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Classical Numismatic

REVIEW Volume XL, No. 2 • Summer 2015 • Lancaster Pennsylvania, London England

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. www.cngcoins.com


Contents Editorial................................................................................................................................ 1 Terms of Sale....................................................................................................................... 2 How to Order....................................................................................................................... 2 Calendar............................................................................................................................... 3 Building a Reference Library (Part 1, Books) by D. Scott VanHorn.............................. 4 Coins for Sale....................................................................................................................... 8 Classical Numismatic Studies No. 8 Information.............................................................. 8 1 Handbook of Greek Coinage Series Information............................................................... 8 2 Dr. Lawrence A. Adams Memorial.................................................................................... 8 4 Sale Schedule for Adams Collection.................................................................................. 8 6 Revenge of the Solidi......................................................................................................... 8 9

Production Staff

Senior Directors: Senior Numismatist: Numismatists (U.S.): Numismatist (U.K.): Controller: Lancaster Office Manager: London Office Manager: Office Staff: Accounting: Photography & Design: Printing Control: IT Consultant:

Victor England, Jr. (U.S.) Eric J. McFadden (U.K.) Bradley R. Nelson D. Scott VanHorn Kenneth McDevitt Bill Dalzell Jeffrey B. Rill Kerry K. Wetterstrom Jeremy A. Bostwick David Guest Cathy England Karen Zander Alexandra Spyra Dawn Ahlgren Dale Tatro Tina Jordan (U.K.) Travis A. Markel Jessica Garloff Robert A. Trimble A.J. Gatlin


Classical Numismatic Review Volume LX, No. 2 Summer 2015

As you flip (or, perhaps more likely, click) through the pages of this Review, we hope you will be impressed by some of the coins you see. I can safely say that this is the finest group of coins I have had the pleasure to catalog for a fixed price. If you take the time to read the descriptions, you will probably notice that they are a fair bit more in-depth than those of our usual offerings, and that they often include quite a few more references than normal. In fact, the only other offering that receives so much cataloging attention is our flagship Triton auction, held annually in January. Our readers are presumably familiar with the weights and the grades, but what does the rest of this lengthy block of text below the image consist of? The bulk is taken up by the attribution, description, and references. The attribution includes the listing of the region, city, or ruler, as well as any chronological or mint information, as appropriate. Our catalogers carefully follow academic developments in the field of numismatics to ensure that only the most accurate information is used. The descriptions of the types and figures on a coin can vary in depth by the venue. Electronic auctions generally have slightly less detailed descriptions, as necessitated by the time constraints inherent in bi-weekly auctions, while the mail bid sales and Triton auctions, as well as the Reviews, each feature increasingly detailed descriptions, often illustrating precisely what each figure is holding in each hand or what the figure is wearing. Likewise, the references cited vary in number and detail. References required to accurately attribute the coin are always cited, regardless of venue, as well as basic references that the collector can be expected to have. Additional citations to major collections, older references, and even other auctions are routinely included for Triton-quality coins, especially in the Greek section. We hope that extra cataloging work seen in CNG auctions represents an added value for the collector. Such Accurate and precise descriptions of the details can help lend a deeper understanding of the series, and the bevy of references included in our major sales helps the collector understand the significance of each coin. Armed with this information, our customers can more easily assemble a world-class collection along their chosen theme, all while comparing their tastes to those of Jameson, Sartiges, Weber, and other elite numismatists and collectors of old. Bill Dalzell Welcome to the summer edition of the Classical Numismatic Review. In a slight change from previous issues, in addition to appearing on line, the present catalog will be mailed to our active mail list and a number of our new clients. The last few months have been extremely busy for us. In early March, we completed the acquisition of the important JP Collection, select examples of which are featured in this list. JP was an active buyer in European sales of the ‘80s and ‘90s, aided in his discriminating tastes by the premier dealers of the time. The pieces offered here today are among the finest Greek coins available on the market. In particular, we’d like to point out the famous and rare Demareteion tetradrachm and the Hellenistic masterpiece issued by Philetairos, ruler of Pergamon depicting the powerful portrait of Seleukos I, both from the 1988 Leu 45 sale. They were two of the top coins in this important sale and are both offered in this issue of the Review for your consideration. We hope that you enjoy these and the rest of the 175 coins on offer. Unfortunately, these past few months brought with them sad news. In March, long-standing member of the CNG community Dr. Larry Adams had died unexpectedly. Many of you who have visited CNG at coin shows will remember Larry, who was always willing to lend a hand and promote the hobby. In addition to his work with us, he served on the Board of the American Numismatic Society and as publisher of the SAN Journal. His cheerful and pleasant company and perpetual fascination with numismatics will be sorely missed. For a more detailed memorial, please see page 84. Larry had periodically discussed with us the sale of his immense collection of over 3000 gold coins. While we had long looked forward to presenting his collection for auction, we are now faced with this prospect sooner than we had anticipated. Starting with CNG 100 in October and continuing through the Triton and related auctions in January, we will present four separate offerings of the Dr. Lawrence A. Adams Collection. Please see page 86 for an outline of the auction schedule of this outstanding collection. Victor England Eric J. McFadden


Terms of Sale 1. General Information. The point of sale for all items online is Lancaster, Pennsylvania. All orders are sent from Pennsylvania. 2. Guaranty and Return Privilege. All items are guaranteed genuine. Any coin order may be returned within fourteen days of receipt for any reason. Coins that have been encapsulated (“slabbed”) by a grading and/or authentication service may not be returned for any reason, including authenticity, if they have been removed from the encapsulation (“slab”). The customer shall bear the cost of returning all items and shall insure them for their full value. Books are not sent on approval and are not subject to return. 3. Sales Tax. Pennsylvania law requires that certain items delivered in Pennsylvania be charged 6% sales tax on the total order, including all postage and handling fees. 4. Postage. All orders are charged for postage, insurance, and handling. 5. Payment. Orders may be paid by US$ check, credit card or wire transfer. US$ checks must be written on a US bank and may be sent to either office. We accept VISA and MasterCard; payment by credit card must be made within 14 days of the invoice date. Credit card payment may be arranged by phone, fax or mail. United States address and phone number: CNG, Inc., P.O. Box 479, Lancaster, PA, 17608., phone: 717-390-9194, fax: 717-390-9978. United Kingdom address and phone number: CNG, Inc., 20 Bloomsbury St, London WC1B 3QA, phone +44 (20) 7495-1888, fax: +44 (20) 7499-5916. Office hours are 10AM to 5 PM Monday through Friday. US$ bank account for wire transfers will be provided by phone, fax or mail. 6. Shipment. Please provide a specific shipping address and advise us of any special shipping instructions. Unless other specific shipping instructions are indicated, coins are sent by U.S. Insured or Registered mail. Every effort is made to ship within 24 hours of receipt of payment. Please allow a reasonable time for delivery.

A Note on How to Order As with our normal monthly uploads, these coins are available for purchase on our website, www.cngcoins.com. If you are viewing the virtual catalog, you may click on an image which will bring you to the online lot description, where you can add the coin to your cart as usual. If you are viewing a printed catalog, enter the inventory of the coin you wish to purchase under “Advanced Search” on our website, www.cngcoins.com.

Digital Publications Archive

Digital versions of this and previous issues of the CNR are available to view or download in our Digital Publications Archive. 2


Printed Auction Schedule CNG 100 - October 7, 2015 Triton XIX - January 5 & 6, 2016 CNG 102 - May 18, 2016

Consignment Deadlines Deadlines for Printed Auction Consignments Triton XIX - September 11, 2015 CNG 102 - January 15, 2016 Deadlines for Electronic Auction Consignments Ongoing – About 90 days before scheduled sale Contact us early, as sales do fill up in a hurry. We may be contacted by email, fax, phone or mail.

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. Email: cng@cngcoins.com

Mailing addresses & Phone Numbers: Attention: Victor England P.O. Box 479 Lancaster PA 17608 Phone: 717-390-9194 Fax: 717-390-9978 Or Attention: Eric J. McFadden 20 Bloomsbury St. London WC1B 3QA Phone: +44-20-7495-1888 Fax: +44-20-7499-5916.

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Building a Reference Library (Part 1, Books)

By D. Scott VanHorn One of my duties here at Classical Numismatic Group is that of the office librarian. In addition to maintaining and adding to the approximately 25,000 books, journals, and auction catalogs currently on our shelves, I periodically receive requests from clients regarding the materials in our collection. While the majority of these requests revolves around book advice, the question, “What book should I buy?” is the one I am most asked. Every new coin collector, at some point in his or her introduction to the hobby, has been advised to “buy the book before the coin.” While this aphorism might seem outdated given the proliferation of more available (and mostly free) online resources, this advice still remains valid. The more information a collector has available to him or her, the more knowledgeable a collector they become and the better decisions they will make when acquiring coins for their collection. They will be able to distinguish the undervalued rarity from the overpriced common example, the genuine from the fake, the coin that has been altered, or the coin that has been misattributed by the cataloger. While it may seem to be an exceptional expense to purchase reference books these days, given the availability of “free” information, the cost is more than repaid in avoiding overpaying for a coin, or assuming that the dealer is correct in what they are selling. Besides, numismatic references are always increasing in value, so one should consider this, as well. What follows is a brief introduction to building a reference library. The headings below indicate the general types of references available. As with the coins themselves, what the collector has in his or her library will depend on the area of interest and budget. What is helpful is that some titles have been reprinted, or, as in the case of antiquarian references that are in the public domain, are available online for printing in a .pdf format through Google Books (www.books.google.com) or the Internet Archive (www.archive.org). Hardcopy offprints of articles may be available through JSTOR (www.jstor.org), if one is fortunate enough to be affiliated with an academic institution. For the collector of limited means, material in this format is still useful, and at a fraction of the cost of the original. General References Early on, every collector must consider purchasing some of the general numismatic references available. Included in this should be some of the general introductions. While books about general numismatics won’t take up much shelf space, they will provide an at-hand resource that one will consult again and again. The books that come immediately to mind (and which if not on my shelf are close at hand) are Numismatic Bibliography by Elvira Eliza Clain-Stefanelli, the works of Harrington Manville, including his Encyclopaedia of British & Irish Numismatics: Dictionary of English Numismatic Terms, and John Spring’s Ancient Auction Coin Catalogs: 1880-1980. In addition to David Sear’s handbooks covering Greek, Roman, and Byzantine coinage, for a good overview of ancient numismatics in general, see the six-volume Ancient Coin Collecting by Wayne G. Sayles. Books on counterfeits and forgeries should also be included here among basic references. Detecting fakes has always been a part of any type of collecting, especially coins. Most are easy to spot; in some instances, however, the products will deceive even experienced collectors and numismatists. With the benefit of the Internet, many forgeries of varying degrees of quality appear in popular online auctions to trap unwary buyers desiring to own an ancient coin. To keep up with the proliferation of fakes and forgers, the collector should include Wayne Sayles’s Classical Deception and David Hendin’s Not Kosher among their most basic references. Dr. Ilya A. Prokopov has published several 4


helpful monographs on the Bulgarian fakes and he maintains an important listing of forgeries – Dr. Ilya Prokopov’s Fake Ancient Coin Reports – through the website FORVM ANCIENT COINS. Basic References The basic references that one acquires are dependent upon one’s collecting area. These are more comprehensive in nature than a “guide book,” providing more detailed lists of coinage as well as numismatic and historical information. For Greek coins, the basic reference is the volumes of The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series by Oliver D. Hoover (published by CNG), which covers the full range of Greek coinages at each city with detailed introductions. The revised Historia Nummorum series will eventually also cover the totality of Greek coinage, but it is years, if not decades from completion. One of the most useful reference types for Greek collectors has been the Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum (SNG) series, which publishes significant public and private collections from around the world. While some of the sylloges are themselves basic references for their subjects (e.g. the volume of the ANS collection covering Baktrian coinage), SNG Copenhagen is the only major public collection whose sylloge series has been completed and is thus the most comprehensive published collection of Greek coins. For Roman provincial coinage, the series Roman Provincial Coinage (RPC) is destined to cover, in a total of ten volumes, all provincial issues from the Republic to the First Tetrarchy. Michael Crawford’s Roman Republican Coinage (RRC) remains the standard volume on that coinage, though many collectors still employ E.A. Sydenham’s Coinage of the Roman Republic for its ease of use. Roman Imperial coinage is best covered by the ten-volume Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC). The sixvolume Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum (BMCRE) provides better background information and is more updated, but is only published through the reign of Maximinus I. The eminent numismatist and scholar Philip Grierson’s catalog of the Byzantine coins in Dumbarton Oaks (DOC) is the basic reference for that coinage, especially as it also includes coin varieties that are not in the collection. For early Byanzntine coinage, Wolfgang Hahn’s three-volume Moneta Imperii Byzantini (MIB) is essential. It is currently under revision, with the assistance of Michael A. Metlich, under the title Money of the Incipient Byzantine Empire (MIBE). The first two volumes have been published. For World coinage, Krause and Mishler’s Standard Catalogue of World Coins still remains as the basic reference, although the catalogue begins in 1601. For British coinage, the standard reference remains The Standard Catalogue of British Coinage (SCBC), now in its 50th edition and published annually by Spink. In addition, many countries have their own standard references. Specialized References Specialized references include texts that pertain to a very specific type of coinage, with the most comprehensive and detailed lists and scholarship. It is next to impossible to list all of the specialized references in connection with the various categories of coins due to their broad number, even within the range of issues. Some of the basic references above will provide concordances to more specialized books and bibliographies that will direct the interested person to more detailed information and, thereby, even more specific references. For additional information on the specialized references that CNG uses, consult the Bibliography tab on our website. It is important to note here that there are some general specialized references that will be of great use to the collector. As we have seen above, various volumes of the SNG series provide detailed references on certain areas or types of coins. Laid out in the sylloge format with the catalog description on the verso and the illustrated coins on the recto, it provides the best format for comparing different types of coins. So popular is this format that other numismatic collections have been published this manner: Sylloge Nummorum Parthicorum (SNP), Sylloge Nummorum Sasanidarum (SNS), Sylloge of Islamic Coins in the Ashmolean (SICA), and Sylloge Nummorum Arabicorum Tübingen (SNAT), just to name a few.

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Publications of die studies are of immense value to collectors. Listing all of the known obverse and reverse dies of a particular issue or series of issues, it can assist the numismatist and collector in ascertaining the authenticity of a coin by comparing the dies for a match or help in determining the pedigree of a coin if it was used in the production of the study. In my opinion, one of the most thorough die studies is Leo Mildenberg’s The Coinage of the Bar Kokhba War (Typos VI). I would suggest that every beginning numismatist and collector have this book among their basic references. Festschriften (a published collection of articles honoring a well-respected scholar who has approached retirement or great age, or posthumously) allow current scholars in the field of the scholar they are honoring the opportunity to publish new research. For the collector, this is an excellent way to have new research related to their area of collecting within a single volume, as well as seeing who the current important scholars are. An adjunct to this is the published papers of the different numismatic congresses. The largest is the International Numismatic Congress, held every six years in different cities around the globe. Hoard studies and excavation reports are useful for locating examples of extremely rare or unpublished coins that haven’t made their presence known in the standard references. For Greek coinage, the Coin Hoards series, particularly the later volumes, are especially useful. The Inventory of Greek Coin Hoards (IGCH), published by the American Numismatic Society is indispensible and should be considered a basic reference (see above). For Roman coins – especially the official and unofficial issues of the third to fifth centuries AD – hoard studies and excavation reports are most helpful. Although some of the published hoards are easy to use (e.g. Venèra), most have no index for the individual hoards published (they are published by national find spot), and one must slowly go through the entire hoard to find what they seek. Important public and private collections also serve as valuable resources for the collector by providing not only valuable attribution information, but also by corroborating claims of pedigree (for a more detailed discussion of pedigrees, see Bradley R. Nelson, Pedigrees, in CNR Volume XXXIX, No. 3 [Fall 2014]). Auction Catalogs Most collectors begin unintentionally building a library of auction catalogs and price lists through their purchases of coins. In the days before the advent of the Internet, buying a coin from a printed fixed price list (FPL) or placing either a mail or phone bid to an auction, resulted in the collector building up an accumulation of printed material that eventually was sorted and placed in one’s library. As more auction houses are faced with rising production and postage costs, they are increasingly reducing the number of catalogs they print; instead, catalogs are now available online or one of the auction platforms, such as sixbid.com or numisbids.com. Firms will still provide printed copies of current or recently completed auctions, but this service will be expensive, and it is best to reserve such purchases for the sales of important collections within the collector’s area of interest. For an alphabetical listing of most auction catalogs and fixed price lists, see the online listings of the Fitzwilliam Museum (www-cm.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/coins/library/salescatalogue/). Numismatic Journals Much of the current scholarship that CNG uses in its cataloging can be found in peer-reviewed articles published in the journals of various numismatic societies. As one becomes more involved in collecting coins, membership in a numismatic organization naturally follows. In addition to fostering camaraderie of associating with fellow collectors in the field, these societies publish journals or newsletters (some annually; others quarterly) containing useful numismatic research. Membership costs in these 6


organizations vary, anywhere from $30 to $100 a year. Acquiring copies of the published journal, however, serves to mitigate the annual membership fee. Subsidiary Materials Finally, one’s library will include references that may not be specifically numismatic, but which can be considered fundamental to collecting nonetheless. These references can be museum exhibition catalogs, as many exhibitions will include coins. Many of the catalogs for smaller museums have limited print runs and distribution; acquiring one of these for the library can be considered a great success. Other references one can include are modern critical additions of historical texts and commentaries. One does not necessarily need to be fluent in the language, since many of the texts are published with translations alongside the original. Histories – whether a general overview or a monograph covering a specific period – are also important, since they add historical context to the coins. Next time, I will discuss what online references are available to supplement your growing bookshelf.

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A Note on How to Order As with our normal monthly uploads, these coins are available for purchase on our website, www.cngcoins.com. If you are viewing the virtual catalog, you may click on an image which will bring you to the online lot description, where you can add the coin to your cart as usual. If you are viewing a printed catalog, enter the inventory of the coin you wish to purchase under “Advanced Search” on our website, www.cngcoins.com.

GREEK

403389. ETRURIA, Populonia. Circa 300-250 BC. AR 10 Asses (18mm, 4.20 g). Laureate head of Aplu left; c (mark of value) behind / Blank. EC Group XVI, Series 70.94 (O1 – this coin); HN Italy 168; SNG ANS 26; SNG Lloyd 23 = Weber 65; SNG Lockett 45; Bement 22; McClean 137; Pozzi 41 (all from the same obv. die). EF, deeply toned, minor die shift, some die rust. $3250 From the JP Collection, purchased from Antika, Lyon, December 1984. Ex Kunst und Münzen FPL 52 (September 1983), no. 81.

From the Rosen Collection

405833. CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 510-500 BC. AR Nomos (24mm, 7.66  g, 12h). Phalanthos riding dolphin right, extending left hand, right hand resting on dolphin’s back; sÅrÅt to left, scallop shell below, dot-and-cable border around / Incuse of obverse type; [t]ÅrÅ[s] to right, radiate border around. Fischer-Bossert Group 1, 9e (V6/R8) = Rosen Sale 432 (this coin); Vlasto 63 (same dies); HN Italy 826; Kraay & Hirmer 294; de Luynes 260 (same dies). Good VF, toned, small area of flat strike, a couple insignificant die breaks on obverse. Very rare early issue, the first featuring the dolphin rider on both sides. $17,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Johnathan P. Rosen Collection (Münzen und Medaillen AG 72, 6 October 1987), lot 432; Numismatic Fine Arts XIV (29 November 1984), lot 6. As noted in the NFA sale, “This very early stater belongs to only the second issue of coinage at Tarentum.... According to a late antique commentator, a statue of this subject stood in the Tarentine Agora (Probus on Vergil, Georgics 2.197), though we do not know whether it inspired the coinage, or followed it. On the identity of the dolphin rider–Phalanthos, the historical founder, or Taras, the local river god?–see R. R. Holloway, Art and Coinage in Magna Graecia (1978), p. 35 and note 1.”

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A Coin of Artistic Merit Pedigreed to Two Early Leu Sales

410387. CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 333-331/0 BC. AV Stater (18mm, 8.60 g, 4h). Head of Persephone right, wearing a stephanos ornamented with palmettes, a slight veil, and triple-pendant earring; tÅrÅ to right, 1 below / Nude warrior, shield on left arm, holding two spears in left hand, preparing to cast a third held aloft in his right hand, on horse rearing right; ^ to left, Q to right, Å∏ below, tÅrÅ@t5@W@ to outer right. Fischer-Bossert G2f (V2/R2 – this coin); Vlasto, Or Type C; Vlasto 4 (same dies); HN Italy 905; BMC 6 (same dies); De Luynes 238 (same dies). Good VF, some light scratches and scuffs. A superb early die from a series of exceptional artistic merit. Very rare – ten example noted by Fisher-Bossert, five of which are in museums. $79,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Leu 45 (26 May 1988), lot 9; Leu 15 (4 May 1976), lot 12. For decades, a flood of Italic peoples – Samnites, Brettii, and Lucani – had been pressing the Greek city-states of Magna Graecia. In desperation, the Tarentines turned to the king of Epeiros, Alexander the Molassian. Alexander, while eager to help his Greek brothers, remained aware of the opportunity to add to his holdings and emulate his Macedonian cousin, Alexander the Great. Though initially defeating the Samnites and Lucani in battle, the fortunes of the Epirote king met a dramatic reversal at the Battle of Pandosia, when Alexander was slain by a Lucanian javelin. The exquisite gold staters of the present type were struck to finance these campaigns.

Pedigreed to 1934

403373. CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 333-331/0 BC. AR Nomos (21mm, 7.92 g, 2h). Nude warrior, shield on left arm, holding two spears in left hand, preparing to cast a third held aloft in his right hand, on horse rearing right; ^ to left, ¬ to right; below, ˚Ŭ above Å / Phalanthos, nude, holding crested helmet with both hands, astride dolphin right; tÅrÅs to left, stars flanking, f5 below. Fischer-Bossert Group 58, 752a (V291/R584 – this coin); Vlasto 542 = CNG 40, lot 586 (same dies); HN Italy 896; BMC 213; Winterthur 228. EF, attractive old collection toning, a little die wear, slight die shift on reverse. Struck from highly artistic dies. $7750 From the JP Collection, purchased from Platt, April 1987. Ex A. Hess (2 February 1934), lot 39. According to tradition the Spartan colony of Taras (mod. Taranto), known as Tarentum by the Romans, was founded in 706 BC under the leadership of Phalanthos. The city derives its name from Taras, the son of Poseidon and a local nymph, Satyra. It adopted a democratic form of government circa 475 BC, and thereafter became the leading Greek city in southern Italy. Its success led to continual difficulties with its neighbor cities, and on four occasions Tarentum required expeditions from Greece to help overcome its aggressors. The last of these expeditions was led by the famed Epeirote, Pyrrhos. Following his withdrawal from the city, Tarentum was occupied by the Romans. Tarentum was among the early cities of Magna Graecia to strike coinage, employing the incuse type that was the hallmark of the first Italian coinages. Taras’ prosperity is exemplified by its vast coinage known today which was continuous from 510 BC until the end of the Second Punic War. The primary type recurring throughout the coinage is a figure astride a dolphin, which depicts either Taras, the city’s namesake, or Phalanthos, who was said to have been saved from drowning by a dolphin.

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From the Trampitsch Collection

405834. BRUTTIUM, Kaulonia. Circa 525-500 BC. AR Nomos (29.5mm, 8.15 g, 12h). Apollo advancing right, holding branch aloft in right hand; small daimon running right on Apollo’s extended left arm; ˚å¨Ò to left; to right, stag standing right, head reverted, dot-and-cable border around / Incuse of obverse, but daimon in outline and no ethnic. Noe, Caulonia, Group A, 9 (same dies); Gorini 3; HN Italy 2035; SNG Lockett 579 (same dies); Boston MFA 173 = Warren 139 (same obv. die); Hermitage Sale II 164 (same obv. die); Kraay & Hirmer 259; Pozzi 270 (same obv. die); Weber 982 (same obv. die). Superb EF, deep iridescent toning. Of fine style and on wonderful metal. Exceptional in this condition. $47,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Armand Trampitsch Collection (Vinchon, 13 November 1986), lot 38. Kaulonia was one of a number of Achaian colonies established in Magna Graecia in the seventh century BC. It is not certain whether it was founded by new colonists from the Peloponnesos or whether it was founded by the Achaians of Kroton. Kaulonia’s coinage began in the later sixth century, and was one of the many incuse types that marked the beginning of coinage in Italy. Apollo, the patron deity of Kaulonia, and his associated iconography were the primary types featured on the coins. In the early fourth century, Kaulonia joined with Sybaris and Kroton in a league that was defeated by Dionysios I of Syracuse in 389/8 BC. Although the city was left intact, this event marked the cessation of its coinage.

411491. BRUTTIUM, Lokroi Epizephyrioi. Circa 350-275 BC. AR Stater (22mm, 8.58  g, 6h). Pegasos flying left; thunderbolt below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet and necklace; ¬o˚rW@ to left. Pegasi 13; HN Italy 2342; SNG ANS 513-5. Good VF, underlying luster. $895 10


405835. BRUTTIUM, Rhegion. Circa 415/0-387 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 16.79 g, 9h). Facing lion mask / Head of Apollo right, wearing laurel wreath; olive sprig to left, r˙˝5@o@ to right. Herzfelder 75 (D43/R63); HN Italy 2496; SNG ANS 660; SNG Lloyd 698; Boston MFA 204 = Warren 174 (same dies); Hermitage Sale II 206 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 288 (same rev. die). Good VF, toned, lightly porous. In fine classical style and high relief. $19,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 2 (21 February 1990, lot 49. This issue of coinage corresponds to quite an eventful period in the history of Rhegion. Around 415/0 BC, the reverse type on the tetradrachms changed from a seated figure to a portrait of Apollo. It is thought that this significant change was precipitated by a change in regime in the city. In the mid 5th century, Rhegion was a steadfast supporter of Athenian interests in Magna Graecia, especially in 427 BC, when Rhegion provided its port as a base from which Athens could operate. By the time of the Athenian Expedition in 415 BC, however, Rhegion refused to participate, and remained neutral, an act that effectively blocked Athens’ access to the straits. The timing of the beginning of this issue roughly coincides with this event. Region’s ambivalence towards Athens, though, did not translate into support for the interests of Syracuse. Perhaps wishing to distance itself from the turmoil in Sicily, Rhegion allied itself with the other major cities of southern Italy in a coalition against Dionysios I, the tyrant of Syracuse. Unfortunately, this decision proved disastrous, as Dionysios invaded Bruttium, and fought against the cities from 399-386 BC, with the result that Rhegion was reduced to near non-existence until it was refounded by Dionysios II in 360 BC. It is uncertain, but given the circumstances, it is not unlikely that the bountiful tetradrachm coinage struck during this period was often used to finance military activity. In any event, these coins exemplify the high aesthetic standard of the Classical Period that is common to the coins of Magna Graecia at this time. The facing lion head is rendered in a bold, detailed manner, as is the head of Apollo, carefully depicted as a serene deity. What separates these coins from their contemporaries is the depth of the relief, which was extraordinarily high. The effect is particularly striking on the obverse, where the lion head has an exceptional and unsurpassed three-dimensional quality.

410151. SICILY, Akragas. Punic occupation. 213-211 BC. AR Half Shekel (20mm, 3.57  g, 11h). Male head right (Triptolemos?), wearing wreath of grain ears / Horse leaping right; J (Punic Ḥ) below; all within wreath. Walker dies II/7; cf. Burnett, Enna 133/134 (same obv./rev. dies); HGC 2, 172; SNG Copenhagen 378 (Carthage). EF, attractive cabinet toning, minor double strike on reverse. Struck on a broad flan. $3750 Originally attributed to Heimpsal II of Numidia, this issue was firmly reattributed to the Carthaginians in Sicily (cf. R.R. Holloway, “Monete provenienti dagli scavi di Moragantina e già attribuite a Hiempsal II” in AIIN 7–8 [1961], pp. 35–7), and most likely to the mint of Akragas (cf. Burnett, Enna, pp. 12–3). Although Burnett suggested that this issue was struck no later than 211 BC, Walker’s analysis of three Sicilian hoards conclusively dates this coinage to circa 213–210 BC, during the Second Punic War. At the outbreak of the war in 218, Akragas was a loyal ally of Rome, but was captured by the Carthaginians in 214. Despite attempts by Rome to retake the city, the Punic garrison held out for nearly four years, until a dispute between the Carthaginians and their Numidian mercenaries led to the betrayal of Akragas to the forces of M. Valerius Laevinus. Unlike the ubiquitous Siculo-Punic coins struck at Entella, the die study of the issues a Akragas shows that the present issue was of a very short duration. Although they were struck from well-executed dies, the hoard coins show that they were not struck with great care, which is not unusual for coins issued in the midst of war. As such, high grade pieces like the present specimen are exceptional, even though these coins are relatively plentiful today.

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Fine Style Struck in High Relief

410383. SICILY, Entella. Punic issues. Circa 320/15-300 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 16.84 g, 7h). Head of Arethousa left, wearing wreath of grain ears, triple-pendant earring, and necklace; three dolphins around / Head of horse left; palm tree to right, †nJMM` (Punic ‘MMḤNT) below. Jenkins, Punic 188 (O55/R165; HGC 2, 284; SNG Fitzwilliam 1382 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1638 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 206 var. (shell on obv.); Rizzo pl. LXVI, 10; Ward 363 (same dies). EF, attractive deep toning. Struck in high relief. $12,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Vinchon (13 April 1985, lot 172. In the final decade of the fifth century BC, the Carthaginians launched a series of invasions of Sicily, conquering much of the western half of the island and bringing devastation to many formerly flourishing Greek communities. The Punic presence lasted for a century and a half, until Rome’s victory in the First Punic War obliged the Carthaginians to withdraw. During their time of occupation, the Carthaginians struck an extensive coinage in Sicily for the purpose of financing their military operations and the maintenance of garrisons. The obverse and reverse types of the series are mostly influenced by Sicilian prototypes, particularly those of Syracuse, except for the later series with the head of Herakles on the obverse, which was obviously influenced by the well-recognized coinage of Alexander the Great. While a few of the series are struck at cities with established mints, such as Motya and Panormos, these are often viewed as minor or campaign mints that operated for a short duration. The location of the primary Punic mint (or mints) on Sicily, responsible for the large issues studied by G.K. Jenkins (‘Carthage’ series I-V), has been the subject of great debate. Most recently, I. Lee surveyed the existing literature and took a fresh look at the full spectrum of evidence, persuasively concluding that this mint was located at Entella (“Entella: The Silver Coinage of the Campanian Mercenaries and the First Carthaginian Mint 410-409 BC” in NC 160 [2000], pp. 1-66).

401899. SICILY, Entella. Punic issues. Circa 300-289 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 17.06 g, 3h). Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Head of horse left; palm tree to right, MBß∆M (Punic MHSBM) below. Jenkins, Punic 398 (O121/R326); HGC 2, 295; SNG Ashmolean 2164 (same dies); SNG Lloyd 1648 (same obv. die); Rizzo pl. LXVI, 11. EF, lightly toned, minor flat spot on reverse. $2450 Ex Patrick H. C. Tan Collection (Gemini VII, 9 January 2011), lot 201; Classical Numismatic Group 75 (23 May 2007), lot 65.

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402804. SICILY, Messana (as Zankle). Circa 500-493 BC. AR Drachm (23.5mm, 5.64 g). Dolphin left; Îånk63 below; all within sickle-shaped harbor / Nine-part incuse square with scallop shell in center. Gielow 40 (same obv. die); HGC 2, 766; SNG ANS 302; SNG Lloyd 1076; Basel 359; Boston MFA 285; Kraay & Hirmer 49; Rizzo pl. XXV, 4-5. EF, toned, cleaning marks under tone, a few tiny deposits. Great metal and strike. $19,500 From the JP Collection, purchased from Maison Platt, June 1987. The colony of Zankle was founded by Cumaean and Euboean settlers in the eighth century BC on the straits of Messina. Its name, meaning “sickle”, was taken from its important sickle-shaped harbor. The colony prospered and even founded its own colonies at Mylae and Himera. Zankle was soon overshadowed by Rhegion, though, whose tyrant, Anaxilas, seized the colony around 488 BC and renamed the city Messana, after Peloponnesian Messenia, whose colonists he settled in Zankle.

The Early Coinage of Syracuse Pedigreed to the De Ciccio Collection in 1907

405836. SICILY, Syracuse. The Gamoroi. Circa 500-490/86 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24.5mm, 17.17  g, 3h). Charioteer, holding reins in both hands, driving slow quadriga right; s¨‰Å above / Head of Arethousa left in incuse circle in center of quadripartite incuse square. Boehringer Series I, 31.3 (V22/R15 – this coin); HGC 2, 1302; SNG ANS 5 (same obv. die); Hunterian 1 (same dies); Pozzi 547 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XXXIV, 1–2; Sartiges 120 (same obv. die). Good VF, attractive old cabinet toning. Great metal. $37,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Vinchon (13 April 1985), lot 112; Giuseppe De Ciccio Collection (Sambon & Canessa, 19 December 1907), lot 285. Syracuse was the dominant Greek state in Sicily from early in the 5th century until its capture and sack by the Romans in 211 BC. A Corinthian foundation on the east coast of the island dating from circa 734 BC, it did not play a leading role in Sicilian politics prior to its capture in 485 by Gelon, tyrant of Gela. Gelon transferred his seat of government there and he and Hieron I, his brother and successor, laid the foundations for the future greatness of Syracuse. The defeat of the Carthaginian invaders of Sicily in 480 BC, in which Gelon played a leading role, marked a turning-point in the history of the western Mediterranean area, just as the Athenian victory over the Persian invaders of Greece in the same year was to have far-reaching consequences in the Aegean world. Gelon died in 478 but his aggressive policies were continued by Hieron whose court also became a cultural center of some note. On the tyrant’s death in 467/6 BC a democratic government was instituted in Syracuse.

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From the Gillet Collection

405837. SICILY, Syracuse. Hieron I. 478-466 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23.5mm, 17.23  g, 8h). Struck circa 475-470 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand and reins in both, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with wreath held in both hands / Head of Arethousa right, wearing pearl tainia, hoop earring with a single pendant, and pearl necklace; four dolphins and s¨-∞åko-s5o-@ (retrograde) around . Boehringer Series XIId, 353 (O175/R246); HGC 2, 1307; SNG ANS 113 (same dies); SNG Ashmolean 1934 (same dies); Gillet 553 (this coin); Hunterian 8 (same dies); McClean 2616 (same rev. die). EF, toned, light cleaning marks under tone. $19,750 From the JP Collection. Ex Münzen und Medaillen AG 68 (15 April 1986), lot 147; Charles Gillet Collection, 553. Charles Gillet (1879–1972) was the son of a prominent French industrialist and came to run the family’s businesses, which eventually became the important chemical firm Rhône-Poulenc. The great wealth he amassed as head of the family gave Gillet the freedom to pursue collecting in a variety of arts, including numismatics. He is perhaps best known today for his particular interest in archaic and classical Greek, though he also had specialized collections of Hellenistic portrait coins, Siculo-Punic coins, Roman gold, and French Gothic coins. It is unknown when he began to collect Greek coins, though he almost certainly began in the 1920s or shortly thereafter, as he accumulated many of the choice specimens from a variety of the famous collections that came to market at that time, including from Jameson and Bement. Over the subsequent decades, Gillet continued to acquire the finest pieces from the important collections that came on the market, but over time his new acquisitions came primarily though private treaties, with most of these coins already having valuable pedigrees. Gillet was known to have formed his collection with a keen eye for beauty, rarity, and quality. Although he was recognized among the prominent auction houses and major collectors of his time, he always worked anonymously through trusted dealers who acted as his agent. He began selling off parts of his collection as early as the 1950s, but it was not until after his death that his collection became the sole subject of a single auction. This auction, anonymously titled “Griechische Münzen aus der Sammlung eines Kunstfreundes”, is one of the most significant sales of Greek coins to this day. Although featuring only a portion of Gillet’s Greek collection, it was the cremé-de-la-cremé. So outstandingly beautiful were these coins that many had been used by various authors as plate coins in their works. The format of the sale, jointly conducted by Bank Leu and Münzen und Medaillen AG, that it set a new standard for the layout of premier auction catalogs. A Kunstfreund pedigree is among the most coveted, and significantly increases the value of a particular coin compared to similar pieces.

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The Famed Demareteion Issue Second Known from the Obverse Die

410381. SICILY, Syracuse. Hieron I. 478-466 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 17.22 g, 6h). ‘Demareteion’ issue. Struck circa 470-466 BC. Charioteer, holding kentron in right hand and reins in both, driving slow quadriga right; above, Nike flying right, crowning horses with wreath held in both hands / Head of Arethousa right, wearing laurel wreath, hoop earring with single pendant, and pearl necklace, enclosed within linear circle; s¨-‰Å˚-os5-o@ and four dolphins swimming clockwise around. Sult 389.2 (this coin); Boehringer Series XIIe, 389 (V198/R269); HGC 2, 1308; SNG ANS 120 (same rev. die); Jameson 754 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 79–80; Randazzo 524 (same obv. die); Rizzo pl. XXXV, 4 (same rev. die). EF, toned, very light cleaning marks in spots on reverse. Superb artistry. Extremely rare – only the second known example of this obverse die. $137,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Leu 45 (26 May 1988), lot 54. The story of the Demareteion coinage has its source in a passage in Diodorus (XI 26.3), that relates to the events following the defeat of the Carthaginians by the Syracusans after the battle of Himera in 479 BC. In the wake of their defeat, the Carthaginians expected harsh treatment by their foes, but Gelon, tyrant of Syracuse, imposed quite favorable terms upon them, supposedly at the behest of his wife, Demarete. In response, the Carthaginians are said to have presented Demarete with a crown of gold valued (or weighing) at a hundred talents, and from this gift was struck a coin, called the Demareteion, that weighed ten drachms on the Attic standard. The identification of the coin in question was one of the great mysteries of numismatics, due to the apparent contradictions in the story: the crown was said to be of gold, but the weight of the coin struck from it was given in Attic drachms, which implied a silver, not gold, coin. We know the metal of the coin must have been silver, as Syracuse apparently had no gold until many years after the event. Among the silver coinage, however, there was a suitable candidate that was known to have been struck relative to the time frame of the battle of Himera, the dekadrachms of Quadriga/Arethusa type. The appearance of these impressive coins was unprecedented at the time, and their style of such superior quality, that it is certain that they commemorated a particular, special event. Thus, these dekadrachms came to be known as the ‘Demareteion’ coinage, and their engraver labelled the ‘Demareteion Master.’ These dekadrachms were accompanied by a series of tetradrachms that featured the exact same iconography and style, and are regarded as masterpieces themselves, only on a smaller scale. Unlike the dekadrachms, which, judging from the extant examples, did not circulate, the tetradrachms appear to have had circulated widely, as most examples show wear comparable to the average Syracusan tetradrachms. The present example, however, exhibits relatively minor wear, and was struck with precision and care. Of the remaining pieces, it is surely among the finest.

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Artistic Sosion Signed Tetradrachm

410386. SICILY, Syracuse. Second Democracy. 466-405 BC. AR Tetradrachm (30mm, 17.11 g, 12h). Reverse die signed by Sosion. Struck circa 413-405 BC. Charioteer, holding reigns in both hands, driving fast quadriga left; above, Nike flying right, crowning charioteer with wreath held in her extended hands / Head of Arethousa left, wearing ampyx and pearl necklace; four dolphins and sUrÅ˚o-s5o-@ around, sos5>W@ on ampyx. Tudeer 2 (dies 1/2); HGC 2, 1326; SNG München 1051 (same dies); Boston MFA 398 = Warren 383 (same obv. die); Jameson 788 (same obv. die); de Luynes 1197–8 (same obv. die); Manhattan Sale II, lot 20 = Gemini IV, lot 52 (same dies); Rizzo pl. XLII, 2 (same obv. die). Near EF, toned, hairline flan crack, cleaning scratches on obverse, some porosity on reverse. Struck on a broad flan. Highly artistic. $45,000 From the JP Collection. Ex Münzen und Medaillen AG 68 (15 April 1986), lot 151; Leu 25 (23 April 1980, lot 71. By the middle of the 5th century BC, the situation in Sicily prefigured much later developments in Renaissance Italy, where local princes engaged in continual warfare among themselves, while employing the services of the finest contemporary artists and craftsmen. Wars required significant amounts of money to hire mercenaries, and the increasing cultural sophistication of the courts encouraged artistic experimentation – the result was the patronizing of some of the most talented coin engravers in history. In Syracuse and surrounding cities, the anonymous “Demareteion Master” and the “Maestro della foglia” were followed by their students and successors - Choirion, Euainetos, Eumenos, Exakestidas, Herakleidas - all of whom proudly signed their works. These masters developed new ways of viewing the world through art, breaking the static forms developed in Archaic and early Classical art, thereby developing new methods of portraying motion and life in miniature. The silver tetradrachm was the preferred denomination for such expression, providing a sufficient canvas upon which these artists had free-range to play. At Syracuse, these artists infused the standard typology - the victorious charioteer and the head of Arethusa - with a vigorous lifelike quality that stands among the finest works of numismatic art. The chariot scene was transformed from a two-dimensional view to a dynamic three-dimensional perspective, with the horses arrayed in a manner to give the viewer the impression that the horses are emerging from the field. On the reverse, the previously stoic and sedate profile of Arethusa was now imbued with an individuality. Although her adornments varied in the way her hair was arranged and the kind of earrings she wore, the vitality of her countenance now offered a radiant immortality.

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From the Tramptisch Collection

410380. SICILY, Syracuse. Dionysios I. 405-367 BC. AR Dekadrachm (34mm, 43.12 g, 5h). Unsigned dies in the style of Euainetos. Struck circa 404-380/67. Charioteer, holding kentron in extended right hand and reins in left, driving fast quadriga left; above, Nike flying right, crowning charioteer with wreath held in her extended hands; in exergue, shield, greaves, cuirass, and Attic helmet, all connected by a horizontal spear / Head of Arethousa left, wearing grain-ear wreath, triple-pendant earring, and pearl necklace; scallop shell behind; around, four dolphins. Gallatin dies R.XIX/G.I; HGC 2, 1299; SNG ANS 372-3; du Chastel 129 (same rev. die); Nanteuil 359 (same rev. die); de Luynes 1246 (same rev. die); Warren 362 (same rev. die); Morton & Eden 59, lot 742 (same rev. die); Triton XII, 106 (same rev. die); Hess-Divo 309, lot 19 (same dies). Good VF, deeply toned with minor deposits underneath, just a touch of the usual die rust. Struck on a broad flan from a crisp obverse and reverse die. $75,000 From the JP Collection. Ex Armand Trampitsch Collection (Vinchon, 13 November 1986), lot 104. Dionysios assumed power in 405 BC and immediately set out to make Syracuse the greatest and best fortified city in all of Greece. He was defending against the renewed imperialistic expansion of Carthage. Three times he defeated the Carthaginians, bringing further prestige and wealth to Syracuse. During his reign, the Syracuse navy became the most powerful in the Mediterranean, allowing Syracuse to expand her territorial control over much of southern Italy. Dionysios reintroduced the large and ostentatious silver dekadrachms, a denomination that had not been used in Syracuse since the Demareteion issue decades earlier. Dionysios entrusted two of the greatest local numismatic artists, Kimon and Euainetos, to design these impressive pieces. The regard for these coins in modern times is reflected by the fact that they are considered a must for any first rank collection of Greek coins.

403962. SICILY, Syracuse. Hieron II. 275-215 BC. Æ (27mm, 18.37 g, 3h). Struck circa 230-218/5 BC. Diademed head left / Horseman riding right, holding couched spear in right arm; @ below; 5ErW@o% in exergue. CNS 195 R1 22; BAR Issue 61; HGC 2, 1548. EF, dark green and brown patina. $575 17


Exceptional Istros from the Trampitch Collection

410391. MOESIA, Istros. Late 5th-4th centuries BC. AR Drachm (18mm, 5.91 g). Facing male heads, the left inverted / Sea eagle left, grasping dolphin with talons; 5str5˙ above, ˚ below, Q to left. AMNG I 450 var. (no Θ); SNG BM Black Sea –; SNG Stancomb 142 var. (no K); Pozzi 1138 = Pozzi (Boutin) 2506 (same obv. die). Superb EF, toned. $2500 From the JP Collection. Ex Armand Trampitch Collection (Vinchon, 13 November 1986), lot 151.

410390. THRACE, Abdera. Circa 500-475 BC. AR Oktadrachm (29mm, 29.38 g). Griffin seated left, raising right forepaw; ivy leaf to left / Quadripartite incuse square. May, Abdera 33 = BMC 1 = Sotheby’s (4 June 1862), lot 150 corr. (leaf control mark, not ΣI); C-N p. 105, pl. 6, 7 = SNG Ashmolean 3434 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen –; Asyut 130; CNA XVI, lot 117 = CNG 84, lot 139 (same dies). EF, deeply toned, slightly granular surfaces. Extremely rare – only the fourth example known with this control. $19,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Ceresio (26 September 1987), lot 64. Abdera has its mythological foundation in the Labors of Herakles, who founded the city in honor of his companion Abderos after the latter was killed by the mares of Diomedes. Historically the first recorded settlement was a failed colonization effort by Klazomenaians under the leadership of Timesias in 656 BC, but neither of these events have left any concrete traces in the later history. It was in 541 BC that citizens of Teos, fleeing the Persian conquest of Ionia, established a long-lasting civic entity. The unchanging numismatic symbol of Abdera, the griffin, was adopted from the coinage of the lost home city, Teos, but turned to face left instead of right as at Teos. Abdera’s production of massive silver oktadrachms begins within a decade of the founding of the city, and reflects the reason for the success of this foundation as opposed to the earlier failure; at the beginning of the 6th century BC the prolific silver mines of Thrace started coming on line, and trading cities such as Abdera and Thasos were well positioned to claim their portion of the wealth. While producing large quantities of silver coins, the city also introduced one of the earliest series of signed coinage by annual magistrates. While the obverse type was invariably a griffin, the reverses, once they evolved beyond the simple quadripartite square in the late 5th century, seem to have been left to the whim of the magistrates, who responded with a delightful repertoire of varied types, mythological and naturalistic, a number featuring visual puns on the magistrate’s name. This was the period of Abdera’s greatest achievements, of well known citizens such as Demokritos, the ‘laughing philosopher’, and Protagoras, the most celebrated of the sophists. The failed revolt against Athens in 411 BC proved only a slight hiatus in the city’s prosperity. However, the final end would come within a generation, as the production of the Thracian silver mines began to slow (or was diverted to the growing power of Macedon) and the Thracian tribes became increasingly restive. In 375 BC the Abderan army was destroyed by the Triballoi, and only closer confederacy with Athens preserved the city. Its annual coinage issues ceased, and after this period little precious metal coinage was struck in Abdera. By the time of the coming of the Romans in the 2nd century BC the great trading city of Abdera had sunk into permanent obscurity.

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Pedigreed to 1882 From the Godefroy and Bompois Collections

405838. THRACE, Ainos. Circa 457/6-456/5 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 16.34 g, 9h). Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos with pelleted rim / Goat standing right; Å5@5 above; to right, ivy leaf within crescent facing right; all within incuse square. May, Ainos 52a (A30/P42) = AMNG II 272.9 (this coin); Boston MFA 774 = Warren 460 (same obv. die); Pozzi 1016 (same obv. die); Traité IV 1498, pl. 344, 8 (same obv. die). EF, deeply toned, a few metal flaws. $27,500 From the JP Collection, purchased from Antika (Lyon), June 1987. Ex Schweizerische Kreditanstalt 4 (3 December 1985, lot 89; Colonel V. Godefroy Collection (cited in May); C. Platt (3 April 1933), lot 89; Ferdinand Bompois Collection (Hoffman, 16 January 1882), lot 573. Ainos came rather late to currency production, striking its first tetradrachms only after the expulsion of the Persians from northern Greece following Xerxes’ defeat at Salamis. Its first period ended with the Athenian coinage decree of 449 BC, but the mint was in operation again by circa 435 BC, tapering off rapidly until disappearing with the conquest of the city by Philip of Macedon in 342 BC. Its uniform types throughout its history were Hermes and the goat, the latter the symbol of the pasture land that provided what prosperity Ainos had. Hermes was the patron deity of Ainos, dating from the time of the Trojan War. According to a poem by Kallimachos, the sculptor Epeios, who constructed the Trojan Horse, also made a wooden statue (ξοανον) of Hermes, which was washed out to sea and recovered by fishermen by the Hebros river. The fishermen, thinking it just a piece of driftwood, tried to burn it in their bonfire. When it failed to burn they took fright and threw it back into the sea, which promptly cast it back again. The natives accepted it as a relic of the gods, and erected the sanctuary of Hermes Perpheraios (the Wanderer) at the future site of Ainos. The later coins of Ainos, with their splendid facing head of Hermes, showcase some of the finest numismatic art of the Greek world. Nevertheless, Ainos never became an important city or trading center. The climate might have had something to do with it; according to Athaneus, Ainos had two seasons, eight months of cold and four months of winter. At least the goats liked it.

405839. THRACE, Ainos. Circa 425/4-423/2 BC. AR Tetradrachm (22mm, 16.25  g, 4h). Head of Hermes left, wearing petasos with pelleted rim / Goat standing left, lowering its head to smell a lily plant to left; Å5@ above; all within incuse square. May, Ainos 205 (A120/P142) = Ars Classica XIII, no. 579 corr. (rev. type). EF, iridescent toning, some porosity. Extremely rare, the second known of this issue, and the only one with clear types. $27,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Münzen und Medaillen AG 73 (17 October 1988), lot 42. The previous known example, from Ars Classica XIII, is horribly preserved, with some tooling on the reverse obscuring the bent foreleg of the goat as well as the flower.

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From the Trampitsch Collection

406344. ISLANDS off THRACE, Thasos. Circa 500-480 BC. AR Stater (20.5mm, 8.75 g). Satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph / Quadripartite incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 2; HPM pl. X, 3–5; HGC 6, 331; SNG Ashmolean 3643 = ACGC 519; Asyut 104; Boston MFA 851; Kraay & Hirmer 435. EF, deeply toned, slight die shift. Great archaic style and excellent metal. $12,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Armand Trampitsch Collection (Vinchon, 13 November 1986), lot 146. Ritual abduction as a form of exogamy was, and is still, frequent in tribal society. The reference here is probably to the Dionysiac cult and is modeled on one of the stone reliefs for which Thasos is famous. For another archaic treatment on the same theme from Delphi, see Boardman, Greek Sculpture: the Archaic Period, fig. 210. The overtly sexual displays seen on many early Greek coins can be disconcerting to the modern eye, viewing them through the lens of centuries of Christian fulminations against ‘paganism’ and its erotic excesses. These scenes are at their most graphic in northern Greece, for example, on the archaic coins of Siris and the island of Thasos, showing the interplay of nymphs and satyrs. The towns and tribes of this region were only newly introduced to the ‘civilizing’ influences of the south, and were still close to their roots in farming and herding cultures. Their gods were not the Olympian super beings, but the spirits of nature, and the emphasis was on celebrating the fecundity of fields and flocks.

403404. ISLANDS off THRACE, Thasos. Circa 90-75 BC. AR Tetradrachm (31mm, 16.88 g, 11h). Head of young Dionysos right, hair in band and wreath of ivy with berries at the tip / Herakles, nude, standing left, right hand on club set on ground, lion skin draped over left arm; ˙rÅ˚¬Eo¨% to right, %Wt˙ro% to left, QÅ%5W@ in exergue; 8 to inner left. Prokopov, Silberprägung, Group XII, 722 (V AC6/R 576) = Lukanc 967; Le Rider, Thasiennes 52; HGC 6, 359. EF, attractively toned. Well centered and struck. $1250 From the JP Collection, purchased from Platt, December 1986.

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409994. KINGS of THRACE, Macedonian. Lysimachos. 305-281 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28.5mm, 17.13 g, 3h). Pella mint. Struck circa 286/5-282/1 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / ∫Å%5¬EW% 2U%5;ÅcoU, Athena Nikephoros seated left, left arm resting on shield, spear diagonally in background; A to outer left, T to outer right. Thompson 248; Müller 353 var. (position of outer right monogram). EF, lightly toned. Attractive surfaces. $2250 Ex Classical Numismatic Group Inventory 705071 (February 1998). At the beginning of his reign, Lysimachos continued to use Alexander’s coinage types, later modifying them by replacing Alexander’s name with his own. In 297 BC, Lysimachos introduced a new type: the obverse was a portrait of Alexander; the reverse was Athena, Lysimachos’ patron goddess. G.K Jenkins noted the power of the Alexander portrait in his commentary on the Gulbenkian Collection: “The idealized portrait of Alexander introduced on the coinage of Lysimachos in 297 BC is characterized by the horn of Ammon which appears above the ear. The allusion is to Alexander’s famous visit to the oracle of Ammon at the Siwa Oasis in 331, when the god is supposed to have greeted Alexander as ‘My son’.... [T]he best of the Alexander heads on Lysimachos’ coinage...have a power and brilliance of effect that is irresistible. It [is speculated] that these Alexander heads may have derived from an original gem carved by Pyrgoteles, an engraver prominent among the artists of Alexander’s court....” Regardless of the inspiration for the new design, part of the remarkable attraction of this coinage is its artistic variety: each engraver created his own fresh and distinctive portrayal of the world’s greatest conqueror.

406346. MACEDON, Mende. Circa 460-423 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24.5mm, 16.53 g, 2h). Inebriated Dionysos, wearing chiton draped from his waist, holding in right hand a kantharos propped on his right knee, reclining left on the back of an ass standing right; barley grain in exergue / µE@-dÅ-5-o@ within linear square around vine of six grape clusters within linear square; all within shallow incuse square. Noe, Mende 89 (same dies); cf. AMNG III/2, 20; SNG Blackburn 561 (same dies); Kraay & Hirmer 404 var. (rev. type, same obv. die); Künstfreund 140 var. = Gillet 764 var. (rev. type, same obv. die). Near EF, deeply toned, granular surfaces. Rare. $19,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Lanz 54 (12 November 1990), lot 115. This coin is the same weight as the piece Noe listed as having been seen in commerce for his no. 89. Judging from the rarity of this issue, this coin may be the coin seen by Noe, and thus would be from the 1913 Kalliandra Hoard (IGCH 358). The city of Mende, located on the Pallene Peninsula on the eastern shore of the Thermaic Gulf, was, according to Thucydides (4.123.1), founded by Eretria in the 8th century. It later founded colonies of its own: Neapolis on the eastern coast of Pallene and Eion at the mouth of the river Strymon near Amphipols. Mende’s wealth is indicated by the high amounts of tribute paid to the Delian Confederacy: eight talents until 451-450 BC, and then amounts ranging form five to nine talents after 438-437 BC. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) Mende originally sided with Athens, but then, on the urging of the oligarchs, went over to the Spartan general Brasidas. It eventually returned to the Athenian side, but is not mentioned in connection with the Peace of Nicias. From 415-414 BC Mende again appears in the Athenian Tribute Lists, but by the fourth century the city was only minting copper coins. The Dionysiac types of Mende proclaim it as a famous wine producing city, as attested by its amphoras that have been found throughout the Mediterranean. On this delightful coin, Dionysos, who rules wine and winemaking, is shown being carried home drunk from a symposium, in a state of careless joy which links the world of men with the Olympians--at least until the morning.

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A Group of Exceptional Lifetime Drachms of Alexander III

407233. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 4.25 g, 2h). Miletos mint. Struck under Philoxenos, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; M in left field. Price 2090; ADM I Series I, 91 (same obv. die); SNG Alpha Bank 629–32; SNG Saroglos 771. FDC, gray-blue toning. Exceptional. $975 In 333 BC, Alexander wrested control of Tarsos from the Achaemenids and began to strike a new coinage of his own type, likely based upon the latest issues of that city under the Persians. This new “Alexander type” coinage was struck on the Attic standard, likely as an attempt to supplant the ubiquitous Athenian ‘owls’ as the preeminent coinage in the eastern Mediterranean. His coinage was so popular, and became so commonly accepted, that the successor kingdoms, as well as cities in the region of Alexander’s empire, continued to produce coinage in Alexander’s name long after his death. Thus, issues attributed to the lifetime of Alexander are relatively rarer than those that are posthumous, having only been struck for 10 years before the Macedonian king’s death, while the later issues spanned nearly two centuries. Moreover, only a handful of mints were producing Alexanders during his lifetime, while the wars between his successors precipitated new issues from dozens of mints. Miletos is one of the few mints that issued Alexanders while the conquerer lived, beginning circa 325 BC, and is commonly known as one of the ‘drachm mints’ that produced huge quantities of that denomination into the early 3rd century. It is conventionally thought that these drachm mints were opened to pay the Greek soldiers who were sent home from Alexander’s army during his eastern campaign. Huge quantities of these coins are known today, but, as expected for a denomination that should circulate heavily, are often found in average grade. As such, high grade specimens often fetch a premium; Triton XVIII, lot 459, an FDC example of the same issue as the present coin, realized $1900.

407237. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (16.5mm, 4.35 g, 2h). Miletos mint. Struck under Philoxenos, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; M in left field. Price 2090; ADM I Series I, 91 (same obv. die); SNG Alpha Bank 629–32; SNG Saroglos 771. FDC, gray-blue toning. Exceptional. $975

407239. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (16mm, 4.30 g, 2h). Miletos mint. Struck under Philoxenos, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; M in left field. Price 2090; ADM I Series I, 91 (same obv. die); SNG Alpha Bank 629–32; SNG Saroglos 771. FDC, gray-blue toning. Exceptional. $975 22


407241. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 4.31 g, 2h). Miletos mint. Struck under Philoxenos, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; M in left field. Price 2090; ADM I Series I, 91 (same obv. die); SNG Alpha Bank 629–32; SNG Saroglos 771. FDC, gray-blue toning. Exceptional. $975

407242. KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm (18mm, 4.35 g, 2h). Miletos mint. Struck under Philoxenos, circa 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ŬE$Å@droU, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; M in left field. Price 2090; ADM I Series I, 91 (same obv. die); SNG Alpha Bank 629–32; SNG Saroglos 771. FDC, gray-blue toning. Exceptional. $975

Pay for Perseus’ Rhodian Mercenaries

403329. KINGS of MACEDON. Perseus. 179-168 BC. AR Drachm (15mm, 2.69 g, 6h). Third Macedonian War issue. Rhodian standard. Uncertain mint in Thessaly; Hermias, magistrate. Struck circa 171/0 BC. Head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; Erµ5Ås above, z-W flanking stem. Price, Larissa, pl. LV, 247; SNG Keckman 795. EF, toned. $895 In his 1988 article on Rhodian imitations, R. Ashton has argued persuasively that this coinage was struck by Perseus to pay Cretan mercenaries serving in his army (see “A Series of Pseudo-Rhodian Drachms from Mainland Greece,” NC 1988, pp. 29-30. The Rhodian coinage circulated on Crete, where it was a familiar and trusted currency for the Cretans, and it is likely that they would have required payment in that form (see also R. Ashton, SM 146 [May 1987], p. 34).

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402964. KINGS of PAEONIA. Patraos. Circa 335-315 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 12.81 g, 1h). Astibos or Damastion mint. Laureate head of Apollo right / Warrior on horse rearing right, thrusting spear held in his right hand at enemy below who defends with shield on his left arm; kantharos behind horse’s rear legs; ∏Å-tr-ÅoUupward to left. Paeonian Hoard 195–7 (same dies); Peykov E2170; NRBM Paeonia 43–4 var. (symbol; same obv. die); SNG ANS 1032 (same dies). Good VF, toned, a couple minor die breaks on obverse. $1250 From the JP Collection. Ex Auctiones 18 (21 September 1989), lot 651. After the death of Perdikkas III of Macedon in 359 BC, the Paeonians, one of the tribes surrounding Macedon, began to rebel. While he consolidated his own hold on the Macedonian throne, Philip II of Macedon temporarily kept them in check with bribes and promises. The Paeonians, fearful of Philip’s designs, sought the assistance of Athens and in the summer of 356 BC the king of Paeonia, Lykkeios, signed a treaty of alliance with the city-state. This proved fruitless as the Macedonians, again under Parmenio, recaptured Paeonia, and for the remainder of the 4th century BC it was an “allied” state, maintaing a sense of semiautonomy while supplying the armies of Alexander III of Macedon with mercenaries. In the confusion and civil war in Macedon following the death of Alexander IV, Paeonia once again became independent. Kassander, wearied by the struggle to make himself king of Macedon, secured his northern border by assisting Audoleon in defeating the Autariatai. This alliance worked for the Paeonians as well; Audoleon acquired a powerful ally. That Audoleon continued to build such connections with his neighbors is clear through the marriage of his daughter to Pyrrhos, King of Epiros and cousin to the Macedonian royal house through Olympias, the mother of Alexander III. Shortly after the death of Audoleon, however, Paeonia reverted to Macedonian control under Antigonos II Gonatas.

405320. KINGS of PAEONIA. Audoleon. Circa 315-286 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 14.14  g, 2h). In the types of Alexander III of Macedon. Damastion or Astibus mint. Struck circa 287/6 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / ∫Ås5¬EWs ÅUdW¬Eo@tos, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; · (monogram of Audoleon) in left field. Peykov E4330; Waggoner, Reflexions pl. V, A = Jameson 1996 = Weber 2246 (same obv. die); Price pl. CLVIII, G; AMNG III/2 12; SNG ANS 1062 (same obv. die); Triton VII, lot 150 (same dies). Good VF. Very rare issue in the name of Audoleon, only six known to Waggoner, three in CoinArchives. $1650

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405151. THESSALY, Larissa. Circa 460-450 BC. AR Drachm (21mm, 5.83 g, 4h). Thessalos right, wearing petasos and holding band across head of bull right; flower below / Bridled horse left, with trailing rein; all within incuse square; ¬Å ‰5 around. Cf. Lorber, Thessalian 9; BCD Thessaly II 152 var. (same obv. die; different arrangement of ethnic); HGC 4, 411. VF, toned, minor flan waviness. Rare variety. $795 Ex BCD Collection (not in prior BCD sales). The taurokathapsia was a form of bull fighting that was popular at many games in the ancient Greek world, and particularly in Crete and Thessaly. Scenes of this event are depicted on coins from various cities of Thessaly, but the type is especially prevalent in the 5th century BC coinage at Larissa, which provides much of the current evidence about the taurokathapsia today. In the Thessalian version of the event, a man on horseback was to chase down and subdue a bull. He first rode alongside the running bull, then grabbed the bull by the horns and jumped from his steed onto the back of the bull. Still holding the horns, the rider then dismounted the bull, and attempted to wrestle it to the ground. A detailed account of this type of taurokathapsia scene is described in Heliodoros, Aeth. 10, 28-30. Interestingly, the early phase of the event is not depicted on the coins at Larissa, but can be seen on rare issues of Atrax (BCD Thessaly II 53), where the rider is pursuing the bull, and the Thessalian League (BCD Thessaly II 897), where the rider is shown moving from his horse to the bull. The later taurokathapsia coinage at Larissa was quite extensive and can be grouped into phases. The first phase, comprising both drachms and hemidrachms, is characterized by the reverse type being in an incuse square. It lasted from circa 460-420 BC, during which time the style of the coins evolved quite dramatically from an archaized to a more realistic, classical form. This first phase appears to consist of three distinct groups. The first group exhibits an archaized style, including an archaic form of rho (cf. CNG 90, lots 40-45. The second group exhibits an early classical style, while still retaining some archaic elements, although the rho now changes to its classical form (cf. CNG 90, lots 4653). The third group has a fully-developed classical style with naturalistic elements, most recognizable by the cloak of the horseman, which changes from a static hanging form to a flowing form that displays the action of the scene (cf. CNG 90, lots 54-60. The second phase was much shorter, running from circa 420-400 BC, and appears to have consisted only of drachms. These coins continue the naturalistic form from the end of the first phase, but the reverse type is now within a shallow incuse circle (cf. CNG 90, lots 61-62), or no incuse at all. Coins of this phase are reverse die-linked to the earliest coins of the following series, where a portrait of the nymph Larissa replaces the taurokathapsia scene on the obverse (cf. CNG 90, lot 66).

406348. AKARNANIA, Anaktorion. Circa 350-300 BC. AR Stater (20mm, 8.43 g, 3h). Pegasos flying right; J below / Head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet; J and tripod behind. Imhoof-Blumer, Akarnaniens 69 var. (obv. monogram retrograde); cf. Pegasi 26/23 (obv./rev.); cf. BCD Akarnania 88 (monograms retrograde, rev. type right); cf. HGC 4, 756/755 (same). EF, lustrous, die break on obverse. Very rare variety, none in CoinArchives or in the BCD Collection. $795

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Commemorating the Repulsion of Gallic Invaders Statue Erected at the Temple of Apollo at Delphi

401805. AITOLIA, Aitolian League. Circa 239-229 BC. AV Stater (18mm, 8.58  g, 5h). Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with coiled serpent, single-pendant earring, and necklace / Aitolos, wearing kausia and sheathed sword, seated right on pile of Gallic shields, holding spear upright in right hand, left hand holding small Nike standing right, who crowns him with wreath; Å5tW¬W@ to left, j above Q to right, spearhead below. Tsangari –; BCD Akarnania –; HGC 4, 938. VF, light marks. Well centered and struck. Very rare and unlisted with these controls. $16,500 While the Macedonian Kingdom flourished, it was by no means master of the whole of Greece. In Aitolia a group of tribes developed into a powerful league that heroically defended the land from the Gallic invasions, which at one point had reached Delphi. The repulsion of the Gallic invaders in 279/8 BC was commemorated by a monument erected in the temple of Apollo at Delphi which represented the personification of Aitolia. The coins accurately display this monument (see Reinach, supra). A redoubtable female warrior, Aitolos is depicted holding a sheathed sword and seated in a defiant posture upon a heap of shields left behind by the enemy. Some of the shields look Macedonian, others Gallic. On the silver coins, a Gallic karnyx lies at her feet.

401900. BOEOTIA, Thebes. Circa 425-400 BC. AR Stater (22.5mm, 12.06 g, 6h). Boeotian shield / Amphora; to left, bow right; Q-E across lower field; all within square incuse. BCD Boiotia 403 (same rev. die); HGC 4, 1325; Myron Hoard pl. B, 32; Traité III 248. Good VF, iridescent toning, a little die wear, minor flan flaws. $1450

Enlargement of 402652 26


401901. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.15 g, 8h). Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left, ÅQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; SNG München 49; Dewing 1611–22; Gulbenkian 519–21. EF, wonderful deep iridescent tone, a couple minor edge splits, small area of flat strike on obverse. $3750

Classical Athens

402651. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.25 g, 8h). Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left, ÅQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; SNG München 49; Dewing 1611–22; Gulbenkian 519–21. EF, toned. Sharply struck. $3750 From the JP Collection, purchased from Platt, January 1985. Fifth-century BC Athens produced a vast quantity of tetradrachms. These “owls” depict on the obverse the helmeted head of Athena, goddess of war and patron deity of the city, and on the reverse an owl – emblem of the goddess – standing right with its head facing towards the viewer, an olive twig and crescent behind, and the letters AΘE before. The majority of Athenian tetradrachms were struck between 454- 404 BC, around the time of the Peloponnesian War. In addition to funding this conflict, the silver from the Laurion mines, coined into these ubiquitous tetradrachms, was used to fund the massive Periklean building campaigns on the Akropolis. Yet these coins, not merely for domestic use, had been since the early 5th century an important international trade currency, setting the weight standards for countless other coinages. Such broad acceptance of Athenian coinage required the engravers to adopt a certain stylistic conservatism, as foreign merchants might not accept a radically redesigned tetradrachm, and the basic types remained unchanged until the introduction of the New Style issues in 165 BC.

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402652. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 17.14 g, 8h). Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl; countermark on cheek: bearded male head right within incuse circle / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left, ÅQE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31; SNG München 49; Dewing 1611–22; Gulbenkian 519–21. EF, test cut on reverse. Interesting countermark. $3750 The tetradrachms of Athens saw an incredibly broad circulation area, from Egypt to Afghanistan, and as such passed through the hands of a myriad of peoples. In some of these areas, local merchants or officials would mark the coins to ensure weight and purity. The types on these marks are widely varied, ranging from simple chisel cuts, to punched letters, to elaborate types, some even duplicating those found on the coin itself (see CNG E-283, lot 82).

401990. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 165-42 BC. AR Tetradrachm (30mm, 16.81  g, 12h). New Style coinage. Eumareides, Alkidam– and Dion–, magistrates. Struck 113/2 BC. Head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing single-pendant earring and triple crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos and floral pattern / Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; Å-QE across upper field, EUÂ>ÅrE5>d˙% Ŭ˚5>dÅÂ> d5o@ (magistrates’ names) in six lines in left field; in right field, Tritpolemos driving biga pulled by serpents left; ∫ on amphora, ÂE below; all within wreath. Thompson 674a (same dies); Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 53, 2 (same dies); HGC 4, 1602; SNG Berry 727 (same dies). Near EF, lightly toned. $1250 28


The Trade Coinage of Aegina

410395. ISLANDS off ATTICA, Aegina. Circa 550-530/25 BC. AR STater (20mm, 12.31 g). Sea turtle, head in profile, with thick collar and row of dots down its back / Deep incuse square of proto-“Union Jack” pattern with eight incuse segments. Meadows, Aegina, Group Ib; Milbank Period I; HGC 6, 425; SNG Copenhagen –; Dewing 1654; Gillet –; Jameson 1198; Pozzi 1618. Near EF, lightly toned, insignificant die break in field on obverse. Well centered and struck on a broad flan. Exceptional for issue. $5750 From the JP Collection, purchased from Platt, January 1986. The island of Aegina, situated off the coast of Athens, has a rocky terrain, and the lack of good agricultural land compelled the early Aeginetans to seek their living from the sea. They became exceptional maritime merchants, and it is appropriate that the record for the most profitable voyage was held by an Aegenitan (Herodotus. IV. 152). In the early sixth century BC, Aegina was the central staging depot for Black Sea grain on its way to the Peloponnesos, and by the mid-sixth century, Aegina had obtained important grain concessions at Naucratis in Egypt. During the course of their travels, Aeginetan merchants were exposed to the coinage of Asia Minor, naturally leading to its introduction at Aegina. The first coins produced on the island of Aegina were struck sometime in the mid-sixth century, depicting a turtle (emblematic of the marine interests of the Aeginetans) on the obverse, while bearing on the reverse the imprint of the punch used to force metal into the obverse die. Silver from the island of Siphnos is the most likely source for Aegina’s early coinage, and the fact that these coins have been found in hoards buried as long as two centuries later is testament to the mint’s prolific output. The Aeginetan chelones (turtles) had a Mediterranean-wide circulation in the mid-sixth century making them Europe’s first and most important trade coins until they were finally displaced by the owls from neighboring Athens during the 5th century. The reverse punch originally consisted of an eight-pronged design that produced eight triangles on the reverse. With use the prongs broke and clogged, producing filled and absent incuses. This lead to the adoption first of a “mill sail” pattern around, followed by the development of a “skew” pattern. The obverse design was also modified by the addition of a row of dots added at the collar from the earlier collared turtle design with a single row of dots down its shell, hence the name “T-back.” The production of turtles decreased over the next twenty years as silver from the island of Siphnos was no longer available and Mediterranean trade was now dominated by Athens, the new mistress of the Aegean. The two neighbors were constant rivals and the Athenians even referred to Aegina as “the eyesore of the Piraeus.” In 457 BC, Athens conquered Aegina and stripped her of her maritime powers. The loss of Aegina’s sea power probably occasioned the replacement of the maritime turtle with the terrestrial tortoise as the emblem of the city and it was also at this time that she formed the reverse “skew” pattern in a more rectangular incuse punch. Subsequently in 431 BC, the Aeginetans were expelled from their homeland by the Athenians, only returning after the conclusion of the Peloponnesian war.

401902. ISLANDS off ATTICA, Aegina. Circa 480-457 BC. AR Stater (20mm, 12.09 g, 10h). Sea turtle, head in profile, with ‘T-back’ design on shell / Large square incuse with skew pattern. Meadows, Aegina, Group IIIa; Milbank Period III, pl. I, 15; HGC 6, 435; SNG Copenhagen 507; Dewing 1674; Gillet 947; Gulbenkian 523; Jameson 1199; Pozzi 1627–9. Good VF, slightly granular. $2650 29


406349. CORINTHIA, Corinth. Circa 400-375 BC. AR Stater (21mm, 8.67 g, 6h). Pegasos flying right; J below / Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; trident to left, scorphena fish to right. Ravel 621 (unlisted dies); Pegasi 162; BCD Corinth 76; HGC 4, 1834. Good VF, toned, small pit in helmet. $695

Mythology on Crete

403470

404019 403470. CRETE, Gortyna. Circa 300-280/70 BC. AR Drachm (19.5mm, 5.59  g, 10h). Head of Europa right, wearing grain ear wreath, triple-pellet earring and necklace / Head and neck of bull right, head turned slightly facing. Svoronos, Numismatique 93; Le Rider, Crétoises, p 84, 91, pl. XX, 17; SNG Copenhagen –; BMC 2 (same dies); McClean 7112 (same dies); Traeger 76–7. Near EF, toned. Well struck. Rare. $4750 While the myth of Europa as one of Zeus’ numerous trysts is well-known and has been the subject of literature and art since at least the fifth century BC, certain portions of the entire episode received more attention than others. What occurred when Zeus brought Europa to Crete is one such part. According to the later authors Theophrastos (371-ca. 287 BC) and Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79), Zeus consummated his abduction of Europa in a plane-tree (ἡ πλάτανος), an event commemorated on a series of silver and bronze issues from the Cretan city of Gortyna, traditional site of that event. According to the traditional account, Europa was the daughter of Agenor, king of Tyre, the sister of Kadmos, the legendary founder of Corinth, and Kilix, for whom Cilicia was named, and was a descendant of Io, one of Zeus’ numerous other mortal female trysts. Europa, too, attracted the eye of Zeus, who, transforming himself into a white bull, seduced the young girl, carrying her across the Aegean Sea to the region of Gortyna on Crete, where she was made the first queen of Crete. Gortyna’s special involvement in this myth - it was claimed the plane-tree was still extant centuries after the event - made its depiction on the civic coinage an important reminder of the city’s role in Crete’s early history.

404019. CRETE, Itanos. Circa 380-350 BC. AR Obol (13mm, 0.90  g). Marine deity right, with human head and torso and dolphin-like tail, holding a transverse trident in right hand / Star with eight rays. Svoronos, Numismatique 12; Le Rider, Crétoises –; cf. SNG Copenhagen 471; BMC 9-10; Traeger 139–40. VF, toned. Rare. $1975 30


Mithradates VI - the Epitome of a Hellenistic Monoarch

410392. KINGS of PONTOS. Mithradates VI Eupator. Circa 120-63 BC. AR Tetradrachm (31mm, 16.83  g, 11h). Pergamon mint. Dated 209 BE (89/8 BC). Diademed head right / ∫Å%5¬EW% Â5QrÅdÅtoU EU∏Åtoro%, Pegasos grazing left; star-in-crescent to left; to right, Qs (date) above !; all within Dionysiac wreath of ivy and fruit. Callataÿ p. 13, dies D53/R10; HGC 7, 338; DCA 688; SNG von Aulock 7; SNG BM Black Sea 1034–5 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen –; Dewing 2121 = Jameson 1366 (same obv. die); Pozzi 2095 (same dies). EF, lightly toned, slightly double struck. Struck in high relief. $12,500 From the JP Collection, purchased from Platt, September 1980. Mithradates is the Hellenistic monarch par excellence, his career driven by megalomaniacal ambitions leading to murderous assaults upon family and followers and disastrous foreign adventures against superior forces. His idealized portraiture attempts to mimic the gods with its bold staring gaze and unruly, free-flowing hair, but at its most extreme is a personification of hysteria in its Dionysiac sense. The wreath of ivy on the reverse reinforces Mithradates’ link with the god as well as making a connection with the cistaphoric coinage that circulated in the area. The stag probably represents the civic center of Ephesos and the mintmark is of Pergamon, all part of the new Pontic kingdom, symbolized by the star and crescent. His empire collapsed before the armies of Sulla and Lucullus, and Mithradates ended his own life in exile in the far region of the Crimea, pursued to the end by vengeful Romans and family.

410140. PAPHLAGONIA, Sinope. Circa 330-300 BC. AR Drachm (20mm, 5.97 g, 5h). Head of nymph left, hair in sakkos; aphlaston to left / Sea-eagle standing left, wings spread, on dolphin left; for below eagle’s wings, s5@W below dolphin. RG 31 var. (magistrate unlisted); HGC 7, 391 var. (same); CNG 96, lot 375 (same dies). EF, lustrous. Rare. $975

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The Cistophoric Tetradrachm at Pergamon

407218. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.63 g, 11h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 123104 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; Å% above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 5; Pinder 93; SNG France 1714; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen 1419. EF, gray-blue toning. $695 Recent scholarship has reframed the Attalid cistophori from a series emblematic of a closed monetary system, a theory proposed by earlier scholars, to a revolutionary coinage that defines an innovation in the structure of the Attalid state. Following the defeat of the Gauls in 166 BC, Eumenes II dramatically reorganized his kingdom. Civic structure now became the backbone of the state, with large amounts of money being spent to more thoroughly incorporate rural areas into the urban Pergamene kingdom. Key to this was the new cistophoric coinage, which was struck at a lower weight than the common Attic standard, to ensure circulation only within the kingdom. Andrew Meadows writes of the cistophoric issues: “This was a coinage designed to look federal, rather than royal. The king’s image was removed in favour of creating the impression of civic unity across clearly defined and identified space. Since the ‘mintmarks’ that appear on a number of these coinages do not in fact designate sites of production, we might speculate that their inclusion was at least partly an element of the ideological programme.” (“The Closed Currency System of the Attalid Kingdom,” in Attalid Asia Minor. Ed. Peter Thonemann. Oxford. 2013.)

407226. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 12.69 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 123104 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; 7 above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 7; Pinder 101; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock 7465; SNG Copenhagen 424. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

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407210. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 12.71 g, 11h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 123104 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; | above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 8; Pinder –; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen –. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

407230. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.72 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 104 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; År above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 4; Pinder 102(?); SNG France –; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen –. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

407221. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.80 g, 11h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 10498 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; d5 above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 12; Pinder 95; SNG France 1719; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen 420. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

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407214. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 12.65 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 10498 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; Â5 above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 21; Pinder –; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock 7469; SNG Copenhagen –. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

407232. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.73 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 9895 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; ¬U above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 16; Pinder 97; SNG France 1721; SNG von Aulock 7468; SNG Copenhagen –. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

407228. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 12.63 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 9592 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; ∫o above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 10; Pinder 94; SNG France 1718; SNG von Aulock 7467; SNG Copenhagen –. EF, gray-blue toning. $695 34


407222. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 12.70 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 9592 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; ÂÅ above, E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 17; Pinder 98; SNG France 1722-3; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen 421. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

407223. MYSIA, Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 12.74 g, 12h). Cistophoric type. Struck circa 9288 BC. Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; above, Å% above ï; E (civic monogram) to left, serpent-entwined thrysos to right. Kleiner, Hoard 29 = ANS 1951.5.47; Pinder –; SNG France –; SNG von Aulock –; SNG Copenhagen –. EF, gray-blue toning. $695

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Hellenistic Masterpiece

410388. KINGS of PERGAMON. Philetairos. 282-263 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 17.04 g, 11h). Pergamon mint. Struck circa 269/8-263. Diademed head of Seleukos I right / f5¬EtÅ5roU, Athena enthroned left, resting right hand on shield to left, holding transverse spear over left shoulder and resting left elbow on sphinx-decorated throneback; ivy leaf above arm, v on throne, bow to right. Ingvaldsen, Philetaerus 8 (dies VII/24 – this coin); Newell, Pergamene 15 (dies XIX/– [unlisted rev. die]); SC 309.5b; SNG France 1601 (same obv. die); Hunt 104 = Hunt Sale I 105; Leu 81, lot 256 (same obv. die). EF, beautiful cabinet toning with traces of iridescent blue, a few light marks under tone. A masterpiece of Hellenistic portaiture. $87,500 From the JP Collection. Ex Leu 45 (26 May 1988), lot 203. When Lysimachos established the mint of Pergamon, he entrusted its treasury to the eunuch Philetairos. Philetairos changed his allegiance to Seleukos I, probably shortly before the Battle of Korupedion in 281 BC, where Seleukos defeated Lysimachos. Although Seleukos was assassinated the following year, Philetairos struck a series of Alexander-type issues in the name of Seleukos. Philetairos continued to acknowledge Seleukid primacy for some time, but soon struck a coinage in his own name. This coinage featured Athena Nikephoros on the reverse, similar to the reverses of Lysimachos. Perhaps because this move might have been viewed as a threat by his Seleukid overlord, the obverse of the first issues of these coins featured the portrait of Seleukos I. Houghton & Lorber (SC), citing Le Rider and Newell, assign this coinage to the aftermath of Antiochos I’s victory over the Galatians, circa 269/8 BC. Near the end of Philetairos’ reign, in the mid-late 260s, the portrait of Seleukos was replaced with the portrait of the Pergamene king, noting a final break from Seleukid authority. Similar to what was done in Ptolemaic Egypt, all of the subsequent kings of Pergamon continued to use these types on the coinage, and even kept Philetairos’ name. Distinguishing the issues between the various rulers has been difficult for numismatists. Westermark’s die study of the coinage, however, provided the key necessary for understanding the series, although more recent hoard evidence has refined Westermark’s assignment of the issues.

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407203. IONIA, Ephesos. Circa 180-67 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 12.56 g, 1h). Cistophoric type. Dated CY 33 (101/100 BC). Cista mystica within ivy wreath / Two serpents entwined around bow and bowcase; ¬˝ (date) to upper left, owl above, EfE to left, torch to right. Kleiner, Dated 37; DCA 325; SNG Copenhagen –; McClean 8097. Good VF, gray-blue toning. $495

996089. IONIA, Herakleia ad Latmon. Circa 140-135 BC. AR Tetradrachm (33mm, 16.54 g, 12h). Stephanophoric type. Head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing pearl necklace, earrings, and crested Attic helmet decorated with Pegasos above the foreparts of five galloping horses, star on earflap / Horizontal club; ˙rÅ˚¬EWtW@ above; below, Nike advancing left, holding wreath, flanked by ö and Ù; all within oak wreath. Lavva, Silberprägung, Group III, 13 var. (unlisted dies); SNG von Aulock 1978; SNG Copenhagen 781. Near EF, toned, minor area of flat strike and lamination on obverse. $1450

Exceptional Lycian Dynastic Third Stater

411492. DYNASTS of LYCIA. Vekhssere II. Circa 410/00-390/80 BC. AR Third Stater (17.5mm, 3.16 g, 12h). Zagaba mint. Lion scalp facing / Head of Athena facing slightly left, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet, ornate earrings, and necklace with nine pendants; z®u®B®X (ZAGABAH in Lycian) to left, ñ to right; all within incuse circle. Cf. Falghera 186; Reuter 128 var. (no monogram); Podalia 21–5 corr. (A5/P5; Zagaba not a dynast); SNG Copenhagen Supp. 469 corr. (same; same dies); SNG von Aulock –; SNG Keckman II –. EF, lightly toned. Well centered and struck. Very rare. Among the finest known. $4750 There has been long debate about whether Zagaba was a place or a person, but more recent research has conclusively shown that it is, in fact, a city, not a dynast (cf. A.G. Keen, Dynastic Lycia: A Political History of the Lycians & Their Relations with Foreign Powers, c. 545-362 BC [Leiden: Brill, 1998], pp. 54–5 and 109). The absence of a dynast’s name here suggests that this issue might be a civic, rather than dynastic (cf. Keen, op cit., p. 54, and Reuter 128 note). Coins with similar types and monogram as this issue, however, are known in the name of Vekhessere II (cf. Falghera 186 and Podalia 1–7).

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Pedigreed Ariarathes VII Tetradrachm One of Nine Published Examples

410389. KINGS of CAPPADOCIA. Ariarathes VII Philometor. Circa 107/6-101/0 BC. AR Tetradrachm (29.5mm, 16.30 g, 11h). Mint A (Eusebia-Mazaka). Struck circa 107/6-104/3 BC. Diademed head right / ∫Å%5¬EW% År5ÅrÅQo¨ f5¬oÂ˙-toro%, Athena Nikephoros standing left; : above & to outer left, o to inner left, ¬ to inner right; all within laurel wreath. Lorber & Houghton Series 1, Issue 1, 3 (A3/P2) = Callataÿ pl. 44, P = Mørkholm, Coinages I pl. 42, 14 (this coin); Simonetta 1 (this coin cited); Simonetta, Coins, p. 35 note 1 (this coin cited); Alram 157 (this coin illustrated); HGC 7, 828. EF, toned. Very rare, one of nine published, and the first example of this issue to have been discovered. $14,500 From the KP Collection. Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XXV (20 November 1990, lot 181; Leu 20 (15 May 1978), lot 154.

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Corresponding Issue in the Name of Antiochos VII of Syria

403475. KINGS of CAPPADOCIA. Ariarathes VII Philometor. Circa 107/6-101/0 BC. AR Tetradrachm (29mm, 16.61 g, 12h). In the name and types of Antiochos VII of Syria. Mint A (Eusebia-Mazaka). Struck circa 107/6-104/3 BC. Diademed head of Antiochos VII right / ∫Å%5¬EW% Å@t5ocoU EUEr-˝EtoU, Athena Nikephoros standing left; : above & to outer left, o to inner left, ¬ to inner right; all within laurel wreath. Lorber & Houghton Series 1, Issue 3, 152-169 (obverse die A7); SC 2148 (Antiochos VII); HGC 7, 829; HGC 7, 829. EF, toned, a few light scratches. $465 This coin belongs to a series of issues that have been die and control-mark linked to the coinage of the Cappadocian kings. Previously believed to be late issues from Antioch for Antiochos VII, a tetradrachm appeared in 2002 that was obverse die linked to the issue of the present coin and reverse die linked to the sole issue of tetradrachms bearing the name and portrait of Ariarathes VII. This discovery conclusively showed that this coinage in the name of Antiochos VII was actually a posthumous issue struck under the Cappadocian king. Further analysis of other issues in the name of Antiochos VII, of similar Antioch mint style, have shown that they are control-mark linked to issues of Ariarathes VII and other Cappadocian kings. Thus, these posthumous Antiochos VII issues constitute the vast majority of tetradrachms issued by the Cappadocian Kingdom. While the attribution of these coins to Cappadocia is now settled, their purpose, time of introduction, and the reason they employ the types of Antiochos VII are not certain. (For a full treatment of these issues, see Lorber & Houghton, esp. pp. 58-60, and E. Krengel and C.C. Lorber, “Early Cappadocian Tetradrachms in the Name of Antiochus VII,” NC 2009, esp. pp. 68-71.)

Exceptional Tigranes Half Chalkous

411371. KINGS of ARMENIA. Tigranes II ‘the Great’. 95-55 BC. Æ Half Chalkous (20.5mm, 6.26 g, 1h). Tigranocerta mint. Struck circa 69-55 BC. Draped bust right, wearing tiara with star and eagles / ∫Å%5¬EW% ∫Å%5¬EW@ t5˝rÅ@oU, Vahagn (Herakles) standing left, leaning on club, lion skin draped over left arm; d to inner left, above arm; to inner right, ˙ above arm, Å below lion skin. M&D 44 var. (lower inner right control not listed); CAA 101 var. (control marks); AC 65. EF, green patina. Exceptional for issue. $795 Ex Tkalec (23 October 1992), lot 157.

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403602. SELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Demetrios II Nikator. Second reign, 129-125 BC. AR Drachm (19mm, 4.11 g, 10h). Tarsos mint, “Royal workshop”. Diademed and horned head right / ∫Å%5¬EW% d˙µ˙tr5oU QEoU @5˚Åt-oro%, Zeus Nikpehoros seated left; to outer left, ± above ±. SC 2158 corr. (lower monogram); Houghton, Second –; HGC 9, 1128a; SNG Spaer 2204 (same dies). EF, lightly toned, flan flaw in field on obverse. Well struck. Extremely rare. $1450 The clarity of the lower monogram on this example verifies that this drachm is a fraction of the tetradrachm issue SC 2157.

Very Rare Samarian Mint Obol

408925. SELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Antiochos IX Eusebes Philopator (Kyzikenos). 114/3-95 BC. AR Obol (9mm, 0.54 g, 12h). Samarian mint. Diademed head right / ∫Å%5 Å@ f5, Athena Nikephoros standing left. SC 2394; HGC 9, 1245; SNG Spaer 2763-4 (same dies); CSE II 781. Good VF, find patina with light deposits. Very rare. $695

403488. JUDAEA, Bar Kochba Revolt. 132-135 CE. AR Sela – Tetradrachm (25mm, 14.67 g, 12h). Undated, but attributed to year 3 (134/5 CE). Façade of the Temple at Jerusalem; showbread table within, star above, 3∑o2C (“Shim‘on” in Hebrew) at sides / Bundle of lulav; etrog to left, 2LC∑R¥ ¡∑RHL (“For the Freedom of Jerusalem” in Hebrew) around. Mildenberg 95 (O27/R65; Meshorer 269; Hendin 1413; Bromberg 124 (same dies); Shoshana I 20370 (same dies); Sofaer 110-1 (same obv. die); Spaer 196 (same obv. die). Good VF, toned, traces of undertype visible on reverse. $7950 40


Two Exceptional Eastern Owls

402654

401806

402654. PHILISTIA (PALESTINE), Uncertain mint. Mid 5th century-333 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 16.04 g, 9h). Imitating Athens. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl; ö (ligate Phoenician MŠ) on neck guard / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left, ÅQE to right, facing lion’s head to inner right; all within incuse square. W. Weiser, “Die Eulen von Kyros der Jüngeren,” ZPE 76 (1989), pl. 16, 8 = = L. Mildenberg, “On the Money Circulation in Palestine from Artaxerxes II till Ptolemy I. Preliminary Studies of the Local Coinage in the Fifth Persian Satrapy. Part 5” in Transeuphratene 7 (1994), 7 = SNG ANS (Palestine) 2 (same dies); Gitler & Tal –; HGC 10, –; CNG E-244, lot 227 (same dies). Good VF, find patina, multiple test cuts. Extremely rare – only the third known. $7500 Ex Lanz 54 (12 November 1990, lot 164. The ubiquitous ‘owls’ of Athens were the first international coinage, and were imitated en masse at various mints in the Levant and East. Studies of the coinage have shown that many of the early imitations were produced to such a high standard that they are virtually indistinguishable from official Athenian issues. The present piece, and the following coin, are two examples whose style is exceptionally well executed. If not for their supplementary markings, they likely would have passed as official Athenian issues rather than imitations. These particular issues are extremely rare, and, unfortunately, none of the known pieces have information on their find spots, so a definitive assignment to a particular mint remains elusive. Gitler and Tal did not include them in their corpus on Philistia, though Mildenberg and the ANS sylloge do place them there.

401806. PHILISTIA (PALESTINE), Uncertain mint. Mid 5th century-333 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 17.00 g, 10h). Imitating Athens. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left, ÅQE to right; to inner right, bull’s head facing right; all within incuse square. W. Weiser, “Die Eulen von Kyros der Jüngeren,” ZPE 76 (1989), pl. 16, 9 = de Luynes 2048 corr. (illustrated as 2040 = Svoronos, Monnaies pl. 17, 1 (same obv. die); Gitler & Tal –; HGC 10, –; Roma 3, lot 130 (same obv. die). EF, toned. Extremely rare – only the third known. $12,500 Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 46 (2 April 2008), lot 296.

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401903. PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Arsinoe II Philadelphos. Died 270/268 BC. AV Mnaieion – “Oktadrachm” (26.5mm, 27.76 g, 12h). Alexandreia mint. Struck under Ptolemy II, circa 253/2 BC. Head right with ram’s horn, veiled and wearing stephane; lotus-tipped scepter in background, Q to left / År%5@o˙% f5¬ÅdE¬foU, double cornucopia, grape bunches hanging at sides, bound with fillet. Svoronos 460; Olivier & Lorber 98–101, dies 1/17; Troxell, Arsinoe, Transitional to Group 3, p. 43 and pl. 6, 2-3 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 134; Noeske 39 (same obv. die); Hirsch 1808. Near EF, underlying luster, a couple light scratches in fields. $12,500

Arsinoë II, wife (and sister) of Ptolemy II exerted a powerful influence on her younger mate, her experience in statecraft coming from her earlier marriage to Lysimachos of Thrace, and her subsequent involvement in the turbulent politics of the Successor kingdoms. After her death in 271 BC, her devoted husband deified her, and initiated a cult in her honor. The temple he intended to construct (plans cut short by his own death) in her name was to have an iron ceiling with a statue of Arsinoë, made entirely of lodestone, suspended in the air beneath it. That grandiose plan came to nothing, but the series of large value gold and silver coins struck in her name was a suitable memorial. The letters behind her bust are die sequence numbers, and these large value pieces were probably used in the distribution of largess. The types were continued by later Ptolemies into the middle of the 2nd century BC.

405661. PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy III Euergetes. 246-222 BC. Æ Drachm (43mm, 75.38 g, 12h). Alexandreia mint. Series 5. Struck 230-222 BC. Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / ∫Å%5¬EW% ∏to¬EÂÅ5oU, Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; filleted cornucopia to left, ^ between legs. Svoronos 964; Weiser 71; SNG Copenhagen 171-2; Noeske 117-9. Good VF, tan surfaces, minor doubling on reverse. Impressive. $595 42


Celebrating Victory During the 4th Syrian War

401904. PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy IV Philopator. 222-205/4 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 14.16 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 217-215/0 BC. Jugate draped busts right of Serapis and Isis / ∫Å%5¬EW% ∏to¬EÂÅ5oU, eagle standing left, head right, on thunderbolt; filleted cornucopia over shoulder, ΔI between legs. Svoronos 1124; Landvatter 25a (O5/R22 – this coin); SNG Copenhagen 197-8; Noeske 139; Boston MFA 2284; SNG Berry 1488; Dewing 2760. EF, lovely even dark gray tone with hues of blue around the devices, a couple light marks. Exceptional strike. $12,500 Ex Leu 83 (6 May 2002), lot 464; Giessener Münzhandlung 64 (11 October 1993), 264; Numismatic Fine Arts XXVIII (23 April 1992), lot 804. This type is thought to have been issued in celebration of the Ptolemaic victory over the Seleukids at the battle of Raphia during the Fourth Syrian War. Official propaganda proclaimed that these two deities, Serapis and Isis, had intervened on the behalf of the Egyptians, saving them from defeat (see C. Lorber, “The Ptolemaic Era Coinage Revisited,” NC 2007, p. 116, and L. Bricault, “Serapis et Isis, Sauveurs de Ptolémé IV à Raphia,” Chronique d’Égypte LXXIV (1999), pp. 334-43).

CELTIC

404149. EASTERN EUROPE, Imitations of Philip II of Macedon. 2nd century BC. AR Tetradrachm (24.5mm, 14.98 g, 6h). Kinnlos (Chinless) type. Mint in the central Carpathian region. Celticized head of Zeus right, without chin / Celticized horseman riding right; line with central pellet below. OTA 244; CCCBM I 47; Flesche 720–1; KMW 1142; Lanz 554; Zürich 1287. Good VF, dark iridescent tone. $1250 The issues of Philip II of Macedon were one of the primary coinages circulating in the Thraco-Macedonian region from the late 4th century BC. It was such an integral coinage to the area that official Macedonian issues of Philip II type continued for decades after his death in 336. Naturally, this coinage was imitated by various tribes in the Danube region, probably to facilitate trade with cities where the type was a recognized medium of exchange, down to the first century BC. The earliest types were reasonably faithful copies of the obverse and reverse types, but over time the various tribes “morphed” them, often into abstract designs that only vaguely resembled the originals.

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401905. EASTERN EUROPE, Imitations of Thasos. Late 2nd-1st century BC. AR Tetradrachm (28.5mm, 16.62 g, 12h). Mint in the lower Danube region. Stylized head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath; schematic style / Stylized Herakles standing left, head right, holding club, lion skin draped over arm; legend highly degraded. OTA Class IV; Lukanc 1345; CCCBM I S218; Flesche 758; KMW 1533; Lanz 982; Zürich 1363. Good VF, toned, die break on reverse. $695 Ex MoneyMuseum, Zurich; Freeman & Sear FPL 5 (Spring 1998), no. 45.

ROMAN PROVINCIAL

403471. THRACE, Perinthus. Domitian. AD 81-96. Æ (32mm, 18.96 g, 6h). ΛYTOK KΛICΛP ΔOMIT IANOΣ ΣEB ΓEP, laureate head right / ΠEPINΘIΩN, Homonoia standing left, holding phiale over lighted altar and cornucopia. RPC 361; Schönert, Perinthos 272-88; Varbanov 33. VF, brown and green surfaces. $475 Ex HLT Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 87, 18 May 2011), lot 822; Waddell FPL 31 (May 1988), no. 54.

403605. COMMAGENE , Samosata. Philip I. AD 244-249. Æ (28mm, 16.11 g, 12h). AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CЄB, radiate and cuirassed bust left / CAMOC ATЄΩN, Tyche seated left, holding grain ears and resting hand on rock outcropping; below, Pegasus flying left. Butcher 33a var. (placement of rev. legend – same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen –; BMC –; CNG E-325, lot 408 var. (same). Good VF, orange earthen dark green patina. An attractive example. $375 44


403604. MESOPOTAMIA, Edessa. Tranquillina. Augusta, AD 241-244. Æ (29mm, 16.44  g, 5h). ΦOVP CABINA TPANK CЄB, draped bust right, wearing stephane / MHT OKΛ Є[ΔЄ]CCHNωN (sic), veiled and draped bust of Tyche left, wearing mural crown; to left, figure (Aquarius[?]) standing right on low basis, and altar. Cf. Babelon, Numismatique, 91 and pl. VIII, 3 (for type); cf. SNG Copenhagen 222 (same – same obv. die); BMC 133-5 var. (rev. legend); CNG E-169, lot 136 (same obv. die). VF, even brown surfaces. $465

ROMAN REPUBLICAN

411372. Anonymous. Circa 225-214 BC. AR Didrachm – Quadrigatus (24mm, 5.78 g, 7h). Uncertain mint. Laureate head of Janus; curved truncation / Jupiter, hurling thunderbolt with right hand and holding scepter in left, in quadriga right driven by Victory; rOÂÅ incuse on raised tablet in exergue. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 64; Kestner 88-90, 92-5; BMCRR RomanoCampanian 78-88; RSC 23. Good VF, toned. $1250

404148. Anonymous. Circa 225-214 BC. AR Didrachm – Quadrigatus (20mm, 6.46 g, 2h). Uncertain mint. Laureate head of Janus; curved truncation / Jupiter, hurling thunderbolt with right hand and holding scepter in left, in quadriga right driven by Victory; rOÂÅ in relief within tablet in exergue. Crawford 28/3; Sydenham 65; Kestner 91, 96, 105, 107; BMCRR RomanoCampanian 101-7; RSC 24. EF, iridescent toning. Well struck. $2750 Ex Leu 59 (17 May 1994), lot 163.

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404147. C. Antestius. 146 BC. AR Denarius (20mm, 3.84 g, 2h). Rome mint. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet with peaked visor ornamented with griffin’s head, earring in the form of a grape bunch, and pearl necklace; dog behind, x (mark of value) before / The Dioscuri on horseback charging right, each holding a couched spear; C • ¶ÍTi below; rOÂA on tablet in exergue. Crawford 219/1a; Sydenham 406; Kestner 2072-3; BMCRR Rome 856; CNR 2; Antestia 2. Good VF, toned. $275 In Greek mythology, Castor and Pollux were the twin sons of Zeus and Leda. When Castor was killed, Pollux begged that he be taken instead. In return for his noble sacrifice, Zeus granted Pollux immortality, a gift which was later given also to Castor. Now known as the Dioscuri, or “sons of Zeus,” these young gods became widely popular as protectors in a moment of crisis. At Lake Regillus in 496 BC, as the infant Roman Republic was struggling for existence against the former king Tarquinius Superbus and his allies, legend says two able, but unknown horsemen helped the losing Roman troops to victory. Immediately afterwards these same young men were seen in the Roman Forum watering their horses. Identified as the Dioscuri a temple was built on the spot to honor them and they became Rome’s protectors.

404146. L. Sentius C.f. 101 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.95 g, 6h). Rome mint. Head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet with peaked visor ornamented with griffin’s head, single-pellet earring, and pearl necklace; }g ∑ RuB / Jupiter, holding reigns and thunderbolt in left hand, scepter in right, driving galloping quadriga right; i below horses; [L∑] ÍeNTiuÍ in exergue. Crawford 325/1b; Sydenham 600; Kestner 2617 var. (placement of controls); BMCRR Rome 1651-9 var. (control); CNR 2/5; Sentia 1. Superb EF, underlying luster. $575 The obverse legend indicates that this issue was struck from the argentum publicum – silver held by the Roman state.

Coinage of Q. Pomponius Musa The Hercules Musarum and the Muses

411374. Q. Pomponius Musa. 56 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.95 g, 6h). Rome mint. Diademed head of Apollo right, wearing hair in ringlets; œ • pOÂpONi downwards to left, ÂuÍA upwards to right / Hercules Musagetes, Conductor of the Muses, standing right, wearing lion skin on shoulders, playing lyre; club to right; herCuLeÍ downwards to right, ÂuÍAru downwards to left. Crawford 410/1; Sydenham 810; Kestner 3372-3; BMCRR Rome 3602-4; Pomponia 8; CNR 13. EF, attractive old cabinet toning. $3250 Although the moneyer Q. Pomponius Musa is unknown to history, his choice of Hercules Musarum and the nine Muses as coin types is remarkable and clearly connected to his cognomen. The reverses of this series – Hercules playing the lyre and the Muses, can be none other than the celebrated statue group by an unknown Greek artist, taken from Ambracia and placed in the Aedes Herculis Musarum, which was erected by M. Fulvius Nobilior in 187 BC after the capture of Ambracia in 189 BC (Plin. NH xxxv.66; Ov. Fast. vi.812). By the second century BC Rome had overrun most of Greece and was captivated by Hellenic art and culture, not the least of which was its sculpture. Fulvius is said to have taken the statues to Rome because he learned in Greece that Hercules was a musagetes (leader of the Muses). Remains of this temple have been found in the area of the Circus Flaminius close to the south-west part of the circus itself, and north-west of the porticus Octaviae. An inscription found nearby, ‘M. Fulvius M. f. Ser. n. Nobilior cos. Ambracia cepit;’ may have been on the pedestal of one of the statues. The official name of the temple was Herculis Musarum aedes, which Servius and Plutarch called Herculis et Musarum aedes.

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Urania, Muse of Astronomy

403784. Q. Pomponius Musa. 56 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.66 g, 6h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Apollo right; star of eight rays to left / Urania, the Muse of Astronomy, wearing long flowing tunic and peplum, standing left, touching with wand held in right hand globe set on base; œ • pOÂpONi downwards to right, ÂuÍA downwards to left. Crawford 410/1; Sydenham 810; Kestner 3372-3; BMCRR Rome 3602-4; Pomponia 8; CNR 13. Near EF, patches of toning, slightly off center. $2450 Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 78 (26 May 2014), lot 665.

411376. Q. Cassius Longinus. 55 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.95 g, 2h). Rome mint. Young male head of Bonus Eventus (or Genius Populi Romani?) right, with flowing hair; scepter to left / Eagle, with wings spread, standing right on thunderbolt; lituus to left, capis to right; œ • CAÍÍiuÍ below. Crawford 428/3; Sydenham 916; Kestner 3471-2; BMCRR Rome 3868-70; CNR 26 Cassia 7. Choice EF, wonderful old cabinet toning. $950 Ex Numismatica Genevensis 6 (30 November 2010, lot 137.

Antony & Octavian at Ephesos

404145. The Triumvirs. Mark Antony and Octavian. Spring-early summer 41 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.98 g, 11h). Ephesus mint; M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore.  • ANT • if Yg • iii • uir • r • p • C •  • BArBAT • œ • p, bare head of Mark Antony right / CAeÍAr • iÂp • pONT • iii • uir • r • p • C • , bare head of Octavian right, wearing slight beard. Crawford 517/2; CRI 243; Sydenham 1181; Kestner 3793-5; BMCRR East 100 (same rev. die); CNR 17; RSC 8a. EF, lightly toned. $4950

After the assassination of Julius Caesar, his power was shared between Mark Antony, the Dictator’s second-in-command, and Gaius Octavius, Caesar’s great-nephew and legal heir. To unite themselves against the assassins, Antony and Octavian bound themselves in what would eventually come to be known as the “Second Triumvirate”. This union was at best a tenuous relationship, as both individuals vied to acquire supreme power. Antony, the older of the two, clearly believed himself the senior member. Octavian, on the other hand, at 19 and Caesar’s legal heir, supposed otherwise. This denarius with both portraits demonstrates Antony’s perceptions in the developing iconography of the new regime: the portrait of Antony may be taken as the obverse reserved for the chief ruler, which Antony believed himself to be, while that of Octavian, on the reverse and much younger with the traces of his first beard still remaining, is the subordinate. While the triumvirate was renewed in 40 BC and sealed through the marriage of Octavian’s sister to Antony, the political arrangement continued to sour, resulting in civil war and the ultimate destruction of Antony at Actium.

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410108. The Triumvirs. Octavian. Autumn 30-summer 29 BC. AR Denarius (21mm, 3.65 g, 9h). Italian (Rome?) mint. Bare head right / Naval and military trophy facing, composed of helmet, cuirass, shield, and crossed spears, set on prow of galley right; crossed rudder and anchor at base; iÂp CAeÍAr across field. CRI 419; RIC I 265a; RSC 119. Superb EF, attractively toned with traces of electric blue and gold iridescence, hairline die break and area of light deposit on obverse. $9,500

The reverse of this denarius depicts a Roman naval and military trophy. Known in Latin as a tropaeum from the Greek τρόπαιον, it typically consisted of the helmet, cuirass, and shields of a defeated enemy arranged on a tree trunk with arm-like branches. Arranged around its base were additional arms and sometimes bound captives. Here, in place of the additional arms and/or captives the trophy sits on the beak (rostrum) of an enemy warship with a rudder and anchor at its base. This denarius was part of a series of aurei and denarii that were struck between the autumn of 30 BC and 29 BC and which conveyed a general message of victory and refoundation. Sear associated this denarius with a contemporary aureus showing on its reverse a similar trophy housed in a tetrastyle temple decorated with a triskeles in its pediment. The obverse of that coin, a bust of Diana Siciliensis, led him to argue that the aureus commemorated Octavian’s important victory over Sextus Pompey at the Battle of Naulochus in 36 BC. The reverse of this denarius, however, is more ambiguous, by leaving the specific victory unspecified. The most likely possibility is it commemorates Agrippa’s victory over Antony and Cleopatra at Actium the previous September, the final triumph for Octavian and the undisputed master of the Roman Empire.

ROMAN IMPERIAL The “Tribute” Issues of Tiberius

403295. Tiberius. AD 14-37. AV Aureus (20mm, 7.85 g, 1h). “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Group 6, AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI ΛVG F ΛVGVSTVS, laureate head right; long, parallel ribbons / PONTIF MΛXIM, Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding vertical scepter in right hand and olive branch in left, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC I 29; Lyon 153; Calicó 305c; BMCRE 47; BN 22. Superb EF. Well centered and struck with artistic dies. $13,750

The denarius of Tiberius with Pax reverse is commonly known as the ‘Tribute Penny,’ the coin to which Jesus referred when he was discussing the payment of taxes to the Romans: “render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s” (Mark 12:17). Although there are two other reverse types on the denarii of Tiberius, those were only issued during the first two years of his reign, while the Pax reverse was employed throughout the remainder, making it the more likely coin referred to. It was also the most common imperial-issue coin circulating in the region at the time. The term ‘penny’ is from the 1611 King James translation of the Bible, and was adopted since the penny was the standard denomination of the time.

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410107. Tiberius. AD 14-37. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.85 g, 5h). “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Group 6, AD 36-37. TI CAESAR DIVI ΛVG F ΛVGVSTVS, laureate head right; long, parallel ribbons / PONTIF MΛXIM, Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding vertical scepter in right hand and olive branch in left, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below. RIC I 30; Lyon 154; BMCRE 48-60; BN 33-4; RSC 16a. Superb EF, faint die breaks. $4950

Exceptional Erotic Tessera

403785. Anonymous issues. temp. Tiberius, AD 14-37. Æ Tessera (22.5mm, 6.02  g, 6h). Struck circa AD 22/3-37. Heterosexual erotic scene: man kneeling left on on couch, while woman lays on her back; curtain behind / VII within wreath. Campana, Spintriae series 13, obv. die D28, rev. numeral VIII corr. (orientation of obv.); Simonetta & Riva scene 8, dies B/– (unlisted rev. die); Buttrey 3 (unlisted rev. numeral). Near EF, green patina with light earthen deposits, minor breaks in patina. Extremely rare – only three examples known for this obverse scene. $14,500 For centuries, numismatists have been puzzled by a curious series of bronze tokens bearing on their reverse numerals from I to XVI. The obverse types on these tokens vary dramatically, bearing not only portraits of Augustus, Tiberius, and Livia, but also various erotic scenes, heterosexual and (possibly) homosexual, or bigas, maenads, capricorns, and other scattered mythological figures. The most prominent theories suggest that they were tickets for entrance to the theater or the games, and the numerals represented sections in the stands, or that they were brothel tokens, with the obverse representing a chosen “product” and the reverse the price. However, both of these theories seem unlikely when one considers that the two seemingly divergent themes are joined by die links to the numeral reverses. Alberto Campana (“Le Spintriae: Tessere Romane con Raffigurazioni Erotiche,” in La Donna Romana Imagini e Vita Quotidiana [2009], pp. 43-96) has published a new die study of the erotic pieces, recording eight specimens with at least basic find spot information, most notably a sealed tomb in Modena, firmly dated to the mid-late Julio-Claudian period, as well as other examples found around the Roman world in Palestine, Gaul, Germany, and Britain, often in areas of military interest. He notes that these tesserae are primarily struck in orichalcum, a metal more valuable than regular copper or bronze. Considering the find spots and the metal used in the tokens, Campana suggests that they were luxury gifts given by the Imperial house to important military figures for use in some now-forgotten board game, possibly a variant of duodecim scripta, a game resembling modern backgammon (“Les spintriae et leur possible fonction ludique,” in Archeothema 31 [2013], p. 66).

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411489. Claudius. AD 41-54. Æ As (31mm, 10.65 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 42-43. TI · CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left / Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear in right hand and holding shield in left; large S C across field. RIC I 116; von Kaenel type 85; BMCRE 206-7; BN 233-5. EF, natural green patina, a few earthen deposits. Bold portrait coin. $895

Aulus Vitellius Germanicus Junior and Vitellia

410109. Vitellius, with his children. AD 69. AR Denarius (20mm, 3.38  g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck citca late April-20 December AD 69. A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head / LIBERI · IMP · GERM · AVG ·, draped busts of Aulus Vitellius Germanicus Junior and Vitellia, vis-à-vis. RIC I 101; Jucker 11; BMCRE 28; BN –; RSC 4; Pecunem 30, lot 437 (same rev.die). EF, dark toning with traces of golden iridescence in the devices, hint of deposits at outer edges, small marks under tone. Exquisite pugnacious portrait of Vitellius and detailed portraits of his children. Difficult to find in high grade and fine style. $17,500

Dardanian Mines Issue

402687. Trajan. AD 98-117. Æ Semis (18mm, 3.16 g, 6h). Dardanian mines issue. Rome mint. Struck circa AD 98-102. IMP CAES NERVA TRA IAN AVG GERM, laureate bust right, aegis at point of bust / DARDANICI, Pax standing facing, head left, holding olive branch in right hand and gathering up drapery with left. RIC II 703 corr. (listed as quadrans); Woytek 608c = GoMo 115, lot 1858; (same obv. die); Strack 498 (bust type not listed); BMCRE –; BN –; Zmajić –. Good VF, black-green patina. Very rare with aegis at point of bust. $575 Under Trajan and Hadrian several series of bronze quadrantes were struck in the names of the imperial mines in Noricum, Dalmatia, Pannonia, and Moesia (Dardania). These operations supplied metal for the mint at Rome, and perhaps were the sites of workshops to produce coinage for local circulation or as donatives. It has been suggested that these mines issues were struck at Rome itself, and served some unidentified function, much as the contemporary ‘nome’ coinage struck at Alexandria in Egypt. Whatever the circumstances, these pieces saw limited use, and except for one rare type struck by Marcus Aurelius, were not issued during any other period.

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Cited in Woytek

410110. Trajan. AD 98-117. AR Quinarius (14mm, 1.57 g, 8h). Rome mint. Struck mid-AD 107-111. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on shoulder / COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Victory seated left, holding wreath in right hand and palm frond in left. RIC II 134 var. (no drapery); Woytek 374b, Portraittyp C (this coin cited); Strack 129α; King 9-10; BMCRE 345-6; BN 280; RSC 73. EF, attractively toned, light scrapes on reverse at 4 o’clock. Rare. $7500 Ex A. Lynn Collection (Helios 4, 14 October 2009), lot 364; Numismatica Ars Classica 25 (25 June 2003), lot 440.

401907. Hadrian. AD 117-138. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.29  g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 119-124/5. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HA DRIANVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, shield at side, holding Victory in right hand and scepter in left. RIC II 77; Strack 77δ; BMCRE 136 var. (obv. legend break); RSC 1102. EF, toned. $495 Ex G. Hirsch 48 (22 June 1966), lot 433.

410095. Hadrian. AD 117-138. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.35 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 134-138. HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP, laureate head right / FIDES PV BLICA, Fides standing right, holding grain ears in right hand and plate of fruit in left. RIC II 241a; Strack 237α; BMCRE 629; RSC 717. Superb EF, traces of light golden toning, spot of dark tone on reverse. $695

402685. Marcus Aurelius. AD 161-180. Æ As (27mm, 9.74 g, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 176-177. M ΛNTONINVS ΛVG GERM SΛRM, laureate head right / SECVRIT PVB TR P XXX IMP VII COS III, Securitas enthroned left, holding scepter in right hand and resting left arm on throne back, S C across field. RIC III 1166; MIR 18, 333-9/30; BMCRE 1544. VF, natural dark green patina, a few minor areas of roughness. $365 51


409995. Commodus. AD 177-192. AR Denarius (17mm, 3.28 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 192. L AEL AVREL C [OM] M AVG P FEL, head right, wearing lion skin headdress / Club facing downward; HER CVL/RO MAN/AV GV in three lines across field; all within laurel wreath with central jewel. RIC III 251; MIR 18, 853-4/72; BMCRE 339; RSC 190. Good VF, areas of light toning. Well struck for issue. $595

402679. Julia Domna. Augusta, AD 193-217. Æ As (26mm, 12.15 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Caracalla, circa AD 215-217. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane / VENVS GENETRIX, Venus enthroned left, extending right hand and holding long scepter in left, S C in exergue. RIC IV 604 or 605 (Caracalla); BMCRE 230 (Caracalla). VF, dark green patina, minor roughness. $395

409996. Maximinus I. AD 235-238. Æ Sestertius (29mm, 22.84 g, 12h). Rome mint. 3rd emission, AD 236-237. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus, draped, seated left on high-backed chair, resting left elbow on chair, feeding out of patera in right hand serpent rising from altar to left, S C in exergue. RIC IV 85; BMCRE 175-6; Banti 24. Good VF, brown patina. $595 Ex CNG Inventory 714124 (Spring-Summer 1999).

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405149. Maximianus. First reign, AD 286-305. AR Argenteus (19mm, 3.72 g, 12h). Treveri (Trier) mint, 4th officina. Struck circa AD 295-297. MAXIMI ANVS AVG, laureate head right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets; D. RIC VI 109b; Jeločnik 96; RSC 622b. Good VF, attractively toned. $595

403473. Constantius I. As Caesar, AD 293-305. AR Argenteus (19mm, 3.26  g, 12h). Ticinum mint. Struck circa AD 294. CONSTANTI VS CAESAR, laureate head right / VICTORIA SARMAT, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets. RIC VI 13a; Jeločnik 35; RSC 286a. Superb EF, areas of electric blue and gold toning. $1250

402677. Divus Constantius I. Died AD 306. Æ Follis (26mm, 6.17  g, 6h). Londinium (London) mint. Struck under Constantine I, AD 307-310. DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO, veiled, laureate, and cuirassed bust right / MEMORIA FELIX, lighted and garlanded altar; an eagle standing on either side; PLN. RIC VI 110 corr. (cuirassed, not draped). EF, brown and green patina. $365

402686. Galerius. As Caesar, AD 293-305. Æ Follis (25mm, 9.16 g, 12h). Alexandria mint, 3rd officina. Struck under Domitius Domitianus, AD 297/8. GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right / GENIO POPV L I ROM, Genius standing left, holding patera in right hand and cornucopia in left; eagle to right; -Γ//ALE. RIC VI 21b. Good VF, brown surfaces. $195 53


402675. Galerius. AD 305-311. Æ Follis (26mm, 6.63 g, 6h). Treveri (Trier) mint. Struck Autumn AD 307-end AD 308. IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on shoulder / GENIO POP ROM, Genius, wearing mural crown, standing left, holding patera in right hand and cornucopia in left; S-A//PTR. RIC VI 769. Good VF, brown surfaces. $145

409992

403799

409992. Constantius II. AD 337-361. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.36 g, 12h). Tricennalia issue. Nicomedia mint, 4th officina. Struck AD 351-355. FL IVL CONSTAN TIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding in right hand spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman motif in left / GLORIA REI PVBLICAE, Roma seated facing, holding spear in right hand, and Constantinopolis seated left, holding scepter in left hand and resting foot on prow, supporting between them a shield inscribed VOT/XXX/MVLT/XXXX in four lines; SMNC. RIC VIII 74; Depeyrot 5/2; cf. Biaggi 2181 (for type). Near EF. $2250 Ex CNG Inventory 720190 (April 2000).

403799. Constantius II. AD 337-361. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.36 g, 12h). Tricennalia issue. Antioch mint, 5th officina. Struck AD 355-361. FL IVL CONSTAN TIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding in right hand spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman motif in left / GLORIA REI PVBLICAE, Roma seated facing, holding spear in right hand, and Constantinopolis seated left, holding scepter in left hand and resting foot on prow, supporting between them a shield inscribed VOT/XXX/MVLT/XXXX in four lines; SMANЄ•. RIC VIII 162; Depeyrot 9/1; Biaggi –. Near EF, traces of underlying luster. $1250 54


Festival of Isis Issue

402680. Festival of Isis. Mid 4th century AD. Æ (16mm, 1.09  g, 6h). Alexandria mint, 3rd officina. [D]EO SANCTO SARAPIDI, draped bust of Sarapis right, wearing modius / DEO SANCTO NILO, river-god Nilus reclining left on protome of lion, holding reed in right hand and cornucopia in left; ALE. Cf. Alföldi, Festival pl. IV, 35 (for type); Vagi 3384. VF, brown surfaces. Well struck. Rare. $575 The Ptolemaic cult of Serapis and Isis enjoyed great popularity throughout Hellenistic and Roman times, and indeed the Romans, like the Greeks and Persians before them, were fascinated by the culture and monuments of ancient Egypt. The Ptolemies and the Roman emperors were not content with just being the foreign rulers of Egypt, but wanted to be viewed as legitimate successors of the Pharaohs. To this end, the Romans portrayed themselves as Pharaohs to the native population and even promoted the import of certain aspects of Egyptian culture and religion to their own native lands. The Egyptian concept of the Pharaoh as a god was appealing to the Roman emperors (the aging Julius Caesar was especially taken with this concept during his romance with Cleopatra). The Isis festival was a major celebration in Rome in the 3rd and 4th centuries, heralding the arrival of the ship of Isis (navigium Isidis) from Alexandria on 5 March. Besides Isis and Horus, other members of the Egyptian pantheon appear--Serapis, Anubis, Harpocrates, and Nilus. Such coins or tokens with imperial busts were first struck by Diocletian at Rome to mark the arrival of the ship, and the tradition continued through the 4th century; the latest imperial bust to appear is that of Valentinian II. Alföldi proposes that in the Middle Ages the festival associated with the Isis ship (also known as carrus navalis) became the car naval or carnival.

409993. Gratian. AD 367-383. AV Solidus (21mm, 4.41 g, 11h). Quinquennalia issue. Antioch mint, 5th officina. Struck AD 372. D N GRATIA NVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory seated right on cuirass, holding in both hands round shield inscribed VOT/ V/ MVL/ X in four lines; Christogram to right; ANOBЄ. RIC IX 21b; Depeyrot 38/8; Biaggi 2284. EF. Rare. $2750

402673. Honorius. AD 393-423. Æ (16mm, 1.80 g, 6h). Nicomedia mint, 3rd officina. Struck AD 393-395. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / GLORIA ROMANORVM, Honorius, raising right hand, on horseback right; SMNΓ. RIC IX 47c (officina unlisted); cf. DOCLR 711 (for type); LRBC 2427. Good VF, brown patina. $135 55


409991. Theodosius II. AD 402-450. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.45 g, 12h). Ravenna mint. Struck AD 402-423. D N THEO DOSIVS P F AVC, pearl-diadmed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORI A AVGGG, Theodosius standing right, foot on bound captive, holding labarum in right hand and Victory set on globe in left; R-V//COMOB. RIC X 1329 and 1801; Ranieri 66-67; Depeyrot 7/3; DOCLR 349; Biaggi –. Good VF, areas of underlying luster. $795 Ex Berk MBS 114 (23 May 2000, lot 61.

409988. Theodosius II. AD 402-450. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.47 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 3rd officina. Struck AD 408-420. D N THEO DOSIVS P F AVC, pearl-diadmed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding in right hand spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman motif in left / CONCORDI A AVCC, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, foot on prow, holding scepter in right hand and Victory set on globe in left; star to left; Γ//CONOB. RIC X 202; Depeyrot 73/2; MIRB 12b; DOCLR –; Biaggi –. EF, areas of underlying luster. $1250 Ex Berk MBS 114 (23 May 2000, lot 62.

409989. Theodosius II. AD 402-450. AV Solidus (22mm, 4.49 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 4th officina. Struck late AD 425-429. D N THEO DOSIVS P F AVC, pearl-diademed, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding in right hand spear over shoulder and shield decorated with horseman motif in left / SALVS REI PVBLI CAE, Theodosius II and Valentinian III enthroned facing, each holding mappa in right hand and cruciform scepter in left; star above; Δ//CONOB. RIC X 240; Depeyrot 79/1; MIRB 23a; DOCLR –; Biaggi –. EF. $1450

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409990. Valentinian III. AD 425-455. AV Solidus (21mm, 4.44  g, 12h). Ravenna mint. Struck AD 430-445. D N PLA VALENTI NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORI A AVGGG, Valentinian standing facing, foot on head of human-headed coiled serpent, holding long cross in right hand and Victory set on globe in left; R-V// COMOB. RIC X 2018-9; Ranieri 96 and 98; Lacam 11; Depeyrot 17/1; DOCLR 841-3; Biaggi 2349. EF. $1375 Ex CNG Inventory 719788 (April 2000.

411490. Leo I. AD 457-474. AV Tremissis (15mm, 1.49 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Struck circa 457-468. pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / Victory advancing right, head left, holding wreath in right hand and globus cruciger in left; star to right; CONOB. RIC X 611; Depeyrot 93/3; MIRB 7; DOCLR 538-41. Superb EF, lustrous, trace of deposits on reverse. $695

EARLY MEDIEVAL

410866. OSTROGOTHS. Baduila. 541-552. AR Half Siliqua (13mm, 1.05 g, 6h). In the name of Anastasius I. Ticinum mint. Struck 549/50-552. D N ΛNΛSTΛSIVS P F ΛC, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / D N/ BADV/ILΛ/ REX in four lines within wreath. COI 70a; MIB 63; BMC Vandals 13-5, 17; MEC 1, 153-5. Near EF, toned. $1750 Ex Classical Numismatic Auctions IV (21 September 1988), lot 797.

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Carolingian Coinage and History Beginning as “mayors of the palace” under the preceding Merovingian kings, the Carolingians became kings of the Franks in their own right, and, under Charlemagne (AD 768-814), reestablished an emperor in the West. Although the dynasty’s name is derived from Charles Martel, who defeated the Moors at the Battle of Tours in AD 732, its founder was Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz and the first of the “mayors of the palace” at the Merovingian court. In AD 751, Pépin le Bref (the Short) removed the last Merovingian king, Childeric III, and was declared king in his own right. But it was Pépin’s son, Charlemagne, who expanded Carolingian power to its greatest extent. In Frankish tradition, Pépin’s kingdom was divided upon his death between his two sons, Charlemagne and Carloman; at Carloman’s death three years later, Charlemagne became sole King of the Franks, and over the next three decades expanded Frankish power. Attempting to create an emperor in the west as a counterbalance to the Byzantine Empire, the Pope crowned Charlemagne as Emperor of the Romans on Christmas Day, AD 800. From this beginning, the Holy Roman Empire would be formed and the title which would continue to be held by its rulers until 1806. In AD 814 Charlemagne’s son, Louis, became sole ruler of the kingdom, but his reign was beset by numerous rebellions. Upon his death in AD 840, the division of the kingdom among his three sons, Lothar, Louis the German, and Charles the Bald, signaled the end of Carolingian unity. Civil war broke out among the three heirs, and at the resolution achieved with the Treaty of Verdun in AD 843, the empire was split into three regions: West Francia, Middle Francia, and East Francia. The western portion became the nucleus of later France, which eventually the Capetian kings would rule. East Francia became Germany and the Holy Roman Empire; the Carolingians who ruled there until AD 911 were succeeded by a Saxon dynasty, commonly referred to as the Ottonians, who consciously modeled themselves as Carolingian successors. Middle Francia, the weakest of the three, was soon divided and absorbed by both West and East Francia. The Carolingian currency system was establish in 755 under Pepin I. In addition to reducing the number of mints that had existed previously under the Merovingians, this reform strengthened royal authority over the minting of coins and, most especially, set forth uniformities of weight, fineness, and design. It also established a set relationship between the Carolingian silver denier, which had become the main denomination, and the fictional denominations of account – the shilling and the gold solidus – that were employed to handle larger sums. Under Charlemagne, this reform was implemented fully and expanded to meet the needs of his ever-increasing empire. Initially, Charlemagne’s deniers followed the weight and general type of Pepin I. As new sources of silver were discovered, and as Charlemagne acquired more power and territory, he issued new, heavier deniers of differing types, some of which types continued under his successors. One of these was the cross pattee / monogram type. Under each successive ruler, the type would be continued with only the monogram being changed to fit the name of the new ruler. Under Charlemagne’s successor, Louis I ‘le Pieux’, a new type, the XPISTIANA RELIGIO, was introduced and featured a temple facade on the reverse A third type was that with the obverse legend, which originally had the name of the emperor, now replaced with the phrase GRATIA D-I REX, along with the monogram on the obverse, and a cross pattee with the mint name on the reverse. These last two types became so popular that early feudal issuers copied them for their own coinage, long after the Carolingian rulers themselves were gone. Known as immobilized types, the Carolingian denier (and its fraction, the obole) continued as a denominational type throughout western Europe in the form of the denar, denaro, and even the English penny (notated as d. in accounting) for most of the Middle Ages until the introduction of the larger gros in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.

From the Garrett Collection

407387. CAROLINGIANS. Pépin ‘le Bref’ (the Short). King of the Franks, 754/5-768. AR Denier (17mm, 1.35 g, 9h). Remis (Reims) mint. Large ⎁ ʖ; long bar above, short bar to right, pellets below and at center / Large ⎁; crosses flanking. Depeyrot 825 (this coin cited); M&G 70 (this coin cited); MEC 1, –; Prou 926; Gariel pl. I, 19. VF, toned. Exceptional metal. $5950 Ex Coin Galleries (12 November 1986), lot 1160; John Work Garrett Collection (16 October 1984), lot 685, purchased from J. Schulman, 11 November 1928; Hennesy Collection.

401909. CAROLINGIANS. Charlemagne (Charles the Great). As Charles I, King of the Franks, 768-814. AR Obol (15mm, 0.62 g). Class 2. Medolus (Melle) mint. Struck 771-793/4. ȓĩዝ⌴8VS around central ornament / Incuse of obverse. Schiesser Type A; Coupland, Charlemagne –; Depeyrot 602; M&G –; MEC 1, –; Prou 678; Gariel –. VF, toned, area of weak strike, struck on a slightly ragged flan. Very rare. $1850 58


407406. CAROLINGIANS. Charlemagne (Charles the Great). As Charles I, King of the Franks, 768-814. AR Denier (18mm, 1.03 g, 6h). Class 2. Medolus (Melle) mint. Struck 771-793/4. ⍛A⌴/ǮVs in two lines / ȓĩዝ⌴8VS around central ornament. Coupland, Charlemagne 4; Depeyrot 605; M&G 268 corr. (rev. legend); MEC I, 727; Prou 681-2; Gariel pl. VIII, 91. Good VF, toned. $2650 Ex Classical Numismatic Review XIX.3 (Third Quarter 1994), no. 613.

407392. CAROLINGIANS. Charlemagne (Charles the Great) or Charles le Chauve (the Bald) . As Charles I, King of the Franks, 768-814 or as Charles II, King of West Francia, 840-877. AR Denier (21mm, 1.63 g, 1h). Metullo (Melle) mint. Struck 793/4-812, or 840-877. แ ��©⎁ǮVs ⎁⍟ҟ ś⎁, short cross pattée / ๘ ȵe˶Vǧǧ⌴, Ǔ²⎁⌴ǮVs monogram. Coupland, Charlemagne –; Depeyrot 606; M&G 1063 (Charles le Chauve); MEC 1, 923-33; Prou 692-8 (Charles le Chauve); Gariel pl. XXIII, 28. Good VF, toned. $575 New research by Guillaume Sarah (“Charlemagne, Charles the Bald, and the Karolus Monogram Coinage,” in NC 2010 indicates that monogram deniers with the legend CΛRLVS REX FR were struck as late as the reign of Charles le Chauve. While Sarah’s metallurgical analyses identified particular issues, without hoard provenance, or until a die study is completed, attribution of these issues of Melle to either Charles is not possible.

Very Rare Depiction of Mallets and Dies

410125. CAROLINGIANS. Louis ‘le Pieux’ (the Pious). As Emperor Louis I, 814-840. AR Obole (15mm, 0.88 g, 8h). Class 1. Metallum (Melle) mint. Struck 814-819. แ VǮē⌴VVIæVs I⍵, cross pattée / ๘ ȵe˶±ǧǧVȵ, obverse and reverse dies; mallet to right and left. Coupland, Money, Class I, 3 ; Depeyrot 608; M&G 397; MEC 1, –; Prou 714; Gariel pl. XVII, 76. Good VF, toned. Very rare. $3750

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407389. CAROLINGIANS. Louis ‘le Pieux’ (the Pious). As Emperor Louis I, 814-840. AR Denier (20mm, 1.57 g, 1h). Class 2. Venecias (Venice) mint. Struck 819-822. แ ƊǮVē⌴VVIæVs I⍵ʖ, cross pattée / ๘ѝ⍟n/⍟æI±s in two lines. Coupland, Money –; Depeyrot 1116D; M&G 456; MEC 1, 789; Prou 917-8; Gariel pl. XIX, 140. Near EF, lightly toned. $975 Ex Coin Galleries (14 November 2000, lot 576.

407405. CAROLINGIANS. Louis ‘le Pieux’ (the Pious). As Emperor Louis I, 814-840. AR Denier (20mm, 1.58 g, 12h). Class 3. Unspecified (Trier?) mint. Struck 822-840. แ ƊǮVē⌴V.VIæVs I⍵ʖ, cross pattée; pellets in quarters / ᛸPIs⍆I©Ⱦ© ⎁⍟ǮIŶIɯ, temple façade. Cf. Coupland, Money, Group D, 1 (Trier); Depeyrot 1179; M&G 472; cf. MEC 1, 794 and 800 (for type). EF, toned. $295

401910. CAROLINGIANS. Pepin II. King of Aquitaine, 839-865. AR Obol (17mm, 0.86 g, 6h). Aquitania (Bourges) mint. แ ʖIʖʖInVs ⎁⍟แ, cross pattée / ±$VI/˶±ƊI± in two lines. Cf. Coupland, Pippin, pl. XX, 14 (for type); Depeyrot 186B; M&G 604; MEC 1, 813 var. (rev. legend); Prou 663; cf. Gariel pl. XX, 1-3. Good VF, toned. $495 Ex Marshall Faintich Collection.

407388. CAROLINGIANS. Charles le Chauve (the Bald). As Charles II, King of West Francia, 840-877. AR Denier (20mm, 1.76 g, 12h). Class 2. Cinomanis (Le Mans) mint. Struck 864-877. แ Ŷ⎁©⍆I© ĕ!I ⎁⍟ҟ, Ǔ²⎁⌴ǮVs monogram / ส æInℽȵ©nIs æIєI⍆©s, cross pattée. Depeyrot 559; M&G 905; MEC 1, 872-874; Prou 420-2, 425-7; Gariel pl. 30, 129. EF, toned, slightly wavy flan. Ex Coin Galleries (9 November 1988), lot 654. $395 60


Orléans City Gate

407393. CAROLINGIANS. Charles le Chauve (the Bald). As Charles II, King of West Francia, 840-877. AR Denier à la porte (19.5mm, 1.59 g, 5h). Class 1. Aurelianis (Orléans) mint. Struck 840-864. แ æ©⎁ǮVs ⎁⍟ҟ ś⎁, cross pattée; pellets in quarters / ©ѝʽe ǮI ©ȾI˞, two-towered city-gate façade with post-and-lintel entry; pellets to left and right; below, long bar above แ. Depeyrot 725; M&G 944; MEC 1, 835 var. (rev. legend); Prou 508-12; Gariel pl. XXI, 11. Good VF, toned. $495 Ex Malloy XIX (16 March 1984), lot 767.

407390. CAROLINGIANS. Charles le Chauve (the Bald). As Charles II, King of West Francia, 840-877. AR Denier (19mm, 1.54  g, 2h). Class 2. Turones (Tours) mint. Struck 864-877. แ Ŷ⎁©⍆I© ĕ!I ⎁⍟ҟ, Ǔ²⎁⌴ǮVs monogram / ส ⍆є⎁ℽn⍟s æIєI⍆©s, cross pattée. Crinon, Catalogue 7; Depeyrot 1040; M&G 916; MEC 1, 903; Prou 450-1; Gariel pl. 36, 267. EF, toned. $465

WORLD

407391. DENMARK. Harald Blåtand (Bluetooth). Circa 958/9-986. AR Halvbrakteat (18mm, 0.36 g, 6h). Imitating an issue of Charlemagne from Dorestadt. Hedeby mint. Large crescent flanked by two lines / Four parallel vertical lines; double crescent above. G. Galster, “Vikingetids møntfund fra Bornholm,” NNÅ (1977/8), 21.2 and pg. 171; Hauberg 1; Hauberg Collection 1-8. EF, attractive blue toning. $895 Ex Classical Numismatic Review XIX.4 (Fourth Quarter 1994), no. 426.

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404037

403482

404037. FRANCE, Provincial. Lorraine (duché). Charles II. 1390-1431. AR Petit gros (25mm, 2.20 g, 3h). Nancy mint. + KAROLVS · DVX · LOThOR · Z · m (stellate stops), Charles standing facing, holding sword over right shoulder / + BHDICTV’· SIT : nOmЄ’· DHI’· nRI’· IhV’· XP’·/ mOn ETΛ · DЄ · n ΛnCI (stellate stops), long cross pattée. De Saulcy pl. IX, 19; Boudeau 1480. Good VF, toned. Well struck. $495 Ex J.R. Stewart Collection; Seaby Coin & Medal Bulletin 371 (April 1949), no. E650.

403482. FRANCE, Provincial. Provence (comté). temp. Bérenger V–Charles I d’Anjou. 1209-1266. AR Gros marseillais – 6 Coronats (19.5mm, 1.64 g, 4h). Marseilles mint. Struck after 1218. + COMЄS : PVIИCIЄ, bare head left / + CIVITΛS MΛSSIL, castle with three turrets and two towers; cross above. Rolland 17 and 24; Duplessey, Féodales 1614; Poey d’Avant 3955 (Charles I); Garret Collection II, lot 849 = Goldberg 59, lot 3751 (a specimen in similar grade, hammer $1900. Near EF, toned. Well struck. $1750 62


404046. GERMANY, Köln (Erzbistum). Philipp von Heinsberg. 1167-1191. AR Denar (18mm, 1.44 g, 11h). HIA[R C] ЄPISCOP, Philipp seated facing, holding crozier in right hand and cross-tipped scepter in left / ЄIA COΓONIA PAIC IIAI, city view with walls, towers, and cathedral. Hävernick 552; cf. Kestner 2710; Bonhoff 1582. EF, toned. $295

401911. ITALY, Bologna (Signori). Anonymous. temp. Sante I–Giovanni II Bentovoglio, 1445-1506. AR Grossone (30mm, 3.32 g, 11h). • BONONI • MATER • STVDIORVM • (annulet stops), lion rampant slightly left, holding banner; coat-of arms to left at feet / S • PETRONIV • DE • BONONIA •, St. Petronius, wearing episcopal regalia, seated facing, holding model of city and crozier. CNI X 29; MIR 24; Biaggi 400. Near EF, toned. $1250

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401912. ITALY, Verona (Comune). nomine Federico II di Svevia. Sacro Roman Imperio, 1218-1250. AR Grosso da 20 Denari (20mm, 1.65 g, 11h). + CI + VI + CI + VI, short cross pattée over large annulet; (VE) RO N A in quarters / + • VE • RO • NA • (rosette stops), short cross pattée over large annulet; CI VI CI V(retrograde E) in quarters. CNI VI 34; Biaggi 2971; De Wit 3609. Near EF, toned. $365 Ex Elsen 23 (14 December 1991), lot 434.

403481. LOW COUNTRIES, Luik (Liège). Chapter of St. Lambert Cathedral. 17th-early 18th centuries. Æ Mereau (20mm, 4.28 g, 6h). Dated 1686. ECCLESI : · LEOD :, crossed bones; flames above and below / ANNIVERSARIVM, skull over crossed bones; 1686 in exergue. Renesse p. 72, 5. Good VF, brown patina. $225 Méreaux, or tokens, were employed in France and the Low Countries by the Church for various distributions. The word derives from the Latin merere, meaning “to deserve: deserving” holders of these tokens received bread or other foodstuffs, or later coins in exchange. These particular tokens were most likely used during the feast day celebrations surrounding the translation of St. Lambert’s remains to the cathederal A member of a local noble family, St. Lambert of Maastricht (circa 636-700) was bishop of that city from 669 to 675, and again from 682 until his murder at Liége in 700. During Lambert’s episcopacy, he became caught up in the intrigues of the Merovingian court and was involved in the murder of Pepin of Herstal’s domesticus, Dodo. In retaliation, Dodo’s relations murdered Lambert. Buried first at his hometown of Maastricht, Lambert’s episcopal successor, Hubertus, subsequently had the remains transferred to Liége (the place of Lambert’s martyrdom and already a place of pilgrimage). Around the the shrine, a cathedral was constructed, which eventually became the seat of the archbishop until 1794, when it was demolished following the French Revolution.

403476. PORTUGAL, Kingdom. João II o Príncipe Perfeito (the Perfect prince). 1481-1495. AR Real o Vintém (19mm, 1.81 g, 6h). Lisboa (Lisbon) mint. + IOHΛNES : II : R : P : ET : Λ : D : G, crowned Y with floreate tail; L to left, annulet to right / + IOHΛNES : II : R : P : ET : Λ : D : G, crowned coat-of-arms; annulets to left and right. Gomes 11.07 var. (legends); Vaz J2.25 var. (same). Good VF, toned. $225

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Very Rare Scandinavian Imitation of Æthelred II

403721. SCANDINAVIA. 11th-12th centuries. AR Penny (19mm, 1.60 g, 3h). Imitation of Æthelred II Long Cross type, York mint, moneyer Dunstan. ฾ ĩĕĩǺʽĩĕ ʽĩ ɃɭҠ, draped bust left; pellet behind neck / ฾ ĕє Hͻ© ɃɃɭ ĩ©Ɨ (retrograde), voided long cross, with triple-crescent ends. Malmer dies 107/1123 (‘single’ chain); SCBI 45 (Latvia), 202–3 (same dies). Good VF, toned, a few peck marks. Lovely large bust. Very rare. $2350

403483. SPAIN, Castile & León. Juan I. 1379-1390. AR Real (26mm, 3.48 g, 5h). Sevilla (Seville) mint. Struck 13791385. + DOmInVS : mICLI : ADIVTOR : ЄD ЄGO : D/ISPICAm : InImICOS : mЄO (rosette), crowned IOhn / + IOhAnIS : DЄI : GRACIA : RЄX : CASTЄL, coat-of-arms within quatrelobe; rosettes in upper angles, S in lower. MEC 6, 611-4 var. (legends); ME 1440. Good VF, toned. $495

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Massachusetts Bay Colony From the Partrick, Clarke, & Wurtzbach Collections Exhibited at the ANS in 1942

403480. UNITED STATES, Colonial & Related. Autonomous British issues. Massachusetts Bay Colony. 1652-1682. AR Threepence (18mm, 1.09 g, 11h). John Hull’s (Boston) mint. Dated 1652, struck 1667-1674. (rosette) MASATHUSETS, pine tree / (rosette) NEW ENGLAND, 1652/ III (denomination) in two lines. Whitman W-640; Salmon 2-B; Noe 36; Crosby 2A-B; Breen 50 (this coin illustrated). Choice EF, toned. $14,500 Ex Donald G. Partrick Collection; T. James Clarke Collection, exhibited at the ANS in 1942, no. 176; Carl Wurtzbach Collection, no. 70; John H. Clapp Collection. The English crown was never particularly concerned with supplying the American colonists with coinage. Early settlers in New England had to make due with bartered goods, Native American wampum, and whatever scraps of coinage trickled up from the Spanish territories to the far south. Such a situation was untenable for the booming markets of Boston, yet coinage was considered a royal prerogative, and, without permission of the monarch the colonial officials were hamstrung. In 1652, with the dissolution of the monarchy and the establishment of the Commonwealth of England, officials in Boston were at last free to take matters into their own hands. On 26-27 May 1652, the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony authorized the creation of a mint to strike silver shillings, sixpence, and threepence. These represent the earliest coinage struck in what is today the United States. Four separate issues were struck: the NE issues, crude types bearing only the letters NE and the denomination; the Willow Tree issues, with a willow tree for the obverse type; the Oak Tree issues, with an oak; and the Pine Tree issues, with a pine tree. These series were struck over a number of years, until the mintmasters’ contracts expired in 1682. All coins bear a fixed date of 1652, the date of authorization. Early collectors believed that this date was used to deceive English officials into believing the series was only struck during the Commonwealth, though this seems highly unlikely, as documentary evidence clearly demonstrates that the monarchy was well aware of New England’s silver coinage.

From the Kendall & Ruby Collections

405145. UNITED STATES, Colonial & Related. Autonomous British issues. Massachusetts Bay Colony. 16521682. AR Shilling (27mm, 4.43 g, 12h). Large planchet issue. John Hull’s (Boston) mint. Dated 1652, struck 1667-1674. · MASATHUSETS · IИ, pine tree / · (NE)W ENGLAND · AN DOM, 1652/ XII (denomination) in two lines. Whitman W-740; Salmon 7-E; Noe 8.2; Crosby 1B-D; Breen 41. VF, toned. $8750 Ex Henry P. Kendall Foundation Collection; Dr. Charles L. Ruby Collection (11 February 1974), lot 6.

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From the John J. Ford and F. C. C. Boyd Collections

403485. UNITED STATES, Colonial & Related. Autonomous British issues. Massachusetts Bay Colony. 1652-1682. AR Shilling (23mm, 4.37 g, 12h). Small planchet issue. John Hull’s (Boston) mint. Dated 1652, struck 1675-1682. (rosette) MASATHUSETS (rosette) IN, pine tree / · NEW ENGLAND · AN DO, 1652/ XII (denomination) in two lines. Whitman W-830; Salmon 1-A (this coin illustrated); Noe 15; Crosby 24-N; Breen 52. VF, toned. $7500 Ex John J. Ford Collection, part XII (Stack’s, 18 October 2005, lot 108; F.C.C. Boyd Collection.

BRITISH

407412. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Northumbria. Aldfrith. 685-705. AR Sceat (11.5mm, 1.15 g, 10h). Eoforwic (York) mint. ม AȁčŊˎƩčћ˟, pellet-in-annulet / Quadruped with forked tail standing left. Booth, Sceattas 1–7 var. (unlisted dies); Metcalf, Coinage 21 (this coin); Pirie, Guide 1.2; Abramson 69.10 (same dies as illustration); SCBI 63 (BM), 757; North 176; SCBC 846. VF, toned. Boldly struck on good metal. Rare. $2250 Ex Spink Numismatic Circular CIV.1 (February 1996), no. 119.

407416. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Northumbria. Eadberht, with Archbishop Ecgberht. 737-758. AR Sceat (12mm, 0.75 g, 1h). Eoforwic (York) mint. ⌓ÿͻB⌓ʼ⌓Ɔͻєl, cross pattée / ⌓üŲB⌓ʼ⌓Ɔ¥, mitred figure holding long cross and crozier. Booth, Sceattas, variety i, 4 var. (dies –/c [unlisted obv. die]); Pirie 17; Pirie, Guide 2.2a-c; Abramson 74.10 var. (rev. legend); SCBI 20 (Mack), 514 (same rev. die); SCBI 63 (BM), 770; North 192; SCBC 852. VF, toned. $895 Ex Linzalone FPL XIX.1 (Spring 1996), no. 76.

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407417. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Northumbria. Æthelred I. Second reign, 789-796. AR Sceat (13.5mm, 1.04 g, 8h). Eoforwic (York) mint; Ceolbeald, moneyer. ม ¥⌓ĕƩ⌦ʼ⌓ĕ, R within beaded circle / ม ü⌓ɭB¥⌦ĕ, pellet within beaded circle. Booth, Coinage 27–8 (same dies as illustration); Pirie 18 (same dies as illustration); Pirie, Guide, Phase Ia, 3.1b (same dies as illustration); Abramson 80.90 var. (rev. legend); SCBI 21 (Yorkshire), 25 (same dies); BMC 283; North 185; SCBC 856. EF, toned. Exceptionally well preserved. Rare issue with monogram on the obverse, extremely rare in this grade. $2500 Ex Finn FPL 15 (1999), no. 60.

407421. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Northumbria. Eanred. 810-841. BI Styca (13.5mm, 1.09 g, 12h). Eoforwic (York) mint; Wilheah, moneyer. ม ⌓¥nˌ⌓ĕ ˌ⌓ҟ, pellet within linear circle / ม ⎍Ɨ⌦H⌓¥H, pellet within linear circle. Pirie 35–6; Pirie, Guide, Phase Ia, 3.4f; North 186; SCBC 860. EF, toned. $465 Ex Finn FPL 18 (2000, no. 75.

410940. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Æthelberht. 858-865/6. AR Penny (21mm, 1.21 g, 4h). Inscribed Cross type (BMC i). Canterbury mint; Beornweald, moneyer. Struck circa 858-864. ม ⍒⌓T⌓⌦B⌓⍒ያh ያ⌓ҟ, diademed bust right / ม Bќያ⌱ќ⍒⌦ĕ ዦɭ⌱⌓˶⍒ in and around the arms of a beaded cross. Naismith C169b (this coin); SCBI –; BMC 8; North 620; SCBC 1053. EF, toned. Extremely rare with this moneyer, only seven examples noted by Naismith. $7950 Ex Chapman FPL 1 (2009), no. SP7; Bruun-Rasmussen 674 (11 December 2006), lot 5430.

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410939. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Edward the Elder. 899-924. AR Penny (23mm, 1.56 g, 9h). Bust Diademed (BD) type (BMC iii). Mint in East Anglia (Ipswich?); Leofhelm, moneyer. Late period II, circa 920-924. ฾ ዞ±ዝዮዮዞ±ያዝ ያዞዱ, diademed bust left / ዥƗɭ⌘H/ዞዥዦ ዦ0 ɭ in two lines; ฾ ฾ ฾ between, Ḩ ฾ Ḩ above, Ḩ below. CTCE 31; SCBI 9 (Ashmolean), 309 (same dies); BMC –; North 651; SCBC 1084. Good VF, toned, areas of weak strike. Charming portrait. $7750

410912. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Edward the Elder. 899-924. AR Penny (22mm, 1.59 g, 12h). Circumscription cross/Horizontal-Trefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC ii). Wessex (prob. Winchester) dies; Deorweald, moneyer. Late period I, circa 915-920. ฾ ዞ±ዝዮዮዞ±ያዝ ያዞዱ, small cross pattée / ዝዞɭያዮ/ዮ±ዥዝ ዦ0 ∂ in two lines; ฾ ฾ ฾ between, Ḩ above, Ḩ below. CTCE 146(i); SCBI –; BMC –; North 649; SCBC 1087. Near EF, glossy dark toning. $1650 Deorwald was the moneyer who struck the unique gold mancus for Edward (CTCE 144 = C.E. Blunt, “A Gold Penny of Edward the Elder” in BNJ XXV [1945–8], pp. 277–81).

410907. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Edward the Elder. 899-924. AR Penny (22mm, 1.62 g, 3h). Circumscription cross/Horizontal-Trefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC ii). Mercia West dies; Rodberht, moneyer. Late period I, circa 915-920. ฾ ዞ±ዝዮዮዞ±ያዝ ያዞዱ, small cross pattée / ያɭዝÏ/ዞያH˸ in two lines; ฾ ฾ ฾ between, Ḩ above, Ḩ below. CTCE 256; SCBI –; BMC –; North 649; SCBC 1087. Superb EF, lightly toned. Engravers guidelines evident on reverse. Of distinctive West Mercian style. Extremely rare – CTCE notes only a single example, in the BM; none in the EMC. $2250 69


410919. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Æthelstan. 924-939. AR Penny (22.5mm, 1.48 g, 6h). Small cross/HorizontalTrefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC i). Uncertain mint; Ari, moneyer. ๘ ®†ĩǧӲ˶±/n ʽĩҢ, small cross pattée / Aʽĩ ዦ./ɭɃĩ˶± in two lines; ฾ ฾ ฾ between, Ḩ above, ! • below. Blunt, Aethelstan 370 note; SCBI –; SCBI 34 (BM), 200 = BMC 95 (same obv. die); EMC –; North 668/3; SCBC 1089. EF. Extremely rare variety with trefoil-pellet reverse. $1750 Although Blunt placed all the coins of this moneyer under his North Eastern I mint, he noted that the style of the BMC 95 piece, struck from the same obverse die as the current specimen, was unusual. Perhaps equally important, he did not note that the reverse was actually a variety of the Horizontal-Trefoil/Two-line type, with a pellet in the bottom field, rather than a trefoil. The style here, in fact, is more refined than the large, bold lettering usually equated with the North East I mint, and it also has the outer linear circle that is typically absent on issues from that mint. The authors of CTCE, however, did note the difference (CTCE, p. 112), and suggested that such issues may belong to the North Eastern II mint. Nonetheless, the style of the Two-line type coins from even that mint is still distinctly different from that on the present coin (cf. Blunt 421–4). As such it is likely that this coin was struck in a mint south of the former Danelaw.

410927. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Æthelstan. 924-939. AR Penny (22mm, 1.54 g, 1h). Small cross/HorizontalTrefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC i). North East I mint; Wilwulf(?), moneyer. ๘ ®†ĩǧ/Ӳ˶±n ʽĩҢ, small cross pattée / ќќƗዥ/ዥќ⌘ ዦ in two lines; ฾ ฾/฾ between, Ḩ above, Ḩ below. Blunt, Aethelstan 407; SCBI 34 (BM), 232 var. (obv. legend, placement of pellet on rev.); North 668/1b; SCBC 1089. EF, glossy dark tone. $1650

410929. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Eadmund. 939-946. AR Penny (22mm, 1.74 g, 9h). Horizontal-Trefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC i). London mint(?); Grimwald, moneyer. ฾ ዞ±ዝዦዮዧዝ / ያዞX, small cross pattée / ŭያƩዦќ/ќ±⌦ዝ 0 ዦ in two lines; ฾ ฾ ฾ between, Ḩ above, Ḩ below. CTCE 52; SCBI 34 (BM), –; North 688; SCBC 1105. Near EF, lightly toned, a couple small flat spots. $1650

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410936. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Eadmund. 939-946. AR Penny (22mm, 1.54 g, 8h). Horizontal-Trefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC i). Uncertain mint; Eardwulf, moneyer. ฾ ⌓©ዝዦዮኋዝ ያዞX, small cross pattée / ⌓¥ያĕĕ/ќ⌦⌘ዝ ዦ0 ɭ in two lines; ฾ ฾ ฾ between, Ḩ above, Ḩ below. CTCE 38; SCBI 34 (BM), 202 var. (legends); North 688; SCBC 1105. Near EF, darkly toned. $1650

410937. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of Wessex. Eadred. 946-955. AR Penny (20.5mm, 1.14 g, 9h). Horizontal-Trefoil 1 (HT 1) type (BMC i). Uncertain mint; Cristin, moneyer. ม ⌓±ĕʽĩĕ ʽ⌓ม ɭ, small cross pattée / üʽƩә˶//Ʃn ȵ⌓ɭ in two lines; ๘ ๘ ๘ between, Ḩ above, Ḩ below. CTCE 20; SCBI 34 (BM), 514 var. (obv. legend); North 706; SCBC 1113. VF, toned. Rare moneyer name. $1150

403596. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Aethelred II. 978-1016. AR Penny (19.5mm, 1.64 g, 9h). Long Cross type (BMC iva, Hild. D). Hereford (Hereford) mint; Æthelwig, moneyer. Struck circa 997-1003. แ ®†⌓ǹʼ®ē ʼ⌓ҟ ⍒éǹ∂, draped bust left; pellet behind neck / แ ®†ĩǹPƩ ȵ/ቸ/ɭ ⎳ʼ⌓, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends. SCBI 7 (Copenhagen), 425; Hild –; BMC –; North 774; SCBC 1151. Good VF, attractively toned, a few peck marks. $1150 Ex Bruun-Rasmussen 764 (11 December 2006), lot 5451.

409120. ANGLO-SAXON, Kings of All England. Cnut. 1016-1035. AR Penny (18mm, 0.96 g, 6h). Quatrefoil type (BMC viii, Hild. E). Bađan (Bath) mint; Ælfwine, moneyer. Struck circa 1017-1023. แ ænѝ˶ ʽ⌓ҟ _nŭǹɠʽѝ⍵, crowned bust left in quatrefoil / แ ⍣ǹŖʖƩn⌓ ɠn Ùa†a, voided long cross with triple-crescent ends and pellet at center, over quatrefoil. Blackburn & Lyon Bath B style; Grinsell –; SCBI –; Hild. –; BMC –; EMC –; North 781; SCBC 1157. Good VF, toned. Extremely rare moneyer for Quatrefoil issue at Hereford, no examples published or referenced elsewhere. $895 Ex William Luard Raynes Collection (Glendining, 15 February 1950, lot 404 (part of). Includes an old Seaby ticket from c.1950.

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403714. NORMAN. William I ‘the Conqueror’. 1066-1087. AR Penny (20mm, 1.33 g, 12h). Paxs type (BMC viii). Sceftesbyrig (Shaftesbury) mint; Ælfnoth, moneyer. Struck circa 1083-1086. แ ʖƩǹǹ⌓ǹȵ ʽ⌓ҟ, crowned facing bust, holding lis-tipped scepter in left hand; trefoil on right shoulder / แ Ʃ⌓ǹnɠ†ɠn ˨Ʃ⌓üŖ, cross pattée; letters of ʖ a ҟ ˨ in annulets within quarters. SCBI 53 (Scottish), 156 var. (spelling of mint; same obv. die); BMC 920; EMC –; North 848; SCBC 1257. Good VF, attractively toned. $1650

406589. PLANTAGENET. Henry II. 1154-1189. AR Penny (20mm, 1.34 g, 3h). Cross and Crosslets (Tealby) type; class C. Carlisle mint; Wilelm or Wilhelm, moneyer. Struck circa 1163-1167. ๘ [Ɔ]⌓n⌹Ɵ Ḧ ⌹ [/] ¥, crowned facing bust, holding scepter / ๘ ʏƱǰǰ[¥Ȯ] ɭn Ḧ ü¥, cross pattée, with crosslet in angles. SCBI 16 (Norweb), 343 (same dies); BMC 214 (same dies); North 956; SCBC 1339. VF, lightly toned. Delicate portrait. Struck on a neat round flan. $975

406580. PLANTAGENET. John. 1199-1216. AR Penny (18.5mm, 1.44 g, 4h). Short Cross type, class Va2. Norwich mint; Renald, moneyer. Struck circa 1204-1205. ƌĿnˎƩĿѝ˝ ˎĿ ҟ, crowned facing bust, holding scepter / ๘ ˎĿn¥⌦d • ɠn • nɠˎ, voided cross; quatrefoils in angles. SCBI 56 (Mass), 1324–6 var. (obv. legend; but same obv. die as 1319); North 969; SCBC 1350B. Near EF, toned. Well centered and struck. $595

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403745. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AR Groat (27mm, 3.66 g, 4h). Annulet issue. Calais mint; im: pierced cross 2. Struck 1422-1430. 2 ƌENRiý ⎡ Di= ⎡ ŷˆ¨ ⎡ ˆEҞ ⎡ ¨NŷȄ ⎡ ⎜ ᚤ fˆ¨Ný=, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches; lis at cusps; annulets flanking neck / 2 ʏɨSѝi ი DEѝM Ḻ ¨ DiѝTɨR E= MEѝM//ѝiȄ Ȅ¨ Ḻ ý¨Ȅi SiE Ḻ, long cross; trefoil in quarters, annulets within second and third trefoil. Whitton, Heavy 11; North 1424; SCBC 1836. Good VF, toned. $375

403747. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AR Groat (26mm, 3.76 g, 7h). Annulet/Rosette-mascle issue mule. London (Tower) mint; im: pierced cross/cross. Struck circa 1430-1431. 2 ƌENRiý= ᚤ Di= ᚤ ŷˆ¨= ᚤ ˆEҞ ᚤ ¨NŷȄ= ᚤ ⎜ ᚤ fˆ¨Ný=, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches; lis at cusps / ม ʏɨSѝi ḥ DEѝM Ḻ ¨ DiѝTɨR E= MEѝM// ýiѝi Ϳ¨S Ḻ ℽ ǣɨɀ Dɨɀ ḥ, long cross; trefoil in quarters. Whitton, Heavy 13e; North 1423/1445; SCBC 1835/1858; CNG 94, lot 1946 (same dies). VF, toned, minor deposits on reverse. Rare mule. $425

Engraver’s Error

403746. LANCASTER. Henry VI. First reign, 1422-1461. AR Groat (27mm, 3.70 g, 2h). Pinecone-mascle issue. Calais mint; im: cross patonce/plain cross. Struck 1431-1432/3. 2 ພ ƌENRiý Ⴅ Di Ⴅ ŷˆ¨ Ⴅ ˆEҞ Ⴅ ¨NŷȄ= ᚤ ⎜ ᚤ fˆ¨Ný=, crowned facing bust within tressure of arches; lis at cusps / ม ʏɨSѝi DEѝM Ḻ ¨ DiѝTɨR E ⎡ MEѝM//ѝiȄ ℽ Ȅ¨ Ḻ ý¨Ȅ SiE Ⴅ, long cross pattée; trefoil in quarters. Whitton, Heavy –; North 1461; SCBC 1875. VF, toned. Missing I in CALISIE – rare engraver’s error not recorded by Whitton. $595 Ex Elsen 98 (13 December 2008), 872; Ivan Buck Collection (Spink 176, 30 November 2005, lot 190.

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403744. YORK. Edward IV. First reign, 1461-1470. AR Groat (27mm, 3.84 g, 10h). Heavy coinage, group III. London (Tower) mint; im: rose. Struck 1464. ḥ EDѾ¨RD⎡ Di⎡ ŷR¨⎡ REҞ ᚤ ¨NŷȄ⎡ ⎖ ᚤ fR¨Ný⎡, crowned facing bust within polylobe; trefoil on breast and quatrefoils flanking / ḥ ʖɨSѝi DEѝM Ḻ ¨ DiѝTɨR E⎡ MEѝM/ ýiѝi Ϳ¨S ⍻ ǣɨN DɨN, long cross pattée; trefoil in quarters. Blunt & Whitton type III(ii)/(d); North 1532; SCBC 1974. Good VF, toned, slight doubling on obverse. $650

409118. YORK (Restored). Richard III. 1483-1485. AR Penny (14.5mm, 0.78 g, 2h). Durham mint; im: lis. John Sherwood, archbishop. ჭ ˊƩý[¨ˊĕ⎍˫ ˊEᛸ ¨]Ⱥŷ⌦, crowned facing bust; ˫ on bust / ĕ[⎍ˊ] ƌ¨[⍴ ýƩ⎍Ʃ Ϳ¨˫], long cross pattée with ĕ at center. North 1687; SCBC 2169. VF, toned. Struck on a tight flan. Rare. $1895 Ex Spink Numismatic Circular L.10 (October 1942), no. 16404 (there as York mint).

406279. TUDOR. Elizabeth I. 1558-1603. AV Angel (30mm, 5.13 g, 9h). Fifth issue. Tower (London) mint; im: latin cross. Struck 1580-1581. ຃ ELIZABETH : D’· G’· AN’· FR’· ET · HI’· REGINA, Archangel Michael slaying dragon lying at his feet to right / ຃ A : DNO : FACTVM : EST : ISTVD : ET : EST : MIRABILE’·, ship bearing coat-of-arms; above, cross between Є and rose. Brown & Comber C19; Schneider 767; North 1991; SCBC 2525. VF, attractive red toning. Boldly struck on a broad flan. $6250 Ex Spink 190 (27 September 2007), lot 561; Glendining’s (24 November 1976), lot 100.

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404143. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AV Crown (20mm, 2.23 g, 8h). Tower (London) mint; im: castle. Struck1627-1628. ჻ CAROLVS D : G : MA : BR : FR : ET HI : REX, crowned bust left, wearimg ruff; V (mark of value) behind / ჻ CVLTORES SVI DEOS PROTEGIT, crowned coat-of-arms. Brooker 193 var. (rev. legend); Schneider 228; North 2181a; SCBC 2711. Near EF, lustrous. $2750

402817. STUART. Charles I. 1625-1649. AR Groat (23mm, 2.02 g, 10h). Aberystwyth mint; im: book. Struck 1638/91642. (book) CAROLVS D’ · G’ · M’ · B’ · F’ · ET · H’ · REX, crowned bust left; plume before, IIII (mark of value) behind / · CHRISTO · AVSPICE · REGNO · (book), crowned coat-of-arms. Morrieson, Aberystwyth, A/1; Brooker 766 (same obv. die); North 2337; SCBC 2891. Good VF, toned. $625

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Cromwell Broad

409117. COMMONWEALTH. Oliver Cromwell. Lord Protector, 1653-1658. AV Broad (29.5mm, 9.03 g, 6h). Dies by Simon. Blondeau’s mint, Drury House, London. Dated 1656. OLIVAR · D · G · R · P · ANG · SCO · HIB · &c PRO ·, laureate and draped bust left / · PAX · QVÆRITVR · BELLO · 16 56, crowned coat-of-arms. Lessen A2; W&R 39; Schneider 367; North 2744; SCBC 3225. EF. $45,000 Ex St. James 1 (13 October 2004), lot 478.

403600. SCOTLAND. Alexander III. 1249-1286. AR Penny (18mm, 1.54 g, 1h). First coinage. Type II. Glasgow mint; Walter, moneyer. Struck 1250-circa 1280. «ȄĚҟ«nēE ʽĚҟ, filleted head right; pronged scepter before / Ѿ« Ȅ˸ / E ɭH ŷ, long voided cross, with star in each angle. Burns 92C (fig. 50a); SCBI 35 (Ashmolean & Hunterian) 94 (same dies); SCBC 5042. VF, toned. Excellent portrait. $825 Ex Roderick MacPherson Collection (Dix, Noonan, & Webb 83, 30 September 2009), lot 3942, purchased from Baldwin’s, June 1987.

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994963. IRELAND, Hiberno-Norse. Phase I (Sihtric III Olafsson). Circa 995/7-1020. AR Penny (20mm, 1.47 g, 4h). Long Cross type. Difelin (Dublin) mint; Færeman, moneyer. Struck circa 1000-1010. ม ӲƪƊ˸ʽü ʽeม ĕӃŖ⌦⍵, draped bust left; pellet to right / ม Ŗ®ʽe⍵ƪዧ ⍵ณ∂ ĕӃŖ⌦ƪ, voided long cross, with pellet at center and triple-crescent ends; pellet in each central crescent. Cf. O’S 6 (for type); cf. Hild. 34 (same); cf. SCBI 8 (BM), 21 (same); SCBI 32 (Ulster), –; cf. SCBC 6103 (for type). EF, lightly toned. $3950

BRITISH MEDALS Elizabeth Claypole, Daughter of Oliver Cromwell

402821. COMMONWEALTH. Elizabeth Claypole, daughter of Oliver Cromwell. 1629-1658. Oval Uniface Æ Medal (40x45mm, 26.67 g). Memorial. After J. Kirk. Struck mid-late 18th century. Bust right, wearing pearl necklace; all within floral cartouche / Blank, though “Mrs/Cleypole” in script faintly visible. MI 431/76; Eimer –. EF, rich dark brown patina. Rare. $495 Ex Classical Numismatic Group 93 (22 May 2013), lot 1921.

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403477. temp. STUART. Sir Richard Browne, parliamentary general and Lord Mayor of London. Circa 1610-1669. Cast AR Military Reward (27x37mm, 8.68 g, 12h). By T. Simon(?) Dated 1644. · NON · VIR · SED · VIRTVS (Not the man but his virtue), armored bust facing slightly left / FOR KING AND PARLIAMENT 1644, coat-of-arms. MI 312/142; Eimer 144. Good VF, toned, light chasing. Rare. $3250 Ex Morton & Eden (21 May 2003), lot 1148; Greta S. Heckett Collection (Sotheby’s, 25 May 1977), lot 73.

Enlargement of 403798 78


Commemorating the Recovery of Nuestra Señora de la Concepción By William Phips - Early Treasure Hunter Provost Marshall General of the Dominion of New England

403798. STUART. James II, with Mary. 1685-1688. AR Medal (55mm, 66.77 g, 12h). Spanish Wreck Recovered by William Phips. By G. Bower. Dated 1687. · IACOBVS · II · ET · MARIA · D · G · MAG · BRI · FRAN · ET · HIB · REX · ET · REGINA ·, jugate draped busts of James, laureate and armored, and Mary right / SEMPER TIBI PENDEAT HAMUS · (always let your hook be hanging, –adapted from Ovid), ship under sail left on sea; in foreground, men in rowboats salvaging for wreckage; in two lines in exergue, NAVFRAGA REPERTA/1687 (shipwreck recovered). MI 619/33; Eimer 285; Betts 67. EF, toned. Rare. $4500 William Phips was an important figure in the early history of North America. Born in Massachusetts Bay Colony, as a child he apprenticed in carpentry and shipbuilding, eventually establishing a shipyard to produce small craft and merchant vessels. This first yard was destroyed during King Philip’s war, leading Phips to found a second in Boston. However, the merchant apparently found his chosen craft too dull and soon turned his eye towards ‘treasure hunting.’ Phips soon received a grant from the King providing him with a ship and initial funding for his Caribbean adventure in 1682. This first trip appears to have been a modest success and was followed by a second voyage in 1683, which did not fare as well and recovered only a few hundred pounds worth of treasure. Yet it was his third trip that would prove to be his greatest success. Phips, now buoyed by a number of investors, including the Crown, set sail for the New World in 1687 with two ships: the James and Mary and the Henry of London. There, on the Silver Bank north of what is now the Dominican Republic, the company found their boon: the Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, a Spanish galleon sunk in 1641. More than £200,000 worth of silver and gold was recovered from this wreck, greatly enriching Phips and his investors, including the Duke of Albemarle. The success of the expedition not only resulted in an increase in wealth for Phips’ but a boost to his social status as well. He was appointed Provost Marshall General of the Dominion of New England, a post which saw him involved in numerous military expeditions in the British Colonies, including the Port Royal and the Quebec expeditions, as well as in contact with several important political figures in Boston, such as Cotton Mather. His relationship with the powerful preacher later led to Phips being named the first royal governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Phips’ tenure as governor was preoccupied both with external conflicts with natives and the internal strife of the Salem witch trials.

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402820. HANOVER. Sir Henry Charles Englefield. 1752-1822. Æ Medal (20mm, 8.43 g, 6h). By G. Mills. Dually dated 1792 and 1817 (in Greek numerals). Bare head left; script Mills on truncation of nek / HCE monogram; AΨNB above, AΩIZ below. BHM 978; Eimer –. Superb EF, warm brown surfaces. $200

402818. HANOVER. Sir Henry Charles Englefield. 1752-1822. AR Medal (20mm, 11.47 g, 6h). By G. Mills. Dually dated 1792 and 1817 (in Greek numerals). Bare head left; script Mills on truncation of neck / HCE monogram; AΨNB above, AΩIZ below. BHM 978; Eimer –. Good VF, areas of toning. $250

979826. HANOVER. Victoria. 1837-1901. AV Medal (26mm, 12.94 g, 12h). Diamond Jubilee issue. By G.W. de Saulles, after T. Brock and W. Wyon. London . Dually dated 1837 and 20 June 1897 (the latter in Roman numerals). AGW 0.414 oz. VICTORIA ANNVM REGNI SEXAGESIMVM FELICITER CLAVDIT XX · IVN · MDCCCXCVII · , old head bust left / Young head left, wearing bandeau, set on filleted olive branch; to left LONGI-/ TVDO/DIERVM/IN/DEXTERA/EIVS (Length of days on her right) in six lines to left, ET IN/SINISTRA/GLORIA (and on [her] left, glory) in three lines to right. BHM 3506; Eimer 1817b. EF, matte surfaces, minor areas of toning. In original case of issue. $725

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Just Published – An Important New Work on Bactrian Numismatics

A Classical Numismatic Studies No. 8

New Discoveries in Bactrian Numismatics

by Brian Kritt

Kritt, Brian, New Discoveries in Bactrian Numismatics [Classical Numismatic Studies No. 8]. Lancaster, PA, and London, 2015. with dust jacket. 162 pp., consisting of 14 pages of prefatory material, and 148 pages of text and illustrations. 37 plates, including three color plates, and numerous in-text illustrations and coin photographs. (GR354) $45 In his last book, Dynastic Transitions in the Coinage of Bactria, Brian Kritt built on the Diodotid coinage model established by Frank Holt, and extended this analysis to produce the first detailed and comprehensive system for the attribution of the coinages of Euthydemus, the succeeding Greek king of Bactria. In the process, he has continued his studies of the eastern bronzes of the Seleucids and their successors in Bactria, developing further his interpretations of the role and significance of the recently discovered Seleucid colony of Aï Khanoum, in the far northeastern corner of what is today Afghanistan. Since that publication, a fabulous new hoard of Bactrian gold staters of the Diodotids and Euthydemus was discovered in the Ganges river valley of India, which has added a substantial amount of new information from coins which had previously been extremely rare, or unknown. Found in the village of Vaisali in Bihar, this treasure has famously dominated many of the auctions of Greek coins sold in the last dozen years or so, while failing to receive any detailed or systematic study of its contents or their implications. That is the challenge Dr. Kritt has undertaken in this current volume. The internal structure and compositon of the hoard, when numismatically analyzed, has produced numerous unexpected discoveries, and revealed interesting details concerning the virtually unknown history of this distant eastern kingdom in the later years of the third century BC. Some monetary practices and innovations that are encoded in the internal dynamics of the hoard have also come to light. In addition, some of the elements discovered have required modifications and new inter- pretations of previous models of the coinages of the Bactrian dynasties. Some individual new bronze coins have also been discovered since Dynastic Transitions was published and are discussed here. One truly remarkable Aï Khanoum bronze has the only representation of a river-god ever found on the coinage of the Seleucid Empire, the god of the Oxus river, while some new Parthian bronzes have shed light on more details of the eastern campaign of conquest undertaken by Antiochus III near the end of the third century BC, as well as providing a chronological fixed point in the early Parthian coinages. Evaluations of some new competing theories of the Diodotid coinages has led to some novel interpretations and understanding of some of the perplexing Bactrian “Pedigree” coins. An examination of inscribed seals written in the ancient language forms of the remote Indus valley culture has led to surprising connections to the control marks and symbols employed on the coins and dedications at Ai Khanoum. This unexpected discovery has required exotic and controversial conclusions involving an apparent influence from a remarkably distant era. 81


The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series by Oliver D. Hoover

Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of of Coins of Northern and Central Greece: Achaia Phthiotis, Ainis, Magnesia, Malis, Oita, Perrhaibia, Thessaly, Akarnania, Aitolia, Lokris, Phokis, Boiotia, Euboia, Attica, Megaris, and Corinthia. [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 4]. 2014. lxxvii + 563 numbered pages (GR333) $65 More than three decades have passed since David Sear published Greek Coins & Their Values, his revision of Gilbert Askew’s A Catalogue of Greek Coins published by B. A. Seaby in 1951. Since then, the field of ancient numismatics and the hobby of collecting ancient coins have changed so much that now Greek Coins & Their Values would require a complete revision to include all of the most current numismatic information available, list the many new types and varieties unknown to Sear, and determine an approximate sense of rarity for all of these issues. In order to encompass this new material and create a viable reference for the beginning and specialized collector, such a handbook would have to be more than the two volumes, which Sear found necessary. As a result, Classical Numismatic Group is publishing The Handbook of Greek Coinage, written by Oliver D. Hoover, in a series of 13 volumes, each covering a specified area of Greek coinage. Completion of the series is expected within five years. This series is designed to aid the user in the quick, accurate, and relatively painless identification of Greek coins, while providing a crossreference for each entry to a major work, which will allow the inquirer to pursue more in-depth research on the subject. The subject-matter of each volume is arranged chronologically for royal issues, and regionally for the civic issues; within each region, cities are listed directionally, depending on the region. For those rulers or cities that issued coins concurrently in all three metals, these issues will be arranged in the catalog with gold first, followed by silver, and then bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest. Known mints for the royal coinage are listed below the appropriate type, making an easy search for a specific mint. Each entry includes a rarity rating based on the frequency with which they appear in publications, public and private collections, the market, and/or are estimated to exist in public or private hands. No valuations are listed in the printed book, since such values are generally out of date by the time of publication. A web-based valuation guide, updated periodically, will allow users to gauge the market and reduce the need for repeated updates of this series. The handbook of Greek CoinaGe SerieS, Volume 12

Handbook of

Coins of baktria and anCient india Including Sogdiana, Margiana, Areia, and the Indo-Greek, Indo-Skythian, and Native Indian States South of the Hindu Kush

Platon c. 145–140 bc History Aside from the numismatic evidence which makes him a contemporary and probable brother of Eukratides II, nothing as known about the reign of Platon in Baktria. The lack of Indian standard silver and Indian module bronze coinage in his name implies that his power did not extend south of the Hindu Kush. Despite Platon’s production of four distinct series of tetradrachms, his reign may have been ephemeral. The coins are very rare and none of his types appear to have been copied by the Yuezhi and Skythians who completely overran the Graeco-Baktrian kingdom in c. 130 BC. Coinage Platon is only known to have struck four series of silver tetradrachms on the Attic standard. These carry the basic diademed portrait type as well as the helmeted portrait type popularized by Eukratides I. The reverses all depict Helios alone or in his solar chariot. It is unclear whether Platon’s use of Helios types was intended to connect him to his Baktrian contemporary, Heliokles I.

Fifth Century BC to First Century AD By

Oliver D. Hoover With a Foreword by Osmund Bopearachchi and a Series Preface by D. Scott VanHorn and Bradley R. Nelson

Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. Lancaster/London

Roman Imperial billon antoninianus of Probus (AD 276–282) from Serdica depicting Sol (Helios) in a facing quadriga.

The initial tetradrachm series is especially notable for the daring attempt to show the chariot and its horses en face. This facing treatment is extremely rare in Greek numismatic art although it later enjoyed some popularity in the Roman Imperial period. All of Plato’s coins name him in Greek as “King Platon the Illustrious.” Silver (Attic Standard) Tetradrachms (c. 16.96g)

165. Obv. Diademed bust of Platon r. Rev. BASILEWS EPIÏANoUS/PLATWNoS. Helios standing facing in fast quadriga. Monogram to l. Baktra. Bopearachchi Série 1. R2 59

Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Baktria and Ancient India Including Sogdiana, Margiana, Areia, and the Indo-Greek, IndoSkythian, and Native Indian States South of the Hindu Kush. Fifth Century BC to First Century AD. [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 12]. 2013. lxxxiv + 389 numbered pages. (GR341) $65 The seventh published volume in the series is Handbook of Coins of Baktria and Ancient India, Including Sogdiana, Margiana, Areia, and the Indo-Greek, Indo-Skythian, and Native Indian States South of the Hindu Kush, Fifth Century Centuries BC to First Century AD (Volume 12 in the series). Beginning with the Kingdom of Baktria, the catalog covers all the Graeco-Bacrian and Indo-Greek kings. This volume includes the Indo-Skythian rulers and satraps, as well as the local coinages of the region. The Indian coinages south of the Hindu Kush are also included. While not obviously Greek coinage, these issues were struck in the context of their Greek neighbors and will add further evidence to the complex monetary systems of the region.

Available for order at www.cngcoins.com


Also in the Series Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Sicilian Coins (Inlcuding Lipara): Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues. Sixth to First Centuries BC [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 2]. 2012. lxxxii and 300 numbered pp. (GR 331) $65 The sixth published volume in the series is Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and RomanoSicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC (Volume 2 in the series). Beginning with Abakion, the catalog covers all the mints of Sicily, as well as the royal issues of Syracuse, and the Siculo-Punic coinage. The mints within each region are arranged alphabetically. The coinage within each city is arranged chronologically, beginning with the Archaic issues and continuing through the later civic issues. Issues in this catalog arranged in the catalog with silver first, followed by bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest. Both civic and royal coinages of these areas are covered.

Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of the Peloponnesos: Achaia, Phleiasia, Sikyonia, Elis, Triphylia, Messenia, Lakonia, Argolis, and Arkadia, Sixth to First Centuries BC [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 5]. 2011. lxxiv and 293 numbered pp. (GR 334) $65 The fourth published volume in the series is Handbook of Coins of the Peloponnesos: Achaia, Phleiasia, Sikyonia, Elis, Triphylia, Messenia, Lakonia, Argolis, and Arkadia, Sixth to First Centuries BC (Volume 5 in the series). Beginning in the northern Peloponessos with Achaia, this volume is arranged southward around the coast, and then northward, ending with Arkadia in the central Peloponessos. The mints within each region are arranged alphabetically. The coinage within each city is arranged chronologically, beginning with the Archaic issues and continuing through the later civic issues in the name of Alexander. Issues in this catalog arranged in the catalog with silver first, followed by bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest. Also included in this catalog are the issues of the Achaian and Arkadian Leagues. Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, and Carpathian Seas (excluding Crete and Cyprus), Sixth to First Centuries BC [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 6]. 2010. lxxiii and 358 numbered pp. Hardbound. (GR335) $65 The third published volume in the series is Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, and Carpathian Seas (excluding Crete and Cyprus), Sixth to First Centuries BC (Volume 6 in the series). This volume contains not only many extreme rarities and issues of some of the more obscure islands, but it also includes most of the major island mints like Thasos, Aegina, Rhodes, Kos, and Samos. This volume is arranged geographically from the Adriatic Sea eastward to the Carpathian Sea, from north to south, and with each island entry within each sea in alphabetical order. The coinage within each city is arranged chronologically, beginning with the Archaic issues and continuing through the later civic issues in the name of Alexander. Where rulers or cities issued coins concurrently in all three metals, these issues will be arranged in the catalog with gold first, followed by silver, and then bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest. Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia (with Kolchis and the Kimmerian Bosporos), Fifth to First Centuries BC [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 7]. 2012. lxxxii and 352 numbered pp. Hardbound. (GR) (GR 336) The fifth published volume in the series is Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia (with Kolchis and the Kimmerian Bosporos), Fifth to First Centuries BC (Volume 7 in the series). The catalog covers the territories of the Black Sea coast, beginning with the Kimmerian Bosporos and ending with Bithynia. The catalog then moves to the contiguous regions of the interior - Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia. The mints within each region are arranged alphabetically. The coinage within each city is arranged chronologically, beginning with the Archaic issues and continuing through the later civic issues in the name of Alexander. Issues in this catalog arranged in the catalog with silver first, followed by bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest. Both civic and royal coinages of these areas are covered. Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Syrian Coins: Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 9]. 2009. lxxviii and 332 numbered pp. (GR338) $65 The first published volume in the series is Handbook of Syrian Coins: Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC (Volume 9 in the series). This series is designed to aid the user in the quick, accurate, and relatively painless identification of Greek coins, while providing a cross-reference for each entry to a major work, which will allow the inquirer to pursue more in-depth research on the subject. The subject-matter of each volume is arranged chronologically for royal issues, and regionally for the civic issues; within each region, cities are listed directionally, depending on the region. For those rulers or cities that issued coins concurrently in all three metals, these issues will be arranged in the catalog with gold first, followed by silver, and then bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest. Known mints for the royal coinage are listed below the appropriate type, making an easy search for a specific mint.

Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of the Southern Levant: Phoenicia, Southern Koile Syria (Including Judaea), and Arabia, Fifth to First Centuries BC [The Handbook of Greek Coinage Series, Volume 10]. 2010. lxxix and 201 numbered pp. (GR339) $65 The second published volume in the series is Handbook of Coins of the Southern Levant: Phoenicia, Southern Koile Syria (Including Judaea), and Arabia, Fifth to First Centuries BC (Volume 10 in the series). This volume is arranged geographically from north to south with each region’s city entries in alphabetical order. The coinage within each city is arranged chronologically and begin with the royal issues during the Persian Empire (as is the case with the cities of Phoenicia), through the issues of Alexander the Great (both lifetime issues and those later civic issues in his name). Where rulers or cities issued coins concurrently in all three metals, these issues will be arranged in the catalog with gold first, followed by silver, and then bronze; each metal is arranged by denomination, largest to smallest.


The Dr. Lawrence A. Adams Collection Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Alexander Adams was born on May 31, 1935 in Los Angeles, California, the son of Alexander and Lucille (née Spiker) Adams. His father was a salesman in the Wholesale Market and Restaurant business. Dr. Adams died unexpectedly on March 24, 2015, just a couple of months short of what would have been his 80th birthday. Larry is survived by Meredith (née Nieboer) Adams, his wife of 54 years. A prominent Dermatologist specializing in Dermatologic Surgery (Mohs-Micrographic Surgery), Larry worked his entire professional career for Kaiser Permanente in the Greater Los Angeles area. Larry received both his undergraduate degree and then his medical education at Loyola University of Chicago, the Stritch School of Medicine, graduating with his M.D. in 1960. He did his internship through the Veterans Administration Los Angeles Healthcare System in 1960-1; his residency in General Surgery at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1961-2; and his residency in Dermatology at the McGaw Medical School of Northwestern University from 1964-7. Larry practiced medicine in California from 1965 right up until his death in March of 2015, primarily at the Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Panorama City Medical Center. Besides medicine and his family, Larry’s third passion in life was numismatics, which he began pursuing in the 1960s. A friend of Larry’s, Don Corrigan (the son of famous aviator Douglas “Wrong-way” Corrigan), advised Larry to purchase only gold coins, and Larry followed this advice throughout his collecting career. He purchased gold coinage from ancient to modern, with an emphasis on the Middle East, the Early Middle Ages, and the Ptolemies of Egypt. He had specialized collections of Kushan, Kushano-Sasanian, Indian (an extensive collection), and Bosporan gold coinage. He liked Dutch gold coinage, as his wife is of Dutch ancestry, and he collected French gold pattern coinage. Over the last few years, he had started to collect gold medals, particularly those from Latin America. In short, if it was gold, and numismatically related, Larry probably collected it! He had a “good eye” for coins, and rarity was more important to Larry than quality, the mark of a “true” collector and numismatist. Larry belonged to many numismatic clubs and organizations, both locally and nationally, but he was especially proud of his membership in the “Sunday Morning Get Together”, a numismatic breakfast group founded by Richard “Dick” Lissner, Irving “Irv” Goodman, and M. Louis “Mark” Teller. Larry joined the group within the first year of its formation. Composed of serious, committed numismatists, this “club” grew to become a “who’s who” of prominent collectors in the greater Los Angeles area. Members included Dr. Osmund Chan, Dr. Robert Hesselgesser, Dr. Vladimir Golovchinsky and Paul Covey from San Antonio, Texas. Victor England would sometimes join the group when travelling through the area, and wives, children, and grandchildren were always welcomed as guests. Another organization that Larry was quite active in was the Society of Ancient Numismatics (or SAN). Larry contributed several articles to the SAN Journal, and eventually became the 84


publisher of the Journal in 1995. Larry, along with the assistance of David Vagi and Victor England, continued to publish the SAN Journal until 2002. Larry was also active in the American Numismatic Society (ANS), which he joined in 1982. He became a Fellow of the ANS in 1997, and a Trustee in 2001. He served on the Finance and Collections committees, and was a member of the Augustus B. Sage Society, an exclusive group for the most serious, dedicated members of the ANS. Professionally, Larry was the West Coast Representative for the Classical Numismatic Group from 1995 until his death. Larry was a fixture at the CNG bourse table at the New York International Numismatic Convention, the Chicago International Coin Fair, and the annual summer convention of the American Numismatic Association. He represented CNG at most of the numismatic bourses in the San Francisco area. If CNG did not have a table at a numismatic convention, Larry was often behind the table of Mark Teller and Company. Larry purchased coins from most of the leading dealers throughout his numismatic career, but relied primarily on CNG (Victor England and Eric McFadden), Mark Teller, and Stephen Album for the majority of his purchases. Larry loved to talk coins, and interacted at shows and club meetings with collectors and dealers that shared his passion. If a dealer (or collector) was visiting the Los Angeles area, Larry and Meredith would often meet them for dinner and numismatic conversation. The collection of Dr. Lawrence A. Adams will be sold by Classical Numismatic Group in a series of sales: several of the firm’s electronic online auctions; CNG 100, an Internet and Mail Bid Sale scheduled for 7 October 2015; and Triton XIX, to be sold in conjunction with the 44th Annual New York International Numismatic Convention on Tuesday and Wednesday, 5-6 January 2016. Some of Larry’s favorite numismatic auction catalogs were the sales of the Virgil M. Brand Collection, sold by Sotheby’s in Zurich, Switzerland in ten parts from July of 1982 to October of 1985. As a tribute to Larry and the significance of his collection, CNG is following in the tradition of the Brand sales and presenting the Dr. Lawrence A. Adams Collection in four separate catalogs using the Brand catalog format.

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The Dr. Lawrence A. Adams Collection Presented in four separate catalogs. Over 3000 gold coins of the ancient and modern world Presale estimate in excess of $9 million

CNG 100, Closing 7 October 2015: 1300 plus lots Ancient Greek & Bosporan, Sasanian & Kushan Kingdoms, Dark Ages, World, United States, Olympic Medals & British

Electronic Auction 361, 14 October, 2015: 650 plus lots Ancient & World

Triton 19, 5-6 January: 750 plus lots Ancient , Indian & World

Electronic Auction 366, 13 January 2016: 300 plus lots Indian

Selections from CNG 100

Lydia, Alyattes EL Trite

Bosporus, Mithradates III with Claudius AV stater

Tauric Chersonesos AV Stater

Cyprus, Salamis Evagoras I AV 1/10th Stater

Ephesos EL Half Stater

Kyrenaica AV Drachm 86


Sasanian Kings, Yazdagard I AV Dinar

Lombards, Cunincpert AV Tremissis

Revolt of the Heraclii at Carthage AV Solidus

Beneventum, Luitprand AV Solidus

Constantine V EL Solidus at Rome

Austria, Salzburg 1628 AV 4 Dukat

Axumite, Wazzeba AV Unit

Denmark 1792 AV Dukat

Visigoths, Recceswinth AV Tremissis at Toledo

Germany, Saxony August II, as King of Poland AV ½ Dukaten 87


Transylvania, Maria Theresa 1778 AV 2 Ducats

Anglo-Saxon England “Crispus” AV Thrymsa

Italy, Naples Ferdinand II 1854 AV 6 Ducati

Edward VI AV Half Sovereign

Netherlands, Holland 1673 AV 3 Dukaten

Scotland, James VI AV £20

United States 1800 AV Liberty $5

Anglo Gallic, Edward Black Prince AV Hardi d’Or

Paris Olympics 1924 Gold Badge

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Revenge of the Solidi A comic by Jeremy Bostwick

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Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.

Post Office Box 479, Lancaster, PA 17608-0479 • Tel: (717) 390-9194 Fax: (717) 390-9978 20 Bloomsbury St., London WC1B 3QA • Tel: +44 (20) 7495 1888 Fax: +44 (20) 7499 5916 Email: cng@cngcoins.com • www.cngcoins.com


CNG CNR July 2015