Compliance at Purdue University when a former teammate of mine asked me to come into the room to work out with his upper weights. After a few days, I changed my career focus, and here I am.

What’s your favorite sport besides the sport you coach?

I enjoy most sports, and I have an appreciation for what it takes to succeed at an elite level. I enjoy amateur sports more than professional.

Getting to see the players mature both on and off the field.

Have you ever experienced the perfect game (coaching or playing)? No. The perfect game would be winning a state championship in football. It would be the perfect game because I would have accomplished a life goal and dream.

How did you get started in coaching?

My high school strength and conditioning coach offered me a volunteer coaching position at Noblesville High School my sophomore year in college. I loved it and haven’t stopped coaching since.

What’s your favorite sport besides the sport you coach? Basketball. I think they’re the most athletic people of all sports.

photos by paige grider // compiled by emily waskom // design by kate thomas

Have you ever experienced the perfect game (coaching or playing)?

(I like) Hip-Hop/ R&B.

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 /JAN. 2016 / SPORTS

COACH NICK SKINNER


a flying personality

SOPHOMORE HANNAH JENKINS FINDS A COMMUNITY THAT ENJOYS CHALLENGING THEMSELVES THROUGH MID-AIR EXERCISE

Finding a way to do something and

a new way to bond with a far away friend, sophomore Hannah Jenkins has found a new hobby called aerial aerobics that allows her to have fun and do it with the person she’s closest with. “It’s new kind of thing that you don’t really hear about often,” Jenkins said. Jenkins has piqued an interest in this style of exercise. It is when a person performs different poses in the air on silk ropes. “It’s a new hobby that I have recently started. I’ve only been to three or four classes,” Jenkins said. “I saw a YouTube video about it and I just wanted to try it so I found the class and I signed up.” Jenkins said that no prior knowledge is needed to participate. “The class is in a secluded room with zen music playing, and there are normally four to five other people there. One instructor that will teach you a trick that she thinks you’re capable of doing. You work on it until you can perfect it,” Jenkins said. Jenkins does not participate alone. She signed up with her friend who recently moved over the summer. “My friend Skye McGillivray signed up with me,” Jenkins said. “I don’t get to see her often so this is a time where we get to bond and hangout.”

Even though the class is only an hour and 45 minutes, the activity brings her and her friend closer together. “The first class I did with my best friend and we did double person pose, and it was really fun,” Jenkins said. However, aerial aerobics can cause harm to the body. “Sometimes the ropes bruise you because they cut off circulation, and it hurts a lot,” Jenkins said. Some parents may be skeptical because it is different and because of what it does to the body. Since no prior knowledge is needed, muscles are sore from repetitive motion as well as it bruising the skin. But for Jenkins, it’s not any problem. “My mom was all for it because she wanted me to find a hobby. My dad doesn’t really have an opinion, but he doesn’t object,” Jenkins said. One challenge she faces is that the studio is located in Indianapolis. That’s about 45 minutes from Columbus. “I can’t drive yet, so I have to have my parents drive me. So, if there is a day I want to go and my parents can’t take me, I can’t go,” Jenkins said. Despite all the travel issues, Jenkins still manages to enjoy herself. “I do it for me as a hobby and for fun,” Jenkins said. story by jocelyn maynard // design by tessa mckenney // photos for The Triangle

HANNAH JENKINS AND her friend Skye Mcgillivray, (to the right) pose for a picture while practicing aerial aerobics in Indianapolis.


20 / 21

on the job

C4 PROGRAMS HELP PREPARES THESE STUDENTS FOR THEIR FUTURE OCCUPATION. CHECK OUT THE ADVICE ABOUT THE C4 PROGRAMS AND HOW IT HAS AFFECTED THEIR HIGH SCHOOL CAREER

“I chose a C4 class because it’s different and unique and it is not like sitting in a classroom all day, You actually get out and do stuff. It has helped me learn what life is like outside of high school and gives you real experience.”

JUNIOR KELSI TYNDALL

CPR and how little time one has to save a life. We also did labs on helping the elders and learning how to make beds and just over all how to nurse a patient. In that year, I was able to learn a lot and it has definitely helped me with today. Now, I’m in Nursing 2 and I have been going to my job site and those experiences have helped me so much as to knowing what my future after high school will look like. “

SOPHOMORE ANGIEALANIS GONZALEZ “C4 classes are more handson and really open up your eyes to a career. I love going into the class and learning more about the field I want to be in. I’m taking C4 class to make sure that’s what I want to do the rest of my life.”

SOPHOMORE MARILU ALAMO

SENIOR NEYDI TORRES

C4 Options

COLUMBUS ANIMAL HOSPITAL is one place students go if they are in the veternarian C4 class. photo by hannah frey

Childhood education Mechanical drafting Welding Cosmetology Criminal Justice PLTW engineering Culinary Automotive Robotics Communications See http://www.bcsc.k12.in.us/Domain/1451 for entire course selection. compiled by hannah abts // design by karen torres

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 /JAN. 2016 / STUDENT LIFE

“I FIRST STARTED C4 nursing last year. I got in the course because I was really interested in becoming a pediatrician. When I first started the class, I was kind of nervous because I didn’t know what I would be doing in the class the whole year, but after a while I really enjoyed learning about nursing and finding out new ways to help others. As the class progressed, we did a lab on how to do CPR. For me, it was really stressful but definitely an eye-opener as to how much work is put into

“I chose C4 because I wanted to see how it feels to be in the dental field and to be more open minded about career paths. In that class, there is a lot of studying but I like that so it makes it easier for me. C4 has taught me to have patience which is needed in the real world.”


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22 / 23

THE NATIONAL ART HONOR SOCIETY IS A COLLECTION OF HIGH SCHOOL JUNIORS AND SENIORS WHO HAVE AN APPRECIATION FOR THE MANY FORMS OF ART. THEY MEET ONCE A MONTH IN MRS. WEAVER’S CLASSROOM IN ORDER TO REFLECT ON OTHER MEMBERS’ WORKS THAT THEY HAVE CREATED. ALL OF THESE WORKS GET REVIEWED AND CRITIQUED BY THE OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CLUB

Q: What is your position on NAHS? A: I’m the President of NAHS. Q: What inspires your artwork? A: The thing that inspires me is when I daydream. It helps me think of some pretty great ideas. Q: What advice do you have for people interested in doing art/joining NAHS? A: My advice would be to practice in order to get better and keep working at it, whatever it is.

Q: What is your position on NAHS? A: I am the Vice President. Q: What is your favorite part of art? A: I find making art very relaxing, and it’s like my way out to express myself. Q: What advice do you have for people interested in doing art/joining NAHS? A: I would tell others to take as many art classes as they could in high school because they are very relaxing and very fun.

JUNIOR ALYSSA LACKEY Q: What is your position on NAHS? A: I am the secretary of NAHS. Q: What inspires your artwork? A: Things that surround me inspire my artwork. Q: What advice do you have for people interested in doing art/joining NAHS? A: If you love art, no matter what level you think you are at compared to other people, do your best to be eligible to join NAHS. We are going to have a lot of fun with it all!

JUNIOR MARINA HUGHES

compiled by kristen dager design by shelby tays

THE TRIANGLE / ISSUE 5 / JAN. 2016 / STUDENT LIFE

SENIOR IMAN ZULKIFLY


new year, new me? THE NEW YEAR BRINGS NEW RESOLUTIONS. SEE HOW NORTH STUDENTS PLAN ON CHANGING (OR NOT CHANGING) IN THE COMING YEAR

Over

Percent of Americans who

ALWAYS SOMETIMES NEVER 17%

45%

38%

How Long will it last? out of 59 students

month

6.8% 8.6% 25.2% 59.4%

make resolutions

one week

Student Resolutionsout of100 students 8%

one way one way

26%

MONEY

40% Don’t

60% of 91 students made New Year’s Resolutions

9%

12%

RELATIONSHIPS

CHANGING HABITS

53%

OTHER

statisticbrain.com activepause.com

one month

6 months

all year

Resolution Success ALWAYS

49%

SOMETIMES

24%

NEVER infographic by karol espinoza

to change or not to change?

HERE ARE STUDENTS’ PERSPECTIVES ON THE YEAR TO COME

“I play guitar as a passion so there is basically no way I could get worse. It is a good vent for stress.” SENIOR SPENCER STEPHENS

“[I chose this] to help me get myself together. It’s a work in progress.” JUNIOR GRACE HUNDLEY

“[I plan] to get better grades this semester and have a better relationship. [I will accomplish this] by doing homework and paying attention.” FRESHMEN ZOE BLACK

“I chose to be more forward with my feelings and not be a pushover. I chose to change this habit because saying ‘yes’ all the time only ends in me spreading myself too thin or me being hurt.” SOPHOMORE EMILY SIPES compiled by lauren jines

The Triangle: Issue 5  

Issue 5 2015-2016

The Triangle: Issue 5  

Issue 5 2015-2016

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