CNG CNR August 2018

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Classical Numismatic

REVIEW

Volume XLIII, No. 2 • Summer 2018 • Lancaster Pennsylvania, London England

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. www.cngcoins.com


Contents Editorial................................................................................................................................ 1 Terms of Sale....................................................................................................................... 2 How to Order....................................................................................................................... 2 Calendar............................................................................................................................... 3 Collecting Seleucid Coins by David S. Michaels............................................................... 4 Coins for Sale....................................................................................................................... 9

Production Staff Senior Directors: Senior Numismatist: Numismatists (U.S.): Numismatists (U.K.): Controller: Lancaster Office Manager: London Office Manager: Office Staff: Accounting: Photography, Design, & Data and Information Specialist: Photography & Design: Printing Control: IT Consultant:

Victor England, Jr. (U.S.) Eric J. McFadden (U.K.) Bradley R. Nelson D. Scott VanHorn Kenneth McDevitt Bill Dalzell Jeffrey B. Rill Kerry K. Wetterstrom David S. Michaels David Guest Julia TrocmĂŠ-Latter Cathy England Karen Zander Alexandra Spyra Julia Motter Marlene Rice Steve Pruzinsky (U.S.) Tina Jordan (U.K.) Travis A. Markel Jessica Garloff Robert A. Trimble A.J. Gatlin


Classical Numismatic Review Volume XLIII, No. 2 Summer 2018

Welcome to the Summer Review This year has seen the implementation of a number of new government regulations that affect the coin business. Europe’s new GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) rules have required quite a bit of work behind the scenes to ensure that CNG is compliant, as we continue to make every effort to see that your data is protected. See our Privacy Policy and Compliance page for more information. We would like to thank Travis Markel in Lancaster, and Alexandra Spryra and David Guest in London, for the time they spent researching the ins and outs of these new rules. Meanwhile in the United States, this summer the Supreme Court rendered a decision that opens the way for states to begin collecting sales tax on Internet sales (South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc). According to ICTA (Industry Council for Tangible Assets), the coin industry’s lobby group, 37 states have exemptions in place on coins. This leaves a few states where CNG will be obligated to collect sales tax, as we expect new state laws to be enacted soon based on the Supreme Court ruling. On the numismatic front, we continue to see more and more material entering auction, and barely a month passes without a new sale sprouting up somewhere from someone we hardly know. The Internet has certainly enabled more dealers to offer more coins to wider and ever-expanding audiences. Unfortunately, the scholarship often leaves collectors with something to be desired. We may not get it right every time, but with seven full-time numismatists and a library of over 30,000 books and catalogues, we certainly try to hold ourselves to a higher standard. Among those numismatists is a new, but familiar, face. This summer we are happy to welcome David Michaels back to CNG. David will be on hand at the ANA show, ready to greet customers both old and new. A major part of his role at CNG will be attending shows. You can expect to see David regularly at shows and club meetings, particularly on the west coast, as we work to renew direct contacts with customers whom we previously only met through phone or email. Additionally, we would like to thank David for taking the time to write the article for this Review, “Collecting Seleukid Coins.” This Review offers nearly 250 coins for your consideration, from masterpiece silver and gold pieces to humble bronzes. We have tried to offer coins in all price ranges. We hope you find something to your liking. Victor England Eric J. McFadden

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Terms of Sale 1. General Information. The point of sale for all items online is Lancaster, Pennsylvania. All orders are sent from Pennsylvania. 2. Guaranty and Return Privilege. All items are guaranteed genuine. Any coin order may be returned within fourteen days of receipt for any reason. Coins that have been encapsulated (“slabbed”) by a grading and/or authentication service may not be returned for any reason, including authenticity, if they have been removed from the encapsulation (“slab”). The customer shall bear the cost of returning all items and shall insure them for their full value. Books are not sent on approval and are not subject to return. 3. Sales Tax. Pennsylvania law requires that certain items delivered in Pennsylvania be charged 6% sales tax on the total order, including all postage and handling fees. 4. Postage. All orders are charged for postage, insurance, and handling. 5. Payment. Orders may be paid by US$ check, credit card or wire transfer. US$ checks must be written on a US bank and may be sent to either office. We accept VISA and MasterCard; payment by credit card must be made within 14 days of the invoice date. Credit card payment may be arranged by phone, fax or mail. United States address and phone number: CNG, Inc., P.O. Box 479, Lancaster, PA, 17608., phone: 717-390-9194, fax: 717-390-9978. United Kingdom address and phone number: CNG, Inc., 20 Bloomsbury St, London WC1B 3QA, phone +44 (20) 7495-1888, fax: +44 (20) 7499-5916. Office hours are 10AM to 5 PM Monday through Friday. US$ bank account for wire transfers will be provided by phone, fax or mail. 6. Shipment. Please provide a specific shipping address and advise us of any special shipping instructions. Unless other specific shipping instructions are indicated, coins are sent by U.S. Insured or Registered mail. Every effort is made to ship within 24 hours of receipt of payment. Please allow a reasonable time for delivery.

A Note on How to Order As with our normal monthly uploads, these coins are available for purchase on our website, www.cngcoins.com. If you are viewing the virtual catalog, you may click on an image, which will bring you to the online lot description, where you can add the coin to your cart as usual.

Digital Publications Archive

Digital versions of this and previous issues of the CNR are available to view or download in our Digital Publications Archive.

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Show Schedule 2018 World’s Fair of Money August 14-18, 2018 Pennsylvania Convention Center 1101 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA August 14 from 1-5:30PM August 15-17 from 10AM-5:30PM August 18 from 10AM-4PM Coinex September 28-29, 2018 County Hall Belvedere Road London, SE17PB 47th New York International January 10-13, 2019 Grand Hyatt Hotel 109 East 42nd Street, New York January 10, Noon-7PM Preview January 11-13, 10AM-7PM (3PM on the 13th)

Printed Auction Schedule CNG 109 - 12 September 2018 Triton XXII- 8-9 January 2019 CNG 111 - 15 May 2019 CNG 112 - 18 September 2019 Triton XXIII - 14-15 January 2020 Consignment Deadlines Printed Auction Consignment Deadlines Triton XXII - 15 September 2018 CNG 111 - 15 February 2019 CNG 112 - 21 June 2019 Triton XXIII - 4 October 2019 Deadlines for Electronic Auction Consignments Ongoing - About 90 days before scheduled sale Contact us early, as sales do fill up in a hurry. We may be contacted by email, fax, phone, or mail.

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. Email: cng@cngcoins.com

Mailing addresses & Phone Numbers: Attention: Victor England P.O. Box 479 Lancaster PA 17608 Phone: 717-390-9194 Fax: 717-390-9978 or Attention: Eric J. McFadden 20 Bloomsbury St. London WC1B 3QA Phone: +44-20-7495-1888 Fax: +44-20-7499-5916. 3


COLLECTING SELEUKID COINS By David S. Michaels Having conquered the vast Persian Empire and even far-flung northern India, Alexander the Great returned to Babylon in mid 323 BC and promptly partied himself to death. His generals, the Diadochi (“successors”), slugged it out for supremacy over the next 40 years, shattering the great Macedonian Empire into several large fragments–the so-called Successor Kingdoms.

Seleukos I

By far the largest and most populous of these was founded by Seleukos Nikator (“victor”), Alexander’s charismatic infantry commander, who proclaimed himself King in 305 BC. His realm sprawled across 2 million square miles, from southern Asia Minor to the Hindu Kush of modern Pakistan, encompassing hundreds of cities and tens of millions of subjects from dozens of ethnicities, including Persians, Armenians, Assyrians, Medes, Jews, Arabs, Afghans, Indians, Scythians and, of course, Greeks. It survived, in some form, for two and a half centuries.

Following the trail blazed by Alexander and employing vast stores of bullion “liberated” from Persian treasuries, Seleukid rulers produced an extensive coinage in gold, silver and bronze from dozens of mints. Yet, until fairly recently, it remained a rather overlooked realm of numismatics, overshadowed by other Classical and Hellenistic Greek states, particularly the neighboring Ptolemaic Egypt. The tide began to shift in the late 1960s, when Seleukid coins found a champion in Arthur A. Houghton III, scholar Antiochos IV Epiphanes and diplomat, who assembled an extensive collection and authored several monographs and books on the subject. The last 20 years have witnessed an explosion of scholarship devoted to Seleukid coinage, providing collectors and historians alike with excellent, deeply researched references to guide them. These include the monumental Seleucid Coins, Parts I and II, by Arthur Houghton, Catherine Lorber, Oliver Hoover, and Brian Kritt, and the compact and useful Handbook of Syrian Coins (HGC Series 9) by Hoover. Only this year, the American Antiochos VIII Epiphanes Numismatic Society launched its “Seleucid Coins Online” website, an invaluable website devoted to the series. (Grypos) Consequently, collectors at every level have discovered the Seleukid series and brought this attractive and historically illuminating coinage long-overdue attention. The coins themselves provide an astounding “facebook” of rulers, often with portraits of great artistry and near-photographic realism. These rulers are an eclectic and colorful lot, with both heroes and villains, the brilliant and indolent, the decent and tyrannical, the enlightened and decadent. Mostly men are depicted, although a few ferocious women left their mark as well. Seleukid coins are widely available in every price range, from $10 small bronzes to exceptionally rare and beautiful gold pieces that have achieved auction prices in excess of $275,000. The most widely available denomination is the silver tetradrachm, usually weighing about 16-17 grams and between 25 and 30 millimeters in diameter. A pleasant VF tetradrachm of a common ruler can cost less than $200, with particularly artistic portraits priced at a premium. Rarities, of course, run much more. However, a modest investment in time and money can thus produce a collection of large, impressive coins spanning an exciting and transformative era in history, when east did in fact meet west, and produced something beautiful. 4


Here are a few brief bios of some of the most important and intriguing Seleucid kings and queens, and the coins they created: Seleukos I Nikator (312-281 BC): The Seleukid Kingdom’s first ruler was also one of its longestlived, reigning more than 30 years and providing his descendants a tough act to follow. Born into the Macedonian military gentry, he was clearly a talented soldier and present at most of Alexander’s major battles, although he never entered the great conqueror’s inner circle. After Alexander’s death, he became commander of the elite Companion Cavalry attached to the regent Perdikkas, but quickly abandoned and assassinated his overlord in 321 BC during a disastrous attempt to suppress the satrap Ptolemy in Egypt. In the resulting carve-up of empire, Seleukos won the coveted satrapy of Babylon and, through brilliant stratagems and sheer tenacity, defeated or outlasted a succession of formidable rivals to end up as supreme commander of all Asia and the Hellenistic near-east. He formally named himself Basileos, or King, in 305 BC, but retroactively dated the foundation of his kingdom to 312/1 BC, the beginning of the “Seleukid Era.” Despite his great success, his personality remains somewhat opaque, though he seems to have been loyal (he kept the Persian wife, Apama, given to him by Alexander when the other Macedonian officers quickly abandoned theirs), and humane, by the standards of the age (he rarely executed a defeated rival, preferring to keep them in comfortable captivity). His coinage is vast, complex, and fascinating, struck at a profusion of mints, with major design changes occurring at roughly five-year intervals. Initial types struck during his Satrapy bear the familiar types, names, and titles of Alexander the Great, with the symbol of an anchor (inscribed on his iron signet ring, supposedly given to him by his mother) appearing as a control mark. After Seleukos adopted the royal title in 305 BC, a new type emerges with a handsome male head wearing a horned Attic-style helmet covered with a panther skin Antiochos I Soter and sporting bull’s ears, all attributes of Dionysus. Scholars have long debated whether the head represents Seleukos himself, or Alexander, or Dionysus, or a synthesis of the three. More recently, opinion has tilted toward the simplest view: Seleukos himself, making this one of the first Hellenistic portrait types. The reverse depicts Nike erecting a trophy of arms, a design that reverberated down through the ages. After Seleukos negotiated 500 war elephants from an Indian king, a new silver tetradrachm type was issued in circa 296 BC, pairing an obverse head of Zeus with a reverse depicting Athena in a chariot pulled by elephants. Elephants went on to play a major role in Hellenistic warfare, though sometimes proving as dangerous to the side using them as to their foes. Antiochos I Soter (294-261 BC): The eldest son of Seleukos I, Antiochos learned battlefield command at the feet of his father and led a decisive cavalry action at the Battle of Ipsos in 301 BC. When Seleukos took the beautiful Stratonike as a bride in 299 BC, Antiochos fell so deeply in love with her that he seemed likely to die. In 294, Seleukos gave Stratonike as wife to his son; at the same time he elevated Antiochos to co-regent and moved Antiochos I Soter the newlyweds off to a new command of the East, solving what must have been an awkward situation in the palace. Antiochos smoothly assumed power after his father’s death in 280 BC, but had his hands full trying to maintain the integrity of the immense polyglot kingdom he had inherited. Two major wars against the Ptolemaic Kingdom resulted in stalemate, but his greatest challenge came when a mass-migration of warlike Celtic tribes swept into Asia Minor in the 270s BC, threatening to wipe out Greek civilization. Antiochos marched to confront them and won an overwhelming victory at the Battle of the Elephants (so-called due to the crucial role of the elephant corps) in circa 269-268 BC. Greeks gave him the title Soter (“savior”) in thanks for saving the day. 5


The coinage of Antiochos I was even larger than his father’s, and his heavybrowed, rather mournful portrait (one can easily imagine his lovesick moping over Stratonike) is a common sight on silver tetradrachms in auction catalogs and dealers’ stocks worldwide. A reverse type he innovated became the standard Seleukid reverse for more than a century: It depicts Apollo seated to left atop the Omphalos of Delphi, a sacred stone covered with woven netting that was said to be the “navel of the earth.” Apollo rests his left hand on a grounded Antiochos III bow and looks down the shaft of an arrow held in his right hand, testing its ‘the Great’ trueness. A rare and artistic variant on this type, struck at the mint of Magnesia on Mt. Sipylus, depicts Herakles resting after his labors. The style of portraiture and the elegance of the reverse vary greatly depending on mint; on some coins Antiochos appears a man of vigorous middle age, while on others he looks wizened and overburdened by the weight of rule. Antiochos III “The Great” (222-187 BC): Seleukid fortunes had reached a low ebb when Antiochos III, great-great grandson of Nicator, arose to the throne after the assassination of his elder brother. The once-mighty kingdom had been riven by dynastic disputes, foreign invasions, and native uprisings, and looked to be on the cusp of dissolution. The young Antiochos announced his intention to reconstitute the empire of his ancestors, and, after an incredibly vigorous three decades of rule, by 192 BC seemed to have accomplished just that. Not particularly modest, he assumed the title Megas Basileos (“Great King”), claiming parity not just with Alexander, but with the Achaemenid Kings of Persia. Alas, at the summit of success he chose to press his luck and launch an invasion of mainland Greece, bringing him squarely against the upstart Roman Republic, the declared guarantor of Greek freedom. To the shock of everyone, Antiochos proved not-so-great and he suffered a crushing defeat at the Battle of Magnesia in 190 BC, barely escaping with his life. The humiliating treaty imposed by Rome, and massive annual indemnity of 15,000 talents (about 22.5 million tetradrachms), largely undid all the successes of his early career and again set the kingdom’s fortunes into a downward spiral. Antiochos III’s coins are of mostly of the typical royal portrait / Apollo-on-Omphalos type, and his image changes from that of a callow youth to a craggy campaigner over the course of his reign. One of the most interesting types depicts an Indian war elephant on the reverse in place of Apollo, pointing (again) to the importance of elephants in Hellenistic warfare. Elephant tetradrachms are among the most prized Seleukid rarities and usually sell for many thousands of dollars; the silver drachm, in contrast, is more widely available and can be obtained in the mid hundreds to low thousands. Antiochos IV Epiphanes (175-164 BC): As the one Seleukid ruler to enter popular consciousness, “Bad King Antiochos” has gone down in history as a tyrant, a megalomaniac, and the unintentional father of Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights. The younger son of Antiochos III Megas, Antiochos spent his youth as a hostage in Rome until the murder of his brother brought him to the Seleukid throne. From the outset, he energetically tried to Antiochos IV Epiphanes strengthen his kingdom through a policy of Hellenization and urbanization. This found favor with his Greek subjects, but the Semetic peoples were less impressed. His assumption of the title Epiphanes (“God manifest”) provoked resentment; in a play on words, the Jews nicknamed him Epimanes or “madman.” His pillaging of the great Temple in Jerusalem turned resistance into outright revolt. Years of bitter warfare followed, leading ultimately to a Jewish breakaway state under the Maccabees, the Jewish recapture of Jerusalem, the re-consecration of the Temple, and the first Hanukkah. Yet Antiochos regarded the Jewish revolt as a minor annoyance, for he had his eyes on a bigger prize. In 168 BC, he invaded Egypt with his well-trained army and easily swept aside all resistance. But at Eleusis he was met by a single Roman magistrate, the aged Popillius Laenus, who handed him a decree by the Roman Senate demanding his immediate withdrawal. Laenus then dramatically drew a circle in the sand around the king and demanded an answer before he stepped 6


out of it. Antiochos had no choice but to submit, or suffer the fate of his father at Magnesia. Antiochos returned to Syria with his army, sacking Jerusalem along the way, and spent his remaining years in royal self-indulgence. Like the man himself, the coinage of Antiochos IV is flamboyant, diverse, and complex. His portrait issues replace Apollo on the reverse with an enthroned figure of Zeus. He also struck a beautiful run of “Festival” issues honoring Zeus and Apollo, in the highest artistry of the age. These last types are rare and consequently pricey when they show up at auction; in general, his coins are fairly easy to obtain in the middle price range of $500-1,500, while smaller silver denominations and bronzes can be had quite inexpensively. Cleopatra Thea (152-121 BC): Daughter of the Egyptian king Ptolemy VI, Cleopatra Thea married the Seleukid usurper Alexander I Balas in 150 BC to cement ties between the two realms. Within five years, Balas had been deposed and killed; his consort, however, had remarkable staying power and proved herself an adept player of the Hellenistic game of thrones. Over a 30-year career, Cleopatra Thea was a Ptolemaic princess, queen-consort to three kings (Balas, his replacement Demetrios II, and Antiochos VII), queen in her own right, and queen-mother of two kings. As ruthless as Cleopatra Thea she was ambitious, she did much to define politics in her age. In 125 BC, Cleopatra assumed supreme power for herself, which required the murder of her eldest son, Seleukos V— reportedly she used him for archery practice! After a brief period as sole monarch, she was persuaded to share power with her youngest son, Antiochos VIII Grypos. This last son finally escaped her domineering shadow in 120 BC by forcing her to drink a poisoned cup she had intended for him. Uniquely in the Seleukid series, Cleopatra appears by herself on the coinage as well as in combination with her various husbands and sons. A rare gold issue modeled on the famous issues of Ptolemaic queens depicts her veiled portrait, along with a cornucopia on the reverse. When she appears on silver tetradrachms conjoined with a Seleukid king (initially her husband, Balas, and later her son, Antiochos VIII), her portrait is topmost, in the position of honor. One could hardly ask for more explicit evidence of her forceful personality. IMPORTANT BOOKS: GENERAL Alexander to Actium: The Historical Evolution of the Hellenistic Age by Peter Green (University of California Press; reprint edition 1993). A monumental and yet highly readable account of the Hellenistic World. Land of the Elephant Kings: Space, Territory, and Ideology in the Seleucid Empire by Paul J. Kosmin (Harvard University Press; reprint edition due August 2018). Academically oriented but novel in approach and quite comprehensive. IMPORTANT BOOKS: NUMISMATIC Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog, Part I, Volumes I-II, by Arthur Houghton and Catharine Lorber, with Metrological Tables by Brian Kritt (ANS/CNG, 2002). An exhaustive and comprehensive piece of scholarship covering the reigns of Seleukos I through Antiochos III, combining a biographical and narrative account of the age with a thorough catalogue of the known issues, including maps, tables, and plates depicting most coin types.

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Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog, Part II, Volumes I-II, by Houghton, Lorber, and Oliver Hoover (ANS/CNG, 2008). Continues the previous book set from the reigns of Seleukos IV through Antiochos XIII and the dissolution of the Seleukid Kingdom. Handbook of Syrian Coins (Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 9): Royal and Civic Issues by Oliver D. Hoover (CNG, 2009). A concise, compact, highly readable, and very useful book covering the whole Seleukid series. ONLINE RESOURCES: “Seleucid Coins Online,� http://numismatics.org/sco/pages/about This is a vast digital database maintained by the American Numismatic Society as part of its Hellenistic Royal Coinages (HRC) project, directed by Dr. Peter van Alfen and Ethan Gruber. SCO has been developed by Oliver Hoover, while the web database, based on the Numishare platform, has been developed by Ethan Gruber. Besides the coins themselves, the site also provides access to excellent maps and a list of reference works.

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Greek Pedigreed to the White-King Collection in 1909

489936. CAMPANIA, Nuceria Alfaterna. Circa 250-225 BC. AR Nomos (20mm, 7.27 g, 5h). Head of Karneios left, with horn of Ammon; to right, small dolphin swimming downwards; mUnd[ETAFAlA mUnrkWUn] (nuvkrinum alafaternum in Oscan) around edge from upper left / Dioskouros standing facing, head turned left, holding thyrsos in right hand, left hand holding bridle of horse that is prancing left behind him. Sambon 1008; HN Italy 608; SNG ANS 560 (same dies); SNG BN 1102 (same dies). EF, attractive old collection tone, slightly off center. Rare, and with an impressive pedigree. ($22,500) Ex New York Sale XXVII (4 January 2012), lot 9; Giessener Münzhandlung 42 (11 October 1988), lot 12; Sternberg XX (20 April 1988), lot 40; Hess-Leu 28 (5 May 1965), lot 10; Prof. L. White-King Collection (Sotheby, Wikinson & Hodge, 22 April 1909), lot 7.

485555. APULIA, Venusia. Circa 215 BC. Æ Aes Grave Binux (30mm, 24.29 g, 1h). Dolphin left; two pellets (mark of value) above / Dolphin left; † above, two pellets (mark of value) below. Burnett I.3; Haeberlin pl. 73, 13; ICC 356; HN Italy 709. Good VF, dark green patina. Rare in this condition. ($1650) Ex Classical Numismatic Group 64 (24 September 2003), lot 758.

Among the First Coins Struck at Metapontion

489937. LUCANIA, Metapontion. Circa 540-510 BC. AR Nomos (27mm, 8.20 g, 12h). Ear of barley with eight grains and bracts at base; 7eT down left field, pellet border / Incuse ear of barley with eight grains; rayed border. Noe Class I, 1; HN Italy 1459; SNG ANS 166; Kraay & Hirmer 228. Choice EF, attractively toned. Well centered and struck. Exceptional and rare in this condition. Among the first coins struck at Metapontion. ($26,500) Ex New York Sale XXVII (4 January 2012), lot 51, purchased from Spink, 22 April 1986.

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486387. LUCANIA, Metapontion. Circa 540-510 BC. AR Nomos (30.5mm, 8.14 g, 12h). Ear of barley with eight grains; 7et up right field, pellets on raised circular border / Incuse ear of barley with nine grains; rayed border. Noe Class III, 57 (same dies); HN Italy 1459; SNG ANS 185–6. EF, attractive deep iridescent tone, light scratch in field on obverse. Sharply struck. ($5750)

489952. LUCANIA, Poseidonia. Circa 530-500 BC. AR Drachm (20mm, 3.44 g, 12h). Poseidon, nude but for chlamys draped over shoulders, standing right, preparing to cast trident held aloft in right hand, left arm extended; µoP to left; pellet border / Incuse of obverse, except trident in relief, and legend in relief and not retrograde; rayed border. HN Italy 1108; SNG ANS 619 (same obv. die). Near EF, attractive old cabinet tone. Excellent metal for issue. ($4950)

486388. LUCANIA, Sybaris. Circa 550-510 BC. AR Nomos (26mm, 7.75 g, 11h). Bull standing left, head right; ¨µ in exergue; pellet border / Incuse bull standing right, head left; rayed border. S&S Class B, pl. XLVIII, 4–8; Gorini 2; HN Italy 1729; SNG ANS 828–44; SNG Lloyd 449–50; Basel 168–9; Bement 213; Dewing 406–7. Choice EF, even gray tone with golden hues around the devices. ($9750) 10


Beautiful Pedigreed Naxos Tetradrachm From the Gasvoda, Armstrong, and von Hoffman Collections

491408. SICILY, Naxos. Circa 461 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 17.42 g, 9h). Bearded head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath / Silenos, nude and ithyphallic, squatting facing on rocks, head left, holding kylix in right hand and thyrsos in left; ˜-Åc5-o˜ around. Cahn 54 (V39/R45); HGC 2, 983; SNG Lloyd 1150 (same dies); SNG Lockett 840 = Pozzi 506 (same dies); BMC 7–8 (same dies); Basel 384 (same dies); Bement 418 (same dies); Jameson 673 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 6 (same dies); Randazzo 227 (this coin); Rizzo pl. XXVIII, 12 (same dies). Superb EF, iridescent tone, great metal and struck in high relief. A masterpiece of Classical art, and an iconic rarity. ($1,250,000) From the Gasvoda Collection. Ex Martin A. Armstrong Collection; Sotheby’s (5 July 1995 [Two Hundred Highly Important Greek and Roman Coins]), lot 19; Ladislaus von Hoffman Collection, purchased from Bank Leu, Zurich; Randazzo Hoard (CH VII, 17). Located on the eastern shore of Sicily in the shadow of Mt. Aitna, Naxos was the oldest of the Greek colonies on the island, founded in 735 BC by colonists from Chalkis in Euboia and Ionia. According to the historian Thucydides (1.100), Naxos established its own colony by founding Leontini in 730 BC, which was soon followed by the foundation of a second colony, Aitna, later known as Katane. Owing to the fertility of the surrounding volcanic soil of Mt. Aitna, Naxos developed an economy of viticulture, and along with Leontini and Katane, became very prosperous. This wealth attracted the attention of Syracuse, which subjugated Naxos in 476 BC, removing its citizens along with those of Katane to Leontini. Following the death of Hieron in 461 BC, the Naxians were able to return to their homes and refound their city. In commemoration, this issue of tetradrachms was struck (Carmen Arnold-Biuuchi, The Randazzo Hoard [1990], p. 29). Featuring Dionysos on the obverse and the satyr Silenos, the half-man, half goat follower of Dionysos, on the reverse, they are one of the most famous coin types minted in antiquity. A superb example of early classical art, while still retaining some of the typical elements of archaic art, these tetradrachms were struck from a single pair of dies. The artist, clearly a master die-engraver and arguably the finest of his time anywhere in the Greek world, is known today as the “Aitna Master”, after a unique tetradrachm of Aitna in the Bibliothèque royale de Belgique (for a discussion of the “Aitna Master” and his association with this tetradrachm of Naxos, see François de Callataÿ, “On the Style of the ‘Aitna Master’ from Eastern Sicily,” Israel Museum Studies in Archaeology, Volume 3 [2004], pp. 43-52). While the head of Dionysos is exceptional in its modeling, the kneeling Silenos is even more striking for its mastery of anatomical techniques, including the foreshortening of the right leg. Here, the clearly inebriated Silenos is managing to balance himself, but the the manner in which he peers at his cup adds a trace of naturalistic humor to the composition.

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485970

489939

489939

485970 489939. SICILY, Syracuse. Gelon I. 485-478 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 17.32 g, 1h). Struck circa 480 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand and reins in both, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with open wreath held in both hands / Head of Arethousa right, wearing tainia and pearl necklace; four dolphins and /s¨∞~Jos5o˜ around. Boehringer Series IV, 38 var. (V26/R22’ [rev. die slightly modified]); HGC 2, 1304; SNG ANS 7; Basel 425; Boston MFA 330 = Warren 295; Cosimo 158 (this coin); McClean 2594; Randazzo 236 (all from the same dies). EF, attractive light toning. Well centered and struck. Superb late archaic style. Very rare. ($57,500) Ex New York Sale XXVII (4 January 2012), lot 159; Elsen FPL 49 (November 1982), no. 2; Lanz 22 (10 May 1982), lot 139; 1970 Cosimo Hoard.

485970. SICILY, Syracuse. Agathokles. 317-289 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24.5mm, 17.19 g, 2h). Struck circa 317-310 BC. Head of Arethousa left, wearing wreath of grain ears, triple-pendant earring, and pearl necklace; three dolphins around, @5 below neck / Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left, driving fast quadriga left; counterclockwise triskeles above, sUrÅkos5W@ and [ in exergue. Ierardi 39 (O7/R22); BAR Issue 2; HGC 2, 1348; SNG ANS 639 (same obv. die); Boston MFA 460 = Warren 402 (same obv. die); Hirsch 660 (same obv. die). Near EF, even gray tone, with slight iridescence. ($3950) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, May 1993.

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From the Frank Sherman Benson Collection of 1909

489941. THRACE, Abdera. Circa 450-425 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 14.98 g, 5h). Kallidamas, magistrate. Griffin with curved wing seated left, raising right foreleg, on tunny left; ˚Å-¬¬-5dÅ-µÅs around / Å∫d-˙r-5tE-W˜ around raised quadripartite incuse square; all within shallow incuse square. May, Abdera, Period IV, 146d (A120/P119 – this coin); AMNG II 61; HGC 3, 1135; Boston MFA 754; Jameson 1031; Sartiges 161 (all from the same dies). EF, beautiful old toning, very slight die shift. Exceptional sharp strike, with vivid details. ($29,500) Ex New York Sale XXVII (4 January 2012), lot 220; Münzen und Medaillen AG 64 (30 January 1984), lot 61 and front cover; H. G. Bois Collection (Sotheby & Co., 7 July 1947), lot 174; Frank Sherman Benson Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 3 February 1909), lot 448.

Very Rare Pedigreed Thasos Drachm

489943. ISLANDS off THRACE, Thasos. Circa 390-335 BC. AV Drachm (13mm, 3.95 g, 2h). Chian standard. Bearded head of Dionysos left, wearing wreath of ivy with berries at the apex / Herakles, wearing lion skin headdress and hunting chiton, kneeling right, drawing bow; QÅs5W@ to left, ˚ to right; all in linear square within incuse square. West 30 var. (letter on rev.; same obv. die); Le Rider, Thasiennes 22; HGC 6, 327; Hunt III 33 (same dies). Superb EF, traces of deposits. Well centered and struck. Very rare. ($88,000) Ex Tkalec & Rauch (25 April 1989), lot 82.

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488409. KINGS of THRACE, Macedonian. Lysimachos. 305-281 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 16.88 g, 1h). In the types of Alexander III of Macedon. Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint. Struck circa 299/8-297/6 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ∫Å%5¬EW% ¬U%5µÅcoU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, M above lion forepart left; ∆ below throne. Thompson 96; Müller 2; Price L31; HGC 3, 1749b. Good VF, deeply toned. ($895) Ex Collection of José Miguel Márquez del Prado; Áureo & Calicó 293 (24 May 2017), lot 2037.

Lovely Late Archaic Workmanship

489944. THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES, Mygdones or Krestones. Circa 480-470 BC. AR Stater (23mm, 8.86 g). Goat kneeling right, head reverted; rosette above / Quadripartite incuse square. Lorber, Goats, Issue 4; HPM pl. I, 2; Asyut 150; Gulbenkian 390; Kraay & Hirmer 380. EF, toned, slight granularity. Lovely archaic style. ($14,500) Ex G. Hirsch 275 (22 September 2011), lot 3419; Giessener Münzhandlung 73 (11 October 1995), lot 85.

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Unique Early Akanthos Tetradrachm

489962. MACEDON, Akanthos. Circa 525-470 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.18 g). Attic standard. Lion right, attacking bull crouching left, biting into its hindquarter; inverted lotus flower below, extending through exergual line / Deep, rough quadripartite incuse square. Unpublished. EF, deep gray tone, with blue and golden hues, a hint of granularity on obverse. A spectacular coin, well centered and struck, and of an exceptionally fine archaic style. Unique tetradrachm from the earliest issue of coinage at Akanthos. ($175,000 ) Ex Numismatica Genevensis SA V (2 December 2008), lot 61; Leu 48 (10 May 1989), lot 106. Akanthos is located in the Chalkidike near the point where the Akte peninsula joins the mainland. In the late sixth century BC, this city began striking coinage, apparently to facilitate the increased trade with those Attic Greek colonies and emporia that had recently been established there. During this same period, as the Persian Empire began its westward expansion into Europe, these coins were also used to pay tribute, part of the Medizing process, in which the locals allied themselves with the Persians. During the Greco-Persian Wars (499-479 BC), Akanthos supported the Persians and, in early 480 BC, provided labor for the construction of a canal across the peninsula, so that the Persian fleet could avoid sailing around the treacherous waters below Mt. Athos at the peninsula’s southernmost tip (Hdt. 7. 22-24, 115, 117). The lion and bull design is common to the tetradrachms of Akanthos from the sixth to the early fourth century BC. The earliest tetradrachms are characterized by thick, dumpy flans, a variable style of incuse, and the head of the lion in three-quarter perspective. Subsequent issues, however, have a flan that is relatively thinner and broader, an incuse of a more regularly quadripartite style, and the head of the lion in profile. The floral symbol in the exergue, which first appeared on some of the earliest tetradrachms, became more stylized in subsequent issues, and sometimes was replaced with other symbols, such as a fish. Later, a pellet-in-annulet appeared above the lion on the obverse, followed by the addition of a subsidiary letter, and, finally, letter combinations and symbols. The series was initially struck on the Attic standard, but when the city became an ally of the Persians in 480 BC, they adopted the Phoenician standard that was common among Persian coinages of the time. The present piece is from the earliest period of coinage at the mint, as evidenced by its thick flan and deep, rough incuse. In fact, the incuse here is deeper and less formed than all other published pieces from this early period, which suggests this coin is the earliest issue known. The piece is also striking for its near realistic style, which is typical of dies in the classical period, but is an unusual characteristic for an archaic issue. One may observe the tense musculature of the attacking lion, the strained posture of the bull reacting to the surprise attack, and even the delicate leaves of the lotus flower below them. This superior artistry suggests that the dies were engraved by a master, which, in addition to the rough incuse, suggests that the dies were the first that were produced for striking tetradrachms at Akanthos, particularly since all the subsequent issues appear to be stylized depictions of the scene as it appears here. All of the early, thick flan issues of Akanthos are extremely rare, with only a handful ever appearing on the market, and the very few known from published hoards are almost all fragments of cut coins. Desneux only located two examples for his 1949 corpus. Not one was even present in the famous archaic coin sales of Kunstfreund and Rosen, nor the great Asyut and Zagazig hoards of archaic coins. The present coin is truly a remarkable specimen for its artistry, rarity, and exceptional state of preservation.

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489959. MACEDON, Neapolis. Circa 500-480 BC. AR Stater (18.5mm, 9.74 g). Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue / Quadripartite incuse square. AMNG III/2, 6; HGC 3, 583; SNG ANS 406–19; Dewing 1604; Kraay & Hirmer 433; Traité I 1740. EF, deeply toned, light scratch under tone on reverse. Perfectly centered on excellent metal. ($10,500) Ex Comte René Philipon Collection (1870-1936). Neapolis, which is well known for its apparently large issues of silver in the 5th-early 4th centuries BC, is relatively unknown outside of numismatics. Its exact location is unknown, though a city that has been under excavation near modern Polychronon may be Neapolis. The city was likely founded as a settlement by colonists from Mende in the 6th century BC. Like many of the other cities in the region, Neapolis supplied troops and ships to Xerxes during the Greco-Persian Wars, and afterward became a member of the Delian League. Its coinage consists of two large series of silver coins, both featuring the facing head of a gorgoneion on the obverse. The first series, with a simple quadripartite incuse reverse, began late in the Archaic period, circa 500 BC, and lasted until circa 480 BC. This is followed by a dual-sided coinage of drachms and hemidrachms featuring a female head on the reverse, which ran from the late 5th century BC until the early 4th century BC.

485557. MACEDON, Neapolis. Circa 375-350 BC. AR Drachm (14.5mm, 1.88 g, 1h). Chian standard. Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue / Head of nymph right, wearing necklace; @-E-o-P around; all within concave incuse. AMNG III/2, 12; HGC 3, 586; SNG ANS 430-54; Traité IV 1168. Near EF, toned. Good metal for issue. ($1450) Ex Auctiones AG 15 (18 September 1985), lot 66.

489782 490653 490653. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (16mm, 4.32 g, 9h). Lampsakos mint. Struck under Kalas or Demarchos, circa 328/5-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, Artemis Phosphoros standing facing, holding two torches; ∂ below throne. Price 1356; ADM II Series V. Near EF, lustrous, a little die wear on obverse. Sharply struck reverse. ($395) 489782. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 4.31 g, 12h). Sardes mint. Struck under Menander, circa 324/3 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; bee in left field, ! below throne. Price 2564; ADM I Series X, 109 (same dies). EF, lustrous, die break on obverse. ($365)

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487481. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (16.5mm, 4.27 g, 12h). Sardes mint. Struck under Menander, circa 324/3 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; ! below throne. Price 2568; ADM I Series X, 78 (same dies). Good VF, toned, underlying luster. Well centered. ($295)

488411. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 17.07 g, 12h). Damaskos mint. Struck under Menon or Menes, circa 330-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬExÅ@ droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, forepart of ram right; below throne, globule between struts, dÅ below. Price 3203; Taylor, Damaskos, Series 2, 177 (A40/P54 – this coin, illustrated). Good VF, darkly toned. ($895) Ex Collection of José Miguel Márquez del Prado; Áureo & Calicó 293 (24 May 2017), lot 2012.

488434. KINGS of MACEDON. temp. Alexander III – Philip III. Circa 324/3-320 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26.5mm, 17.11 g, 3h). In the name and types of Alexander III. Arados mint. Struck under Menes or Laomedon. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU ∫Ås5¬EWs, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; kerykeion in left field, • below throne. Price 3332; Duyrat Group IV, Series 11, 790–1 (D183/R355). Good VF, toned, a few deposits. ($495) Ex José Miguel Márquez del Prado Collection.

486955. KINGS of MACEDON. Philip III Arrhidaios. 323-317 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 17.23 g, 11h). In the name and types of Alexander III. Pella mint. Struck under Antipater or Polyperchon, circa 323-318/7 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; vertical thunderbolt in left field. Price 232; Moore 170-93; BM 2002,0101.125 [Hersh] (same dies). Choice EF, toned. ($1450) From the WRG Collection. Ex CNG Inventory 902390/97553 (July 1992).

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485930. KINGS of MACEDON. Philip III Arrhidaios. 323-317 BC. AV Stater (18mm, 8.63 g, 10h). In the types of Philip II. Abydos mint. Struck under Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos. Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath / f5¬5ππoU, charioteer, holding kentron in right hand, reins in left, driving biga right; star and erasure mark below. Thompson, Philip 25 = ADM II Series VI, 101 = SNG ANS 300 (same dies, but with monogram still in die); CNG 84, lot 277 (same dies). Choice EF, lustrous, a trace of die wear on obverse. ($6750) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, February 1996. Ex Classical Numismatic Group XXXI (9 February 1990), lot 106. This exceptional piece is notable for fact that the monogram that usually appears to the right of the star has been erased in the die. Interestingly, the obverse die used for this issue was also used to strike staters at Lampsakos (see ADM II p. 47 and n. 24).

483764 488435 483764. KINGS of MACEDON. Antigonos I Monophthalmos. As Strategos of Asia, 320-306/5 BC, or king, 306/5-301 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 4.18 g, 1h). In the name and types of Alexander III. Abydos mint. Struck circa 310-301 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; µ in left field, ivy leaf below throne. Price 1527; ADM II Series XIV, 264 (same dies). Good VF, toned. Well centered. ($265) 488435. KINGS of MACEDON. Kassander. As regent, 317-305 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.28 g, 10h). In the name and types of Alexander III. Amphipolis mint. Struck circa 316-311 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / [Å]¬E$Å@ droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; aphlaston in left field, À below throne. Price 129; Troxell, Studies, Issue L3. Near EF, deeply toned. ($395) Ex José Miguel Márquez del Prado Collection.

Exceptional Late Archaic Korkyra

489949. KORKYRA, Korkyra. Circa 525/10-490/70 BC. AR Stater (20mm, 11.07 g). Cow standing left, looking back at suckling calf standing right below / Two rectangular incuse punches with stellate patterns; diamond-shape at center on one stellate, square-shaped center on the other. Fried group I, dies 30/54 = Leu 18 (5 May 1977), lot 135; Jameson 1956 (same obv. die); SNG Delpierre 1195; SNG Lockett 1662; HGC 6, 31. Near EF, lightly toned. Rare. ($25,500) Ex New York Sale XXVII (4 January 2012), lot 345, purchased from Spink, January 1990.

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983618

419480

983618. THESSALY, Herakleia Trachineia. Circa 380-350 BC. Æ Dichalkon (13mm, 2.79 g, 10h). Head of lion right / Club right; ˙rÅ above, uncertain letters below; all within wreath with ties to left. Cf. Rogers 250–1; cf. BCD Thessaly II 90.4–7; HGC 4, 116. VF, dark red and brown patina, area of flat strike. ($135) Ex BCD Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 96, 14 May 2014), lot 117.

419480. THESSALY, Krannon. Circa 350-300 BC. Æ Dichalkon (17mm, 4.38 g, 3h). Rider on horseback right, wearing petasos and chiton / Hydria on cart with long handle to left; to right, crow perched left on wheel; K UK across upper field, KrÅ across lower field. BCD Thessaly II 119.10 var. (same obv. die; spelling of ethnic); HGC 4, 385. Good VF, dark green patina. ($120) Ex BCD Collection (Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 360, 30 September 2015), lot 37.

Two Stunning Larissa Drachms

489946

489948

489946. THESSALY, Larissa. Circa 404 BC. AR Drachm (20mm, 6.07 g, 5h). Head of the nymph Larissa right, hair bound in sakkos, wearing single-pendant earring / Bridled horse leaping right; 2År5sÅ above, Å below. Lorber, Profile 23.1 (A7/ P13) = Traité IV 695, p. CCXCVIII, 5 = Nanteuil 842 = BCD Thessaly I 1131 (this coin); cf. BCD Thessaly II 181; HGC 4, 428 (this coin cited and illustrated). EF, toned. Struck on a broad flan. ($34,500) Ex BCD Collection (Nomos 4, 10 May 2011), lot 1131; Leu 30 (28 April 1982), lot 99; Henri de Nanteuil Collection, no. 842; Bourgey (7 June 1909), lot 228.

489948. THESSALY, Larissa. Circa 356-342 BC. AR Drachm (21.5mm, 6.12 g, 6h). Head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx, single-pendant earring, and plain necklace / GÅr5s>Å5W@, horse standing right, preparing to lie down. Lorber, Hoard, Phase L-III, 51 (same obv. die); BCD Thessaly II 319; HGC 4, 454 corr. (illustration for 453 and 454 switched); SNG Copenhagen 120; SNG Ashmolean 3882; Boston MFA 898. Superb EF, toned, minor die break. ($9500) Ex Paul H. Gerrie Collection (Triton XII, 6 January 2009), lot 220; Leu 81 (16 May 2001), lot 192; Leu 45 (26 May 1988), lot 148.

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983622

968417

968417. THESSALY, Larissa. Late 4th-early 3rd centuries BC. Æ Chalkous (13mm, 1.99 g, 6h). Head of the nymph Larissa right / Horse left, about to roll; 2År5 above, [sÅ]5W@ below; d below horse. Rogers 296; BCD Thessaly II 391.1; HGC 4, 535. VF, black patina. ($145) Ex BCD Collection (Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 311, 25 September 2013), lot 137.

983622. THESSALY, Larissa. Late 4th-early 3rd centuries BC. Æ Hemichalkon (10mm, 2.53 g, 6h). Head of the nymph Larissa left / Horse standing right, preparing to lie down; 2År5sÅ above, [Å5]W@ below; d in right field. Rogers 304; BCD Thessaly II 392.4; HGC 4, 536. Good VF, dark brown patina with hues of pale green. ($145) Ex BCD Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 96, 14 May 2014), lot 218.

Very Rare Pelinna Drachm

489953. THESSALY, Pelinna. Circa 425-350 BC. AR Drachm (19mm, 6.20 g, 10h). Rider on horseback left, wearing petasos and chlamys, holding spear pointing backwards; Å5 above, Å below / [π]E25@@ŬE$Å@droU@, warrior, wearing petasos, chiton, and scabbard with sword, advancing left, head right, holding spear in right hand, shield and a second spear in left; all within incuse square. BCD Thessaly I 1226 (this coin); BCD Thessaly II 510 (same dies); Traité IV 527, pl. CCXC, 15; HGC 4, 263 (this coin cited and illustrated). Near EF, minor marks and roughness. Very rare. ($16,500) Ex BCD Collection (Nomos 4, 10 May 2011), lot 1226.

968419 482179 490654 968419. THESSALY, Pelinna. Late 4th-3rd centuries BC. Æ Chalkous (16mm, 2.50 g, 6h). Rider, wearing petasos and chlamys, on horse prancing left / Mantho standing right, holding open box; π E25 downward to right, @@Å5 upward to left, W horizontal to left. Cf. Rogers 429, fig. 233; BCD Thessaly II 531.1 var. (ethnic); HGC 4, 276. VF, attractive bluish-green patina. ($175) Ex BCD Collection (Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 311, 25 September 2013), lot 231.

482179. THESSALY, Pharkadon. Late 5th-early 4th centuries BC. AR Obol (11mm, 0.88 g, 2h). Horse prancing right / Athena standing left, holding spear in right hand; to right, shield resting on tree; f Å above to left and right, retrograde rKÅ upward to left. BCD Thessaly II 618.4 (same dies); HGC 4, 298. Good VF, lightly toned, a touch of porosity. ($265) Ex AG Collection.

490654. THESSALY, Trikka. Circa 440-400 BC. AR Hemidrachm (15mm, 2.66 g, 6h). Thessalos, petasos and cloak tied at neck, holding band around head of forepart of bull right / Forepart of bridled horse right; [Å]-˚˚-[5]-rt around; all within incuse square. Cf. BCD Thessaly II 767–9 (ethnic); HGC 4, 311. VF, toned, minor double strike and light scratch in field on reverse. ($165) Ex BCD Collection.

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482176 467855 482176. THESSALY, Thessalian League. Late 2nd-mid 1st centuries BC. AR Stater (21mm, 6.13 g, 1h). Sosipatros and Gorgopas, magistrates. Laureate head of Zeus right / QE%%-Å2W@, Athena Itonia advancing right, holding shield in left hand and preparing to hurl spear from right; [%W]%5-∏Åtro% above spear, @-5 across central field; [˝]or˝W∏Å% in exergue. BCD Thessaly II 862.1; HGC 4, 209. VF, toned, struck from worn dies. ($175) Ex BCD Collection.

467855. THESSALY, Thessalian League. Mid-late 1st century BC. AR Stater (23mm, 6.16 g, 12h). Menekrates and Alexandros, magistrates. Head of Zeus right, wearing oak wreath / QE%%Å-2W@, Athena Itonia advancing right, holding shield in left hand and preparing to hurl spear from right; [µ]E@E-˚rÅto[¨] above spear, [Å]2E$Å@dr[o¨] in exergue. BCD Thessaly II 886.2; HGC 4, 210. VF, deeply toned. ($245) Ex BCD Collection (Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 399, 14 June 2017), lot 154; Peus 284 (10 December 1974), lot 220.

883248 883261 883248. PHOKIS, Elateia. Early 2nd century BC. Æ (16mm, 3.82 g, 3h). Head of bull facing, fillets hanging from ears; E2 above / Laureate head of Apollo right; fo˚EW@ upward to left. BCD Lokris 473.1 (this coin); SNG Copenhagen 137; HGC 4, 1143. Good VF, dark green-brown patina. ($195) Ex BCD Collection (Numismatica Ars Classica 55, 8 October 2010), lot 473.1.

883261. PHOKIS, Elateia. Early 2nd century BC. Æ (16mm, 4.61 g, 12h). Head of bull facing, fillets hanging from ears; E2 above / Laureate head of Apollo right; fo˚EW@ upward to left. BCD Lokris 473.13 (this coin); SNG Copenhagen 137; HGC 4, 1143. Near EF, dark green-brown patina. ($195) Ex BCD Collection (Numismatica Ars Classica 55, 8 October 2010), lot 473.13.

485989. EUBOIA, Histiaia. 3rd-2nd centuries BC. AR Tetrobol (15mm, 2.12 g, 2h). Wreathed head of the nymph Histiaia right, wearing single-pendant earring and pearl necklace / 5%t5 Å5EW@, the nymph Histiaia seated half right on the stern of galley left, her left arm placed around stylis to right; wing on stern, %År below. BCD Euboia –; BMC 86; HGC 4, 1524. Choice EF, toned. ($295) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, May 1992.

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The Coinage of Athens in the 5th Century According to myth, the then-unnamed city of Athens, under the tutelage of her first king, Kekrops I, sought a patron deity. Athena and Poseidon, knowing that Athens was fated to be the richest and most powerful city in Greece, both coveted this position and the honor and sacrifices that would come with it. A contest was arranged to determine who would become the city’s protector; each deity was to offer a gift to the Athenians, with the giver of the more useful gift declared the winner. Poseidon, god of the seas, created a spring on the Athenian acropolis and promised that the city would become a naval power, while Athena, goddess of wisdom and war, offered the olive tree, a symbol of peace and source of prosperity. Kekrops, who was appointed judge of the competition, chose Athena’s gift, and the city was named after her new patron goddess. Archaeological evidence indicates Athens was continuously inhabited since the early Neolithic period and was an important Mycenaean center by the middle of the 2nd millennium BC (interestingly, around the time the 1st century BC rhetorician Kastor of Rhodes’ dates the reign of Kekrops). Like other settlements in Greece, Athens fell into decline during the late Mycenaean Period, but was spared the widespread destruction and/or abandonment that many Greek towns met. Athens’ population greatly expanded during the succeeding Greek Dark Age (circa 1100-800 BC) and Archaic Period (circa 800-481 BC). The growth of the peasant population was particularly significant during these periods, and the desire of the lower classes to have a voice in civic affairs had a direct impact on the foundation of Athenian democracy. The coins offered below date to a period in the 5th century BC when Athens transformed itself from leader of an alliance of city-states to head of an empire. This was the age of the First and Second Peloponnesian Wars (460-445 and 431-404 BC, respectively), fought between the Delian League led by Athens and the Peloponnesian League led by Sparta. Predictably, the demands of the conflicts and increasingly central role of Athens in the political affairs of Greece and beyond led to a dramatic increase in the production of coinage. Thukydides (2.13.3) records that Athens received six hundred talents of silver in tribute every year, and the city controlled a major source of silver in the Laurion Mines. Considering that roughly 1,500 tetradrachms or 6,000 drachms could be coined from each talent of silver, we can begin to get some sense of the staggering output of the Athenian mint. Iconography and Stylistic Evolution After Athens’ “wappenmünzen” issues, the city settled on a design that focused on her patron goddess. For centuries Athens’ tetradrachms would carry an immobilized design with a helmeted head of Athena on the obverse and the goddess’ symbol, an owl, on the reverse. The olive sprig behind the owl referred to the gift Athena gave to its city, and, taken as a whole, the coin type serves as a proud summation of Athens’ foundation myth. Athenian tetradrachms of this type were known for their reliable weight and purity and served as the dominant currency throughout the eastern Mediterranean (and were widely imitated as far afield as Baktria and Arabia) until the flood of Alexander the Great’s coinage supplanted them in the late 4th century BC.

Bold Group IV Transitional Tetradrachm

486376. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 475-465 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.18 g, 11h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, [necklace], and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, with spread tail feathers; olive sprig to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Starr Group IV (unlisted dies); Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 9, 8–12; HGC 4, 1595. Good VF, toned. Great metal. A wonderful small owl, neatly presented in the incuse. ($7500) Chester Starr arranged Athens’ coinage from ca. 480 until the mid 5th century into five groups, and his chronology is still widely accepted today (although the dating of his Group V coins is now considered too late). By the time of Starr’s Group IV, production of tetradrachms had steadily increased and the uptick in the number of required dies (and engravers) necessitated a greater standardization of style. On the obverse, the head of Athena changes little from Starr’s Group III – the goddess has a bold profile and retains her “archaic smile”; the hair on her forehead is arranged in two waves, with somewhat greater uniformity than previous periods; and on her helmet, her leaves float above the visor (sometimes referred to as a “laurel wreath,” these leaves were first introduced after the victory over the Persians in 480/79 BC). On the reverse, the owl’s rear leg is often stretched back, and her tail is split into three flared feathers. Owls of this period are generally smaller than those depicted on later issues, as is the size of the letters comprising the ethnic.

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487485. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 475-465 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.21 g, 8h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, with spread tail feathers; olive sprig to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Starr Group IV, 126 var. (O–/R119 [unlisted obv. die]); Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 9, 8–12; HGC 4, 1595. Good VF. Great metal. ($6750)

Attractive Starr Group V.B

487501. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 465/2-454 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.21 g, 11h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, [necklace], and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, spread tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Starr Group V.B (unlisted dies); Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 10, 1–10; HGC 4, 1596. Near EF, lightly toned with underlying luster. ($6750) On Starr’s Group V tetradrachms, Athena’s helmet decoration remains similar in form to his Group IV, but the arrangement of the hair is notably different. The wave has been abandoned, with the hair now falling over the forehead in one long swoop. On the reverse, the lettering is still quite small (although we begin to see a gradual enlargement on some dies). The owl’s tail remains flared, but the treatment of the legs has become more standardized. While earlier groups often rendered the owl with one leg drawn back, the legs on Group V tetradrachms are consistently parallel and a bit more rigid in their execution.

Transfer of the Delian League Treasury

487491. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (22mm, 17.19 g, 6h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, [necklace], and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, closed tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 10, 16; Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. EF, light marks in reverse field. Robust and attractive owl. ($2750) In 454 BC, the treasury of the Delian League was transferred from Delos to the Athenian acropolis, and the League’s funds were used for undertaking massive building projects intended to glorify Athens (the Parthenon being the most famous). Tribute was now paid directly to Athens, which had become an empire in all but name, and the scale of coin production soared. Certain details in the design set tetradrachms of this period apart: the leaves on the helmet are consistently attached to the visor; the form of the helmet’s palmette is modified; the letters on the reverse are gradually enlarged; and the owl’s tail is depicted as a compact prong, rather than as three flared feathers. On this coin, the style of the palmette on Athena’s helmet and the narrow, deep incuse of the reverse suggests that it was among the earliest in the ubiquitous tetradrachms of the mid-late 5th century, as these features more closely resemble those found on the early-mid 5th century issues (“Starr Groups”). As Athens massive output of coinage progressed during the mid-late 5th century, the mint required a large number of die engravers and it is no surprise that we encounter quite a bit of stylistic variation as a result. Recently, Christophe Flament has attempted to arrange the chronological sequence of the silver coinage of this period. However, it must be kept in mind that an ordering based on stylistic analysis is naturally subjective. Engravers with varying degrees of skill must have been working side by side. A firmer understanding of Athens’ coinage during this period awaits a comprehensive die study, which, admittedly, would be a Herculean task for any numismatist!

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487493. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.21 g, 5h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, closed tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 12, 9; HGC 4, 1597. EF, faint doubling on obverse. Boldy struck on a full flan. Lovely and delicate style. ($4500)

490673

490676 490673. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.20 g, 4h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, closed tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 12, 18; HGC 4, 1597. Choice EF, lightly toned with underlying luster. Exceptional crest. ($5750) 490676. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.18 g, 8h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, closed tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 12, 24; HGC 4, 1597. Choice EF, toned and with underlying luster. A compact and tidy rendition of Athena, with exceptional crest. ($5750) 24


490672. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 17.23 g, 12h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, [necklace], and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, closed tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 14, 7; HGC 4, 1597. Superb EF, fully lustrous. ($3750)

488886. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 400/390-353 BC. AR Tetradrachm (21.5mm, 17.21 g, 9h). Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace with pendants, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing, closed tail feathers; olive sprig and crescent to left, AQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 15a-b; Svoronos, Monnaies pl. 19, 19; HGC 4, 1598. EF, deep cabinet toning. ($1450)

485993. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 165-42 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 16.93 g, 12h). New Style coinage. Metrodoros, Demosthe(nes), and Aristode(s), magistrates. Struck 115/4 BC. Head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing single-pendant earring and triple crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos and floral pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; Å-œE above; ;˙t>rodW>ro%> År5%>tod˙ to left, d˙>;o%>œE over grape bunch to right; Z on amphora, [uncertain letters below]; all within wreath. Thompson 637 var. (unlisted combination of magistrates; same obv. die); HGC 4, 1602. EF, toned. Very rare. ($1875) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, 1991.

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488413. BITHYNIA, Kalchedon. Circa 260-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (29mm, 16.79 g, 12h). In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU ∫Ås5¬EWs, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; , in left field, grain ear in exergue. Price 926 (Kallatis); Türkoğlu –; HGC 7, 521. Good VF, toned, a couple minor cuts on obverse. ($575) Ex Collection of José Miguel Márquez del Prado; Áureo & Calicó 295 (5 July 2017), lot 23. See U. Wartenberg & J.H. Kagan, “Some Comments on a New Hoard from the Balkan Sea” in Travaux Le Rider, pp. 402–5, for the reattribution of this, and many of the other issues Price assigned to Kallatis, to Kalchedon.

483765. MYSIA, Kyzikos. Circa 550-450 BC. EL Hemihekte – Twelfth Stater (8mm, 1.31 g). Head of boar right, holding in its mouth a tunny upward / Quadripartite incuse square. Von Fritze I 34; Boston MFA –; SNG BN –; Pozzi 2163. Good VF. ($675)

Fine Style Pedigreed to 1966

489954. MYSIA, Kyzikos. Circa 390-341/0 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 15.25 g, 7h). Head of Kore Soteira left, wearing single-pendant earring, hair in sphendone covered with a veil, two grain ears in hair; sotE5rA above / Head of lion left, mouth open with tongue protruding; below, tunny fish left; grape bunch behind; kU-Z5 above. Pixodarus Type 2, Group B; von Fritze II 23, pl. V, 26; SNG BN 398 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen –; SNG von Aulock –; BMC –. EF, lightly toned. ($19,500) Ex Nomos FPL (Winter-Spring 2008), no. 47; Hess-Leu 31 (6 December 1966), lot 400.

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Amongst the Finest Known

489958. MYSIA, Pergamon. Mid-late 330s BC. AV Stater (17mm, 8.61 g, 12h). Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Archaistic Palladion: statue of Pallas Athena standing facing, holding spear aloft in right hand, preparing to strike, on left arm, a shield adorned with a four-point star and fillet hanging below; to lower left, a crested Corinthian helmet right; all within cupped circular incuse. Callataÿ, Statères 3a (dies D2/R4 – this coin); SNG BN 1557 = De Luynes 2493 = Saida 37; von Fritze, Pergamon 7; var. (rev. not in incuse); Gulbenkian 699 var. (same); Jameson 2580 var. (same); PCG pl. 28, 25 var. (same). Superb EF, lustrous. Perhaps the finest known. Rare. ($69,500) Although lacking a legend, this series has been attributed to Pergamon, based on similar silver fractions, which also contain the city ethnic, ΠEPΓA(M) (SNG BN 1558-66). On the other hand, the date of this issue is less certain. SNG BN placed it circa 310-284 BC, though ignoring that two examples of this type were found in the Saïda hoard (IGCH 1508 = CH VIII 190), which Westermark dated to circa 323/20 BC. She also saw a correlation between these staters and those of Philippi in Macedon (an example of which was in the hoard), and accordingly dated them to after 336 BC (echoed by G.K. Jenkins and M. Castro Hipólito in the Gulbenkian catalog), based on Mørkholm’s placement of the Philippi issues during the reign of Alexander (EHC pp. 84-5). Mørkholm’s dating, however, was based on the single coin of Philippi in the Saïda hoard (Saïda 34), which was of such high grade that he thought it must have been struck near the date of the hoard’s deposit. Other numismatists, however, have placed these Philippi staters earlier, circa 356-345 BC (Bellinger, Philippi p. 37, and N. Waggoner in SNG ANS). The hoard also contained ten of the twelve known examples of an extremely rare gold issue of Kios. Significantly, this issue of Kios and the fact that the Pergamene staters have a close stylistic affinity with the coinages of Philip II and Alexander III – offer a potential clue toward identifying when and why they were struck. More recently, F. de Callataÿ has revisited the issue by examining the examples of this issue that have appeared on the market over the last decade (F. de Callataÿ. “Les statères de Pergame et les réquisitions d’Alexandre le Grand: l’apport d’un nouveau trésor (‘Statères de Pergame 2004’)” in RN 169 [2012]). Exhibiting no traces of circulation wear, these coins are closer to the full Attic weight than the two more worn specimens in the Saïda hoard, suggesting an earlier date for this issue than circa 323/20 BC. Callataÿ also demonstrated (along with the two specimens in the Saïda hoard) that in total five obverse and seven reverse dies by two engravers were used in striking this issue, all of which are die-linked. The obverse dies share a close stylistic similarity to early Alexandrine issues of Miletos (cf. Leu 81, lot 182) and Abydos (cf. CNG 70, lot 92), as well as earlier staters of Philippi (cf. Triton IX, lot 724). Likewise, the control marks that appear on these Pergamene coins (Corinthian helmet, rose, and eagle [or cock]), are symbols typically found on coins from early in the reign of Alexander III. The apparently brief but intense minting of these Pergamene staters, with their links to Macedonian types struck early in the reign of Alexander III, suggests that these coins were struck from funds requisitioned locally for the Macedonian troops in Asia Minor of Alexander himself in 334 BC (cf. Diod. Sic. 17.19-21; cf. Plut. Vit. Alex. 16.1-8; cf. Arr. Anab. 1.14-16).

489960. TROAS, Abydos. Late 6th-early 5th centuries BC. EL Trite – Third Stater (11mm, 4.67 g). Eagle standing left, head right, with wings closed / Incuse punch. SNG Ashmolean –; cf. SNG München 1 (stater); cf. BMC 33 (Ionia; same); Aufhauser 20 (16 October 2007), lot 73 (same dies). Near EF, slightly off center. Extremely rare – one of two known. ($13,500) Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 59 (4 April 2011), lot 610.

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468953 485151 489783 468953. IONIA, Uncertain. Circa 650-600 BC. EL Trite – Third Stater (12mm, 4.63 g). Lydo-Milesian standard. Globular surface with cluster of pellets / Two incuse squares. Weidauer –; Traité I 3; Elektron –; Rosen 253; SNG Kayhan –; SNG von Aulock 7761; Boston MFA 1749; Pozzi 2350. Near EF, as made. Rare. ($2750) 485151. IONIA, Uncertain. Circa 625-600 BC. EL Hekte – Sixth Stater (9mm, 2.50 g). Phokaic standard. Raised clockwise swastika pattern / Quadripartite incuse square. Weidauer –; Karwiese, Artemision, Type II.7; Elektron II 53; Rosen 314; Traité I 117-8; SNG Kayhan –; SNG von Aulock 1777. Good VF. ($950) Ex L. Shea Collection; Daniel Koppersmith Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 94, 18 September 2013), lot 570; Classical Numismatic Group 90 (23 May 2012), lot 599.

489783. IONIA, Uncertain. Circa 625-600 BC. EL Myshemihekte – Twenty-fourth Stater (7mm, 0.63 g). Phokaic standard. Raised counterclockwise swastika pattern / Quadripartite square punch. Weidauer –; Karwiese, Artemision, Type II.7; Traité I 237 var. (swastika clockwise); SNG Kayhan 702; Boston MFA 1782 var. (same); Rosen 365. Good VF, struck from a worn obverse die. ($295)

Early Carian Coastal Issue

489950. CARIA, Uncertain. Circa 500-490 BC. AR Stater (22mm, 13.64 g). Two dolphins leaping in opposing directions, the top right, the bottom left; below, small dolphin leaping right; all within dotted square border with floral ornaments in the corners / Two parallel rectangular incuses with irregular striations. Stefanaki, Corpus 29 (D7/R11); Cahn, Poseidion, pp. 11–2; HGC 6, 1350; SNG von Aulock 2743 var. (orientation of dolphins); SNG Keckman 283 var. (legend on obv.); Asyut 689–91; Boston MFA 2010 = Warren 1181; Jameson 1542. EF, traces of find patina on reverse. Well struck. ($44,000) Ex Roma 4 (30 September 2012), lot 383. This issue had originally been attributed to Poseidion on Karpathos, but Cahn’s analysis of the issues bearing an inscription, πos, has conclusively shown that this legend is not an ethnic, and thus cannot indicate a mint at that city. It is most likely struck at a mint on the coast of Caria, or one of the other mints that used this form of double rectangular incuse: Ialysos, Kamiros, or Lindos. The style of the incuse suggests that this piece may predate the previously known issues of this mint.

489956. ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Rhodes. Circa 340-316 BC. AR Didrachm (18mm, 6.91 g, 12h). Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; rod5o@ above, grape bunch and E to left; all within incuse square. Ashton 98; SNG Keckman 436-40 HGC 6, 1433. Near EF, toned. ($2750)

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488415 489784 488415. ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Rhodes. Circa 250-229 BC. AR Didrachm (19mm, 6.63 g, 12h). Mnasimachos, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; Â@Å%5ÂÅco% above, r-o flanking stem; to left, Athena Nikephoros standing left. Ashton 208; SNG Keckman 537; HGC 6, 1439. Near EF, lightly toned, well centered. ($675) Ex D. C. Kopen Collection; Classical Numismatic Group 73 (13 September 2006), lot 374.

489784. ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Rhodes. Circa 170-150 BC. AR Hemidrachm (12mm, 1.13 g, 12h). ‘Plinthophoric’ coinage. Athanodoros, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; ÅœÅ@odWro% above, r-o across field, kerykeion to left; all within incuse square. Jenkins, Rhodian, Group B, 43; SNG Keckman 651; HGC 6, 1462. Near EF, lightly toned. ($245) Ex Macy Collection; Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 400 (28 June 2017), lot 272.

489945. SELEUKID EMPIRE. Seleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. AV Stater (19mm, 8.56 g, 7h). In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Babylon I mint. Struck circa 311-300 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing single pendant earring, necklace, and triple-crested Corinthian helmet adorned with a sphinx seated right / ∫Å-s5¬EWs ŬE$Å@droU, Nike standing left, holding wreath in extended right hand, and cradling stylis in left arm; © below left wing, A below right wing. SC 81.9 corr. (position of monogram); Price 3716 corr. (same); HGC 9, 3a; SNG Saroglos 161 corr. (monogram in wreath). EF, underlying luster. Well centered on a broad flan. ($8250) Ex Lanz 74 (20 November 1995), lot 165.

488416. SELEUKID EMPIRE. Demetrios II Nikator. First reign, 146-138 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 14.27 g, 1h). Phoenician standard. Sidon mint. Dated SE 168 (145/4 BC). Diademed and draped bust right / d˙;˙tr5oU ∫Ås5¬EWs, eagle standing left; palm frond over far shoulder; to left, ˙$r (date) above w; to right, s5dW above aphlaston. SC 1954.2b; Rouvier 1237; HGC 9, 969; DCA 152. Good VF, toned, struck from slightly worn obverse die. ($775) Ex MNL Collection; Patrick H.C. Tan Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 84, 5 May 2010), lot 693; Auctiones 15 (18 June 1985), lot 193.

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486021. PHOENICIA, Tyre. 126/5 BC-AD 65/6. AR Shekel (27.5mm, 14.17 g, 12h). Dated CY 50 (77/6 BC). Bust of Melkart right, wearing laurel wreath, lion skin around neck / Eagle standing left on prow; palm frond in background; to left, l@ (date) above club; d5 to right, b (Phoenician B) between legs; tUr[o]U 5Er&% ˚&5 &%U¬oU around. DCA-Tyre 177; HGC 10, 358; DCA 919; BMC –. EF, iridescent toning. ($2250) From the WRG Collection. Ex Coin Galleries (7 November 1990), lot 216.

485559. JUDAEA, Jewish War. 66-70 CE. AR Shekel (23mm, 13.78 g, 11h). Jerusalem mint. Dated year 1 (66/7 CE). Omer cup; ! (“1” in Hebrew = date) above, pellets flanking; L!Rc¥ LQc (“Shekel of Israel” in Hebrew) around / Sprig of three pomegranates; YcrQ 2Lcur¥ (“Jerusalem [the] holy” in Hebrew) around. Deutsch 25 (O8/R19); Meshorer 187; Kadman 2; Hendin 1354; Bromberg 59 (same obv. die); Shoshana II 20107 (same obv. die); Sofaer 2–3; Spaer 162–4. EF, toned. ($16,500)

486022. JUDAEA, Jewish War. 66-70 CE. AR Shekel (22mm, 13.71 g, 12h). Jerusalem mint. Dated year 2 (67/8 CE). Omer cup; @c (“Y[ear] 2” in Hebrew = date) in Hebrew above, L!Rc¥ LQc (“Shekel of Israel” in Hebrew) around / Sprig of three pomegranates; YcurQY 2¥Lcur¥ (“Jerusalem the holy” in Hebrew) around. Deutsch 62 (O5/R59); Meshorer 193; Kadman 8; Hendin 1358; Bromberg 63–4; Shoshana I 20202–3; Sofaer 5–8; Spaer 167–8. EF, toned. ($9500) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (9 December 1992), lot 3144.

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486023. JUDAEA, Bar Kochba Revolt. 132-135 CE. AR Sela – Tetradrachm (23.5mm, 14.39 g, 2h). Undated issue, attributed to year 3 (134/5 CE). Façade of the Temple at Jerusalem; showbread table within, wavy line above, 3∑o2C (“Shim‘on” in Hebrew) at sides / Bundle of lulav; etrog to left, 2LC∑R¥ ¡∑RHL (“For the Freedom of Jerusalem” in Hebrew) around. Mildenberg 68 (O14/R53); Meshorer 270 (same obv. die as illustration); Hendin 1413; Bromberg 426 (same dies); Shoshana II 20336 same obv. die); Sofaer 107-13; Spaer 193-7. EF, slightly crude strike. Overstruck on an uncertain Roman tetradrachm. ($5950 ) From the WRG Collection. Ex Harlan J. Berk BBS 47 (19 February 1987), lot 214.

486024. JUDAEA, Bar Kochba Revolt. 132-135 CE. AR Zuz (18mm, 3.21 g, 6h). Undated issue, attributed to year 3 (134/5 CE). Grape bunch on vine; 3∑o2c (“Shim‘on” in Hebrew) around / Palm frond; 2lc∑R¥ ¡∑Rjl (“for the freedom of Jerusalem” in Hebrew) around. Meshorer 149 (O11/R102); Meshorer 281 (same obv. die as illustration); Hendin 1430 (same dies as illustration); Bromberg 508 (same dies); Shoshana I 20438 (same dies); Sofaer 133 (same dies); Spaer 225 (same dies). Good VF, toned. Overstruck on a denarius of Vespasian. ($875) From the WRG Collection.

489957. PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. temp. Darios I to Xerxes II. Circa 485-420 BC. AV Daric (15mm, 8.38 g). LydoMilesian standard. Sardes mint. Persian king or hero, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver over shoulder, in kneeling-running stance right, holding spear in right hand, bow in left / Incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb, Group A/B (pl. XIII, 27); Meadows, Administration 321; BMC Arabia pl. XXIV, 26; Sunrise 24. Superb EF. ($7950) Ex Nomos 11 (9 October 2015), lot 119.

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Oriental Greek

488417. KINGS of PERSIS. Vādfradād (Autophradates) II. Early-mid 2nd century BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 16.39 g, 11h). Istakhr (Persepolis) mint. Bearded head right, wearing diadem and kyrbasia adorned with eagle / Fire temple of AhuraMazda; above, half-figure of Ahura-Mazda; to left, Vādfradād standing right, bow before; to right, eagle standing left on standard. K&M 3/1 (same obv. die); Alram 546; DeMorgan, p. 403 and pl. XXVIII, 7 and 10 (for obv.; same die); cf. BMC 1 (Darius[?]; for type); Sunrise –; MACW –; Nomos 14, lot 172 (same obv. die). Near EF, toned. Very rare. ($9750) Ex Nisa Collection.

488419. BAKTRIA, Greco-Baktrian Kingdom. Antimachos I Theos. Circa 180-170 BC. AR Tetradrachm (32mm, 16.59 g, 12h). Diademed and draped bust right, wearing kausia / ∫Å%5¬EW% QEoU downward to right, Å@t5;ÅcoU downward to left, Poseidon standing facing, holding trident and filleted palm; Í to inner right. Bopearachchi 1A; SNG ANS 274-5; HGC 12, 106. EF, light porosity. ($2450) Ex David Nelson Collection; Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 115 (25 May 2005), lot 186.

482175. BAKTRIA, Indo-Greek Kingdom. Menander I Soter. Circa 155-130 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 2.50 g, 12h). ∫å%5GE∑% %∑t˙ro% ÂE@å@droU, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing crested helmet covered with pelt of scales and adorned with wing / s#˜M srt{ sjrhµ (Maharajasa tratarasa Menamdrasa in Kharosthi), Athena Alkidemos advancing left; monogram to right. Bopearachchi 16E; SNG ANS 868-74; HGC 12, 193. Near EF, lightly toned, traces of earthen deposits. ($265)

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Roman Provincial

486245. GAUL, Nemausus. Augustus, with Agrippa. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ As (26mm, 12.57 g, 9h). Struck circa AD 10-14. IMP above, DIVI • F below, P P across field, heads of Agrippa, wearing combined rostral crown and laurel wreath, and Augustus, laureate, back to back / COL (NE)M across field, crocodile right, chained to long palm frond; at top, wreath with long ties; two palm fronds at base. RPC I 525; RIC I 159. VF, attractive dark green patina. ($575) From the WRG Collection.

486784 482177 486784. TROAS, Alexandria Troas. Pseudo-autonomous issue. temp. Trebonianus Gallus, AD 251-253. Æ (23mm, 5.39 g, 6h). ALEX TRO, turreted and draped bust of Tyche right, with vexillum inscribed [CO/AV] over shoulder / COL AVG, TROA in exergue, horse grazing right. Bellinger A486; RPC IX 486. VF, attractive light apple green patina. ($245) 482177. PAMPHYLIA, Perge. Marcus Aurelius. AD 161-180. Æ (25mm, 10.70 g, 6h). AVT KAI M A ΑΝΤ[ΩΝЄΙΝΟС], laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / ΠЄΡΓΑΙΩΝ, Asclepius standing facing, head left, leaning on serpent-entwined staff; omphalos at feet to right. SNG BN –; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen –; BMC –; RPC Online 8408 var. or corr. VF, green patina. Extremely rare. ($175) RPC Online currently lists only one specimen for this type, citing a coin in trade in the United States. The obverse legend is listed as “ΑVΤ ΚΑΙС ΑΝΤΩΝЄΙΝΟС” and the omphalos on the reverse is not noted. As no image or weight is given, it is impossible to say if our coin is the same as that cited in RPC (although with incorrect description), or a variant.

486169. SELEUCIS and PIERIA, Antioch. Claudius. AD 41-54. Æ As (24mm, 14.76 g, 12h). IM • TI • CLA [• CAE] AV • GER •, laureate head right / Large S C; • below; all within circular boder within laurel wreath. McAlee 250c; RPC I 4279. EF, even dark brown patina. Choice. ($395) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Coin Galleries, 18 November 1983. Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XI (8 December 1982), lot 386.

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Selections from the Staffieri Collection of Alexandrian Coins

484441. EGYPT, Alexandria. Claudius. AD 41-54. Æ Obol (22mm, 4.91 g, 12h). Dated RY 11 (AD 50/1). [TI KΛ]AY KAI CEBA[C ΓEPM], laureate head right / AYT OKPA across field, right hand holding two stalks of grain and three poppies; [L IA] (date) below. Köln –; Dattari (Savio) 151; K&G 12.73; RPC I 5184; Emmett 89.11; Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 7 (this coin). EF, attractive reddish brown patina. A wonderful piece that is normally seen heavily circulated. ($795) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Emporium Hamburg 66 (17 November 2011), lot 182.

484442. EGYPT, Alexandria. Agrippina Junior. Augusta, AD 50-59. Æ Diobol (26mm, 10.42 g, 12h). Dated RY 13 of Claudius (AD 52/3). AΓPIΠΠINA [CЄBAC]TH, draped bust of Agrippina Junior right, wearing wreath of grain ears / Draped bust of Euthenia right, wearing wreath of grain ears; [Є]YӨH NIA/L IΓ (date) across field, two grain ears to lower right. Köln 110-2; K&G 13.4; RPC I 5194; Emmett 103.13; Dattari (Savio) 179 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 11 (this coin). Good VF, reddish-brown and green patina. An untouched and attractive coin. ($975) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Sammlung Amadeus (Giessener Münzhandlung 100, 20 November 1999), lot 452; Kunst und Münzen AG XXII (2 April 1981), lot 263; Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 179. According to Emmett, this type was coined for Claudius’ regnal years 11-13 and 15. Agrippina Junior, wife and niece of Claudius, is assimilated to the goddess Euthenia (Abundance), the wife of Nilus, and symbol of agricultural prosperity, who appears on the reverse. The excellent and realistic portrait of Agrippina recalls, in particular, the marble head that resides in the collection of Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen (Catalog No. 636).

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One of the Great Rarities of the Alexandrian Series Ex Dattari Collection

484443. EGYPT, Alexandria. Nero. AD 54-68. Æ Drachm (38mm, 36.04 g, 12h). Dated RY 14 (AD 67/8). NEPΩ KΛAV KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP AV, laureate head right; L I∆ (date) below chin / ΖΕΥΣ ΚΑΠΕΤ[ΩΛΙΟΣ], Zeus enthroned left, holding long scepter and thunderbolt; at feet, eagle standing left, head right. Köln –; K&G 14.118 corr. (obv. legend); RPC I 5285 (this coin cited; attributed to RY 11 in error); Emmett 140.14 (R5); Dattari (Savio) 281 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 20 (this coin). EF, dark brown surfaces with traces of green, twice holed in antiquity (which does not affect any significant part of the design). Exceptional and one of the classic rarities of the series. The authors of RPC cite only two examples: this coin, and an example in the ANS collection. ($25,000) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Kunst und Münzen AG FPL 50 (November 1982), lot 151; Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 281. This coin is one of the great rarities of the Alexandrian series, with only one other specimen having been offered for sale (Marcel Jungfleisch Collection, Sotheby’s, 1972, lot 26, which also was holed twice in antiquity). Another, heavily worn example resides in the collection of the American Numismatic Society in New York City (mistakenly attributed to regnal year 11). Nero issued a prodigious amount of billon tetradrachms at the Alexandria mint. It has been speculated that this was part of his fund-raising campaign to rebuild Rome after the devastating fire of AD 64 (he melted down the higher silver content tetradrachms already in circulation, and replaced them with the lower silver content billon tetradrachms). As a result, bronze coinage in general was neglected during Nero’s reign in Alexandria, especially the larger denominations – hemidrachm and drachm.

Ex Wetterstrom, Meyer-Coloniensis, & Dattari Collections

484449. EGYPT, Alexandria. Trajan. AD 98-117. Æ Drachm (38mm, 29.10 g, 12h). Dated RY 13 (AD 109/10). AVT [TP] AIAN CЄB ΓЄPM ∆AKIK, laureate and draped bust right / Trajan, holding eagle-tipped scepter and branch, driving quadriga right; L IΓ (date) above. Köln –; K&G 27.260; Emmett 459.13 (R4); Dattari (Savio) 747 = RPC III 4385.1/2 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 52 (this coin). Near EF, attractive green and reddish-brown patina, slight double strike on obverse. Struck on an unusually large flan. Exceptional quality. Extremely rare type for this regnal year, the authors of RPC cite only two specimens: this coin and an example in the Vatican, no. 261. ($4250) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Kerry K. Wetterstrom Collection (Classical Numismatic Auctions XIII, 4 December 1990), lot 31; Dr. Meyer-Coloniensis Collection (Münz Zentrum 64, 15 April 1988), lot 221, purchased in 1976 from Münz Zentrum; Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 747.

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484450. EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian. AD 117-138. BI Tetradrachm (24mm, 13.65 g, 12h). Dated RY 10 (AD 125/6). AVT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CЄB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Agathodaimon serpent, wearing skhent and with a grain ear in its coils, erect to right, facing Uraeus serpent, wearing horns and disc and with a grain ear in its coils, erect to left; L ∆E-KAT-OV (date) around. Köln 895; Dattari (Savio) 1550; K&G 32.336; Emmett 804.10; RPC III 5596/44 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 58 (this coin). EF, toned. Exceptional quality for issue. ($3750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Numismatic Art & Ancient Coins FPL 6 (Zürich, Fall 1988), lot 211.

Exceptional for Issue

484451. EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian. AD 117-138. Æ Diobol (25mm, 8.40 g, 10h). Dated RY 15 (AD 130/1). AVT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CЄB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Hadrian, raising hand in salutation and holding scepter, seated left on galley sailing left under direction of helmsman; vexillum on front deck, L I-E (date) across upper field. Köln 1032; K&G 32.513; Emmett 1127.15; Dattari (Savio) 1582 = RPC III 5785/29 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 86 (this coin). Choice EF, reddish-brown patina with touches of green. Exceptional state of preservation. ($3750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection, purchased from Dr. Piero Beretta, Milan, October 1972; Dr. Piero Beretta Collection (Milan); Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 1582.

484453. EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian. AD 117-138. Æ Drachm (35mm, 25.00 g, 12h). Dated RY 19 (AD 134/5). AVT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CЄB, laureate head left / Harpokrates of Herakleopolis, wearing kalathos, standing facing, head left, raising finger to his mouth and cradling club; altar at feet to left, L ЄNNЄ-AKΔ (date) around. Köln 1177; Dattari (Savio) 1730; K&G 32.653; Emmett 979.19; RPC III 6002/11 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 78 (this coin). Good VF, dark green-brown patina. Very rare with bust left, only one specimen in CoinArchives (CNG E-286, lot 257), which graded Fair. ($3750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; UBS 83 (8 September 2009), lot 238.

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RPC Plate Coin

484454. EGYPT, Alexandria. Aelius. Caesar, AD 136-138. Æ Hemidrachm (28mm, 11.36 g, 12h). Struck AD 137. Λ AIΛI[OC K]AICAP, bareheaded and draped bust right / [Δ]HM ЄΞOY-C [Y]ΠAT • B •, Homonoia enthroned left, holding phiale; cornucopia at side of throne, OMONOIA in exergue. Köln 1273; Dattari (Savio) 2078 & 7995; K&G 34.5; Emmett 1352 (R3); RPC III 6234/26 (this coin, illustrated on pl. 316) = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 165 (this coin). Good VF, dark brown surfaces. Very rare denomination for Aelius, and an exceptional example. ($1750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Auctiones AG 26 (16 September 1996), lot 409. Employing an interesting dating convention for the time, this series carried Aelius’ titles (and subsequent dates) as tribune and consul, the latter for the second time. Other series generally involved the dating of the coins with respect to the emperor’s regnal year rather than the conventions employed here.

From the Canavesi, Beretta, and Dattari Collections

484457. EGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (35mm, 25.45 g, 12h). Dated RY 2 (AD 138/9). AV T K T AIΛ A∆P ANTωNINOC ЄVCЄB, bareheaded bust right, slight drapery / Tyche reclining left on lectisternium (couch), holding rudder with her right hand, resting left elbow on pile of pillows; L B (date) above. Köln 1312-3 var. (bust type); K&G 35.33 var. (same); Emmett 1687.2; Dattari (Savio) 8765 corr. (this coin, obv. photo is incorrect in the plates) = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 111 (this coin). EF, attractive reddish-brown patina. An early portrait of exquisite execution, which is far superior to any at auction since 2000 for this regnal year. ($7750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection, purchased from Renzo Canavesi, Sagno, 1996; Renzo Canavesi Collection (Sagno); Dr. Piero Beretta Collection (Milan); Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 8765. A true gem from the Staffieri Collection, this piece was featured on the cover of the catalog when his collection was sold.

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Wonderful Depiction of Kronos

484459. EGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (35mm, 26.99 g, 1h). Dated RY 4 (AD 140/1). AVT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTωNINOC ЄVC CЄB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Pius right / Draped and veiled bust right of Kronos, crowned with solar disk; falx (sickle) to right; L ∆ (date) across field. Köln –; Dattari (Savio) 8583 (same dies); K&G 35.92 var. (date spelled out, falx behind Kronos’ shoulder = Dattari 2684); Emmett 1595.4 (R5); Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 117 (this coin). Near EF, attractive dark brown patina. Extremely rare, a type issued by Pius only during his fourth regnal year. An exceptional bust of Kronos, with only two other specimens appearing at auction since 2000. ($12,500) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection, purchased from Dr. Piero Beretta, Milan, September 1973; Dr. Piero Beretta Collection (Milan). Giovanni purchased this coin from Dr. Beretta, one of his sources for Dattari coins, and believed it to be Dattari 8583 (and it does share the same dies). Dattari 8583 was, however, part of the Dr. Meyer-Coloniensis Collection (Münz Zentrum 64, 15 April 1988, lot 270), and it was recently sold again by Peus in their Auction 420, lot 308 (1 November 2017). Most likely, this was another example of this rare type that was acquired by Dr. Beretta from another source, and due to sharing the same dies, he thought it to be the Dattari coin.

Sarapis – A Syncretic God

484460. EGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (34mm, 23.08 g, 12h). Dated RY 5 (AD 141/2). AVT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTωNINOC [ЄV]CЄB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Pius right / Radiate and draped bust of SarapisPantheos right, wearing kalathos and horn of Ammon; before, trident of Poseidon entwined with serpent of Asklepios; L Є (date) across field. Köln 1412 (same dies); K&G 35.163; Emmett 1676.5; Dattari (Savio) 8725 (this coin) = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 119 (this coin). Good VF, attractive brown surfaces. Very rare. An exceptional Alexandrian type. ($7500) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection, purchased from Dr. Piero Beretta, Milan, October 1972; Dr. Piero Beretta Collection (Milan); Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 8725. Sarapis was a syncretic god, combining Hellenistic Greek and Egyptian religious beliefs. His name is of Egyptian origin and derives from a synthesis of Ausar (Greek, Osiris), the Egyptian god of the Underworld, and Hapi (Greek, Apis), a manifestation of the god Ptah. Under the Ptolemies, Sarapis became the chief tutelary god and the subject of a royally-sponsored cult, whose emphasis on an afterlife made the worship of Sarapis one of the more popular mystery cults. His immense popularity soon extended to his creation as Sarapis-Pantheos, a hybrid deity incorporating other divine elements. In the case of the present specimen from the Staffieri collection, he is depicted with the radiate crown of Helios, his own kalathos, the ram’s horn of Ammon, and the trident of Poseidon entwined with the serpent of Asklepios. In Alexandria, a large temple complex, called the Serapeum, was constructed and remained highly patronized well into the fourth century AD. Shortly after the imperial decree of AD 391, officially declaring pagan temples closed, the Serapeum was besieged, plundered, and destroyed.

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Venus in Taurus

484461. EGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (34mm, 23.87 g, 11h). Zodiac series. Dated RY 8 (AD 144/5). [A]VT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTωNINO[C CЄB ЄVC], laureate head right / Venus in Taurus (night house): diademed and draped bust of Aphrodite (Venus) left, with star of eight rays before her; below, bull butting left; [L H (date) in exergue]. Köln 1492; Dattari (Savio) 2960; K&G 35.280; Emmett 1450.8; Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 143 (this coin). Good VF, dark brown patina with areas of green and red, some roughness. Rare. Exceptional, basically as struck with some encrustation. ($4750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; A. Hess AG 251 (7 May 1981), lot 163. The Great Sothic Cycle was a calendrical cycle based on the heliacal rising in July of the star Sirius (known to the Greeks as Sothis) and lasting approximately 1460 years. According to ancient Egyptian mythology, in a Golden Age, the beginning of the flooding of the Nile coincided exactly with the rising of Sirius, which was reckoned as the New Year. Only once every 1460 years did Sirius rise at exactly the same time. Thus, the coincidence of this along with the concurrent beginning of the flooding of the Nile gave the event major cosmological significance by heralding not just the beginning of a new year, but the beginning of a new eon. This event also was thought to herald the appearance of the phoenix, a mythological bird which was reborn every 500 to 1000 years out of its own ashes. According to one version of the myth, each new phoenix embalmed its old ashes in an egg of myrrh, which it then deposited in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis. So important was the advent of the new Great Sothic Cycle, both to the realignment of the heavens and its signaling of the annual flooding of the Nile, that the Egyptians celebrated it in a five-day festival, which emphasized the important cosmological significance. In the third year of the reign of Antoninus Pius (AD 139/40), a new Great Sothic Cycle began. To mark this event, the mint of Alexandria struck an extensive series of coinage, especially in large bronze drachms, each related in some astrological way to the reordering of the heavens during the advent of the new Great Sothic Cycle. This celebration would continue throughout Pius’ reign, with an immense output of coinage during the eighth year of his reign in Egypt, which included this coin type, part of the Zodiac series.

484462. EGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (34mm, 22.88 g, 12h). Dated RY 10 (AD 146/7). AVT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTωNЄINOC CЄB ЄVC, laureate head right / Isis Pharia sailing right, holding a sistrum and billowing sail; L ΔЄKA-TOV (date) around. Köln 1550; Dattari (Savio) 2668; K&G 35.359; Emmett 1590.10; Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 121 (this coin). EF, dark brown patina, very minor roughness. Well centered and struck, which is unusual for this popular type. ($3250) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Garth R. Drewry Collection (Triton VIII, 11 January 2005), lot 807. The sistrum is present in Isis’ right hand on this specimen, partially obscured by the thick patina.

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484463. EGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (34mm, 20.73 g, 12h). Dated RY 14 (AD 150/1). AVT K [T] AIΛIΛ (sic) A∆P ANTωNINOC CЄ B ЄVC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left / Eirene standing facing. head left, holding two grain ears and caduceus; L I-∆ (date) across field. Köln 1657 var. (placement of date); K&G 35.510; Emmett 1500.14; Dattari (Savio) 8402 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 123 (this coin). Good VF, dark brown patina. A rare type only issued by Pius for three regnal years (2, 14, and 15). ($2450) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Kunst und Münzen AG FPL 55 (December 1984), lot 388; Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 8402. On the reverse of this lovely drachm, we have a syncretic image of Eirene (Pax or Peace), where she is given the grain ears of Euthenia. It is also interesting to note the celator’s error in the obverse legend, where the letters IΛ are repeated.

Superb Marcus Aurelius Drachm Ex Beretta & Dattari Collections

484464. EGYPT, Alexandria. Marcus Aurelius. AD 161-180. Æ Drachm (34mm, 27.07 g, 12h). Dated RY 3 (AD 162/3). Μ AVΡΗΛΙΟC ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟC CЄ, laureate bust right, slight drapery / ЄYΘH-NIA, Euthenia standing facing, head left, holding two grain ears and cornucopia; L Γ (date) across lower field. Köln 2009-10 var. (obv. bust type and legend); K&G 37.158; Emmett 2129.3; Dattari (Savio) 3451 = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 176 (this coin). Choice EF, attractive dark brown patina. Exceptional two-year type for Marcus (regnal years 2 and 3). ($8750) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection, purchased from Dr. Piero Beretta, Milan, October 1976; Dr. Piero Beretta Collection (Milan); Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 3451. A superb coin that Dattari used to illustrate both the obverse (pl. III) and reverse (pl. XIII) in his original 1901 catalogue.

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Extremely Rare Diobol of Commodus Ex Wetterstrom, Garrett, and Curtis Collections

484465. EGYPT, Alexandria. Commodus. As Caesar, AD 166-177. Æ Diobol (23mm, 7.75 g, 12h). Dated RY 17 of Marcus Aurelius (AD 176/7). AVTOK • KAIC • Λ • AVΡΗΛΙΟC KOMMO∆OC, bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Griffin, as Nemesis, seated left with right forepaw on wheel; L I-Z (date) across field. Köln –; Dattari (Savio) 3833 & 9537; K&G 41.5 (this coin illustrated) = Emmett 2503.17 (R5 – this coin illustrated, with commentary on p. 111) = Curtis, “The Coinage of Roman Egypt: A Survey” (reprinted from The Numismatist, January-August 1956), pl. XXXVIII (this coin, reverse illustrated) = Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 186 (this coin). Good VF, dark brown surfaces. Extremely rare, with only one other inferior example appearing at auction since 2000 (CNG E-243, lot 293). ($2500) Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Kerry K. Wetterstrom Collection (Classical Numismatic Auctions XIII, 4 December 1990), lot 131; John Work Garrett Collection (Part III, Numismatic Fine Arts/Bank Leu, 29 March 1985), lot 4840 (part of); Col. James W. Curtis Collection. Commodus issued very little bronze coinage in Alexandria, both as Caesar and Augustus. This becomes apparent when Emmett’s charts are consulted, and almost every bronze type for every regnal year is an R4 or R5.

489785. EGYPT, Alexandria. Gordian III. AD 238-244. Potin Tetradrachm (23mm, 12.86 g, 12h). Dated RY 6 (AD 242/3). A K M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC ЄY, laureate and cuirassed bust right, with gorgoneion on breastplate / Bust of Zeus-Ammon left, slight drapery, wearing crown of disc and uraei, with scepter over shoulder; L ς (date) to left. Köln –; Dattari (Savio) 10291; K&G 72.123; Emmett 3436.6. Good VF, dark brown surfaces. ($225) Ex Hermanubis Collection.

Roman Republican

486389. Anonymous. Circa 225-214 BC. AR Quadrigatus (22mm, 6.59 g, 6h). Uncertain mint. Laureate head of Janus, with curved truncation / Jupiter, hurling thunderbolt and holding scepter, in galloping quadriga driven right by Victory; in exergue, incuse rOÂa on raised tablet. Crawford 29/3; Sydenham 64a; HN Italy 334; RSC 23; RBW 64. EF, toned. ($2250)

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488422. M. Piso M.f. Frugi. 58 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.87 g, 6h). Rome mint. Terminal bust of Mercury right; to left, star above wreath; calix below chin / Â • piÍO Â F/ Frugi above secespita and patera; all within laurel wreath. Crawford 418/2b; Sydenham 825; Calpurnia 23; RBW 1505. VF, toned. Nice metal. Scarce. ($750) Ex Jonathan P. Rosen Collection; Nancy Walsh Collection (Gemini XI, 12 January 2014), lot 369; Berk BBS 125 (27 February 2002), lot 330.

482178. C. Memmius C.f. 56 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.96 g, 6h). Rome mint. Head of Ceres right, wearing wreath of grain ears; C • ÂeÂÂi • C • F downward to right / Bound captive kneeling right at foot of trophy; C • ÂeÂÂiuÍ downward to right, iÂperATOr downward to left. Crawford 427/1; Sydenham 920; Memmia 10; RBW 1531. EF, attractively toned, miniscule obverse die break before chin. ($975) Ex Gemini II (11 January 2006), lot 258.

488425. Q. Cassius Longinus. 55 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.83 g, 12h). Rome mint. Veiled head of Vesta right; œ • CAÍÍiuÍ downward to left, ueÍTA upward to right / Curule chair within Temple of Vesta; urn to left, voting tablet inscribed AC (Absolvo Condemno) to right. Crawford 428/1; Sydenham 917; Cassia 9; RBW 1533. VF, bankers’ marks and a few scratches on obverse. ($395)

486390. The Caesarians. Julius Caesar. April-August 49 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.96 g, 3h). Military mint traveling with Caesar. Elephant advancing right, trampling on horned serpent; CAeÍAr in exergue / Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis, and apex. Crawford 443/1; CRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; RBW 1557. EF, lightly toned with a dusting of earthen deposits. Well-centered and struck. ($2250) 42


485935. The Caesarians. Julius Caesar. Early 46 BC. AV Aureus (20mm, 8.04 g, 6h). Rome mint; A. Hirtius, praetor. Veiled female head (Vesta or Pietas?) right; C • CAeÍAr COÍ • Ter around / Emblems of the augurate and pontificate: lituus, guttus, and securis; A hirTiuÍ • pr around. Crawford 466/1; Molinari 3 (D26/R224); CRI 56; Calicó 37b; Sydenham 1018; RBW 1634. Near EF, toned. ($6750) From the WRG Collection. Ex Berk BBS 26 (9 August 1983), lot 12.

487044. The Triumvirs. Mark Antony and Octavian. Spring-early summer 41 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.84 g, 12h). Ephesus mint; M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Bare head of Mark Antony right;  • ANT • if Yg • iii • uir • r • p • C •  • BArBAT • œ • p around / Bare head of Octavian right; CAeÍAr • iÂp • pONT • iii • uir • r • p • C • around. Crawford 517/2; CRI 243; Sydenham 1181; RSC 8a; RBW 1798. Near EF, toned. Great metal. ($2450)

486113. The Triumvirs. Octavian. 35-34 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.75 g, 6h). Mint in northern Italy or traveling with Octavian in Illyricum. Bare head left / IMP above, CAE-SAR across field, DIVI F below, round shield with three concentric rows of studs and central boss. RIC I 543b; CRI 393; RSC 127; BMCRE 313 = BMCRR Gaul 123; BN 1021-2. Good VF, toned, small banker’s mark in reverse field. ($1350) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Baldwin’s, February 1989.

Roman Imperial Pedigreed to 1913

486214. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (20.5mm, 3.81 g, 6h). Uncertain Spanish mint (Colonia Caesaraugusta?). Struck 19-18 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head right / Round shield inscribed S • P • Q • R/ CL • V in two lines. RIC I 42a; RSC 294; BMCRE 333-4 = BMCRR Gaul 128-9; BN 1311-5; CNR VII, 794/3 (this coin). EF, attractive cabinet tone. ($4950) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, October 1992; Ex Tkalec & Rauch 1 (15 April 1985), lot 194; Ernst Herzfelder Collection (Egger XLIII, 14 April 1913), lot 265.

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478846. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 1h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck 15 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI • F, bare head right / IMP • X across field, ACT in exergue, Apollo Citharoedus of Actium, standing left, holding plectrum and lyre. RIC I 171a; Lyon 28; RSC 144; BMCRE 461-2 var. = BMCRR Gaul 175-6 var. (no pellet after ACT); BN 1399-401. Superb EF, fully lustrous. ($5750) This type commemorates Augustus’ most famous victory, his defeat of the combined naval forces of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in September of 31 BC.

486235. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.71 g, 7h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck 11 BC. AVGVSTVS DIVI • F, bare head right / IMP • XII in exergue, bull butting left. RIC I 178a; Lyon 31; RSC 158; BMCRE 476 = BMCRR Gaul 183; BN 1411-3. Good VF, toned. Nice metal. ($795) From the WRG Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Group 35 (20 September 1995), lot 706; Vinchon (22 May 1995), lot 249.

485936. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AV Aureus (20mm, 7.81 g, 12h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck 2 BC-AD 4. CΛESΛR ΛVGVSTVS DIVI F PΛTER PΛTRIΛE, laureate head right / ΛVGVSTI F • COS DESIG • PRINC • IVVENT around, C • L • CΛESΛRES in exergue, Caius and Lucius Caesars standing facing, shields and spears between them; simpulum and lituus above. RIC I 206; Lyon 81 (unlisted dies); Calicó 176a; BMCRE 513-8; BN 1648-50; Biaggi 92. Near EF, traces of earthen deposits. Well struck on a broad flan. ($9750) From the WRG Collection. Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XXXIII (3 May 1994), lot 411; Numismatic Fine Arts XXIX (13 August 1992), lot 325.

486248. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ Dupondius (28mm, 12.90 g, 12h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck circa AD 10-14. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head of Augustus right / The Great Altar of Lugdunum: altar enclosure; panels decorated with corona civica flanked by figures holding laurel branches; decoration along roofline; altar flanked by columns surmounted by statues of Victory standing vis-à-vis, each holding palm frond in left hand over left shoulder and wreath in right hand; ROM ET AVG in exergue. RIC I 232; Lyon 96; BMCRE 566; BN 1707-14. Near EF, green patina, small pit on obverse. ($895) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (9 December 1992), lot 3212.

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486193. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (21mm, 3.94 g, 5h). Rome mint; L. Aquillius Florus, moneyer. Struck 1918 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head right / L • AQVILLIVS FLORVS III VIR around, SICIL in exergue, warrior (Mn. Aquillius), bareheaded, in military dress, holding shield on left arm, standing left, looking right, raising with right hand a halfnaked female figure (Sicilia) who is sinking to the ground . RIC I 310; RSC 366; BMCRE 49-50 = BMCRR Rome 4556-4557; BN 187-189. Near EF, light iridescent tone, some shallow cleaning scratches. Rare. ($4750) From the WRG Collection.

Agrippa Receives the Rostral Crown

486192. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.76 g, 2h). Rome mint; C. Sulpicius Platorinus, moneyer. Struck 13 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTV[S], bare head right / C • SVLPICIVS • PLATORIN, Augustus and Agrippa, bare-headed and togate, seated side by side, facing slightly left, on a bisellium, placed on a platform which is ornamented with three rostra; on left, staff or spear. RIC I 407; RSC 529; BMCRE 115-6; BN 537-41. EF, toned, some shallow cleaning marks under tone. ($5750) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (10 June 1996), lot 478. The prows on the reverse commemorate the occasion on which Agrippa received the rostral crown, the battle of Naulochus.

486247. Divus Augustus. Died AD 14. Æ As (27mm, 11.75 g, 1h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, circa AD 34-37. DIVVS AVGVSTVS • PATER •, radiate head left / S C across field, winged thunderbolt. RIC I 83 (Tiberius); BMCRE 157-8 (Tiberius); BN 141-3 (Tiberius). EF, even brown surfaces. ($2250) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, January 1996.

486957. Tiberius. AD 14-37. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.79 g, 8h). “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Group 1, AD 15-18. TI CΛESΛR DIVI ΛVG F ΛVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MΛXIM, Livia (as Pax), holding scepter in right hand and olive branch in left, seated right on chair, feet on footstool; plain chair legs, double line below. RIC I 26; Lyon 144; RSC 16; BMCRE 34; BN 16. EF, toned. Fine style. ($2250) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, 1982.

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478843. Tiberius. AD 14-37. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.79 g, 5h). “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Group 4, AD 18-35. TI CΛESΛR DIVI ΛVG F ΛVGVSTVS, laureate head right; one ribbon on shoulder / PONTIF MΛXIM, Livia (as Pax), holding scepter in right hand and olive branch in left, seated right on chair, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC I 30; Lyon 150; RSC 16a; BMCRE 48-51; BN 28-31. Near EF. Well struck. ($975)

485937. Tiberius. AD 14-37. AV Aureus (18mm, 7.66 g, 8h). “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Group 6, AD 36-37. TI CΛESΛR DIVI ΛVG F ΛVGVSTVS, laureate head right; long, parallel ribbons / PONTIF MΛXIM, Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding vertical scepter in right hand and olive branch in left, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC I 29; Lyon 153; Calicó 305c; BMCRE 47; BN 22; Biaggi 170. VF. ($5750) From the WRG Collection. Ex Coin Galleries (15 April 1992), lot 13.

486155. Gaius (Caligula), with Divus Augustus. AD 37-41. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.63 g, 2h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. 1st emission, AD 37. C CΛESΛR ΛVG GERM P M TR POT COS, bare head of Gaius (Caligula) right / Radiate head of Divus Augustus right; two stars flanking. RIC I 2; Lyon 157; RSC 11; BMCRE 4-5; BN 3-8. VF, toned. ($4250) From the WRG Collection. Ex Coin Galleries (12 November 1986), lot 183.

463913. Claudius. AD 41-54. Æ Sestertius (36.5mm, 29.42 g, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 42-3. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right / EX • S • C•/ P • P/ OB • CIVES/ SERVATOS in four lines within oak wreath. RIC I 112; von Kaenel Type 69; BMCRE 185; BN 209. Good VF, tan-brown river patina, slightly rough surfaces. Handsome portrait. ($1950) Ex Collection of a Director.

46


Pedigreed to 1903

485938. Claudius, with Agrippina Junior. AD 41-54. AV Aureus (18mm, 7.59 g, 5h). Rome mint. Struck AD 50-4. TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG GERM P M TRIB POT P P, laureate head of Claudius right / AGRIPPINAE AVGVSTAE, head of Agrippina Junior right, wearing wreath of corn ears. RIC I 80; von Kaenel type 50, 958 (V676/R595 – this coin); Calicó 396; BMCRE 72-5; BN 76-81; Biaggi 215 (same rev. die). Good VF, underlying luster. ($19,500) From the WRG Collection. Ex Coin Galleries (13 November 1991), lot 3; Helbing 63 (29 April 1931), lot 442; Glendining’s (3 December 1929), lot 826; Sotheby, Wilkinson, & Hodge (2 December 1924), lot 56; Paul Charles Stroehlin Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson, & Hodge, 25 May 1903), lot 10.

487051. Nero. AD 54-68. AV Aureus (18mm, 7.60 g, 5h). Rome mint. Struck December AD 61–December 62. NERO · CAESAR · AVG · IMP, bare head right / PONT · MAX · TR · P VIII · COS · IIII · P · P, Ceres standing left, holding two grain ears in right hand and long torch in left; EX SC flanking. RIC I 29; Calicó 431; BMCRE 31; BN 41; Biaggi –. Good VF, lustrous, reddish toning, typical of those from Boscoreale, small scratch on obverse. ($14,500)

486179. Nero. AD 54-68. Æ Sestertius (33mm, 28.45 g, 7h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 65. NERO CLAVD CAESAR · AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right / Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory in extended right hand and resting left on parazonium; three shields behind cuirass, S C flanking; ROMA in exergue. RIC 273 var. (no aegis); WCN 145; BMCRE 173; BN 369-70 var. (same). Good VF, dark green patina. Handsome high relief portrait. ($6500) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, July 1984.

478192. Galba. AD 68-69. Æ As (27mm, 10.20 g, 7h). Rome mint. Struck circa June–August AD 68. SER · GALBA · IMP · CAES · AVG TR P, laureate head right / PΛ X Λ VGVST, Pax standing left, holding olive branch in right hand and caduceus in left; S C flanking . RIC I 283; ACG –; BMCRE; 125-6; BN 131-2. Good VF, green patina, a few cleaning marks. Bold portrait. ($1450) 47


Numismatically Important Special Issues Struck on Two Weight Standards Vespasian Becomes Emperor at Alexandria

484444. Vespasian. AD 69-79. AV Aureus (19mm, 7.86 g, 5h). Alexandria(?) mint. Struck AD 70. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / COS ITER TOROT (sic), Pax standing facing, head left, holding grain ears in her extended right hand and a short caduceus with her left. RIC II 1527; Calicó –; RPC II 1904/3 (this coin – attributed to Antioch); Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 31 (this coin). EF. Extremely rare, one of three known, with the other two in the American Numismatic Society and Bibliothèque Nationale collections. This coin is overstruck on an earlier aureus before Nero’s weight reduction. Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica AG 5 (25 February 1992), lot 440. Vespasian. AD 69-79. AV Aureus (19mm, 6.92 g, 5h). Alexandria(?) mint. Struck AD 70. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / COS ITER TR POT, Aequitas standing facing, head left, holding scales with her right hand and a scepter with her left. RIC II 1526; BMCRE II Addenda 496 (this coin mentioned on p. 426); Calicó 604a (Antioch); RPC II 1905/2 (this coin – attributed to Antioch); Staffieri, Alexandria In Nummis 32 (this coin). EF, small bruise on the edge, attractive cabinet toning. Extremely rare, one of two known, the other being the British Museum specimen. This coin was struck on the reduced weight standard introduced during Nero’s reign. Ex Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection; Bank Leu AG 54 (25 April 1992), lot 234; Münzen und Medaillen AG 21 (19 March 1960), lot 33; John Glas Sandeman Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 13 June 1911), lot 457 (purchased by Feuardent for £5.2.6). The attribution to Alexandria is not without controversy. Laffranchi first suggested Alexandria as the probable mint in his 1915 article (“Sulla numismatica dei Flavia,” RIN 28, pp. 139-54). William E. Metcalf compared the obverse style of two aurei to the Alexandrian billon tetradrachms for Vespasian’s regnal year 2 in his article “The Flavians in the East” (Proceedings of the 9th International Congress of Numismatics, 1982, pp. 321-39), but a coin similar to our example was assigned by Metcalf to Antioch in Syria. Giovanni Maria Staffieri believes both of these coins to have been struck at Alexandria, and he makes his case, also based on style, but to a larger extent based on the fact that we know Vespasian was “raised to the purple” in Alexandria on 1 July AD 69. The likelihood that Vespasian had precious metal coinage struck in the Latin style at Alexandria is indeed very plausible, but short of any actual hoard evidence, not absolutely certain. Two (2) coins in lot.

($125,000) 48


478845. Titus. AD 79-81. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.49 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck 1 January-30 June AD 80. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head left / TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, wreath set on curule chair. RIC II 109; RSC 319; BMCRE 70; BN 55–6. EF, toned, lustrous. ($2750)

485943. Domitian. As Caesar, AD 69-81. AV Aureus (19mm, 7.36 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Vespasian, AD 75. CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVT, Spes advancing left, holding flower and lifting hem of dress. RIC II 787; Calicó 912; BMCRE 154; Biaggi 426. Good VF, reddish tone around devices, underlying luster. ($9750) From the WRG Collection. Ex Coin Galleries (16 February 1994), lot 7; Stack’s FPL (Summer 1993), no. 463; Schweizerischer Bankverein 21 (24 January 1989), lot 147.

Superb Domitian Aureus

472011. Domitian. AD 81-96. AV Aureus (18mm, 7.60 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 90-91. DOMITIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / GERMΛNICVS • COS XV, Minerva standing left, holding thunderbolt and spear, with round shield at side. RIC II 697; Calicó 841; BMCRE 171; Biaggi 409. Superb EF, lustrous. Fine style. ($29,500)

49


484471. Trajan. AD 98-117. Æ Sestertius (33mm, 27.73 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 104/5-107. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, S C in exergue, Trajan on horseback riding right, thrusting spear at fallen Dacian soldier. RIC II 534; Woytek 203b; Strack 360α; Banti 207; BMCRE 834; BN 217 var. (bust type). EF, exceptional green patina. Wonderful surfaces. ($4500) Ex CNG Inventory 733407 (December 2002); Gorny & Mosch 117 (14 October 2002), lot 556.

486785. Trajan. AD 98-117. AR Denarius (20mm, 2.86 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck circa mid AD 112-early 113. IMP TRAIANVS AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery / DIVVS PATER TRAIAN, Divus Trajan Pater seated left on curule chair, holding patera and scepter. RIC II 252 corr. (bust type); Woytek 406b; RSC 140. EF, attractive cabinet tone. Excellent metal quality. ($695) Ex CNG Inventory 859898 (November 2009); Goldberg 55 (29 October 2009), lot 230 (part of).

486681. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Dupondius (23mm, 11.30 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, radiate head right / [AEDE] DIVI AVG REST, cult images of Divus Augustus and Diva Livia within octastyle temple set on podium; figure of Divus Augustus between two reclining figures on pediment, quadriga at top of roofline, acroteria (Romulus on left, Aeneas bearing Anchises on right) at bottom of roofline; in front, two statues on bases; S C flanking. RIC 1017; BMCRE p. 353 †. EF, even dark green-brown surfaces. ($795) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, November 1993. The second Temple of Divus Augustus, commenced under Tiberius and dedicated by Caligula in August AD 37, suffered during the great fire of 80, which began on the Capitoline Hill and spread into the Forum and onto the Palatine. It was possibly restored or rebuilt under Domitian, although it is not mentioned in the Chronographia, and it certainly received further restoration under Antoninus Pius in 158. The temple under Antoninus was Corinthian octastyle and contained the seated figures of Divus Augustus and Livia within, generally drawn on the coinage at an elevated level to suggest perspective. The reliefs on the pediment are impossible to identify with any certainty, but the statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the right and Anchises carrying his father on the left.

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486677. Divus Antoninus Pius. Died AD 161. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.29 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Marcus Aurelius, AD 161. DIVVS ANTONINVS, bareheaded bust right, slight drapery / CONSECRATIO, four-tiered funeral pyre surmounted by facing quadriga. RIC III 438 (Aurelius); MIR 18, 27/4-12 (Aurelius); RSC 164a. EF, wonderful iridescent tone. ($595) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, November 1991.

Two Fine Style Faustina Junior Aurei

487499

478826

From the Archer M. Huntington Collection 487499. Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. AV Aureus (20.5mm, 7.15 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Antoninus Pius, circa AD 147-148. FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, with hair bound in pearls at back of head / VE NVS, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple in right hand and drapery in left. RIC III 515b (Pius); BMCRE 1063 var. (hair style); Calicó 2095; Biaggi 941 var. (hair in fillet). Near EF, underlying luster. ($9750) Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection (Numismatica Ars Classica 67, 17 October 2012), lot 164 (HSA 22246).

478826. Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. AV Aureus (20mm, 7.36 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Antoninus Pius, circa AD 150-152. FAVSTINA AVG ANTO NINI AVG PII FIL, draped bust right, with hair bound in pearls at back of head / CONCO RDIA ·, Concordia standing facing, head right, holding cornucopia in left hand and bit of drapery in right. RIC III 500a (Pius); BMCRE 1078 note; Calicó 2043; Biaggi 917-8 var. (obv. legend). Superb EF, lustrous. ($32,500)

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486783. Commodus. AD 177-192. Æ As (23.5mm, 11.45 g, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 192. L AEL AVREL CO MM AVG P FEL, head right, wearing lion’s skin headdress / Club within wreath; across field, HER CVL/ RO MAN/ AV GV/ S C. RIC III 644; MIR 18, 853-9/72; BMCRE 723. Good VF, attractive natural dark green patina with a few spots of red. ($595) Ex Dr. Walter Stoecklin Collection, purchased from M&M Basel prior to 1975.

486717. Caracalla. AD 198-217. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.33 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 215. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right / P M TR P XVII COS IIII P P, Apollo standing left, holding branch in right hand and resting left on lyre set on plinth. RIC IV 238A; BMCRE 107-9; RSC 282. Choice EF, deeply toned. Well struck. ($395) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, 1982.

486724. Elagabalus. AD 218-222. AR Denarius (18mm, 2.61 g, 6h). Antioch mint. Struck AD 218-219. ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / FELICTAS, galley left on waves, vexillum at prow; TEMP in exergue. RIC IV 188; Thirion 348; BMCRE 277; RSC 27a. Near EF, attractive cabinet toning. ($575) From the WRG Collection. Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XXVIII (23 April 1992), lot 1294; Numismatic Fine Arts XXIV (18 October 1990), lot 2166.

482057. Balbinus. AD 238. AR Antoninianus (21.5mm, 4.44 g, 1h). Rome mint. 2nd emission. IMP CAES D CAEL BALBINVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / PIETAS MVTVA AVGG, clasped right hands. RIC IV 12; BMCRE 74-6; RSC 17. EF, toned. Well struck on a broad flan. ($1250) Ex Imagines Imperatorum (Áureo & Calicó 241, 8 February 2012), lot 355.

52


486786 488426 486786. Otacilia Severa. Augusta, AD 244-249. Æ Sestertius (30mm, 16.96 g, 12h). Rome mint, 4th officina. 4th emission of Philip I, AD 245. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane / PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia seated left, drawing veil with right hand and holding scepter in left. RIC IV 209a (Philip I); Banti 12. VF, attractive brown surfaces, some red. ($345)

The Usurper Vabalathus 488426. Vabalathus. Usurper, AD 268-272. Antoninianus (19mm, 3.02 g, 12h). Antioch mint, 2nd officina. 2nd emission, March-May AD 272. IM C VHABALATHVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / IVЄNVS AVG, Hercules standing right, with lion’s skin draped over right arm, holding club in right hand and Apples of the Hesperides in left; star to left. RIC V 4; Bland, Coinage 20j-k (dies 26/Ive v); BN 1265 var. (star to right). VF, earthen green patina. ($795) The son of Odenathus, the ruler of the rich eastern trade center Palmyra, and his wife Zenobia, Vabalathus was declared king following the murder of his father in AD 267. Since Vabalathus was still in his minority, Zenobia took over as regent, using the confusion following the death of Gallienus to expand Palmyrene power. In AD 269, the Palmyrenes seized control of Egypt and, with it, the Roman grain supply. To bolster her position, Zenobia laid claims to an illustrious ancestry, including Cleopatra VII of Egypt and the legendary Dido of Carthage. The emperor Aurelian recognized the threat posed by Zenobia and Vabalathus and launched a campaign. In AD 272, Palmyra was sacked and both Zenobia and Vabalathus were captured as they tried to make their way to Persia. The two were to be brought to Rome and paraded in Aurelian’s triumph in AD 274, but apparently only Zenobia survived the journey.

482056. Magnentius. AD 350-353. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.52 g, 6h). Treveri (Trier) mint. First phase, struck January– February AD 350. IM CAE MAGN ENTIVS AVG, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA · AVG LIB · ROMANO, Victory, holding wreath, standing right and Libertas, holding scepter, standing left, holding trophy with hook between them; TR. RIC VIII 247; Bastien 6; Depeyrot 9/1; cf. Biaggi 2197 (for type). Near EF, toned. ($9750) Ex Imagines Imperatorum (Áureo & Calicó 241, 8 February 2012), lot 355; Numismatica Ars Classica XXV (29 November 1990), lot 505.

485947. Valentinian III. AD 425-455. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.39 g, 12h). Ravenna mint. Struck circa AD 430-445. D N PLA VALENTI-NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORI-A AVGGG, Valentinian standing facing, with left foot set upon human-headed serpent, holding long cross in right hand and Victory on globe in left; R-V//COMOB. RIC X 2018-9; Ranieri 96 and 98; Lacam 11; Depeyrot 17/1; DOCLR 841-3; Biaggi 2349. EF, underlying luster. ($1750) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, June 1996.

53


Byzantine

485884. Justin II. 565-578. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.53 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 9th officina. D N IV-STI-NVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding crowning Victory on globus in right hand, shield over left shoulder / VICTORI-A AVGGG, Constantinopolis seated facing, head right, holding spear in right hand and globus cruciger in left; Θ//CONOB. DOC 4h; MIBE 5; SB 345. Superb EF, tiny metal flaw on reverse. An attractive and well-struck example. ($495) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Baldwin’s, May 1988.

485890. Heraclius. 610-641. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.50 g, 7h). Constantinople mint, 5th officina. Struck 610-613. [∂ N Һ] ЄRACLI-ЧS P P AVG, cuirassed bust right, wearing plumed helmet and chlamys, holding cross in right hand / VICTORIA AVςЧ, cross potent set on three steps; Є//CONOB. DOC 3b; MIB 5; SB 731. EF, double struck, light scratches in obverse field. ($495) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, December 1993.

485901. Theophilus. 829-842. AV Solidus (17mm, 3.47 g, 6h). Syracuse mint. Struck circa 830-831. * ΘЄOFI-LOS ЬASIL, crowned and draped bust of Theophilus facing, holding cross potent in right hand / ΘЄOFI-LOS ЬASIL, crowned bust of Theophilus facing, wearing loros, holding globus cruciger in right. DOC 18.1; Anastasi 542; SB 1671. Near EF, toned. ($595) From the WRG Collection. Ex Berk BBS 68 (13 November 1991), lot 59.

485902. Basil II Bulgaroktonos, with Constantine VIII. 976-1025. AV Histamenon Nomisma (27mm, 4.41 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Struck circa 1019-1025. +IҺS XIS RЄX RЄςNANTIҺm, facing bust of Christ Pantokrator; crescents in upper quarters of nimbus / +ЬASIL Є COҺSτAҺτIҺ R, crowned half-length busts of Basil, wearing loros and being crowned from above by manus Dei, and Constantine, wearing chlamys, holding long cross between them. DOC 6a; Füeg II 6.C; SB 1800. EF, minor reverse die breaks, edge slightly shaved. ($675) From the WRG Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Auctions IV (21 September 1998), lot 764.

54


485912. Constantine X Ducas. 1059-1067. AV Histamenon Nomisma (28mm, 4.43 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Struck circa 1065-1067. +IҺSI XIRX RЄX RЄς[NANTIҺm], Christ Pantokrator enthroned facing / +KωNRACA [OΔOVKAC], Constantine standing facing, holding globus cruciger in right hand, being crowned by the Virgin Mary; M Θ in field. DOC 2; Füeg II 2; SB 1848. Good VF. ($675) From the WRG Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Group XXIX (30 March 1994), lot 1256.

485907. Michael VII Ducas. 1071-1078. EL Histamenon Nomisma (2729mm, 4.40 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Facing bust of Christ Pantokrator; IC XC across field / Crowned facing bust of Michael, holding labarum in right hand and globus cruciger in left. DOC 2c; SB 1868. EF, lustrous. ($575) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, April 1985.

485909. Isaac II Angelus. First reign, 1185-1195. EL Aspron Trachy (28mm, 3.18 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. The Virgin Mary enthroned facing, holding head of the Holy Infant on lap; m ΘV across upper field, three pellets on cushion to either side of Virgin / Isaac standing facing, holding cross-tipped scepter in right hand and akakia in left, being crowned by St. Michael the Archangel, holding scepter with tripartite tip in left hand; eight jewels on Isaac’s collar, ICAAKIOC Δ to left, O between heads, X/AP and X/M to lower right. DOC 2c; SB 2002. Near EF, toned. A well-struck example. ($650) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, May 1992.

485911. John III Ducas (Vatatzes). Emperor of Nicaea, 1222-1254. AV Hyperpyron Nomisma (31mm, 4.35 g, 6h). Magnesia mint. Struck circa 1232-1254. Christ Pantokrator enthroned facing; • above throne to right / John standing facing, holding labarum in right hand and akakia in left, being crowned by the Virgin Mary. DOC 6b; SB 2073. Near EF, toned, a few light scratches, clipped. ($495) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, September 1995.

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Early Medieval & Islamic

485918. VISIGOTHS, Spain. Sisebut. 612-621. AV Tremissis (19mm, 1.51 g, 6h). Ispalis (Seville) mint. ๘ ⌽Ʃ⌽⍟BV˶V⌽ ʽ⍟, facing bust / ๘ Ʃ⌽ʊ©⌦Ʃ ʊƩV⌽, facing bust. CNV 219; Pliego 274a; Miles, Visigoths 187a; Chaves –; MEC 1, –; ME 220. Choice EF. ($595) From the WRG Collection. Ex Harlan J. Berk BBS 101 (24 March 1998) lot 55.

485919. CRUSADERS, Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem. Imitation Bezants. 11th-12th centuries. AV Bezant (22mm, 4.30 g, 7h). Imitating a dinar of the Fatimid caliph al-Amir. Acre mint. Second Phase, struck 1148/59-1187. Beginning of caliphal titles in two lines, continuation of name and titles in inner margin; mint formula in outer margin / ‘al/ghaya in Arabic in two lines across field, Kalima in inner margin, “Second Symbol” (Quran 9: 33) in outer margin. Balog & Yvon 27c-d; cf. Metcalf, Crusades 138 (for type); CCS 4. Good VF. ($595) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, October 1994.

483766. ISLAMIC, Anatolia & al-Jazira (Post-Seljuk). Artuqids (Kayfa & Amid). Fakhr al-Din Qara Arslan. AH 543570 / AD 1148-1174. Æ Dirham (30mm, 8.36 g, 6h). Dated AH 562 (AD 1166/7). Draped half-length facing bust; AH date to right and left / Name and pedigree of Fakhr al-Din Qara Arslan in four lines; name of Abbasid caliph in left and right margins. Whelan Type IV, 123-4; S&S Type 7; Album 1820.7. VF, brown patina. Rare. ($395)

56


World

491249

491245

491249. DENMARK. Hardeknud (Knud III, the Hardy). 1035-1042. AR Penny (17mm, 1.03 g, 12h). East Danish standard. Lund mint; Ulfcil, moneyer. Struck circa 1040-1042. ม ዧaʼḦTዞüዧ⎍Ϳ Ḧ/, helmeted and armored bust right; quatrefoil of pellets before / ม ዮ⌦ ዟüዢ⌦ ∂ዧ ⌦ዮዝ, voided long cross, with triple-crescent ends. Becker, Coinages, dies H25/244; Hauberg –; Hede III 33 var. (moneyer; same obv. die); SCBC 1170. Choice EF, toned. ($3950) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Triton VI (14 January 2003), lot 1425; Classical Numismatic Group 49 (17 March 1999), lot 2214.

Illustrated in Ruding’s Annals 491245. DENMARK. Hardeknud (Knud III, the Hardy). 1035-1042. AR Penny (17mm, 1.04 g, 1h). East Danish standard. Lund mint; Sumarlith, moneyer. Struck circa 1040-1042. ม H©ʼTዞün⎍Ϳ ʼዞҟ, helmeted and armored bust left / ม Ӳዮ ዦዞ ʼ⌦ዞ T ∂n, voided long cross, with triple-crescent ends. Becker, Coinages, dies H2/184; Hauberg –; Hede 33 var. (obv. type; same rev. die); SCBC 1170; Rogers Ruding, Annals of the Coinage of Great Britain and Its Dependencies (London 1840), pl. D, 42 (this coin illustrated). EF, toned. ($4950) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Davissons 18 (21 November 2002), lot 228; Gordon V. Doubleday Collection (Glendining’s, 6 October 1987), lot 186; Walter Machado Maish Collection (Sotheby’s, 25 March 1918), lot 58; Henry Webb Collection (Sotheby’s, 22 5 July 1895), lot 35; William Lake Price Collection (Sotheby’s, 27 May 1880), lot 43); Roderick Mingey Murchison Collection (Sotheby’s, 28 May 1866), lot 328; James Dodsley Cuff Collection (8 June 1854), lot 593.

Augsburg Under Swedish Occupation

487739. GERMANY, Augsburg (Stadt). Gustav II Adolf der Große (the Great). As King of Sweden, 1611-1632. AR Taler (42mm, 28.98 g, 12h). Swedish occupation issue. Dated 1632. (rosette) GVSTAV : ADOLPH : D : G · SVECO : GOTHO : VANDALO : REX · MAG, laureate, draped, and armored bust facing slightly right / PRINC : FINLAND : DVX ETHO : ET · CARDOM : ING, crowned coat-of-arms of Sweden. Forster 240; Davenport 4543; KM A68. Choice EF, deep iridescent toning. ($2450) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection, purchased from Stephen Harvey, December 1992. Augsburg’s coinage vividly records changes in the city’s leadership during the Thirty Years’ War. This taler was minted in the name of Gustavus Adolphus, the Swedish king who occupied the predominantly Protestant city beginning in 1632. Only a few years after this coin was produced, the Habsburgs recaptured Augsburg, and the city resumed producing coins in the name of the Holy Roman Emperor.

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487741. GERMANY, Braunschweig-Lüneburg (Herzogtum). Friedrich. 1636-1648. AR Löser zu 3 Reichstalern (80.5mm, 86.5 g, 5h). Zellerfeld mint. Dated 1639 HS. (rosette) ·V : G G · FRIDERICH · HERTZOG · ZU · BRAUNS : U · LUNEB : COAD : D : ST : RA : D · P : E : ST : BREM :, facing bust, wearing ruff, within elaborate frame surmounted by facing cherub with wings spread / * FRIED · ERNEHRD * * UNFRIED · VERZEHRT * · 16 39, coat-of-arms surmounted by five elaborately plumed helmets; H Փ S in lower section. Welter 1406; Davenport 131a; KM 151. EF, deep cabinet toning, faint chasing. ($9750) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection, purchased from Stephen Harvey, December 1992.

The ‘Glockentaler’ and the Politics of the 30 Years War

487742. GERMANY, Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (Herzogtum). Auguste der Jüngere (the Younger). 1635-1666. AR Taler (42mm, 28.91 g, 10h). ‘Glockentaler’ – Third Bell Taler type. Zellerfeld mint. Dated 1643. · AUGUSTUS HERTZOG ZU BRAUNS : UND · L :, armored and mantled half-length bust left, holding baton and plumed helmet / * ALLES * MIT * BEDACHT * ANNO 1643, bell inscribed GLORIA, with rope from left part of yoke; three rosettes around, SIC NISI below. Welter 810; Davenport 6368; KM 422. EF, underlying luster. Very rare. ($7250) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection; Künker 140 (17 June 2008), lot 2088. As a type, the glockentaler (bell taler), appears to reflect the changing sentiment of the leadership of the Dukes of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648). In 1622, Christian von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (1616-1626), issued an unusual series of doppeltalers and talers (see Davenport 6319-6323). Reputedly minted from silver plate taken from the Imperial abbey of Corvey, this type features religious legends in both French and German. The reverse depicts God’s right arm extending from the clouds, armored and holding a sword that may, or may not, support a crown. In keeping with Christian’s aggressive advocacy of the Protestant cause, the German reads GOTTES FREVNDT DER PFAFFEN FEINDT (God’s friend; the priests’ enemy). By the time of Auguste der Jüngere, however, German territories, including Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel, had been the site of much of the devastating fighting during the war. The departure in 1634 of the imperial armies from his territories was a cause of celebration. To commemorate this event, a series of seven taler types were struck. Collectively known as glockentalers, since a bell features prominently into the design of six of the types (the fourth type shows a stone block and a bell clapper), all of these coins have the common reverse legend ALLES MIT BEDACHT (everything with deliberation), which suggests that the consequences of the impulsive policy of Christian von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel and almost twenty years of devastation, brought sober reflection with the onset of peace.

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487743. GERMANY, Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (Herzogtum). Auguste der Jüngere (the Younger). 1635-1666. AR Taler (42mm, 28.78 g, 6h). ‘Glockentaler’ – Fourth Bell Taler type. Zellerfeld mint. Dated 1643. · AUGUSTUS · HERTZOG · ZU · BRAUN : UND LU :, armored and mantled half-length bust left, holding baton and plumed helmet / * · ALLES * MIT * BEDACHT * 1643, clapper of bell, inscribed 13 · K · MAII ·, leaning on box inscribed AP · 13/ XV · 10/ IN f.; below, SED?. Welter 812; Davenport 6371; KM 425. EF, attractive cabinet toning. Rare. ($1950) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection; Ponterio 124 (17 January 2003), lot 754.

487744. GERMANY, Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (Herzogtum). Auguste der Jüngere (the Younger). 1635-1666. AR Taler (41mm, 28.65 g, 3h). ‘Glockentaler’ – Sixth Bell Taler type. Zellerfeld mint; Henning Schluter, mintmaster. Dated 1643. · AUGUSTUS · HERTZOG ZU · BRAUN : U : LUN :, armored and mantled half-length bust left, holding baton and plumed helmet / H Փ S * · ALLES * MIT * BEDACHT * AO : 16 43, bell inscribed W · A · I · D · I · R, with E on clapper; TAN DEM across fields,; below, M · VII B · 14 · ZZ ·. Welter 815; Davenport 6374B; KM 428. EF, attractive cabinet toning. Rare. ($1950) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection; Millenia Collection (Part II, 26 May 2008), lot 585.

485921. ITALY, Firenze. 1189-1532. AV Fiorino d’oro (19mm, 3.53 g, 10h). Segno: lion’s paw. Struck 1267-1303. ๘ ōǭɭʼ ዞnͿƱ¥, lily of Florence / / ⎄ / ƱɭH¥ nnዞ⎄ / B, bust of St. John the Baptist facing, holding cross-tipped scepter in left hand and raising right in benediction. Bernocchi 350; MIR 4/93; Biaggi 785; Friedberg 274. Near EF. ($975) From the WRG Collection. Ex Coin Galleries (20 August 1986), lot 4119.

472215. ITALY, Napoli (Regno). Alfonso I il Magnanimo (the Magnanimous) d’Aragona. 1442-1458. AV Sesquiducato – Alfonsino (27mm, 5.28 g, 3h). Napoli (Naples) mint. แ Ḽ ]Ǵ⌚ɨɔ˴V Ḽ Ę Ḽ ŷ Ḽ r Ḽ ]r]ŷɨ Ḽ ˴IýILI Ḽ ýI˶ Ḽ VL˶r, coat-of-arms / แ / ĘN˴ / M / ]ĘIV˶ / Ě˶ Ěŷɦ / ĘĚ˴PIýI / INIMIý / M, knight on horseback right, holding sword in raised right hand. Pannuti-Riccio 2; MIR 53; MEC 14, 848 var. (legends); Biaggi 1662; Friedberg 896. Choice EF, lustrous. ($5750) Ex ANPB Collection (Varesi 69, 7 October 2016), lot 339; Spink Zürich 52/II (26 October 1994), lot 1156.

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Ex Viking and Lockett Collections

491242. SCANDINAVIA. Circa 991-1020. AR Penny (19x19mm, 2.63 g, 8h). Imitation of Æthelred II Long Cross type of the moneyer Æthelnoth of Lincoln. Square flan. ม ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦ɭ, draped bust left; pellet behind / ม ዞTዞ⌦ዧ ɭTዦ ɭ ⌦ዢዧ, voided long cross, with triple-crescent ends. Malmer ‘single’ chain, dies 117.1145 (no. 10 – this coin); SCBI 27 (Lincolnshire), 92 (same dies); Mossop 16 (dies T/r). Good VF, toned. Exceptional. Very rare. ($7500) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Viking Collection (Spink 150, 14 March 2001), lot 1173; Richard Cyril Lockett Collection (Scottish & Irish – Part I, Glendining’s, 18 June 1957), lot 480.

486787. SPAIN, Castile & León. Enrique II. 1369-1379. AR Real (27.5mm, 3.47 g, 7h). Sevilla (Seville) mint. Third period, 1373-1379. ๘ ĕɭ⍴Ʊɔ⎍˫ Ḧ ⍴ƱýƌƱ Ḧ ªĕƱ⎍Ϳɭˆ Ḧ EĕEŷɭ/ ḥ ĕƱ˫ʁƱýƱª⍴ Ḧ ƱɔƱ⍴Ʊýɭ˫ Ḧ ⍴Eɭ˫, crowned Eɔ / ๘ EɔˆƱý⎍˫ Ḧ ĕEƱ Ḧ ŷˆªýƱª Ḧ ˆEҩ Ḧ ýª˫ͿEɔ, coat-of-arms within quadrilobe; rosettes in upper spandrels, ˫ in lower. MEC 6, 597-8 var. (legends); ME 1313. VF, toned, minor edge split. ($325) Ex Aureo (21 April 1998), lot 469.

Extremely Rare Olof Skötkonung (the Treasurer) On a Square Flan

491239. SWEDEN. Olof Skötkonung (the Treasurer). 995–1022. AR Penny (21.5x22mm, 3.47 g, 10h). Imitating an Æthelred II Long Cross type of the moneyer Askletill of London. Square flan. Sigtuna mint. Struck after 1009. ม ዞዝዞ⌦ʼዞʼዝ ዞҟ ©ዢɭ, draped bust left; pellet behind / ม ɭӲ üͿ⌦ ዦ ⌦ዢዢ/ዝ, voided long cross, with triple-crescent ends. Malmer, Sigtuna Chain 5, 216.606 = Malmer Chain 105, dies 4.206/4.606; SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 1477 (same dies). VF, toned. Extremely rare. ($3750) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Viking Collection (Spink 150, 14 March 2001), lot 1160.

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A Special Offering of Siege Coinage

488427. DUTCH REVOLT (Nederlandse Opstand), Low Countries. Breda. Besieged by the Spanish under Ambrosio Spínola, Marqués de los Balbases, July 1624-5 July 1625. CU 2 Stuiver Klippe (18x19mm, 3.57 g). Emission of Spring 1625. Dated 1625. • II • / BREDA / OBSESSA in three lines; below, coat-of-arms flanked by 16 25 / Blank. Vanhoudt I 460; Gelder, Noodmunten, 231a; Maillet 11; Lasser 1177; CNM 2.09.11. VF, brown surfaces. ($475) Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.57.5908 (Numismatica Genevensis SA VII, 27 November 2012), lot 635 (part of). Breda, a town in the Spanish Netherlands, was one of the lands of William the Silent, Prince of Orange, a major figure in the struggle for Dutch independence in the Eighty Years’ War. Maurice of Nassau, William’s son, was in command of the town when it was besieged in August of 1624 by Spanish troops under Ambrosio Spinola. The well-defended town eventually fell to the Spanish in June of 1625. Not long after the fall of Breda, however, the tide of the war began to turn against Spain. The Dutch and their allies grew increasingly powerful, and in 1637, Prince Frederick Henry of Orange retook the city. In 1648, the Dutch United Provinces were officially declared independent of Spain in the Treaty of Münster. The Surrender of Breda, a painting by Diego Velásquez, vividly captures the end of the Spanish siege. The painting depicts the surrender of the Dutch by Justin of Nassau to the Spanish army. In his painting, Velásquez emphasizes the graciousness of the Spanish. He shows the two adversaries, Justin of Nassau and Ambrosio Spinola, meeting as if they are old friends. Spinola puts his hand on Justin’s shoulder, preventing him from kneeling, as if to reassure him that he’ll be treated with respect. The painting, completed ten years after this klippe was struck, is a fascinating depiction of the ideals of 17th century chivalry.

488428. STRASBOURG BISHOPS’ WAR (Bischöflicher Krieg), Germany. Straßburg. Besieged by the Roman Catholic bishop, Herzog Karl von Lothringen, 1592. AR 80 Kreuzer Klippe (33x34mm, 28.71 g). Dated 1592. Coat-of-arms of the PrinceBishop; below, coats-of-arms of the cathedral chapter and city of Straßburg; 15 9Z flanking upper shield; 80 (mark of value) in exergue; all within wreath / Blank. E&L 448; Mailliet 1; Brause-Mansfeld I, pl. 25, 2; Lasser 1188. VF, toned. ($650) Taking place between 1592 and 1604, the Strasbourg Bishops’ War was a conflict between Protestants and Catholics for control of the Bishopric of the city. One of two sectarian wars that broke out within the Holy Roman Empire between the 1555 Peace of Augsburg and the outbreak of the Thirty Years’ War in 1618, it proved to be less bloody than the other sectarian war, the 1583-1588 Truchsessischer Krieg over control of Köln. Benefitting from the Peace of Augsburg, Strasbourg enjoyed a larger amount of autonomy, status as an important trading center, and the site of a prestigious university. This university initially attracted radical thinkers of both religious sides. By the beginning of the war, both the University and the town were strongly Protestant. When the city’s bishop, Johann von Manderscheid, died, Protestants, fearing that the Catholic Karl von Lothringen would stand for election as the new bishop (which he did), seized the episcopal offices and appointed fifteen-year-old Johann Georg, son of the Elector of Brandenburg, in the hopes that Protestant Germany would rally behind them. In addition, the Protestants acquired a loan of 300,000 florins from Friedrich I, Duke of Württemburg, to assist their cause. The Catholic prelates meanwhile fled to Saverne, and in exile, elected Karl as bishop. With the support of his younger brother Franz, Karl moved from Saverne to take Strasbourg. Owing to the unwillingnes of the Holy Roman Emperor, Rudolf II, to intervene, Henri IV, King of France – a Protestant who had converted to Catholicism – brokered a truce by dividing the bishopric between the contending prelates. Ultimately, Johann Georg passed the bishopric to Karl in return for Oberkirch, a German district that passed to the House of Württemburg.

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488429. FRANCO-DUTCH WAR (Hollandse Oorlog), Low Countries. Groningen. Besieged by Christoph Bernhard Freiherr von Galen, Bishop of Münster, 1672. AR Rijksdaalder Klippe (34x34mm, 29.02 g). Dated 1672. · IVRE · · ET · TEMPORE · 1672 ·, crowned coat-of-arms; 50 and ST (mark of value) flanking shield / Blank. Van der Wis type 3; P&W Go17.1; Delmonte, Argent 736; Mailliet 5; Lasser 1214; CNM 2.20.2. Near EF, toned. ($750) The Franco-Dutch War, sometimes called the Dutch War (1672-1678), was a conflict between the Dutch Republic and a coalition composed of France, Sweden, the Bishoprics of Münster and Köln (Cologne), and England. The lands of the Austrian Habsburgs, Brandenburg-Prussia, and Spain, later joined with the Dutch Republic to form the Quadruple Alliance. The first year of the war is often known as het Rampjaar (the Disaster Year), because a full-scale invasion by English, French, and German forces took the Dutch Republic completely by surprise. Following his defeat of the Fronde, and now king in his own right, Louis XIV (1643-1715), considering the Dutch to be economic rivals, seditious republicans, and Protestant heretics, began to prepare for war with the Dutch Republic. This was a slow process, since the two nations had been allies since the time of the Dutch Revolt. The Dutch signing of the Triple Alliance in 1668 with England and Sweden in support of Spain changed this arrangement since it checked French expansion in the Spanish Netherlands in the French War of Devolution (1667-1668). Carefully, Louis shifted the alliances of England and Sweden away from the Republic. Then, through a series of maneuvers, the French forces, along with an English expeditionary force, occupied the seven provinces. The Dutch public panicked and rioted. In the ensuing chaos, the brothers Johan and Cornelis de Witt, were seized and lynched by a mob, who believed that the brothers were involved in an attempt to assassinate William of Nassau (later William III of England). William was proclaimed stadhouder. France’s promises to England stiffened Dutch resistance. The siege of Groningen then failed, and a series of Dutch naval victories under Admiral Michiel de Ruyter turned the tide toward the Dutch. At this same time, the Dutch were acquiring allies: Brandenburg-Prussia, the Holy Roman Emperor, and Charles II of Spain. In 1673, Louis turned away from the Dutch and turned to the Spanish Netherlands. At Maastricht, where Louis personally oversaw French operations, the commander of the musketeers, Charles d’Artagnan, perished. Among the English delegation overseeing the battle was a young John Churchill, who would distinguish himself in the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714), as the 1st Duke of Marlborough. From 1676 through 1678, Louis’ main strategy was to undermine this new coalition. The marriage of Mary, the daughter of Charles II to William of Nassau, meant that now England would be on the side of the Dutch. Louis quickly tried to campaign before the English could re-enter the war against him. After victories at Ghent and Ypres, Louis gained considerable territory through the Treaty of Nijmegen, which ended the war in 1678.

488430. FRANCO-DUTCH WAR (Hollandse Oorlog), Low Countries. Groningen. Besieged by Christoph Bernhard Freiherr von Galen, Bishop of Münster, 1672. AR Quarter Rijksdaalder Klippe (24.5x25mm, 7.14 g). Dated 1672. · IVRE · · ET · TEMPORE · · 1672 ·, crowned coat-of-arms; 12½ and ST (mark of value) flanking shield / Blank. Van der Wis type 4; P&W Go19; Delmonte, Argent 738; Mailliet 7; Lasser 1216; CNM 2.20.4. VF, toned. ($375) Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.57.5937 (Numismatica Genevensis SA VII, 27 November 2012), lot 708 (part of).

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488431. WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION (Spanischer Erbfolgekrieg), Germany. Landau. Besieged by the French under the command of Claude Louis Hector, Duc de Villars and Maréchal, 6 June-20 August 1713. AR 1 Gulden 4 Kreuzer Klippe (34x37mm, 10.21 g). Dated 1713. Crowned ducal coat-of-arms of Württemburg-Winnental, framed by Jagdorden, C · A · H · Z · W · around, I V · across field, 17 13 below; in upper stamp: PRO/CAES : & IMP: in two lines; in lower stamp: BEL : LANDAU/1. FL : 4 x. in two lines; in corner stamps: crowned CA monogram / Blank. Klein & Raff 221.1; cf. Davenport 2377; Mailliet 7. VF, toned. ($1250) Ex Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.1.7081 (Numismatica Genevensis SA VII, 27 November 2012), lot 739 . In 1701, a Grand Alliance against Louis was established. Consisting of England (after 1707, Great Britain), the Dutch Republic, and the Holy Roman Empire, their candidate was Charles, the son of Leopold I. By this point, however, the Empire was weakened by the increasing independence of German states within it. Now, Catholic Bavaria allied itself with France. William III, Louis’ chief rival, had died shortly after the war began. His sister-in-law Anne succeeded him. The new queen relied on John Churchill, the 1st Duke of Marlborough, as her commander. His victories at Blenheim, Ramilies, Oudenaard, and Malplaquet, sealed his reputation as a great general. By 1710, however, the situation was at a standstill. Churchill’s victories in the Low Countries were offset by the Alliance’s defeat in Spain. The war’s cost made it unpopular in Britain. The succession of the Alliance candidate to the throne of Austria made an Austro-Spanish union no better to Britain than the Franco-Spanish one that made them join the Alliance in the first place. Now, with the Tories in power, the administration of Robert Harley initiated peace talks with France and ceased active military participation, much to the consternation of Churchill and the Whigs. Without British support, the other Allies were forced to make peace. Under the treaties of Utrecht in 1713, and Rastatt and Baden in 1714,. Phillip renounced his claim to the French throne and was confirmed as King of Spain. Spain retained is overseas possessions, while their European territories were divided between Austria, Britain, and Savoy. In the long run, Britain emerged as the leading European maritime and commercial power, bringing to an end almost a century of Dutch influence and the end of the Dutch Republic as a major power. The break-up of the Holy Roman Empire continued, paving the way for the creation of more powerful German states, most notably Prussia.

World Medals Hope for Unity in the Face of Dissentions

489964. LOW COUNTRIES, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden (Dutch Republic). West-Friesland. 15811795. AV Medal (37.5mm, 15.29 g, 11h). Hope for Unity in the Face of Dissentions . Unsigned, but attributed to Paulus Utenwael. Dated 1604 (over 1596). TRAHITE • ÆQVO IVGO • 1604 (over 1596), yoke of two oxen left, drawing cart bearing orange tree; in exergue, coat-of-arms within floral spray, two lis flanking / ḥ FRAN GIMVR ◊ SI ◊ COLLI DIMVR, fortified islands of Hoorn, Enkhuizen, and Medemblik in sea; below, ships and two pots separated by orange branch floating in sea; above, name of god in Hebrew. Roovers, “De Noord-Nederlandse Triumfpenningen,” in Jaarboek voor Munt- en Penningkunde 40 (1953), 61; cf. Van Loon I, 479-80 and Van Loon II, p. 11 (for similar medals). Near EF. Extremely rare in gold. Perhaps unique. ($13,500) 63


Isabel of Portugal by Leone Leoni

489965. SPAIN, Reino de España. Isabel de Portugal. Riena consorte, 1526-1539. AR Medal (75mm, 124.3 g, 5h). By Leone Leoni. A contemporary cast, circa 1549. DIVA • ISABELLA • AVGVSTA • CAROLI • V • VX, bust of Isabel facing slightly left / HAS • HABET • ET • SVPERAT (she has these and surpasses them), the three Graces embracing each other, the central figure seen from behind and facing right, those on ends facing left and right, respectively, and holding flowers; cupides to either side. Attwood 28; Armand I 25; Middeldorf & Stiebral, Renaissance Medals LVI (this piece). EF, toned. Cast and chased as made. ($97,500) Ex Stack Collection (Morton & Eden, with Sotheby’s, 9 December 2009), lot 131; ‘Property of a Collector’ (Sotheby’s, 12 June 1974), lot 201. Leone Leoni (circa 1509-1590) was a prominent sculptor and engraver of the Italian Renaissance. Starting his career as a goldsmith, Leoni quickly rose to prominence as an engraver of coins and medals. In the late 1530s, he created a number of medal dies for the Papal mint in Rome, but his violent temper led to altercations with other of the Pope’s resident artists, including the engraver Cellini and the jeweler Pellegrino di Leuti. When the later accused him of assault in March 1540, Leoni confessed, and was sentenced to have his right hand cut off, which the Pope commuted to service in galleys. Leoni was freed through the patronage of Andrea Doria, prince of Genoa, and engraved several medals for him before moving on to Milan, where he oversaw a redesign of the Milanese coinage of Charles V. Following this, he served for a time in the Piacenza mint, before chance and good connections gained him an audience with Charles himself. In late 1547, Leoni proposed to the governor of Milan, Ferrante Gonzaga, to produce an equestrian statue of Charles, an idea that apparently intrigued the emperor, as he was asked to accompany the royal entourage to Brussels. Here, the artist finally gained an audience with Charles, where he presented examples of his medallic work, earning approval of the monarch and commissions to produce further medals – the current type included. As Isabel had died in 1539, the portrait on this medal could not have been made from a subject, but was rather derived from a painting by Titian, now lost but known from a copy by Rubens. Leoni wrote of the design, “If I have made it from Titian, it is because His Majesty commanded it thus.” (Attwood p. 88) It would appear that Charles was pleased with this work, as he later had Leoni create a sardonyx cameo bearing the same portrait.

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Enlargements of 489965

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487745. SWEDEN. Gustav II Adolf den store (the Great). 1611–1632. AR Medal (40mm, 18.09 g, 12h). Celebration of Victories. By R.N. Kitzkatz. Struck 1632. GUST · ADOLPH 9 D : G : SUEC : GOT : VAD : R · M · PRIC : FIN : DUX · ETHO : ET · CAREL : IGRIÆ : D9, draped bust facing slightly right, wearing ruff; all within ornate frame with facing winged cherub heads above and below / (rosette) STANS ACIE : PVGNANS : VINCENS : MORIENSQVE : TRIVMPHAT, crowned sword between palm frond and olive branch; city and village view in background; KR monogram to lower right; above, radiant name of god in Hebrew. Hildebrand 178a. EF, toned. Rare. ($1250) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection. Ex Superior (9 December 1994), lot 596.

487746. SWEDEN. Gustav II Adolf den store (the Great). 1611–1632. AR Medal (43.5mm, 26.22 g, 12h). On his death at the Battle of Lützen. By Sebastian Dadler of Danzig. Dually dated 9 December 1594 and 6 November 1632. GUST : ADOLPH 9 D · G · SUEC : GOT : VAD : R · M : PRIC : FIN : DUX ETHO : ET CAREL : IGRIÆ : D9, draped bust facing slightly right, wearing ruff; all within ornate frame surmounted by cherub, with additional cherubs to either side; skull and cross bones over S D below / STANS ACIE PUGNANS VINCENS MORIENSQUE TRIUMPAT (clover)/ NATUS 9 DEC : ANNO 1594 GLORIOSE MORTUUS 6 NOU : ANO 1632, hand raising sword with laurel wreath between olive branch and palm frond; above, radiant name of god in Hebrew. Wiecek 81; Merseburger 1070. AU, toned. Rare. ($1450 ) Ex Richard A. Jourdan Collection, purchased from Karl Stephens, 2002. Gustav II Adolf, afterwards styled as “den Store (the Great),” fell in battle on the afternoon of 16 November, 1632, at the battle of Lützen in what is today Germany. The Thirty Years War had already been raging for nearly two decades before Swedish and German Protestant forces met the Catholic Imperial armies in a decisive battle on the foggy field south of Liepzig. Gustav himself personally took the field that day, and around 1 PM, while leading a cavalry charge on his right wing, both him and his mount were struck by enemy fire. The king was separated from his command, behind enemy lines, and not found again until a few hours after the smoke cleared, when his stripped and mangled body was retrieved and borne back to Sweden.

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British

480640. ANGLO-SAXON, Continental Sceattas. Circa 720/25-800/20. AR Sceatt (12mm, 1.19 g, 6h). Series X, type 31. Ribe mint. ‘Wodan’ head facing; pellet above, short cross pommée to left and right; single pellet above / Fantastic creature flying left, head right, with tail coiled leftward; two pellets to left. Abramson 103.10; OdV&K 775 (same dies); cf. SCBI 63 (BM), 446; SCBI 69 (Abramson), 337; North 116; SCBC 797. EF, obverse slightly off center. ($2250)

489780. ANGLO-SAXON, Archbishops of Canterbury. Wulfred. 805-832. AR Penny (19mm, 1.20 g, 12h). Canterbury mint; Swefheard, moneyer. Struck circa 810-822/3. ม Ӳ⎍⎍ዞዟዡዞያዝ ዦɭɉ˶©, tonsured facing bust / / ม // ዝɭያɭ/ ዛዞያዧዢ©/ üዢ⎍ዢ˸©/ / Ӳ /. EMC 2016.0342 (this coin); Naismith 59.2j (same obv. die); SCBI 9 (Ashmolean), 44; BMC –; North 236; SCBC 890. Good VF, some minor edge loss. ($3500) Found at Louth, Lincolnshire 2016. This anonymous Episcopal issue was struck at a time of political uncertainty in Kent, when old Mercian hegemony was replaced by that of Wessex.

491231. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Mercia. Coenwulf. 796-821. AR Penny (19mm, 1.36 g, 9h). Tribrach type. Canterbury mint; Duda, moneyer. Struck 797/8-circa 805. ม üℽዞnዮ/ዮ⌦/ዟ ያ/ዞҟ, Ȯ with horizontal line above; all within pellet circle / ዝዮ ዝ ¥ within angles of tribrach moline. Naismith 13.1n (this coin); SCBI 9 (Ashmolean), 15 var. (obv. legend); cf. BMC 93; North 342; SCBC 914. EF, toned, slightly wavy flan. ($4250) Ex Allan Williams Collection; M. Vosper FPL 122 (September–October 2002), no. 195.

Ex Lockett and Carlyon-Britton Collections

485361. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Mercia. Burgred. 852-874. AR Penny (19.5mm, 1.26 g, 12h). Phase IIb. Coenred, moneyer. Struck 866-868/70. ม ዛዮያűያዞዝ ያዞҟ, diademed and draped bust right / ዦɭn ዞͿ⌈ in pelleted topless lunettes above and below ม üዞnያዞዝ. MacKay H7.4 (dies O4/R4) = N. Heywood, ‘The Kingdom and Coins of Burgred,’ in BNJ III (1906), p. facing 59, 1 (this coin); SCBI 9 (Ashmolean), 35; BMC 183-4; North 426; SCBC 941B. EF, toned. ($1850) From the WRG Collection, purchased from C.H. Wolfe, July 1989. Ex Richard Cyril Lockett Collection (English – Part IV, Glendining’s, 26 April 1960), lot 3600 (part of); P.W.P. Carlyon-Britton Collection (not in Sotheby’s sales, but cited as such by Heywood p. 66); 1884 London Waterloo Bridge Hoard (IBCH 256).

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491237 485366 491237. ANGLO-SAXON, Anglo-Viking (Danish East Anglia). St. Edmund memorial coinage. Circa 895-918. AR Penny (19mm, 1.39 g, 9h). Mint in East Anglia (Ipswich?); Onnonea, moneyer. / ม / ⎄æ ዞ⌃ዝዦ⎍nዝ ያü, large _; trefoil above / ม ɭዢዢዢዢɭnዞ⌃ዢዢ⌃ዢҟ, cross pattée. SCBI 48 (Northern), 747 (same dies); BMC 478; North 483; SCBC 960. Good VF, toned. Rare with trefoil above A. ($795) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Davissons 8 (10 April 1997), lot 497.

485366. ANGLO-SAXON, Anglo-Viking (Danish East Anglia). St. Edmund memorial coinage. Circa 895-918. AR Penny (17.5mm, 1.15 g, 4h). Mint in East Anglia (Ipswich?); Winegar, moneyer. ม ˞⌐ ዞ⌃ዝዦዮnዢ, large _ / ม ዮዮɃዞያዢዢ, cross pattée. SCBI –; BMC –; North 483; SCBC 960. VF, toned. ($595) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Andy Singer, December 1989.

486794. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Æthelberht. 858-865/6. AR Penny (20.5mm, 1.22 g, 6h). Inscribed Cross type (BMC i). Canterbury mint; Hunræd, moneyer. Struck circa 858-864. ๘ ¨ዞT⌦ዛዞ¨ʼh ʼዞҟ, draped bust right / ዡ⎍nʼ/ዞዝ/ ዦɭ/n/ዞ/Ϳ/¨ in and around the arms of a beaded cross. Naismith C192a-b; SCBI 1 (Cambridge), 536; BMC 37; North 620; SCBC 1053. Good VF, deep cabinet toning. ($6750) Ex M. Lessen Collection, purchased from Dave Hess, June 1967.

478775. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Alfred the Great. 871-899. AR Penny (20.5mm, 1.53 g, 12h). Two Line/ Horizontal type. Canterbury mint; Deorweald, moneyer. Struck circa 880-899. ม ዞ⌦ዟʼዞዝ ʼዞX ዝℽʼ!ℽ, small cross pattée / ዝዢaʼ⎍/ ¨⌦ዝ ዦℽ in two lines; three pellets between, pellets above and below. SCBI 20 (Mack), 733; BMC 10; North 638; SCBC 1069. VF, toned, slightly wavy. ($2500)

479002 485362 485362. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Eadmund. 939-946. AR Penny (21mm, 1.49 g, 6h). Horizontal-Trefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC i). Winchester? mint; Otic, moneyer. ม ዞ²ዝዦ⎍nዝ / ʼዞX /, small cross pattée / ɭ˸ዢü ม/ ዦɭn!ዞ in two lines; ม ม ม between, trefoil above and below. CTCE 74; SCBI 34 (BM), 328-9; North 691; SCBC 1105. Good VF, toned, some light marks. ($1250) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Seaby, February 1989. Ex Seaby Coin & Medal Bulletin 835 (November 1988), no. E59.

479002. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Eadred. 946-955. AR Penny (22mm, 1.54 g, 4h). Horizontal-Rosette 2 (HR 2) type (BMC i). Uncertain mint; Frithuric, moneyer. ዞ©ዝʼዞዝ ʼዞX, small cross pattée / ዟʼɭT/ ʼዢü ҇!ɭ in two lines; cross pattée flanked by annulets between, rosette above and below. SCBI 4 (Copenhagen), 741 (same dies); CTCE 196; SCBI 34 (BM), 655 var. (rev. legend); North 708; SCBC 1113. VF, toned. Rare. ($1650) 68


486795. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Eadgar. 959-975. AR Penny (22mm, 1.60 g, 12h). Circumscription Cross (CC) type (BMC iii). Winchester mint; Ælfsige, moneyer. Struck circa 959/60-973. ม ዞ©ዝű©ʼ ʼዞX ˸ɭ ዛʼ!ዢ, small cross pattée / ม ®⌦ዟӲዢűዞ ዦɭ ⎍⎍ዢnn, small cross pattée. Harvey 33A (dies B/b) = M. Lessen, “A Presumed ‘Hampshire’ Hoard of Eadgar CC Coins,” in NumCirc CXI.2 (April 2003), 1 (this coin); CTCE 240 var. (rev. legend); SCBI 34 (BM), –; North 749; SCBC 1135. Near EF, lightly toned, slightly concave. Very rare. ($3750) Ex M. Lessen Collection, purchased from Classical Numismatic Group, November 1994; circa 1993 ‘Hampshire’ Hoard.

478193 491236 478193. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (20mm, 1.55 g, 3h). Crux type (BMC iiia, Hild. C). Northampton mint; Leofsige, moneyer. Struck circa 991-997. ม ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦j, draped bust left; trefoil-tipped scepter before / ม ⌦ዞɭዟӲዢűዞ ዦ! ɭ ዡ©ዦͿ, voided short cross; ù ʼ ⎍ ҟ in angles. SCBI 20 (Mack), 876 (same obv. die) Hild 1255; BMC –; North 770; SCBC 1148. VF, deeply toned. ($675) Ex Baldwin’s vault, with old tickets.

491236. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (21mm, 1.66 g, 6h). Intermediate Small Cross/Crux type mule (BMC iii, Hild Cb). Winchester mint; Beorhtmaer, moneyer. Struck circa 995-997. ม ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦j, diademed and draped bust left / ม BӎʼዡͿዦ®ʼ ዦ!ɭ ዩዢዧ, voided short cross; ù ʼ ⎍ ҟ in angles. Harvey 536a (dies J/e – this coin); SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 1368 (same rev. die); Hild. 4158; BMC –; North p. 159, n. 312; cf. SCBC 1150/1148. Near VF, toned, a few peck marks. Rare mule. ($1250) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Lawrence R. Stack Collection (Sotheby’s, 22 April 1999), lot 513; Gordon V. Doubleday Collection (Glendining’s, 6 October 1987), lot 562.

491232 482173 491232. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (19.5mm, 1.70 g, 12h). Long Cross type (BMC iva, Hild. D). Bedford mint; Gunni, moneyer. Struck circa 997-1003. ม ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦∂, draped bust left; pellet behind / มű⎍ ዧዧዢ ዦณ∂ B ዞዝ©, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends. SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 29 (same dies); Hild 87; BMC 13; North 774; SCBC 1151. Good VF, toned, peck marks. ($875) Ex Allan Williams Collection; Spink Numismatic Circular CXVI.2 (April 2008), no. HS3302.

482173. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (19.5mm, 1.73 g, 9h). Long Cross type (BMC iva, Hild. D). Ilchester mint; Goda, moneyer. Struck circa 997-1003. ม / ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦ɭ, draped bust left; pellet behind / ม űɭዝ ዦቸ∂ űዢዟዞǮü, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends. SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 332 (same dies); Hild 1029; BMC 98; North 774; SCBC 1151. Good VF, toned, peck marks. Very rare mint. ($1975) Ex Hermann Vogel Collection (A. Hess 189, 16 April 1928), lot 1590 (with his ticket) The acquisition by the Ashmolean Museum of the Stevens-Cox collection of West Country mints in 2013 has significantly reduced the number of Ilchester mint coins in private hands

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491234 478195 478195. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (19.5mm, 1.67 g, 6h). Long Cross type (BMC iva, Hild. D). Northampton mint; Bruning, moneyer. Struck circa 997-1003. ม / ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦∂, draped bust left; pellet behind / ม Bʼ ⎍ዧዢዧ ü ዦณ∂ ዡ©ዦ, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends. SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 396; Hild 1242; BMC –; North 774; SCBC 1151. Good VF, toned, light crease, minor peck marks. ($750) Ex Baldwin’s vault.

491234. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (19mm, 1.31 g, 6h). Long Cross type (BMC iva, Hild. D). Romney mint; Leofwine, moneyer. Struck circa 997-1003. ม / ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦, draped bust left; pellet behind / ม ⌦ዞ ɭዟዩዢ ዞ ዦณɭ ʼ⎍ዦ, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends. SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 1071 (same dies); Hild 3315; BMC –; North 774; SCBC 1151. VF, toned, peck marks. Rare mint. ($1250) Ex Allan Williams Collection; William J. Conte Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 58, 19 September 2001), lot 1753; F. Elmore Jones Collection (Glendining, 12 May 1971), lot 679.

491235 478196 491235. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Æthelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (20mm, 1.73 g, 6h). Long Cross type (BMC iva, Hild. D). Wallingford mint; Ælfric, moneyer. Struck circa 997-1003. ม / ®Tዞ⌦ʼ®ዝ ʼዞҟ ©é⌦∂, draped bust left; pellet behind / ม ®⌦ዟ ʼዢü ዦ ቸ∂ ዩ ዞ⌦ዢű, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends. SCBI 9 (Ashmolean), 579 (same dies); Hild 3897; BMC –; North 774; SCBC 1151. Choice EF, deeply toned. ($1575) Ex Allan Williams Collection; William H. Pheatt Collection (Buckland, Dix, & Wood 12, 21 March 1995), lot 531, purchased November 1972.

478196. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Edward the Confessor. 1042-1066. AR Penny (19mm, 1.79 g, 10h). Expanding cross type, heavy issue (BMC v, Hild. E). Northampton mint; Æelfwine, moneyer. Struck 1050-1053. ม ዞዝዩዞʼ /ዝ ʼዞҢ, diademed bust left; scepter before / ม ®⌦ዟዢnዞ ɭn ዡ²ዦͿ, voided short cross with expanding limbs and circle around pellet-in-circle in center. Freeman 5; SCBI 20 (Mack), 1197 (same dies); Hild –; BMC –; North 823; SCBC 1177. Good VF, toned. Rare. ($1150) Ex Baldwin’s vault.

482171 480959 482171. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Edward the Confessor. 1042-1066. AR Penny (19mm, 1.51 g, 9h). Pointed Helmet type (BMC vii, Hild. F). York mint; Styrkollr, moneyer. Struck 1053-1056. ม ዞዝዩ/ዞʼ ዝ ʼዞዢ /, crowned and draped bust right, holding cross-tipped scepter in right hand / ม ӲͿዢʼüɭ⌦ ɭn ዞɭዟዞʼ, voided short cross with pellet-in-annulet center and triple crescent ends; annulet in second quarter. Freeman 346; SCBI 11 (Reading), 155 (same dies); Hild –; BMC 334; North 825; SCBC 1179. Good VF, toned. ($795) 480959. NORMAN. William I ‘the Conqueror’. 1066-1087. AR Penny (20mm, 1.36 g, 10h). Paxs type (BMC viii). Salisbury mint; Godwine, moneyer. Struck circa 1083-1086. ม ዩዢ⌦⌦ዞ⌦(ዦ ʼ)ዞX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter; trefoil on shoulder / ม űɭዝዩዢnዞ ɭn ˨ዢዞʼ, cross pattée; letters of ዩ a X ˨ in annulets within quarters. SCBI –; BMC 904; North 848; SCBC 125. Good VF, attractive iridescent toning. ($1450) 70


485368. NORMAN. William I ‘the Conqueror’. 1066-1087. AR Penny (19mm, 1.37 g, 3h). Paxs type (BMC viii). Southwark mint; Osmund, moneyer. Struck circa 1083-1086. ม ዩዢ⌦⌦ዞ⌦ዦ ʼዞX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter; trefoil on shoulder / ม ɭ˨ዦዢዢnዝ ɭn ˨ዢዢTዢ, cross pattée; letters of ዩ a X ˨ in annulets within quarters. SCBI –; BMC 976 var. (arrangement of PAXS); North 850; SCBC 1257. EF, toned. Well struck. ($1850) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, April 1991.

483761 483762 483761. NORMAN. William I ‘the Conqueror’. 1066-1087. AR Penny (20mm, 1.44 g, 3h). Paxs type (BMC viii). Wallingford mint; Æthelwine, moneyer. Struck circa 1083-1086. ม ዩዢ⌦⌦ዞ⌦(ዦ ʼ)ዞX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter; trefoil on shoulder / ม ዢዞűዞ⌦ዩዢnዞ ɭn ዩዢዢ⌦ዢ, cross pattée; letters of ዩ a X ˨ in annulets within quarters. SCBI –; BMC 1021 (same dies); North 848; SCBC 125. Good VF, toned. ($1450) 483762. NORMAN. William I ‘the Conqueror’. 1066-1087. AR Penny (19mm, 1.39 g, 12h). Paxs type (BMC viii). Winchester mint; Leofweald, moneyer. Struck circa 1083-1086. ม ዩዢ⌦⌦ዞ⌦(ዦ ʼ)ዞX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter; trefoil on shoulder / ม ⌦ዢዞዟዩɭ⌦ዝ ɭn ዩዢü, cross pattée; letters of ዩ a X ˨ in annulets within quarters. Harvey 2057 (dies B/a); SCBI 21 (York), 1235 (same dies); BMC 1102; North 848; SCBC 125. Good VF, toned. ($925) Ex Glendining’s (8 July 1987), lot 429.

485369. NORMAN. William II Rufus. 1087-1100. AR Penny (19.5mm, 1.44 g, 6h). Cross in Quatrefoil type (BMC ii). London mint; Eadric, moneyer. Struck circa 1089-1092. ม ዩዢ⌦⌦ዞ⌦ዦ ʼዞX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter / ม ዞዝʼዢü ɭn ⌦ዢዢn[ዝ], short cross potent, with pellet in each quarter; all within quatrefoil. SCBI 26 (East Anglia), 1408 (same dies); BMC –; North 852; SCBC 1259. VF, toned. ($2950) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, October 1990. Ex Classical Numismatic Auctions III (29 April 1989), lot 538.

485371 485372 485371. PLANTAGENET. Henry II. 1154-1189. AR Penny (18mm, 0.95 g, 10h). Cross and Crosslets (Tealby) type; class C. Newcastle mint; Willem, moneyer. Struck circa 1163-circa 1167. ๘ģn[ʼዢ Ḧ ʼ Ḧ ¥n...], crowned facing bust, holding scepter / [๘ Ѿ]ዢ⌦⌦ģɩ Ḧ ɭ[n Ḧ nģ⎍æ¥˨], cross pattée, with crosslet in angles. Cf. BMC 588 (same obv. die); North 956; SCBC 1339. VF, toned, areas of flat strike. ($325) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Michael Trenerry, July 1989. Ex Gordon V. Doubleday Collection (Glendining, 8 June 1988), lot 930 (part of; includes ticket); L. A. Lawrence Collection (Part IV, Glendining, 28 November 1951), lot 997 (part of; includes ticket).

485372. PLANTAGENET. Henry II. 1154-1189. AR Penny (19mm, 1.27 g, 6h). Short cross type, class Ib1. York mint; Gerard, moneyer. Struck 1180-circa 1182. ƌģnˊƱæ⎍S ˊģҟ, crowned facing bust, holding cross-pommée tipped scepter / ๘ Żዟˊaˊዝ / ɭn / ģ⎍ģˊ, voided short cross; quatrefoils in angles. SCBI 56 (Mass), 554 var. (rev. legend; same obv. die); North 963; SCBC 1344. VF, toned. Unusual misspelling of moneyer’s name. ($295) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, March 1989.

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478817 480957 478817. PLANTAGENET. Edward I. 1272-1307. AR Farthing (12.5mm, 0.45 g, 4h). New coinage, class 1c. Tower (London) mint. Struck May-December 1279. ม ģĕ⎍⎍¥ʼĕ⎍⎄ Ḧ ʼģҟ, crowned and draped facing bust / ⌦ɭɃ ĕɭɃ ƱģɃ ⎄Ʊ⎄, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. Withers I 2a; SCBI 39 (North), 1002; North 1051/2; SCBC 1443A. EF. Good metal. ($795) 480957. PLANTAGENET. Edward I. 1272-1307. AR Penny (19mm, 1.36 g, 6h). New coinage, class 3f. Tower (London) mint. Struck 1280-1281. ๘ ģĕѾʼ= _nŶ⌦= ĕn⎄ ƌӎB, crowned and draped facing bust / ýƱ⎍Ʊ Ϳ_⎄ ⌦ɭn ĕɭn, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. SCBI 39 (North), 146; North 1021; SCBC 1392. Good VF, toned. ($275) Ex F. Elmore Jones Collection (Part I, Glendining’s, 13 April 1983), lot 1267 (part of).

485448. PLANTAGENET. Edward III. 1327-1377. AR Groat (27mm, 4.43 g, 10h). Pre-Treaty period, group C. Tower (London) mint; im: cross 1. Struck 1351-1352. ๘ EĕѾ¨ʼĕ=ი ĕEƱ=ი ŷ=ი ʼEX=ი ¥Ƀŷǭ=ი Ԥ ი Ŗʼ¥Ƀý=ი ĕ=ი ƌӎB=, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches with lis at cusps / ๘ Pɨ˫ѝƱ ი ĕEѝ⍴ ი ¨ ĕƱѝ˶ɨʼ E⍴ ი ⍴Eѝ/ ýƱѝƱ ˶¥˫ ǭɭɃ ĕɭɃ, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. Lawrence 27; North 1147; SCBC 1565. Good VF, toned. ($465) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, April 1991.

488161. PLANTAGENET. Edward III. 1327-1377. AR Groat (26.5mm, 4.52 g, 2h). Treaty period. Calais mint. Struck 13631369. ๘ EĕѾ¨ˆĕ= Ḽ ĕEƱ Ḽ ŷ Ḽ ˆEX Ḽ ¨Nŷǭ Ḽ ĕN˫ Ḽ ƌӎB ი ⎜ ი ¨ʠ˶, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches with lis at cusps; annulet on breast / ๘ Pɨ˫ѝƱ ი ĕEѝ⍴ Ḽ ¨ ĕƱѝ˶ɨˆ E⍴ Ḽ ⍴Eѝ/ ѝƱǭ ǭ¨ / ý ¨ǭE ˫ƱE, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. Lawrence 1; North 1258; SCBC 1619. VF, toned. The first issue at the Calais mint. ($975) Ex Jon Mann Collection (with his elaborate ticket); Frank Brady Collection (Spink, 6 October 2011), lot 40, purchased from Spink.

485785. PLANTAGENET. Richard II. 1377-1399. AR Halfpenny (13.5mm, 0.56 g, 11h). Tower (London) mint. ม ʽƩý¨ʽĕ / ʽĚҞ / ¨NŻ=, crowned and draped facing bust / ýƩ⎍Ʃ ͿaS ⌦ɨN ĕɨN, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. Withers II type 1, n; North 1331b; SCBC 1699. VF, toned. ($365) From the WRG Collection, purchased from Andy Singer, December 1989. Ex Richard Cyril Lockett Collection (English Part III, Glendining’s, 4 November 1958), lot 3061 (part of).

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489781. LANCASTER. Henry V. 1413-1422. AV Half Noble (26mm, 3.36 g, 8h). Class C. Tower (London) mint; im: –/ pierced cross. ƌ ĚNrƩý= ĕƩ⎡ gra⎡ ˆĚҢ ᚤ aNgǭ⎡ ⎜ ᚤ ƌӎB=, Henry standing facing, holding sword and shield, in ship; cinquefoil above shield, ornaments -11-11, ropes 3/2, quatrefoils 3/3, trace of annulet on side of ship / ม ĕɨ⍴ƩNĚ Ḻ NĚ Ḻ ƩN Ḻ fѝrɨrĚ Ḻ Ϳѝɨ Ḻ argѝaS Ḻ ⍴, compound cross fleurée, with Һ at center and each bar terminating in lis; in each quarter, lion passant below crown; broken annulet in second quarter. Cf. Schneider 237-9 (for type); North 1377; SCBC 1750. VF. Rare. ($2850)

485329. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AV Noble (33mm, 6.92 g, 9h). Annulet issue. London mint; im: lis. Struck 1422-1427. ƌ ENˆiý= ჭ Di= $ ŷˆ¨= $ ˆEҞ $ ¨NŷȄ= $ ⎜ $ fˆ¨Ný= $ DN=S $ ƌһÝ=, Henry standing facing in ship, holding sword and shield; annulet to left of hand; ornaments: -11-1; quatrefoils: 3/3; n type 2, F type 1 / Ⴀ iƌ=ý ᚨ ¨ѝͿ= ⍿ Ϳˆ¨NSiENS ⍿ ʖEˆ ⍿ MEDiѝM ⍿ iǣǣɨˆѝ= ⍿ iݨͿ, cross fleurée over voided short cross potent; at center, ƌ within quatrefoil; in each angle, crown above lion passant; all within double polylobe, with annulet in one spandrel and trefoil (type 1) in all others; n type 1, P type 1. Whitton, Heavy 3a; Schneider 274 (same dies); North 1414; SCBC 1799. Good VF, lustrous. ($5950) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, September 1990.

485326 491229 485326. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AV Quarter Noble (19.5mm, 1.71 g, 7h). Annulet issue. London mint; im: lis. Struck 1422-1427. ჭ ƌENˆiý= ჭ Di= $ ŷˆ¨= $ ˆEҞ $ ¨NŷȄ=, coat-of-arms; small lis above; all within polylobe with trefoil cusps / ჭ EҞ¨ȄͿ¨BƩѝˆ მ ƩN ი ŷȄɨˆƩ¨, cross fleurée with lis at ends and in center; in each angle, lion passant left over trefoil; all within polylobe, with pellet in spandrels. Whitton, Heavy 1c; Schneider –; North 1420; SCBC 1810. Good VF, small scrape. ($1200) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, December 1989.

491229. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AR Halfgroat (21.5mm, 1.80 g, 10h). Rosette-mascle issue. Calais mint; im: cross patonce (IIIb)/plain cross (V). Struck 1430-1431. (cross patonce) ƌENˆiý=ḥ Di=ḥ ŷˆ¨=ḥ ˆEҞ ℽ ¨NŷȄ=ḥ Ӳ ḥ f, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches with lis at cusps / ม ʁɨ˫ѝi ḥ DEѝ⍴ Ḻ ¨ DiѝͿɨˆ E Ḻ ⍴Eѝ⍴/ ѝiȄ ℽ Ȅ¨ Ḻ ý¨Ȅi ˫iE ḥ, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. Whitton, Heavy 23; MHG 10/2; North 1448; SCBC 1862. VF, toned. Well struck. ($325) 73


Henry VI’s Last Quarter Noble

478774. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AV Quarter Noble (19mm, 1.77 g, 3h). Leaf-trefoil issue. Tower (London) mint; im: lis. Struck circa 1436-1438. ჭ ƌĚNrƩý=Մ ⎍ƩƩƩ=Մ ĕƩ=Մ Żr¨=Մ rEҞ $ ¨NŻ⌦=, coat-of-arms; small lis above; all within polylobe with trefoil cusps / ჭ EҞ¨ȄͿBƩͿѝˆ ƩN ŷȄɨˆƩ¨ [...] ŷȄɨˆƩ¨, cross fleurée with lis at ends and in center; in each angle, lion passant left over trefoil; all within polylobe. Whitton, Heavy –; Schneider 334 var. (rev. legend; same obv. die); North 1483; SCBC 1831. Good VF, minor striking perforations. Extremely rare. Apparently only the second known example fo this type. The last Quarter Noble issued by Henry VI. ($4950) Ex Sotheby (16 November 2000), lot 516. Found Middleton, Staffordshire, 1998. The end of the Burgundian alliance in 1435 and loss of Paris to the forces of Charles VII the following year left the English position in France in a perilous state. The consequent economic slump resulted in a steep decline in output, particularly of gold, from the English mints.

477564. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AR Halfgroat (21.5mm, 1.93 g, 6h). Trefoil/Leaf-mascle mule. Calais mint; im: plain cross/lis. Struck 1438-circa 1440. ม ƌĚNrƩý=Ḻ DI=Ḻ Żr¨ /Ḧ rEҞ ᚤ ¨N⌦= Ӳ fr¨, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches with lis at cusps; leaf on breast, trefoils flanking / ჭ EҞ¨ȄͿBƩͿѝˆ ƩN ŷȄɨˆƩ¨, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter. Whitton, Heavy –; MHG 1 = “The Last Calais Halfgroat,” in NumCirc CII.3, p. 106 (this coin); North –; SCBC 1911B. VF, uneven toning. Unique. ($1750) Ex Dr. John Hullet Collection; Spink Numismatic Circular CII.3 (April 1994), no. 2165. Reportedly ex Reigate Brokes Road (Surey) Hoard, 1990, likely sold in a group lot in Glendining’s 8 December 1992 sale. The Calais mint struck its final coins sometime during the year 1440. Mint workers apparently had a current trefoil-issue obverse die available but, lacking a matching reverse die, reused one from their most recent half groats, the leaf-mascle issue. Both this – the unique half groat – and the extremely rare matching groats are such mules.

480583. YORK. Edward IV. First reign, 1461-1470. AR Penny (18mm, 0.93 g, 7h). Heavy coinage. Tower (London) mint. Struck 1461-1464. ม ĚĕѾaˆĕ⎍S ˆĚҢ aNŻ⌦= Ӳ , crowned and draped facing bust; lis on breast; two pellets flanking crown / ýƩ⎍Ʃ ͿaS ⌦ɨN ĕɨN, long cross pattée, with trefoil in each quarter; extra pellets in first and fourth quarters. Blunt & Whitton type I(b) var. (obv legend); North 1538; SCBC 1983. Good VF, slightly soft on nose. An apparently unpublished variety of an extremely rare type. ($2950) Blunt & Whitton record two of this type, based on the additional reverse pellets. Both have the king’s name abbreviated in the legend, whereas the current coin gives his name in full, apparently cutting off the French titles at the end.

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490230 485797 491230. TUDOR. Henry VIII. 1509-1547. AR Groat (26mm, 3.15 g, 11h). First coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: castle. Struck 1509-1526. / (castle) ƌĚNrƩý⎡ ⎍ƩƩƩ= ĕƩ⎡ Żr¨⎡ rĚҢ Ḻ ¨Ż⌦⎡ ә ᚤ Ŗ⎡, crowned bust of Henry VII right / (castle) ʖɨ˫⎍Ʃ ĕE⎍⎡ᚤ a ĕƩ⎍˶ɨˊ E⎡ᚤ ⍴E⎍=, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. Whitton group ii, 1; North 1762; SCBC 2316. VF, toned. Well struck. ($695) 485797. TUDOR. Henry VIII. 1509-1547. AR Groat (24mm, 2.75 g, 9h). Second coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: rose. Struck 1526-1544. შ ƌĚNrƩý⎡ ⎍ƩƩƩ⎡ ĕ⎡ Ż⎡ r⎡ ¨Ż⌦⎡ ә ᚤ ŖraNýE=, crowned bust A3 right / შ ʖɨ˫⎍Ʃ ĕE⎍⎡ a ĕƩ⎍˶ɨˊ E⎡ ⍴E⎍=, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée; saltires in cross ends. Whitton group i, 3; North 1797; SCBC 2337C. Good VF, toned. ($465) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, January 1990.

485796 489103 485796. TUDOR. Henry VIII. 1509-1547. AR Halfgroat (17.5mm, 1.26 g, 3h). Second coinage. Canterbury mint, under Archbishop William Warham; im: monogram. Struck 1526-1532. (monogram) ƌĚNrƩý⎡ ⎍ƩƩƩ⎡ ĕ⎡ Ż⎡ r⎡ ¨Ż⌦⎡ ә ᚤ Ŗ, crowned bust right / ýƩ⎍Ʃ ˶a˫ ᚤ ýaN ˶ɨr ᚤ, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée; Ѿ a flanking. Whitton group ii; North 1802; SCBC 2343. Good VF, toned. ($325) From the WRG Collection.

489103. TUDOR. Henry VIII. 1509-1547. AR Halfgroat (19mm, 1.29 g, 5h). Second coinage. Canterbury mint, under Archbishop Thomas Cramner; im: Catherine wheel/–. Struck circa 1534. (wheel) ƌĚNrƩý⎡ ⎍ƩƩƩ⎡ ĕ⎡ Ż⎡ r⎡ ¨Ż⌦⎡ ә ᚤ Ŗr, crowned bust right / Ḻ ýƩ⎍Ʃ ˶a˫ Ḻ Ḻ ýaN ˶ɨr Ḻ, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée; ˶ ý flanking. Whitton group vi; North 1804; SCBC 2345. Good VF, attractively toned. ($450)

Ex J. Eric Engstrom Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 102, 18 May 2016), lot 1516; Classical Numismatic Group Inventory 871725 (June 2010). Archbishop Cramner annulled the marriage between Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon in May 1534. The reasoning behind the choice of the Catherine Wheel as mint mark for his coinage at Canterbury at this time remains unexplained. As Lord Stewartby states ‘it could hardly have been a cynical reference to his part in removing the Queen’.

485552 485807 485552. TUDOR. Edward VI. 1547-1553. AR Sixpence (27mm, 3.15 g, 3h). Third coinage, Fine Silver issue. Tower (London) mint; im: tun. Struck 1551-1553. (tun) EĕѾaˊĕ=/ ⎍Ʃ=/ ĕ=/ Ż=/ aŻ⌦=/ Ŋˊa=/ ә / ƌƩB=/ ˊEҢ, crowned and mantled facing bust; rose to left; ⎍Ʃ (denomination) to right / (tun) ʖɭ˫⎍Ʃ ĕE⎍⍴ a ĕƩ⎍˶ ɭˊ E=/ ⍴E⎍=/, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. North 1938; SCBC 2483. Good VF, deep iridescent toning, areas of flat strike. ($975) Ex St. James 5 (27 September 2006), lot 275.

485807. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AR Groat (23mm, 1.90 g, 5h). Second issue. Tower (London) mint; im: crosscrosslet. Struck 1560-1561. ນ ELIZABETH : D’· G’· AN’· FR’· ET · HI’· REGINA, crowned and mantled bust 1F left, wearing ruff / ນ POSVI DEV’· AD IVITORE M : MEV’·, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. BCW CC-1G/CC-b3; North 1986; SCBC 2556. Good VF, toned. This coin was reportedly illustrated in the 1989 edition of Coin Market Values. ($950) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (8 April 1989), lot 746 (part of).

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482180. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AR Shilling ( 31mm, 5.86 g, 4h). Second issue. Tower (London) mint; im: martlet. Struck 1560-1561. (martlet) ELIZABETH : D’· G’· AN’· FR’· ET · HI’· REGINA, crowned and mantled bust 3Cii left, wearing ruff / (martlet) POSVI DEV’· AD IVITORE M : MEV’·, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. BCW MR-4Hii/ MR-b5; North 1985; SCBC 2555. Good VF, toned. ($2250) Ex Davissons 34 (21 January 2015), lot 166.

482174. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AR Sixpence (25mm, 3.11 g, 2h). Third and Fourth issue. Tower (London) mint; im: lion. Dated 1566. (lion) ELIZABETH : D’· G’· ANG’· FR’· ET · HI’· REGINA, crowned and mantled bust 1F left, wearing ruff; rose behind / (lion) POSVI DEV’· AD IVITORE M · MEV’·, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée; 15 66 above. BCW LN-1B/LN-a2; North 1997; SCBC 2561. Good VF, toned. ($575)

Ex Clonterbrook Trust & Lockett Collections

478815. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AR Sixpence (26mm, 2.99 g, 9h). Third and Fourth issue. Tower (London) mint; im: coronet. Dated 1566. ՟ ELIZABETH : D’· G’· ANG’· FR’· ET · HI’· REGINA, crowned and mantled bust 4B left, wearing ruff; rose behind / ՟ POSVI DEV’· AD IVITORE M · MEV’·, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée; 15 70 above. BCW CN-2/CN-j1; North 1997; SCBC 2562. Choice EF, deep cabinet toning. Full round flan, rare thus. ($3750) Ex Clonterbrook Trust (Glendining, 7 June 1974), lot 160 (part of); Richard Cyril Lockett Collection (English Part I, Glendining, 6 June 1955), lot 2013 (part of). Reportedly ex ‘Montagu lot 95’ and Abbot Collections.

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487737. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AR Crown (40mm, 29.54 g, 1h). Seventh issue. Tower (London) mint; im 1. Struck 1601-1602. : 1 : ELIZABETH : D : G : ANG : FRA : ET : HIBER : REGINA, crowned and mantled bust left, holding lis-tipped scepter / : 1 : POSVI : DEVM : AD IVTORE M : MEVM :, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. Barr/Cooper dies C/3; BCW 1-a4/1; North 2012; SCBC 2582. Good VF, toned. Excellent portrait. ($8750)

‘Portcullis’ Testern Ex John J. Pittman Collection

478776. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AR Testern (24.5mm, 3.24 g, 4h). ‘Portcullis’ money. Tower (London) mint; im: O. Struck for the Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies (East India Company), early 1600/1. O : ELIZABETH : D’· G’· AN’· FR’· ET · HI’· REGINA ·, crowned coat-of-arms; crowned E R flanking / O : POSVI · DEVM · ADIVTORE · MEVM ·, crowned portcullis. BCW 0-1/0-a; North –; SCBC 2607D. VF, toned. Rare. ($5750) Ex John J. Pittman Collection (David Akers Numismatics, 6 August 1999), lot 3740. In 1600, the recently organized East India Company found themselves in need of coin. They initially planned to import the commonly used Spanish dollars, but Elizabeth refused to grant such a license, and insisted that the company use coins bearing her name and image. In the end, a compromise was reached allowing the royal mint to strike new coins with the name of the queen, but with the royal symbol of the portcullis in lieu of a portrait of a woman, which would likely have not been acceptable in the Indies. (BCW p. 11) Ultimately, £6000 worth of silver was struck in denominations of 1, 2, 4, and 8 testerns. But even without a feminine visage, the coins proved to be unsuccessful in trade, and quickly disappeared.

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Two Touch Pieces

478807. STUART. James I. 1603-1625. AV Angel (27.5mm, 4.50 g, 12h). Second coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: tower. Struck 1612-1613. ჻ · IACOBVS · D‘· G‘· MAG‘· BRIT‘· FRA‘· ET · HIB‘· REX ·, Archangel Michael slaying dragon lying at his feet to right / · ჻ · A · DNO · FACTVM · EST · ISTVD ·, ship bearing coat-of-arms; above, cross between I and rose. Schneider –; North 2081; SCBC 2616. Good VF, pierced for use as a touch piece. Rare. ($4750) Lot includes an old Baldwin’s ticket in the hand of Peter Mitchell (Eaglen DO1E-1). The association of disease with evil and the employment of the laying-on of hands to cure that disease/evil has been a part of human belief since at least the time of Jesus and the miracles associated with him. Among the numerous diseases that existed in medieval and modern Europe, one of the most heinous and virulent was the so-called morbium regis, or, as it was known in French, mal de roi – the King’s Evil. A form of scrofula, a tubercular infection of the lymph nodes that left untreated turned into suppurating sores. While various home remedies were known, the one perceived certain cure was the laying-on of hands by the king in his role as the anointed representative of Christ. Beginning in France under Robert II (996-1017) and in England under Edward the Confessor (1042-1066), this ritual became an important part of kingship and also a crucial test of royal legitimacy. As a part of the ritual, the afflicted would receive a coin as alms. Because of its association with this ritual, the coin would be kept to act as a talisman for the sufferer. By the time of Edward IV, the coin used was a gold denomination, the angel, that was perfectly suited for the ceremony as it bore a depiction of the Archangel Michael slaying the Dragon on the obverse and the royal ship-of-state – an allusion to the monarch – on the reverse. Under Henry VII (1485-1509), the practice was ritualized into a Divine Service and the coins themselves were a central part of the ceremony, retaining their relative intrinsic purity. Having first been threaded with a ribbon for suspension, the coin would be passed over the affected areas by the monarch, who would sometimes make the sign of the cross with the coin as well. Even after England had become a Protestant country, Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603) continued to do the latter. Under the Stuarts, the ceremony took on special significance since they viewed it as an important component of their increasingly absolutist view of the divine right of kingship. While James I (1603-1625), owing to his Protestant background and the lack of such a ritual in Scotland, initially balked at performing the ritual, he soon acquiesced, although he removed everything in the ritual that remotely smacked of papism and invoked God in the actual healing. Under James I and Charles I (1625-1649), the coin itself underwent significant design changes to the reverse, including under Charles the replacement of the traditional legend with a more ironic one – AMOR POPVLI PRAESIDIVM REGIS (The People’s Love is the King’s Safeguard). Like his father, Charles I performed the ceremony only on Easter and Michaelmas, as well as on Progresses. In 1633, a few days after his Scottish Coronation, Charles touched about 100 people. To commemorate this event, special angels designed and struck by Nicholas Briot were used. During his captivity following the end of the Civil War, Charles continued to perform touchings; the coins and ribbons were supplied by those wanting to be touched. Under the Commonwealth, both the denomination and the ceremony ceased. When the ritual was reintroduced during the Restoration of Charles II (1660-1685) and his successors, a gold medalet, now specifically a touch-piece, was created to replace the angel. Designed solely for the touching ceremony and not meant to be used as currency, this medalet continued to employ the designs of the former angel (although now the ship was now modernized by depicting the Sovereign of the Seas accompanied by the legend SOLI DEO GLORIA (Alone to God the glory). The last reigning monarch to touch on British soil was Anne (1702-1714), who did so three months before her death. The Hanoverians refused to participate at all and the ritual died out in England, although in France it did so until the execution of Louis XVI (1774-1793), and was continued by the Stuart Pretenders until the death of Cardinal Henry Benedict Stuart, Henry IX to the Jacobites, in 1807.

478804. STUART. James I. 1603-1625. AV Angel (28.5mm, 4.39 g, 4h). Second coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: book on lecturn. Struck 1616-1617. (book) · IACOBVS · D‘· G‘· MAG‘· BRIT‘· FRA‘· ET · HIB‘· REX ·, Archangel Michael slaying dragon lying at his feet to right / (book) · A · DNO · FACTVM · EST · ISTVD ·, ship bearing coat-of-arms; above, cross between I and rose. Schneider –; North 2081; SCBC 2616. VF, pierced for use as a touch piece. Very rare for this mintmark. ($4450)

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478811. STUART. James I. 1603-1625. AR Shilling (30mm, 5.81 g, 2h). Second coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: lis. Struck 1604-1605. · ჭ · IACOBVS · D‘· G‘· MAG‘· BRIT‘· FRA‘· ET · HIB‘· REX, crowned and mantled (third) bust right; XII (mark of value) behind / · ჭ · QVÆ · DEVS · CONIVNXIT · NEMO · SEPARET ·, coat-of-arms. North 2099; SCBC 2654. Good VF, toned, light mark on cheek. Lovely surfaces. ($1250)

478813. STUART. James I. 1603-1625. AR Shilling (31mm, 6.00 g, 6h). Third coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: lis. Struck 1623-1624. ჭ IACOBVS D : G : MAG : BRI : FRA : ET HI : REX, crowned and mantled (sixth) bust right; XII (mark of value) behind / ჭ QVÆ DEVS CONIVNXIT NEMO SEPARET ·, coat-of-arms. North 2124; SCBC 2668. EF, lightly toned with lovely surfaces. ($2750) Ex J.M. Ashby Collection (Spink 145, 12 July 2000), lot 2146, purchased from Baldwin’s, 1957.

484711. STUART. James I. 1603-1625. AR Weight for a Gold Halfcrown (13mm, 1.23 g, 12h). Dies by N. Briot. Struck after 1632. I ◊ R ◊ ◊ M ◊ BRIT, crowned bust right / Crown over ◊ II · S · IX · D/ ◊ (mark of value). Whithers 856 (same dies; example in bronze). Near VF, toned. Rare in silver. ($925)

485331. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AV Crown (19.5mm, 2.29 g, 4h). Group B. Tower (London) mint; im: castle. Struck 1635-1636. ჻ CAROLVS D : G : MA : BR : FR : ET HI : REX, crowned and mantled bust left, wearing large ruff; V (mark of value) behind / ჻ CVLTORES SVI DEVS PROTEGIT, crowned coat-of-arms. Schneider, Tower Class I, 5; Brooker 193 var. (legend stops); Schneider 228 var. (tower at end of rev. legend); North 2181a; SCBC 2711. Good VF, toned, lamination on obverse. ($1250) From the WRG Collection.

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485812. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AR Crown (43.5mm, 29.71 g, 8h). Group V. Tower (London) mint; im: sun. Struck under Parliament, 1645-1646. (sun) · CAROLVS · D’· G’· MAG’· BRI’· FRA’· ET · HIB’· REX, Charles on horseback left, holding reins in left hand and raised sword in right / ·:· (sun) ·:· CHRISTO · AVSPICE · REGNO, coat-of-arms. Cooper, Silver dies XXVII/XXXVIII; Brooker 275 (same dies); North 2199; SCBC 2672. Good VF, toned, some metal stress. Struck on a broad flan. ($4500) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, April 1990.

478625. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AR Halfcrown (35mm, 14.66 g, 12h). Group I, type 1a1. Tower (London) mint; im: lis. Struck 1625. · ჭ · CA ROLVS · D · G · MAG · BRI · FR · ET · HI · REX, Charles on horseback left, raising sword over right shoulder, on plumed and caparisoned horse / ჭ CHRI STO AV SPICE REGNO, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. Brooker 276 (same dies); North 2200; SCBC 2763. VF, toned. Full flan. ($3500) Ex Dr. John R. Hulett Collection (includes his ticket), purchased from F. Purvey, April 1975.

488432. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AR Sixpence (24mm, 2.90 g, 3h). Group A, type I. Tower (London) mint; im: lis. Dated 1625. ჭ CAROLVS · D : G : MAG : BRI : FR : ET · HI : REX, crowned and mantled bust left; VI (mark of value) to right / ჭ CHRI STO · AV SPICE REGNO, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée; 16 25 above. Brooker 571 (this coin); North 2235; SCBC 2805. VF, toned. ($595) Ex Ian Gordon Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 90, 23 May 2012), lot 2523; CNG Inventory 883178 (November 2010); S. Alfred Bole Collection (Part I, Dix Noonan Webb 89, 29 September 2010), lot 1539; John G. Brooker Collection (includes ticket; purchased from Spink, 5 September 1974).

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From the Selig, Lord Smith of Marlowe and Francis Collections

478777. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AR Pound (53mm, 118.5 g, 4h). Oxford mint; im: plume. Dated 1642. (plume) CAROLVS : D : G : MAGNI : BRITANI : FRAN : ET : HIB : REX, Charles on horseback riding left, holding reins and sword; plume to right, pile of arms below / ·:·:· EXVRGAT : DEVS : DISSIPENTVR : INIMICI, RELIG · PROT · LEG/ ANG · LIBER · PAR in two lines between parallel lines; above, three Oxford plumes above ·XX· (denomination); 1642 below. Morrieson, Oxford, B-2; Brooker 860 (same dies); North 2398; SCBC 2940. Good VF, toned. Very well struck on a full round flan. Excellent surfaces. Rare in this high grade. ($25,000) Ex Herman Selig Collection (Spink 70, 31 May 1989), lot 155; Lord Smith of Marlowe (Rodney Smith) Collection (purchased by Spink, 1983); Grant R. Francis Collection (Glendining’s, 24 March 1920), lot 252.

478778 478779 478778. STUART, Siege money. Newark. 1645-1646. AR Shilling (27mm, 5.42 g, 12h). Dated 1645. Crown; C R flanking, XII (mark of value) below / OBS/ NEWARKE/ 1645 in three lines. Brooker 1224 (same dies); North 2640; SCBC 3142. VF, toned. ($1850) 478779. STUART, Siege money. Newark. 1645-1646. AR Shilling (28mm, 6.02 g, 12h). Dated 1646. Crown; C R flanking, XII (mark of value) below / OBS :/ NEWARKE/ 1646 in three lines. Brooker 1225 (same dies); North 2640; SCBC 3143. VF, toned. ($1950) 81


484468. COMMONWEALTH. 1649-1660. AV Crown (19mm, 2.18 g, 4h). Tower (London) mint; im: sun. Dated 1650. ᛹ THE COMMONWEALTH OF ENGLAND, coat-of-arms within wreath / GOD · WITH · VS · 1650 ·, two coats-of-arms; ·V· (mark of value) above. Schneider 358 var. (obv. legend and stops; same rev. die); North 2719; SCBC 3212. VF, lightly toned. Full flan. ($6250) Ex Ian Gordon Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 90, 23 May 2012), lot 2625; Dr. Andrew Wayne Collection (Triton IX, 10 January 2006), lot 2297; ‘Property of a Lady’ (Spink 168, 15 April 2004), lot 169; Glendining (13 March 1975), lot 106.

482168. COMMONWEALTH. 1649-1660. AR Shilling (31mm, 5.70 g, 11h). Tower (London) mint; im: sun. Dated 1653. ᛹ · THE · COMMONWEALTH · OF · ENGLAN(D over P) ·, coat-of-arms within wreath / GOD · WITH · VS · 1653 ·, two coats-of-arms; ·XII· (mark of value) above. ESC 987A; ESC (Bull) 127 (this coin illustrated); North 2724; SCBC 3217. VF, attractive cabinet toning. Very rare variety. ($1250) Ex Glendining’s (9 February 2000), lot 296, purchased from J.A. Duggan, 4 December 1972.

484469. STUART. Charles II. 1660-1685. AV Unite (34mm, 9.08 g, 4h). Hammered coinage. Tower (London) mint; im: crown. Struck 1660-1662. ՞ CAROLVS II D G MAG BRIT FRAN ET HIB REX, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left / · FLORENT · CONCORDIA · REGNA ·, crowned coat-of-arms; C R flanking. Schneider, Hammered, dies O5/R6; SCBI Schneider -; North 2753; SCBC 3301. Good VF, toned. Very rare with this die combination. ($12,500) Ex Glendining’s (15 April 1971), lot 99; E. Wertheimer Collection (Glendining’s, 24 January 1945), lot 137.

487620. STUART. Charles II. 1660-1685. AR Crown (37mm, 29.98 g, 6h). Tower (London) mint. Dually dated RY XVI and 1664. CAROLVS · II · DEI · GRATIA, laureate and draped bust right / · MAG BR · FRA · ET · HIB · REX · 16 64, crowned cruciform coats-of-arms around rayed Garter star; interlinked CC in angles. ESC 28; SCBC 3355. Good VF, lightly toned with traces of brilliance. ($1850) 82


Inverted Arms of Nassau

482169. STUART (ORANGE). William III. 1694-1702. AR Halfcrown (33.5mm, 14.91 g, 6h). Tower (London) mint. Dually dated RY undecimo and 1699. GVLIELMVS · III · DEI · GRA ·, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / · MAG BR · FRA · ET · HIB · REX · 16 99, crowned cruciform coats-of-arms around central arms of Nassau with inverted lion. ESC 560; SCBC 3494. VF, toned. Very rare variety with inverted arms of Nassau. ($1350) Ex Spink Numismatic Circular CXV.3 (June 2007), no, HC050.

Elephant & Castle Halfcrown

482170. STUART (ORANGE). William III. 1694-1702. AR Halfcrown (33.5mm, 14.35 g, 6h). Tower (London) mint; mm: elephant and castle. Dually dated RY decimo tertio and 1701. GVLIELMVS · III · DEI · GRA, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; below, elephant and castle / · MAG BR · FRA ET · HIB REX · 17 01, crowned cruciform coats-of-arms around central arms of Nassau. ESC 566; SCBC 3495. Fine, toned. Extremely rare. ($3950) The elephant & castle mark, relatively common on gold issues of this reign, occurs only on the 1701 Halfcrown of all the abundant silver issues of William III. Very few specimens are known, all in worn condition.

482172. STUART. Anne. 1702-1714. AR Halfcrown (33mm, 14.97 g, 6h). Pre-Union, VIGO issue. Tower (London) mint. Dually dated RY tertio and 1703. ANNA · DEI · GRATIA, draped bust left, with hair tied in fillet; VIGO below / · MAG BR · FRA · ET · HIB · REG · 17 03, crowned cruciform coats-of-arms around rayed Garter star. ESC 569; SCBC 3580. Near EF, toned, minor reverse flaws. ($975) The War of the Spanish Succession, sparked by Louis XIV of France in his attempts to expand his hegemony, flared into a continent-wide conflict, with France, Spain, and Bavaria opposed by a coalition centered around England, Holland, and Austria. One aim of the Allies was to deprive Spain of the wealth derived from its American colonies. When Admiral Sir George Rooke, commander of the combined fleet, learned the 1702 treasure had arrived at Vigo Bay in Spain, he resolved to seize it. His force of fifty ships besieged the harbor, destroying the French fleet guarding the convoy, sinking most of the ships and capturing cargo worth some 2 million pounds at the time. A special issue of gold and silver coins was struck from the captured plate and a number of medals honored the great victory.

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485332 488433 485332. HANOVER. George I. 1714-1727. AV Quarter Guinea (15mm, 2.06 g, 6h). Tower (London) mint. Dated 1718. GEORGIVS · D · G · M · BR · FR · EG · HIB · REX · F · D ·, laureate head right / BRVN ET · L · DVX S · R · I · A · TH ET · EL 17 18, crowned cruciform coats-of-arms around rayed Garter star; scepters in angles. MCE 277; SCBC 3638. Near EF, light rose roning. ($650) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (19 June 1991), lot 1900 (part of).

488433. HANOVER. George III. 1760-1820. Pattern AR Sixpence (21mm, 2.68 g, 12h). Soho (Birmingham) mint; dies by Jean-Pierre Droz. Dated 1790. Crowned GR cypher within wreath / BRITTANIA, Britannia seated left on globe, holding olive branch and trident; Union shield to right; 1790 to right. ESC 1645; Bull 2219. AU, toned. ($425)

485335 485334 485335. HANOVER. George III. 1760-1820. AV Third Guinea (17mm, 2.77 g, 12h). Early coinage. Tower (London) mint. Dated 1804. GEORGIVS III DEI GRATIA, laureate head right / (star) BRITANNIARUM REX FIDEI DEFENSOR, crown; 1804 below. MCE 456; SCBC 3740. Near EF, underlying luster, deep red toning. ($465) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (19 June 1991), lot 1900 (part of).

485334. HANOVER. George III. 1760-1820. AV Half Guinea (20.5mm, 4.20 g, 12h). Early coinage. Tower (London) mint. Dated 1809. GEORGIVS III DEI GRATIA, laureate head right / BRITANNIARUM REX FIDEI DEFENSOR, crowned coatof-arms within Garter; 18 09 below. MCE 445; SCBC 3737. Near EF, underlying luster. ($675) From the WRG Collection. Ex Stack’s (19 June 1991), lot 1900 (part of).

480600. SCOTLAND. William I ‘the Lion’. 1165-1214. AR Penny (20mm, 1.48 g, 6h). Crescent and Pellet coinage, group II. Uncertain mint (Berwick or Roxburgh?); Raul Derling, moneyer. Struck circa 1174-1195. ม ⌦Ě ʼĚዢ Ѿዢ⌦¨ɩ Ḧ, crowned bust left; pommée cruciform scepter before / [ม ʼ¨]⎍⌦ ĕĚʼ⌦ዢg[...], cross pattée; in each angle, pellet-increscent above pellet. Cf. Burns 18 (fig. 38; for type without mint name); cf. SCBI 35 (Ashmolean & Hunterian) 44 (for type with similar arrangement of letters); SCBC 5025. VF, toned, areas of weak strike. There appears to be space for three letters of a mint name (BЄR or ROC), but they are not legible. ($465)

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485826. IRELAND. Henry VIII. 1509-1547. AR Groat (23mm, 2.28 g, 5h). First Harp issue. Tower (London) mint; im: crown. Struck 1536-1537. ՟ ƌĚNrƩ ý⎡ ⎍ƩƩƩ= ĕ⎡ Ż⎡ r= ¨Ż⌦ƩĚ, crowned coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée / ՟ Ŗr¨NýĚ⎡ ĕɭ⍴ƩN⎍˫⎡ ƌƩBĚrNƩĚ=, crowned harp; crowned ƌ and Ʃ flanking. SCBI 22 (Copenhagen), 406; D&F 202; SCBC 6473. VF, toned. ($375) From the WRG Collection.

478618. IRELAND. Edward VI. 1547-1553. Base AR Threepence (18mm, 1.30 g, 4h). In the name of Henry VIII. Dublin mint. Struck 1547-circa 1550. + HENRICVS : D : G AG[L : FR : Z : ]HIB : REX, crowned ‘late Tower’ facing bust / [CIV]I TAS DVB LINIE, coat-of-arms over long cross fourchée. SCBI 22 (Copenhagen), 412; D&F 221; SCBC 6491. VF, areas of weak strike. Attractive portrait for issue. ($950)

485784. ANGLO-GALLIC. Edward the Black Prince. As Prince of Aquitaine, 1362-1372. AR Hardi d’argent (19mm, 1.13 g, 8h). Poitiers mint. Ěĕ Pɭ gĚɔ˶ ˃ĚgƱ ¨gƱĚ, half-length figure of Edward facing beneath Gothic canopy, holding sword in right hand and raising left in benediction / P˃ɔ ýP˨ ¨⍾PƱ ˶¨ɔ, long cross pattée; lis in first and fourth quarters, leopard in second and third. AGC 230A, 9/a; SCBC 8134; Elias 205b. Good VF, toned, deposits. ($575) From the WRG Collection, purchased from William B. Porter, July 1992.

485327. ANGLO-GALLIC. Henry VI. 1422-1461. AV Salut d’or (26.5mm, 3.49 g, 12h). Second type. First issue. Rouen mint; im: leopard. Étienne Marcel, mintmaster. Second issue, 1433-1444. ƌEɃˆƱý⍋s Ḧ dEƱ Ḧ ŷˆ¥ Ḧ fˆ¥ýɨˆ⍋ Ḧ Ӧ Ḧ ¥ŷȄƱE Ḧ ˆEX, the Annunciation: the Virgin standing right, receiving tablet inscribed ¥⍋E from the Archangel Gabriel standing left; heavenly light above, two coats-of-arms below; pellet-in-annulet under last letter of legend / Xʖý= Ṅ ⍋ƱɃýƱͿ Ṅ Xʖý= Ṅ ˆEŷɃ¥Ϳ Ṅ Xʖý= Ṅ ƱMʖEˆ¥Ϳ, Latin cross, with lis to left, lion passant guardant to right, and ƌ below; all within polylobe, with lis in each point; pellet-in-annulet under last letter of legend. AGC 386F, 1/b; Beresford-Jones, Salutes, p. 78, 7 and pl. 1, 15; Elias 270c; Schneider 111; SCBC 8164. EF, underlying luster. ($2250) From the WRG Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Auctions XII (26 September 1990), lot 1309.

85


British Medals

A Relic of the Anglican Church Pedigreed by Descent from the Hand of Charles I 489967. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AV Medal (60mm, 79.05 g, 12h). Dominion of the Seas. By N. Briot. Dated 1639. CAROLVS · I · D : G · MAG · BRITANN · FRAN · ET · HIB · REX · (lozenge and double lozenge stops), bare-headed bust of Charles I to right, his hair long and with ‘lovelock’ on his left shoulder, wearing a decorated cuirass with the plain collar of his shirt falling over it, and the St. George of the Order of the Garter suspended on a ribbon from his neck; on shoulder truncation, 1639 (barely visible); behind near the edge, BRIOT / NEC · META · MIHI · QVÆ · TERMINVS · ORBI · (Nor is a limit to me that which is a boundary to the world), warship sailing to right, under full sail and with sailors on deck and in the rigging; on the left, seashore with fortress. Cf. MI 285/97 (unlisted in gold and with date on truncation of shoulder); Eimer 136a corr. (no date on truncation of shoulder in gold); P. C. Godman, Itchingfield, Sussex Archaeological Collections Relating to the History and Antiquities of the County 41 (1898), pp. 95-158, and especially pp. 118 ff. and pl. 7 (facing p. 118, this medal); Jones 174 (in silver). EF, Beautifully toned and impressive. Some traces of suspension marks. Unique and of the greatest historical importance. This medal was the personal property of King Charles I and was given, as a keepsake, to Bishop William Juxon during the last few weeks of the King’s life. It has passed by bequest and descent until 2010. (POR) Made for Charles I by N. Briot in 1639 and kept by the King until he gave it to Bishop Juxon in 1649; from Juxon as a gift to his niece Elizabeth Merlott c. 1649, by descent in the Merlott family to Charles Merlott Chitty in 1815, then by descent from him to William Farington Chitty in 1867, who, in turn, left it to Percy Sanden Godman in 1878, by descent within the Godman family until 2010, from whom it was loaned for display in the Pepys Library of Magdalene College, Cambridge (1986-2009). Given its history and associations, this is the most important of all existing British medals and a relic of the Church of England. Nicolas Briot had become chief engraver at the Paris mint in 1606, but left for England in 1625, in part after a dispute with Guillaume Dupré. He went to London where he worked as a doctor; at some point he was introduced to Charles I and, after producing some splendid work (including the first version of this medal, MI 256/40-41 of 1630), he was appointed chief engraver at the Royal Mint from 1633 to 1645. Early in his reign, Charles had re-claimed the title ‘Sovereign of the Seas’, an ancient title associated with the kings of Britain since King Edgar in 904 A.D. The 1630 medal had been struck as propaganda in the face of foreign naval incursions into waters claimed by Britain; soon Charles ordered that shipping in the Channel be taxed. In 1634, he imposed yet another tax over the entire kingdom, “Ship Money”, hitherto only used in war time and with Parliamentary consent; this infuriated many and was one of the causes of the Civil War. At that time the British fleet was very much outclassed by the Dutch; in 1639, a Spanish fleet under Admiral Oquendo was forced to take refuge in British waters in the face of a Dutch force under Maarten Tromp. Although at the ensuing Battle of The Downs on 31 October 1639 the British sailed out to aid the Spanish, the Dutch were overwhelmingly victorious. This was the context in which the present medal was made. The reverse is a reiteration of that from the 1630 medal, but the portrait on the obverse has been updated, showing a slightly thinner Charles with longer hair, his elaborate ruff replaced by a more understated soft collar. The timing of this medal’s production, so soon after the British embarrassment at the Battle of the Downs, suggests that it was produced specifically for Charles in order to assure him that, despite the evidence to the contrary, he still held control of the seas by virtue of his ancient title. This unique gold version was for the King himself (it is also known in silver and bronze), and it was evidently mounted for him to wear on a ribbon. William Juxon (1582-1663), the man to whom Charles gave this medal, was a quite a brilliant churchman who had advanced rapidly, becoming Bishop of London in 1633. In 1636, he was also given the joint position of Lord High Treasurer and First Lord of the Admiralty. He resigned his secular positions in 1641 but remained close to Charles and was with him as his spiritual advisor during his final imprisonment and execution. At some point in the last weeks of his life the King presented this medal to Juxon, who carried it away and carefully preserved it; during the same period the King gave away a number of his other personal possessions to other people who were close to him. Out of fear of Royalist plots, all the items that were given to Juxon by the King on the way to the scaffold were confiscated; Parliament also removed him from the bishopric of London. He retired to the country until the Restoration in 1660 when he was recalled by Charles II and made Archbishop of Canterbury; he soon fell ill and died in 1663. Juxon never married and either gave away or left all his possessions to members of his family and public institutions. The present medal was given to his niece, Elizabeth Osborne, on the occasion of her wedding in June 1649 to William Merlott in Chichester; it has an unbroken pedigree from that day to now. The English Civil War had religious as well as political motivations. The heavily Puritan Parliamentarians believed that Charles’ various religious reforms were bringing the Church of England too close to Catholicism, and the transcripts and letters from the periods of Charles’ captivity during the war show that religious issues were a key part of the negotiations between the two sides. Ultimately, Charles refused to abolish the ecclesiastical role of bishops, and his insistence on this aspect of church hierarchy led in part to his execution on the 30th of January 1649. Almost from the moment of his death, Charles was revered as a martyr for the Anglican faith, prompting scores of pious poems as well as a trade in his relics. Upon the accession of Charles II in 1660, a commemoration of Charles ‘King and Martyr’ on 30 January was inserted into the liturgical calendar, initially to prompt the people of England to repentance for the regicide and avert divine wrath. The feast was eventually removed from the calendar in 1859. To this day, Charles I is still the only ‘saint’ created by the Anglican Church since the schism with Rome under the Tudors. This is the second medal to be associated with Juxon and the last days of Charles I. The other piece is a pattern 5 unite piece by Abraham Vanderdoort (though long thought to have been by Thomas Rawlins), which Juxon gave to another of his nieces, Frances Fisher (née Juxon) on the occasion of her marriage. After a long history, with a first mention in a will of 1751, that piece passed to Hyman Montagu. His sudden death in 1895 resulted in the sale of his collection and the coin came up at Sotheby’s in the third Montagu auction (13-20 November 1896, lot 352) where it was sold to Spink for £770, at the time the highest price ever paid for a coin in Britain; it then went by private treaty to the British Museum. The present medal, with its unbroken chain of ownership running from its maker, Nicolas Briot, to Charles I, then to William Juxon and on to today, makes this the single most important medal in the British series.

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87


GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

Please refer to our online bibliography at www.cngcoins.com for a complete listing of specialized and general references used, and abbreviations.

ANCIENT Banti BMC BMCRE BN Bodenstedt Boehringer Bopearachchi Depeyrot Calicó CNS Crawford CRI Fischer-Bossert Flament Hendin HN Italy Meshorer MK MIR Price Prieur RIC RPC RSC SC Sellwood SNG ANS SNG BM Black Sea SNG Copenhagen SNG France SNG Kayhan SNG Levante SNG Lloyd SNG Lockett SNG München SNG von Aulock Starr Svoronos Traité Weidauer

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BYZANTINE, MEDIEVAL, WORLD, and BRITISH Album Biaggi Bitkin BMC Vandals CIS CNI Davenport ESC Friedberg KM Levinson Lunardi MEC MIB MIBE MIR NM North SB SCBC SCBI

S. Album. A Checklist of Popular Islamic Coins. 3rd ed. Santa Rosa. 2011. E. Biaggi. Monete e zecche medievali italiane dal seculo VIII al seculo XV. Torino. 1992. V. Bitkin. Composite Catalogue of Russian Coins. 2 vols. Kiev. 2003. W. Wroth. Catalogue of the Coins of the Vandals, Ostrogoths and Lombards and of the Empires of Thessalonica, Nicaea and Trebizond in the British Museum. London. 1911. (Reprinted as Western and Provincial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum.) S. Goron and J.P. Goenka. The Coins of the Indian Sultanates. New Delhi. 2001. Corpus Nummorum Italicorum. 20 Vols. Rome. 1910-1943. J.S. Davenport. Various works on European crowns. H.A. Seaby & P.A. Rayner. The English Silver Coinage from 1649. London. 1992. R. Friedberg. Gold Coins of the World. 8th ed. Clifton. 2009. C.L. Krause & C. Mishler. Standard Catalogue of World Coins. Krause Publications. Iola. R.A. Levinson. The Early Dated Coins of Europe. Clifton, NJ. 2007. G. Lunardi. Le monete delle repubblica di genova. Genoa. 1975. P. Grierson & M. Blackburn. Medieval European Coinage. Cambridge. 1986. W. Hahn. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. 3 Vols. Vienna. 1973-81. W. Hahn and M.A. Metlich. Money of the Incipient Byzantine Empire. Vienna. 2000. Various. Monete Italiane Regionali. 5 Vols. Pavia. ND. G. Depeyrot. Le numéraire mérovingien. 5 vols. Wetteren. 1998-2001. J.J. North. English Hammered Coinage. 2 Vols. London. 1963, 1975. D. Sear, et al. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. 2nd edition. London. 1987. Standard Catalogue of British Coins. London. Annually. Various authors. Sylloge of the Coins of the British Isles.



Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.

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