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The Coins of Roman Antioch Supplement No. 1

Richard McAlee


The Coins of Roman Antioch Supplement No. 1 Richard McAlee

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. Lancaster/London


Copyright Š 2010 by Richard McAlee All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced by any means, printed, electronic, or other, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Published by Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. PO Box 479 Lancaster, PA 17608-0479 Library of Congress 2007935566 ISBN 0-9709268-9-8 Printed in the United States of America


Contents Corrigenda

7

Supplement to Abbreviations and Select Bibliography

8

Supplement to the Text

9

Supplement to the Commentary on the Coins

9

Supplement to the Catalogue

11

Supplement to Appendix I: Countermarks

30

5


The Coins of Roman Antioch Supplement No. 1 Corrigenda Page 49, last sentence of second paragraph: “under Elagabalus” should be “under Macrinus”. Page 114, fn. 153: “ANTIOXIEΩN” should be “ANTIOXEΩN”. Page 182, fn. 314: “Dimitian” should be “Domitian”. Page 206, fn. 346 and fn. 347 to catalogue no. 477 were omitted. They are: 346

The flat-topped kalathos is a characteristic attribute of Phoenician deities. See, e.g., SNGCop Phoenicia 87 (Berytus).

The figurine of the animal has not been noted in previous catalogues. It is mounted on a handle, which is held by Baal-Zeus. It is too indistinct to permit certain identification, but it probably represents a bull, the animal most closely associated with the Phoenician god Baal-Hadad (as a symbol of fertility and power). Baal-Hadad was also the god of thunderstorms (as was Zeus), so both symbols (thunderbolt and bull) would be appropriate for that deity. 347

Pages 226-227, paragraph beginning “The rare semisses of Group 1 … ”: footnote 18 should be numbered 19, footnote 19 should be numbered 20, and footnote 20 should be numbered 21. (The corresponding footnotes following the text at the end of the chapter are numbered correctly). Page 227, first sentence of first full paragraph: “during the reign of Marcus Aurelius” should be “during the reign of Antoninus Pius”. Page 235, catalogue number 567: the photograph shows 567(b), not 567(a). Page 242-244: There are no footnotes numbered 83-86, but this is not an omission. Page 402, line after 5a: “t” should be “5c”.

7


8

Supplement No. 1

Supplement to Abbreviations and Select Bibliography

Supplement to Abbreviations and Select Bibliography

Augé & Duyrat

C. Augé, F. Duyrat (edd.), Les monnayages syrien—Quel apport pour l’histoire du ProcheOrient at romain? Actes de la table ronde de Damas, 10-12 novembre 1999 (Beirut, 2002).

Asolati, et al.

M. Asolati, I. Calliari, A. Conventi, and C. Crisafulli, “Le emissioni provinciali di Traiano per la Cirenaica: Nuove evidenze dale indagini archeometriche e dall’analisi dei coni,” RIN 110 (2009), pp. 317-364.

RIN

Rivista Italiana di Numismatica e Scienze Affini. Società Numismatica Italiana, Milan, Italy.

RIC 22

I.A. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey, Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. 2, Part 1 (London, 2007).

RPC 4

C. Howgego and V. Heuchert, Roman Provincial Coinage, Vol. 4 (The Antonines), on-line at http://rpc.ash-mus.ox.ac.uk

Seleucid Coins 2

A. Houghton, C. Lorber, and O. Hoover, Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalogue, Part II (Lancaster and London, 2008).

SNGHunter

SNG [Great Britain], Vol. 12, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins, Cyprus – Egypt (London, 2007).

Zeugma Tetradrachm Hoards

M. Önal, Zeugma Tetradrachm Hoards (Ankara, 2008).


Supplement to the Text and Commentary

Supplement No. 1

9

Supplement to Chapter II Page 40, The Civic Coins of the Imperial Period

The identification of two new varieties of the chalkous (nos. 122A and 612A) demonstrates that the smallest denomination of the Antiochene coinage was struck regularly during the imperial period for almost two centuries, both as a civic coin and as an S.C coin. The chalkous was struck during the time of Augustus (nos. 93-94 and 97), Nero (no. 111), Nerva (no. 122A, this supplement), Trajan (nos. 525-528A), Hadrian (no. 543), Antoninus Pius (no. 159), and Marcus Aurelius/Lucius Verus (no. 612A, this supplement).

Page 50, The Post-Reform Coins of the Third Century

Denarii were struck in large numbers at one or more eastern mints, one of which was certainly Antioch, during the last decade of the second century and the early part of the third century. Double denarii (antoniniani) were also struck at Antioch commencing with the reign of Gordian III, and Syrian tetradrachms tariffed at four denarii were produced during this period. Since there were sixteen asses/assaria to the denarius, the reformed aes coins valued at eight assaria and four assaria were equivalent to one-half denarius and one-quarter denarius, respectively. The reformed aes coins and the silver together provided a range of denominations equal to one-quarter denarius, one-half denarius, one denarius, two denarii, and four denarii.

Supplement to the Commentary on the Coins Pages 160-161, Vespasian, The Orichalcum Coinage

The newly revised second edition of RIC 2 separates the dupondii of Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian with reverse crossed cornucopiae and winged caduceus from the smaller orichalcum denominations struck at Rome for use in Syria because its authors believe that the dupondii circulated primarily in the west rather than the east.1 However, these dupondii are not infrequently seen in trade in the Near East, and David Hendin (personal communication) reports encountering them in Israel over a period of many years. The example of no. 369 (RIC 22 757) shown in this supplement appeared in an auction in Israel and has a countermark of Legion X Fretensis (Howgego, GIC 729). The legion was stationed in Judaea during the Flavian period and the following century, and according to Howgego this countermark appears almost exclusively on Antiochene S.C coins and Tiberian “Commagene” dupondii. At least one other eastern legionary countermark appears on no. 369: a thunderbolt, which almost certainly represents Legion XII Fulminata.2 All of this demonstrates that some of these dupondii did in fact circulate in the east.

Pages 187-191, Trajan, The Silver Coinage

The commentary and the catalogue identified the bearded figure on the reverse of nos. 477-477A as BaalZeus and the female figure on the reverse of nos. 481-483 as Baalat-Hera, that is, as amalgamations of Zeus and Hera with their corresponding Phoenician deities. In a recent article, Kevin Butcher instead interpreted them as Hadad and Atargatis, the Syrian gods of Hierapolis.3 Butcher noted that the coins, which were probably made at Rome for issue in Syria and circulated widely in that province, represented Zeus and Hera in a generic sense and the Syrian deities in a more specific way, concluding: “Like other contemporary Syrian silver depicting familiar ‘icons’ like Tyrian Melqart or the Tyche of Antioch, the images of the two Hierapolitan deities formed part of a religious iconographic tradition which could be recognized by contemporaries as ‘Syrian’.”4

Pages 192-193, Trajan, The Orichalcum Aes of A.D. 98-99

In a recent article, Asolati, et al. published a hoard of aes coins found in 1934 in the Agora of Cyrene which contained 238 examples of the orichalcum dupondius with Greek legend in wreath (nos. 498-498A, this catalogue) and 54 examples of the corresponding orichalcum as (nos. 499-499A, this catalogue), as well as 89 sestertii with reverse Zeus Ammon and 205 dupondii and asses with reverse Zeus Ammon. The hoard demonstrates that nos. 498499A circulated in the province of Cyrene as well as in the province of Syria. Asolati, et al. noted the same die links previously published in this catalogue between a dupondius (no. 498A) and a Syrian tetradrachm (no. 434) and RIC 22, pp. 47-48 and cat. nos. 756-764. Howgego, GIC 472. All of the examples listed by Howgego are Antiochene S.C coins. The example of no. 369 with this countermark is shown in the “Museum of Countermarks on Roman Coins” at The Roman Numismatic Gallery, http://romancoins.info/ CMK-legionary-East.htm. 3 K. Butcher, “Two Syrian Deities,” Syria 84 (2007), pp. 277-286. 4 Id., p. 282. 1 2


10

Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Commentary on the Coins

between an orichalcum as (no. 499A) and the extremely rare orichalcum as with reverse S.C in wreath (no. 504). The article also provides metrological data and die analyses. The mean weight of the 238 dupondii was 12.95 g, the median was 13.00 g, and the standard deviation was 1.26 g; the mean weight of the 54 orichalcum asses was 6.35 g, the median was 6.31 g, and the standard deviation was 0.74 g.5 Two dupondii and two asses with reverse Greek legend in wreath were analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The analyses indicated a copper content for the two dupondii of 83.1% and 85.25% using EDXRF and 81.51% and 85.28% using EDS, and for the two asses 85.43% and 85.66% using EDXRF and 82.95% and 85.81% using EDS. The same analyses indicated a zinc content for the dupondii of 16.7% and 14.41% using EDXRF and 18.48% and 14.72% using EDS, and for the asses 13.73% and 12.56% using EDXRF and 14.19% and 11.90% using EDS.6 The overall composition of the alloy was similar to that of orichalcum coins struck at Rome. There were 61 obverse dies and 121 reverse dies observed for the 238 dupondii, and 27 obverse dies and 36 reverse dies observed for the 54 asses. Using the statistical formulas developed by Good and Esty, there were an estimated 61-68 obverse dies and 147-184 reverse dies used to strike the dupondii, and an estimated 27-46 obverse dies and 48-109 reverse dies used to strike the asses.7 If we use an assumed average output of 30,000 coins per obverse die (see page 22), this suggests total production on the order of 1.8 to 2.0 million dupondii and 800,000 to 1.4 million asses.

Page 287, Elagabalus, The Denarii

The commentary expressed agreement with Butcher’s view that the denarii of Elagabalus attributed in RIC to Antioch are not from Antioch but from one or more Black Sea mints. However, the author has since noted striking similarities between some of the denarii and some Antiochene S.C coins. See Figure 27A below, which shows an example of no. 777 with a portrait of Elagabalus which is very similar in style to the two denarii illustrated alongside it.8 Thus, it seems highly probable that at least some of Elagabalus’s eastern denarii were produced at Antioch.

Fig. 27A.

A

B

C

Pages 327-328, Philip I, Production for Other Cities

The eight-assaria piece produced at Antioch for Philippopolis has the reverse type seated figure of Roma holding an eagle supporting two small figures, presumably Philip’s parents.9 See Figure 31N, with a portrait of Philip II. The four-assaria piece has the reverse type Roma standing.10 The smallest denomination, the as/assarion, has the reverse type head of Roma right bracketed by the letters SC, all surrounded by a wreath. See Figure 31M. The smallest denomination is not published in any of the major references, and is usually attributed to Antioch because of its similarity to the asses produced at Antioch for its own use (see nos. 1004-1005, this catalogue).11

M

Fig. 31. Bronze coins struck at Antioch for Other Cities under Philip

N

Asolati, et al., p. 329. These figures are more accurate than the average weights (12.7 g and 6.1 g) calculated by this author and shown at Table 6 (p. 44) of this catalogue, since the samples are much larger. The mean weight of 12.95 g for the dupondius is closer to the Roman standard of 13.19 g (see Table 6) and reinforces the conclusion that the coin was a dupondius. 6 Asolati, et al., p. 325. 7 Asolati, et al., pp. 340-343. 8 The SC coin is from Münz Ritter on-line catalogue, March 2008. (See also no. 777(c)/2, of similar style.) The denarius with reverse legionary standards is from the author’s collection. The denarius with reverse quadriga bearing stone of Elagabal is from Triton 6, 14-15 Jan. 2003, 1053. 9 G.H. Hill, A Catalogue of Coins in the British Museum, Catalogue of the Greek Coins of Arabia, Mesopotamia, and Persia (London, 1922) (BMCArabia), nos. 4-10 at pp. 42-43, and commentary at p. xli. The coin illustrated is from the author’s collection. 10 BMCArabia nos. 1-3 at p. 42. 11 Butcher, Phil & Sam, p. 78, where several examples in museum collections are noted, all attributed to Antioch. The example illustrated here is from the author’s collection, ex CNG Electronic Auction 235, 364, where it was attributed to Antioch. The coin was struck from the same obverse die as no. 1005, this catalogue. 5


Supplement to the Catalogue

Supplement No. 1

11

Supplement to the Catalogue

37A

70C

71A

34-35. Year 11 Pompeian Era = 56/55 B.C. Æ 20 (tetrachalkon) The author has not seen any Pompeian-era coins clearly dated Year 11 (AI or IA), although he has seen coins dated Year 14 (ΔI or IΔ) which could easily be mistaken for coins of Year 11. The existence of coins dated Year 11 requires confirmation. 37A. Year 13 Pompeian Era = 54/53 B.C. Æ 27 (trial strike?) This unique trial piece, which in the catalogue was referenced to Malter Galleries, Oct. 2002, subsequently appeared at Triton 9, 9 Jan. 2006, 1045, where its weight was recorded as 16.39 g and its die axis as 12h. A better photograph is added, courtesy of CNG. 70C. Year 25 Caesarean Era = 25/24 B.C. Æ 20 (tetrachalkon) Same as no. 58, but in ex., KE, and cornucopia to l. of seated Zeus. MC (6.37 g; 12 h). (Ex. Rare) This coin confirms Butcher 33.2a, which was based on “Seyrig cast (date unclear)”. 71A. Year 28 Caesarean Era = 22/21 B.C. Æ 20 (tetrachalkon) Same as no. 58, but in ex., KH(?), and cornucopia to l. of seated Zeus. Malter Galleries 90, 21 Sept. 2008, 1053. (Ex. Rare)

73B

75A

76

73B. Year 33 Caesarean Era = 17/16 B.C. Æ 20 (tetrachalkon) Same as no. 58, but in ex., ΓΛ, and cornucopia to l. of seated Zeus. MC (7.56 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) Butcher 37a published a coin possibly of this date (“date unclear”) in the Fitzwilliam Museum, but with no symbol to l. of seated Zeus. This coin confirms the date, which is the latest known for the pre-imperial bronze coins of Antioch. 75A. Year 5 Pompeian Era = 62/61 B.C. Æ 19 (trichalkon) Same as no. 74, but in ex., E. MC (5.80 g; 12 h). (Ex. Rare) This date has not previously been reported. Since the date-numeral in the exergue is often at least partly off the flan, it may be difficult to distinguish E from Γ. In fact, the coin supposedly dated Γ shown in the catalogue (no. 74) is struck from the same obverse die as this coin, and may be another coin of Year 5 rather than Year 3. There are, however, coins on which the date-numeral Γ can be clearly seen, e.g., Butcher Plate 1, 1b. 76. Year 9 Pompeian Era = 58/57 B.C. Æ 16 (trichalkon) Same as no. 74, but in ex., Θ. MC (5.81 g; 1h). (Ex. Rare) The author stated (at p. 80, fn. 53) that the existence of this variety was doubtful and that the only published example, supposedly in London, could not be located. However, this coin has a date in the form O , which cannot be omega and must therefore be theta, standing for Year 9 of the Pompeian Era. The coin is smaller in diameter and thicker than the examples with other dates seen by the author.


12

Supplement No. 1

77. Year 19 Pompeian Era = 48/47 B.C. Æ 23 (trichalkon) VAuctions 243, 11 March 2010, 38 (8.64 g). (V. Rare) At p. 39 of the text, the author used the figure of 9.57 g from a single coin of this type in Paris (RPC 4217) to determine the weight relationship between the heavy trichalkons of Year 19 and the corresponding tetrachalkons, and calculated it as 82%. The corrected weight of the example in the author’s collection, listed in the catalogue as 9.6 g, is 9.68 g. A third example (Münzhandlung Ritter GmbH, MA Shops, March 2010) weighs 9.95 g. The wellpreserved example listed here provides a fourth weight, giving a mean of 9.46 g for the four examples, equal to 81% of the mean weight of the tetrachalkon (11.73 g). 83A. Year 11 Caesarean Era = 39/38 B.C. Æ 16 (dichalkon) Same as no. 83, but no AI below grapes, and to left of left wheat stalk, in very small letters, I above A. MC (3.30 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) 96A. Year 42 Actian Era = A.D. 11/12 Æ 17 (dichalkon) Same as no. 89, but in rev. field, B – M. MC (4.32 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) The author listed a trichalkon and a chalkous with this date in the catalogue (nos. 96 and 97), and noted in footnote 75 that “Butcher 56b is a dichalkon of the Tyche/tripod variety supposedly dated Year 42, but this is based only on a note by Seyrig and is unconfirmed.” This coin confirms the existence of dichalkons dated Year 42. 97. Year 42 Actian Era = A.D. 11/12 Æ 14 (chalkous) MC (2.52 g; 12h).12 (V. Rare) This newly discovered example confirms the previously uncertain legends. The obverse is anepigraphic; the reverse has ANTI upwards at left, OXEΩN downwards at right, and B – M in the lower field. 111. Year 114 Caesarean Era = A.D. 65/66 Æ14 (chalkous) For an example of the undated variety with rev. legend XAΛ – KOYΣ counterclockwise from lower r., see SNGHunter 2841 (1.63 g; 12h). A second undated (and anepigraphic) variety is listed as no. 111A below. A third undated variety was probably struck during the time of Nerva and is listed as no. 122A below. 111A. Uncertain Date Æ 12 (chalkous) Obv. Dr. bust or head of Artemis r. Rev. Bow in case and quiver. Courtesy of Frank Kovacs (1.77 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) This coin is anepigraphic and is quite different in style from the examples dated Year 114. It may have been struck during a different period. See also no. 122A below.

Supplement to the Catalogue 122A. Probably c. Year 145 Caesarean Era = A.D. 96/97 Æ 13 (chalkous) Obv. Dr. bust of Artemis r., with crescent on diadem. Rev. XAΛK – OYC, from upper r. Bow in case and quiver. MC (1.81 g; 11 h). (V. Rare) This undated coin bearing the legend “Chalkous” is similar to the variety dated Year 114 (no. 111), but it differs in a number of details: the position of the quiver is inverted (the quiver strap is to the right instead of to the left); the rev. legend omits the date and uses the letter C instead of Σ; and both the types and the fabric are more compact. The portrait of Artemis resembles that of Apollo on the dichalkons dated Year 145 (compare this coin with no. 119/1), and the use of C rather than Σ is consistent with a later date than the coins dated Year 114. It seems likely that this variety was not struck in the time of Nero, but instead was struck in the time of Nerva as part of the issue dated Year 145. 133. Year 194 Caesarean Era = A.D. 145/146 Æ 17 (trichalkon) (f) 4 SNGHunter 2987 (2.57 g; 12h) . (Ex. Rare) The numeral-letter is not described in SNGHunter but is visible in the plate to the right of the garland on the altar. This is the same coin listed in this catalogue as no. 133(e) (supposedly with no numeral-letter, based on the description in Hunter 3, 198.) 134. Year 194 Caesarean Era = A.D. 145/146 Æ 17 (trichalkon) (d) B (and ЄTOYC spelled in full rather than abbreviated) CNG Electronic Auction 238, 11 Aug. 2010, 258 (3.11 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) 135. Year 194 Caesarean Era = A.D. 145/146 Æ 17 (trichalkon) (e) A MC (2.30 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) 137. Year 194 Caesarean Era = A.D. 145/146 Æ 16 (trichalkon) Rusty Romans Ancient Coins, VCoins 9/09 (2.7 g). (Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 146. Year 195 Caesarean Era = A.D. 146/147 Æ 17 (trichalkon) (c) B ancientart-jerusalem, eBay item N. 230465593280 (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue.

This example plus the three listed in the catalogue give a mean weight of 2.54 g for four specimens, compared to a mean of 2.63 g for two specimens given in RPC and quoted in this book’s Table 5. The mean weight of 7.21 g for the contemporary Zeus/Ram coins is 2.84 times as much, which is consistent with the interpretation of no. 97 as a chalkous and the Zeus/Ram coins as trichalkons. 12


Supplement to the Catalogue

Supplement No. 1

122A 77-2

83A

134(d)

96A

135(e)

97-2

137

111A

146(c)

13


14

Supplement No. 1

149. Year 195 Caesarean Era = A.D. 146/147 Æ 14 (dichalkon) (d) No numeral-letter. MC = Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/A015 (1.38 g; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. The rev. legend on this example is clockwise, so the description of this type is revised to state that the rev. legend is “clockwise or counterclockwise”. In addition, on this example the Є in the date is retrograde. 159B. Year 212(?) Caesarean Era = A.D. 163/164 Æ 15 (trichalkon) Obv. … MHTPO. Towered, dr. and veiled bust of Tyche r. Rev. ЄT … Eagle stg. r. on garlanded altar holding leg and thigh of animal; to r. of altar, Θ. Malter Galleries 90, 21 Sept. 2008, 1055. (Ex. Rare) The date on this coin is not legible, but it resembles no. 159A (which has an eagle stg. facing on altar holding leg and thigh of animal), and is presumably dated ЄTOYC BIC (Year 212). 169A. Æ 11 (dichalkon?) This coin was listed in the catalogue as a civic coin of the late second century or early third century, but new information from Oliver Hoover indicates that it is actually a Seleucid coin struck in pre-Roman times. The legend “ANTIOX…” refers not to the city of Antioch but to one of the Seleucid monarchs named Antiochus. 170. Æ 15 (1/12 nummus) (i) Є over Δ Gert Boersema Ancient Coins, VCoins, Oct. 2008 (1.33 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 171. Æ 15 (1/12 nummus) (d) Δ eBay Item No. 280276979808, Oct. 2008. A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (h) H CNG Electronic Auction 192, 23 July 2008, 289 (1.73 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 172A. Æ 17 (1/12 nummus) Same as no. 172, but obv. legend GENIO ANTIOCHENI, and Є in rev. field. MC = CGB Monnaies 43, 29 April 2010, 977 (1.63 g; 12h) (Ex. Rare). Photo courtesy of CGB. 191. Æ 36 (sestertius?) Triton XI, 8-9 Jan. 2008, 874 (25.98 g) (Rare). This coin, perhaps the finest known example, was only illustrated as an enlargement in Fig. 11A at p. 56. The denomination remains uncertain because no analysis has been reported of its metallurgical composition, but the similarities in its module and weight to those of the sestertii of Augustus with CA in wreath, struck in Asia Minor, make it very likely that it is a sestertius. 13

Supplement to the Catalogue 207. Æ 27 (as) (b) Dot to r. of S.C. Peus 398, 27 April 2009, 739 (16.55 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (d) No dot below S.C. MC = CNG 78, 14 May 2008, 1414 (15.04 g; 12 h); MC = CNG Electronic Auction 191, 9 July 2008, 96 (15.72 g; 12h). The first coin shows that the letter G in AVGVSTVS in the obverse legend lacks the distinctive stroke projecting from the bottom which is characteristic of Augustus’s lifetime Antiochene S.C issues, and instead resembles the letter C. This appears to be typical for Augustus’s posthumous S.C coins,13 but it previously escaped the author’s notice because the examples in hand all lacked that portion of the obverse legend (see p. 121, nos. 207-208). The second coin has the countermark ΓA|Є (Howgego, GIC 524), meaning “Gaius, Year 5”, corresponding to A.D. 41. This coin shows very little wear, which is consistent with its having been struck a number of years after the death of Augustus in A.D. 14. 208. Æ 27 (as) (a) Dot above S.C. Elsen 94, 15 Dec. 2007, 791 (14.38 g). The legible portion of the obverse legend on this example includes AVGVSTVS, with the letter G resembling C, as discussed under no. 207 above. (V. Rare) (c) Dot below S.C. eBay Item No. 300208711385 (16.3 g). (Ex. Rare) 213. AR tetradrachm fngcoins, eBay no. 260550240213, Feb. 2010 (13.9 g) (Ex. Rare). This is the second known example, and it shows that the letter to the left of Zeus (described in the catalogue as “M with dot above it”) is actually a monogram of M with a small I above the left apex, a small P above the right apex, and a dot (O?) between them. 217. Æ 27 (as) (a) Dot above S.C. MC (15.44 g; 12h). This example has an unpublished countermark: a monogram in a rectangular incuse consisting of a large P with I at the upper left leg and Π at the upper right leg. Compare Howgego, GIC 606. 218. Æ 21 (semis) (d) No dot. J. Jencek Ancient Coins & Antiquities, VCoins, March 2010 (6.35 g). This example has an unpublished countermark: B in a rectangular incuse. See Howgego, GIC 751 - 770 for similar countermarks with “B”, none of which appears on coins of Antioch and none of which is as early as this. Compare Howgego, GIC 548 (KOB, probably signifying 2 quadrantes). 234. AR tetradrachm J. Jencek Ancient Coins & Antiquities, VCoins, July 2008 (14.40 g); CNG 82, 16 Sept. 2009, 832 (14.16; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety (the Jencek example), which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue.

For two other examples, see Butcher, Plate 3, 59 iv, and Kunker 124, 16 March 2007, 8732.


Supplement to the Catalogue

Supplement No. 1

149(d) 207(d)-2

159B

170(i)

208(a)

171(d) 208(c) 171(h)

172A

191-4

207(b)

207(d)-1

213-2

217(a)-3

218(d)

234

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16

Supplement No. 1

243. AR tetradrachm CNG 82, 16 Sept. 2009, 833 (14.59; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 245. Æ 26 (as) (f) Dot below S.C (dot on circle). Dr. Claus W. Hild Numismatik, MA Shops, June 2008 (13.83 g). (Ex. Rare) 250. Æ 24 (as) (a) Dot above. Holyland Numismatics, VCoins, June 2008 (14.57 g). The legend on this example is clearly legible, confirming this variety. (b) Dot to r. J. Jencek Ancient Coins & Antiquities, VCoins, March 2008. This example has a countermark not previously reported on an S.C coin (Howgego, GIC, Supplementary Countermarks 501.1, on a Tiberian “Commagene” dupondius). Howgego described it as “possibly a bird’s head”; this coin clearly shows it to be the head of an eagle facing r. 251. Æ 20 (semis) (e) Dot to l. (on circle). Sphinx Numismatics, VCoins, Oct. 2008 (6.75 g). (Ex. Rare) 282. Æ 25 (as) (c) (IMP. NER)O CLA. CAES. AVG. GER. No dot. MC (14.41 g; 12h). (V. Rare) The obverse legend on this coin varies from the one listed in the catalogue because there is an “S” at the end of “CAES.” Also, on the three examples of no. 282 illustrated in the catalogue the obverse legend begins from the upper right, but on this example the legend begins from the lower left. 286. Æ 20 (semis) (b) Dot below (on circle). Münzhandlung Ritter, Jan. 2009 (8.51 g). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 295A. Æ 29 (as) Same as no. 295, but double-headed lituus. Peus 398, 27 April 2009, 741 (14.38 g). (Ex. Rare) The symbol is irregular and the portrait is of an odd style, but the coin appears to be genuine. 311. Æ 29 (as) CNG 78, 14 May 2008, 1420 (13.55 g; 12h). (Scarce) This example was struck from the same obverse die as the author’s example of no. 312(a), shown in the catalogue, illustrating another die linkage between the “name and wreath coins” with the ethnic of Antioch and the S.C coins. 312. Æ 29 (as) (a) Dot to l. of Galba’s head. Courtesy of Frank Kovacs (16.70 g). This example has a countermark of an anchor between A and N, which Howgego (GIC 373) listed as occurring on S.C coins of Claudius, Nero, and Otho, but which has not previously been published on an SC coin of Galba.

Supplement to the Catalogue 317. Æ 29 (as) Courtesy of Frank Kovacs (14.56 g). This example has a countermark of an anchor between A and N, which Howgego (GIC 373) listed as occurring on SC coins of Claudius, Nero, and Otho, but which has not previously been published on a coin with “name in wreath” reverse. 319. Æ 28 (as) Gemini 6, 10 Jan. 2010, 787 (13.95 g). This example has a countermark consisting of the letters LVS in a rectangular incuse. Howgego (GIC 597) listed the countermark as occurring on two unidentified coins of Nero, and did not consider it to be a legionary countermark. S.N. Gerson, “A New Countermark of the Fifth Legion,” Israel Numismatic Research 1 (2006), pp. 97-99, published this coin and interpreted the countermark as referring to Legio V Scythica, although Legion IV was named Scythica and Legion V was named Macedonica. 323. Æ 23 (semis) (a) Dot above. Sayles & Lavender, VCoins, Sept. 2008 (8.95 g; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. Same obverse die as nos. 318 and 323(c)/1. 363. Æ 20 (semis) (c) Dot to r. David Vagi, eBay Item No. 3014202513, at wildwinds.com./coins/ric/vespasian/ RPC_2011.1. (Ex. Rare)


Supplement to the Catalogue

243

245(f)

250(a)-2

250(b)-2

251(e)

Supplement No. 1

295A

311-2

312(a)-2

317-2

319-2

282(c)-3

323(a)

286(b)

363(c)

17


18

Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

367. COS. V = A.D. 74 Æ 28 (as) MC (13.08 g; 11h); MC = Triton 13, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/A039 (16.46 g; 11h). (V. Rare) Two photographs are added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. These are the second and third published specimens; the first (see RPC 2, 2007) is in the Berlin collection. All three coins are struck from the same obverse die, and the two shown here are also struck from the same reverse die. Their fabric resembles that of the undated S.C asses (nos. 362 and 364) rather than the smaller, thicker flans characteristic of the COS. IIII asses (no. 366). Butcher14 grouped the COS. V asses with the undated ones as “Issue 2,” but despite the similarity of fabric there are significant differences between the dated coins and the undated ones: the dated coins have a bust with drapery on the near shoulder (as do the Group 10 tetradrachms), while the undated coins have a head with no drapery. In addition, the dated coins do not have a dot (officina mark) adjacent to the S.C, while the undated coins do, and the dated coins are known only in the larger denomination, while the undated coins appear in two denominations. Moreover, the undated coins are die-linked to the “name and wreath” coins dated Year 125 (A.D. 76/77),15 so they were probably not struck at the same time as the coins dated COS. V (A.D. 74). On the first example shown there is a circular line visible below the obverse legend similar to that seen on Vespasian’s Syrian denarii and aurei dated COS. IIII and the Group 10 tetradrachms (see discussion at p. 159). The author continues to favor the attribution of all the coins dated COS. IIII or COS. V to the same mint which produced the Group 10 tetradrachms, which in this author’s view was more probably Tyre than Antioch.

389B. COS. VIII = A.D. 80-81 Æ 28 (orichalcum dupondius) Obv. IMP. T. CAES. DIVI. VESP. F. AVG. P.M. Radiate head of Titus r. Rev. COS. VIII CENS. TR. POT. P.M.T.P. Winged caduceus between crossed cornucopiae. RIC 22 --; MC = Pegasi Numismatics 22, 20 April 2010, 444 (11.53 g). (Ex. Rare) This unique coin is clearly patterned after the similar dupondii issued under Vespasian, which were part of an issue of four orichalcum denominations intended for circulation in the east (see no. 369 above and Supplement to the Commentary at p. 9 above).

369. COS. V = A.D. 74 Æ 26 (orichalcum dupondius) Archaeological Center 41, 2 Oct. 2007, 55. This coin has a countermark of the Tenth Legion (Howgego, GIC 729), which demonstrates that these dupondii circulated in the east.

409. Æ 28 (as) (d) Dot to r. Tom Cederlind Numismatics & Antiquities, VCoins, July 2008 (13.67 g). (Ex. Rare)

388. COS. III = A.D. 74 Æ 26 (orichalcum dupondius) RIC 22 (Vespasian) 767; eBay Item No. 350046245251. (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this rare hybrid, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue.

406. Æ 28 (as) (d) No dot. Ancient Art Jerusalem, eBay Item No. 330276656692, Oct. 2008. This example has a countermark of a thunderbolt, which is the symbol of Legion XII. Howgego, GIC 472 listed the countermark as appearing on S.C coins of Augustus and Claudius only, although another countermark of Legion XII (GIC 737) occurs on coins of Domitian. This coin confirms that the thunderbolt countermark was applied during or after the reign of Domitian. 407. Æ 28 (as) (d) Δ Höhn 66, 5 Dec. 2009, 699 (16.80 g). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (f) 2 J&C’s Coins, eBay Item No. 290214201049, Aug. 2008 (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. Note the form of digamma, which is different from the usual 4. (h) H CNG Electronic Auction 181, 6 Feb. 2008, 228 (12.77 g; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue.

412. Æ 22 (semis) (d) B (horizontal, directly above the wreath ties). Peus 398, 27 April 2009, 743 (7.63 g). (Ex. Rare) 421. Æ 29 (as) (l) No numeral-letter. Hirsch 260, 1214 Feb. 2009, 2003. (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 485. AR didrachm Elisha Coins, eBay Item No. 290258548814 (7.6 g). (Ex. Rare) A photograph of a better example of this variety is added, clearly showing the aegis on Trajan’s neck.

Butcher, pp. 351-52. There is a die linkage between a “name and wreath” coin with a head of Titus (BMC 239) and an undated SC coin with a head of Titus (Paris 308). 14 15


Supplement to the Catalogue

367-1

367-2

369-2

388

389B

406(d)-2

407(d)

Supplement No. 1

407(f)

407(h)

409(d)

412(d)

421(l)

485-2

19


20

Supplement No. 1

487. Æ 26 (as) (g) Z Roma Numismatics, VCoins Aug. 2008 (15.73 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 488. Æ 22 (semis) (h) H Senatus Consulto, eBay Item No. 330323875917 (7.43 g). (Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 489. Æ 27 (as) (a) A Effler Coll. (17.32 g); eBay Item No. 260284307040 (12.3 g). (Rare) The first example, from the same dies as the Milan coin illustrated in the catalogue, confirms that the numeral-letter is A; it is faint but visible in the photograph. The second example, from different dies, has a clear numeral-letter. The “coin” in the author’s collection weighing 9.63 g (listed in the catalogue but not illustrated) is actually a deceptive modern cast with a simulated desert patina, but with file marks (hiding the seam) visible on the edge. (c) Γ Bassem Daou, eBay Sept. 2009; MC (18.14 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) The numeralletter appears at first glance in the photographs to be I, but closer examination reveals it to be Γ. (e) Є Numismatik Lanz, eBay No. 370171566881 (11.66 g). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 490. Æ 27 (as) (b) B MC (15.55 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 491. Æ 27 (as) (f) I This variety listed by Dieudonné remains unconfirmed, and is probably a misreading of Γ (cf. no. 489(c) above). 495. Æ 21 (semis) (b) A Triton XII, 6-7 Jan. 2009, 1250 (5.07 g). (Ex. Rare) The author saw this coin in New York as part of a group lot, but a photograph was not available. 497. Æ 26 (as) (d) ЄK Beast Coins, VCoins. (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 507. Æ 23 (orichalcum as) CNG Electronic Auction 191, 9 July 2008, 97 (9.12 g; 7h). This example has a countermark not previously reported on Antiochene coinage: a head of Sarapis wearing a modius (Howgego, GIC 20). 525. Æ 11 (orichalcum half-quadrans/chalkous) Elsen 94, 15 Dec. 2007, 814 (1.48 g). (Ex. Rare) The example illustrated in the catalogue with this bust variety (laureate head of Trajan, no drapery) did not show the bust truncation clearly, and fn. 382 noted that it might be a coin with drapery which was not visible. This coin confirms the existence of the variety.

Supplement to the Catalogue 536. Æ 26 (as) (d) Z Herakles Numismatics, eBay Item No. 1277066748, at wildwinds.com./coins/ric/ Hadrian/_antioch_AE26_BMC295 (15.27 g). (Scarce) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 543. Æ 11 (half-quadrans/chalkous) (e) Є CNG Electronic Auction 202, 14 Jan. 2009, 118 (0.99 g; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 552. Æ 19 (orichalcum semis) SNGHunter 2949 (3.99 g, 6h) is a variety with round and oblong shields behind the cuirass on which Roma is seated. 553. Æ 27 (as) (d) Γ SNGHunter 2968 corr. (16.55 g, 6h). (Ex. Rare) SNGHunter describes the head of Antoninus Pius as laureate, but the plate shows that it is bare. (e) H MC (14.19 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) Butcher, pp. 364-65, implies that the bare-headed variety appears with all ten numeral-letters A through I, but examples are known for only some of those numeral-letters. With the addition of the two varieties listed in this supplement, coins with a bare head of Antoninus Pius (nos. 553 and 554) are now known with six of the ten numeral-letters A through I. Thus, it does seem likely that this variety was struck with each of those ten numeral-letters. 555. Æ 24 (as) (a) A Tom Vossen, VCoins, July 2008 (30 mm; 16.76 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. This is a good example of an as of Antoninus Pius struck on the old heavy standard of c. 15 g. (f) 4 Sphinx Numismatics, VCoins, July 2008 (23 mm; 9.63 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. This is a good example of an as of Antoninus Pius struck on the new light standard of c. 10 g. 556. Æ 25 (as) (c) A Zurqieh Co., LLC, VCoins, Oct. 2009 (17.26 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. This coin is unusually heavy for an as of Antoninus Pius. SNGHunter 2969 is struck from the same pair of dies, and weighs 12.63 g. 556B. Æ 22 (as) Same as no. 555, but laureate head of Antoninus Pius r., and above S.C, star. Numeral-letter: B. Courtesy of Robert Effler (9.28; 12h). (Ex. Rare) This variety corresponds to no. 584(b), which has the same reverse type but obverse head of young Marcus Aurelius. 558A. Æ 22 (as) Same as no. 555, but radiate head of Antoninus Pius r. Numeral-letter: 4. MC (9.77 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare)


Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

489(e)

487(g)

553(e)

490(b) 488(h)

555(a)

497(d) 489(a)-2

555(f)

507-2 489(a)-3

556(c) 525

489(c)-1

556B

536(d) 558A

489(c)-2

543(h)

21


22

Supplement No. 1

559A. Æ 16 (semis) Obv. … [ΚΑΙ?] ΤΙ. ΑΙΛΙ. ΑΔ. ΑΝΤΝЄΙΝΟC(sic) CЄΒ … Radiate head of Antoninus Pius left, slight drapery at neck. Rev. S.C, A below, all within laurel wreath of ten elements. RPC 4, temp. no. 8993 = BN 1989 (2.51 g). This is undoubtedly the same coin listed in the catalogue under this number based on a pencil rubbing made in Paris in 1988. The coin is of good workmanship, but its weight is lower than any known genuine bronze coin of Pius from Antioch and it does not appear to belong with the orichalcum group. The low weight and the misspelling of Pius’s name suggest that it is a contemporary counterfeit. A less likely possibility is that it is a posthumous issue struck on a reduced weight standard at the end of the reign of Marcus Aurelius, when semisses weighing c. 2.5 g were struck (see no. 595 and discussion at p. 255). 563. Æ 19 (orichalcum semis) (g) Z Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/A069 (3.57 g; 12h). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 564. Æ 19 (orichalcum semis) (f) 4 Münzhandlung Ritter, MA Shops, June 2009 (3.98 g). (Ex. Rare). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 571. Æ 23 (as) (b) A or H Numismatik Lanz, eBay Item No. 370250371366 (10.3 g). (Ex. Rare) The numeral-letter is either A or H, but not Γ. The reverse die is definitely not the same as the one used to strike the variety with Γ listed in the catalogue. 581. Æ 22 (as) (e) Θ eBay Item No. 310114782972 (9.32 g). (Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 582. Æ 24 (as) (b) Θ CNG Electronic Auction 188, 28 May 2008, 276 (9.81 g). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 590. Æ 23 (as) (b) B Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (10.23 g; 7h). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (Rare) (c) Γ Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (11.42 g). (Ex. Rare) (i) Θ MC (9.33 g; 12h). (Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (l) AI MC (9.68 g; 6h). (Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 590A. Æ 22 (as) Same as no. 590, but laur. bust r., dr. and cuir. Numeral-letter: Δ Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (11.17g; 2h). (Ex. Rare) 16

Supplement to the Catalogue 592. Æ 18 (semis) (f) Θ Ancient Coins of Canada, VCoins, Oct. 2008 (5.07 g). (Ex. Rare) 597. Æ 23 (as) (h) Є Effler Coll. (6.88 g; 7h). (Ex. Rare) 598. Æ 23 (as) (e) BI Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (9.76 g; 12h). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (j) A eBay Item No. 300199904790 (8.9 g).16 (Ex. Rare) 603. Æ 23 (as) (b) B Effler Coll. (9.93 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (f) 4 eBay Item No. 140224672022. (V. Rare) This is not a new variety, but this coin was struck from the same obverse die as no. 622A(b) (rev. Lucius Verus and Marcus Aurelius stg.) and therefore confirms the latter’s attribution both to Antioch and to Lucius Verus. 605. Æ 22 (as) (f) Γ I Effler Coll. (9.66 g). (Ex. Rare) 606. Æ 15 (semis) (c) Γ Effler Coll. (3.33 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) Same rev. die as no. 650B (see corrected attribution of 650B below). (g) Z eBay Item No. 300249595544. (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 608. Æ 16 (semis) (b) Γ Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/ A073 (3.61 g; 4h). (Ex. Rare) 609. Æ 16 (semis) (b) IB MC (3.65 g; 1h). (Ex. Rare) This coin was struck from the same obverse die as the coin with numeral-letter A, and shows that the bust is draped (not cuirassed), seen from the front. The fact that the same obverse die was used for coins with numeralletters at the beginning and near the end of the sequence (corresponding to one and twelve) tends to support the interpretation of the numeral-letters as representing officinae rather than a chronological sequence, since it is unlikely that a single obverse die would have endured throughout the entire sequence. 611A. Æ 18 (semis) (a) Same as no. 606, but obv. legend CA(?) AYP. MAIC. (sic) OYH. KAI. I Π(?). Numeralletter: Λ (A without cross-bar). Elsen 94, 15 Dec. 2007, 826 (4.02 g). (Ex. Rare) (b) Variety with S.C retrograde. Sayles & Lavender, VCoins, Aug. 2010 (3.41 g; 11h). (Ex. Rare) These coins, with their garbled legend and unusual numeral-letter, appear to be from the same engraver who produced no. 607 and no. 611.

Obverse legend illegible, but the portrait is clearly of Marcus Aurelius and not Lucius Verus.


Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

559A 603(b) 590(i) 563(g) 603(f) 590(l) 564(f) 605(f) 590A 571(b)

606(c)

592(f) 606(g)

581(e)

597(h)

608(b)

582(b) 609(b) 598(e)

590(b)

611A(a)

598(j) 590(c)

611A(b)

23


24

Supplement No. 1

612A. Æ 11 (half-quadrans/chalkous) Obv. A[V]T. K. … A(or Λ) OV … Laureate head of Lucius Verus r. Rev. S.C, Γ below, all within laurel wreath of eight elements. MC (1.24 g; 3h).17 (Ex. Rare) The author has seen several small coins purporting to be examples of this small denomination with a portrait of an emperor other than Trajan or Hadrian, but most of them were misattributed coins of Hadrian or irregular coins which are probably contemporary counterfeits.18 This coin, however, is of relatively good style and fabric and appears to be a product of the official mint. It differs from the half-quadrans coins struck by Trajan and Hadrian in having an obverse legend, which unfortunately is only legible in fragments. See the enlarged photographs in this supplement of halfquadrans coins of Trajan and Hadrian and this coin. If the half-quadrans denomination was struck with a portrait of Lucius Verus then it was almost certainly struck with a portrait of Marcus Aurelius, as well. 613. Æ 23 (as) (d) AI Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (8.32 g; 12h). (Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (h) Ξ Ξ (resembles two backwards Zs) MC = CNG Electronic Sale 241, 29 Sept. 2010, 206 (9.19 g; 7h). (Ex. Rare) This unusual numeral-letter(?) is known for Marcus Aurelius (nos. 597A(b), 598(f), and 598A(a)), but has not been previously recorded for Lucius Verus. 615. Æ 23 (as) (a) A Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (11.07 g). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (e) Є Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (9.59 g; 1h). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. (k) AI Courtesy of Frascatius Ancients (9.41 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 616. Æ 23 (as) (c) Γ MC (9.25 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) 623A. Æ 15 (trichalkon) Similar to no. 623, but ΛOVKIΛΛA CЄBACTH from lower l. (same obv. die as no. 624), and [ANT]IOXЄΩN MHTPO … from lower l. Malter Galleries 90, 21 Sept. 2008, 1103. (Ex. Rare) 633A. AR tetradrachm Same as no. 632, but eagle stg. on leg and thigh of animal, head r., wreath in beak; to r. of eagle’s hd., star; ram’s head in exergue. CNG 78, 14 May 2008, 1437 (13.09 g). (Ex. Rare)

Supplement to the Catalogue 642A. AR tetradrachm Same as no. 636, but eagle stg. r., head l., without wreath in beak; between legs, star; in ex., ram’s head r. Same rev. die as no. 634. Rauch 84, 13-15 May 2009, 634 (13.29 g). (Ex. Rare) 643. Æ 17 (as) (b) B eBay Item No. 380025472177 (V. Rare). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 650B. Æ 13 (semis) This coin, with radiate bearded bust left, was listed in the catalogue as being of Commodus(?), but should be corrected as being of Lucius Verus based on no. 606(c), listed in this supplement, which was struck from the same reverse die. 652. AR tetradrachm MC = CNG 81, 20 May 2009, 813 (9.90 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) This is a previously unpublished specimen. It is the ninth known tetradrachm of Pescennius Niger, and the fourth known in private hands. The other known example of no. 652, illustrated in the catalogue, is in the Prieur Collection. 653. AR tetradrachm CNG 82, 16 Sept. 2009, 855 (12.37 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) This is the same coin listed and illustrated in the catalogue, ex Berk 63, 29 Aug. 1990, 266, but the illustration in the catalogue is of a plaster cast of the coin. 658A. AR tetradrachm MC = Baldwin’s 60, 4 May 2009, 759 (14.22 g; 11 h). (Ex. Rare) Same as no. 658, but laur. bust of Severus r., dr. and cuir., rev. legend ΔHMAPX. ЄΞ. VΠA. TO. Γ, and the smaller end of the leg and thigh on which the eagle perches is to the right. Same obv. die used to strike no. 657 and no. 661. Same rev. die used to strike no. 658B; see comment at 658B below. 658B. AR tetradrachm CNG 69, 8 June 2005, 1205 (14.08 g; 12 h). (V. Rare) Same as no. 658, but rev. legend ΔHMAPX. ЄΞ. VΠA. TO. Γ, and the smaller end of the leg and thigh on which the eagle perches is to the right. Same reverse die as no. 658A. The leg and thigh with the smaller end to the right appears on coins which are among the earliest examples of Severan tetradrachms, e.g., no. 664 (Caracalla COS. II DES.) and no. 712 (Geta COS. DES.). 698A. Æ 19 (as) Same as no. 696, but laureate head of Caracalla left, and obv. legend AVT. KAI. ANTΩNЄINOC, from upper r. Elsen 94, 15 Dec. 2007, 829. (Ex. Rare)

The weight of 1.24 g is close to one-eighth the mean weight of the asses of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus (9.4 g), consistent with the interpretation of this coin as a half-quadrans/chalkous. 18 For example, see no. 650A in the main catalogue, listed as Commodus(?), but which is probably an ancient imitation of an Antonine semis. Its weight is only 1.47 g, but its fabric is broader and thinner than that of this coin, and the types are larger. 17


Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

Half-quadrans coins of Trajan, Hadrian, and Lucius Verus (Enlarged)

615(k)

612A 652-2 616(c)

613(d) 623A

653

613(h) 658A 633A

615(a) 658B 642A

615(e)

698A

643(b)

25


26

Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

710. AR tetradrachm MC (13.51 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) Outside of the Mampsis Hoard, the only example previously known to the author is the one in the BN (ex Sternberg 1983), a plaster cast of which is illustrated in the catalogue. The MC coin is from the same dies as the BN specimen. The reverse legend was given by both Prieur and this author as VΠATOC AΠOΔЄΔЄI, but it is actually VΠATOC AΠOΔЄΔЄIΓ, with the Γ appearing under the river-god’s outstretched right arm.

788A. Æ 19 (as) Same as no. 788(b), but retrograde Δ Є below S.C (dot at bottom), on either side of eagle. Elysium Ancients, eBay Item No. 220580137562, April 2010. (Ex. Rare) Not from the same reverse die as no. 782A, although the type is the same.

722A. Obverse legend is AVTO. KA. M. O. CЄ. MAKPЄINOC CЄB. See comment at no. 722B below.

801A. Æ 16 (semis) Same as no. 799; wreath of ten elements fastened at top with garland. MC (3.28 g; 4h). (Ex. Rare) This coin resembles no. 799/2 in style, but it is clearly a smaller denomination: the types are markedly smaller, as is its diameter, and its weight is about half the average (5.9 g) of the larger denomination. Like the other Group 5 coins, it was probably struck at Laodicea rather than Antioch.

722B. Æ 21 (as) Same as no. 722A, but eagle below S.C and no Δ or Є. Elsen 96, 14 June 2008, 503 (7.98 g); MC (6.68 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) Like no. 722A, this is a transitional issue struck on the heavier weight standard of Caracalla rather than the reduced standard used for most of Macrinus’s bronze coins.19 It has the reverse type seen on Caracalla’s Group 2 bronze coins, which is otherwise unknown for Macrinus. Both examples are struck from the same obverse die as no. 722A, and these three coins allow the full obverse legend to be reconstructed. 725A. Æ 17 (as) Same as no. 725, but letters on rev. are retrograde. CNG Electronic Auction 181, 6 Feb. 2008, 236 (4.70 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) 734A. Æ 19 (as) eBay Item No. 300277760996 (Ex. Rare). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 750A. Æ 19 (as) Same as no. 749, but CS instead of SC, and Δ below, Є above. eBay Item No. 320225555321 (4.5 g). (Ex. Rare) 751. Æ 19 (as) (c) Wreath fastened at top with diamond. Educational Coin Company, eBay Item No. 320441287054. (Ex. Rare) 781. Æ 19 (as) (b) Same as no. 781, but obv. legend AV. K. M. AV. CЄ. ANTΩNINOC, and wreath fastened at top with diamond. Effler Coll. = Sphinx, VCoins March 2008 (3.31 g) (illustrated); MC (3.63 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) 782A. Æ 19 (as) Same as no. 782(b), but retrograde Δ Є below S.C (dot at bottom), on either side of eagle. David Connors Ancient Coins & Artifacts, VCoins, June 2008; Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/A095 (6.18 g; 12h). (Ex. Rare) Both examples are struck from the same reverse die.

797A. Æ 17 (as) Same as no. 797, but Δ below, Є above (instead of K above, A below). CNG Electronic Auction 181, 6 Feb. 2008, 237 (3.58 g; 1h). (Ex. Rare)

802. Æ 32 (8 assaria) (c) No symbol in rev. field. Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/A102 (15.63 g; 12 h). (Ex. Rare) 814. Æ 26 (4 assaria) S.P.Q.R., eBay Item No. 250343159673, Dec. 2008 (Ex. Rare). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 832. Æ 32 (8 assaria) CNG Electronic Auction 209, 22 April 2009, 274 (15.24 g; 11 h). (Scarce) A photograph is added of this example, which has a particularly well-preserved reverse showing the Tyche of Antioch seated with a second Tyche standing to the left and the emperor to the right crowning the seated Tyche. See the enlargement of the reverse. 856A. Æ 16 (as) Same as no. 856, but obv. legend [IMP.] SEV. ALEXAND. AVG., and laur. bust of Severus Alexander r., dr. (and cuir.?). Malter Galleries 90, 21 Sept. 2008, 1105. (Ex. Rare) This coin appears to be overstruck on an S.C bronze; the letters SC (upsidedown) are visible above Δ Є. 859A. The catalogue omits “CЄB.” at the end of the obv. legend. The correct obv. legend is AVTOK. K. M. AT. ΓOPΔINOC ЄVCЄB. CЄB. 890. Billon tetradrachm Holyland Numismatics, VCoins, Jan. 2010. (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 897. Billon tetradrachm VAuctions 244, 1 April 2010, 43 (14.04 g). (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue.

The mean weight of the three known examples of the transitional issue (722A and 722B) is 7.04 g. Caracalla’s asses average 7.2 g in weight and Macrinus’s asses (except for the transitional issue) average 4.3 g. (See Table 4 at p. 19.) 19


Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

710-2

722B-1

782A-2

814

788A 832-3

722B-2

797A 856A

725A

801A 890

734A

750A

802(c)

897

751(c)

781(b)-1

Reverse of no. 832-3. (Enlarged) 782A-1

27


28

Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

924. Billon tetradrachm Den of Antiquity, VCoins, July 2008. (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. Same obverse die as nos. 949 and 950.

1113. Billon tetradrachm (e) Five dots. CNG Electronic Auction 135, 15 March 2006, 68 (12.12 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue.

976. Æ 18 (as) Elsen 99, 28 March 2009, 1563 (5.62 g). (V. Rare) The revised mean weight for Philip’s First Issue asses is 4.4 g, based on the weights of this coin, the two listed in the catalogue (3.3 g and 4.14 g), and another example in the author’s collection (4.53 g). This is the same weight observed for the asses of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander (see Table 4 in Chapter I).

1118A. Billon tetradrachm Same as no. 1113, but laur., cuir. bust seen from front. Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/ A121 (12.36 g; 7h). (Ex. Rare)

997A. Æ 29 (8 assaria) Same as 997, but bust of Tyche l., ram l., and rev. legends retrograde (die reversed). MC (17.15 g; 11h). (Ex. Rare) 1004. Æ 18 (as) Elsen 99, 28 March 2009, 1562 (5.19 g)20. (Ex. Rare) A photograph of a better example is added. The coin is from the same obverse die as the example shown in the catalogue. The revised mean weight for Philip’s Second Issue asses is 4.1 g, based on the weights of this coin, the two new examples of Philip II listed under no. 1085 below, and the three coins listed in the catalogue under nos. 1004, 1005, and 1085. This suggests that the weight of the Second Issue asses was reduced from c. 4.4 g for the First Issue asses (see comments under no. 976 above), in line with the reduction in weight of the larger denominations. 1041. Billon tetradrachm (b) Cuirass without Gorgon’s head. Den of Antiquity, VCoins, April 2008 (10.15 g). (Ex. Rare) Same obverse die as no. 1040(b). 1085. Æ 20 (as) Elsen 99, 28 March 2009, 1564 (3.72 g)21. (V. Rare) A photograph of a better example is added. A second example appeared in the same Elsen sale (lot 1565, 4.07 g). 1105. Billon tetradrachm (e) Five dots. Helios Numismatik. (Ex. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 1109. Billon tetradrachm (a) Only right pteryx visible. VAuctions 221, 5 Feb. 2009 (12.22 g). (V. Rare) A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. Same obverse die as no. 1108/2.

20 21

1125. Billon tetradrachm (e) S (reversed) CNG Electronic Auction 165, 30 May 2007, 176 (13.67 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 1126. Billon tetradrachm (f) S CNG Electronic Auction 141, 7 June 2006, 153 (12.73 g). A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 1160. Billon tetradrachm (f) No dots or letter. Holyland Numismatics, Feb. 2008. A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. Coins without a dot or letter are often merely the result of the area where they appear (below the bust) being off the flan or obscured. However, this exceptionally well-preserved example confirms the existence of this variety. 1175A. Billon tetradrachm Same as no. 1174, but laur. cuir. bust left seen from front, two dots under bust, B between eagle’s legs. Zeugma Tetradrachm Hoards 185186. (11.805 g and 10.730 g). (Ex. Rare) 1177. Billon tetradrachm (e) S under bust; S between eagle’s legs. Den of Antiquity, VCoins, July 2008. A photograph is added of this variety, which was listed but not illustrated in the catalogue. 1181A. Æ 30 (8 assaria) Same as 1181, but ram running l. instead of r. Triton XIII, 4 Jan. 2010, 1396/A128 (18.41 g; 6h). (Ex. Rare) 1193A. Æ 32 (8 assaria) Same as 1193, but no pteryx at shoulder (dr. bust). VAuctions, 30 April 2009, 84 (15.96 g). (Ex. Rare)

This coin was purchased by the author from Elsen but lost in the mail. If a reader encounters it, please contact the author. This coin was purchased by the author from Elsen but lost in the mail. If a reader encounters it, please contact the author.


Supplement No. 1

Supplement to the Catalogue

1126(f)

924

1105(e)

976-2

1160(f)

1109(a)

1175A

997A

1113(e)

1177(e)

1004-2

1118A

1181A

1041(b)

1125(f)

1085-2

1193A

29


30

Supplement No. 1

Supplement to Appendix I: Countermarks

Supplement to Appendix I: Countermarks Countermarks Found on SC Bronze Coinage Howgego, GIC No.

Description of Coins

Description of Countermark

Reference

371

Claudius

Anchor22

Wildwinds23

373

Also Galba

Anchor between A | N

See no. 312.

472

Also Domitian

Thunderbolt (Leg. XII Fulminata)

See no. 406.

501.1

Claudius

Head of eagle r.

See no. 250.

---

M. Aurelius or L. Verus

CA in rectangular incuse

Butcher 441

---

Tiberius

HK in rectangular incuse

Butcher 86a

---

Tiberius

Monogram in a rectangular incuse consisting of a large P with I at the upper left leg and Π at the upper right leg

See no. 217.

---

Tiberius

B in rectangular incuse

See no. 218.

Countermarks Found on Flavian Orichalcum Dupondii Howgego, GIC No.

Description of Coins

Description of Countermark

Reference

472

Vespasian

Thunderbolt (Leg. XII Fulminata)

The Roman Numismatic Gallery24

729

Vespasian

XF (Leg. X Fretensis)

See no. 369.

Struck over another countermark, P.R. (GIC 599). The anchor is definitely GIC 371, listed in Howgego as appearing on a single Thracian coin, and not GIC 373, which appears on Commagene and Antiochene coins. 23 www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/claudius/RPC_4277.1 24 http://romancoins.info/CMK-legionary-East.htm 22


Supplement to Appendix I: Countermarks

Supplement No. 1

Countermarks Found on Trajanic S.C Coins of Orichalcum Howgego, GIC No.

Description of Coins

Description of Countermark

Reference

20

Trajan (S.C orich. as)

Sarapis, head r., wearing modius

See no. 507.

Countermarks Found on Coins of Antioch with Greek Reverse Legends

25

Howgego, GIC No.

Description of Coins

Description of Countermark

Reference

373

Otho (Mucianus)

Anchor between A | N

See no. 317.

521

Tiberius (Flaccus)

ΓA|B (Gaius Yr. 2)

The Roman Numismatic Gallery25

597

Otho (Mucianus)

LVS

See no. 319.

http://romancoins.info/CMK-Caligula.html

31



Coins of Roman Antioch Supplement 1