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GOODS O LY.

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Upper O'Connell Street.

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8

Iu L 6, 1912. July 6

[AN CLAIDHEAMH SOLUIS.J

RETURN OF AN DALACH.

An Dalach reached Doire on Saturday, and was back m his old place in the League Offices He came into touch o� Monday morning. w1t.h 1:1an� of the leading Gaels of the States He spoke at the great wh.Ile_ m N�w York. Feis m Celtic Park, at the prize distribution in the Lexi_ngton A venue Opera House, and at the Coi:vent�on of �he New York Gaelic League. � he dmner given Padraig O'Dalaigh by the Umted Gaelic League Branches of Greater New York at the Hotel Knickerbocker on the evening of June r_8th, was a great success, despite the fact that it was very hurriedly gotten together. About one hundred guests attended and a large number sent regrets that they could not be present at the occasion on account of the shortn_ess �f the notice given them. Among the distmgmshed guests present were Major-General John F. O'Ryan, Commander N.Y. State troops; Dr. Francis Quinlan, Dr. Roger Power O'Neill, D�. Gertrude B. Kelly, Miss Eleanor R. Cox, M�ss_ Mattie Sheridan, Miss Lecky, Commissioners Murphy and Dalton, Judge McAdoo, Mrs. Tracy Edson, President of the National Arts Club; Dr. Nelson, representing Bishop Greer of the Episcopal Church; Father Kenny, S.J., Hon Denis A. Spellissy, the genial propnetor of the Knickerbocker. Mr. ]. B. Regan, who _has always been an ardent supporter of the Gaelic League, came as an invited guest. Fa!her M. C. Kelly_ came from Highland Falls �nct was acc<?ml?amed by Father Timothy I. Shanley, of this city. Father Power and William M. Byrne, both of whom were to attend, sent regrets at the last moment that they could not come. Letters of sympathy with the Gaelic League movement, and with regret that they could be present, were received from the following persons :-President Wm. Taft, through his Secretary ; Senator O'Gorman, Dr. Parkhurst, Mayor Gaynor, Gen. Thomas H. Barry, Com�nander U.S.A. ; Mr. James Byrne, John D. Crimmins, Justices Martin ]. Keogh, Victor .J. Dowling, John Ford, and John W. Goff, Bishop D. H. Greer, Mr. George J. Gillespie.

--.. .i:�--

Illness of Domhnall O Murchadha. The sudden illness of Domhnall O Murchadha one of the three Oireachtas Secretaries last' ' week, would have greatly upset Oireachtas a�range11:ents had it preventel him from taking his part m the plays and from performing many other duties. His friends and fellow workers were relieved when he appeared at the Sugradh G�edheal on Sunday, and their joy was veiy evident on Tuesday night when he played the part of " Mainchin" in Tomas O hAodha's play.

CoL&1rce C01111AXCC,

1912.

TOURMAKEADY COLLEGE.�· Staf£-p6�t101c 6 "Oo-rhn_.o.tt�rn (-6.Jtu-ott.o.m}; m,;,1t1e n1 tu��.<:\1t; .<.\�, c.6.c p.o.utto}C O Con5.o.ot.o., B. A. ; Se.0.5.<:\n RU.<:\U.:\!TI; eo5.o.n O ffi61lle, Se<.\mur mac mu1t11r.

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COURSES,

1912.

rst Session, July 8th-August 3rd. znd Session, August 5th-August 31st. Courses in (r) Methods of Teaching. (2) Phonetics-A Special Course in Tonic Soifa Singing will be given by 'Com.&r 6 11-.0.ot>.6. in connection with this subject. (3) Old Irish. (5) Latin, through Programme. Bilingual (4) the medium of Irish. (6) Composition. (7) School Work. (8) Singing. (9) Secondary Local Topography. (ro) Summer School Work. (r r) Dancing. STAFF :-Revd. J. O'Donohue, Professor of Irish, St. Flannan's csu;« Ennis. (Head Master rst Session). Revd. J as. Hayes, Professor of Irish, St. 51.Munchin's College, Limerick. (Head Master znd Session). 'Com.&r O 11u.6.tt.&m, M.E., Dublin. 'Com.&r O 11-.0.ot>.6., Dublin. p.&'O'f'.6.15 0 11-.o.1tc1p, Dublin. Se.&n 6 mu1pt1te, G.L.O.

The College-residential for the Staff and about twenty students-is beautifully situated (Seven miles from Kilkee) on the Shannon Estuary, in a district unrivalled for Irish Folk-song and Folk-lore, Sea-bathing, Boating, Fishing, Cliff Scenery, Antiquities, etc. The Ideal Summer College for the Student and the holiday-maker alike. Send at once for Ct.&r and full particulars to se.J.11 :son.uu 111, ·r 'Oj-oicec'o .o.n cu1r, Co. .6.n CLl.11'· 1.

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FIRST SESSION from Jt1ly 1st to August 3rd. SECOND SESSION from August 5th to September 14th.

Certificates of the College will

Splendid Irish-speaking . �xcellent te3:ching. district. Mountam and Lake Scenery. Sea within a few hours bicycle ride. Free trout fishing. Good accommodation.

be recognised by the National

SPIDDAL COLLEGE. Staff-.6.n • Ut1, m ec enri (-6.pu-otl.<:\m); 'Com<.\r m cc Uomn,{\1tt; "C?mt-r 6 Col.m Sm ; p1t1b 6 Udtu11on ; C.<:\1cl1n 111c 5.<:\0.<:\nn; Se-'mur 6 muttcond.

ONE SESSION, from August 5th to September 7th, Most Irish speaking district. Irish the daily language of 93 % of the people over three years. Comfortable lodgings. Sea and Mountain. Seabathing. Boating. Free fishing. Unsurpassed Teaching Methods. For further particulars apply to.6.11 c.o.C.o.1n 'bn.1.0.n 6 cn.106.6.m, St. or or

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-tay Makeof

Ty newrtrer Reo str«

Gaels remember! an Irish-Irelander when you want New or Second-hand Typewriters, Duplicators, Stencils Stencil Ink, Ribbons. Carbons, Paper, etc. Typewriting and Duplicating in Irish or English at reasonable rates,

The Foley Typewriter Trading Compnnv, Tel. 117 Y

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SOUTH DUBLIN UNION.

COAL AND COKE \VAXTED.

" 1 5Cu1rnne .o.r eo5.o.n 6 Con1r.6.1'6e .o.5t1r .6.t' .6.t' '6e1t1 re .6.'f' j-o n 'Ce.6.n5.6.t1 .&'f' S111nre..1r .6.5ur cum Cot15.6.1m .6. t.6.t'.>.6.1f\'C 'Oo Connr.6.'6 n.6. 5.6.e'61t5e .6. cum orbpe .6. cup cum cmn bero .6.n Cot.&1f'Oe 1 5C.6.f\t'.6.15 t1.6. C.6.t'.>.6.tC.6.15." -11e1u1 111 1Jn.1.o.111. SUMMER

1912.

Board.

\Vanted for .v= above Unio!1 a Supply of Co�l, to be delivered at the Union, its Dispensanes and Auxiliaries, in quantities of not less than a cargo of 300 to 400 Tons at a time as may be required and ordered, until the 30th day of June, 1913. The estimated quantity required is:HOUSE COAL 5,000 Tons. SCOTCH COALS 2,000 do. Total 7,000 Torn;. The accepted Contractor will be required to deliver 3,000 tons before the 30th September, 1912. Tenders to be submitted for Coal supply to Vvorkhouse and Auxiliaries. SCOTCH COLLIERIES. Geo. Taylor and Co.'s, Hard Ayr, Bargany Ayrshire, Auchencruvie, and Wallsend Coal. � The Slack in any one cargo must be delivered separately, and said slack must not exceed 5 per cent. of the gross weight of the cargo. ENGLISH COLLIERIES. St. Helens, Workington, Ellenborough, Broughton, Plas-pow Coal, Hard Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, and Point of Ayr Coal. The Slack in any one cargo must be delivered separately, and said slack must not exceed 6 per cent. of the gross weight of the cargo. The Guardians also invite Tenders from Irish Collieries. The Dispensaries of the Union are also to be supplied with the same quality Coal (English} as supplied to the Workhouse (at the same price) as ordered from time to time. The Guardians will require Colliery Certificates and Bills of Lading, with each cargo at time of discharge before they accept delivery, and a written guarantee that the Coals delivered are part of the said cargo, and may send their officials to inspect same. Contractors will be bound to pay their workmen the standard rate of wages, and to employ carters (if any) who pay their workmen the standard rate of wages obtaining in Dublin. COKE. Best Irish, per chaldron. Printed Forms of Tender and all further particulars can be had on application to the Master of the Workhouse. Solvent security in the sum of One Thousand Pounds will be required for the due performance of the Contract. Tenders to be lodged with me at my Office not later than rz o'clock, noon, on Wednesday, the roth July, 1912, on which day they will be considered by the Guardians. ·The Guardians do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any Tender. (By Order of the Board), JOHN P. CONDON, Clerk of the Union. Office : I J ames's Street, Dublin, 26th June, 1912.

Head l\1aster-'00t111C-6.D 6 to1115sr5 (Professor of Irish, Blackrock College and Ladies' Training College, Gerysfori.) Assisted byseimur 6 su1tleol'>61t1, B.A., Professor of Irish and Classics, Mount Melleray Seminary.

TO BE HELD 1:-,; THE

COURTHOUSE GROUNDS, WATERFORD, On Sunday, July 7th.

----:·-·

mice6l (> n1050.o.t1u{\1n, N. Teacher, Professor of Irish. seimur 6 Uorhn5d1le, Teacher of Traditional Singing, &c.

Competitions in Irish Language, History, Story telling, Fiddle Playing, Choral and Solo Singing, Dancing, &c., &c .

College opens on July 8th.

GREAT BAND CONTEST.

p.&ur-0.15 6

Se.o.5'6.6., 1lun.6.1t:>e.

Competitions for Brass and Reed Bands, Fife and Drum Bands, War-pipe Bands. ALL THE

LEADING

51 COMPETITIONS.

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VALUABLE PRIZES.

ADMISSION

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Excursion Trains from all Parfs.

--·:·--


tci. 6, 1912. July 6, 1912

I

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By Rev. J. Halpin, P.P., and with contributions in Irish by Dr. Douglas Hyde and Canon P.

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\YAXTED by Co1rne Ce,0nnc<.'.1l1 no. m,-oe, three Irish teachers to teach in Branches and Schools Guaranteed salary from branches alone £72. A certificate from a recogni�ed Irish College will be essential, and competency to teach step-dancing and singing will also be a recommendation. Applications must be forwarded before 29th June to P-'tll1.d1C 6 r�tt.<\m.6.m, .6.n U.6.1m.

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TEACHING OF IRISH MUST BEGIN IN HiF ANT CLASSES.

The Lord Mayor of Dublin, to whom the Gaelic League in general is deeply indebted for hisJkindness and activity on its behalf during Oircachtas week, presided on Friday, July 5th, at the best and most spirited of all the The purpose of the Oireachtas gatherings. meeting was set out in the following resolution which was proposed by the President of the League:" That this meeting expresses its profound dissatisfaction at the central administration of primary education in Irish-speaking and Englishspeaking districts, and we reiterate the demands of the Ard Fheis as follows :-' Being convinced that realJy satisfactory results cannot be attained from the teaching of Irish in the third and higher standard in the National Schools, we request the Commissioners of National Education to make provision in the next estimate for payment for the teaching of Irish in all standards from the infants up.' " Dr. Hyde said that the Gaelic League was out to make Irish-speakers of the rising generation. It was useless to hope that children who take up Irish for the first time in the fourth standard could become a Gaedhi]geoir before leaving school. He called for an explanation from the Commissioners as to why the grant for teaching Irish in the junior standards was refused. A very imperfect report of Eoin Mac Neill's remarkable speech, says :Mr. Eoin Mac Neil1, in seconding the resolutions, said he should register his conviction at the outset that they had had too many requests and too many protests. They were getting tired of protests and requests, and the public were getting tired of their attitude of protest and request. He believed they could not rely upon the support of the public in a policy of He thought that when request and protest. the requests and protests had been made-and they had made them ad nauseam-the resources of civilisation were not yet exhausted (Applause.) There was no doubt that the national opinion of the country was behind them on the question. But they wanted something more than public The reason They wanted action. opinion. there was that was inaction was there why between the authorities and the public opinion of the country a thing which was shaped by that system of education. They should expect that the principles that should underlie education would be advocated by the head masters and the managers' associations, and the teachers' associations, and that the campaign should be · fought out by them. They saw, week after week, reports of meetings of these associations. Vv ere these meetings taken up with the consideration of the principles and ideals of Irish education? No. So far as could be judged from the reports of the whole proceedings of these meetings, they were dominated by questions of salary and status and endowment. In those Boards they had ten (Applause.) Catholics and ten Protestants. They were supposed to be there to see that fair play was given to each religion, but they used their position in order to secure foul play in matters of Irish nationality. (Applause.) The people had the remedy in their own hands, and he saw signs that before long they would know how to put that remedy into effect. (Applause.) Liam Mac Giollabride, Una Ni Fhaircheallaigh, Sean O Caoimh, and An Dochartach supported the resolution. Michael Smidic pointed out that while only a paltry sum had been grudgingly granted for Irish fees, the British Treasury had expended over £50,000,000 in forcing an anglicised school system on the country. The Lord Mayor, in putting the resolution, which was passed, said it would be admitted that on all occasions when the Gaelic League wanted to fight, and were in earnest about the fight, they had shown all sections of the people of that country that they knew how to If the Gaelic League wanted to fight fight. upon this question they would find now, as they found during the last four or five years, an active, strong and well-informed public opinion prepared to stand with them to the end of the fight. In Ireland, for the last hundred years, they had never got anything without fighting for it. Neither the English Government nor anv Department ever formed by them had ever been known to do a graceful thing in a graceful The ):'ational Board. by neglecting to way. train the youth of Ireland in the Irish language, were striking a fell blow at the success Oi the );°ational University, because if the young men of the country were not fit to go in for a L'nivcrsitv . were . examination in Irish thev

13, 1912

1t1L

12

July 13, 1912

[AN CLAIDHEAMH 90LUIS,]

preventing the X ational University �om becoming successful. He thought that idea should be sounded throughout the country for the purpose of driving into their movement all the great and powerful influences that were con-. In the nected with the Xational University. course of the next five or ten years the young men of that country would have either �f two courses open to them-Trinity .College T :v1th<?ut compulsory Irish, or the X ational University If these young men with compulsory Irish. had not got an opportunity of becoming proficient in Irish, when they were going for the University Degrees, human nature was human nature, and very many that ought to go to the National University would take the line of least resistance, apart altogether from the monetary inducements which Trinity held out. When the Gaelic League gave the lead in the University fight we followed, said the Lord Mayor, give us the lead again and I promise you that the public representatives will fight with you to a finish. Vrnws

OF A ScHOOL MANAGER.

Canon Arthur Ryan, P.P., Tipperary, wrote" It seems to me that the future of Irish in the primary schools depends on the training of the Great dissatisfaction has primary teachers. been expressed by managers at the inefficiency of teachers who hold certificates for Irish granted by the training colleges. The standard in this all-important subject is very low. Unless the standard is raised 'for the teachers sent out to teach Irish, the future for Irish in the primary schools will be gloomy indeed."

A,n

t: 1 o mn -.,

+

nu o;

Seo e .o.n:f rre.t\511.A "Oeq1t-6 oe.o.l1f.6.-0-r.6. ..,11 •"eA"' I" "v.0.tl 1� ' l 10111 .o.� m•n oerc• rn1' m�l' m' rn._,H;rn, · co1h "COi�01r , · 1 t e xr· . Cp.6.CCf.i.-0 teir .6.11 5ce1rc .0. l:"111 ln1J1 • 1'- , r 1r ,r��"01t1 1 rom .6.f• 11.0. q11 pt�nc ...,1111 ...,1u 11-0 .o.ise o ..\lne.o. te 1,.0.ul>Ap .1. (1) .0.11 cre.o.t1-ce1r-c, .1. '5.o.e-61t-s uo . r .(\11 " \\110 do you think I am ? " (2) '5.6.e-6il -e.�?'1 6 ::, r q1e t>e.o.11t ..\ t>.o.1te , ._\.-t.o. ct, ..,t. Se.o.-6, 111.61"0111 tc (1), LA .6.11 ce1rc r1n fOC�lJI .o.n .6.5 Conetl0.6.11 6 rnu1mne.o.ci111 'DO l>Al1l1 .0.11 o.o.in oir "00 -6e1rm111e.o.CL .(\r " 'bo-oe,c .t\11 C6cu t ..,ccn.o. II re " 01_!1 11� me .(\1� �e t1te.o.r o,e1t .0.5.0.c:" 111011 ,h;.o.r�'· plA.\111 .6.C"C .6. 1'.6.-0 50 5C.6.1C}'11111'U 1 5con111t11-6e -_i:;e1lte f .O.'O , ' . . . 'UO mo t.6.-0 11 ..., 11'5.o.e-01 t5eo1111 re111. S111 11u-o n ..,c }'Cl'O .o. tl11u50.-6. Ct1q111111r, mo.11 r111, " Ce f.o.01te ..,r r:u (�r 1r u61;s te.o.-c) .o.-ci .0.5.0.c ? " m.6.11 '.5.o.e-61t:s .0111. ni'� Locc .6.l1 brc .(\5.0.m-r.o. .6.")1" Ce he rmj-e "0.6.1' le -0 ..,011111'> 'i II 1,: ."O�C.6. :S�l1 re1u111 e r1_n 'UO 11i-6, A�Uf ;sup uc..,r �11 11.0.-0 e: .o.cz .o.n, �-.o.b.6;111ce.o.11 50 co1-cce.o.nn-c.o. e? 8111 e .A11 ceir-c le 11e1'UCCAC .0.5.0.11111. 1r 10111"0.6. 11U'O lllf en t>e.<\11t.o. re111 lf re1u111 'UO ")1A"O, cu111 1 :sce..r How do you fare? "Give you good-morrow," 111t.' .t\Cc c.o.u 1r r1� 1.6.'?, 1 5co1i111l111u uo " How d'ye do ? :, " Good 11"1,· ? 1r fC�"J1l1 t10m-f�. :SO 1110)1 All JIU'O morn1?g, .o.-Oe1")1Ce.6.")1 n o, .6.11 ")1U"O 1r fe1'U1")1 'UO l1.6.U. Ru-o e1te nf " Ce he m1re "0.6.11 te "0.0.011110 ? " .o.sur h10n.o.11n .6.CC 1r 1on.o.nn e .o:sur " Who do men <ay I am ? :: Who do men thin-� I .am,?,',',, n6, _1�oc.o.t .6.f1 toc.o.t, b rern111 :so 'neor.o.'6 \Vho am I, as people thmk t " -6.n Se.o.o.o.c " u{11nn n6 t:ome..r 6 mi1lte n6 .6.o'6 0 "OUOC.6.15, -Cl11{q1 :SO mb101111 b.6.111C .o.5ur CU1m1tc .O.C.6. te1r .6.11 ll'5.6.CUll5 5.0.C .6.�� 11.e f·otu1r, .6.11 n-Uf.6.1'0CCAJ1 .-1.11 11101) C.0.111-ce r111 50 :sn.o.C.6.C. 1 u-c.o.oo (2), 1r m.0.1-t t10m .0.11 tll.o.1cf11e.o.c .0.11 Aon toc.o.t 10.m � "0-c�oo, 5�e-6�t5e.o.c-<:1r ;1'.e t>e.o.11t.o. n.o. h.&t1'0· � C.6.-Cf1.6.C. 11.o. l:"05.6.-0 re Of1111 C 111.6. CU1f11m .6.11-fpelf lf.0.11 oroc.o.t r.o.u.o. r10.-6.o.111 fro .o.15e .1. "Mosstharnoshin111 "00\5 t10m 50 O}'tllt re 11e1-6n;ste 1 fainhaina. 5ce.o.11c .o.15e rem 11.(\. .0.5 HlfCCAtt'U 6 Ce.0110.o.1tt 111 11.6.C toc-c Of1"C..6., .o.5ur 5.0.n Oltie.o.'U -c.o.1i:15e .\CA .6.f1 c�n...1'n�nc n.o. m1-6e (.o:c_:.& !1'°'c �OJI 1 n-.e.0.5.0.10,, f01f110l1) .6.5Uf ..6.C.6. .0.5.0.m-r.o. "00 00-0f1U15 CU1'0 OC.0.5 '0.6. re.o.n-j.-Ulf111111 le ce1r-ce.o.11n.o.10 (11.&11 te151-6 "01.0. 5u11 mur-c.0.11 n6 Seo m.0.11 m6tt-6i1t .0.5.0.m .6.f.6.111 re111 .A11 mei-o r111 !) " mi'r "0 Af1 1161r1un re111 -00 11e1-6-cooC.(.\11ll1-fC e : Cu1111m1r be.o.")11.o. ..,1p rm .0.11 .o.n 5cum.d ro: j.-e111 e." " Even if it is [only ?J according to our ( =my) own " Own notion." lf be.u11t.o. '00 "re111 .o.:sur 111 "OC.6.11f.6."0 " emne .o.n 5n6 '00 " rem." " even " e so "OCO '000 .o.5ur 5ur haina . .6.-CA le 11e1-6rn.o.c. Seo (e.o., a) .An C.6.11.6.trl.6.111-C .6.-CA .0.11 " e r.i.n ti1n'le. mo.11 "O'f.'u.6.r:st6c.o.111n .o.n roc.o.t fl.6."0.6.111 tl'O e1te .1. " Faggadamugada" .1. " l-'.&5.0.u .o.mu1c .0.5.0.u e." b'j_-en:��J1 :SUtt.6.b 1011.6.1111 f0111 fOC.o.t Af1 fOC�t Af be.Attl.o. Let me leave 1t to you outside [of the .t\SUf 111 rern1tt " fASf.(.\'O " (.1. "rk.o.-o" 1 question]." -0.cc reo ce1rc 5c.o.n.Ath.o.111-c) uo cul' .o.n "faggad." Clte 0")1.6.11111 "00111 0At1t1-r.o. .1. .0.11 rem111 "f.6.5.0."0 II 1)0 oe1-t .0.5.6.11111 1 5c.o.n.o.111.o.1nc .6.CA u'e1r o.&1r 1 11-1011A'O " fAS.6.1m " (let me leave) ? seos-0.ti1 t.6.orue. ,

I

:u

<,

11

II

1

ARD-FHEIS DEMAND.

On the motion of Padraig de Brett, seconded by Eibhlin Nie Neill, the following resolution was adopted-" We agree with the Irish National Teachers' Congress that fees should be paid for the teaching of Irish to the children in the junior standards, and that the fees should be paid in all standards in respect of the pupils who attend 75 per cent. of the classes, as in the case of cookery.''

---·:·--

THE NEW COISTE GNOTHA.

II

II

II

---··:---

--·:·--

A LETTER FROM THE FAR WEST.

The " resident " members or baill na cathracb are :BAILE ATHA CLIA TH. Micheal Smidic An tA thair Padraig O Flannagain Seaghan T. 0 Ceallaigh O Rathghaille Una Ni Fhaircheallaigh Domhnall O M urchadha Tomas Aghas Eibhlin Ni Dhonnabhain Risteard O Foghludha . Diarmuid O Cruaidlaoich Maire Ni Aodain Tomas Mac D. 0 Mathghamhna Micheal O Foghludha Seamus O Cathasaigh An Mairtineach

167 161 161 160 155 152 138 134 124 123

I I5 108 107 107 106

--•)-East Kelowna, British Columbia, June 7th. DEAR SIR, -As I am taking in AN CLAIDHEAMH �OLUIS, and intend being a regular subscriber, I would hke to _kno-w ve_ry much if I might use your columns. to ge� mformat10n on the Irish language which I am studying as a member of the Gaelic Alliance and on any Irish matter which is of interest to m� and if ' so, if there is any charge for it. I am the o.1ly Irish Ireland.er in this district and �vould be deeply indebted to you if you would kindly inform me. Yours faithfully, ] . 1\1. CARPENDALE. . [Our corre�ondent is welcome to any help we can g1\·e ....

The " non-resident" members or baill na tuaithe are:CuIGE LAIGHF.AN. Uaithne G. 0 Lo -hlainn (Castlebellingham) An tAthair Seamus O Cuinn (Dundalk) Conchubhar O hAragain (Wexford) Seaghan O Gruagain (Birr) CUIGE ULADH. ... Peaduir Mag Fhionnlaoich (Belfast) An tAthair Maitiu .Mag Uidhir (Trillick, Co. Tyrone) An tAthair Mac Duibhir (Co. Donegal) An tA.thair Padraig O Grianain (Rathfriland, Co. Down) Seaghan O Cathain (Belfast) ... Seamus O Du bhghaill An t Athair Fullerton (Belfast)

136 125 118 117 195 192 171 161 129 117 I 16

Cu1GE CnoNNACHT. 165 Padraig O Maille (Connemara) I 43 Seoirse Mac Niocaill (Galway) An tAthair Seagban O Xliodhchain (Castlebar) 141 I 39 An Dr. Seaghan P. Mac Enri (Galway) An tAthair Brian O Criochain (Riverstown, Co. 125 Sligo) Ir 3 Maire Ni Thuahail (Tourrnakeady) I 11 An t Athair Mac Giolla Sheannaigh (Galway) CUIGE ::.\lUMHAN. Padraig de Brett (\Yaterford) " An Seabhach " (Killarney) ... " An Fear Mor " (Roscrea) Cormac O Cadhlaigh (Fermoy) Art O Caoimh (Cork) Neili Xi Bhriain (Foynes, Co. Limerick) T'na Xie Coluim (Killorglin, Co. Kerry) Scaghan Toibin (Cork) Scaghan Gorduin (Ennis SA�ANA.

Liam Mac Giolla Bhrighdc (Surrey)

Feidhlimidh O Cinneide (Manchester)

ALBA.

Cormac Mac Giolla Iosa (Glasgow)

II

II

II

210 207 207 190 180 167

I.fl

qo

IOS

200 135

THE OIREACHT AS ODE. .

. . ,. c ..,p ..,

To the Editor of" "'\n Cl�roe...,1i1 Sotu1r."

I find seve_ral misp�ints, which may puz:�lc or mislead the read.er, _m 1;fiY_01reachtas Ode as published in the p�es\ s,,�c ..,1� m lme 2 should, oi course, be poi:0111; ?.i. c.o.pl� m _Ime 9 should be u ..., ud.pt'-'; t615rro in lm� 3� 1e!srm ; r-cpfoc·pu in line 39, rci11ocr ..,1-o ; and rmot in hne .+7 should be rm61t. To make the verses clear, l should be obliged by the insertion of this letter.

1J l<-\ H."\S b(',o.S l.6.1.

AERIDHEACHT

DAY.

I

SUNDAY NEXT AT DOLPHIN'S BARN. All leading Entertainers and Gloncree Band. Major .John MacBride.

IRISH

Commencing 3.30.

Oration by

Admission

------ma�!��:;r�r, MADE

BOOTS.

L = N= E=, · ==O J===O =H===N =M====A

67 NORTH KING STREET, DUBLIN.

IN THE MARCH OF CIVILISATION.

Som� rears ago our grandmothers prided themselves on the,: ample feather beds, but now-a-days no good housew1_le cares to use one of these unhealthy and not �oc: clea,_1ly 1l luxurious articles. Any housekeeper wblung to dispose of one or more feather beds could nol de better than to communicate with the Irish Feather Co., Ltd., T�ra Street, Dublin, who supply Curled Hair Mat· tresses in part or whole exch.an&"e or purchase for casla ' as ma Y be desired.


1ut,

13. 1 12

Ju] y I 3,

J, 2

� •"

k;istic

f}

Tailorin�

At 25 % under usual prices.

IRISH TWEED SUITS made to order, 37, 6, 42/·, 45/·, 50/• to 75/IRISH SERGE SUITS made to order, 42/·, 45/·, 501·, 55/• to 75'·

See our "Neverfade" Irish Serge

@

60/-

.J.ll Garments made on the premises b11 ,killed Irish Tailors under the persanal ,upervt,ton oJ experienced and ..d.rttsttc Cutter»:

THE IRISH TWEEDHOUSE,

'"' l:IS.]

13

DOLLARD,

\

Printinghouse, Dublin, Ltd., PRINTEIS, LITHOGRAPHERS, STATIONERS, ACCOUNT • BOOK MANUFACTURERS.

Aid 10 Upr.

DEAKIN'S RELIABLE REMEDIES should be at hand in every Irish Home. Deakin's "Red Ivy " Corn Plaster.

applications suffice.

Deakin's

WiJd

7}-d. per pkt.

Rose

One or lwo

Deakin's Blood Purifying Tonic.

Enriches as well as purifying the Blood. A necessity in Spring and early Summer. Bottles, 9-�d. and 1 /6.

TAILORING! TAILORING! Serge & Tweed Suits to Order, From

50/-

A. DEAKIN,

The Pharmacy, Phibsboro', Dublin. (Beside Canal Bri ge.)

N.B.-.Actual maker of Household & Veterinary remedies •I all kinds. Lists free.

I. S. VARIAN & CO.,

One of. the most Irish-speaking districts. Ninety-four per cent. lnsh speakers. Good lodgings. Beautiful Sea and M.ounta.in Scenery. Bathin.g. Boating. Free Fishing. Nme miles from Galway station. Can give full certificate.

For Iurtber particulars apply to.6.n -c-.6.i:Atl1 b111An O Cf11ocJ.1n, Sl15e.a.c. or

The Revd. .(\Tl

J. Corbett,

P.P., Partry, Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo.

"Or. mcc en111, University College, Galway.

M. E. McSWINEY, Cutter.

cot.s.tsoe eo:5.6.1n uf

com Ra1ue.

47 Gt. Geor-ges St., CORK.

CURTIS

P. P. CURTIS, Late Manager Dollard, Printinghouse, Dublin ; and Sealy, Bryers & Walker, Dublin. Head Teacher School of Prmting,

LETTERPRESS & LITHOGRAPHIC

PRINTER

,

Bookbinder and Stationer t

NIRTH IIIILIN BRUIN FACTORY,

g1 & 92 TALBOT STREET, DUBLIN.

Professors-.6.n "O'f1, tll.6.C en111 (.&.tm-ott.-.m), Com;..r mac 'Oomne.rl.L, {;1..,m.._\l' (> Co l.m Sm , p1t1b () t1Al'Ot10n, Cc11-ct.fn rue 5c10.a.1t1n, Se.1mur <) mu11c.a.-6A ("Oc1mrc11).

or

MURPHY BROS.,

l"Oat f'ree f'ron, Maker,

J.

WELLINGTON QUAY, and ESSEX STREET, DUBLIN.

Gives 1 /- and 21-

from July 1st to August 3rd. 2nd Session from August 5th to September 14th.

and ends on September 7th.

011/ces •atl Works :

Balsam.

Cough

instant relief to the most distressing cough. per Bottle.

College: First Session

Spiddal College : Term begins August 5th

Cash Tailoring Co.,

4 CAPEL STREET, DUBLIN, G1org1•1 St., Danleary. + JOHN NELIGAN. Pro1rlete,

Tourmakeady

Professo�s-P,'-1;>�6.IC 6 "Oori1n,,LL.i1n ( &1m-Oltc1111), ._\n -r:-;'-\-c,"1.q1 �6.'0fl.6tc O ?on5Mle, B.A., se,,5.M 6 R�16.'0,,rn, eo5c1n 6 m,,1Lte1 m,,111e ni tu,,i:<11l, Se,"\mur m e c mu1111r ("O�ri1r-11). Excelle�t tea;hing. Splendid Irish-speaking district. Mountain and Lake Scenery. Sea within a few hours· bicycle rid�. Free trout fishing. Good accommodation. Eleven miles from Ballinrobe station. Can give full certificate.

CJ With a largely increased Plant of Upto-date Machinery can produce rapidly and at reasonable cost any work entrusted to them. , • f:I Largest users in Ireland of Irish-made Papen.

CoL&1ri:e Conn «cc,

12 TEMPLE LANEt lligh-class Work.

DUBLIN.

Moderate Prices.

CARRIGAHOLT,

---

CO.

CLARE.

Summer Courses, 1912.

1st Session, July 8th-Aug. 3rd. 2nd Session, Aug. 5th-Aug. 31st. CERTIFICATES

GRANTED.

RECOGNITION BY NATIONAL BOARD EXPECTED IMMEDIATELY. Send for full particulars to

•&O'I"OGRAPHY.

sedn 5onuu1n,

Large Assortment of Irish Poster Type.

FIMNERTY'S,

Clarecastle, Co. Clare•

De Old (lrlsh) Firm, ltlll L eadlnj, ltlll the hit.

Studios : 41 HEMRY ST., 77 AUNGIER ST., :DUBLI•.

LADIES & GENTLEMEN'S CLOTHING Beautifully Dry Cleaned and Tallor Pressed bJ lillfest and best process-by our speciality.

PATRIOTIC PLUG

PLEASING

THE MOST

THE IRISH-Al�ERICAN DRY CLEANING CO.,

11.. d ome« :

S3 GnEE�iVILLE TERRACE, DOLPHIN'S IARn.

Branch Office :

49 Aungier St.

HUGH

FITZPATRICK ct 58 Talbot Street), Ironmonger, bardwar� � 6�n�ral n2erc1,mH. (Late of Parnon's, 51

60 TALBOT STREET, Under Railway Bridg«:

S\VAN &

PIPE TOBACCO.

DUBLIN.

co.,

Machine, General Smiths, Plumbers Sanitary Contractors.

and

Range Repairing and Setting,

lrnamental VIiia Gates and Railings a Speclallty. ESTIMA1ES FREE.

21 UPPER DO�SET STREET, DUBLIN. Factorv and Workshop, 2 Granby Lane.

THE

Better and Cheaper than imported. Direct from the Manulaetur•r1. Special CllJotations for Laundries & Institutions.

M. O'CONNOR & CO., 50 Capel Street, Dublio.

ACT.

�bt Irisb nrapers' Jlssistants' Jlsso�iation. THE

APPROVED

SOCIETY

J. CROSS,

Practical Plumber & Gasfltter ELECTRIC LIGHTING, BELLS, &c.,

113 AMIENS STREET, DUBLIN. General House Repairs.

First-class Work.

Reasonable Coit.

FOR

ALL SHOP NO

BASKETS & HAl\1PERS

INSURANCE

WORKERS

MATTER

WHERE

AND

CLERKS

EMPLOY.ED.

Cards and Forms Now Ready.

CAMPBELL

EVERYWHERE.

Registered Head Office : 56 HENRY ST., DUBLIN.

co.,

MERCHANTS' QUAY, DUBLIN. Che Artistic Cc1ilora and Outfitte-ra,

Business transacted in Irish if required. BRANCHES

&

Salts to Measure from 30s. · to 65s. Flt aad Style Gu.raat..._ None but Irish Labour BraploT•d. Patterns and Self.Jleasuremeut Forms Hilt ea AppllcatlaL

e

OUTFITIINO,

lrlsb Poplln Ties, Sblrta, Collars, Braces, le., le., a SNdall'Y.


5A eOAc;;.ail"iAl!f�t-� AtnAt-n.

IRISH

SROS.,

�MING

+

A

MARQUEES

���nn� 1 fe1re.A1111�,

GLEESON

J-. F.

&

caitors bf Braa,trs.

»'B'i'W. BAZAARS, & CAIIPINO-OUT.

KELLY A CO.,

8 &. 10 CHANCERY Sl". (Formerly Pill Lane) Aleo at Ul>PER ORMOND QUAY, DUBLIN.

6d., I/·, 1/6, 2/•,

ONLY.

TRIAL SOUClffO.

l"OB SALB OR RIBB.

HURLEY '

GOODS

-.._....... : 1140 DRUMOONDRA ROAD,\ :IIDIN ttocm, Pumyors 4 W'me Mercbaots.

lco,

IRISH GOODS ONLY,

11

Upper O'Connell Street.

HURLEY 6dn- /•,

--·--

-


Tim ia.illlpadul ud A11i1aic Wea.

it.._ r...

at home. uder .,_ owa e,ea.

..

==

==

wa.,..-�

bJ llae IRISH ==

==

18 CLARElfDOII ST., DUIIUII.

ARQUEES

• CIE

Tftl P IIDIIII -Y.

F......................

CLARE LANE- ,4elare St.), DOIIUN. DeQnttN (dN... UCClltd .. t•Ckl, ..

..... ., ...... lllllliwf ..... fl. MIJIII ltl t A�ts tl)(Jnled thrm,tlwl,f C,,,111r,.

I

Liberal tena.


All. le4r,At' XIV. Vol. XIV.

f 1r

U1m1i,

19.

No. 19.

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b.o.1te .dt.o. ct1.o.t, 1ut27, 1912. DUBLIN, JULY 27, 1912.

ti1A1t nero ce C.6.00 zmuic '01 e1t'1t1ll. .0.5t1f m.& c.& Ot'A1t1n -p.&1l'c 'Oo $lAC.&'6 r.o.n trnprpeacc rh61t' 50 rnb ero comcporn n.& pernne A5A1t1n r.&n 1mp1t'e.&cc ceA'OnA, 50 'Oce.1.rcoc.o.'6 nior mo cume.cce nerc .0.5.&rnn ..it' cu t'f .&1b puintroe 11 .o. 111mp1t'e.o.cc.& n.& c.& ce.1pt.1 'O urn n r .&n b1 t.te .&Li At' .6.n erect. r.& l.&t.6.1t'· 1f t'l-.&m.o.1'0eAC An f\U'O 'O.&t' 'Oct'eo1t'1'6t10 5e.o.tt.&mn.& 'Oo tAo.&1t'c u.&"t.& porme l'e rut m.& ca 'O.&'O.a1'6 '0.6. l.6.$.6.'0 r.&:sc.a .a5.o.1t1n. .o.5ur 1f l'1-.o.m.o.1'0eAC 'Oo'n CflUA:$ belt rte.aCCA'O t'01ti1 -6.t''O-'Re.6.CC.6.l'Oe S.o.rAn.o. .o.111.1.1t 1r 'O.& mb.o.'6 '01.6. be.0.5 e .a5ur 6 .& pocaroe l.&n 'Oe t1o'Ol.o.1ct10 '06bt.a. 'O'te.al' 'Oomnct.t 6 Conart.t piop-czorn r.&1tce ro1ti1 n1 Seo1t're n1or rmne.o.'6 .a tercero -oe be.arc 1r t\mne.&'6 1 mb.o.1te 'Ct1...1c .an -cre.accti1.o.m reo CU.6.1'0 -C.6.t'C. cu ut.e-o.

[Registered as a Newspaper}

INSIST

ON GETTING

IRISH-MA:DE etJTLE.�Y FROM YOUR IRONMONGER.

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Cutlery Mannfaetnring Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. .05 .6. t.in .0.5.0.mn lucc ru.o.111re.&m 1f e1t15, .o.n 1f ffiOf\ 1f C-p.&'t ro 'Oe l6. .0.CC f1l1 m.or .6.C.&. r1u '0(1mn te15111c Of\.6.11111 rem ffi.6.f\ '6'e.o'O, 5up 'O.o.0111e te cm5rmc rrnn 1 n'O.&l-010 l1cp1'6e.6.cc, ,j.5ur .6.f\ .6. fon rc.ootlCe.6.t' le " 'ROb1l1fOl1 " 1r "Ye.o.cer," .o.5ur t.. lucc le.o.n.6.mn.o.. 1r nM 1f' tn1C1'0 CU1f\ ftt.l.r 'Oe rm, '0.6.t' l1om. CO:$.u'O leo fU'O mum11ce...11' ll.o. 11e1re..1nn '00 CUf\ fe t.&1-p, 1f e .6.t\ ll'OU.o.l5.o.f-n.6. be.6.r'C '0.6. re1r 1r m.o.1rs .6. t:u5.6.t1n '00 '6e.o.n.6.ti1 ort.o. re1t1. cf1l te cme !

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'°t'

GAELSS�pport the Only Picture House in Dublin owned by an Irishman.

THE

IRISH CINEMA

CAPEL STREET (next to Trades' Ital/),

NOW OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30. PRICES,

30.,

40.,

60.

Change of Pictures-Monday, Thursday and Sunday.


-6.t1

4

ctcroe.crn sotuis, fAN

'OU1t1ne 5Ul' fe t.&ll' .05.0.mn t:.& 51110tiMt't.6. .t.l' re.on .6.Ct: corn be ,5 !

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e 'C.& be1t'C 5.o.e'6€.j.t T>it1f C.6.t' e1r b.&1f '0\'.&5.o.1t 1 n.o.imerpce te 'Oe15e.an11�r5e-' Liam 6 Cro1r111, 6r 'C1J" Co ncrt t .o.5ur mrce at. O C1.6.J"UU0.6111. '00 , L Mm 6 Cro1r111, .o.5ur 1 'OC1J" .o.n 61r .(\ l)i re .0.5 cur, r.ao1 te r.a'O.a. t'.)1 re .ar n.a 5.o.cue.at.0.10 bu-o 1'.>ftre 'r.o.n Ortez n t}r. 11ior l'.>1f.6.'0.6. '66 'r.0.11 cir rm, :so 'Ot:1 50 r.o.1l) re .6.5 '01.6.11-0b.6.11" 1 rnearc 111>. l) p111111'6e .6.1111 .o.:sur 1.6.'0 .6.l' t:1 1.6.J'\J".6.CC '00 '6e.a11.6.ti1 .6.J" r.ao1rre n.6. 11e1-re.o.n11 'Oo ti.o.mc .o.m.ac. bau. 'Oe Ct.a1111 11.a 115.aeue.at ..60 e.6.'6 e 6 tom 1 terc, .a:sur niop ror '06 50 t6 A t)f.1r .6.CC .6.5 f10f' Ob.6.11" .1l\ ro r .6. c6m-$.oe'6e.6.L. S.&15'01u1r crou.a .ab e.o.u m,ce.&t 6 C1..o-ruut>.&111. 1 Loe 5C.6.'f'm.6.1t1 'Oo r.o.05.atu1'6e.6.'6 e. t'.):; re .6.l' 11.6. 5.o.1rc1'6e.ac.6.1l) bu'o creme 'O.&J" "tJ"01'0 1 5co5.o.'6 11.a 5cur.o.'6 1 n.o.imerpce te 11-.0. t11111, A5Uf '0.6. bf\15 f111 '00 l'.>J"On11.o.'6 .6.11 ceim b' .6.01Ji'Oe 1 f..611 .6.1j'\m .6.1J'\, .o.r ct.oj- '06 c.o.m.o.tt 1 11-.6. '61.6.1'6 f.6.11 50 r,.0.10 'OJ"e.o.m '01t1r .6.:S cup -romp.o. fA01l'fe n.6. 11e1re.o.1111 '00 l'.>.6.111C .6.m.o.6 le 6 t.:5.m t.&1'01r, cu:s re .0.5.0.1'0 .o.r ..Se.&11 m..1t:5.ati111.o., .o.5ur l)i re .6.r .6.11 5ce.6.'0 'Ore.am '00 t;.&1n15 50 11e1rm1n fe l'.>t'.6.C n.o. l) r111111152 1 mbt1.o.'6..1111 .o. 1865. .<\n t..1m 1r l'.>1 Se.amur mac Sc1op.&m -re 5t.ar, b'eirezn .o. l'.>i m.o.r ceznn 66ti1.6.1j'\te .o.r .6.11 tUCC cro'O.o.. .<\n U.6.1t' '00 ceip 01't.6. 1 11'0e1re..o.'6 11.6. 'O.&l.6., bu.o.1te..1'6 1rce.ac 1 1:>pr10ru11 e, ..15ur 1:)1 re 1 m1:>-r..o.15'0e..o.n.6.r re.o.'6 te.o.t:- l'.>t1..1'0n..1. 'C.6.'f' e1r e rc..101te..o.'6 6 '6.o.or1 1 t>rum '0 f.6.11 re t:.o.m.6.tt 1 11e11'11111 '0 f01111 1.6.'f''f'.6.CC '00 UE':.6.11.6.111 Al' tucc C'f'0'0.6. '00 t.o.l'.>.6.1'f'C 1 5ce..o.1111 A certe ..o.1r1r, .ace b' tm .o. -r..0.11:'> 'O.& l'.>.6.'f'l' 'Oo l'>r1r ort..1 ru'O 'O'e.6.rb.o.'6 mu11115ne, A15e. A:Sur oi .o.11' b..11t1u5.a'6 te1r t:.o.r r.&1te .6.lf'ir, 1'.>1 re .6.'f' 11.a 'O.o.tc.&1t> buu c.&1:'Mcc..115e .a-r Ct.6.1111.a10 5.6.e'6e.at 6 tom 1 te1t;. be.0.5 1011511.6.'0 e1l'e .6. 1:'>e1"t 50 f.6.011-t.6.5. be.6.5 1011511.0.'0 cor .6.'f' bot:s .a:s 5..1tt.a1t> u11't:e 1r 5..1e'61t cro'6.6. 'Oe te1t:em n.a 1:>e1l'ce reo .(\ l:'.>e1t .0.5 t.6.1:'>.a1rc ..o.n te1l' 1 or.o.'O 6 n-.o. 'Out".0.15 fOtt.&me 1 11-.6.J" t:65.6.'6 1.6.'0. 50 11'0e1111'0 '01..1 u�lc t) 1 '6(1 -:sr.&rc.o. p ,&'O R.o. 15 11.6. tC.1111 e.

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.0.11 boR'O n-& 1s1 un-c.o.. Ce.ar'O .6. 'Oe.6.11r.6.1' mun.a 'OCU:SA1'D .6.11 bor'O reo .a:sur 5.6.c bOf\'O e1te .&1-r'O .o.-r .6.'f' 'Oe.6.-r11.a"6 'Oe c..1111c ..15ur 'Oe c.o.1t:1111 m1te.&111 .6.5 .6.n 01'f'e.acc.6.r reo .o. cu.0.1"6 t:.o.r.a111n ? .6.5 '01.0. t:.& f10f 50 \'.JfU1t CU1'0 .6.5.6.11111 .6.5 Ob.6.1l' 50 r.&"t.6.C f .6.'0.6. .&5ur r.&c.ac c-ru.0.1'6 .a-r ro11 Ome..1c.o.1r 11.0. c1-re Ce.o.r'O .o te- :so 'Oc1c1rr..11"6e .&1r'O o-r.6.11111. ti' te.6.'0f ..11'6e .o. "6e.a n.o.ti1 te1r .6.n 5c-re.o.cu r 1r tu5-l\ .o.5ur 1r (11p-1rte fi\ r.6.05.l\l &CC 5.0.n ClUc.f .<.\ t.6.l'M1J1C "66. 1f m.o.p rm c.t:.& .6.11 bO'f''O 1r m.a1t .6.11 f\tl'O mAH';. C.6.m.o.tt te TI.&1f1U11C.6. f01$1'0, ACC 11U.6.1l' .6. -re1ct:e.(\l' tl.6.C op11t .6.0t1 111.a1t: le ce.acc .o.1rce, 1110-r ti1or 'Oumn rl15e -e1c111c e1te .6. t:.6.t1'f'.a1115c cu5.o.11111 tem, .6.5ur 6 t:.&1,t.6. 11.ac 11e 50 teor c.0.1-rl'.>e .ac.& te te.o.cc .o.r .a oe1t .(\ cur r,crn 1 t'>fe1"6m, b.o. C01l' sur 51110111 .6. t>e1tp"6e .a tu l' 1 l'.>f en'.>m. m.6.l' 'Ou D..11-rc 'O t15�.c:0611, .6.11 t.& ce.6.n.o., .6.5ur be.6.11 'Oe 11.0. rnn.&1D f111 .6.CJ. .6.f\ lOJ"\5 5ot.6. 'O.& ce1rc111u5.&'6 --115€': 111 t:t15c.or, mor.&n ..&1r'Oe .o.-p 5tt1.o.1re.o.ct: .6.l' b1t 'O.t. mb1onn .ap r1C1l'>.o.t 116 50 n'Oe.6.11.0.1'6 11.a 'D.o.ome .<.\CJ. ce.J.n5..o.1tce te1r Ml n5tu.o.1re.6.cc r111 5111ori1 '1101r t11 .o.' br1re.0"6 m6J' e1-re.o.6C.0C e1c1nc. b..o. rh.o.1t; trnn tu.6.15e 11.& 1omcu-r .a5 p111111e65 A "6ttl (c.& 1'e 11.6. Ct1.6.15e C.6.1Ct:e f.6.l1.6.01f\ !) 11.S. 1'tt'O .o. f' lH t nl.6.l' 1.6.'0, .6.CC l1 .6. "61.6. 1'0 f1t1 ft:�111 t: ..., ru'O e1c1nc ..o.:s ce.6.rc..&1t r.ao1 tJ.t.6.11", r,:h5t:e.C.t' 50 leor le C.6.11111C .6.'r \€' C<'\111e.6'0

CI..uo•:s.uu1

July

SOLUIS.J

50 m1111c, .a5ur m.& c.J. .(\on fi1.(\1t 1 5c.a111nc . _\5ur 1 5c.&111e.a'6, 'ne n..1c oru.o.1r .an bol''O 1l&1r1ut1t:.6. .a '66c.&111 '0100 te c..o.m.6.tt m.0.1-t .ano1r? 1lu.a1l' A ct1rce.ar .6.l' C.6.11111t: b...1 6611' 50 t'.6.cr.a1'6e 1r 1om"6.o. 'f'U'O 11.6.C or.&15ce.6.f\ A'f' 5n1oti1. te C.6.11111C .6. :se1ot:e.6.l' le t.&til t.&1'01'f'. m.af\ 'OU0.6.1'f'C .o.11 C-6.f''O rh.aor t:.6.m.l\tt 6 1"0111 : n1 oru..11-pe.o.m.6.f\ .6.011 Ceo r.a C1'f' reo te Ce.6.'0 bt1.o"6.6.m .6.CC J"U'O .6.t' C.6.1te.6.ti1 Ct'01'0 ;\ '6e.6.11.6.ti1 ..1'f' .i\ ton. "11.0. 5e.o.>0.o. r1.o.>0-&111e." Ctu1111m1'0 :so oru1t .6.11 'OJ'\0115 reo .0.5 'OUl CJ'\1 1orrur rhu15eo f.6.01 t.&c.o.1r (11.& ce.o.p 5u-r e.o.11.6.C.6. .6.C.& 1 5ce1rc .0.5.0.m). 'Ore..1m ctu1tce61'f'1 1.6.'0 r111 .6.t:.& .a' t:.a1rt:e.6.t 11.6. "5.ae"6e.o.tt:.6.CC.6. f.6.n C.6.00 C1'f'e rm .a5ur .6.5 te1f'1U5.o.'6 'Ot'.&m.o.1111 .ar .<\n 'OOCCU'f' m.ac enl'i, ti1.o.1te te1r .6.11 5cu1r. .0.11 m.&1rc1ne.ac, 51oi..t.a tr,orc O bl'o111, 'Com.&r m..1c'Oo11116.6.'0.o.1 1r .<\·. oe.6.11 lt'l,, .6.C.& 1 mbun .6.11 'C.& '6.& 5tu.a1rce.&11 .ac..1, .a:sur b61"tl'e 511ot:..1. 1110r fe.6.l'l' te 11.6.5.6.1'0 11.6. 115tt1.6.1ft:eA11 n.& 10'f''f'tl1r 1r 'Oe.6.C.6.1f' b61C'f'1 f.&$.o.1t. 1r c11111ce 50 n'Oe.a11-r.a1'6 .0.11 Cum.0.1111 reo .o.n-1i1.a1t .am.ac 'r !m.o.c '00111 $.o.e'6e.atc.acc rrn. Cu1-re.o.nn mu11111c1l' 10'f''f't11r ..111-cru1m rn.6. 'O'f'.&m..6.nn.0.10 .a:sur 1r '0.6.0111e 1.6.'0 .6. tiru1t cu1r5111c .o.:sur rcu..11m 611111 .6.C.6., .a5ur .o.t:.& -re1"6 te 'f'tl'O .6.'f' b1t; .6. 'Oe.6.11.6.111 C1r1'6 r1.o.'O .ar cum.a .o.'f' 1:>1c .ar ro11 n.a cu1re. 'f'tl'O 11.6.C 1:'>f.6.C.6.'0.6.'f' .ar1.6.ti1 1r '06C.o.-t.&n "6.& 5tu..11rce.&11 'Oe te.6.r..110 u.6.1rte ..15ur 'Oe 1i111.&10 u.o.1rte .a t..1t>.a1rc "5.ae'61t5e. 'C.& r1..1'0 .o. ce.o.rb.&mc 'Oe.&5-tomptA .a-r cum..1 .6.'f' b1t .a:sur .a ce.o.rb.&111c :SUf\ fe1'01'f' te 'OU111e .6. oe1t; 111.6. u.o.r.o.t .a5ur 'C.& ru1t .a5.am nu.0.11' 5..1e'61t5e .a l:'>e1c .a15e. 'f'.6.C.o.r f1.6.'0 50 be.at .an rhu1-rtm 50 re.o.cn6c..11'6 r1.6.'0 11.a m..11'01 5otp, m.& c.& .a te1c1'01 111r .o.n mb.a1te r111. 50 11.o.c.o.1tt, m.6.ot R..11c1115e, b.a1te t11 t-ru.a1c, be..o.nco-r, be..1t .a11 rhu,-rtm, e.o.c-'6u15ce, mot..11m 50 1r b..11te C.o.1pt .a p.o.cr.a1"6 rM'O. mo-r .6.5ur mot.o.1m 50 'Oeo e (116 1) c1be ce .o. cur cur te 11..1 te1c1'0 'Oe -ru'O.

.

5.0.e>Oe.o. l'C.6.C'C U.<\C'C.6.1 n. -6-1 R'O. 1:'.H cru111111u5.a'6 .a5 Coti1.a1rte6-r.a11:'> 11.6. mboct 1 11 U .6. C C .o. r -6.-r'O "() 1.6. r 'O .6.0111 reo CU .6. 1 '0 t; .6. 'f' .6.111 n .a5ur 11111115 p.&"6r.o.1c 6 rh.&1tte '00'11 c-ru111111u5.6.'6 com 5.ae'6e.at.ac .6.5ur 01 .a11 ce.o.11nc.ar, Cu1-p f.).&'Of\.6.15 1.6.r r1n .6.11 -run reo or 00111.6.11' .6.11 cru1111115"te :" 6 C.&'f'l.6. :SU'f'.6.b e Ce.6.1111C.6.'f' UA6t:.a1r -&1r'O .6.11 Ce.6.1111C.6.'f' 1r 5.6.e'6e.6.t.6.15e 1 11e1J'11111 50 11-1.6.t''f'.6.1m1'0 .6.'f' .o.11 mbOf\'O 11.&1r1u11c.o. cl.&'f' re1te.o.ti111.ac 01bl'e .6.,, CU'f' mr 11.6. r5otc.o.c.o.10 111r .an 5ce.o.1111c.a-r reo. be1'6 cl'u111111115.6.'6 .a5 1:>.att..11l'.> C'f'.6.011Je .a11 1:'>.6.1te rm 'Oe '0611111.615 reo cu5.6.11111 te feM:.6.111C .6. Ofe.6.'0f .6.1'0e .aep1"6e.o.ct: .6. cur ru.ar .6.1111, .a5ur fl'e1r111 te 1.6.'f''f'.6.Ct: .a '6e..111.am cu11 f\A115 .a cul' .6.'f' bun .6.1111 te 11-.0.5.6.1'6 .6.n $e1n1r1'6. b' em1r 50 oru1t1'0 .a:s 'Oe.a11.am .a1cr1r .a-r '5.o.e"6e..1t.a1l'.> 'C.& ruc.6. mu111ce61r .6. C.a1rte.&m .o.' D.6.f\f\.6.1$, b.o. c61r1 50 1.a-r-r.a1'6 ..1-r .an 5Co1rce 511ot:.o.. l:'>ru151'01r r111, 6 "t.&rt.a .6.11 01'f'e.6.'0 reo .6.1f\51'0 1 n-.&1c .ar te1c te 11.0.5..11"6 n.a 5Ce.o.n11c.ar n1 111011511.a'6 .ar b1t; b.o.He mo-r 115.o.e'6e.at.ac. U.6.CC.6.11' ,6.1l''O .6. 1Je1"t 'f'011111C 5.o.tt'O.o. m.ap 1r .&1c e 111.6. mb1on11 50 teor cep.rb.&nc.o.1r .o.5ur 111or me.o.r..1 '11.a r111, 11.a c.a1pte m.o.me. sn-&rh. S111 cte.act:.6.'6 .o.c.& .0.5 'Out .ar 5cut 50 mo-r mr 11.6. ce.6.nnc.a-p..1c.a10 '.5.6.e'6e.at.o.6.a, .a5ur 111 5.ac con'O.o.e e1te .6.t:.& r1ne.a'6 te1r A11 0-r.o.1-r-r:se. 1r m6J'\ .6.11 c-ru.0.5 50 r..1cf.6."6 re.a11-cte.o.CC.6.'0 'Oe1-rce.6.l' b'f'e.&5 rott.&111 m.o.r e reo '00 te15. :sul' m6 .6.t:.& 1 11-.0.1111 rn.&1111 1 Rorcom.&111 11.& .6.l' 01tel.11.6.10 -&-p..11111, .a:sur 1r f10l' e. ni't t.& 11.ac l'>ru1t n.6. 11,&l'..1111ne.ac.a .6.'f' r.o.1r-r:se, .6.5ur 1:>.&1"6te.al' 50 teo-r 'Oiol:'> 5.ac 1:>t1.a'6.0111 ce.6.tt 1r '066.6. 5u-r m..1r 5e.o.tt .6.f' 1.6.'0 .6. r11.&1ti1. 1:'>e1t; bu.6.1tce t11-pc1 n.o.c 5cu1-re.ann rM'O .o.on cru1m r.o. rn.&m. C-pe1'0e.o.n11 murnt:1l' 11.6. 5cl.6.'0.6.C m.& b.&1'6t:e.ar b.&'O 5u-p.6.b e .6.11 r11.&1ti1e61r 1r re.&l'l' f.6.11 mb.&'O r111 .0.11 ce.o.'O te.o.-r .a l:'>.&1'6re.a-r, .a:sur :so 'Oc1oc-r.o.1'6 .an c-.o.111e6t.o.15e rt.&n r.&o.&1tce. 1r m1111c .o. te1"t1'0 .o.rhl.6.1'6, .o.Ct: f1t,::e�'6 n1 '0.6.orne e1te :su-r '001-c-remce .o.n r5e.at e. m.al' 5e.att .6.'f' l'.>.&"t.a"6 u1t15 A f65tu,mce.6.p .o.n 1r f11.&ti1 .6.CC .6.1f\ ti1.o.1te 1�1f .6.n crtiirnce. 'Oe.o.c.0.11' 'Do "6urne .o. mbe..o.'6 cte1t1n .o.15e, te15e.ar 1110r re.&rr p.&5.o.1t 11.& '6ut .6.l' rn.&m .6.l' m.o.1'0111 t:10'Dt.6.C.6.11 (J'\01111 '00 Ce.6.'0-f.)f\011111). 'Ou1:'.>.6.1J'\C re.c.r eot.o.r.6.c t1om c.am.att 6 tom :sul' t>reAl'l' .6.11 r11.&1ti1e61r be.o.n n.& re.ar '0.6. n'Oe.&n.o.'6 11.(\ mn.& .o.n 01re.6.'0 cte..1ccu5A'O te 11.6. f€'.6.l'.&1l'.>. 1r be.0.5 ru'O n.6.c mb1011n l.(\ti1 116 cor .6.:; 11.0. m11,,1t) .o.m, r.a r..o.o5.at .c.c.& .o.1101r .6.1111.

27, 1912

- "· > 'l'1.l\- 511-\.\S. '. .A " 1)1- l1 ..v. '-·1-1''\. 1h1...1.1r .6. 01or .6.011 t\tl'O 5. .rn m6p ..,11 'C.J.1J\lle le '0101 ..15 mu1t1c1-r 101,ru1r 50 m1111c, re..\ J\'O " " . reAf .6.1t ...\ cu1, ..,11,. :Snice ..,1\ .(\ 511101111 f1.6.'0 .o.11 cte.6.f reo 111 50 teor, .&1ce.01111 <"He 1 11e11'1t1n Cu11,ce.a-r " re.ar..:.\ll " ...,p ('lOS.J.lt> cotil t11.l\1C. U.6.lt\e.6.'0611,10, t'OC.6.f\.6.10 ..o.5t1f ,._\l' tH:u,,10 1.6.'0, .J.CC rit1m 11.6.C 1tl 50 teor ..,1ce,.\nl1,\ 111E11'11111 .6. .scur,1:.0.r -re.af.o.1t .ar .&r.l\t.6.ll), 'r .J.p b.J.111l) 111.J.J\ Ct11t'Ce.u'f' 111 10t''f'tlr. 1lt1.o.1r .o. CLt11nfe ..\j\ 50 mb(m:) -re.o.r..11t .o.'f' ..o. te1tm reo 'Oe l'trn q,umneoc.oro ..6.11 C-.o.or 65 1rce..1c 111f .6.tl n5 'n.a tnl)e1'6 .._\11 5.0.c 'Oume ·u,, 11.ucr ...,1'6 1rce.Jc 'f'U'O te 'Oiot. 10cr..11"6 re .6. p1or..1 re p15ne, 116 r:s1Lt1t15e. C11:>e ce 11..11:se .(\ m1:>e1"6 .6.11 u1ti111' 1r .t..111'0e r 1 leJf-fe.0.11 .6.11 'f'U'O, .ur.at, 11(1 tl.l\11, 116 C1l)e ce'n f61''0 -pu'O 116 re1tme .o. oe..6.r ...,rn1. 'D.o.1111reoc.o.1'6 fU.'O teol'.> .o.1111r111 50 r5.o.t.o.1'6 .o.n L.& opt.o.. n1.& e11'15e.a11n ..111 'f'U'O te 'Oume n.o.c 'Otl'.uf'06c' A u.0.1'6, cu1-p-r1'6 re1re...rn CC 01'6ce " ene ..11r. fc;

n,,;

Rormuc.

Cum.o.nn lrce.o.f\'0.6. ti11c 61t.

+

'C.& eot..1r m.a1c .a5 5.o.e'61l5e61p1b, .u5ur 50 11.&1p1'0 AC.6. reo .6. OfU1t 'Otut;-o.amt: .6.C.6. te1r c.tl 5Co1rce 5110-t..6. .6.:Sttr te1r 1M co1rc10 ce.6.1111cc.1p .6.'f' ru'O e1-re.an11 Ce.6.'f''O 1r re1'01'f' te1f 11.6. C01ft11J reo '00 '6e.an.6.ti1, .a:sur ce.o.-r'O 11.o..C rem1r te6. 1r re1'01f\ te1r 11..1 Co1rc10 reo rt15te 01br115te .o.:sur l'1.a5t.ac.o. 'Oo ce.ap.a'6 .o.5t1r 'Oo '6e.o.11..:1n1 'Ote.a5"t.6.C, .6.CC 111t re 111.o. 5cum.ar 11.6. -p1.o.5l..1c.o. reo '00 cur cum C11111. Ort-r.a, .6. ler5t'e61r, .6.:Sttr opm-r.a .a5ur .6.'f' 5.6.C b.6.lt f .& te1t; .6.C.& .6.t1 'C.& f.6.1Cc1or o-pm 5Ul' 1011'0.6.tiM1l 00A1'f' rm. 'Ot:111111 .a11 1om.arc.a ft11me 'Oo 611-r 111r 11.a co1rc11J m6-p.6. .a5ur 'Oe.6.J'\m.6.'0 '00 '6e.6.n.o.ti1 A'f' .6.'f' 5CU1'0 fe111 'Oe'n cr.o.o't.6.'f', C.a1tr1m1'0 cu15rmc 11c.c .6.'f' .6.11 -&r'O-}'e1r, 11.& .6.l' e1-r11111 une, 11.& ..1r 11.6. cu151 o .6. te..1r .o.r .a1 t- oe6 c.a 111 c n .& 5.ae"61t5e 'Oe'11 ce.6.'0 'Out, .ace .a-r 5.0.c Uon cr5 r.o.n 115.ae'6eAtt:.acc, .6.5ur .ar :SAC $Ae'6P.ot 1 11-c. 'Cu15e.6.'6 5.0.c 5....1e'61t5eo1r n.6.c .6.omte.6.'f'. re1'01l' Le e111ne .act e rem .a1i1 ..s.111 .(\ cum 01bl'e '00 'Oe.6.11.6.111 ; m.& 5n1on11 re1re.a11 r..11tt15e 6.1f' 1:'>ur 1:>01cce .a-r 'Ot:1-r 'O.& t>.o.l'l'· .o.r Al' mbe1t 'r.6.11 Sp1'0e.6.t 'OU11111 .6.11Ul'.6.1'0 '00 Ce.o.p CU1'0 .6.5.6.111n 50 mbe.6.'6 1 11-.6.J'\ 5ct1mc.f ru.a'0..6.6 'Oo cur r.& 5tu.a1re.acc 11.6. 5.o.e"61t5e r.o.n Ce :sur mo-r .0.1� me.o.r .6.'f' 11..1 'Oe..15· .&1t: r111. $.o.e'6e.o.t..110 m.al' 5e.a t t .ar .a 11'01tre.o.cc .o.5ur .6. f.6.0C.6.'f\, f.o.C"t.ar 'Oumn 11.&r ri16l' ft111111e.o.ti1 '00 cur .6.'f' .&'f' t.o.nnt:.6.10 .6.5Ur Af' bp.&1re '00 le.o.tnu5.6.'0 1 11-.6.r 5cu15e fe111. b.6.'0 e t"O'f'J'\.6.'0 11.6. fm.ao111t:e feO 5ur Ct11t'e.6.'6 CUm.6.1111 ..1r bun .6. oru1t .6. .amm 111 't65r..11'6 .6.l' 5coti1.6.'f' 0.6.J'\1" .6.n .a1rce reo. 5.ae'61t .6.l' ru'O e1re.a11n 0t'.6.1ntl e m.& 1:'>1 re 50 'Otuc 1 n-.a-r 11-.a1511e 5u-p 1 5Co1111..1cc.6.11J, re..1c.o.r .6.011 .t..1C e1te, .o.C.& r10-r-'6u11 fe.6.fC.6. n.o. '5.o.e"61t-Sf', .o.5ur 6' r .6.tilt.6.1'6 .6.C.& 1r mor e .6.f' 11'0U.o.t5�r 'Ot, 'f'e1l' r111, ..15ur 1r m6p .6.11 Ob.6.1f' .ac.& -rom.o.1111i. 1nr .a11 5ce.ou uut ce..1rc1115e.o.nn r5p1011e61r1 U.6.1tln 111r .6.11 1.().pC.6.f\, le1r 11.6. 'CJ p.&1pe.().-r.o.10 11u..o.1'6e.o.cc.o. 'Oo $.o.e'6e.o.t.o."6. eot.o.r .6.5.6.m .6.l' $.o.e'61q::;eo1r1l'> 65.6. .&11nr1t1 .6. OfU1t re1t; 11.6. r:S'f'1l:'>11e6pM:t:.o. 50 bj'\e.0.5 101111C.6., .a:sur n.ac oru1t u.o."t.o. ..1cc be.c.5..&n eot..11r ce.&-p'O· .6.ti1t.6., .o.5ur roc.o.1Un mote.a le n-.6. m1r11eAC '00 'C.& n.o. ce.6.'0C.6. 1 11-.6.l' me.6.r:S 11.6.C ti1u.o.r5..11tc. 1:'>fu1t .a t1or ..6.C.o. ce.o.-r'O 1r Co1111-r.o.'6 11..1 5..1e"61L5e .6.1111 50 ro1tt. b101111 p.&1pe11'\ t'.)e.o.'f'l..6. ,15ur Ul\f:Se.6.tt:.6. ru.o.'f'.6.C.6. 11.6. S.ar.o.n.o.c 5.& te15e.6."6 .6.C.6. 'C.& .o.5ur 1..1'0 reo .0.5 m1tte.6.'6 .6. t1-..11511e.6.'6. o-p.6.11111 p.&1pe1r 5..1eu1t5r 'Oo cul' 111.0. 11-.&1c rm, .&5ur cre..111-1111r11e.ac me.o.11.am11..1c .6.'f' 11-.o.1tpet.c CJ. .o. 'Oo 1:'>11..111.0."6 1 5cu111111e n..1 5Co1111..1cc.o.c. t.&11 J'tl'0.6. le 'Oe.6.11.6.111 .a5.o.111n nAC -rem1r uom A f\.&'O ..o.1111reo. n10-r m6r 'Dl11T111 p.&1pe.o.-p l.Je.6.!=; re.acc11..o.ti1.o.1t '00 cur r.t.. ct6 '6C1111n rem. 1Hop ti16'f' '0(111111 .6. t.&11 '00 '6e.o.11.6.ti1 le1r .6.11 115N:'61t:c; 'Do co11111e.&t be6 .a:sur uo cur 1 11-.&1r'Oc-n15E' At'lr. be1'6 r.&1tce .o.:sur r1ce ro1111 c.&c .o.c.& r,ero 'Oo te &on co115n..o.ti1 'Oo c..11:'>A1pc '6(111111. cu1l'e..1r n.6. ce.o.'Oc.a 1r 11.a ce.6.'Dt:.6. 1m-ucr,e.o.<''.6. 6t115 '0.6.011111:'> 1 5Co11 n.o..cc.0.1 D, .o.5ur .&1 ce.a.c.0.11> 11<1.c e, .J.'f' ff'.o.'6 .l\11 �e11111,1t>. r:& c61pe.6.11n.o. 'Oe'n 1m-l1C1'f' fm 65.6.m 50 r(11l t, .o.:i::;..ir be11'> .Jt.o.f CJ'\011'.>E" Of'm C61p '00 cup Ct115 ernnP .6. CU1t'fe.6.f 'Se .6.11 c.&p'0.6. port:.6. cu5.o.m 5.J. 111.o.rr,.01'6. ce.o.rbo5 0 'Oe.6.5.0.1"6 .o.C.5. 1 11-.o. U.o.CC.6.l'.611 .6f\ .6.11 5Cum.l\11n. -com-<5.s m.o.c 'Oorh11.o.1 t t. 50 R.1.t: 0 m.1111e U.o.c., b.c.n e -<5.t.a Cl1.o.C.


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RUBBER STAllP

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" SHEET IIETAL WI 8,

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Sbs•t. DUBUII.

........... cw-.---.n.. ... -.ac.

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S,4\n au.'R4S'O.Al "O'toc m .&tc .41l tnc .4Cc .&1c 1 mbe1'0 no 'O:Re.Am �151n D.6-01ne .A mbe1'0 10ffltt: o,tt ., � 111 A ,,�on sm t.6S.&1 t ao1mae on mtri� 1\e.

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All. (AN CLAtlllUl81

t A3llr U1m11' 22. No.

[R•gistned as a N••J(>a�•r.)

22.

s.L�

ffJDnt AD 1.AI, I

� No.

oc,,».

berte -6.t.o. cuez, tu5n.o.s.o. 3, 1912. DUBLIN, AUGUST 3,

1912.

Support New Irish Industry ...........-. '

NNEDY'S� BREAD quality Made:

t28 GREAT BRITAIN ST. PA'l'RICK'S BAKERY

DUl3LIN.

''TITAN" SOAP.NO RUBBING� Wonderful

eleam*.

Made PHCENIX WORKS, DUBLIN.

PATRIOTIC PLUG

PLEASING

" YEIY ..- 111m,.:· • TRY TBKM.. .%0Ult8BLP •

THE MOST

cooking, is highly diand contains nearly twice as � as the Avera e Calf Meal. DO

PIPE TOBACCO. DEAKIN'S RELIABLE REMEDIES

UL & VINCENT, LTD., DUBLIN.

should be at hand in every Iriah Home. Deakin'• 11 Red Ivy " Corn Plaue.r. applications suffice. 7id. per pkt.

One or two

Deakin'• Wild Rose Cough Balaam. Gives

instant relief to the most distressing cough. per Bottle.

1/• and 2/•

FJl.N.AG.A.N'II FUNERM. l!'aTA8USHMwrr-. H AONGIBR STRBBT.

c1• ,, .......... c

Pwtaallty C-.117 U•....._..

,-. ... '9'Nl'T P

1u11 ••• ••

l!e1•1 � •- tnl, T1hrl1•1 ... ••

•1111·....

Deakin'• Blood Purifying Tonic. Enriches as

well as purifying the Blood. A necessity in Spring and early Summer. Bottles, 9ld, and 1/8. ..... ,,... f'rom .......

J.

JL DEAKIN,

The Pharmacy, Phibsboro', Dublin.

J. W. ELVEl{Y & CO• €stabltlbtel 1 SSO..

(a.•ld• C.aal Brld1e.)

N..11.-�dMal maker of Household & Veterina"J' 1Ymedi,·, Lisa fre«: •I .a !lintb.

BROS.,

.11abnt Standard Goods Stocktd. +

A

TRIAL SOLICITED.

MARQUEES

TENTS AND

FOR SALE OR HIRE.

Aett1ue.o.cc.o.nn.o. 1 fe1re.o.nn.o., 1"BTES, BAZAARS, & CAMPING-OUT.

8

&. 10

J.

F.

KELLY

&

CO.,

CHANCERY ST. (Formerly Pill

Lane)

Al80 21 UPPER ORMOND QUAY, DUBLIN,

'

••

Mo•era Plant. Modem M,t_..,

140 DRUMCONDRA ROAD, F•ilY 6rocers, Purveyors & Wioe Mercbaots. ,.,,... MODERATE.

Knickers

PRINTING.

Diaa:rict Offices in all important centres.

FLEMING

Foot Ba�. Jerseys. •

CAHILL & CO.,

40 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin.

HURLEY ''CAMANS" 6d., I/·, 1/6, 2/·, 2/6, 3/6.

TAILOR INC! TAILORING!

HURLEY BALLS

Serge & Tweed Suits to Order,

6d., IJ·, 116, IJ9, 2/·, 2/6, 3/0..

From

50/-

M. E. McSWINEY, Cutter.

MURPHY BROS.,

47 Gt. George's St., CORK.

DUBLIN. : , GOU LONDON.


All. te�r,�t' XIV. Vol. XIV.

U11t1111 20. No.

b-<-\1t� .&t-<.\ ct1-<.\t, tutn-<.\S-<.\3, 1912.

20,

DUBLIN, AUGUST 3,

[Registered as a Newspaperj

1912.

INSIST ....

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ON GETTING

IRISH�MJ.\DE etJTLE.'R.Q FROM YOUR IRONMONGER.

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Cutlery Manufaeturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. 50 oru1t 'Ot1e.o.m te 'Oi Lfe.o.cc .6.1' ru.0.1'0 n.o. titt� 6. l'le.o.rr.o.'6 .6.11 cr.o.ot) UAt.o.

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tu511.o.r.o. 3, 1912 Augusf' 3,

1912.

[AN CLAJDHSAIIII ,OLU19,)

) lu511.o.r.o. 3, 1912.

A SINISTER PROPOSAL. While England retains in her grip the control of Irish education, we can never feel that the battle for the Irish language has been won. We had thought that the question of compulsory Irish in the examinations for the County Council University scholarships was settled but it was· announced last Saturday that M/ Birrell will not sanction the £10,000 promised for secondary. school scholarships unless the County Councils hand over their University scholarships. for distribution among students to be nommated by the National Board. Mr. Birrel� refus�s to make I�ish compulsory on the Board s nommees. He will be satisfied with English and arithmetic. The Councils and the National University have made Irish compulsory on scholarship and matriculation candidates, and they have pledged their honour to see their conditions observed. Now Mr. Birrell, who knows at least the meaning of the word honour, although he may ignore the practice of the virtue, asks the Councils to break their patriotic pledges, and further, he says to them, that unless they hand over to him their £50,000 for University scholarships, he will withhold the £10,000 which has been promised for secondary school scholarships. The proposal is worthy of the country which sent us the soupers. It is a souper proposal and Mr. Birrell, the Englishman simple. pure with his hand on the purse strings, offers a paltry £10,000, if we will give him control of our £50,000 from Irish rates, and if we abandon our right to see that we get Irish education in return for Irish money. He attempts to use as a bribe a grant long overdue to Irish education, but we can assure him that the bribe will be rejected. He is, it is said, about to sever his connection with Ireland, but before he leaves us finally he shall have learned that Ireland prefers honour to crumbs dropped from the Castle table, and that it has the good sense to see that £50,000 expended on Irish education, in accordance with Irish ideals, may be made much more fruitful than £60,000 expended by Castle officials on children of the garrison. The Councils won the battle for compulsory Irish in the National University. Compulsory Irish will now secure the Councils' scholarships for that University. )Ir. Birrell aims at upsetting the regulations for compulsory Irish, and at securing for the Seoinin Universities-Trinity and the Queen's-some of the money raised by the Councils for University education. The attempt is not creditable to him in any sense, nor to the � ational Board, whose officials he would have distribute the soup money. It is an insult to the members of our County Councils, but they may be trusted to teach Mr. Birrell that they are neither the fools nor knaves he assumes them to be. The brazen impudence of the proposal will secure its defeat. The rate-inaid from the Councils will eventually amount to about £50,000. Xlr. Birrell would add £10,000 to the larger sum if the whole amount were handed over to the Castle for the further destruction of Irish ideals in Irish education. The Councils would contribute £5 to Mr. Birrell's £1, (and that fr out of Irish taxes), but his one-sixth should control the whole. Government control of education Ireland regards as a She is not going into Mr. Birrell's plague. parlour at this hour of the day.

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No Irish Need Apply. The principal teacher of Meentogues airls' schools, in Ciarraidhe, retirecl on pension °verv recently. The school manager, Father Thoma's O'Sullivan, has appointed in her stead a teacher who is una�quainted with the Irish language. The population of the Rath Mor District Electoral Division, in which the school is situated, amounts to 1,922 persons. Of these 788 speak Irish, and there are 2 98 speakers of Irish under fortv years of a�e. . The �ational Board may argue that English is the language of the majority of the people of the district, and it may use the argument to keep Irish in an inferior position in the school, 1?ut how will Father O Sullivan justify the apJ?Omtment he has made? Three Irish poets, Eogham Ruadh, Eoghan O Rathaille, and Finin O Scannaill, were born in the Rath Mor district, but of them Father OSullivan, who bears the name of Eoghan Ruadh, appears to have no thought. A big section of the people are well acquainted with the language, and we should expect that the opportunity of restoring it which the presence of so many Gaedhilgeoiri affords would not be spurned by any Kerry school manager. The people of Rath Mor have a right to protest against the appointment, and should t?eir protest be ineffective, then they should consider the wisdom of withholding their children from the school.

....

Tuam Demands Bilingual Schools. The following resolution from the Tuam District Council has been sent to His Grace the Archbishop of Tuam, the National Board, and to the managers and teachers in Tuam district : " That in view of the fact that the recent Census returns show an alarming decrease in the number of Irish speakers in Tuam Union durinz the last ten years, more particularly among th� younger people, and while congratulating the teachers on the patriotic effort they .are making !o arrest th� decay of the language by teaching it as an ordmary or extra subject in the schools, the Council is of opinion that until such time as the bilingual programme is introduced into the schools no real progress towards saving the language can be made. We, therefore, demand on behalf of the ratepayers of the Tuam Union that the bilingual programme be introduced into the schools of the Union at the earliest possible moment." We welcome the assistance of Tuam and U achtar Ard Councils into the fight for the Bilingual teaching Gaelicising of the schools. should be feasible in every part of the Tuam district, and there are a number of schools where Irish should be the sole teaching language. The Tuam teachers, we learn, have formed a special class for the study and promotion of the best teaching methods. Why has not Tuam a. winter Irish scho�l? . With an Spideal and Partraigh colleges ,v?rkmg m summer and a Tuam school working in winter, the local teachers should find it possible in a short time to make Irish the language of primary educa tion in their schools. #

Return of League Representatives from America. fliJAn t Athair Micheal O Flannagain, Fionan Mac Coluim, and the cailini who had charge of the League Exhibition of Irish goods, sailed from New York on the "Adriatic," on July 25, and are expected tor each Coibh on August znd at latest. They intend spending the first week after their return in Cuige Mumhan. They will-arrive in Dublin on Saturday, August roth, and will be given a reception by the C oiste Gnotha, which will meet on that day, and by the Gaels of Dublin. Miss Xoonan has not been with the Exhibition since March, but :\lis:, O'Loughlin, of Dun Erner, and Miss Quinn, of Banada Convent, Sligo, were able to give their services to the League to the close of the tour.

...

Premier Botha hears of the Gaelic League. " Homo Rusticus ., writes from South Africa in raise of the manner in which Le Gaelic League I is driving home its teachings. He h ::; Leen rwentv-five Years under the S uthern Cr ss , nd ,rnultl like to draw Irish • tter.tion to rl.e '"ithfulness of the Dutch, who ha, e remained true to their ideals and language for 300 ) t, rs amid savage surrounding races. One .Ander» n Graham. whose name would indicate some intelligen<'e in the owner. has been writing for Africanders on Jr....land. He· regards the revival of Irish as follv and waste of time. Patriotic Africanders, howev er. are more interested in hear-

i.ng of the Gaelic League and its work from inside · than from a Graham who has Iorzotten his own �rigin and is content to place hi.5 native intelligence �t the service of Britishers who require truth-telling only when it is plea.sing to themselves, 'When An tAthair Mac Giolla Sheannaigh was in Pretoria some months ago he lectured on the work ?f the Gae�ic League, and amongst those present l.l1 the audience were Premier Botha and sev era I members of his Government. After the lecture the Minister of Justice came to An t Athair Mac Giolla Sheannaigh to make SJX'Ci,11 inquin=s about the state of Irish in our educationa t S) stems

....

Galway Excursion. The Ard-Chraobh excursion to Calw.iv offers an excellent means of spending the \\eek end ancl Ba?k Holiday in the Irish-speaking West. The tram leaves Broadstone at 8.45 Sunday morning an� returns from_ Gahv_ay at 8.o p.m. The night mail (12.0) also is available. On payment of r s. extra the tickets will be made good {or return on the Bank Holiday. Students joining the Spiddul College and Tawin summer school will find the excursion convenient. X o fears need he entertained on the score of the weather. We learn �rom a�1 Aran Island expert that a fine period wil l immediatel y follow the present abnormal \\ eather.

....

American Papers and the Oireachtas. _Many of Miss Mary Synan's articles on the Oirea�thas and Ardfheis now appearing in Amencan papers repr_esent our lively but decor<:ms �eshval as bemg guarded by police from imagmary hosts of Unionists who thirsted for _th� blood of the Ardfheis delegates. Dublin Unionists at any rate have never interfered with the Oireachtas, and the Ard-fheis delegates have never found it necessary to seek Castle We cannot protection in Dublin streets. believe that Miss Synan wrote such stuff and must attribute the yellow tinge of her articles to the brush of the American syndicate editor through whose hands her articles pass.

...

The Dingle Guardians. � The Din�le Guardians, who some weeks ago seemed quite favourable to the Irish language, now appear to be engaging doctors and cooks without troubling to stipulate that candidates fo.r the vacant posts should be well acquainted with the language of the big majority of the people and ratepayers of Dingle. League News. � Mr. Bigger lectured at Sgoil Shamhraidh an Chaisleain Ghlais on July 25th. He unfurled the lVIacUidhir flag at a Gaelic League gathering at Lios na Sgiath on Sunday. An aeridheacht will be held in Cill Ruis on Sunday. Turas na hArdchraoibhe go Gaillimh starts from Broadstone at 8-45 on Sunday morning. A successful aeridheacht was recently held in Tyrellspass. Lios Tuathail Feis was the occasion of a big gathering. There was a big number of competitors. A correspondent reports that the Convent of Mercy Schools, Teampul Mor, have a big number of pupils proficient in Irish reading and conversation. An enthusiastic public meeting held at Burnfort, Cork, endorsed the Ard-Iheis demands regarding Irish in the schools. :\Ie�:-rs. Murphy, Curtin, O'Brien, Crowley and Sean O Cearbhaill were the speakers. An Irish sermon was preached in the Ca tho lie: Church on the occasion of Castlebcllingharu Feis. .An aerideacht was held at Carraig an ChobhaJtaigh on Sunday last. Dr. Dwane, Secretary, and Xlicheal 0 Conchubhair, teacher, presented satisfactory 1ep<J1 ts to the Kilmallock Gaelic League at its recent annual meeting. The Ardfheis resolutions regarding J rish in the schools were adopted at a public meeting recently held on the occasion of Drum Tairbh Feis. ·· An tAthair Mac Aocha preached in Irish on Cruach Phadraic on last Sunday.

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MR. BIRRELL'S BRIBE.

Miss O'Farrelly, speaking in Cill Sgire at a meeting over which Father Matt Maguire presided, dealt at length with the brazen proposal of Mr. Birrell. Sne said : " Yesterday I saw h) the papers that Mr. Birrell now claims that it is his to shape this future of J rish education. " K av-s-more-c-he also rnodestlv claims that it is his to �undo the work of the Gaelic League for years- the work for which great and good men have been sacrificed-the work which has the support of the Irish people- the work which bears the approval of the vast majoricy of the County Councils=-I ref er to the making of Irish essential in the National L'niversity-s-rnis, 11r. Birrell calmly tells us, is to be ignored and that, forsooth, in the interests of education. '· You look interested, and no wonder-for never in recent times was there a more brazen claim put forward than that which, if reported right in yesterday's papers, emanates now from a l\J inister of the Crown. Lee me tell you exactly what has occurred: " For a long time past there has been a scheme before Parliament and before the Irish Boards of Education, a scheme with regard to Scholarships from the Primary to the Secondary Schools. This scheme, involving as it does a grant of £10:000 a year for the education of clever pupils from the � ational schools, is of great importance to the country , and has been pressed for by the Irish members, Anyone would have thought at th is hour of the day that Irish would in any such scheme be naturally an essential subject. Far from it; these educationalists of ours thought out the problem at round table conferences; they thought it out without any reference to you or your wishes in the matter, and in their wisdom they decided that the K ational language should no: be essential for a X ational Scholarship. Whnt a contradiction in terms? But now throw a sn1J to these terrible Gaelic Leaguers. Ah, yes! We ha \'e it. Vv e can put it on an equality with Who could cavil at that? No one English. would be so unreasonable. Well, my friends, you and I are unreasonable enough to question the educational value of an examination which leaves out of account a man's nationality and his history and the legacy of civilisation which the past has left him. We are unreasonable enough to demand that, above all others, the brilliant pupils leaving our primary schools and starting on a course of education at the national expense shall reflect in the highest degree the culture of the nation. "Bt�t, ') Mr. Birrell may retort, "some of these pupils may be the descendants of settlers and the past of their ancestors is not your past. Why "force it on them?" To that I say, that any body �f people coming into a country and choosing to nve there and set up a home, have got to take the. tradi�ions of the country in which they live. It is their adopted country; . no other countrv wants them. It is the history, it is the past the place where thev breathe and live. And I say more, that the educational work of a country must be regulated to fit the needs and the demands of the great majority. " But this claim of Mr. Birrell and the Education Boards regarding the essential subjects for these pnmary school scholarships is not all. There is something else behind, something that will take vour l>reatl� away: something that will bring home t�) you the insolence of the latest and most aggressive atta.cks on the national language. Here is a new claim for you : Let me quote the exact words as they appear in vesterclav's Freeman:,, It is proposed that." savs the ·Freeman report "when these scholarships expire, the holders shall be elected. without further examination, to County Council scholarships. Up to the present th� County Councils have offered these on the condition "tha t they shall be held .it the N" ational Uni,:ersity. But Mr. Birrell, we understand, considers that they should be tenable at anv of the three Irish Uni,·ersities, and will not sanction the scconda ry scholarships unless the County Councils · agree to this." " 1 r is . proposed, as you see, that these new holrler s nf scholarships are to set Countv Council Sc rolnrships without any fu�ther examination, .m.l that for their benefit the Countv Councils rescind their resolutions with rezard to the :\'ationa! L'niversirv and essential Iri�h.

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·· The form in ', .hich this new proposal is put is most insidious. It is in the form of a br.; e. Give up ) our essential Irish plan and we promise to endow YOU with an extr .... £ 10,000 for scht.Lrships. Send )OUr scholars t Trinity and Belfast Universities where Irish is not compulsory: or else make the X ational Universitx in self-defence · unsay its act of national faith. '· Mv friends. it is a bold, a masterly stroke. It is well thought-out plan for the undoing of the work of the Gaelic League for some years past. lt takes one's breath awav : it is so based on the weakness of human nature .and on the Irishman's 10\·e of learning and on his desire to give his child even· chance in life that education can give ; it rs so well arranged to catch the County Councils in its toils. "It has taken months evidentlv to work out this new scheme: its announcement is timed for the moment when we are all enthusiastic over the prospect •f better things for Ireland in the near future, when in our expansive mood we may be willing to agree to many compromises. " But 11r. Birrell and his advisers ha ve counted without their hosts. I say it confidently here today, in putting forward at this hour of the day any scheme of education which leaves the national language in an inferior position, above all, they are ill-advised to advance any scheme likely to plunge the country once more into turmoil over this question of essential Irish. For over two years this question of making Irish essential for entrance to the new University was discussed in every county in Ireland and at almost every public Board. The newspapers here and in England rang with it; echoes of the controversy reached even to America and the Continent. Ireland declared herself for, the national language; the County Councils backed by the people declared themselves; the whole question was closed, and the general understanding was that the settlement was a final one. Now, two years later, when the date fixed for the enforcement of the new rule in the X ational University is drawing close upon us, a responsible Minister, on the eve of his departure-if rumour speaks true-s-announces plainly and bluntly, that he will not sanction the secondary scholarships unless the County Councils agree to having their scholarships open to all three Irish Universities. Already the County Councils, or at least the large majority of them, have made a bargain with the National University. They said to the authorities : if you make Irish essential for entrance we shall endow you with a number of scholarships. After mature consideration the offer was accepted. The National University ran the risk of handicapping her own work in accepting this offer. Fortunately, the national spirit was strong enough to overcome this risk. The number of students goes on increasing rapidly. The work of the institution, freed as it is from many of the old restrictions, is developing out of all proportion to the expectations of the people. '' Now the immoral proposal, backed as it is by an offer of £10,000, is made to our County Councils to round on the National U niversitv, which undoubtedly did make sacrifices to meet the wishes of the County Councils and the people. Was there ever a more insolent proposal ? Is this the: kind of emancipation we have been anticipatAre the wishes-the undoubted ing for ears ? wishes-of the people and their elected representatives on the County Councils to be over-ridden by the wishes and the schemes of a clique or party Are the speaking in the name of education. parents to decide the type of education they want for their children. Are they responsible before God and the country for their children, or has Mr. Birrell now taken on himself a new and heavy burden at a moment when rumour declares him to be about to resign the cares of office? "We have kindlv recollections of Mr. Birrells administration here in Ireland, especially in educational matters. As a Minister he was responsible for a great University Act. His sympathy has been with Ireland in many ways. What a pity that his name should now be associated with a proposal which is sure to be a bnoxious to the people and to the County Councils. Can it be that Mr. Birrell is being made a scapegoat for other people or for some of the Education Boards? "Three weeks ago the Ard-Fheis of the Gaelic League at its annual conference demanded that the obnoxious three language rule he amended so as to place Irish on an equality with the other two Mr. languagl's in the Intermediate programme. O'Donnell proposed this amendment in the House of Commons last week. What do vou think was Mr. Birrel's reply. ' On educationa'I grounds.' he said. he was opposed to depri \·ing the students to whom Irish is a native language (meaning native speakers) of the advantages to be derived from Here Mr. Birrell learning a third language. places the interests of the comparatively small number of native speakers against that of the country ·at large, or rather of those students who must learn Irish as they learn any other l.mguage.

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Yer. ,, hen it comes to a question of the.-;e verv students .. ith reg .. r J to. the prirn.irv seholar:-;hip;, Xlr. Birrell .i.is nothm., to ofter. · Irish or Eng.is .. · a· a compulsory subject th.rt is the best we get. The native Irish spe .. ker t.1k�� Irish the native English speaker .akes E11t,'.: sh. "'her� now. Mr. Birrell, is the educ.uicnal ,llh .intJ.<re to to be derived from the study and m,lstt:n a

°or

new language, of 1Yhich last week you d�-bred you could not deprive th;:.• 1utin• Irish spclker? ,vhere. indeed ! So wonder we want to settle our education.11 affairs nearer home than "'estminster where responsit.Jle �linistLrs brl� lYen today t� treat our educational id�als as something so futil� as no_t even to d�s�rYe the pour re�pect of cons1stenc) m the oppos1t10n. A fe1\" cb) s ago an extra language was ,l , ,1luable mental tr.lini1w and not for the world ,,ould 11r. Binell depri�·� us of it. A couple of da:::; later 11r. Birrell in cold blood adumbrates a scheme for the allocation of £10,000 of public money in scholarships, a scheme from \Yhich a second language (not to talk of a third one) is carefully excluded. It \\·on't do! '· The other day �Ir. Birrell was good enotirrh 0 to saY there were educationalists in Ireland; 1 couple of days later he puts fonrnrd a sch�m� which. if accepted by the County Councils., deprives them of the elementary right of examinin<r their students, or at least such section of ther� as come up with primary scholarships for their mn1 scholarships. Are the County Councils n0t fit to organse and carry out examinations for their own scholarships, or .are the flood-gates of nomination to be opened before our eyes? " One cannot help thinking that his proposal is not quite so disingenuous as it seems. 'fhere speaks behind it the voice of that bitter opposition to essential Irish which dislocated public life here for so long. ' We have scotched the snake, not killed him." He is raising his head again. " Once more we must appea to the people; once more we must appeal to the people's representatives. Will the County Councils fail us? .No! for the County Councils are the ,·oice of the people. More! their own personal honour is now_ involved. They are .asked to break the bargain they made two years ago with the Xational Unfrersity, a bargain ratified on both sides. 'Essential Irish for our scholarships and no scholarships by nomination ' must be the en of o� the Councils henceforth. " It is fitting that the first note in the coming fight should be sounded by you the people of Kilskerry, presided over as you are by one -of the fighting Magufres. It is right that you ,vho h;_l\'e seconded so patriotically the efforts of Father Matt. towards the Irishising of your children's education, that you who see for yourselves the wisdom and the justice of this cry for the native language, shoud make known to-day to the rest of Ireland your wishes in this matter. You and I want this long-asked-for grant towards primary scholarships; we look upon it a.s the right of the people to get such a grant-but we shall not accept a grant bound up ,vith such insultinrr conditions. We shall gladly take it if they �mend the. scheme, but if not, it is our duty to reject it. It 1s only a hagatelle compared to the offers our people have rejected for conscience sake and for Ireland's sake. " Now, mY friends. I would like to talk of more personal matters, matters of peace and progress -the path of the Gaelic League has more often been the warpath, not that we love storm rather than calm, but because war is forced on us. See to-day, for instance. Yesterday ·we looked forward to a deightful quiet time among!-t You, a time in which to note your progress and to' gather encouragement from your example. Sucldenlv we lit on this report in the newspapers of the· new Scholarship Scheme. It came as a shock, unexpected, bewildering. It ,ras clearl) our duty to put the matter before vou and ask vou for Your opinion. Xo need to ask \'OU twice. Your answer will reach the County Councils in whose ' honour we haye the most - implicit confidence. My friends: to-day will to-morrO\v be a past; to-morrow will itself be a past in a. few short hours. What record are '\\'€ senclincr dnm1 to 0 that are fhinl)'" from us. h.1story of these dan 0 Every day _an Irish speaker dies, nay, many Irish speakers die. It is only a question of arithmetic to count the da: s and the years till they all pass. If we do not see now to the young gennationand between us and the young generation. hetwe�·n our fathers and mothers and vour own children- thc. re is interposed a net\\'Ork of Education Boards -shadow,, shapes armed ,rith rules and rP!!lllati-ons tied .up in neat bundles with red tape. t'>You may be as Irish as you like, but if the Celtic drsign on the hem of your garments is not outlinec1 in red tape you st.and in dangN of receiving no credit from mam· of our educational authoritir5. ""' , mmrJI. Go on as you ban� been gom� l.,e,·er:.. on. Don-t get tired on the w.ay. Xothing good was e,·er arrived at without trouble ancl la hour." I


.o,n Ct6.1'0e�m sotu1s.

lu:511.0.r.o., 3, 1912 August 3,

1912.

{Alf l.'LAIDffllAMH SOLUfl.j

GAELIC RELIGIOUS SERVICES AND FEISEANNA.

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The side of Irish life which b) its nature should have been the first to respond to the Gaelic spirit has long remained outside the Irish movement. It is strange that outwardly religion has been so little touched by the Gaelic Revival. But a change is coming. An La Feile Phadraig of this year was a record day in the Dublin «ourches, and now another link has been forged in Lt� ''hain which it is hoped will closely bind religious and Gaelic sentiment. The Castle Bellingham Feis, held on Sunday, July r ath, was inaugurated by an Irish service. During the eleven o'clock Mass in Kilsaran parish church Irish hymns were sung, and at the end of the Mass an Irish sermon was preached by Dr. Lochran. Never before had the tongue of the Gael echoed within those walls. Never before had the parishioners heard the Word of God in the language of the Irish saints. The beautiful Hymn of St. Patrick, by the Rev. George O'Neill, S.J., familiar since last St. Patrick's day to so many Gaels, was sung by the K.ilsaran school children. Miss Giltrap, their mistress, must certainly have been inspired with some of the old· Irish musical spirit, for the rendering was remarkable. A German musician present said he had never heard anything of the kind to surpass it. The Irish words suited the church singing as English words never can, and the minor key of the music made it most devotional. A listener to the hymn could not but feel amazed that any other but Irish hymns should be sung in our churches. With such a wealth of treasure at our hands it is incomprehensible that we should turn to the inferior religious musical productions that are heard all over this country. When shall we have a hymn-book of beautiful Irish hymns set to beautiful Irish music, and when shall we discard those that a well-known English religious author could write only to the strains of a barrel-organ? Where Castle Bellingham has led, let us hope that other places will follow. An Irish religious service should open every Feis held on a Sunday, and thus the language that was banished from our altars will at least during one clay in the year regain its rightful place. B. 111.

uc1s15.

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OIREACHT AS PRIZE WINNERS

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A NIGHT IN TRI LIAGA.

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Workers in Tri Liaga who had been preparing for several weeks for their annual Feis-A.eridheacht were disappointed last Sunday by the weather which was unusually and persistcntlv wet. They were disappointed in not haying either competitions or aeridheacht, but they were not disheartened. They meet difficulties with a firm purpose of overcoming them in Tri Liaga. and w..hen they cannot over-come them directly they get round them. The acri.lhcacht and competitions were postponed, an: l \\ ill he held in a fortnight's time, and neithc;r competitors nor workers will be a bit less enthusiastic in the intervening fortnight than 1hey were during the month preceding July 28th. The enthusiasm of Tir Eoghain is a invigorating as the air of its hills. It is a plant that blooms the whole vear round. As the aeridheacht was not held it cannot be described, but the work that preceded the date fixed for that event is what matters. League work in Cill Sgirc has gone on without a break since An t Athair Maitiu Mac Uidhir became sagart of the parish. This continuitv of work in a -v-tcmatic \Vay has won for the Gaelic League respect and

admir�tion that help it considerably. f4 It has no mistakes, and no failures to live down The. best possible relations exist between th� N ational teachers and the two Irish teachers who conduct night schools and teach Irish in the day schools. The people have shown a great �nd sustained enthusiasm for education. The night schools ar� working wonders among · them, and they contmue year after year. The school. teachers" and the Catholic Curate help the Insh teache:s by conducting some of the classes. There is a lot of unofficial education carried on in this way. Some of its fruits were to be seen at a ceilid� g�ven in Tri Liaga school last S�nday. The smgmg by the girls was in the. Insh style. The singing of " Spailpin a Rum ". would do credit to Rinn, and the rendermg of "Maire Ni Ghriobhtha" and "Una Bhan" would win praise in Tamhain or Baile Doighte. Eithne Ni hOisin and Mairead her sister have succeeded in !ea�hing I�ish �inging to ; la:ge �u.mber of Tn Liaga children. Mairead N1 hOisin ha� been helping singing classes in the schools smce she left Carysfort Training College early in July. The danci1:� ?f the Knocnagor girls showed that ou! cailini ar.e capable of bringing to success m a short time an exacting art. The young dancers of Tri Liaga are good enough to appear on any stage. The object of their teachers has not been to prepare them for public exhi�ition, but to enable the young people to bnng by means of their own accomplishments some good entertainment into their own homes. Violin players and a pipers' band from Omagh helped to make the evening very enjoyable. When the singing, . story.t�lli�g, and dancing were over, An tAthair Maitiu mtroduced Miss 0'.Farrelly, who spoke of the attempt of Mr. Birrell to upset the compulsory Irish regulations of the National Ur:iiversity, and to capture for Govcrnm�nt nommees .the County Council scholarships. An tAthair Mac Uidhir himself spoke on the same subject. He was very, very angry. The tnckery of the enemies of Irish nationality always arouses the anger of earnest workers. �ncl ��e, Tri Liaga people applauded An t Athair Maitiu s fierce denunciation of the knaves who never cease to scheme against Irish Ireland. BUAILTEAN. PRIZES FOR IRISH IN NATIONAL SCHOOLS, 1912. The following letter and return of answering have been rcce1ve,J by Dr. Skeffington from the National Board in rdcrenc_c to his prizes for Irish, open to Monitors and Pupil-teachers o1 the four South-eastern counties, at the Easter examinations for 1912 for entrances to Training Colleges:• Office of National Education Dublin, r ath July, 19 12. Sir, With reference to your letter of the 9th inst. I am directed by the Commissioners of National Education to enclose. herewith a r�turn showing the three final year Monitors or Pupil-teachers in the National Schools of the counties Waterford, Wexford, Kilkenny. 3:nc) Carlo�,. wh? qualified (by examination) for admission to 1 ran mg Colleges at the King's Scholarship Examination of 1912, and who obtained the best marks in Irish at that Examination. I am, Sir, Your obedient servant. P. E. LEMAS5, Secretary. J. B. Skeffington, Esq., LL.D., Ex-Senior Inspector. Return-Highest answering :-:\1r. Garrett Quinlan C�olnas1!1car Boys' N.S., Co. Waterford ; second pla"e'. l\hss Bridget O Farrell, Bagenalstown Convent X.S., Co. Carlow ; third place, Miss Katie Ryan, Kilkenny This year, again, three Presei:itation Convent �.S. co�nties. sha�e the pnz�s on very satisfactory proficiency in Insh. This is the third and final year for which these prizes have been offered by Dr. Skeffington, and they h�ve beed fo1:1nd verv encouraging to the study 01 Insh by Candidate teachers. It is to be hoped that such prizes for Irish and other subjects will be offered on a wide scale by the Board or by generous individuals. · Irish crrtJfirate� have been sent to the winners, to whom also cash pnzes, first of £3 ; second of £2 ; third of !_, 1, have been paid by Dr. Skeffington. 1

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each - Surgeon-Gen. O'Niall, Killaloe ; An Craoibhin Aoibhinn ; Prof. R A. S. Macalist�r, Univ. College, Dublin ; Padraig Ua Casaidc, Lowell, U.S.A. ; Walter Dallon Tipperary ; Dermod O'Brien, P.RH.A. '; Mrs. Peel, Kilkee ... ... l..j. 0 0 Craobh Ro�crc (tre M. B. Bheolain) . I 10 0 Rev. P. Griffith, C.S.S.R., Limerick . I 5 O £,r IS. each-S. R Lysacht, Flax Bourton : Col. Lynch, M.P. ; Prof. Culverwell, F.T.C.D .... 3 3 0 £1 each-An Doctuir Domhnall Ua Loinsiuh Baile Mhuirne ; •· Malit Merch Brych;i°�.'; De Cyrnru, An t-Athair Diarmiacl O Murchadha, Co. Luimnighe ; Seosaimhin Ctib Dublin; P. J. Boland, :\.I.A., Member of Governing Bod)' of Univ. College, Galway ; Mrs, Bulger, Lisdoonvarna ; Hugo :\Iaguii·e, London ; Eibhlin Xie Aitcinn i\Iakhreacl Nie Dobbs, Co. Aondroma ; 'Miss· Helen Warren, Dublin; Micheal Smiclic, Very I<ev. Canon Flannery, V.G., Killaloe; Re\. A. Lalor, C.C., Kil!aloe ; Rev. J. Reeves, C.C., Newcastle West : Irish Class, Sixmilehriclge; Rev. T. J. O'Hogan, P.P., Sixmilebridue ; J. A. Dalton, Portarlington ; Colonel John . Macnamara, Corofin; Craobh Liscanuoir, Co. Clare; Craobh Naoimh Ita, Caisleaiu Nua,. Mrs. Cata, Brooklyn, U.S.A. ; Rev, J. Hallman, P.P., Ardagh, Co. Limerick ; J. H. Duggan, Co. Clare ; Rev. 1L Hehir, P.P .. Kildysart ; Rev. T. Kelly.CC., Ballin.un lly ; Rev. 1. Meade, C.C., Broadford, Co. Care; Anonymous; Archdeacon Stuart, P.P., \'.G .. Roscrea ; Rev. R. O'Connell, St. Fla1J11a11's Colle�e, Ennis ; Rev. P. O' Halloran, C.C., Corofin ; An t-Athair Sean O Donnchaclh St. Flannan's College . . ' 32 0 0 P. 0. Dubhthaighe, Cluaintairbh 0 15 6 Rev. M. Crowe, C.C., Birr ... O IO 6 ros. each-Alec. P. Wilson, Belfast; Maire Nic Airchinnigh, Cahersherkin, In nistiornain ; Miss K. 0 Brien, Dublin; Eoin Mac1 reil!, Seamus }IacDonncadha, Dublin · Ladv Shaw, Terenure; Bean Ui Rathallaicrl{ Bligh Talboicleach O Crosan, Co. Ciarraicll� '. Miss Francis Geoghegan, Stillorg:111 ; J. O'Reg��n, �o. C:, Sixmilebridge; J. O'Flynn, D.C., S1x111Ilehnclge; J. H. Cla11dillo1J.-:-,.; T .. Sixmilebriclge ; Rev. J. Darcy, P.P., Terrrglass ; Rev. P. Grace, P.P., Ruan ; Mairghread Ni Bhrian, Dublin ; R. de Naish' 0 Griobtha, Newcastle West; Rev. T. Roche, C.C., Kilmaley; Rev. E. O'Scanlan, ,� C., Birr; John P. Boland, M.P. ; Re,. \\'. Grace, C.C .. Rev. John O'Dea, C.C., Bnclyke; Conchubar O Coileain, Craobh an Ceitinni-oh II O O 5s. each-Ellis Nie Sheamuis, Donnybrook ; Miss J. Macnamara, Foynes ; Seumas O h-Ealuighe, Henri O Deaghaclh, Sean }lac Giollan Atha,Joseph Carney, Cavahan; l\Iiss E. Gleeson, Dun Erner ; Miss Annie Dundon, Castle }fa hon . .. .. :2 0 0 :2s. 6d. each-Seumas O'Maolgabhnaigh, \\'. A. N'olan, Glasnevin ; Anon., "An Do, Mi, So," .. O IO O X eili ni Bhriain writes that of letters in connection with Fund, and asks us to print the The Catholic

she has received a number the O'Currv Irish Col!eae b following :...:_ Presbyter!·· Dannevirkc, Ne\\' Zt:ala11d, April -1-th, r912.

::\Irs::; O'BRIE:\', As a Clareman in far Xew Zealand I am ,Hi tin ff to extend you a helping hand in your efforts to establiJ1 a Gaelic College at Carrighaholt for the cles-.e11cla11ts of the Dalcassians. I� has_heen well said that Home R.J!e is 11ol 11ecessarily na_bonaht)·-that H�me Rule does not comprise en:rythmg the people oi Ireland want. A 1011,�-<,ppressecl pc�ple )1a,e to be �ducated in tlw great principles of nahonahty. and now 1s the time tu help the JH:ople of !rel.and to develop a�! those characteristics. i 11 tellectual, social, moral, economic, and political-that are essential to r�1ake_Ireland a_ n,�tion worthy of the priceless gfory ('[ nabonalit)·. Patnobsm that is built upon the heclrock foundation of justice, charity, temperance. industr", progress. and self-respect can ne\·er fail. · I enclose you herewith an order ior [5. I am, dear ::\Iiss O'Bri1.:11. Yours failhilllh·. (Rev.) THU)U<; ]. °C\HILL. Gycla clymuina clan goreu Oc!c!iwith (from) ·· l\Iallt }lerch Brvchan." •· Op with the Gaelic!" Cymriu is keen!, inlcrestecl in the splendid struggle her sister nalir,11 · Eireann is making ior her language-a stru,10Je \\ liich must be \'icturious in the encl, r-,-. DEAR

G\\'YXXOX DAL.

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1912.

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l'.4' 1' ,,, 1J' J"CO lf'Cl� re1c p{mr:. Sur.-,car l·un <'on511.1m -00 'C.1.�,\I.JIC 1J'111it1r1 cori1.1t-::::.1r -'5UJ' a ( JJ""-IJ'I ·r,o i1iot. _cu"'l'"'m .mt .\On crt1:9-• 1r r•'.lfll' cun ct'n( �"' �.\e1J1l5e -o_u ct1p a11 .1.56.1-u n.& """ c >!.'-"•rd ·oo <'tlJI at1 uun ltlf 5·'� C(•�n.;4}1 5..1.e'()C:..\lAC ...c11h, ll(\ r lfl(' cun "'" ce.11150 uo co1mt•A'"(J ue.u "'5ur a l.lfJ.1111- ·u'�'<'.lt'J'•muf;od> .0,

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ON-August &tb to 31st. INl'lPGI-E. D,. IIALl!RA, B.A. complete --,...,. or G••llo LNQru• l'ublloa· on •pplloatlon•

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;1ora1 necoranons, Why use tinsel ornaments and paper flowers when I can supply Real Flowers and Flowering Plants at reasonable prices, which will not only last the few days of the festive season, but will be a fragrant reminder of the glorious event ?

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CU1'015 Le 'OeM1cuir1t> 1M h e1111nn.

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( .-. ·-,

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45 HENRY .STREET, DUBLIN.

Price from 12/tt.

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Opposite O'Connell Monument,

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��t'Mf'

u 1111111 2 I.

XIV.

Vol. XIV.

"

.' :··,·

-0-11

..

No

.. '·

•••

b"''\1t0 -<lt-0-

21.

ct.t.or;

tu:5n-0-s-0-;10, 1912.

DUBLIN, AUGUST

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'J}15m11. [Registered as a Newspapn:

INSIST

Oi-:E PENNY

ON GETTING

l'R.ISH�M'ADE etJTLE.RQ FROM YOUR IRONMONGER.

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Cutlery Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. 'C.& mmr .o.5t1r flt.o.l), '01'e.o.po1'0e.o.r.6.cc A:Stlf t.&. b.&'O.o.1'6e.o.c'C, b6t.6.1l' 1.o.r.o.mn .o.5t1r b6t.6.1f\ 5.0.n 1.6.t'Ann, .0.5 .o.n Ce A tlOCf.o.r te b.6.e'Oll.5' .o. to5tt11m n6 r.o.01rre .6. 6.6.tte.6.m r.o.n .&1c. 'C OSllU :$,<\'{) . be-1'6 .o.n ob.6.11' .6.:S co1re.o.cc, le cum1u$.o.'O De, r.0.01 co1m11'ce n.o.om br15'0e, A pu5.c.'6 6 '6e.o.r 'Oe'n .&1e reo, .o.r An 'Oomn.o.c, r8 u 'Oe lt15n.o.r.o.. 'C.& re fOC1't115te 50 mbe1'6 Aef'1'0eAC'C 1 · bp.&1rc 11A cotA1rce A5.6. mbe1'6 CA1t1nce61pi morA ct1u1Ce.6.CA. '°-1' m.o.rnm "()M tuAtn 'n.6. '01.6.1'0 f111 .1. I9 lt.:1511.0.r.o. CU11'fe.6.1' cur .6.1' ObA1t' n.o. te.o.1'.l.o.r .o.5ur 6 tom 50 'OetpeA'6 .o.n ri1eA'6on fo5mA1f\, "1 n-.&1'C A bt1'6 t::11.15.0. bu'6 t::At1.o.1'6e" rn ..,' r ro1prce.o.nA6.o. .o.n r.&'6 e. Se 'C.& n.o. mc1111nceo1r1 co5.o.1ee Le C.6.mAtt. 06m m.o.c 1le1lt, le.o.r-u.o.C'C.6.t'.6.l1 ConnrA'6, tld 5.c.e'01L5e, .o.n c.&r'O-Ott.o.1i1 . b. 6 'O.

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THE

IRISH CINEMA

CAPEL S1REET (next to Trades' /fall),

NOW OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30.

PRICES,

30.,

40.,

60.

Chan�e of Pictures· Mc.nday, Thursday and Sunday.


luSt16.f A

August

.6.n Cl.6.1'0e.6.rh sotu1s.

10, 1 12.

5

(AN CLAIDBB.UIB. SOLUI&.j

10. 1912.

0

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r. mite p unr; THE TIDE TURNS AGAINST ENGLISH DONEGAL.

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The population of County Donegal fell from 173,722 in 1901 to 168,537 in rcr r , the decrease The Irish-speaking population being 5,185. numbered 60,677 in 1901 and 59,313 in 19rr, the decrease being only 1,364. The rate of decline was lowest among the Irish-speaking The decline in the total number of people. Irish speakers is comparatively small, and it need cause no uneasiness if we remember other surprising facts given in the Census book. The total number of persons speaking Irish only increased from 4,448 in 1901 to 4,733 in 1911. The totalnumber of Irish speakers under eighteen years rose from 16,703 in 1901 to 16,820 in 1911. The total number of speakers of Irish over thirty years was 1,223 greater last year than in 1901. Donegal, Dunfanaghy, Glenties, Millford, and Stranorlar are the chief Irish-speaking districts. Dunfanaghy Rural District had in 1911 a population of 15,471. Of these 11,919, or 77.5 per cent., spoke Irish. There were 2,234 persons who spoke only Irish. The actual decrease in the number of those who spoke Irish was 442. The decrease in the number of those who spoke only Irish was 790, but there was an increase of 465 in the number of persons under eighteen years who were unacquainted with English, and in the same age group there was an increase of 390 in the total number of The decrease in the total speakers of Irish. population of the district was 310. Glenties Rural District is scarcely less Irish than The total population last year Dunfanaghy. was 32,800, including 24,136 Irish speakers who amounted to 73.6 of the total number of There were 1,787 persons in the district. There was an persons who spoke only Irish. actual decrease of 343 in the total number of Irish speakers, and a decrease of 230 in the number of those who were unacquainted with English. Persons under eighteen who spoke only Irish rose from 497 in 1901 to 517 in 1911. The total number of speakers of Irish under the age of eighteen rose from 6,745 to 6,928. The actual decrease in population was 391, showing a decline rate of r.z per cent. Millford Rural District had a population of 19,393. Of this number 47.7 per cent., or 9,260 spoke Irish. There were 402 persons who spoke only Irish. The actual decrease in the number of Irish speakers was 298. Speakers of Irish under eighteen fell in numbers from 2,943 to 2,710. The number of those who spoke only Irish showed a decrease of roo. The loss in population was 866; The rate of decline was 4.3 per cent. Stranorlar had a population of 13,121. The number of Irish speakers was 3,506-867 more than in 1901. The number of those who spoke only Irish fell from Z ..F to 204, but in the age group " under r8 " persons who spoke only Irish increased in numbers, and the total number of Irish speakers in the same group rose from 750 to 984. Stranorlar lost 536 in the number of its population. The decline rate was 3.9 per cent. The population of Donegal Rural District was 19,616. The number of Irish speakers rose from 4,319 to 4,332. The increase is small, but it is remarkable, because the total population decreased during the decade. The district had but 61 persons unThe Gaedhilgeoiri acquainted with English. make up 22.0 per cent. of the total population. There were in the district 864 persons less than in 1901. The decline rate was 4.2 per cent. In Inishowen Rural District the number of Irish speakers fell from 4,083 in 1901 to 2,911 last year. The district lost 1,172 Gaedhilgeoiri. It had only 22 persons unacquainted with English. Letterkenny Rural District had 2,445 Irish speakers in 1901. Last year it had only 1,729, and only 20 of that number were unacquainted with English. Londonderry �o. 2 District had 224 speakers of Irish last year. In 1901 it had 255. The number of Irish speakers in Strabane No. 2 District rose from 2L4 in 1901 to 394 last year. Ballyshannon had 178 speakers of Irish in 1901. Last year the number had risen-

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co5r.o.1'0 11 .:\ 'C1 m't1 R1 f1 R 05.0. 1 ;sCOlil{\ 1 R n.c l101bRe seo .o.5us 10Cf.o.R .6. S1.6.'0 cun 11.6. SC01 t.eznne, So-1i1 R\.\ 1'0 1-<.\U, �,5t:S ;sCOS'C-6.1 110 CU1'0 'cc ,O.S ,6.11 £roo S11l.

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5"\t co isoc ce.:\1mco.1n. 5u1t n1.o.1't teo 'Out r"' 11", co11r�e"',tt-0.c.o.11'.'.> so Cl:�1 curo 'Oe'n <.\1R5c.so so ui::"',5&1t bo. ceo.rrc 'OOH'.) 1"'\RR-j_c<\S �5us eo t.e,s cuu 11111 ,(,\ cu R 50 ·oci --o.11 t"-\ R'O-R U1l.6.1'0e 5.0.11 ri101 t. t. to 481. In Letterkenny Urban District the number of speakers of Irish rose from 368 to 423. The remarkable features of the Donegal Census returns, as far as Irish is concerned, are that the decrease in the number of Irish speakers is insignificant, that increases are 1 ecorded in five districts, and that increases in the number of speakers of Irish in the age group marked " under 18 " are recorded in seven districts, that more persons, under eighteen and over thirty, spoke Irish last year than in 1901. \Vhile the decline in population was at the rate of 7 per cent. or more, in Anglicised districts, the decline in Glenties was at the rate of 1.2 per cent.; in Dunfanaghy at the rate of 2 per cent.; in Stranorlar at the rate of 3.9 per cent.: in Millford at the rate of 4.3 per cent. The decimation of the Irish speakers takes place among persons aged from eighteen to thirty, the people from whom the majority of emigrants are drawn. The decline has been stemmed among the young, and thousands of old Gaedhilgeoiri have taken up again the habit of Irish speech. One of the most remarkable points of the return is that the number of persons unacquainted with English rose from 4,448 to 4, 733. The Irish language is holding its own in Donegal. The last county of the Gaedhealtacht (the books for the other counties of the Gaedhealtacht have been published) turns out to be the best. If Irish were dead in all the rest of the land we might restore it to the nation at large from Tir Chonaill. The tide has turned against English in one Irish county, and that county has enough Gaedhilgeoiri to form the nucleus of a Gaelic nation. To what and to whom should we attribute the turning of the tide ? Tir Chonaill Gaedhealtacht has over sixty schools in which Irish is on an These schools equal footing with English. have played an important part in the language fight. The existence of two Irish colleges in the county was another factor in the fight. Then Tir Chonaill is more fortunate than other parts of the Gaedhealtacht in having an Irish-speaking Bishop-Dr. O'Donnell of Rapbee=-and Irish-

speaking priests. Dr. O'Donnell publishes his pastorals in Irish and English. The catechism is taught in Irish only in the fior Ghaedhealtacht Crann Ethne, a society for the strengthening of the use of Irish in the homes, has the active support of the Bishop and of his priests. It was founded some years ago and has spread into the utmost parts of Dun na nGall. To the clergy and teachers and to the spirited parents who have set their faces against the encroachment of English is due much of the credit of having turned the tide in the most Irish part of Cuige Uladh. Tir Chonaill has taught us all a lesson. The movement' has been made a one. It has not been kept above the popular heads of the people. Wherever the Gaelic League fails to become a people's movement it must fail. In Tir Chonaill the gospel of Irish Ireland was preached to the people until they understood its significance. Now Irish is safe in the county. EXCURSION TO SLIGO. Muintir Mhic Eil are running their annual excursion to Sligo on the r Sth inst. Dublin Gaels who have not yet seen the beauties of Lough Gill should not miss this opportunity. A thoroughly enjoyable day is guaranteed by the organisers of the excursion and those acquainted with the Craobh know how the members of Craobh Mhic Eil can render the long train drive a pleasant and stimulating pastime. Arrangements are made for cheap boating up Lough Gill, and car drives to Rosses Point and other places of interest. The return fare is only 4s., and tickets may be had at the Branch premises, gr Upper Dorset Street.

IRISH. ROSARY BEADS.

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tu5n.c.r.c., 10, 1912 August

C•• CLAIDRllAMH

10, 1912.

glossed therein, to ,;wit, '' b' fheidir mi ruilh/�a.dh an fios so le Fumn, does not seem to be familiar beyond the borders of Cuil Aodha, .hence the need of explaining it. To Amhlaoibh also I must make known that the use of the Rom":n type is purely editorial, for his o"".n MS. 1;11 Irish script was the COJ?Y handed m. This does not mean that I object to Roman ty:reon the question of type I have an oren mmd. It were better perhaps if we got nd of the prejudice in favour of Irish type. "<Torna." our true Milesian poet who has no reason to hide his real name Tadhg . 0 Donnchadha, continues his sketch of the h�e and labours of Father Owen O'Keeffe. In. this instalment he gives two short. prose pieces Calendar and Trosadb na h�?ine _an� three noems one Ar Eacbtradb Dhuinn, m ogldchas �f deibhidh; and the others in the customary assonance, �nc of these being by Uilliam Mac Cairtediu an Diina. Tadhg has. gone .to great trouble in recording variant readings with other notes at the foot of the pages, and deserves . . every commendation therefor.. Mr. O'Rahilly's own contribution �s most It rs entitled A interesting and valuable Richard Barret 'san 91), an,d (Preab Song by includes a sketch of the celebrated Erns poets life so far as the industry of the editor coul� ascertain it. The song edited for us on this occasion is quite characteristic of Connacht with its frequently recurring popular assonance, the mention of Gibraltar and the .0rand Also the Con�arht spirit ?f Seignior. &c. and mirth runs through it. The refram jollity is in� most cases : t

Mar sin 's da bhrigh sin, nil beart nios crion,na Na bheith go siorruidhe 'cur preab san ol ! The recording of Knight's version in his absurd ·' phonetics " is a very doubtful advantage. Everybody. knows , that, past participles have their endmgs as -ti, -tai, that do is eo, &c. in the mouths of Connacht people. Pairlement Chloinne Tomdis (edited by Prof. O. J. Bergin) is continued. w« n?tice, ab�ch, 127, 572, which should be abhach, i!. 0 Reilly, T6ruigheacht Dhiarmada agus Ghrdinne, and other authorities are correct. Perhaps Prof. has followed the celebrated modern Bergin lexicon which reads · '' �b.o.c, -.0.15, m., the e1;trail; of any beast (=10n.c.t.c.p)." If he will only cast his eye down t? the next wo�d he will find " o.l:'.>.o.c, -.0.15, pl. id., m., a �wart, a pigmy, a sprite, an elf.'� The conclusion is plain. The prin�er, suffering from parablepsy. in place of dottmg, as per proof, the -b- of " �b.o.c " went down a line to the next entry and dotted instead the -c of " �lJ.c.c " (as it originally must have been). The error per�iste�, tor the editor appears to have added -MS, pl. id." in lieu of " -.c.1c, pl. id." The word for a dwarf is abhac, for it can be checked by speech, a check from which we are unfortunately debarred in the case of abhach, entrails, unless it turn up in some little corner of th� country. The only living tern�� the pre�ent wnter knows for "entrails, guts are mionach (meanach), . put6ga, caolain, inni. Under Miscellanea Father Paul Walsh �ites On some Irish Adverbs. His note goes into of the of po�ition and adve!bs aspects many direction, but some of his conclusions s�em It was the present wnter rather doubtful. who supplied the dictionary with .0.11 r:.o.'O.c. r.o.tt .o. r.a.s.c. ci'1 ? which was a remark addressed to him by one (N 6ra Ni Mhurchadha) of two l�ttle girls with whom he was walking to .Cahertrant near Ventry. Having heard previously only of the Aran sdll he could scarcely believe his ears and to make quite sure obtained the very pec�liar English explanation which settled. t�e Smee point, for that moment at any rate. that of course he has heard it frequently m Corea Dhuibhne. This form sall is probably no more than a wrong inference �r?m thall, anall and it may well be doubted if it can be identified with the Mid. Ir. sell, Early Mod. seall. If the latter had descended to the present day it should have remained unchang�d and been found more widely represented m the dialects. The actual existence of sall only in two small corners of the �and makes one suspect any ancient origin for it. Fr. Walsh does not notice Mr. Thos. Flannery's theory, which is worthy of some consideration, that in column (c) we have an eclipsing particle a, ' from.' Mr. Flannery includes a_ bhiad, ' from afar,' a gcein, ' from a �istance,' if I reme�ber aright. It is a rule suitable for modern ti:n�s whatever the origin be. The 0. Ir. antit.aid apparently shows that originally the particle was an- not affecting the following consonant, and that by the formation of a transported n-

IOLUII.]

(a n-) eclipsis was afterwards produced, cf. the development of later: 0. Ir. nicondet, Uls. cha dteid (Strachan's Tdin, 104), although aspiration still lives on for most of the other consonants. Hence it cannot be the neuter article. Father Walsh ought also to have set down three other colums thus, for illustration's sake:-

(d) uachtar iochtar alltar oirthear iarthar tuaisceart deisceart

(e)

(1) OS, uas I

alluriartuadhdeas-.

air iar

The form anduaidb is used in other parts of Munster besides Clare. Father P. S. Dinneen contributes a most interesting note on al-jraits, that peculiar Kerry word which has been puzzling many of us for some time past. He has now laid the question to rest and ought to be satisfied. It is a wonder indeed that no one thought of going to English (the common cause) before to explain it.. The . present writer had to thank Father Dmneen on a previous occasion for deducing the South Ulster word meathlaidhc, ' a reaper,' then known only as mealthaidhe, from meitheal, ' a band of reapers.' He is now under a double obligation to " the great lexicographer," not to mention another of a differen t kind. It is perhaps no harm to add here some of the friendly criticisms of Gadelica that I have heard whenever it was under discussion by its subscribers. I find that there is a demand for more Irish, the remark usually taking this form : "All who subscribe to Gadelica can read Irish well. Why, therefore, don't the contributors use Irish throughout ? " the only obstacle I see to this being the necessity for the present of explaining idioms, &c., in English, in order to A convey a clear idea of their application. strong objection to the Roman type has also found voice, some going so far as to say that they cannot or will not read Irish printed in it, and that, so far as they are concerned, the whole movement may go, if the Roman type get the upper hand in common use. This is ?,O d�ubt a mere prejudice, for t�e present \�iter fi?ds it just as easy to read his l�o.man-rnn�ed Bible as his Irish-printed one. Still pr�J udices must be considered, and the editor would be well advised in not waging open war upon them. His courage and enterprise are undoubted, but behold the army of crusted old l\Iilesians arrayed against him, many �f them believing imI?l�citly in Gadelus of Scythia and the pagan ongm of the Bobel-loth alphabet ! Even the spirits of the valiant heroes who are said to have fought at Fionntraigh could not rot:t them! Gadelica is not getting the support it deserves. A recent " census " shows that of the 45 newly elected leaders of the Gaelic League (viz., the Coiste Gn6tha) 12 out of 15 'Dublin' members · and 25 out of 30 ' country ' members don't subscribe to Gadelica ; total 37 non-subscribers out of 45. Leaving out Dublin, the whole of Ireland accounts for not much more than onefourth of the subscriptions. There are many counties without a single subscriber=-Wexford, for instance. Kilkenny, Clare, Donegal, Germany buys more copies than the whole province of Con;11ach� together. . Let us hoI?e this state of affairs will be remedied. As I said above, scholarship cannot live on love or promises. MAC TIRE.

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A Piper's Return. On Saturday, July 6th, Michael J. Anderson, Irish Union Bagpiper, sailed for his home in County Sligo, on the S.S. Columbia of the Anchor Line, says the " Irish American." Mr. Anderson has recently finished an engagement at the New York Hippodrome and spent most of his spare time in making bagpipes. He recently delighted both dancers and audience at the New York Feis and Feis concert, and it is expected that he will be a prominent figure on the Feis platform in Ireland, where he is already well-known among Irish Revivalists, especially in the South of Ireland. He intends to manufacture pipes when he settles down home, and it is certain that he will be a big boon to the preservation of traditional Irish music, as the pipers and pipemakers have been on the wane for years. With the stimulus giv�n to this fine old Irish instrument by the Gaehc League and kindred societies good openings exist for experts in either making or playing. Mr. Anderson also intends giving lessons and arranging music for the pipes, and if time permits he expects to publish a tuto� for �he Union pipes. He took five sets of pipes with him, one set being the product of the celebrated master, Taylor, and the others being made by Mr. Anderson himself.

TURAS GO CILL COINNIGH. The Irish Literary Society went to Kilkenny for their annual excursion. On Saturday, been round the town, having they drove to Gowran, where they inspected the old church. In the evening the Reception Commit.tee entertained them to dinner at the Club House Hotel. On Sunday, they were entertained by Mrs. Potter. On Monday an Address was presented to them by the Mayor and Corporation. Later they inspected the Industries at Talbot's Inch, and in the evening an entertainment under the auspices of the Gaelic League was produced at the theatre. On Tuesday they drove to Jerpoint and Woodstock. Let us return to the entertainment at the theatre. All the songs, dances, etc., were up to a high standard. The children in costume were particularly attractive. Though. /E's " Deirdre " was undoubtedlv an ambitious undertaking, the performers·· (especially Miss ::\1. A. Henderson and Messrs. Lough and Brophy) acted most creditably. Why a certain veterinary surgeon should have c�n�idered it. wor�h his while to lead a chorus of interruptions m the .shape of cheap criticisms, giggles, guffaws, etc., it is difficult to say. It was hard on the audience and especially unfair to the actors. Thanks are due to Lady Desart, Mrs. White, Messrs. Brooke, Hourahan, Hegarty, Haughton, Keane, and Potter, for the excellent arrangements thev made on behalf of the visitors.

--·:---

Colaiste Muire. We are glad to notice that the directors of Colaiste Muire, a new Catholic college which opens in Galway on August. 26t�, propose t.o make Irish a compulsory subject m the curriculum. " Irish will be taught to all," says the prospectus, '' and will be spoken freely in the College as it is everywhere in the Galway district." Father Peter Davis will be the College president, and Dr. O'Dea. Bishop of Galway, will be patron. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNICAL INSTRUCTION FOR IRELAND. Training of Teachers of Crochet Work and Sprigging.

A LIMITED NUMBER OF SCHOLARSHIPS (not more than three) of the value of £25 each, tenable for one year, at the TRAINING SCHOOL FOR LACE AND SPRIGGING TEACHr;RS, ENNISKILLEN, are offered for Competition among Girls having a satisfactory general education and some proficiency in Crochet Work or Sprigging, in order to enable them to secure training as teachers of these subjects. . . Applications for admission to the examination must be made on the appropriate forms, and despatched so as to be received in the Offices of the Department not later than THURSDAY, AUGUST 22nd, 1912. Further particulars and forms of application may be obtained from THE SECRETARY, Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction, Dublin.


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50 Upper O'Connell St., Dublin. And 112 Quay, Waterford.

A_

BOUT Russell's Hair Cutting, Shaving, and ... Shampooing Saloon, 55 South King Street, top of Grafton Street, Dublin . FOR SALE. AT Achill Sound, in the heart of the Gaelthacht, a first-class Caravan, accommodates four. Will sell for one-third of its value. X.Y.Z., c/o Claidheamh Soluis.


17, t9tl.

lri h Industey.

r

SOAP.

CROSS,

,,,.�...cUcal Plumber & Gasfl.tter !LICTRIC LIGHTING, BELLS, le.,

MIENS STREET, DUBLIN.

" SHEET MEtAL WOIII, t Upper Abf>ey Street, DUBLl1'.

RINTING.

....,. Plut. MNUB M•tk•

& CO.,

Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin.

&

(&

CONSTITUIIIT COi.LEU OP THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY W IRELAND),

SESSION 191�·13. The following Regulations for the College Courses, etc., may be obtained on application :1. GENERAL REGULATIONS-SCHOLARSHIPS, FEES. 2. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN ARTS, PHILOSOPHY, CELTIC STUDIES. 3. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN SCIENCE. 4,. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN LAW. 5. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 6. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. 7. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN COMMERCE. The College Scholanhlps, Exhibitions, and Prins amount to about £4,000 for the /ear, not lncludln1 the Scholanhlps County Council Scholanhlps an offered by the Corporation of the City of Dublin. ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS EXAMINATIONOctner 8th, 1912. INTRODUCTORY COURSES IN MEDICINEOctober 8th, 1912. LECTURE':, BEGIN (EXCEPT IN LAW)-October 15th, 1912. LECTURES IN LAW BEGIN-Octolter 24th, 1912• COUNTY COLTNCIL AND CITY OF DUBLIN EXAMINATION-September SCHOLARSHIP 1oth, 1912. Apply at the College, 86 St. Stephen's Green, or the Medical School, Cecilia Street, or by letter addressed o the Registrar, University College, Dublin.

HURLEY ''CAMANS" 6d., I/·, 1/6, 2/·, 2/6, 3/6.

HURLEY BALLS 6d., I/·, 1/6, IJ9,

2/·, !/6,

• CATALOII

E

f

DUii.ii. GOU


le41'>.6.1' XIV. Vol. XIV.

Ult'htt

No

22.

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#

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DUBLIN, AUGUST

ir

'

b,0., 1 t f\ -&t.o.

22.

...

17, 1912.

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p1t;111n. (Registered as a Newspaper)

INSIST

ONE PENNY

ON GETTING

l"RISH�M�DE.. et1TLE."R.Q FROM YOUR IRONMONGER.

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Cutlery Manufaeturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. 0 1r ro111e.o.1111c.o. .611 co111510tt .o.5ur .o.n cte.o.r �

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cu

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1

YOU WILL LIKE THE ·����������� LATEST

" LUCANIA" AND " PIERCE"

--CYCLES. They are absolutely the Finest Bicycles made, and they're

IRISH.-Does that Matter? DEPOT;

GAELS-

.0.11

Support the Only Picture House in Dublin owned by an Irishman.

THE

MODELS IN

IRISH CINEMA

not.o.n,

84 pone c.001m5111 84

"CAMDEN"

STREET,

DUBLIN.

CAPEL STREBT (next to Trades' flail),

NOW OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30.

PRICES,

30.,

Change of Pictures· Monday,

40.,

60.

Thursday and Sunday.

N OTE.-We sell Irish Bikes only, and sell them on their We repair all makes, properly and cheaply. merits.

Does that Matter


l115t1.6.f.6. 17, 1 12.

.6.fl

Cl.6.1'0e-6.ti1

sotuis.

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August 17, 1912.

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Ci\1oli Restaurant, PATRICK STREET, CORK.

The Gael's Rest.

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EXCURSION

TO

SLIGO Sunday, 18th Aug., 1912 . RETURN FARE, 4i(Bicycles, 6d,)


• tuSfl4fa17, 1912. Aug1,1st 17,

1912.

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7

[AN CLAIDHBAIOI 80Lt11S.]

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167 161 161 160 155 152

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FIANNA DISPLA AND

�eR1ue�cc NEXT SUNDAY At

a.so

P.•m•

At Croydon Park, Fairview COMPANY AND AMBULANCE BRILL,

FIRST AID, SIGNALLING, CAMP SCENE, DANCING, SINGING, PIPERS' BAND, Etc.

Admission

- Threepence


�n Ct.6..1t>e�rt1 souns.

lu511.c.r.c. 17, 1912 August

17, 1912.

(AN CLAJDHBAMR 90LUJ9,]

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lu5n.c.r.c. 17, 1912. THE RESULTS OF THE AMERICAN MISSION.

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The absence from Ireland of An tAthair Micheal O Flannagain and Fionan Mac Coluim has not dimmed their vision of the true state of On t�e contrary, th�y see affairs at home. Irish conditions, if we Judge from evidence contained in their speeches, much more clearly than many home workers. Their mission was a successful one, but its success cannot be measured by the $15,000 which they raised for The friendly relations the Language Fund. established during the mission between the Gaelic League and the numerous Iri�hAmerican organisations, will secure a substantial annual subsidy for Gaelic League work at home. Our friends in the States are anxious to bear with us at home the brunt of the Irish-Ireland battle, and they need only to be approache� to come to our assistance. The effect on InshAmerican trade of the advertisement given to Irish products by the . travelling ex�ibition originated by An t Athair O Flannagam and worked under Gaelic League auspices for the past fifteen months, has been so considerable that consular reports are already noting the Before 1907 Irish exports to the change. States had been falling for twenty-five years. Since that year-it was the yea� in which �he exhibition was first sent out-Insh trade with the States has been going up. From $12,000,000 it has risen in five years to $18,000,000. The Gaelic League and the people of Ireland are glad of the friendliness of our people in the States. That friendliness will grow in strength and good results and the Irish on both sides of the Atlantic will profit by it. The Gaelic Le�gue may �n the futnre be the means of cementmg the alliance, because, more than any other organisation, it has the power of appealing to all classes and · creeds of Irish people abroad. It was for the direct benefit of the League, however, that the Gaelic League mission went to the States. The returned missionaries have bro ugh, us advice almost as valuable as the solid cash contribution which they raised, and which has served to maintain our organising staff during the past year, and will co?-tinue to mai�ta�n it during the coming year. Fionan Mac ColmI? in his speech at the Mansion House on Monday mght referred to local patriotism, and suggested that every parish in Ireland should raise annually the few pounds necessary to finance a fr�e scholarship at one of our numerous Gaelic The result of such a s�holarship Colleges. would be that in a few years each pansh would have its own staff of trained teachers of Irish. An tAthair O Flannagain pointed out regarding America that it is easier to get $1,000,000 into Ireland from there through trade in Irish products than to get $1,000 as cha�itable_ contributions. He indicated many ways in which our people abroad are handicapped by the almost useless system of education to which the Nati�nal schools subjected them, and he told us plamly Tell the how to end the wretched system. people, said he, that the schools are their school_s, that the children are their children, and you will have but a short, successful fight. The people who broke the power of Landlordism �ill. easily get rid of a body of unpatriotic Commi�si?ners. No children belonging to the Commissioners are compelled to swallow . the '� intellectual dope" which estranges Insh children fr�m their land and language. He never, he said, saw a Commissioner of the National Board and his wife in heart-breaking tears at an Irish railway station bidding farew�ll. to one of_ their children who was leaving to JOm the emigrant ship. Make the cause of the Gaelic League the cause of the people, and it will triumph.

IRISH

ROSARY BEADS.

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An U i Breasail Rosary is Irish made Prices from 6d. to 5 - in all Stationers and Catholic Repositorie;;. Ask to see them. Wholesale fromA. MITCHELL, 23 Waterford Street, Dublin

)

5leo

The Summer Colleges. Critics with more captiousness and willingness to find fault than real knowledge of Gaelic League doings have lately been d�ploring We have, this year, Irish-Ireland inactivity. thirteen Irish schools and colleges for the training of teachers in the best m_ethods of language teaching, and for the creation of methods of instruction in all school subjects in Irish. They provide, also, of course, for the instruction of students who are but beginners in the study of The growth of individual schools has Irish. hardly been interfered with by the establishThis year ment of new rival institutions. appears to be a record one in some colleges and all are enjoying big gatherings of eager students. If these things be signs of Gaelic League inactivity, then it is much more potent for the revival of the Irish language than the sort of Cuige Mum?an activity our critics desiderate. has now six Irish summer colleges, at Rmn, Beal Atha Ghaorthaigh, Cuan Dor, Cathair Domhnaill, An Daingean, and Carraig an Connacht has four, at Tamhan, Choltaigh. An Spideal, Partraigh, and in Oilean Acla. Cuige Uladh has two, at Gort an Choirc� and at Caislean Glas, and will soon have a third at O It is a sure indication of the spread Meith. of our movement that new centres like those of An Daingean, Cuan Dor, An Spideal, Acaill and Caislean Glas have sprung immediately We need not into efficiency and popularity. fear the growth of such centres of Irish instrucThese is room and necessity for many tions. more but our aim should be in future to make . ' The bigger new schools serve local needs. and older centres may be left to serve the requirements of those students who will be willing to travel far; the smaller schools in detached parts of the Gaedhealtacht, like those at Caislean Glas and the new one which is to be opened next week at O Meith, will attract local teachers and students and will serve as fightina centres from which Irish-Ireland ideas an°d teachings will go forth. They will help to awaken and strengthen local patriotism and the students they train will, if properly handled help in collecting local songs, stories and seanchus. The colleges leave little undone in their special work of training teachers. If we have any reason to make a suggestion to them it is in regard to matters outside their What are they do�ng for teaching methods. Irish history? Is a knowledge of th_e h�erary and general history of Ireland essential m the examinations for the certificates awarded? The tradition of creative work has not yet been Excellent work revived among Gaedhilgeoiri. has been done, but no stream of fine literature will come until we have a great host of men trained in the art of writing. What have our summer colleges done to teach the mere forms of writer's art either in verse or prose ? The painstaking work of teaching verse or prose forms must be begun somewhere. Why not in our colleges? They are almost the 01:ly places where Irish-Ireland work �an be c�r�1ed Their conditions out with satisfaction. approach the ideal. The teachers are experts, the students are eager, and there are few or no The college committees will, we distractions. hope, take steps to adopt our suggestions in time for the 1913 sessions.

Colaiste O Meath Mara. Colaiste O Meith Mara will be opened on It will cornm�nce its ca�eer Sunday next. under the patronage of his Emmence Cardmal Logue and the Most Rev. Dr. O'Neill .. S�r Henry Bellingham, one of the very !ew pa�notic members of the National Board, is president, Canon Quinn, P.P., of Carlingford, is ma�ager, Eoin Mac X eill is ardollamh, and he will be assisted by a staff of competent t_eachers of The College will be housed m Omeath Irish. Park House, the use of which has been secured on reasonable terms from the Court of Chancery. The site and surroundings are very picturesque. The place is convenient to the railway, is beside the sea, and it is most likely to become a health and holiday resort with the growth of _the c?llege. 'he college will be the nearest of its kind to

Belfast, Newry, Dundalk, Drogheda, and It will attract students and visitors Dublin. from these and many other centres, but its chief aim will be to supply 1ocal teachers with a means of fitting themselves rapidly and perfectly for the work of Gaelicising their schools. There is lots of Irish in the district. Some of the most prominent workers in Belfast and Dublin got there bias here. Eoin Mac Neill, An Dr. Seamus O Ceallaigh, Sean O Maclain, -and others gave much attention to the canamhaint of this district years ago. One of the promoters writes :-" If the Irish College puts a new spirit into the Gaelic movement in the district, if it stirs up the lukewarm and stimulates the ardent student, if the opening day begins a new record in the records of local effort, then the Committee may be heartily commended for their work.''

...

The Coiste Gnotha Report.

The resolutions passed at last week's meeting of the Coiste Gnotha have reference to several The Birrell Scholarship important matters. scheme is condemned because it threatens the standing of Irish in the National University, and gives no secure standing whatever to The Irish in its own examination scheme. employment of public officials without Irish_ in the Gaedhealtacht is condemned, and Insh departments are asked to remedy the scandal The appeal of their employment involves. some Irish Unionists for penalising clauses in the Home Rule Bill against the Irish language is opposed by the League. The Chairman of the Galway County Council, who stated last week that the Gaelic League was partly responsible for the presence of extra police in Galway, has been asked to substantiate_ or withdraw his statement. We hope Mr. Gnffin will have the good sense to correct his mistake. The resolution condemning the sanctioning in the schools of the F ola system of Irish spelling states! clearly and truly the case against it. Its authors seek to get National sanction for a I ts system that serves for a barony in �ork. adoption would lead to the creation of ten different systems instead of one we now have.

....

Another Birrell Legacy. The following resolution of the Dublin Corporation calls attention to a matter of grave public importance:. . . " That this Council express its strong opmion that in the event of Sir Reginald Egerton retiring from the position of Secretary of the Irish Post Office, that the vacancy should be filled by the promotion of some official engaged in the Irish service." We will not be satisfied with any Post Office Secretary who will not be acqua�nted with the An Enghs?man must Irish language. official. Suppose an be incompetent necessarily the seat of Government of Ireland were on the Life instead of the Thames, would an Englishman be eligible for so high a post ? . Or would the Government appoint to any post m England an Irishman without English?

.....

Irish History in the Intermediate. Q. Mr. Boland.-To ask the Chief Secreta�y to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, whether, in view of the fact that the Intermediate Board has no control over history courses in prima�y schools, steps will be taken to secure tha� in the next set of rules issued by the Intermediate Board the outlines at least of early Irish hist�ry shall form part of the junio_r grade co�1rse, with a view to seeing that pupils presentm!5 the1:1selves for examination in the Intermediate w11J have been grounded in the most important part of Irish history, and not be confined, as at present, to the last four centuries of the Christian era. (6th August, 1912). . A. )fr. Birrell.-The Board of Intermediate Education are not in a position to say w�at action will be taken by them when fram1�g the programme of examination �or 1�14 m regard to the teaching of early Insh history. They are alive to its importance. (6th August, 1912]. . The Commissioners, :Mr. B1rrell states, are alive to the importance of early Irish history. That is why they exclude it from the Intermediate.


.

.. ...

tusn.&f.& 17. 1 12. August 17, •)112.

(\n ct.o.1'0e.o.ti1 sotuis . 11

[AN CLAIDHE.AMH SOI.UIS.]

The first and most prolific cause of all we find in their education. Our primary system of education devotes itself to reading, writing and arithmetic, without bothering itself about what we a.re to read or what we are to write or what figures we are to add and subtract. The result is that the graduates of our schools engage in occupations requiring primary a knowledge of things in general but not requiring at the out.set any special know ledge of anything in particular, they become policemen and firemen and street car conductors and newspaper reporters and the less ambitious or intelligent unskilled labourers. Our secondary schools are strong upon the classics, with the result that their Irish graduates fill the professions of religi�m, law and medicine. But when it comes to agriculture and industry, the two great fields of human activity, we find the Irish, not indeed absent-they are not absent entirely from anything, but less strongly represented than might be expected from their One result of crowding the ablest ability. members of a race of such ability and ambition into a few narrow fringes of American society is to produce extreme competition and the keen rivalry th.at is consequent upon it. There is no race of people in America more true or devoted to the land of their fathers than the Irish. You will see the Irish flag much oftener in America than any other flag except the Stars and Stripes. Everybody in America, black and white alike, can tell you on what day of the year Ireland's national holiday falls. You cannot walk a hundred yards in any city of America on St. Patrick's Day without being reminded of how the Irish have-cornered for their exclusive use the most bea.utiful of all the colours of the rainbow. I suppose the Germans and the English, the Scotch and the French, have got national holidays and national colours, but I have spent several yea,rs in America and I have not yet found out ,vhat they were. The strong national tradition of our Irish homes, and the centuries of struggle against a foreign foe have produced this intense apirit of patriotism, but our school system has retulled to make it intelligent. The result is that whereas few races, if any, have such a fund of wriotic energy' there are few that can show for : t auch meagre results. At home 'these results a.re patent to the eyes of all of us. With a climate soft as a mother's smile, and a land fruitful as God's love, the young and strong are still flying from us by tens of thousands every year. · Situated amidst the busy hives of human activity that form the nations of north western Europe we still have a diminishing population, untilled fields, a few attempts at industry that are almost pathetic. With much more arable land than Holland and Belgium combined, we produce less agricultural wealth in the year than either of them alone. You can travel for a hundred miles through France or Germany without seeing on either side of the railroad, as far as the eye can reach, a single acre that is not under cultivation. Travel through Ireland and you see the rich uplands devoted to the most primitive form of farming known to civilisation, and the lowlands waste through want of drainage. This is true not merely of the lands that still remain in the hands of the graziers, it is almost equally true of the land in the hands of our peasant proprietors. There is one force in Ireland that is primarily responsible for this state of affairs, there is one force that could remedy it, and that is our system of education. In blaming our system of education it is well to point the finger of scorn directly at the particular influence in education that is the source ol the mischief. The mischief is entirely due to those who draw up the programme of our schools and those who train the teachers. It is clue to the Commissioners of National Education. It is they who put into the hands of the million children of our Irish schools those books of scrap literature that contain information about evervthing in the world except the things that concern the future lives of their readers-hooks which prepare their readers to be at home and abroad amongst the best newspaers readers in the world, but amongst the poorest supporters of any more solid and profitable reading. The remedy lies in putting the case up to the Irish people themselves. A race of people that destroyed the dreadful power of Irish lundlorrlism is not going to be overawed by the bogey of a miserable board of twelve national school commissioners and the mvsterious Treasury that is supposed to stand · back of it. Bi.it the people will have to be made to understuu-I t�at their interest in the schools is just h vital as their interest in their homes. The schools are built with their money. Who ever heard of a School Commissioner digging into his own private pocket in order to erect a school. It is the peoples' own <·hildr('n for whom the schools

are built. It is the children of the lrish people who have to spend their dreary five hours a. day learn. ing the miserable foreign drivel with which our school books are filled. It is Irish children who imbibe the idea in those schools that the world outside is the only place that can give them a fair field for their activity, and that Ireland is the only place on God's round earth that is etemallv destined to be dull and poor. I never saw a Commissioner of National Education crying his heart out at the railroad station in Castlerea as he saw his youngest boy follow his brothers to a land from which he was never destined to return. If through the language, literature and song of Ireland the schools of Ireland opened up to the children of the country the rich storehouses of human interest that make Ireland the most attractive country in the world to those who know her, few would leave her shores from choice. If thev taught them to make use of the natural resources of Ireland, in a few years nobody would leave it from necessity. How does this state of affairs affect the attitude towards Ireland of our people abroad. The few things Irish that our people know anything about, the few things that we have been able to teach them in spite of our national schools, are more widely known and more highly respected than the corresponding things of any other nationality -;the Irish flag, the national holiday, and perhaps the name of Robert Emmet. But the great big things of our national life=-our literature, our art, and our music are either entirely unknown by the great body of American people or regarded by them as commonplace. When I went to America for the first time eight years ago one of the first places I went to see was the great Metropolitan Museum of Art in Central Park, New York. I saw there specimens of the art and culture of almost every nation on the globe, ancient and modem, civilised and uncivilised, China and Japan, Persia and India, Greece and Italy, Spain and France, Germany, England and Holland, as well as many a barbarous tribe of the old world and of the new were all represented by saniples of their handiwork, but I could not find from the cellar to the roof-tree a single object to remind me that such a race as the Irish race ever existed. Well, that defect has been partially remedied since then. They have now in the New York Museum copies of the Ardagh Chalice, the Tara Brooch, the Shrine of St. Patrick's Bell, and of some of the silver table ware produced in Dublin during the eighteenth century. And who do you think pull: them there? Siir Purdon Clarke, a man who though born in Ireland was regarded as an Englishman, and against whom the IrishAmerican papers protested when he was imported from England to act as procurator of the museum. A few years ago a deputation from some of the Irish societies of Boston, headed by a distinguished Irishwoman who is present here to-night, called upon the directors of the Boston Museum and asked them to devote a section of their new building to a display of ancient Irish art work. They were received with a smile of incredulity by the sort of people who are constantly asking if any good can come out of Ireland. Later on in order to prove that Ireland had something worthy of an institution that prides itself in the possession of carved oars from the South Sea Islands or Totem poles from Alaska, they procured at a cost of fifty pounds a plaster cast of the High Cross of Monasterboice. The gift was refused, and in a city that is so Irish that when the people want to select a Mayor they have to decide between an O'Donovan and a Fitzgerald, you could not arouse sufficient interest amongst the Irish themselves to punish the antediluvian officials who gave them such a slap on the nose. When Colombia University in the City of Xew York wanted a man to give lessons in Irish they had to go to Switzerland to get him. When Harvard University in Boston wanted a man they had to get a Yankee whose people had been so long in America that he could only guess what country they came from. When a Chair of Irish was established in the Catholic University at Washington, not by the bounty of some IrishAmerican millionaire, but by the fifty cent. pieces of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, and when for shame sake they had to give it . to an IrishAmerican, they were first compelled to send him to Germany in order to fit him for the class-room. I could go on for another hour telling you such things as these, things that explain why it is that one of the most powerful races in the world to-dax i s at the same time one of the most helpless. The blame for all of it lies upon the shoulders of those who rule our educational system, and above and beyond all others upon the Commissioners of National Education. A people of the high national spirit of the Irish, if they only understood, would pitch that miserable Board into the

river Liff'ey, if they could devise no other remedy. Yo� are the leaders of the Gaelic League. You cJa!� that your League is equal to the responsibility that falls upon it in the Ireland of to-dav. Go out all over Ireland and tell the people �f Ireland that the National schools are their schools and not the schools of the National Board that the children attending the National Schools are their children and not the children of the National Board. The Irish people have remained Irish for centuries under difficulties greater than any that we encounter to-day. They will remain Irish in the future if only their leaders point out to them the way. Make your cause the cause of the whole Irish people and you will soon find what a poor fight for West Britonism the twelve Commissioners of National Education will be able to make.

THE RECEPTION PROGRAMME. The proceedings were opened by the Lorean O'Toole Pipers' Band, who accompanied the entrance of the Delegates. Between the dances interesting vocal items were rendered by Miss Sighle Ni Bhroin, Messrs. Cathal MacGarvey, T. O'Carroll Reynolds, Tomas Mac Carta, Gearoid O Croifte, Seaghan Mag Fhloinn, and the Emmet Choir which was conducted by Leo O Brannagain, Miss Metcalfe, the Lorean O'Toole Trio, and Messrs. Fagan and Cuffe gave exhibition dances, and Piaras Beaslaoi recited his Oireachtas Ode. The dance music was played by Mrs. Kenny and her daughter, and Miss Wheatley also assisted· at the piano. The arrangements were admirably conducted by ·' Seaghan Mag Fhloinn.

INTERVIEW WITH MR. FIONAN MAC COLUIM Interviewed on Saturday by an " Irish Independent" representative, Mr. MacColuim spoke in most glowing terms of the enthusiasm of the Irish in America for the revival of the During his tour he language of the Gael. travelled something like 20,000 miles, visiting most of the principal centres in the States; and, as a result, after paying all expenses, 15,000 dollars had been added to the funds of the Gaelic League.

New York Leads. During his campaign in New York, Mr. MacColuim said he received valuable assistance from the Hon. J. D. Crimmins, who placed an office at his disposal at 624 Madison Avenue, and from the Hon. Martin J. Keogh, Judge of the Supreme Court, who acted as treasurer to the mission, and gave the services of his secretary free. New York took first place in the States in the matter of generous subscriptions, but the city which, for its size, had done most for the League was Butte, Montana, which, with a population of about 40,000, had contributed from 700 to 1,000 dollars annually for the past seven years. This was due to the National of such well-known Irishmen as Mr. Hugh spirit Daly, John J. O'Meara, Rev. Father Hannon, and Judge Lynch. "Wherever I went," Mr. MacColuim added, " I met an extraordinary number of Irish speakers. New York has several Gaelic societies, while in the Catholic University of Washington, Harvard, Columbia, the North-Western University of Chicago, the University of California, and elsewhere, Irish literature is part of the curriculum.''

Industrial Work. The results of the thirty-nine exhibitions of. Irish manufactured goods which were conducted in the principal cities, Mr. MacColuim said, exceeded their most sanguine expectations, and a considerable impetus h� been given to the demand for many Irish products. He was struck forcibly with the extent to which the Irish linen industry depends on the American market. He thought that the Irish-Americans were the mainstay of the industries round Belfast. The big Irish linen trade with the States, though well organised, was based upon the national sentiment of the Irish in America. " In all the hotels managed by Irishmen, and in the Catholic institutions, Irish linen seemed to be used exclusively." Previous to their departure the delegates attended a convention of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in Chicago. where 1,000 dollars were voted to the League.


�n ct.sroe srn sotuis.

1-0

fAN Cl..6.IDHEAMH SOLl;IS.J

time for several years almost exclusively to the service of the College. but that now as the College had attained a position of security and assured prosperity, he might consider himself entitled to claim in whole or part the restoration of his freedom during the holidays.

--�:--

RIIIG COLLEGE COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT. The annual Conference of the Branches of the SouthEast of Ireland associated with the management of Ring Irish College, was held in Dunga.rvan on Monday last. Very Rev. M. Sheehan, M.A., D.Ph., St. Patrick's College, Maynooth, presided. and the following representatives attended :-Very Rev. Dr. Henebry, University College, Cork ; Carrick-on-Suir, John O'Flynn and Maurice O'Hickey, Trustees of College Building Fund ; Lismore, Mr. J. McGrath, J.P., Chairman D. T. Waterford, Council ; Rural District Connolly, Castlecomer, Sean O'Kiely; Kill, Michael O'Donovan; Old Parish, Thomas Veale; Dungarvan, Wm. O'Hickey ; M. O'Foley, Gaelic League Organiser ; SeUDlaS O Heocaidh (An Fear Mor), Padraig O'Kiely, Ring Irish College (Hon. Secretary). Letters of apology for their inability to attend were read from Rev. Father M'Grath, P.P., Ring and Old Parish ; Rev. Father Flannery, C.C., Mitchelstown, and Mr. P. Brett, Waterford. On the proposition of Very Rev. Dr. Sheehan, seconded by the Very Rev. Dr. Henebry, the Rev. Father M'Grath, P.P., Ring, was unanimously reelected Chairman of the Conference and of the Committee of Management. Mr. P. O'Kiely, Hon. Secretary, submitted a statement of the receipts and expenses of the Summer.College and Secondary School. The Trustees reported that on August, 1911, the debt from the College for building and furnishing In September, 1911, £150 ns amounted to £1,050. paid to the bank out of the profits of the Summer Gollege. In April, 1912, another appeal for funds was issued by the Trustees, and so generous has been the response that in July of the present year the Trustees were able to pay a further sum of £150 to the bank, bringing the amount of the debt down to l750. It was decided to issue an appeal to the friends of the College requesting them to undertake to contribute £1 a year to the College Building Fund till the debt The 1911 session at the Summer will be paid off. College was the best from even- �t of view since 'l'he number of students the College was started. �t during the two months n11D1bered 240. 0a.t of 1he profits of the Summer College the Committee were able to pay £150 to the Bank in ieduction bf A further &Jim was paid the BuildiJig Fund debs, YJ the: bank out of subscriptions received frQm the sen� public. Messrs. T: F. H. Jacob and Wm. Meebail, who Audited the accountS of the SuiDYDeT College and Sec� Schoolfm: the year aded D4'Celllber 31st; 19p. JAl>xnitted 1:b.- report, aqd it was '4opted. A � of the O:>mqaittee � Management of the 'College was held after the �ce. Very tt•v. 1Dr. Sheehan, M.A., presi4ed. The Hon.. �� ,epQrted that 60 stuqnta 'd� bJ.y, the first JJlontli' of �ed � � SlUQme.r Sessi- anil about I so have &m�ed for ·• August iesSion.

�e

-�---·----

OOJO(AU.GBT COLLBGB, TOURIIAUADY. The sumrne.i; �n at the lnsh Co�e. Tourma�' was formallnJbwrned OD Augt:LSt' f, by the Prellain, before a large gathering ,aident, �- P. Do ol student&. Their iirst aeasiOn was; he was glad to sy, a splendid record of success, .nd � att.en<led. RY studentt,, not alone �om the different provinces of Ireland, but from :tonilon and New York, whilst this session the same countries were well represented, as was also the Argentine. From year to year the success of the Co�ty ;bad been u,.creasing, and its name as a 81iat of Irisl>. � wa, penetratirig new Jaads, The �trict was thorQughly Irish, the language being rich, full of idiom and vocalous, teeming -with seanThe students had every chaidhe and singers. opportunity oi bec<>ming per:f4ct masters of the laqguage, b\lt it was necessary for them to work hard, they in Tourmakeady bad no place for laggarde. had He was also glad to announce that this session ma<Je arrangements for a series of lec�res on · :ereat subJects by some of the leading and most widelyknown. gentlemen of the day, both clerical and lay. Tile attendan.ce at the College this year is the largest on r�rd, the number running almost into 200. To meet all requirements arrangements have been made for the instruction of those who are 'beginning a study of the language as well as for the further advancement and proficiency of students who have already acquired a knowledge of Irish.

*

1:'.l

TBB :NATIOllAL BOABD AIU> TBB GABLIC OOLLBGBS. At a meeting of the Professors and Students of the Connacht College, Spiddal, held on Augu� 7, a resolution was passed unanimously congratulating the authorities of the O'Curry College, Carrigaholt, on their spirited action in refusing to accept recognition from the National Board at the expense of sacrificing the independence possessed by the older Gaelic Colleges The resolution also called upon the other new Colleges to insist on having liberty to examine, free from the interference of the National Board. At a ceilidhe following the meeting, Dr. MacEnri expressed the thanks of the staff and students to the visitors who had kindly taken part in the opening of the College: and whose visit was drawing to a close. He especially mentioned the great services to the language movement rendered by Mr. T. MacDonagh Mahoney, and Mrs. Mahoney. During the recent propagandist tour in Mayo, Mrs, Mahoney had shown herself to be one of the orators of the Gaelic movement. He promised them Cead Mile Failte any time in the In reply. future that they would visit Spiddal. speeches were delivered by Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney. Miss Dowlev, of Carrick-on-Suir, and Seaghan Og All the proceedings O Siothchain, of Cahirciveen, were conducted in Irish. There are nearly 1 50 students at the College, and over 100 more are expected during the session


.6.n Ct.A1'0e.6.rh souus,

lu;5t1AfA, 17, 1912 August 17, 1912.

THE USE OF WELSH .IN INSURANCE WORK. The Welsh correspondent of "The National Insurance Weekly" writes in the last issue of that paper :USE OF THE WELSH LANGUAGE. . A striking commentary upon the triumrh of aggressive Nationalism is accorded _by the _act10n of the Carnarvonshire Insurance Committee at_ its second meeting, when Mr. William Ge?rge, the Chancello(s brother, presided. . c;:>n t�e motion of Mr. Hugh �ntchard, a leading solicitor m the cou?-tf, the comm1t�ee decided by an overwhelming majorrty, that all its busines� should, " as far as practicable," be conducted in the Welsh language. A strong _appec1;l w�s made on behalf of a small monoglot English m:no:1ty on the committee of whose services the c�mmittee would be practically deprived if the resolution were _adop�ed. To this it was replied that one of the fi!st quahfi�ahons for effective public service was acquamtance with .the 1 g age of that country. The whole of the proceedmgs !�re\onducted \Vhen it came throughout in \Vel�h. to submitting the reports and minutes of the su�committees it was found these had been recorded �n The meeting refused to hear them read m English. English and the clerk, Sir John T. Roberts, thereupon promptiy translated them exte�pore into �Velsh, acquitting himself with great .c�ed1t, and �ffordmg an object lesson in the value of bilingual officials. . Among the objections rais�d at the meetmg to conducting the proceedmgs. m \"_'elsh was the fact that scientific terms contamed m the Act-e.g., sanatorium tuberculosis, etc., were not Welsh, to which the' ch urman promptly replied that neither were they English ! The questi�n of �he srecial t� berculosis medical officers was raised, it being pomted out that if these were monoglot English a deadlock would arise in the committee. The chairman, however, assured the committee that the tuberculosis doctor for that county would be thoroughly proficient in both Welsh and English. The Welsh Commissioners promptly filled the post of chief inspector, vacated by Mr. \V. J. Evans after holding it for a fortnight, by promoting the assistantsecretary of the Commission,. :Mr:. James Evans, to The new _chief �nspector is �qually that position. proficient in Welsh and English. The va��nt assistantsecretaryship, with a salary_ of £550, n�mg t? £700, and carrying with it the nght to pens10n, is now advertised. This new departure, with regard to the use of the Welsh language, has n�turally c3:rouscd commen�. It is Keen controversy rages m the daily press. the farce a to reduce will it that out :pr�sence pointed at these Committees of such of the Welsh Commissioners The reply to this who do not understand Welsh. objection indicates the present temper of Wales. It is put thus :-" Do Wales and Welsh Ins�1rance Committees exist for the benefit and convenience of the Commissioners, or are the Commissioners and �heir offi.... ials appointed for t�e servi�e an_d_ the beneh,t of Wales and its . people ? . . English . visitors to \\ elsh watering places �ave no coi:icephon of the extent to whioh the native tongue IS to-day the language It of the home of the market, and of the sanctuary. is taught .syst matically in the_ majority of schools, · elementary, seconda y, and higher; Weis� pla� es of worship outm�mber by :three t? one tI;?se in whic h the services are conducted m Enghsh. \\ ith a population of say 2! millions, Wales issues some two dozen newsp�pers and _an eq�al number _of mo_nthly and quarterly magazines pnnted exclusively m Welsh ; one \Velsh work, running to some ten volumes, cost £18,000 to produce, and the publisher m_ad·� a h indsome profit; another Welsh book, published _at _4s., sold 20,000 c opies within three months of _pubhcat10n. The simple statement of such _fae�s will prob�bly modify the point of vie� of those mclmecl at first sight to condemn the new pohcy.

; ---•:-

STATISTICS OF IRISH TEACHING. The Ardrunaidhe of the Gaelic League has received the following returns from the Office · of National Education. Office of National Education, Dublin, rzth August, 1912. SIR, Referring to previous correspondence, I am directed by the Commissioners of National Education to forward the remainder of the information requested by you, and which is only now available, viz.:I. Number of King's Scholars who were examined in Irish in the respective Training Colleges, together with the number declared eligible to teach the subject :Training College

Number examined in Irish

Marlborough Street St. Patrick's Our Lady of Mercy Church of Ireland .. De La Salle St. Mary's Mary Immaculate

II.

Number passed and qualified to teach the subject

12 41 39

17

0

0

39 23

28 21 7

28

')

,)

7

---�-----

Xumber passed �umbe:· and qualified in the examined su bject in Irish -------·

Total number of King's Scholars Teachers other than King's Scholars

�--------

9

(Alf G.AI.DBSAMB IOLUII.]

182 130

90

---------------

III. Number of evening schools which opened for 19II-I2 session-367 (including 16 under alternative rules). IV. Number of evening schools in which Irish was taught during this session-III. V. Names of schools in which the introduction of the bilingual programme has been sanctioned since July, rcr r :------� -------�----�----------

Co. Donegal, Roll No. 10444-Ballylar National School. ,, 15003-Inishbofin. Do. " ,, 15397-St. Michael's, Co. Cork " Slievereagh. ,, 12876-Douglas Girls'. ,, Co. Kerry ,, 12243-Carna Convent. ,, Co. Galway ,, 13322-Inisheer. ,, Do. ,, 15429-Clonkeen Kerrin. ,, Do. ,, 12586-Carrabrown. ,, Do. The bilingual programme was withdrawn from Roll No. rr582-Belderg National School, Co. Sligo-from 3-rst December, rgrr. VI. Return of schools in Irish-speaking districts as recently revised :Statement as to the extent to which Irish enters into the curriculum of such schools :Number of these Schools in which

All I can say in reply to the editor and Prof. Bergin is that I did not at the time of reading the texts connect apaighe, etc., with the abhach. of recent I hardly thought it lexicographers and editors. possible that such an excellent scholar as Standish H. O'Grady could go astray. Even O'Reilly, a man of wonderful industry according to O'Donovan, etc., has frequently been found in these recent times far more accurate than people would imagine from Stokes' If one accept the accuracy of strictures on him. O'Grady, etc., one's first thought is naturally to fancy that M. Ir. apach, abbach must be a different word from abhach, owing to the dissonance of I recollect having read Mr. O' Rahilly's the forms. note on the question, but cannot at the moment lay my hand on it. I see now that there seems no way out of the difficulty but to grant that abhacb is wrong, and regret having been " unwittingly unfair " to the two mentioned by the editor. MAC 1'IRE.

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1 5Col..o.1r-oe 61,o:11.o.1n r.u1511e 'O.o.m, ,0.C;\ .0.5 C1U-601nm5 1 n-OrJ1t115e. ___ 'Oe m.o.q,�. 'Oo f;-e.o.r1 ,0.n 6l,,<,\1U11tl, be<.\c.o. .o.5ur rt..&1ncc. 'C.o. ru-o ue.o.r .0.5 " msc 'C1re" 1nr .un ;sc L., roe.o.rn ,0.n cre.o.cc1h.u1n reo C.6.1Cre .0.5 Cll.0.CC .6.11 " 5.u1)Cl1C.u " "00. ,0.CC uo-1115ne re ue.u)1111.6."0 be.0.5 m.o.r ;se.uU ,\}1 61U.There are many s51110u.unn re m.o.r reo. Co111m5. counties without a single subscriber - Wexford, 111 f10J1 .o.n mero j-eo 1 "OC,\010 61LLe Kilkenny, etc. Comm;s '°-l1 '°- l.u15e.<.\"O. Subcriber 1r e.uu me f!�111, .uCC ni r1or -oom .o.n b p ut l, .o.otnne.uc eit.e .e n n a;s .<.\ f'.\50.o.1l.. 1r m6111r fltt .(.\ l.e15e.uu. bell' bU.<.\11) ,0.5ur be.unn.uCC usrm. mij-e, H1SC(�1H'O ..,\11°>lC',\l'H·, f,\',-'J1c.

--•!•--

o 5n.&11111e. --.:.--

pe-0:0-0.n

County

�not.0.15 f501t f.}e.o."O.o.lf' °OUAlr A11 b.o.f'Oll.0.15 � 1M$A1'0 Cot1t1AC'C uo bt'onnA'O A5 Otf'eAC'CAr nA 1f 1 f501t Atl Spmell .Ml r501t 'O.<i bt16.Un.o.:ro. te.c.n5tAC:1r feAt't' 1 5Cot1t1.o.C'C.o.1f>.

-

Antrim Donegal Mayo Gah\.·ay Clare Limerick Kerry Cork Waterford Louth Tyrone

I 84 85 306 .-,-

.)J

..

7 94 87 29 3 3 736

I

60 20 55 3 41 12 3

4 24

II2 rs 2 43 53 12

IO

4

r4 I

8 ZI 57

2 r6 68

I

4 9 II II 2 2

6

IO

I I I

Ici• 2

I

I

194

267

32

106

135

----� VII. Number of Inspectors recognised as competent to examine in Irish-21. I am to add that it appears from returns received that History was taught in 8,095 schools during the year ended 3rst December, 1911, and no doubt Irish History was taught in the great majority of these schools, if not in all, in accordance with the requirements of the school programme ; but from the information now at hand the actual number. of schools in which such instruction was given cannot be stated with accuracy.-! am, sir, your obedient servant, W. J. DILWORTH, Secretary. The General Secretary, The Gaelic League, 25 Rutland Square, Dublin.

REVIEW OF GADELICA, Vol. I., No. 2, " ABACH."

Since the appearance of the above I have received two communications concerning the word abach, entrails. The editor writes as follows: " In your comment on the present instalment of Pairlenzent Chloinne Tomais, viz., your note on the word "ab(h)ach," you have unwittingly been unfair to Prof. Bergin and A back (:\lid. Ir. apach, abbach) is Father Dinneen. the correct form of the word. O'Reilly was the first to blunder, and beginning with O'Grady editors have ever since been tumbling after him. l have already aiven a brief note on the word in the last vol. of the Gaqlic journal, p. 308, ad fin. So �ath_er Dinneen is right about this ; even though he is mistaken about abhac, a dwarf." The other communication ,vas an anonymous typewritten postcard which it is not hard to ascribe to It reads as follows : " ).1. Ir. Prof. Bergin himself. apach, abbach; pl. apaige, T. Troi (2), ! 049'. apaigib, ib., 10-H, apaighe, C. Cath., 3483, apa1ge, zb., 3i'io5' apaighib, ib., 4013, etc." I read both of the texts quoted, the Cath Cathardha in two or three R.I.A. :\ISS., one of which was most bPautifully neat in its penmanship and caligraphy and, what was of great interest to me, written in Leinster oa the summit of Sliabh O mBarr, a placename that has eve- since been a complete puzzle to me. The text of this )IS. was also neat and accurate, but I fear was not at all used by Stokes.

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ARD-SGOIL CHOLUIMCILLE. CLOGHANEELY. The classes of the Ulster College hav.e been in full swing for the past four weeks, and from every point of view the session is the most promising and successful The College building in the history of the Ard-Sgoil. has been considerably improved, the accommodation for students in the neighbourhood is excellent, while the attendance is larger than ever before for the same The period, considerably over 100 being on the rolls. Principal, Miss Agnes O'Farrelly, M.A., and the members of the staff are highly pleased with 'he spirit of zeal and earnestness shown by the students. The class in old Irish conducted by Seamus Mac Lochlainn is making good progress, and a number of advanced students are attending the Welsh class Miss Hayden, M.A., of the under Eamonn O'Toole. Xational University, is giving a series of lectures in Irish history. Carl Hardebeck spent a week at the College and conducted classes in traditional singing. In the roll of students all Ulster is represented, while several of the Leinster counties have sent contingents. Among those attending the classes are Dr. Bradley, Drogheda; Brother Stanislaus, Clarendon Street, Dublin; Miss Dobbs, Cushendall; Miss Norwenna MacXeill, Messrs. Brown, Allen, MacAllister, and Beckett, Belfast; Rev. Father Clenaghan, Dean of Residence, Belfast University· Rev. Father Rudden St. Patrick's College, Cavan ·' Rev. Father McCann' Ardbo, Tir-Eoghain; Rev. 'Father McKenna, Kil� ken�1y; Rev; �ather O'Brien, Kilkenny; Mr. Chn�topher O Reilly, Dublin· Miss Howard Dublin. ]�here are also a number of un'der-graduates of 1Jnivers1�y qolleg�, Dublin, including Messrs. MacWeeney, O Duffy, 0 Nolan, MacDonnell, and Liam O Brolchain. The College has had several distinguished visitors inclt�cling two American. ladies,. Miss MacKinney, President of the International Kmdergarten Associa t.ion, and Miss Slack, of Boston ; Mrs. Bradley'. Drogheda; Miss Bradley, Kells; Mr. and Mrs. Sean Mac Giolla an Atha Bradley, Dublin ; Editor of AN CLAIDHEAMH SoLUis, and last but not least, Father Matt Maguire, the esteemed President of th!.' Dail Uladh, who got a most enthusiastic reception and addressed the students, rnngratulating them on the good spirit shown by the large attendance and the earnestness and zeal shown by the students in their work: . Excursions to Machaire Rabhartaigh ancl th!.' h1stonc Cloc-Cheann Fhaolaidh stone have been carried out. and the weekly ceilidhthe and debates have been enjoyed by all.

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"e1n.e 05" MEMBERSHIP CARDS. Every member of " e-111e 65 " should possess one of the new Membership Cards . Neatly and artistically printed with border of Celtic design, the Cards are .mitable for framing, and will be looked upon as treasured mementoes in years to One Card post free to any come. address for two penny stamps. Twenty cards post free for 2s. 6d. WRITE TO C.6.01 tce 11.6. 11..o.nn, Ce.o.11n65 f.>.o.11neU, 25, .6.i:.o. Cti.o.t

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coupon. re 15

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11.-Feiseanna whose Syllabuses have been approved by the Oireachtas Committee, and whose Fixtures are fulJy authorised. August 15-Abbeyleix (Leix and Ossory Feis). August 18-Manorhamilton.

III.August I 5-Kilbrien. August 18-Dungarvan. August 25-Ballymacarbry. Lughnas 25-Caban tSile, Aeridheacht, Craobh Naorn Bride.

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North Dublin Union. MEDICAL OFFICER WA:'.',;TED FOR CLONTARF & HOWTH Xo. 1 SUD-DISTRICT. The Board of Guardians wi] 1, at their meeting to be held on Wednesqay, the z i st day of August, 1912, at the hour of 3 o'clock, p.m., proceed to elect a properly qualified Medical Officer for the Clontarf and Howth, No. 1, District of the Union, at. a �alary of £145 per �num, to increase by trienmal increments of £ r o until a maximum salary of £195 has been attained, together with the usual vaccination and registration fees. The person appointed will also be the Medical Officer of Health to the Rural District Council for the above district, and the salary attached to the office is £15 per annum, payable by that body. The area now assigned to this sub-district will be subject to alteration should it at anv time be desirable to make such. The gentleman elected must possess all the necessary prescribed qualifications (vaccination etc.) required by the Local Government Board: and be subject to their sanction, and undertake and . discharge the duties appertaining to the appointment to the satisfaction of the Board of The person appointed must reside Guardians. within the above sub-district. Applications, with Diplomas and copies of Testimonials, to be lodged with me up to 3 o'clock, p.m., on Monday, r oth August, 1912', and candidates will require to be in attendance upon the day of election. By Order,

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.

BEST· EQUIPPED

Main.guard Sl., GAL"'\tV'A Y. l..&t'.>..&f'C..6.f' 5..&e'()1t5e .<\nnreo.

PRINTERY

IN

IRELAND. Minute's Walk from Railway Station.

'" w

The House for Tourists and Visitors. Extensive Stabling for Horses. Accommodation for Motor Cars. Hot and Cold Baths.

WRITE

FOR

*

ESTIMATES TO ATHLONE. Ceatrally Situated.

STOP

Facing the Sea.

AT

HILLSGROVE HOTEL

PRINTERS

Lr. Salthill, GALWAY.

OF

An t:-i1neA n n ae,

Perfect Sanitation. Newly Furnished and Decorated. Splendid View of Galway Bay and Clare Hills, Special Terms to Weekly Visitors. MRS. CONLON, Proprietress. Bet & Cold Baths. Tariff Moderate.

"QUIBT,

FLEMING'S HOTEL �

Solus

BUY ONLY

YBT CBNTRAL"

PATERSON'S

32 GARDINER'S PLACE, DUBLIN,

•RISH

3 Minutes' walk from Parnell's Statue, 5 Seconds from Gardiner St. Chapel and Findlaters Church. Electric Light throughout. Sanitary perfect. H. C. Baths. Bed and Breakfast from 3/-

MATCHES

ne, n<5aeijeAt be4\n'GL\. 1 m Batl-e !ra cltAt

USE ONLY

PATERSO�S WOOD VESTA

MATCHES SAD� O:N OU.BX..IN.

ALL CHARCES STRICTLY MODERATE.

HOMES OF THE GAEL.

GALWAY ARMS HOTEL,

OKDEK

54 &. 55 Rutland Square, West, Dublin. Visitors to Dublin will ftnd this Hotel most comfortable and convenient. Also Ivy Hotel, Athenry. Mrs. KENNY, Proprietress. 'Phoae 3494.

/

The Manager, ".6..n

ct.c roecrn so uns,:'

m,,'r rrnan te,\"C be1t bu e.n, C-4\ti.t\1f1 CUt\1t\'O �11 Com&r rnec C,0.ttil-0-01t (1· ���f,�LL,) 2 Keailwortll Buildings, Harold's Cross Road, NIM DRUGS.

TRY

"'II"""

RELIABLE REMEDIES.

IRISH MANUFACTURED SOAPS AHO BRUSHEi.

"HIRSOLENE ' '' 1/6 per Bottle.

RATHGAR.

THE MARVELLOUS HAIR RESTORER,

Post Free, f/9.

lol.\t'>t\1f1 :s�wotumn 1 bero rE.1tce 1 r1ce 11om.\t.

25 Rutland Square, Dublin.

Kindly supply me with ··························-·--·-··. cop·-·····------·of " .6..n Ct41't>e.411l sotuij-," for ·----moaths, for which please find enclosed.

K�nil�orth Phermacy,

FOKM.

-------·····-·········---·· value·····--············-·------·-··------·--·

Sisrned D '·····----------

Address ( in fu II), ····---···-------·--------···········-··········-·······-.

Dare

------·-····----- ------·····-·····-····················-

N umber

0n

List-.-'•.._

_

Cu.t out thi5 term, and whea lltefi in addre.. t.Subscription, 6/6; Six Montas, 3/3; Quarter, t/8. MANAGER, " �n Ct41'0e4lril Sotu1r,.. .25 Rutland Square, Dublin.


All. l!'N CLAilH+EAMH

, A5Ut

FAJnoe

So-tutsJ

l.A.@A,

AD

-=======-..:__-----------------·--- --- - - - -- . - -----· b erte .&t.<\ cuer, tu5t1.<\S-0. le.4t'>-<1f' XIV U1m1r 25. Vol.

DUBLIN,

[Registered as a Newspaf,er.]t

No. 25.

XIV.

AUGUST

No.

042ll

24, 1912.

24, 1912.

---------------=-----============------- --· · --- - - ---t>"-o

Ct?.4f1C oo S4C :E;4e'()11.seOif\ , mb41le .&c�

Clt.4t 5.c1n don .6f\jn "00 �.6flf'.4C 4CC

KENNEDY'S BREAD Finest (}uaiity Made: ·�R§yi

127& 128

GREAT BRITAIN

ST,

Support New Irish Industry. ........--..

''TITAN" SOAP.NO RUBBING�

Wonderful Cleanser.

Made PH<ENIX WORKS, DUBLIN.

LOUGHLIN FOR

AND

ST

PATRICK'S BNKERY .

DUBLIN. Tile Only Irish Mutual Office Founded and Worked on •J•to•date lines under control of representative Irishmen, ISadowment and Whole Life Assurance Transacted at Lowest Rates In Industrial and Ordinary Departments. AGENTS WANTED IN ALL PARTS OF IRELAND. �lications invited from capable and eaergetic men who can inluence business. Good terms and prospects. Speedy promotion to successful canvassers. Write for Prospectus and Full Particulars. HAlltY J. MAGlillE, sec,

Head Office: 1 :JPPER O'CONNELL STREET, DUBLIN.

BELFAST-IS High! Street.

District Offices" in all important centres.

FLEMING

l./1..l..

:BROS.,

140 DRUMCONDRA ROAD, Family Grocers, Purveyors & Wioe Mercbaots.

Light Weight,

1.o

TENTS

+

AND

A

4/8.

WATERFORD WEAR WELL.

BOOTS LOOK WELL.

Price fro,n 12/11.

Irisb Outtittiog Headquarters, OVER

20,000 UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS, &c. are Re-covered and Repaired by us annually.· Our work is all done by skilled mechanics, and

TRIAL SOLICITED.

MARQUEES

turned out in first-class

.6.ef\1Ue.<\c<:.<\nn.<\ 1 fe1re.<\nn-0.,

manner, whilst ourprices are

FETES, BAZAARS, & CAMPING-OUT.

F.

KELLY & CO.,

Punctuality and courtesy are also two leading

Uniuersitp College, i)ublin.

features.

SESSION

1912-13.

The following Regulations for the College Courses, etc., may be obtained on application :1. GENERAL REGULATIOt-TS-SCHOLARSHIPS, FEES. 2. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN ARTS, PHILOSOPHY, CELTIC STUDIES. 3. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN SCIENCE. 4. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN LAW. 5. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 6. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN ENGINEERING AND ARCH! ECTURE. 7. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN COMMERCE. The College Scholarshlps, Exhibitions, and Prizes amount to about £4,000 for the year, not Including County Councll Scholarships and the Scholarships offered by the Corporation of the City of Dublln. ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS EXAMIKATIONOctober 8th, 1912. INTRODUCTORY COURSES IN MEDICINEOctober 8th, 1912. LECTURES BEGIN (EXCEPT IN LAW)-October 15th, 1912. LECTURES IN LAW BEGIN-October 24th, 1912. COUNTY COUNCIL AND CITY OF DUBLIN SCHOLARSHIP EXAMINATION-September 10th, 1912. Apply at the College, 86 St. Stephen's Green, or the Medical School, Cecilia Street, or by letter addressed ·to the Registrar, University College, Dublin,

IA• univ6rsa/ly expressed ot,ini.n td•ut our prodm Is,

and we have n• douet you will •e pleasetl. Any respectable Tobacconist can supply yeu with eur Banba's Ci.-ara, Turciriah Cig-arettes, ilanba's Straia-ht Cut Ci&"arettes, Vir&"inia Flavour, R.D.S. Smeking Mixture, Bread Cut, a Ceaneisseur's To•acce; Banba's Smoking Mixture-mild aatl ••diu111-Irieh Plug, Irish Cut Plug, 'Artl lt.i' Cigarettes, er eur Irish Ceurt•, all of wlaiela yeu wiU 6atl are excelleat Yalue.

TRI IIISI TOIICCO CO., Gnwen uul Manufacturen,

17 llulllu•' ...,, IIIUI.

FJI..N.A.G.A.N'S FUNERAL ESTABLl8HIIII.ENT• 64 AUNGIBR STREET. c:.,n.., Hear.... c.&cb.., ••• ••..,. Paaeral •........._ Paact-llt7 ud Ecea.-,. ...,......._ CeaatrJ" Uadertu:er• ••P,alN, T..... •• •e, ••

J. W. ELVEl{Y & CO. Establlsbtd 1 sse:

THE KEENEST IN IRELAND.

9 & 10 CHANCERY ST. (Formerly Pill Lane) Also 21 UP.PER ORMOND QUAY, DUBLIN,

(A CONSTITUENT COLLEGE OF THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND),

Tlau u

19 Parliament Street, Dublin.

FOR SALE OR HIRE .

J.

�:------------------� " YEIIY NICE INDEED."

_

• TRY TH•M YOUl'USELF •

FIT WELL.

fiiObtst Standard Goods Stocktd. PRICES MODERATE.

HATS,

Sommer Under Vests & Pants from 2/11 each, Sommer Weight Balbriggan Socks, Fancy Shades, from 1/6. The "AIRTRU" Irish Tweed Cap, 1/11, 2/6.

Telephone No. 785.

Bnacb Offlcea :-

COH-85 South Mall,

STRAW

Smart Shapes.

The Irish United Assurance Society.

Telegraphic Address:-" UNn'EDLY." Dublin,

WEXFORD

IRISH GROWN TOBACCO • .__

Jerseys.

FRAS. SMYTH Bl. SON, Grafton Street, l Lr. Sackville St., i' DUBLIN. Parliament St., 1

PRINTING.

40 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin. Cabinet maktr, and Upl)olsterer.

This is important and Artistic Work. Why not have it done at home, under your own eyes, by the IRISH

..

..

..

..

Boots, etc.

6d., I/·, 1/6, 2/·, 2/6, 3/6.

CAHILL & CO ..

Finn.

Knickers

&

HURLEY ''CAMANS"

M•••r• Plant. Modero M1tll•••·

T. GARDINER ,

Foot Balls.

HURLEY BALLS 6d., I/·, IJ6, IJ9, 2/ ·, 12/6, 3j •· ----·!. . -----

;CATALOGUE FREE

..

Motor Car Upholstering and Hood• a Speciality

28 CLARENDON ST., DUBLIN.

DUBLIN. 0011

LONDON.


All •. le.6r,-lt' XIV. Vol. XIV.

U11n111 23. No 23.

c,0- 1m1 te11te-0-cc

b-0-1l� .<it-0- Cll-0-t, lt1'.511-6-S-0-24, 1912. DUBLIN, AUGUST

s,(_, t t.

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[Registered as a Newspaper]

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b' .&lumn ..o.n t'.6.U.6.f'C e 6 .6.f''OJ.n..o.1t'.> n..o. re1re -6-n com.o.t'5A'O bf'e.&5 'O..o.ome um t:1'.&tn6n..o.. e1r�..o.cc ;so 11..o.1f'e..o.c, ..o.;sur ..0.5 'Ot:1mce.c.,u mor All 5..o.rt'..o.'6 UontiMt' '01om..o.'6to1rrn o'n le..o.nt'.> n.J. r.0.10 t..o.r ..o. OC'C mb1J..o.'6n..o. '0 .6.01f 50 'OCl ..o.n re..o.n61f' cpomt..o. c..o.1tce 1r 5..0.c ..o.1t1'0 .o.c..o. ..0.5 mnrmt: rce..o.t, . o.;sur ..o.;srt:e.o.Lt..o.t> e..o.C'Cf'.6.1tle 50 b111n-'5l6p..o.c. -6-;sur 't1m1r '00 te15 ..o.n -piob..0.1f'e ..o.n ce..o.'O rct'e..o.'O Af ..o. 5le..o.r, t>i ;s..o.c cu1rte 1 t>p:1te..o.nnA1t'.> 5..0.c ..o. 1'.o.u ..o.nn ..0.5 bOf\r..o.'6, ..o.:sur but> 5e..o.rr 50 f'.6.1U tl.<l f'111r1CC01f\1tle ..0.5 b.o.111C fmUf.6.15 .6.f Cl.&r .6.fl t'mnce. but> ri'l6f' ..o.n r.&r..o.m ..o.1;sne 'Oo 5..o.�el ..o.r bit ..o._ oe..o.'6 1 l.&t..o.1r bi r-e..o.n:s..o. n..o. ..o.n $lt1..o.1re..o.C'C rm 'O tecrmc. n'5..o.et>e.o.l re :.Sf'.6.'0Am .6.i c.&6; Di �e.opi. lf n6�A 11.o. n5.o.eue..o.t re me..o.r ..o.m ; ..o.;sur 010'0..o.1' ..o.nnru'O n..o. 5..o.e'61t rem ;so -c&n..o. 11e1ti1fple..o.u..o.c ..o.;s re.o.f.6.ri'l .o.11 f61'0, 5..0.n b6.t1n ..o.C..o. .6.f' emne, ..o.;sur 5..0.n 'COf'.6.U .o.c..o. ..o.p ft;_tA1\f>pe6f rle.o.mn.&n..o.1t>t11J 11 b..0.05..0.l '06 te.0.115..0.111 ..o.n cS..o.1cr-be..o.rV· troc.&m 1 ,�.o.r..o.1t'.> bt1r'O eo5..o.min, mot..o.t> /"" Le D1..o.� 1

INSIST

ON GETTING

l"RISH-M�DE. etlTLE.RQ FROM YOUR IRONMONGER.

ff he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Cutlery Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. cot t.<i 1s-ce cnoc.& 1n no.omt-0-. c.& CoU.&1rce Croc.&111 n..o.omt.o. ..0.5 cur 'Oe 50 11J.tumn. 'CJ. 5..0.rf..o."O Ot'e.&5 'Oe m..o.c..0.15 le15mn 'C.&m ..o.nnru'O ;su..o.l..o. ..0.5 r.o.oc..o.r Ann re Llt.o.lf'. ..o.p 5u..o.t..o.mn, r.o.5A1-rc, 1r omi'6e rco1le, 1r re1r1p1'6e, 1r cl..o.nn re1r11'1tle, 1r lucc u..o.1rle, 1r lUC'C 01bre-5..o.c 'Oume .6.C..o. ..0.5 Ob.6.1f' 50 '01.6.n 'Oice..o.U..o.c cum ce..o.n;s..o.n A m.&t..o.r '01to5tt11m, A:SUr 1 '00 cu-r .0.5 rpt'e..0.5..0.'6 1 mb.&tl'C.6.15 f6'0l..o. 1r 1on5..o.nc..o.6 .6.fl r..0.05..0.t e, rA05..o.t 11.6. A1f'1f. -6-n ceot 1r ..o.n rP6t'c, ..o.n 5cott.&1rc1'6e reo. c..o.t't..o.nn..o.cc, ..o.n 'Oilre..o.cc c1'01ue, ..o.n c-.&p'Ou5..o.'6 mnt:mne, A:SUr .o.n r1or-t10n 'O'f1pmn 1f '00 n6r..o.1t'.> nA n'5..o.et>e..o.t 6 oun ;so b.c.1'1'· Si ..o.n otM1t' reo Atl Ob..o.1p 1f 'C.6.t'.>ACC.o.15e 'CJ. .61' r1ut>..o.t 1 fArl t:ip 1fl'01U.

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but> m6p ..o.n cur cum crnn opAmn e 1 5Cotu1rce C1'6cJ.rn 11..0.omt.1 :sut' t.&1t115 Se.&n U.1 CeAtW.15 re n-.&1' n'Oem cum t'ornnc le1cc1u1p1ue 'C.& "Sce1l5" ..o.p n.1 'Oo tAl')A1t''C 'OC1mn. 'OA01l11t'.> 1f Cf'U1t1fle eol�r ..o.p f"G..11r 1f .&p f'e.1ll.6.C.1j"' Tii m1rce .6. l'\.6.'0 :SUl'\ rl.6. lle11'e..o.nn .6.'C..i A.5"A111r1. mo re cp, eour .al' m.c.c le151r1n 1 ;scupr.o.rn 11.0. re.o.n-..o.1mr1pe t:At' elf co15ci51re fe, n.ci ffl.6.f\ A t'.>i Do CUlt' re r1or 50 ' f'Mri1 t'01m1f reo .6.C.6.. crumn 'Otimn .6.f' "SeAn..o.cur e1pe.o.nn, po1m te..o.cc Cr1ort: " ; " 6 te.1cc Cr,1orc 50 t:e..o.cc .o.n cpem1m," ..o.r "'Op..o.01t10 e1f'e.o.nn ; " ..o.p "" "" .O.rlr1 ; " .o.r "e..o.5l.o.1f c1re.1nr, "peme..o.c.o.r C1f\e. ,., Af\ " 10mp..o.ri1Alt) 1r At' m..o.p..o.1tle..o.ct: f1pe..o.nn ; " A. � ; " . O.:SUf ..0.1\ '' 01'0e.o.v.6.f .O.f\ '' f01p5t1e.o.ri1 C1f'e..o.nfl Seo nMf' cu1r re r1or A:SUf e.o.l..o.t>n.o. e1pe..o.nn." At' Sco1t Ctu..o.n.6. e..o.t'.6.11''0 :" Do cu1p frnnern n.o.omt..o. Sco1l Clu..o.n..o. e..o.r..o.1f''O ..o.1' bun c1mce.o.lt bl1.o.t>n..o. .6. 520. 1H l'..o.1t'.> .o.nn 1 'OcorAc .o.cc bot t>e.0.5 'Oo '6em f111ne111 rem 'Oe tt..o.c..o.1t'.> 1r 'Oe cpe t::.6.1' e1r r1uce uo o'n t'.>ff'..o.mnc 1r o'n 10'0.a1l 1r 6 rcot.0.10 n..o. bf'e..o.c..o.n. Dem re le n-A t>.& tJ.1m rem e. -0-;sur con, tu..o.t 1r 'Oo t>i An Oot 1r ..o.n ce.o.U cp1ocnm5te A15e 'Oo n..o.m re cw.1r mop 1 n-.1 'Oc1mce.c.tt 1 5ct1m.o. 1f 50 mbe..o.'6 re rem 1 t>rot.o.c ..o.p ..0.11 fe..o.r r1of'-tlutf'..o.cc.1c r10r-cpJ.1t>teM: r..0.05..0.t. 'Oo b'e..o.'6 e, .&mt.o.c; t>10'6 re ..0.5 ;smue 1r ..0.5 O b.6.1f' C01'CCMllC..o., .c.5ur t'.>io'(') re ..0.5 Cf'OfC.o.'(') be..o.5.J.11 A1'.&1t1 1r tut> 1r f.l\t.o.rnn 1r ;so mm1c.

YOU WILL LIKE THE LATEST

MODELS IN

"LUCANIA" AND "PIERCE"

CYCLES.-They are absolutely the Finest Bicycles made, and they're

I RISH.- Does that Matter? DEPOT:

GAELS-

Support the Only Picture House,n Dubin owned by an Irishman.

THE

IRISl-l CINEMA

84 pone 6.ao1m5m 84

"CAMDEN"

STREET,

DUBLIN.

CAPEL STREET (net to Tl'tldes' Hall),

NOW OPEN DAIIY 2.30 to 10.30.

PRICES, Change of Pictures-

30. 40.,

60.

Monda• Thursday and Sunday.

NoTE.-\Ve sell Irish Bikes only, and sell them on their \Ve repair all makes, properly and Lheaply. merits.

Does that Matter

I


tiasn.&f.6 August

24, 1 · 12.

tur CLA11t••.u1a aou11a.J

24, 1912.

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summer Sc boo I, ORANMORE, CO. GALWAY.

FOURTH SESSION-August 5tb to 31st. Prlnclpa/-E. D. VALERA, B.A. For advanced Students of the Language. Visitors can attend in July to acquire bias, all(! read ext with local teacher. ,.Students can avail of the Special Excursion to (:alw�y, on the 4th August by (\,, ..6.11'0 CttM'C> to reach U'-'tt'-'n mott. For Pro•pectus apply to -

:S. O COICUBHAIR, Hon. Ste., 68 Serpentine Av., Sandymount, E. I.

•c.

0 ..

DIX, Hon. T�a., 17 lildare ltrtet, Dublin.

"cu1mr1e n<-\

m-6 Rt'>."

.(\ll '5.6e'01 t5 f.(\01 " HOME RUL

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:5 t U-<>.16 f0$.o. H.: tyg m3r-m6r. bv chumv le tyg m3r 6 civ rm la nu nih@ ge chun sul6 ·d@. ni ecvch se nv din@ mahv 1 e sdig nv masg " ba,., i lasv, na ni ghelhvch se ,. fa vad-/ag vvad gu rev i like ·di on i nechvr. ni ma .,.sin dv viha. ·l nr, m6, rm b3 ·chil dv vi ge, dvchich se -�=-ct. vi sul@ du g miha. · l, 1 vn ryrc si ge un tv. ha.rlv gur ha· sdig sgvha · n 6 hyg la, 1 dv ghar se gegg < ag dv chron sgch@ gil@ vi fas i mel-m cal i lasv. dv ghl3 se 1 v sgvhan ige ·, ach dv binvch tri lag as sulv ran@ se n cli-cly. ni bv vasv na svn, dv ch3 dalvg nv ve,. 1 vi si tyn-tin lavhl < ·n--la/l c ·n ige · nedvchn c adt1ch se dol har dorvs des tl · tum nv hi ha svn vmach na. gu ra.ni·ch sgach nu crev nu cloch riv@ dv lagvch e1' lar e. mu lav div na rev i hil@ cur isda ·ch er nv dine ma hige ·, na. ,. i lis, 1 gur Meg se n sul ih@ /asdv ris.

The Cheapest House in Town For Chandlery,

J. C. LARKIN, �6 �EXFORD STREET.

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LAR.KIN,

99 Lower Dorset . FOR.

Plumbing. £igbttng and


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lu5t1.6.f.6. 24, 1912.

THE DIGLOTS.

_.__

The existence of the native speech of Ireland is, alas, no longer dependent on a purely monoglot population. We find, m fact, the relics of this in process of absorption decade after decade into the diglots or bilinguists. Herein we find a problem that gives food for It is quite a very serious thought indeed. dangerous state for any language on the globe to be in, quite independent of the circumstances of the country in which it may still be existent. In Ireland it is greatly to be feared that the case is worse than in other countries. Let us take any country in Europe in which the circumstances are similar to those of Ireland, and we find that, although a considerable portion of the " over-ruled" nation may of necessity have become diglot, yet it would seem that�hese diglots are intelligent enough to grasp the simple fact that they are in honour bound to speak their native tongue to one another when no Even the stranger intervenes in the case. stranger matters little. One has only to think of the oft-quoted case of Bohemia where the Slavonic-speaking natives have often placed English travellers in quite an awkward fix by refusing to speak to them in any tongue but Bohemian. This attitude may appear to many rather unreasonable, but it is at least intelligible and even effective, for it places before strangers the claims of the native tongue and will probably force them m the long run to enter the country in future prepared to ask for necessities in it alone. The principle of honour in using only one's own speech at home applies even to dialects. The Alemannic native of Switzerland dare not speak High German in his mountain home; such a practice would be considered an extreme affectation and quite out of place in home surroundings. In this we see that the literary and colloquial forms of speech have each their own welldefined sphere. Even little Wales is a clear example of a shrewd diglot population who use their own tongue between themselves as a matter of honour, and also force the use of it on many of the English settled there through industrial migration, for it has been recorded in Parliamentary evidence that in three years the English miner learns to use Welsh only in his work underground, as he hears no English spoken by the native workers. It is an unfortunate , fact that the Irish diglots are less intelligent than those of any other They are a flabby country in Europe. indolent set of people, so lazy intellectually in fact that the bulk of them will not trouble to speak their own tongue among themselves, though well able to use it for all the ordinary · purposes of life. When taxed with this, even the worst of them will show some pride in the boast that they " can buy and sell in Irish," and immediately afterwards will use English at the fair or market with other bilinguists. One of the contributory causes is undoubtedly the English weekly newspaper which is commonly read by the diglots. Yet, owing to their numbers and constant augmentation, it is to this section of the Irish-speaking population that we must look for the future of the language. How heart-rending it is to hear that m several places m West Clare such as Ennistymon, Lahinch, etc., there are whole populations of Irish-speaking people who commonly use English m speaking amongst themselves. It shows how necessary it is to convert the diglots to some feeling of pride in using only their own tongue in such circumstances. This, however, is only one of the aspects of the saving of a language, a matter which is really a far more complex problem than most people think. We hope to return to the subject soon in order to deal with others.

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Coiste Condae Mhuigheo. Coiste Conndae Mhuigheo was reorganised some months ago. It holds a surtradh mor in Caislean a' Bharraigh next Sunday to raise funds with which to employ a country organiser. Bad as the position of Irish in the schools appears to be, there are grounds for hope. A pamphlet published by the Coiste shows that the author, an tAthair O Miodhchain, now a member of the Coiste Gnotha, knows where revival work may be made most effective and who are the effective workers. "Now, however, that a strong public opinion has been created in favour of the movement, it is evident that the local Branch must open out and break new ground. It must look beyond itself. In the first place, it must study the Irish position in the parish as a wholeparticularly in the schools and in the homes of the parents. For example, it should know the number of Irish speakers it possesses m the parish ; it should know what are the chief prevailing Anglicising influences ; it should know, at the present moment, precisely in what schools of the parish Irish is taught, and in what schools it has not yet been introduced; it should know what are the Irish qualifications of the National teachers ; it should know what is the provision in the programme of the school as a public institution for the teaching of the language, and what progress has been made in each school towards the great goal, the introduction of a programme in which Irish is the basis of instruction. s »

· Irish in the Homes. "House Classes, again, should be held m each district to teach the native speakers, if any, how to read Irish, to teach the members of every family to say the Irish prayers, to learn the old Irish songs, to foot again the old Irish dances, to hear the seanchaidhe tell again the old Irish tales of the long ago, to make the people learn something, too, of the history of their own country. The ordinary Irish farmer must not be expected to be an enthusiast. Therefore, to encourage the doing of all this work, suitable prizes of one sort or another mast be given, as, for example, for the production of the most Irish speaking family of a district. Thus will be created a kind of perpetual Parochial Feis." Eire Og. "Whatever measure of success, however, might attend the efforts of the local Branch in thus striving to stem the decay of the language and to catch up the people of the parish generally into the Revival Movement, there is one quarter in which the work of the Branch must not fail-amongst the children, the boys and girls, of the the whole parish. Compared with this, all other work might well be abandoned for the boys and girls of to-day are the men and women of Ireland to-morrow." If our readers refer to the Census returns for Mayo they will see that m the rural county districts the Irish speakers made up where they are least numerous over 36.0 per cent. of the population, that is in Claremorris, while m Killala they make up 58.0· per cent., in Ballinrobe 68.o per cent., and in Belmullet 76.7 per cent. of the population of these districts. There are 23 schools in Belmullet ; there are 22 in Killala, and 36 in Ballinrobe. Irish might easily be made the teaching language in Belmullet and Ballinrobe districts, and there should be no objection whatever to bilingual education in all three districts. But what do we find ? While there a re 81 schools in the three districts, there are only twenty bilingual schools in all Mayo, and there are but 49 other schools in the more Irish parts of the county in which Irish is taught.

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It is evident, therefore, that even in those parts

...

of Mayo where Irish speakers make up 58, 68, and 76 per cent. of the entire population their language is entirely excluded from many schools.

Help from the Managers. Coiste Mhuigheo has a big problem to face, but it has at hand all the requirements for successful work. If many teachers are unacquainted with Irish, the county has two Irish colleges and a summer school, and there is no part of the county, outside the towns, where Irish speakers make up less than 36 per cent. of the population. The teachers will do what the managers require of them. If the Coiste can get the school managers to determine on utilising the schools for saving Irish there will be no trouble with the teachers An tAthair O Miodhchain points out that each Branch of the Gaelic League should have information regarding the state of Irish in the local schools. Of course it should. It should also have the public spirit necessary to call the attention of the school managers to the neglect of the Ianguage in schools under their charge.

.....

The University Scholarship. The Most Rev. Dr. O'Dwyer, Bishop of Limerick, speaking last week at a meeting of the Limerick Committee of Technical Instruction, said in reply to those who criticised the standing given to Irish studies in the Committee's scheme: "Some people have found fault with us for requiring holders of Count, Scholarships to study the Irish language during, their C niversity course, but in my opinion most unreasonably. We are finding the whole cost of the education of these scholars. Surely that gives us some right over their course of studies, and if we recognise the very natural and most honourable effort that is being made by our country to preserve the national language, it surely does not become any Irishman, no matter what his views or opinions may be, to reproach us. The case is on a totally different footing from the action of the Senate of the National University making the study of Irish compulsory on all its students. That action may be right or wrong, judicious or the reverse, but it is not and cannot be based on the grounds on which the Council, as representing the ratepayers, acts, as being the body that provides the funds for these scholars' education." Mr. Birrell's bait will catch no fish in Limerick. The sinister attempt to employ the £ 10,000 grant to secondary education for the further Anglicisation of Irish education was vigorously condemned by Dr. Bradley and Father Fullerton at the opening meeting of Colaiste Omeith Mara.

...

Anti-Irish Teachers. Another snowball resolution advising X ational teachers to withdraw their support from the Gaelic League is going the rounds of the teachers' associations. It has been adopted by a Galway association which met in Clifden and by an association of teachers whose schools are situate in the Irish-speaking parts of Portlairge. The teachers who supported the resolution in Galway and Portlairge are not doing their duty to the national language in their own schools. That is why they ask those patriotic teachers who are working in the language movement to withdraw from the League. They would prefer to see the language perish rather than take the trouble to learn it and fit themselves for efficient work in their schools. No doubt their attitude is very pleasing to West Britons and to all who talk bombast about our place in the Empire but who are too lazy to fit themselves for a place in Gaelic Ireland. We believe it is now up to the Gaelic League to hold public meetings in both Galway and Waterford in order to educate local opinion in the districts of those West British teachers. The people will not stand by the dastardlv teachings that have been sent forth by the associations. Let them be told what their duty to the language is. Let the school managers be reminded of their duty. The people and the managers might easily eradicate the West British plague from the schools.

IRISH

ROSARY BEADS.

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An U i Breasail Rosary is Irish made Prices from 6d. to 5/- in all Stationers and Catholic Repositories. Ask to see them. Wholesale fromA. MITCHELL, 23 Waterford Street, Duhlin


1nrnmer, the men in the winter months, to study the history, the language and the liten.twe of eheir own country, to heat lectures on the ancient chronicles and sagas, on political economy, phJsics, chemistry and other aubjects. The c:oune 111ually embraces two terllll; when �� � ldum to their homes to take up their occupdiolll agam.•

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24, 1912.

COLAISTE O MEITH MARA.

--·:·--

Colaiste O Meith Mara was opened on Monday by His Eminence Cardinal Logue. The college is under the patronage of His Eminence and of the Most Rev. Dr. O'Neill, Bishop of Dromore. Sir Henry Bellingham The President is Father is Honorary President. Father Greenan and Quinn, P.P., of Carlingford. Seosamh O Dolain are treasurers. Father James Quinn, C.C., is secretary. The staff includes Professor Eoin MacNeill Peadar O Dubhda, Eamonn Bhaldron, Aodh Mac Gre�chain, Domhnaill O Baoghaill, Fr. Fullerton, Maire Phleimeann and An tAthair O Tuaghaill. SPEECH OF CARDINAL LOGUE. His Eminence Cardinal Logue, in opening the proceedings, said-Rev. Fathers, ladies and gen�l�men, I consider it a great honour, and a great privilege, to take the chair at this meeting of the Gaelic College herein Omeath. I am delighted to have the opportunity of welcoming your professors and your studcn ts to this newly-established College, and I have a special reason for being rejoiced at your assembling here at this the only corner in the wide archdiocese of Armagh where the old tongue has held out up to the present. And I think the assembling of a number of Irish students here under the very capable masters of the college, will contribute to add to the life of the old Gaelic tongue here in Omeath, for, unfortunately, it was sick up lo this and dying out. I remember--I think it was in 1886 when I came here to give confirmation for a Deanery of Drogheda and Dundalk for my predecessor, the late Dr. :11 .... Gettigan, who was sick, walking home from the church to the priest's house I passed group after group of people, and didn't hear a I have been coming here word spoken but Irish. occa"ionallv in summer ever since for a week now and again, and as I pass along I hear no Irish. Sometimes the oldc people as I meet them along the road address me in Iris' just to show that they know it, but the young people speak no Irish as far as I know. That is just what has taken place in all the Irish-speaking districts. or what has been taking place before the Gaeli : League gave a new impetus to the study of Irish. 1t is a very lamentable thing to find that in the parts of the country where Irish is familiar to the people, and where there is the best opportunity of giving new life to the language, it has been neglected and is dying out. �ow, I think that the establishment of the Trish College here will put a stop to that deterioration in this part of the Diocese of Armagh. With regard to the rest of the Diocese of Armagh, of course, there is no Irish spoken in it. I am here for the last 23 years among people who don't know a word of Irish, and the result of that is that I have forgotten Irish myself. I can use a few words of Irish in conversation, but to do anything further I find impossible, because no matter what book knowledge you may have of the language-I have experience of a few modern languages myself, such as French and Italian, as well as English, which, I believe, is a modern language very modern, because it is borrowed from every language, in Europe-I find that, no matter what book knowledge you may have of the language, no matter how well you may know it from a literary point of view, without a foundation in practice in speaking it you will never be at home in it. Hence I think that one thing that should be aimed at in this part of the country, where Irish is spoken fluently still, at least by the old people, what should be done is to give an impetus to the speaking of Irish in the families. A good deal had been clone in Donegal by the Bishop of Raphoe, who had made an order that the Irish speakers of his diocese should speak Irish for at least one or two hours of the day amongst their families, and I think that if that rule could be extended to other parts of Ireland it would keep up the spoken language. The written language, Middle Irish, and Old Irish, are all very fine for scholars, and most useful for the purpose of studying �ur annals, and for philological and other purposes ; but if we want to have practical Irish we must extend the speaking of Irish, and have it spoken more commonly amongst the people. That is one of the fruits I expect to see from this new College, and I am sure I won't be disappointed in that expectation. On that account it gives me the greatest pleasure to come here and to welcome the strangers to this part of the archdiocese, and to wish them every success in this undertaking, which is started, I learn from Mr. MacNeill, with a large number of students, and I hope that number will be larger Bevond that, I have merely to start other still. speakers on this occasion. I am pretty much like the instrument in these motor cars. You turn a handle and start a spark, and when the spark is started the motor car will bring you off. I, therefore, repeat that I look upon it as a great ho11:our and a grec1:t pleasure to come here to-day, and this College and its success will be of the deepest interest to me as long as 1 am left here amongst the people. SPEECH OF MR. F. J. BIGGAR. Mr. F. J . Biggar said he was ve�y J?lea�ed to be there at the Gaelic College m the old prmc1pahty of Armagh. Armagh was the centre of Ulster. From Armagh vibrated every chord that was felt from the extreme point of Tirconnell and Tyron� and Antrim _do� nearly to the Newry waters, and it was very gratifying indeed that the Prince of Armagh should be there that day. It spoke well for that College established on the upper reaches of Carlingford Lough, and he could safely say that no more beautiful site _could be selected for any college in Ireland. How the site had come mto the hands of the Gaelic League he did not know ; whether they had "rushed" it, as they had to do at Ardglass, he could not say ; but they were there at any rate, and all Gaelic Leaguers were wel ome. The Irish race in Ulster had remained true to their traditions, and had still an unbroken record with the past, and those there that day were covering up those traditions by establishing a College that would do great work in carrying on the proudest traditions of the race by 'Y"hen that to:igue preserving the national tongu�. was established, and when their children taught it to their own children, then indeed would they have a nationality that would be in �he full sense. of the term a nationality of which the Insh people might well be proud. SPEECH OF MR. JOHN M'NEILL. Mr. John M'N eill, on behalf of the teaching staff of the College, thanked His Eminence for comi�g to g�ve the College a start, and for setting the spark m motion

g

(d CI..AIDHSAMH IIOLUla.]

I I

'V:hich w�s to set the :"heels going round. He thanked his Emmence for his thoroughgoing svrnpathy and support for the work w�ich �hey w�re attempting to commence that <la)'.'. His Emmence m speaking about 9meath took occasion to remark about the diminution m. the spea_king _of �ris� in that district, the principal Insh-speahng_ district in Lein?ter:. �ike Mr. Biggar, h� (1':fr. McNeill) felt a strong inclination to claim that district as a part of Ulster, but the people of Leinster were hardly likely to let that claim zo unchallenged At all events, this much the staff of the College could say that no mat_ter where students came from, whether from Ulster, _Lemster, Connacht, or Munster, the staff woul� do �heir best �or them. But about the speaking ?f Insh gomg clown m that district, the strangest thing 111 all Ireland was that there was any Irish at all spoken there. It was a miracle that the Irish language was spoken there at all. There was not a single district in Irelai:-d in whic�1 the �ircumstances were so unfavourable t<;> I�ish, and m which that language survived. The d1stn�t was s_erved by railways, and it was between two large m?ustnal towns, Newry and Dunclalk, and there was an important port within ten minutes of it, and if there was any person there who was conversant with anr other pa_rt of lreland similarly circumstanced in wluch. the Insh language h_ad not been swept away ti.tty. \ car:' ago, he would like to meet him. It was providential that the language was still alive there and it was to the honour and credit of the people of Omeath th rt they had kept it alive. Long azo the people of Omeath wer_e an enterprising people, and they went abroad to exploit the world for their own benefit and to make money f<;>r themselves, but when they came back to Omeath agam to spend the rest of their lives there.they kept up the custom of speaking Irish at home. H� did not know why the change had come in the last thirty years, but he was afraid the influence of the schools were partly responsible for it, and that was why they were there that day. They were there to p 1 t � fresh opportunity into the hands of those who were m charge _of t!1c Na.tional Schools, and those conducting the teaching 111 the schools, and they trusted and relied that they would have the support and co-operation of the m,:nagcrs of the schools and of the teachers, as far as tl:c 1!1fluence of that place could reach. The presence of his Eminence ancl of so many managers and so many teachers there was an earnest that the opportunity �hat the st aft of the College would do their best to put in the hands of the teachers would be taken advantage of. He saw no reason why any man or woman who was able to teach a school at all, and who came there to learn Trish �houlcl not get a sufficient knowledge in a very short time to be able to teach Irish effectively in the schools .. r\t all events they had advantages there ?vcr other similar colleges that had been established m Ireland. There was no very long journey to be undertak_en. All the students had to do was to get into the tram, and he was landed down there almost on the spot, with the slightest tr<;>uble and expense, and when he was there he would be in touch with the old stockthe lri.sh-speaking population of Omeath. Speaking from his knowledge of other places, and from what had taken place elsewhere, he had every confidence that the commencement that had been made that clay was a commencement of great and remarkable things. When the old people and the middle-aged people, and so !Ilany of �he _young people as had the Irish language m that �hstnct saw the College at work they would rally to it, and the College would rally to them, and together they would restore and establish the national language in honour and high estate, as it was in the days when that region-that Norfh-East sicle of Ulster from Clonard to Dromore and Bangor-was the light of the world. SPEECH OF DR. BRADLEY. Dr. Bradley said that they h�cl all seen the attempt mad� recently to injure the Gaelic movement in Ireland. A bribe of £10,000 was offered, which, if accepted by the County Councils, would destroy the language movement. It would destroy the continuity of teaching of Irish from �he �r�mary to the secondary schools and It had been a very cliffi -ult on to the universities. !Ilatter to get the language carried to the point where it was to-clay. That insidious move had been made to. do away with the necessity for the children learning Insh. If they wanted to geL to the higher grades in Ireland, they ought to go forth to the County Councils and ask them to stiffen their backs and refuse to take tha miserable bribe. SPEECH OF FATHER FULLERTON, C.C. Rev. R. Fullert<;>n, C.C., Belfast, said he had always thought from the time he began to take an interest in the Irish language that �t _would �e possible and easy if t_h�y onl)'.' set about it in the nght way to link up the living Insh speech of Omeath with that of Tory Island. If they only put their shoulders to the wheel �hey could save !he Irish language in Ulster, and that m a very short time. They wanted to brinz the Irish language back again, _and to make it the living speech of the whole o� the Insh people, and in doing that they would be placmg the people in the position that God and nature intende1 them to occupy; they would make them a self-respecting people, realising that they were the descendants of men and women who made Ireland the first country in the world. They could not hope to succeed unless they made the national schools national in the _only sense in which nationality could !>-ave any meanmg, that was by making them Irish. They all knew that the great obstacle to their progress, and the great killing influence that had kept them back, was the system of education known as the National Education System, and Dr. Bradley had just referred to a bribe that was being handed over to Ireland a� the present time. He thought, however, that Mr. Birrell could take it for granted that all those who were in �ympathy with �rish Ireland were prepared to fight this question agam, and were determined to succeed. On the motion of Mr. J. T. Dolan, Co.C., seconded by Dr. Finnegan, a vote of thanks was passed to Cardinal Logue for presiding. His Eminence, in reply, said the establishment of that Col�ege would create a national feeling, a national feelmg that was badly wanted in some parts, but not th.ere. In some parts of Ireland they forgot they were Irishmen and women altogether, and were carried away by modernism and politics and other things. They were losing sight of their old traditions, and the _only way to keep their old traditions alive was to cultivate the language which was the vehicle that handed clown those traditions to the present clay.

FEIS EACHDHRUIM UI Bl:IROIN. T�e annual Feis of the Aughrim Branch of the �aehc Le�gue, . Co. Wicklow, was held recently in Aughnm, m beautiful weather, and was attended by a large number of people from the �r. John E. Redmond, surrounding. districts. M.P., who is at present staying at his shooting lodge, �t Aughavanagh, came in specially to open the_ Feis, and he remained during the afternoon a� mtereste� �pectator of the various competitions. 1 he com�e�1t�ons were held in the open air, on the lan?s adjoining Mr. William Fogarty's rmii, which �1r. !ogarty, who is one of the patrons of the F�is, kmdly placed at the disposal of the The competitions in the language Con_im1ttee. a good knowledge of the courses showed sectior: prescr�bed for them, the answering all round being o_f a high standard. The choral singing was part�cu�arly fine, and there was some excellent sob smgmg: . The dancing and instrumental music competitions proved very interesting. They were The watch�d by a large crowd of spectators. A�ghn.m Dwyer Band performed a selection of Irish au� be\ore the competitions began. The De Lac) Pipers Band, from near Ferns, was also present and played selections in the course of the afternoon. The Very Rev. J. Caffrey, in asking Mr. Redmo11:d to open !he Feis, thanked those present for. having co�e 111 such large numbers to the Feis. He desired to pay a special tribute to Mr. M�c�weeney for his energy and perseverance in bringing such an tmI?ense gathering together. They had as the principal guest of the Feis that day the Chairman of the Irish Party, hut he asked them as a favour not to expect a. speech from �Ir. Redmond. He had just returned from his hard work _in the House of Commons to Aughavanagh, to gum strength so that he might be able to do good work in Parliament in a short time. The Leader wanted to spare his voice and luncs and build his strength up in order that he might be able to accomplish fine work in the months that were to come before Christmas. Mr. John E. Redmond. l\I.P.. who was acc�rded a most enthusiastic reception, said : Ladies and Gentlemen-I listened with the zreatest pleasure to Father Caffrev's remarks. tha,·e come here to be instructed �nd to enjoy myself (hear, hear), and to promote in anv wa v I can the enjoyment of others (hear. hear), ·and -I certainly would not have enjoyed myself if I had been expected to make a speech, and I am sure I would not have promoted your enjoyment if I made a speech (laughter). I have simply come here to join with you in witnessing the exercises of the Feis (hear, hear), and I desire to congratulate you on the fact that you have a beautiful dav, and that you have so manv skilled and clever Irish competitors in the various exercises, which I will watch with the greatest possible pleasure (hear, hear). I have now been .at two or three of vour Feiseanna (hear, hear). I "·as at the first· one held here, and I take a great pride in seeing the great advance the Gaelic League in Aughrim has made, and noting how splendidly the children taking part in the exercises compare with the children in other parts of Ireland (hear, hea,r). I wish you and this movement every possible success and I will witness with great pleasure all the competitions (loud cheers).

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MARQUEES

J

.6.ef\l'Oe.o.cc.o.nn� 1 fe1re.o.nn.o.,

J. W. ELVEl{Y & CO.

FETES, BAZAARS, & CAMPING-OUT.

€stabllsbtd 1850

FOR SALE OR HIRE .

J.

F.

KELLY & CO.,

9 & 10 CHANCERY ST, (Formerly Pill

Lane)

Also 21 UP.PER ORMOND QUAY, DUBLIN,

Uniuersitp College, Dublin. (A CONSTITUENT COLLEGE OF THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF . IRELAND),

SESSION

1912-13.

The following Regulations for the College'[Courses, etc., may be obtained on application :-] . I. GENERAL REGULATIONS-SCHOLARSHIPS, FEES. 2. COUH.SES. FOR DEGREES IN ARTS, PHILO. SOPHY, CELTIC STUDIES. 3. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN SCIENCE. 4. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN LAW. 5. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN MEDICINE. 6. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN ENGINEERING ANI> ARCHI ECTURE. 7. COURSES FOR DEGREES IN COMMERCE. The College Scholarshlps, Exhibitions, and Prizes amount to about £4,000 for the year, not lncludlng County Councll ScholarAhlps and the Scholarships offered by the Corporation of the City of Dublln. ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS EXAMINATIONOctober '8th, 1912. INTRODUCTORY COURSES IN MEDICINEOctober 8th, 1912. LECTURE':, BEGIN (EXCEPT IN LAW)-October 15th, 1912. LECTURES IN LAW BEGIN-October 24th, 1912. COUNTY COUNCIL AND CITY OF DUBLIN SCHOLARSHIP EXAMINATION-September 1 Oth, 1912.1 _ at the 86 St. Stephen's Green, or the College, Apply

-

Medical School, Cecilia Street, or by letter addressed to the Registrar, University College, Dublin

Foot Balls.

J.

CROSS,

Practical Plumber & Gasfltter ELECTRIC LIGHTING, BELLS, &c.,

113 AMIENS STREET, DUBLIN . General Htuse Repairs.

First•class W1rk.

4 Upper Abbey Street, DUBLIN. •••afact11r1r1 of Work In Sheet Copper, Draas, Tin, Iron, Zinc. le. "VV• AR• ��AWWR8 OP

Pfltrol Tanke. 811en.,.ra. at-I a-d•d Mud Guards. llla.,latora and Lampe, £>tc!! Repaired. Bodie• Pannelled. o .. 1van11,ed ftnd zinc Vantlllltora, •to.

PRINTING.

Modern Methods.

co .. 40 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin. CAHILL &

Knickers

Boots, etc.

Rea11nable Cost.

••SWIFT'' SHEET METAL WORKS,

Modero Plant.

Jerseys.

HURLEY ''CAMANS

0

6d., I/·, 1/6, 2/·, 2/6, 3/6.

HURLEY BALLS 6d., I/·, 1/6, 1/9, 2/ ·, 2/6, 3/ • ..

---·----

CATALOGUE FREE.

DUBLIN. CORK LON DOH.


SolUIB.


All. le.c1t'.>.c1f' XIV.

b.o.1t� ,J.t.o. cu.o.t, t11511.o.s.o. 31, 1912.

Vol. XIV.

n to:5.0. t.r.os

DUBLIN, AUGUST

t.o. n

n 1.0.5.0.1 t.

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[Rtsristered as a Newspaper)

31, 1912.

'Oe6 n.1 rroeop ! Se.11'.>, rm .1' '0615, m.o.t' .o.'Oe1f'1'0. nz, hUtc.0.15 ! Voila tout! .o.t'r' .o.n ft'.o.ncM:. Hey, presto ! .o.f'r' .0.11 ru1t'reo1t' S.o.r.o.nn.o.c "C.& z,n ctear 'Oe.o.n-c.1 .0.5.0.mn. Dio'o .&-r uc.o.1"1''°'111:S .15.0.mn .o.r .o.n 115.o.1tt1Je.1f'l.6. .1 . .o.r ce.o.n5.o.11'.> . .,1\ nue.11":s-n.&ri1.o.'O, cu1-r1m1r l1Cf'1U$.o.1'.> 11.0. 5.1e1'.>1t5e .6."f' .6."f' n-1.6.f.6.CC, .15ur f51'101J.o.1m1r 1 lK'f'e.6.C.6.10 5.1e1'.>1t5e i-t.&n rut r.o. ct,o (co5.o.'f' .6.'f' terc 1 0, 11.0.c 'Oe.o.r e ? 11.o.c 5ctu.11r .o.n ct6'06'f'.o.). .c:\tumn r,:>e1f'e.o.m.o.1t m.o.1re.o.c tu, .1 te.o.1'\c65 mo cporoe .15ur mo ct.eib to, .o. " 116m "Rut" n.1 n-.&-r.o.nn ! .6.'f'f' .o.n C.6.'f'lJ c.&n.o. ii'O 6 t-r1.111 Con5.11t. 11.o.c e.o.cc.o.c .0.11 iJior.o. czmce tu, ru.11m brn n n.o. r1of'-'5.o.eu1t5e r.& t.&n rut -oe l1cf'e.o.c.o.10 re.o.nn.o. t1C'f'e.o.c.o. 5.o.e1'.>1t5e-n.o. .a-rr.111'.>e.o.cc.o. r.&r-.&1lne ro111e.o.ri1l.6. tl'O '00 cum .o.5ur '00 cezp fen1t1r f.o.f'r.0.11'.>, t'i n.o. S5e1tfo, te t111n 'Cu1t' 11e.o.ri1f'u.o.11'.> 1Je1t '11.1 c1t'cte.o.r.1m .1-r t.&-r mu15e Sen.0.11" ! l1ct'e.1c.1 'Of'.0.011'.>e.o.cc.o. 1.0.u uo-n1 f10'f'-'5.o.e1'.>e.o.t.o.c .o.n 'f'U'O .o.c.& l.&n-'5.0.tl'O.o. !

f

INSIST

IRISH-M'ADE etJTLERQ FROM YOUR IRONMONGER.

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturer�,

The Irish Cutlery Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN.

0'11 'O e1sce-0. n.-c.

mo $-r.&t> 50 r10-r .o.n 'Ot'.0.011'.)e.o.cc uu ! mo :S"f'.6.'0 t.6.t' C101111 .6.tl fCit tl"f' ! mo $1'.&'0, 11.6.C fOC.6.l t.6.1' roct.0.11:) fU'O ? mo $t'.&'O 50 ue6 mo 116m "Rut! ! ! .O.cc cor5 .6.f' .&"f' t.o.0.6.lf'C. C.1'0 m.o.-r 5e.o.tt .6.1' .6.11 1Jroc.o.t Home Rule rem ? C.o.u uob' .&1c .o.5ur c.& cum uob' .o.1mr1-r .o.5ur c1.o. b.o. pe.o.f'f.6. .o.5ur c.11ue -oob' ,::.&t cumt.6. t>6 ? 1H h.o.n11r.o.. 1 mb.o.1te ,lt.c. Ct1.o.t n.o. 1.Je.0.-rr.o.1 -oo ce.o.p.o.'O e. 1rn..o. re.o.ccmo5.o.u.o.1l) u"en n.o.om.o.1'.> ce.o.nn.0.11" .o.n c-Olt.o.ri1 5.o.tbr.o.1ch uo -oe.0.5 .6. t.&-rt.o.. cum e. .o.:sur comco-r-r.o.15e 11.&1r1t"1nc.o.c 11.0. h.o.1mr1re rm r.& 11'0e.o.t\.o. '06 e cum.o.'O. 'Oo CU.6.l.6. rem e u.& .o.um.&1t .0.5 t.o.l'.>.o.1f'c uo or com.o.1f' co1mt101161L b15 po1L1c1t>e.o.cc.o.. Voila tout t Sm .o.' '061$ ! foc.o.t ur-nu.6. r.o. '5.o.1tt1Je.6.t\l.6. rem e .o.5ur .o. ce.o.-o .0.5 5.0.c .o.or1 ce.o.n5.o.1t> .6. te.0.5.0.n rem '00 CUf' .6.11' ! Se.o.1'.>, Ct11f\1mif .&f' te.0.5.0.11 rem .6.lf\, C.o.u 1r 5.1e1'.)1t5 uo Rule ? 'C.& f\t.o.5.o.1t, -r1.o.5C.o.u 1r 5.o.et>1l5 .o.tc.o.r, -re1m, re1me.o.r, 1-rt. -oo Home ? 'C.& b.o.tle, .o.t.o.rt>.o., -ot:1t.o.15, lt'L C.o.'O 1r 5.o.e'01t5 uo Home Rule, m.o.f' rrn ?'C.& �1rc, .o. 51ott.o. i1'0 1 u"C-r1.o.n Co115.o.1L ! "R1.o.5.o.tc.o.r b.o.1te no Re1m .o.n b.o.1le, 1-rt. Voila tout! Sm .o.' uo15 ! 'C.& .o.n ce1rc c1,u.o.1t> 111'1 " R1.o.5.o.tc.o.r b.o.1te" -re1t>e15te .0.5.0.11111. no " Re1me.o.r .0.11 b.o.1te " nior 11r-11t1.o.1t>e n.& " Home Rule " rem ! .0.5 -out 1 11-otc.o.r .o.c.&m.0.01'0 .6.f' .o.n 5ce1rc reo. 1r ct11mm tlom re.0.11-C.6."f'.6. t10m, Se.o.rtttf feo-rur bt1.6.lf (be.o.nn.o.CC 'De te 11-.0. .6.11.o.m) t>.& mnrm u.o.m 1 or.o.-o 'r 1 .5ce111 6 tom sut' cu1r re ce1rc .6.1' '5.o.et>1t5eo1t' 6 Co11nc.1e 11.0. 5.o.1tt1me .1. C1.o. .o.n $.o.et>1t5 .o. cu1-rre.o.t> re .o.-r Home Rule ? 'Se .0.11 rre.0.5-r.o. tt15 re rm .0.1-r n.& "'Ott5e .0.11 b.o.1te" ! f10f'-COri15.o."f'.6.C 5t.o.11foc.o.t 111 re com u.o.tt .6.f' rm.o.ome.o.'O -r.0.10 '5.o.et>e.o.t.o.c. ..6. .6."t.6."f''0.6. '00 110CC.6.'0 .o.5ur .6.C.&1'0 rS"f'il'.>11e01f'1 .o.n t.o.1'01 ril .$0 tu 1S (rt.&n mo co1iMf't.6. !) r.o. t.& m'OlU fe111 ! Se.o.t>, .o. r5r10neo1-r1 .0.11 Cl.o.1'01ti1, 11.& bi'O 50 ce.o.c.o.f't>.o. n.& .0.5 5.o.1ttl'.>e.o.-rto1-re.c.cc re.a.rc.o., .o.cc ue.0.11.0.1'6 .o.1t-r1r .o.-r 11.o.m.o.tcun b.&tce-r 1 u'Cit' Con.o.1lt, "'Ourne u.o.r.o.t bf'e.6.$ re.o.-r.o.n1.11t 11.&-r c.o.151t

ON GETTING

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C.o. 1 t e.o. tt1 5.0.11 "CO 1l.o.'O. 1r b-re.&$ bo5 rennre.o.m.o.1t .o. cu1t'ce.o.l' cum .6.f\ 5CU1'0 .6.1"f',51'0 '00 fC.6.lpe.o.u .6.1111f0 1 n81rmn. 11i ft11l .6.CC f\Om11c t.o.ete.o.nt.o. 6 t.&ft.6. 'Oom ct"mc.o.r u'te1crmc .6.f\ CU"f'f.6.il'.> 5116t.o. n.o. 111otco1te reo 1 5Cof'c.o.15. bi u.& ce.o.'O 1r c-r1 r1c11'.) ue ri1.6.C.6.1l'.> te1511111 nu be.o.5.&11 'f.o.11 mb"f'elf fe C"f'e6f1.6.'0 .o.nn, .o.;sur 1Ji c01.5 'Ot1me ue.0.5 1r u.o.c.o.-o u'o1uil'.> te1511111 .0.5 r.c.ot.c.-r u61l'.>. bi 01ue 1 5c61i1.o.1l' 5.0.c ce.o.tf'.6.1f' m.o.c te,:511111 ! lli rut.&1-r n.& 50 mbe1'0 f't1'0 ue l'.>.6.1'1' .o. r.o.ot.c.1-r .0.5 n.o. rcot.&1f''io rrn 50 hl1-r1te. bi ott.o.m t'e :S-re151r .0.1111 1r cr1 ce.o.-o pu11c .o.r t1c1'0 -oe tu.o.r.c.rc.1.t .o.15e, .o.5ur 111 r.o.1l'.> .o.cc be1-rc m.o.c te15m11 re n-.o. cu-r.c.m 1 t'1t n.o. bll.o.t>n.o.. bi o1'0e 'Ol1$e .0.5 r.o.ot.o.-r .0.1111, 1r ce.o.u 50 te1t iJunc ue te.o.cc 1rce.o.c .c.15e-, .o.5t1r 5.0.11 .o.cc .o.n c-.o.on -oi1me .o.m.&m re Cf'e6-r.o.'O .o.15e. 'C.& n.o. ce.o.uc.c. .o.1r51u reo .0.5 ce.o.cc 50 bo5 t'e11'.) .o.-r tt1cc c-reo-rt.o. 11.0. h.&1ee, .o.5ur c.& .o. r1.o.11 .o.lf', 'Se 1r u61c15e n.& ru1t b-re1r uu.o.'O.o. .6.t' 01t>1l'.> 5.o.et>1t5e 1 n-.&-rur u.& te1tem, .o.cc c6111 be.0.5.

*

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re.o. n bOC'C 5,J.b-c.o. R-0.C ! 'Oelf'Ce.6.f\ ,SU"f' C0$.6.1'.> fe.6.1' 'Oe ri1t1m11c1yt Ci11min m.o.-r o1'0e -re ct"1-rr.arn re1t'meo1l'e.o.cc..o. 'r.o.� Cott.&1rce ce.o.-on.o. te- u1.o.'011.o.15e. SurgeonMa3or 1 n-.o.rm .S.o.r.o.n.o. .o.b' e.o.'O e. 'Cl ce1ty,e ce.o.u ' r.0.11 mbl1.6.'0.6.111 tl'l.6.f' pmre .6.f .6.11 .6.f'tl'l .o.15e. n1 p1t.&1-r n.& 5t1f\ mor .6.11 cur cum cm11 .6.1' re1-rmeo1rrn 65.0. n.o. mmn.o.n .0.11 re.0.11-warrior ro .o. 1Je1t m.o.-r ce.o.nn te1511111 opt.o.. C101111ur .6. t1ocr.o.t> te n-.o. te1te1'0 eol.o.f 11.6. ce1rce uo Ctlf' 1 '0Cu15r111c '06 rem co1, .6.f\ blt ? ,0.C{; C.6.'0 1r .5.&0.6.t> le heot.o.r ? 1r uoc.o. .50 oru1t 5.0.ot .o.15e 6'n 5cu15e.o.ti1.o.t> 5ti1m no m.o.-r rm te m.o.c m1c ue.o.-rnr.o.t.&r re.0.11-.0.t.o.r utm1e e15m ue Luce COtil.6.CC.6. .6.11 l.o.e m'01t1 1 t1t'lf\1tlt1. 1t teOf\ r.o.n. but> 1i161� L\n e.o.5co1r '°'l' '6t1111e bocc u.& te1te1'0

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GAELS-

.0.11

Support the Only Picture House in Dublin owned by an Irishman .

THE

IRISH CINEMA

not.o.n,

84 pone C.601ri151t1 84

"CAMDEN"

STREET,

DUBLIN.

CAPEL STREET (next to Trades' lfall),

1':0W OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30. PRICES, 30., 40., 60. Change

of Pictures·

Monday,

Thursday and

Sunday.

NOTE.-\Ve sell Irish Bikt:s ouly, and sell them on their merits. We repair all makes, properly and cheaply. Does that Matter


An

1�$11.0.fA 31, 1912. August j r, 1912.

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ca win summer

Scboo 1,

ORANMORE, CO. GALWAY.

FOURTH SESSION-August 5tb to 31st. Principa/-E. D. VALERA, B.A. For advanced Students of the Language.

Visitors can attend in July to acquire bias, aud read ext with local teacher. Students can avail of the Special Excursion to Galway, on the 4th August by -OT' .6-f1'0·Ct1-0.ot'.> to reach U-0.p6n mor. For Prospectus apply to-

S.

o

Cl.6.1'00-Arh SOlU15.

CONCUBHAIR, Hon. Sec., 58 Serpentine Av., Sandymount, OR

E. R. McC. DIX, Hon. Treas., 17 Kildare Street, Dublin.

5

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EXILED

IRISHMEN

............................

By in�isting on seeing 1he l�hel " F. & C.

J?·"

,

I

Irish,.nen a.broad ca.u be. certain they are getting oenutne Irish Poplin Ties made by the famous firm of Fry & Co., Dublin, makers of Poplin for.' over 170 years. _,

FRY'S

IRISH

POPLIN


tusn.6.f.6. 31. 1 12 Augus- j r,

o.n Cl.6.1Ue.6.th sotuis.

l').t�.

[AN CLAlDHlU.XH IOLUII.} P-

An otA1ueam sotuis lu:sn.6.f.6. 31, 1912.

�-"�

--·--

A STRIKE AGAINST ANGLICISERS. The Ardfheis of 191 r called for the making of Irish compulsory in the training entrance examination for teachers. The Commissioners who notified in r9o8, 1909 and 1910, that kno\\:led�e of .a second language might be made essential for candidates, but never had the courage to make a second language compulsory, were not likely to make Irish compulsory merely for the asking. The last Ardfheis repeated the demand of the Ardfheis of 1911, but the Training Colleges, which open in a few weeks, will begin their courses with Irish in the same place among the disregarded subjects which it bas always occupied. The Board, without a blush, shrank from carrying out its declared policy and intention, and now we have to face the truth of the situation, which is, that resolutions without a determined driving power behind them will get no attention from such a body as the Commissioners. If, however, school managers begin to strike against teachers without qualifications for the teaching of Irish, teachers themselves will soon begin to see the need of learnWhile managers continue to ing the language. engage new teachers who are unable to teach Irish the Board will continue to ignore the Ardfheis demand, but if the refusal to engage teachers without certificates m Irish became general, the teachers, the directors of the colleges, and the Board would immediately change their present attitude of passivity, which is m truth a verv damaging attitude to Irish education. The Gaelic League has done a big lot of teaching in the face of difficulties and in circumstances a 1 w a ys trying, out we must remember that the whole regular machinerv o.f Irish education is outside Gaelic the ,:ontrol. It is not, however. bevond Leauue . b reach of our influence, and to effect its reform in order to bring it into conformity with our ideals regarding � ationality in education should Le our chief aim. Shouting at the Board is always ineffective. It is only when we make matters unpleasant for the Co�missioners that they give us our wav a little. Our teaching work is about to begin ·again, but that work places hut few difficulties in the wav of the Anglicisers except in so far as it sets up ·a standard hy which to estimate the value ,of their own work. r n addition to preparing for teaching work, let us this , ear prepare to strike against the engagement of teachers without Irish. The passive attitude of the Board and of the Colleges is very damaging to Irish Ireland. We must begin. to damage the other side. The war can be earned on in every place a national school exists. The members of our organisation have clone many courageous things. Xow again it is up to �h�m to make active war on a system of teacher-training that is making the revival of tbe national language impossible. The engagement of teachers ,rithn1:t Irish must be challenged every where. An t Athair () Flannagain reminded us at the Mansion House that it is the right of Irish parents to take theAnglicisers to task, and they must be reprox e.l, not a thousand miles from their doors, but in the Yen· spot that suffers from the un-Irish system of The education they force on Irish chi'rlren. school managers will be with us to the extent we require of them. Many of them are nlirenst •)f the Gaelic Leaaue. but the thousands who have . b tear 1rers that Irish primary no definite conviction should be acquainted with the Irish language will not refuse to make a teaching knowledge of the laneuace a necessarv qualification in the appointteachers if iocal opinion he strong in supme�t port of the demand. We hope to hear of frequent meetinus and resolutions dernnndinn that teachers must know Irish, and we hope also that every appointment m.uh- without rP1..uird tn the demand will be exposed and denounced. We must cease to fear our own voices in so just a r:t use.

of

IRISH

ROSARY BEADS ..

An Ui Breasail Rosary is Irish made Prices from 6d. to 5/- in all Stationers and Catholic RP.positor.es. Ask to see them. Wliolernle fromA. MITCHELL. 23 Waterford Street, Dublin

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The Resurrection of Cornwall. The Breton weekly, "Ar Bobl," has an article entitled "La resurrection de la Cornwall," the writer appearing to have some hope that such a thins is possible despite the disappearance of the We learn therein that a young nati�e speech. Cornish journalist, Mr. Robert W.alling, is full of the idea of founding "une Union Regionaliste du Devon et de Cornouailles." It is interesting to know that Mr. Walling in his enthusiasm asserts w:hat Cornishmen will always remain Celts, although we fancy that the loss of their language is sufficient to settle that question for all practical purposes. It is to be hoped that the indifferent Irish will take warning by what has happened in Cornwall while there is yet time.

O Meith Mara.

...

A recent issue-of the" Dunda lk Democrat" contains a very interesting article by Laurence P. Murray, in which he traces the history of Ui Meith Marn, now O Meith, anglice Omeath, from the earliest times down to the establishment of the Irish college there, an event which may be almost described as being of ) esterda y. We quote here the conclusion which, dealing with the present state of the district, indicates something of the work the College has before it in helping to stem th t decax of Irish traditions : •· For three hundred years the Irish-speaking district of Louth, Monaghan ancl Armagh was cut off from the other Irish-speaking parts of Ireland. The Pale hemmed it in on the south, while to the north lay the Ulster plantation. In spite of this isolation Irish was commonly spoken over these three counties till less than two generations ago. Omeath is now the last stronghold of the old tongue, and it is wonderful that, six hundred years after the enactment of the Statute of Kilkenny which forbade the use of Irish within the Pale, Gaelic is still commonly spoken under the shadow of the roofless empty °>[ orman castles of Carlingford, Moyry, and Caol-uisce. From its long isolation as wel] as from the dialectica l peculiarities of the spoken language, the Y,1 lue of this district to Irish r re land cannot be over-estimated. '' Unfortunatelv , within the last ten Years, great changes have taken place even in Omeath itself. The language is dying out, Irish poetry, and Irish legendary lore are disappearing, only a very small percentage of the children are learning Irish. the old native speakers are passing away, and with them the precious treasure of language, oral tradition, music and song. Poor imitations of the latest fashions in feminine dress can now he seen among the hills of Corrakit and Ballinteskin. while in the townlands around the pier the importations from the foreign music halls are heard, where a decade ago the people sang Cr-chill .m Chreazain and Ur-chnoc Chein mhic Cainte. Forrnerlv everv hill, well, ri,·er, and fort had its clistincti�·e Irish name, but \l'ithin the last fe,,· weeks I fournl it impossible to obtain any information concerning a number of Irish place-names ,, hich I took down ten years ago from the lips of some of the inhabitants. When ,re look at the matter faom this point of view, we must all admit that the establishment of an Irish college is not too premature. In the cirrumstances. tht> duties o-f the students towards the district and its inha l>iIt will probably be fomvl tants are obvious. im1,ossible, at least for a few ) ears, to enforce the customar: rule against the use of English l>:, th€ students, but sti 11, in their intercourse \Yith the inhabitants, the students should remember that nothing helps so much to hasten the death of the language in the Irish-speaking district as the con· stant ust' of En,rlish b,· the \'isitors. If the rule against the speaking o( English cannot be insisted 011. the rnle against foreign songs a ncl dances It is to be hope'.1. should be rigidl) enforced. too, that during their spare hours the students \\"lll assist in !�e work of jotting clown ewry scrap of oral tra<l1tions, local legencls, place-names, ancl songs-in fact (:'verything that would tend to �e<'1 othe the plains, hills and glens of our native land ,rith the cloak of historical interest which once invested them, hut "·hich has, unfortunately, 1 >een tom from them hY thme e\'il spirits ,1f materialism and indifference that were home to our shores on the ,rn,·es of English ciYilisation.'' MARK

YOUR

LINEN.

RUBBER

STAMP

With your name in Irish or English, 1/6 Post Free.

BROADBERY & Co.,

Rub�:ke�:.amp

19 Hendrick St.

DUBLIN. NO'TJ:.- The anly Rubber Stamp Firm in Ireland authorised to use the Irish Trade Mark 0504.

Organising Kerry. A contemporary states :-The first of a series of public meetings to be held throughout West Kerry was held at Camp on r Sth inst. The interest taken in the language in Camp appears to be on the wane. Camp is not escaping the effects. of the foreign influences, yet hopes may be entertained that Camp, now a Iavourite holiday resort, will join an Irish Ireland. The meeting was a very large one, and the interest taken in the language seemed to· develop during the course of the meeting. The next meeting was held at Dunquin, the citadel of the Gael, A Feis and public meeting were on 25th inst. held and speeches were given in the language. The third meeting will be held at Aunascaul on A large and enthusiastic meeting is J st prox. expected there. Aunascaul held out for the Gaelic movemen] when other districts m West Kern· , were indifferent about their native language. The people of West Kerry would do well to listen to the opinion of the students of the English Universities as regards Irish education, sentiments and language. They are amongst them to-day adding to their education by acquiring a knowledge of another language, the Irish language. The speakers at the meeting at Camp were Sean og Ciabluiin, the Ua Rathaille, and Mr. Xicolls.

Dull

Children and Irish.

11

Several young boys and girls in Dublin know only Irish, and were so returned on last Years Census papers. X o account of them has· been rendered by the Census Commissioners. We are likely to hear more of the matter.

Uisneach Coisde Ceanntair. The Uisneach Coisde Ceanntair are organising a great aeridheacht, to be held on the historic Hill The of Uisneach on Sunday, 8th September. great Gaelic Festival will be held under the auspices of the Uisneach Coisde Ceanntair, and will far exceed in point of importance and magni tude anything yet witnessed in the Midlands. 1 t will be a feast of Irish music, song and dancing while a special feature of the proceedings will be A speeches on the Irish Revival Movement. be will feature pleasing and attractive the presence of the Athlone Pipers' Band in their Gaelic costume. A host of talent will be provided for the occasion, which Gaels of the Midlands may look forward to as one of no ordinarv significance.

Tyrone Coiste Ceanntair. The report of the annual general meeting of the Tyrone Coiste Ceanntair is a good record of work done. Amongst so many excellent workers it is hard to single out any for special praise. We hear that the people of Lower Bodoney have been verv helpful, both the fathers and the mothers as well as the children themselves. Mr. Peadar O Cleirigh, X.T., has done a man's part in fanning the flame of enthusiasm that has spnmg up in the The organiser, Aodh O Dubhthaigh district. has also given great assistance, as indeed have m.mv others. We have a list of the committee befo�e us as we write. Most interesting is it to the writer of this note to see that there is a represen tative on it from Glenmacoffer. for in that Yen· parish some years ago he could not get any of the inhabitants upon whom he chanced during his rambling to even admit that they knew a word of Irish! How much things ha Ye changed for the better since that I

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COLLEGE RE-OP.ENS TUESDAY, SEPT. 10th HILE affording its students every facility for the acquirement of modern languages which are taught on the latest scientific methods, and preparing them for the

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UNIVERSITY, KING'S. SCHOLARSHIPS, MATRICULATION & INTERMEDIATE, Desmond College has the unique advantage of being situated in a thoroughly Irish speaking district, thus enabling its students to obtain a thorough practical knowledge of Irish in the shortest possible time.. \Vrite for prospectus to-

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(Alf OLAl»K•AMH IOLUlS.)

palpable that he simply followed his MS. and would have done very wrong in departing from it. If I add his two occurrences to the 8 I already possess I actually have a majority of z ! By that, however, I do not set much store. O'Reilly also clearly drew merely on what he met in MS. Thus have I vindicated these two scholars. Later editors also have probably not been " tumbling after O'Grady." The MSS. again in all probability ! . , The onus now lies on Mr. 0 Rahilly and Prof. Bergin to explain the th�ng in some ?ther way. There is really something extraordmary in the matter when one discovers attempts at erasure of the aspiration mark. So far as I can see there are two alternatives; (r) that .o.b.o.6 and .6l).a6 are different words, (z) that the word .o.b.o.6 was no longer understood and was in some inscrutable manner mixed up with .o.l'.>.o.c ' a dwarf' in the MSS. in spite of their complete discordance in sense. I trust the two mentioned will have something to say on the point.

l\IAC TIRE. ---•!•---

Notes from Timthiri, Muinteoiri Taistil, and Branch Secretaries. � � 1 5C01111l\CC-6.1'l).

� THE TYRONE COISDE CEANNTAIR. The annual general meeting of the above Coisde Ceanntair was held in the· Parochial House, Rooskey, Rev. M. M'Geown, P.P., Greencastle, presiding. The report of year's work submitted by Mr. Waldron was considered highly satisfactory. As a number of teai::hers in whose schools Irish was taught bf the extern �eacher du_ring the past year are undertakmg the teaclung of Insh themselves it was considered that for the ensuing year Mr. Waldron would commence work in another portion of the district, and that two evening schools be taken up, one at Greencastle and one in the parish of Gortin. Mr. Clarke, J.P., C.C., spoke in very flattering terms of the work of extern teachers since he came to the district. Arrangements were made for holding Ceilidhthe or Aeridheachta for the Irish Speakers' Society and Craobh Ruadh on Sunday evenings. It was arranged to hold an Aeridheacht Mhor at Greencastle on the 15th August. Aver)'. hearty vote of �hanks �o Father Matt Maguire, P.P., Kilskeery, for lus contmued interest in the progr�ss of the language movement in this locality and his advocacy of our claims to financial assistance at the hands of the Coisde Gnotha, was passed with acclamation. It was also proposed and seconded " That the Irish Insurance �om111;issioners in any appointment which they ma�<e, m this or any o�her Irish-speaking district, should give preference to Insh speakers, and that Irish should be made a compulsory subject in any examination for such appointments." GREENCASTLE SUMMER SCHOOL OF IRISH. . At the close of the Coisde Ceanntair meeting a meetmg of the Summer School Committee was held, and the final arrangements made for the opening of the school on Monday, 1st July. GLENELL Y BRANCH GAELIC LEAGUE. The annual general meeting of this Branch was held on Wednesday. The Branch was affiliated, and ar!angements made for employing a district teacher of Irish.

--•!•--

CRAOBH AN CHEITINNIGH.

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Craobh an Cheitinnigh will hold their annual Aeridheacht at the Thatch, Drumcondra, on Sunday, rst September. Songs will be contributed by leading

A Chara,

A NICK IN THE TALLY.

I send you the following extract from Sir Wm, Wilde's C_ollection of Information, in which he relates the followmg incident as-" characteristic of the love of learning and the spread of education among the pea�antry in the west of Ireland, as well as the means forcibly employed to expunge the Gaelic as a spoken languaJ:se.". Wlu�e travelli�g through the country collecting mfo�mahon for his popular superstitions they were bemghted on a summer evening by the shores �f Loch Ina near the fo?t of those picturesque mountams, called the twelve pms of Benna-Beola in Con�emara.. "_Our guide (he says) conducted us to a neighbounng village, where we were received for the night with that hospitality which has ever been the characteris�ic of those wild mountaine�rs. While supper was preparing and the potatoes laughmg and steaming in the skieh, the children gathered round to have a look at the stranger, and one of them, a little boy about eight years of age, addressed a short sentence in Irish to his sister, but m�eting the father's eye he immediately co:Vered, havmg to all appearance committed some hem�us fault. T�e man called the child to him, said nothmg, but drawmg forth from its dress a little stick common�y called a scoreen or tally which was suspended by a stnng round the neck, put an additional notch in it with �is penkni!e. Upon our inquiring into the cause of this proceedmg, we were told that it w1.s done to prevent the child speaking Irish, for every time he attempted to do so a new nick was put in his tally, and when these amounted to a certain number summary punishment was inflicted upon him by the schoolmaster. Every child in the village was similarly circumstanced, and whoev�r heard. one of them speak a word of Irish was authorized to msert the fatal nick. \Ve asked the father if he did not love the Irish language-indeed the man scarcely spoke any other. ' I do,' said he his eye kindling with enthusiasm, 'sure it is the talk of the ould country and the ould times, the language of my father and all that's gone before me-the speech of these mountains and lakes and these glens where I was br�d and born, but you know,' he continued, 'the children must have larnin' and as they tache no Irish in the Xational School, we must have recourse to this to instigate them to talk English. . . .' We have known a Y.oung 111;an who•�ad assumed a very fine English acce_nt twitted with the �ircumstance of his having once carn�d the_ scfre, by be1�g told 'Arrah, leave off your English ; tisn t so long smce the beam was round your neck.' " From the foregoing is it then to be wondered

-- - ---------

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LOWER BADONEY BRANCH GAELIC LEAGUE-H..;11115 1H, cpo.011'>e. 128 Present. 250 on Rolls.

Dublin vocalists. Dancing, musical solos, and recitations wil� also be important features, whilst two pipers' b�nds will do much to enliven the proceedings, which will commence at 3.30. Most of the artistes have won prizes at the Oireachtas and Dublin Feis .

---:·-·THE STRENGTHENING OF IRISH CIVILIZATION. Sp.o.1u f.)t11Jlt: C'�o1111h15h111, 82, 24th August, 1912. To THE EDITOR AN CLAIDHEAMH. A Chara, I am sure the following points have been often discussed in the Gaelic League with regard to the Gaedhealtacht :1. The formation of dramatic clubs and choral societies for the entertainment of the people of those districts. 2. The raising of funds to educate musically the Give the musically young native speaking Gael. (creative) gifted Gael a substantial inducement to remain in the district and await interesting results. As you know how necessary to the life of the movement is the protection everywhere from Anglicisation of the native-speaking Gael. 3. Could not a scheme of primary, intermediate and University Education be drawn up in the Irish Language, similar and parallel to our National University system so as to open up to the native speakers the channels leading to the various learned professions, e.g., music, medicine, law, theology, philosophy, civil and mechanical engineering, etc., etc . Herein lies noble work for a Home Government. I believe that to strengthen and develop materially the germs of Irish Civilization in the Irish-speaking districts would be a most permanent safeguard to the interests of Irish Ireland. I am confident that there are many who would willingly contribute to the furtherance of the happiness of the home life of the Gael. Trusting you will publish this letter in the interests of the cause. Is mise do chara 'san cuis. seos-.\.1i1 o c1lo1rcc_.

at that the language of the Gael came into disuse when the children of the native speaker were so treated. This denationalising Board still continues to taboo the language, not exactly in the same manner with the children, for now the system is reversed; for, instead ?f the scoreen or tally bein� around the child's neck, it is. around the master, and 1f he shows any sympathy with the language or the revival he will have his tally notched by the National Board Inspector. 1111re uo C.o.J1.o., se,c.."5.&11 o co.1111�, 111, Vice-President Blackrock Branch. Co.pp.0.15 'Ouo, 22 l,t1 ,511.o. f.o., I 9 I 2.

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British Columbia. A Chara, \Vill any of your correspondents please inform me as to the necessary parts of the national dress in detail and the colour and material it is usually made of ? I wrote for the spring number of Guth na Bliadhna, as advised in AN CLAIDHEAMH SoLurs, as I understood there was an article on it in the beo.pL.o., but I cannot find it, and am ashamed to confess that I do not understand enough of .0.11 ut:e.c-115�, rern to make the rest of much use to me. Also if there is any further publication continuing the O'Growney series beyond part V., and if the (•q1e 65 cards are open to all. mire tc me.o.r m611,

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To be had bound in one book, or in parts from

A

$.o.et>1t5e611'1m.& t.0.5.0.nn r1l'.> :so 11.&1'.o.rnn ti16'f\ c.0.5.d.l'O be1t> fJ.1tce 'f'61il.o.1l'.>. te.o.c-r.o.. ct115 mo 5e.6Ll.6.1m 'Oil'.> 50 mbero fll'.> f.6.fC.o. terr .o.n ceac .o.:sur ten- .o.n l'.>fl'e.o.rc.o.t. le t1c1r no ce.o.6t:.61'f'e.o.6c cmncpeac 'Oo cul' cu:s.o.m, nero mo 6J.'f''f\ ro1m .o.n " mbJ.'O." 'C65.o. na 5.o.et>1t5e .0.5 be.0.5 .6:SUf .6:S mop. m.J.1 n-c-111 u.o, co11Ce,0.11,0.11111, _ 11.o. Se.o.cc '0Ce.o.mpo1tt,

,0.

The Best Book for

Prices-3s., Zs., Is., 6d. Matinee Prices-3s., 2s. ls. Booking at Cramer's.

.J. fl,O_ 111 n !

,& fl,(\ 11111 !

-+---

STRAIGHT ROAD TO IRISH. -

A Comedy in One Act, by L3.dy Gregory,

CTI.6-00

!

,<>. fl,(\ 11111

M. H. GILL & SON

"MIXED MARRIAGE,"

Saturday B 15

11

.). n CtA1-0e.6.rh soters.

DUBLIN.

M. H. GILL & SON

L10.,

50 Upper O'Connell St., Dublin . 112 Quay, Waterford. And

mlllffGe011l1 5-.\e1'.)1t5e.-.__\Ql1 "OUl1le �O CUm�\11n ,\C,\ .6.JI lOJ15 111Ull1Ce01J11 5,1e-01t5e, f5J1100�\1"01f,5•\11 mo1lt 50 -oci Rllth\11)e, 6ol.11rce Conn.o.cc, r,,n Spme.o.l, t 5Co. n.o. 5.o.1U1me._ c�, ,\-00.o.JI m.6.1'C mu1nceo111i 1-01_11 Otl.6.C.6.lLU .c.5ur C,\lllni ...,nnr,n .6.5Uf lu"O .0.11 lOJIS porc.0.1.


An OU1'0eArh Sotu1s.

luSn.1r.1 31, t9UI, August 311 191a.

RELIANCE ,noto Eqgraving e�mpany •

mrs HOTEL(

n

11

St.l'eet,, ' .Abbe�

-- DUBLIN· --

l

Two •Hrs fre� O'Coanell Strut ... uarei.t F1rst-Cla11 Heu! u , North Wall.

s.,,.....

Splcu� AcammMatieafor eta• Ice. DiaMn, W111aa a Breakfast. 4,1 a 1/·

Popul&P RNtaUP&Dt at Popular Prloa.

Yiliton to Cork FLANAGAN'S HOTEL, Will be well

Moderate Tarill

Caterecl for.

Bar attached, atocked with lleat •riaka At Pepalar Prica.

Dinnen, Laacheor,s, Teas.

Winthrop Street, CO.RH.

W. WREN, Proprietor�

A·�·

45,Atnn .A1>0tr, .65Uf :S.Ac u,te

50 comp6111

HOTEL, GALWAY.

KPN'&

'CNm.Att..

fl1"0

Togher' 1 P.rlvate Hotel

(Lat•�!'-ict'•)

7 ST. FRANCIS STREET, OALWAY. wilt find this Hotel a home from home, ard can be Board. Every convenience ; TERMS MODERATE. Batb,f Quiet

VISITORS �odated with or without Localil4'.

L•cbeo•., Dl•••n or Tea •t Sborte•t Notice. MRS. T06HER, Proprietress.

DUBLIN

FROM

VISITORS

...

Printin•house, Dublin, ltd .,

Telephone 127 X.

PIINTEIS, UTBOGRAPHERS, • STATIOlfEIS, ACCOUNT 8601 IIAJIUFACTURERS.•

ENGRAVERS,

PROCESS

HALF·TO.ME AMO LINE BLOCKS,

tj With a lar1ely increased Plant of Upto-date Machinery can produce rapidly and

106 & 107 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin.

at reasonable cost any work entrusted to • • • , • them, , Lariat 111en in Ireland of Irish-made

DIXON'SDUBLIN

WELLINOTON QUAY, and ESSEX STREET, DUBLIN.

DUN. EMER GUILD,

P ..P. CURTIS, Late Manager

DUNDRUM, DUBLIN.

Dollard, Printinghouse, Dublin; and Sealy, Bryera & Walker, Dublin.

Head Teacher School of Prmting.

. . LETTERPRESS & LITHOGRAPHIC

Olllce• aad Worb :

SOAPS.

CURTIS

Papers.

cecc osoc nOM nt c.o.e� m, �� CeA1'fl46 nA 541 ttnne, 1 n:s.c11' 'Oo 'te.4f'mAm .An t>O't.41J' l.4f'.41"n, m'4'ou,�e.Av .an -ce.Ac , n,tL1.Ai>n.A .A5ur -c.A ne.c111t:

DOLLARD,

PRINTER

tapestrltt. Carpets. CELTIC DEll811.

E•broldtrlts. IRISH IATERIALL

t

Bookbind�r end....Sttition�r,

12 � TEMPLE

DUBLIN.

LANE,

IRISH

/1/gh�class Wo.dc. · Moderate Prices.

L1rge AssJrtmlat of Irish Poster Type.

SHOULD CALL ON

J. TIERNEY, Malne,uard Sl., GAL'\tVAY. Ut>at1CA11' 5Mt'01t...5e .<\nnreo.

MAHON'S Ho'"'EL ' I

FORSTER .ST.,

BEST� EQOIPPED •

IN

PRINTERY

IRELAND.

G.A.LW.AY.

Mloate'• Walk tro,a Rllllwq St•tloa.

The Hou.e. (cu, Tourlsts �nd Visitors. Extensive Stabllag (or Hc>rses. Accommodation for Motor Cars. Hot and Cold Baths.

WRITE FOR EST-IMATES

t..41)4n,c4n. r,4e-01l5e .dnnseo.

c.tnllr Sitaat&

8'I'O P

Facial the Sea.

A.'I'

PRINTERS

OF

HILLSGROVE HOTEL Lr. Salthlll,

kn

�e,neAUUAC.

OALWAY.

Perfect Sanitation. Newly Furnished and Decorated. Splendid View of Galway Bar. and Clare Hills, Special Terms to Weekly Vi111tors. KRS. CONLON, Proprietress,

Bet a CtW Batu.

Tariff Moderate.

----------------------------------ROMBS OF THB GABL.

54

GALWAY ARMS HOTEL, a.

55 Rutland Square, West, Dublin.

VlsltoPS to Dublin wtll find this Hotel most oomfortable and convenient. Also Ivy Hotel, Atheney. lll'S. KENNY, Pl'Oprletl'els. 'Plloae 3494.

Solus

BUY ONLY

PATERSON'S IRISH

MATCHES

ne, n5L\el)e4L be�nt;� 1 m BMl-e !ra eltat-. •

7

USE OllLY

PATERSO.N'S

Woon VESTA MATCHES -ADE tl19 OUl!ILX!!I'.

n

"OUIBT, YBT CBNTRAI. "

FLEMING'S HOTEL @

12 GARDINER'S PLACE, DUBLIN,

OKD-�R

3 Minutes' walk from Parnell's Statue,

5 Seconds from Gardiner St. Chapei

and Findlater's Church. Electric Light throughout. Sanitary perfect. H. C. Baths. Bed and Breakfast from 3/•

ALL OIWIQU ITRIOTLY IIODEUTE.

The Manal"er,

FO.K.M.

".o.n ct.c roeern so uns,"

Kindly supply me with

·-··-····cop

25 Rutland Square, Dublia.

_o( •• .O.n Ct.irOe4t11 Solu1r ," for

months, fer which please find enclosed &.ve Money and Vi!.>it the

9 Lord Ed ward �b·ect, Dublin.

SPl!C•AL BU&INE88

11

-······- .. ·-------······

SPECIAL

00008 45 -. II • FROM • •· 50 11 11 11 IRISH 551.. 11 •• ., MAl<ERS. 60/-. .. .. &OJ- .. I.Min' Tailtri8' a &pccialit,. C.tti&C Reom & Work INU on -tna, ... S7/6 421• 45'-

-

SUITS, To Meaaure, 35/·

0111' SS - Suit, worth 42'-· 11

I

·---·····----�

value

Signed, ... ·----------------Address (ia full), _ --··········· .. ····-·-···..

SOUTH CITY YAaLORiHC UP·TO·DA TE.

Nuw1ber on List

....,.

-

_

Cut eut dais term, aad wb• IUed ia addrea t.Subscriptioa, '/6; Six Mentlaa, 3/3; Quarter, 118. MANAGBR, "An Cu,...Mil f,otu1r," 25 Rutland Square, Dublia.


Atl s..J f A5Ur FAIDAt I.I ·1.48, I l'f4

,

Vol.

XIV.

No. 27. -

(Uer:ister,:d us a Ne,NsfJater.]_

--

-

---

A\e�

t)4'f) �41't. 00 J;4C E4et>11.se011' t mb4t\e C1.14C S4n 4on 41'.!n

'00

te.d.nn4C ,cc

KENNEDY'S BREAD Finest Quality Made.

�·------:::===============-� ��· & 128

GREAT BRITAIN

ST.

No. 04!t1t.

-- -·-----

borte st:« cu.oz,

u,m,p 2j.

---�--------

127

Cutt•UIHI --�

te..1n.. 1t' XI v

....

---

me-0.'06t1 f6:5ti1 � 1 n 7, 1912.

DUBLIN,

SEPTEMI\ER 7,

P1Smn.

;,Support New Irish Industry.L;.........

�'TITAN" SOAP. Made PH<ENIX WORKS, DUBLIN.

LOUGHLIN WEXFORD

STRAW

Smart Shapes. l./11..

Tl,g

is- a First Quality Cream Equivalent.

WATERFORD BOOTS

Requires no cooking. is highly digestible, and contains nearly twice as much Oil as the Average Calf Meal.

.

N,8.-0ur analysis guarantee Is hl,Eher than o!"e!.�· _

FIT WELL.

anti we have ne tieu�t you will �e pleaSN, Any reapectable To�acconist·eaa sup,ly yeu wltll eur Banba'• Ci,ara, Tureirisla Cil'al"ettes, •anba'• Strai.-ht Cut Ci.arettu, Vlra-inia Flavour, lt.D.S. 8meking Mixture, aread Cut, a Ceanoi...or'11Te�aete; •anba'a Smoking Mixture-mild aati aedi11111-Irillll Plug, lrisll Cut Plus, 'Artl ai' Ciprett.8, or eur Irish Ceurts, all or wliieli :,011 wUI finti are ex1telleat Yalue.

LOOK WEL�

TBI WSI TOIICCt CO.,

Price from 12/11.

Sn111en ufl Jlaa,efaol11nn,

lrisb Outfittiog Headquarters,

17

FA.NA.GAN'S

PAUL & VINCENT, LTD., Olllces-BLACKHALL PLACE, DUBLIN.

The Irish United Assurance Society. The Oftly Irish Mataat Office Foaftdecl and Worked Oft ap-to-date liaea ander control of representatiYe Irishmen.

l!ndowment and Whole Life Assurance Transacted at Lewest Rate. Jn Industrial and Ordinary Departments. AGENTS WANTED IN ALL PARTS OF IRELAND.

Telegraphic Address:-" UN1TKOI.Y." Dublin.

Telephone No. 785.

Braac:h Offices:-

COU-85 South Mall.

BELFAST-IS High Street.

District Offices in all important centres.

FLEMING

FRAS. SMYTH BJ. SON, Grafton Street, } Lr. Sackville St., DUBLIN. &. Parliament St., But-No longer on the Quaye.

PRICES MODERATE,

TENTS

+

AND

A

TRIAL SOLICITED,

MARQUEES

FOR SALE OR HIRE.

.6.et'-1'0e-0.cc-0.nn-0. 1 fe1re-0.nn-0., FETES, BAZAARS, & CAMPING-OUT.

J.

F.

KELLY

& CO.,

8 & 10 CHANCERY ST. (Formerly Pill

Lane)

Almo 21 U�PER ORMOND QUAY, DUBLIN,

H .. r... , C..cbea, an• eYe1'7 Funeral ....... Panctuallt:, and econea7 •••rant . Ceantl'7 Uadertakerm ••PPI.... T•llll•H l!le. ••

J. W. ELVEl{Y & CO. €stabllsbt4 1850:

Foot Balls. Jerseys. Knickers

•• -

-

•.

lett.r ud Cheaper than imported. Direct from the Manufaetaren.

Special Quotation, for Laundries & lnstitutioaa.

M. O'CO'KNOR & CO., 50 Capel Street, Dublin.

PRINTING.

M•••ra Plant. Modero Methe••·

CAHILL & CO ..

40 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin.

Boots, etc.

I

BASKETS & HAMPERS • ', "'l'-'

fiiObtst Standard Goods Stocktd.

c:.en..,

M AUNGIER STREET.

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Umbrellas at all prices, including Plain. Fancy, Xeat-tolding (011 steel tubes)The Xew Coloured Silk Umbrellas, Travellimz L'mbrcllas (which fold into small space), Golf Umbrellas, Double-Ribbed Umbrellas, Shooting Chairs, Horse Measures, Xilgherr\' Canes Irish Blackthorns, &c . &c. · '

BROS.,

140 DRUMCONDRA ROAD, Family Grocers, Purveyors & Wioe Mercbaots.

FUNERAL ESTABLISHWll!N'r;

Grafton St."s of world wide fameRich and poor have heard its name ; It is known in every land, For 'tis there, I understand, F Smyth makes the " Griffon Brand " Of Umbrellas, farfamed and Not equalled in any land.

MANUFAOTURERS.

Head Office: 1 :JPPER o·c��NELL STREET, DUBLIN.

,. 1111.11.

19 Parliament Street, Dublin •

Price 17/6 per cwt.1 Carr/age Paid.

Applications invited from capable and eaersretic men who can influence business. Good terms and prospects. Speedy promotion to successful canvassers. Write for Prospectus and Full Particulars. HAIU(Y J. MAGUIRE, Sec.

U 1/u uniw,s•llJ' •Jtft1'•1Htl ¥MN ili•ut ••r pro,/uds.

• TRY TH•M TOUJlll8BLP •

4/8.

" EMERALD"

WEAR WELL.

NO RUBBING

�' YEIIY NICE INDEED."

HATS,

Light Weight,

1io

Wonderful Cleanser.

IRISH GROWN TOBACCO. ,

Summer Under Vests & Pants from 2/11 each. Summer Weight Balbriggan Socks, Fancy Shades, from 1/6. The '' AIRTRU" Irish Tweed Cap, 1/111 2/6.

CALF MEAL

01'E PENNY-

1912.

FOR

DUBLIN.

-----------

-------�------------�

AND

ST_.. PATRICK'S BAKERY,

---

HURLEY ''CAMANS" 6d., I/·, IJ6, 2/;·, 216, 3/6 .

HURLEY BALLS 6d., I/·, 1/6, If 9, 2,. ·, 2/6, 3j ••

CATAL06UE FREE DUBLIN. CORK LONDON.


t TELEPHONE 13S Y.

�TER O'HARA, tOII • 1IU UPPER DORSET ST.

M. CREEDON, Fi� Plaster lanllfutuNP, CLA�E LANE (Clare St.), DUBLIN.

Otcorattot CdOap tXtCllttd iB \:Olll'Cbti, ere, Ila• .t leliiilua 1tataPy ud Basta of Patrlltio Irish-. Agents v,anted tliro11glwut Co11nt1 y

�888.

• J. DUPFY

&

Liberal terms.

SONS,

ORTH FREDE�ICK STREET, I ..._ Palntlnll and ........ Contl'IIOtor,

1¥,..c;,-. Bx,,.,.,••ce ol Colweot•,

etc.

t.ocn.e,n n .

an

A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF FOLILOIE AND LITERATURE IN IRISH.

,

.

IRISH MANUFACTURES alwa1 • • KOlaloe Slates (all aise•). BaDdlng Brtclra

Yearb S.meriptioa. Po.t lree 1/8. To SaNCriben alwoad. SO ceata.

Se•d .,,,.,.. to-

RY LE & QUIRKE, TRALEE.

an 108 BlaokPOOk.

BROOKS,

t:;b.0 18 f9ARR. ·

,arc ••

t.1r ".,,cnLE11 • IIADICWI tile U..td Kl•••··· Post Fl'II. TEAi to UJ lly thia means Co11811111en purchue fro:u 4d. to Id. per lb. under unal retail priCN. . .61' 1/4, I/8, r./10 , 2/ •n ).')unc. U1rs• l>a.6t4'6, CoS,6 re•n-u1rse be4t4'6

6.,e•nn•1s. 18/, •o/36/- i 40/-

16/-

32/-

•n g4t.011. •n 'Ou1,�1n.

....., IJirit .. . Mad.igan Brothers, ...,.. 41 HBNRY .STREET, DUBUN.

The Irtah Sn,.oke,

Before baying else-

Telepho u: 3589 Telegram•'

1

IEYTHER," DUBLIN.

& HOPKINS NU11l11acturing Jewellers, O'Couell Monument,

)

toUBLIN.

Overcoats To Meuare

Prom •••

The Ideal Ta

'.K'BO


.• ,:, . ..

�,) ,�.!fl: ,,

.,

u J(<!

,

'

te.c1r>�f' XIV.

b�1t0 .&t.o.

Vol. XIV.

me.o.>0011 ro5m.o.1n 7, 1912.

DUBLIN, SEPTEMBER 7,

j •

ct.i.cr.

ronccrnz.s co.nrce.

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!

'O'ROS'C,6.11.

IRtl{istered as a Newspaper:

1912.

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ON GETTING

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eUTLE.RQ

FROM YOUR l�ONMO:"·HU::'R.

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Cutlery Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. ".0.5t1f n.lf' 'Ot10.6.1t'C CU l10m .o.n t.l ce.6.n.6. 5.0.c ni t.l5.&1t rue tern ?" "-0.f'.6. n.o.c. ort11t .o.n t:-.o.t.6.1f\ r.&rc.o. .c.5t1r 1r cum.o. e," .o.ttr' Sc.0.5.ln. " .o.cc 1r e .o.n re.o.n-r5e.o.t 1 5c6tnnc-1'6e e, '.0.5 1.0.rr.o.1'6 Se.o.5.&111 .o.5t1r 5.0.n Se.0.5.ln te r.&5.&1L' ; b.o.'6 Ce.6.ttt: 'Ot11C f10f r.&$-"lt Cl.6. .6. mb'.o.r 1.6.'0; 1r ob.o.1r 5.0.n n1.o.1re 1 rm ? " .o.rr' Cot. " f .&5 rum-r.o. e rm." " 11.lfi t.l5 me r.&t.o.c r.o.'O.o. rut: e, .o.5ur ce' fl''O t:.l '6.l b.lttf' .0.5.0.m, .o.ct: .o.m.lm 50 l'>Ft11llm t:t11t:15te 1 n51'.l'6 te1r .6.11 5c.61l111 U'O o'n 5ce.o.'O .6.m .6. DF.6.C.6 me i." "Sm e .o.n coti1.o.f1t.6. 50 oru1tm1'0 .0.5 'Ottt .o.tt .0.5.0.1'6, .6.CC .o.' t'>fttll t1or .0.5.dt: ce'r'u 1f re.6.1'1' 'OC1111n .o. '6e.o.11.o.m .o.cc .o. t>e1t tior .o.s .o.n 5Cr101r,. n�.6.1f\ .1 t'>e.o.r f1.6.'0 .0.5 'Otll .6.·t'>.o.1te, .o..sur :seoor.o.mt11'0 f5e.o.t.6. .o.nnrrn C1.6. 111.6.'0, .6.:Stlf C1.6.t'b .o.r M'O ; 1r .o.nior b6t.o.tt n.o. C1101re t.&11115 p.o.'O ! " 'O'.o.oncu15e.o.'0.6f' .6.1' .6.11 rocru:s.l\'6 reo; .o.;sur niott t.lr mott.&n re1r r.& lhi 5cor.o.10 so f'.6.t'>.6.'0.6.1' .0.5 .0.11 5Ct101r. Cu.0.1'6 c.&rr, ce.o.m1 .o.5t1r ce.o.nn e1Le t.6.f\t:, .o.5t1r ni '6e.o.c.1. ceo.1111 .o.n c.o.1Un t.&rrc.o. ror. bio'0.6.fi .0.5 re1te.o.1i1 so m10bi re .0.5 e1p5e "De1pe.o.m1.6c corn to15'0e.o.c. m.61t. S.o.n 'Oe11,e.6'6 t<\11115 .c-n c&1r,r1n .).5ttf .<'\n c.1p.o.1LUn 'Oe.o.r r.0.01. "Seo cu:5.0.11111 e r.o.n "Oe111e..,'6 tMtt t.&tt, '' .o.rr' Se.o.5.&n. "Sm e e, .o.cc c1.1 11e .0.11 cr10111.6'6 'Ot1111e .o.c.J. .<'\11 n ? " .o.ttr' C6t. "111 me m.& t:.l 't10r .0.5.0.m," .o.r,r' SE:.l\$.&n;n "re.o.c e rmt>ce 50 cutt.o.m.o.c te n-.o. t:.6010 ; .o.. Co1L cro1'6e, c.& r.o.1tc10r 01,m t.61' e1r 01bt1e .o.tt t.o.e 50 Dp11tm1'0 me.o.Uc..;. ! " " 0, 'O'.o.1t111 me tllf't\1 so t'.6.10 re m.6Ji rm, niott l .o.01.1r fl roc.o.t 1 1'1t .o.n comr.i1'6 llom, .o.5t1r n.&tt n'ttqt.o.ft:.6. .o.1tne '6om e, 11.0.c fi.11l'.> t1or .c.5c-m n.<'\c r.0.10 r1 le m'.0.5.0.1'6, r.o.r.0.01, ! 1Mc f.dn mb.o.1te '0 t.6n.o.r 1Tl'01U ! " .o.rr' Cot 50 bf16n.6.c. 11i't .o.on m.o.1t '6.& ce1tc 11.oc re.o.r e1te l:'.>i mr .o.n 5c.&1rr111, .o.5t1r .o. t'>i 1 n;sr.&'6 te1r .o.n 5c.o.1Un .O.m.dc te1r .o.n Le bt1c-'6.o.11c.c.1t'> 1'011ne reo. 5c.&1r11h1 t.o.ttt:.d. 5.0.n r1C1 01re.o.'O .o.5t1r .6.011 .o.m.o.rc .6.ti'l.&111 6 .0.01,'ne 'O.l t'.6.10 1rc15 .6n11. "'Oon.o. so tej11," .o.11r'n t>e1rc te6 rem. 50 'Oipe.o.c .0.5 r5u.o.b.0'6 .o.m.o.c .o.n 'Ott01C1'0 '0011 c&1flf1111, nt1.6.11', reo 1 n-.o. .0.5.0.1'6 5tuc-1rce.&n 111r n.o. c.o.01r te11111ct11:se. b1 c6ti'l.l\cu .l\n cor;s.&111 c.o.1ttce .(\S .111 c1om.&n.o.1'6e, 1

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Support the Only Picture House in Dublin owned!by an Irishman.

THE

ONE PENNY

IRISH CINEMA

11 ..R O t .6.. R ,

8,184

pone c.0.011115111

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PRICES,

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Change of Pictures· M nday,

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Does that Matter


'

4\n Cl.6.1'0eAtfl souns.

me.<1u6n f65m.&1f' 7, 1912. September 7,

cos

5

CA1' CLAI8KEAliUI SOLVlS.)

1912.

cem rmc rneortrnuo t '0.

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roe,(\cc co1se ce1n. s5e-6. l'.>i cu15 ce.&'O 'O.&ll .&nn, ..1.::sur cu15 ce..1'0 bot>f'J.n, ..15ur cu15 ce.A'O b..1c.&C, .&5ur cu15 ce..1'0 b..1tn.an, .&5ur cu15 ce.1'0 cl.&1f'ine..1c. l'.>i cu15 ce..1'0 be.o.n .&5 .&n cu15 ce.A'O bot>f'.&n, 1r cu15 ceA'O be.111 .15 .1n cu15 ce.1'0 b.1c.1c, 1r curs ce.1'0 be.o.n .15 ..111 cu15 ce.1'0 bAtt'.>An, 1r cu15 ce.A'O be.111 A::S An cu15 ce.1'0 cLl11'1neAC. l'.>i cu15 ceA'O teAnt'.> .15 5.1c curs ce.&'O 'Oiot'.> rm, 1r cu15 ceA'O cu ..15 5AC 1:'.>i'Oir A:S r1ut'.>Al t11le Cu15 Ce.6.'0 'OiOt'.> rm. 1 n-emte.1Cc 'nA n-.&on crtu.&:s .Am.&111. 'tu5c.Ao1 rH't .61C 1 .111 Ct1.1t-te.1n.&CA1f' Of'tA ro. 'OCU5A1'01f blM'OA111 n.1C 'OCU:S..11'01f :SOf'C.6. te..1Cc 1:'.>i rm1re 1 n�1r11111 At' ..1 mblMt>An A1111. 0 Cf'01111Ce..1f''O ; .6.:SUf tu5.o.'0Af' t..3. 1f '0Ct15c.o.01 blM'OA111 A15e, 1r '0'1te.o.'0Af' fUAf :SAC 111 1:'.>i ..115e; f'11111e.&'O"-'f' 'Ot111le bOCC 'Oe. lJi f'l 1 nelt\11111 .6.f' ..1 'O'CU:SCA01 bf'M11 b6f'01me ; A5t1l' Ctl.6.1'0 0 Cf'01111CeAf''O m.o.f' .6. t'Alt'.> bf'M11 ..1 ''O'Mt'f'A1'0 t1t1..11t' ..1 f'A1111:s re CuA1't'.> re curo1:ste .o.1r. '0011 f'l'.S, A:SUf 'OUDA1t\C .\n 1\1 '04' A 5Ui1n '°'l' " ' l ::;01"CH� �o l1tl.61'0eA<.' "C, ,.\ tH tro1t11CeAt\'O ? " te11· , "-' " lH't .6CC 11tl.6.1'0e.\CC t�occ ,.\5.0.m rem 't'.>.o.01t'.>, .0. 1,15," .o.rr' e1reAn. " '501'0e .611 11tl.:\1'0e.L\CC l)oCc l\CA .6:Sll.C ? " Af\f' .(\11 1'1. " 'C.J. 50 t>p11t ,.\11 Cl1At-teAlh\CA1t' A�Am te t.J. 11' blM'O,.\m, 1l' '0'1te.i"()Af\ 5,.\C t11le 111

t'.>i .&5Am, 1r f'111ne.o.'O.&f' 'Oume bocc 'Oiom," .o.f'r' e1reAn. " m.& c.&, c.&1m bf\6n.c.,c .o.r 'Oo ton," Af'f' .o.n f'l. " 501'0e c..3. .0. t>it ore ? " " 'C.&1m .&:S 1.o.rr1..11t> cu1'0r5te," Af\r' e1reAn · " f'U'O r.L\ mb1C A t'.>eAf'r.o.r r1l) 'O.&m le 1:'.>.0.f\ 'OC01l' mA1t tern." 'RJ.11115 fe ..111 :t,e.o.tt A11 f'l '00 CeA'O m.6f''C. t'.>.&mt'io5..1n, •r t'mne re 5eAt1.&n le1t1, 1r ft1A1r '0'1mt15 re .6.nnrm, re ce.o.'O e1te u..11te-re. ..1};Uf t\.&11115 re m.6C .o.n f\105, muf'C.<\'O m.o.c l'.>p1.o.111, .1:sur ru..111' re ce..1'0 e1le u.0.11'.>e-re.o.n. fu.0.11' re b1.o.t> 1r 'Oeoc .0.5 An f\1$ ; .(\:sur nu..111' .(\ t'.>1 re ,1;5 1mteACC, '0Ut'.>.61f'C O Cf'01111Ce.&f''O, ll A ..v.no1r c.&1m :so l1eM:c.o.C l\f' f..1'0 m t'.>.6.f' 5com.o.om. Cu1r-r1-o ro ru..1r me 50 '0Mn-m.6.1t '°'l' mo t'.>onn..11t'.>. 1 n'OM1'0 5.0.C mte t'O'OA ..1 ru.&11' me c.& .&on ni ..1m.&m e1te A t>it Of'm." "r .,. ?" ·nut'.>.o.1f'C .o.n f'l. 0o1'0c A11 t\U'O rm . "'01.um beAu5unn.&A5.o.m, ""' " ..1rr ' O Cf'om1ce.o.1''0, " .&:SUf .o.n CMC miotCon (1'0 .&1111fU'O, ..15ur r.&l.6.f't.& Af' A 11'0e.o.nr..1111n m.&f'CA1"5e.6.CC A t'.>.6.1le t'.>emn l.&n-cr.&rc.&." "11-1" . "' re .&n m6f''OA1l .15ur A • .6.t'r ' An f\1, .o.n ril6f'·Cu1r .& tu:s t>u1c 'Oo Curo .& C.6.1tte.o.t> ; .&CC m.6 ni CU 'Oume m.&1t re.6.rc.& 5eot'.>.& CU rm com m.&1t le1r An 5cu1'0 e1le." 'O't.&:s O Cr01111ceAp'O be.o.nn.o.cc .6.5 ..111 t'iS, ..15ur '0'1mt15 re te n-.6. 5unn.6., 1r le n-.& com, 1r te n-..1 t.&lAf't.&. nu.&11' .6. t'.>i re A:S m.o.ttcA15e.6.Cc .&f' ..1n mb6t.&t' A:S 'Out ..1 t:i.A1te 'OO c.6.r.&t> miot mu15e A1f\, .6.:SUr CU1t' fe Uf'C.6.f' fA '5U1111.6. le nuA11' ..1 l1.&!..11t> .o.n miol mm:se ..1 m..1ttt'.>.1t>. 6u1r re A11 5unn.o. te n-.1 tu1t conn.&1c re 'n.o. bome.o.nn.16 i, A.:SUf nu.0.11' A ters re ..1n 5unn.6. r10r tJi ri 'tM miot mm:se m.6.t' r,; ri f'011ile. '0'1mt15 re .&nnrm .&5ur te15 re 11..1 com te1t1, .6.:sur tin nA com te6. nu.111' .& conn.A1c r1re 50 t'..11t'.> 'Oe.6.tl t1A'O .6.f' 11.6. C0111 A t'.>tte1t U1f't1, te1m ri ru.&r At' Cflt..11D Ui Crom1ce..1r'O, .o.::sur 'O't.&r ri 'n.6. bo111e..1nnAC com bre.&S 'r 'Oo conn.&1c 'Out'.>.&1f'C r1re te 110 5Cf'om1ce..11''0, r.e f'Mril. Co1r5 '00 Com UA1m·re." " m.& se.&tt.&nn CU 50 bp6rr.111' mtre,," Af'r' e1re.o.n. 'OuD.61f''C r1re, " m.& com5l'.>eAnn cu Cf'i m61'0e cu1rre.o.r m1re Of'C p6rf.A1'0 me t(1." "r �Ol'OM'O, " Af'f , e1re.&n, " 11.6. m61'0e .&CA A1111 ? " " 'S"'c: .&n \,...,. . " Af\r ' 1f€', " n.&C '0Ce1'0 . Cc-A'O tn61'0, Ct'i 'O'Mt't'..11'0 '00 1'10$ r.0.05..0.lC..6. 50 CU1f'm no 'Oinne.o.1' 5.0.n ..1 111nr111 '0.0.m-r.1 cum cor..0.15." " 11oc ! " Af\r' 0 Cro1111ce.&f''O, " .An t'.>fmt cu ...15 rm.o.ome.o.t> nAC re1'011' t1om-r..1 .&n m61'0 rm .& co1me.&'O ? tli tt.o.C.&111n-re 50 bt'.At .o. 'O'Mf'f'..11'0 mo f\10'5 r.0.05.&tt"A 5.0.n ..1 f10f A t.o.t'>A1f'C 'OU1C·fe 50 mbemn ..15'0ut .&nn. 'CJ. re fUf'.&f'O.& 50 te6t' An m61'0 rm ..1 con5t'.>.&1t.'' " lr '06CA 50 5co1meJ.'Of..11f' i ! " Af\r' 1fe. " 's-1 .&n 'OAf'n.o. m61'0, '' .&f'r ' 1re, , , n.o.c 5c.o.rr..11t' l1om 1 5cu1'0e.&CCAm n6 1 :scomt>J.,t .&f' b1t 1 mbe1't'.> cu tem 1r m1re '°'1' .&'n 1ut sut' 1 f'10ct: mil mm:se A ru.&11' cu me." " 11ut ! " Af'r' 0 Ctt01111C€'Af''O, " CA te15re.A 4\ te.&r i f111 A Ctlt' Of'm ; Co1meJ.'OfA111tl i rm cit>e .&f' t>1t rse.1t �-" " lf '06C.& So 5co1me.&'Or.o.1t' i ! " ..1rr' 1re. "'S1 .C.Tl 'Cf'eAr ffl61'0 .6.C.6. me .o.' 'OOL A CUf' Of'C," .&f'f' ,re, '' n.o.C t'.>f.&5..1nn cu 1 'Oc15 me 1 :scu1'0e.&Cc.om . ..1011 'OU111e, A:SUf tur.& A 'OOl .o.m.o.C." lJi .6.11 5116 Af' tl·A f'e1'0CeAC eACOf'l'A 50 bp6rrA'O fl e. nJ.n5A'OAf' .0. t'.>A1le 50 cr5 m Cro1111ce.&r'O. lnr llA lM1tnfe.6f1..1C.6.1t'.> U'O ni r..11t) .<\CC c15te Anl)e.o.5A .6.CA. 'Oo f.J6f re fem 'r A11 bome.o.ntl.6.C 1 11'01.o.1'0 'OOl A t'.>A1te '061t'.>. ,(\t' m..11'0111 t..i Af' tl·A m.&f'.6.C 11U..11f\ A 'Ot11ft5 re 'r '00 'OCAt'C re Anonn 'r .o.n.o.tt CAn fACA re f'Mm re01nrA com bf'eA:s lc>1r. 'Out'.>..11t'c re le n-A ti111.6.01, " 501'0e M1 .&1c 1 t'.>p11t me m.6.1' ro ? " "r· ,.., " AJ'f , 1re, " 50 t'.>fU1L C(l \....<.\ me C111l1Ce, A5 'Oe.c.\1Mti1 10t1:S.6.l1CL\1f." "r· '--.6. 50 'OC.6.f\1:'.> t" .o., '1f't' , e1feL\n . " 'C.& co," .o.f'r' 1re, " 111 'Oo teompA tern." " 1m teom11..1 tcm ! " .o.rr' e1reA1l ; " ni r..11t) A te1te1'0 'Oe teomrl\ A5M11-r.6. r1..1ti1." " 'C.& f10f A:$.L\fl1 50 n1A1t llAC 11.6.1D," Af\r' 1fe; ".6.CC c...i re� .6.F;AC At101r. '}' ..,'O 1r com1e.&'Of.o.r Cll m1re, COltlle.<\'Of.6.1'0 Ctl All reomrA."

The Cheapest House in Town For Chandlery,

J. C. LARKIN, 36 -WEXFORD STREET. CU1'0

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LAKKIN,

99 Lower Dorset Street .

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'°'n cl,oJue{\m sot.uts

INDUSTRIES IN THE GAEDHEALTACHT.

-<•We are now very familiar with the idea that, if the Irish-speaking population is to be retained in its own countryside and prosper therein, efforts must be made to establish This is much easier industries in their midst. It is not the great capitalists said than done. who are on the side of the Irish language in the present struggle, but rather a few clear-thinking patriotic people of moderate means at the Although this would seem to be very most. something like a true statement of the case tt is, nevertheless, possible to do something towards establishing new cottage and other The industries amongst the true Gaedhil. Gaedhil, unfortunately, appear to suffer from an excess of conservatism as regards the industries which have remained popular Anyone amongst them up to the present. who has traversed the maritime region of West Connacht cannot help feeling impressed with the notion that a lot of time is spent by the peasantry of the district on an industry that is no longer remunerative owing to the progress Yet the inhabiof science having made it so. tants still imagine that it is something like a �old min� as rega�ds providing the rent money. Is it not time to disabuse them of this erroneous idea and draw their attention to other possible sources of income which they, through their r�maining so long in the one groove, have It is, perhaps, no hitherto neglected to tap ? harm to name one or two of these, with the qualification that we do not do so in the capacity of industrial experts, but rather very much as the idea would occur to one of the general public. Often There is the question of blackberry jam. and often have English correspondents written to Irish papers about the common custom throughout Ireland of letting the blackberries �o to waste on the bushes, although there is m England a far greater demand for this kind Once, indeed, of jam _than can be supplied. the children of Garumna Island could not understand why a party of strangers from Dublin had a desire to gather this kind of berry which probably in that very island is found larger and more luscious than elsewhere To the people of Garumna it is in Ireland. weed of no account. It wild a berry-a merely seems also that in some districts the humble mushroom can be made to yield a small profit. A small· farmer in Co. Roscommon-a woman -once turned these to account so well that she received a sum of upwards of fro for a single gathering of the mushrooms growing These, though perhaps not on her farm. practicable in all districts, may indicate what could be done in drawing attention to easily established industries. Unfortunately the Congested Distncts Board and others have not always been happy in their choice of industries for remote districts Lace-making, which is now quite common'. depends very much on the whim of fashion, and it is also an unfortunate fact that the lace-mistresses are, in most cases, given to discouraging the use of Irish by their pupils. Far better are the stocking-knitting, etc., of Co. Donegal and other places, by which we of course, mean generally cottage industries that will not succumb to fashion. Let us hope that something practical will be accomplished before long on the lines we have laid down. •

I

Ci'1oli Restaurant, PATRICK STREET, CORK. The Gael's Rest. 5AC

Aon

n1'6

SAOll.

" Pictures from Ballingeary." " The Cork Weekly Examiner " publishes interesting " Pictures from Ballingeary" in which we see our veteran supporter of the movement, Seandun, famous as the translator of "Robinson Crusoe," and others whose appearance is well known as being resident in Dublin, including, however, a visitor, Mr. John We extract Fraser of Aberdeen University. the following, which is portion of the letterpress appearing with the pictures:" About eighteen miles from Macroom lies Ball�ngea�y, the recognised stronghold of the Celtic tongue, and where since the revival movement of the language those whose hearts are centred in its restoration have worked and toiled in and out of season, day and night, to glean from the peasantry of the district the wonders a�d beau�ies of the native tongue. To-day Ballmgeary is thronged with Gaels eager to ac9.uire knowledge of the language, and to submit to examination at the College the Irish learned elsewhere. In all parts of the district the language is being taught both orally and by letters, but the greatest boon to the student is the frequency of meeting with old native �peake:s, who take the greatest pleasure in imparting all the information on both the grammar, pronunciation, and elocution, that The visitor cannot but be may be sought. impressed with the extraordinary readiness of the old people resident in the district to discuss details of the language with all comers, whether they be the merest tyro or scholars such Another as Seandun or Professor Bergin. matter that forces on the observer the extraordinary exactitude and perfection of the Irish language is the fact that the native speakersold people who in most cases may be labourers or small farmers-cannot alone speak Irish flawless in grammar, beauty of sentences, and perfe�t in elocution, but they can go further and give the very innermost details of the grammar o! the sentences used, it being a very common thmg to hear the people proving certain !orn1s of sentences to be grammatically correct, JUSt because a word may be genitive or dative, How many millions of as the case may be. speakers of the English language could bring the rule of grammar to bear in support of the correctness of their English ? "

..

Evening Schools. Frequent reference is made to the results of popular education in Denmark but we seldom succeed in �·oing ai:ything cump�rable to the work of the Danish evenmg schools which we praise but d? 1:?t emulate. The work that is being done in 1 reilic, however, cannot be mentioned too often fo: �he excellence of its organisation and for the mmimum of expense which it involves. The evening schools of the parish are as important almost as the day schools. They are attended by persons ab?·ve the usual school age, and the atten?ance is good and regular. Evening schools for girls and young women are open from April to Au�ust; those for boys and men are run during There are manv obvious the wmter months. In summer the reasons for this arrangement. men and boys are always busy in the fields and for them attendance at classes. of any kind is out of the question. In winter they are -free at night a�1d the weather as a rule offers no difficulty. For guls. the hardship of tra,·elling on country roads at night makes summer evening schools much Another reason for the division is pleasanter. that it gives the extern teachers work for the whole year and enabl�s t�1em to _conduct a larger number ?.f classes. Insh is a chief subject of instruction m the Treilic evening classes. The difficulties in th� way of. successful teaching are great bee a use Good capable Irish has died out in the place. teachers .h�ve. done work that will not perish. If the �aehc1sat1011 of Irish education continue. each co_mmg generation of Treilic people will be more Irish than the present one, and the work of instruction will become easier as each school ocenera-

EXILED

IRISHMEN

�B...

l

. the label " F. & C. n.': ' �- insrstmsr on seeing • Irishmen a_broad c:1.11 be. certain they are g-etting genuine Ir ish Poplin Ties made by the famous firm of Fry & Co., Dublin, makers of Poplin for • • over 170 years.

"

FRY'S

IRISH

_,

POPLIN

tion becomes the marrying and housekeeping one. Many good workers have left the district in the last few years, taking with them to other parts of !Teland a knowledge of Irish which was learned m a placE: where the language had died. Thev br�:>Ugh! with .them also a faith in Ireland's futur;. Insh history is taught and ordinary=book work is supplemented by frequent lectures by well-known �lster scho�ars. Hygiene gets an important place It is recog1� the evenmg schools' programme. msed that health is all-important and the effects �>f th� teachings of a few years may be seen already in brighter and cleaner homes.

...,

Gaedhealtacht Thire Eoghain. When giving an account of Gaedhealtacht Thire Eoghain ". An Claidheamh " missed many points worth notmg. The organisation of the district was due in no small measure to Aodh O pubhthaigh, who spent some time in the district in I 9 I r , The clergy and teachers are very active The Paidrin Pairteach is repeated in helpers. Goirtin and Caislean Glas churches before late Mass every Sunday. The Ancient Order of �ibernians, which _is very strong in the district, gives valuable assistance in forwarding Gaelic League objects. Irish dances have latelv taken the place of the waltz and quadrille at the social gatherings of the Order. Ea�onn O Canna.idh, who has taken over the teachmg of the Gleann Fhoichle classes is doing s�tisfactory work. He does "extern " t;aching in six schools, and teaches two large classes · of Eire Og has been teachers who meet weekly. found very useful for keeping the children together, and the Craobh Ruadh badge for Gaedhilgeoiri has been taken up bv the elders who continue to wear it and to observe the conRevival work without the ditions it enjoins. assistance of the parents is uphill toil. In this part of Tir Eoghain they are taking, consciouslv and gladly, an active part in Irish-Ireland work.

"""

Feis Bhreifne Ui Ruairc. We have seen in the local press some rather belated reports of Feis an Chluainin (ManorFrom hamilton) which was held on r8th ult. the "Anglo-Celt," which gives the best report, we gather that the event went off very successfully. It is interesting to find that competitors fr?m places in which Irish still lingers, viz., K1ltycl?�her, etc., took place in the language Addresses were delivered by competitions. several speakers which should have some effect in spreading the light in the district.

....

Meeting and Feis at Dun Ohuinn, Th� second effort at organising Kerry, as descnbed in the local press, has now been An Seabhac and successfully accomplished. the students of the Dingle College were present at Dun Chuinn on the occasion, as also were some " strangers " from Dublin. A very good feature at the Feis was the inclusion of a competition for the best singing of the songs of the local poet, 0 Duinnshleibhe, one of whose poetic pieces is, he is glad to say, in the possession of the writer of this note. The next meeting took place at Aunascaul, and the next after that is to be held either at Brandon or Castlegregory. Sligo School of Irish. We are glad to see that " The Sligo Champion " devotes its leading article in a recent We learn issue to the Sligo School of Irish. therefrom that it will be re-opened on 7th inst. The teachers are Padraic O Domhnallain, headmaster of Tourmakeady College, and the Rev. Father O'Kelly, B.A. Our contemporary adds : " If necessary a larger staff will be provided, and. this is one of the reasons why intending pupils should be prompt in sending in their applications and stating their requirements, as later on it will be impossible to secure the best teaching assistance when Irish teachers will have accepted engagements for the winter months." Ballyshannon Branch. The newly established Branch at Ballyshannon, Co. Kildare, have recently organised Mr. Eamonn a very successful aeridheacht. Ceannt, of Dublin, delivered a short address on the objects of the language movement and appealed to the audience to support the Branch as a measure of their practical sympathy.


.(\n ct.croeern sotuis.

8

[.AN CL.UDH.KAMH SOLUIS.j

ffle4"06n fOSril411' 7, September 7 • 191

laid down in the boat-house and it w as converted into an airy, comfortable class-room. Countless other jobs had to be done before the place was ready to be cleaned down and for the f urniture to be moved in. This stage had just been reached when we arrived. .1. [elli Ni Bhriain had been staying in the neighbourhood for a week previous. For the nex, directing tradesmen's operations. few days we struggled to get things ready, and by the time the ard-ollamh and our first student (Seumas Collins, maighistir sgoile) arrived the place looked quite presentable. In fact we felt so pleased with the progress made by Sunday, 7th July, that we invited the parish priest to dine so that our flower-decked table and spick-andspan dining room might be admired by a visitor. Next day crowds came pouring in. Such a scene of bustle and excitement! Cars laden with students arriving, cailini aimsire getting ready dormitories and private bedrooms- ollarnhna drawing up time-tables for classes; bean an tighe drawing up menus for meals, Nelli Ni Bhriain with a pen in one hand and a duster in the othereverybody breathlessly busy. How delighted we were to welcome the students; but oh 1 what a scramble it was to have everything ready for the reception of residents. Some of the furniture coming by boat from Limerick did not arrive till the first session was far advanced. The big tables ordered for the diningroom were among the missing goods, and it was rather a crush at the small tables which we had to make shift with, but people didn't seem to mind this. What did seem to trouble them was that for a time there were not enough looking-glasses to go round, and some men students came to me several times, looking very

�ate, saying, " ii sgathan agahm, a tihean a' tighe Cad a dheaftf41.itnid '' !/ And I

I

;;,:_;

""-•��,,.. 6411-114'1' 4 t84,-CU1T'84nn 1'11'0 U411:I

&,tn11ff1 ffle41r(ffi ct.6 116 ,11'6te 4. \.e 11·4 t.e1�1'0f. bfao f'toe 4g41: So bfatt r4n &10-r4n 1 mb.Att.e 4-U C1..t4t SM"61t.5e6t11i '04114b rto11111r �tft84ftll

6 �05tUUA1,

"1S 11 Lower O'Connell St. Dublin

the .A.dvertiers in All

bad to bid them be patient and tive in �dpeS'. of the: boat from Lnericlt. How �-h�ed everybod¥ was ! We wete lik-e a big family party and a vi!!ry merry eee, What a clatter <H.. '-u�ter aild talk at meal-time there ri$ed to be. Aho bow helpful and obliging Gaels are, One day a patty of learned graduates from five differerlt Unitersities in Ireland, Englam;I and Ge.tfi)any were busily engaged erecting a bathins...l:>6x {pr the women students ; on several occasions clergymen (of both churches) have been discovered blacking their boots, arid on being remonstrated with said lightly, '' 0 ta Eoghan (an fear oibre) gnothach, agus is cuma linn." Most of the staff gave their services voluntarily, no small sacrifice this on the part of men who were hard at :work all the year round. It meant not only going without remuneration, but going )Vithout a holiday. The catering for about 40 �le daily in so remote a place was no easy matter, With the exception of three things, tea, sugar and bacon, which came from Limerick, we got all our supplies locally, being anxious to give the custom to the Gaedhilgeoiri of the district, but they were at first unprepared for the demand ma.de on them, having for the most part only laid in sufficient supplies for their own needs, so that for a time it was difficult to obtain such simple necessaries as milk, butter, eggs, potatoes, turf, etc. After a time we got into touch with farmers who" were able to guarantee us regular supplies, and next year the district will be better prepared to respond to the call of the college for food to feed the hungry. Already the people realise that the

CL.AlflHE.AMB

d=serve vour support.

In Old Irish. Modem Iris� Gothict Mental and Moral Scie guinea per sh: lecture-hours. THOMAS O'NOLAN, 77 Waterloo load,

Do they receive it ?


me.&t>o11 fo$ri1.&1r

September 7,

-6. n Ct6.1'0e s: m Sol. u 1 s

7, 1912

[Alf CLA!DRSAMH IIOL!'ff

1912.

O'CURRY COLLEGE, CARRIGAHOLT. --•!+-

The College will be kept open in the winter and will be in charge of Aine Ni Bhriain who has been there as a student during the summer months. She intends to take in two Irish speaking girls from the neighbourhood and train them for domestic service, and has kindly volunteered also to look after and develop the garden and grounds of the College, so that it may be made as fa� as possible � self-suppor_tInsh cl_asses will be held m ing community. the evening and the Gaelic atmosphere of the the summer session will be maintained. Students of Irish desiring to obtain lodgings in the College may write to Neili Ni Bhriain, Ardanoir, Foynes, or to Aine Ni Bhriain herself. Any of the selfcontained houses, consisting of three rooms and kitchen, of which the College is composed, may be rented on moderate terms. The winter climate of this coast is particularly mild and healthy, and the people of the place are most friendly and anxious to help the student. OOLAISTE OHOMHGH AILL.

From the hum of the Gaelic Colleges we never seem to:be free. Before some cf these have completed their winter session's work, many ot the summer colleges are busily teaching away, and now, whilst excellent reports as to "summer" work are coming from Omeath, Cloughaneely and elsewhere, we have the announcement that the Belfast College of Irish re-opens with its inaugural public meeting on the 9th inst., class-work This College commencing on Monday, l Gth inst. now enters on its eighth session, and the experience of its past seven years' successful work will, doubtless be:a valuable asset in all its fut:ir� s�ssions .. �t is a healthy sign of the college that it is m a position to offer a large number of scholarships and also to pay travelling expenses of teacher-students coming over ten miles to its classes.

9

l

GALWAY AS THE GAELIC CAPITAL OF IRELAND. Sir, Although myself a Gaelic Leaguer I do not live in Ireland. But I come over each year and thus obtain perhaps a more vivid impression of her progress and changes than if I lived among them all the twelvemonth. This year I went again to Galway and I should like to tell your readers that I was certainly struck by the improvement in one most important particular namely that the people seemed far less ashamed of speaking their Some five years language than heretofore. ago when I was there one heard very little Gaelic in the streets except on market day. This time I heard it constantly spoken, not by the children, I must admit. That appeared to be the weak point, but there were quite a large number of young men and women who seemed to use it habitually. Let them teach their children. After visiting many of the towns of Europe one is immensely struck by the individuality of Galway. It is the least Anglicised city that I have seen in Ireland. If it were in any other country there would be whole guide books full of its praises. It possesses the charms of a beautiful situation, of historical interest, of picturesque old buildings, and of the most ancient spoken language in Europe. It is full of possibilities if its inhabitants only realised them. It might yet become a unique city in Western Europe, if it remains Gaelic. If it becomes Anglicised it will never be any-

MEETING IN THE TRILLtCK DISTRICT.

-:+--

At an aeridheacht held at Kilskeery, Co. Tyrone, Rev. M. Maguire, P.P., presiding, the following resolutions were passed unanimously :" We the people of Kilskeery and district, in public meeting assembled, hereby endorse and pledge ourselves to support by every means in our power the demands of the Gaelic League :" (a) That proper provision be made by the Board of National Education for the teaching of Irish to children of all standards, and that fees shall be payable for such teaching from infants' classes upwards, on the basis of attendance at classes of 75 per cent. "{b) Thathenceforward no student be admitted into a training college under the National Board unless he or she has a good knowledge of Irish, and that no �eacher be classed as fully qualified unless he or she is competent to give instruction in all subjects through the medium of Irish. " (c) That the feees and expenses of all teachers wl_io secure certificates of qualification as teachers of Irish at any of the recognised Irish training colleges shall be defrayed by the Board of National Education. " (�) That we reaffirm the resolution already adopted unanimously protesting against the attempt to deprive the County Councils of their right to decide upon the terms and conditions on which they shall award the University Scholarships which the people of Ireland have at their own expense provided for the education of their own children. That we call upon our County Councils to reject this bribe of £ r o, ooo, and to refuse to accept any money offered with such conditions attached as have been announced by the Chief Secretary for Ireland. " (e) That we call upon all managers of schools to carry into effect the recent resolution of the Central Council of Clerical Managers pledging themselves not to appoint to any of the schools under their control any teacher not competent to teach Irish, and calling upon their fellow-managers to accept the spirit of this resolution. " {f) That in our opinion the time has arrived for the National Board and those in control of the training colleges to put an end to the sham teaching of Irish which at present prevails in most of these colleges, and to have substituted therefor efficient and competent teaching of the Irish language and the method of instruction in same." Addresses were delivered by Mr. John T. Kelly, T.C., Dublin ; Rev. M. M'Geown, P.P., Greencastle ; Rev Father O'Daly, C.C., Clogher; and the Chairman.

---·:·----

..).J1

;1.5

FIXTURES. September 8th-Laytown-.c.e111'6e;1.cc 111611. Sept. 8.-.c.e111ue;1.cc ;1.5 c11;1.010 s11.&1'0e ;1.n rhurtm n .6.

mb erte

ve111.

Sept. 22.--0-e111ueo.cc 1 -o'Cul,o.c 1i16111 6 ofo.1t.5e CJ10.01u Co l.urmcrl.te.

Notes from Timthiri, Muinteoiri Talstll.] and Branch Secretaries. 1

(/

O'CURRY COLLEGE, CARRIGAHOLT.

DUNFANAGHY UNION. Trained Nurse Wanted. The Board of Guardians of the Dunfanaghy Union hereby invite applications from fully Trained Nurses for the position of Midwife for Tory Island, in the Crossroads No. 2 Dispensary District. Candidates will require to be certificated Midwives, and to possess the qualifications prescribed for Trained Nurses by the Order of the Local Government Board of the 5th July, roor. The Board will give preference to a Nurse possessing a thorough knowledge of the Irish language. Documentary or other evidence of such knowledge may be required by the Guardians before proceeding to make the appointment. The Salary attached to the Office is Seventy Pounds a year, together with a Residence rent free on the Island. Applications accompanied by Diplomas and Testimonials will be received by me up to II a.m. on the 14th day of September, rqrz, the date on which the Board are prepared to make the appointment. Dated this 3rst day of August, rqrz. JAMES BOYLE, Clerk of the Union. Clerk's Office, Dunfanaghy Union.

thing better than a twentieth-rate English borough. I speak, perhaps, as a fool, but I have dreams of seeing Ireland some day recognised by all the peoples of the world not merely as a governmental unit, but as the living representative of one of the great races of history; as the last home of the Gaels whose traces are indelibly marked on every land from India to the Atlantic Ocean. Their bronze swords and their gold ornaments are to be found in every museum. But is it too much to hope that in Ireland they should remain a living people ? Now when that day arrives, Dublin will of course be the political capital of Ireland. Belfast will be the industrial capital, and Cork the outlet for our southern trade. But Galway, if its people possess any virility, might have a far higher mission. It might be recognised as the Gaelic capital of Ireland, and the centre of Gaelic culture in the world, in fact a place of universal interest. A place to which travellers and students would come from all nations to hear the old language spoken, to search in libraries and museums for books, pictures, manuscripts, to study the best remaining examples of Celtic art and architecture. This may perhaps seem a dream, but it is one capable of realisation, if there is any virile blood left among the people. I am, sir, yours, etc.,

seo inse be-0.n.ct-0.1:5.

Dall Uladh-Meetlng at Cloghaneely. A meeting of the Executive of Dail Uladh was held at the College, Cloghaneely, on zoth inst., Right Rev. Monsignor O'Doherty, P.P., V.F., Omagh, presiding. The following were present :-)Iiss O'Farrelly, M.A., Miss MacNeill. Principal, Colaisde Choluimcille; Treasurer; Rev. L. Donnellan, C.C., Crossmaglen; Rev. M. O'Mullan, C.C., Claudy ; Rev. M. M'Geown, P.P., Greencastle; Rev. T. MacDonald, C.C., Portadown ; H. O'Duffy, Gaelic League Organiser, and Antoine O Dochartaigh, National Teacher, Falcarragh. Reports were received from the following SubCommittees :-Publication, Rathlin Island, College The Management, and Irish-speaking districts. latter has succeeded in establishing teachers in the Glenelly (Tyrone), and Clonmany (Inishowen) districts. It was decided to make this Sub-Committee a permanent one, adding Rev. R. Walsh, C.C., Gortin, and Mr. MacBrlde, National Teacher, Plumbridge. For the present the efforts of the Committee are to b _• concentrated on districts of Tyrone and South Derry. It was also resolved to appoint a Committee to report on the condition of the Irish language in Donegal. It was decided to request the Coisde Gnotha to give grants to the following �istricts with a vie� to establishing district teachers m them :-Glengevlin, Farney, Dunfanaghy, Ardara, Kilgort Park, and Dungiven, Rathlin and Carrickmore. The Secretary, Peadar O Ceallaigh, Coalisland, was appointed to act as Treasurer during the absence of Miss MacNeill in India. The Treasurer reported that collections had been successfully taken up at the ecclesiastical retreats held during July, the clergy contributing to the Dail with the same generosity as in former years. It was ordered that particulars of the amounts subscribed in

COD LIVER OIL. GREENE'S

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To be had at William� Stl'eet,

DUBLIN.

btt�ro1n te 11-0.5-0.1'0 .o.n -cS-0.rhtt.o.1'6. t>�.o.n'C.o.tt

1

nt>1tu1pr15

e.


the various dioceses should be publish�las soon1'as

� :ileteMtl J pormatiOJJ,, can be obtained from the

co��LLEGE.-Bev. Father O'Flanagan, the recent Gaelic League delegate to America, has spent a few days at the College, and delivered a lecture to the students on bis Ameri�� �ur. He _gave an account of the various nationalities in the United States.. He --+itnu,4 an iateresting comparison between Amencan iud�, f1.ncl. bmrin� methods and those of Ireland. His remarks on education were listened to with great attention, especially by the _National teachers present. 1,. Jiea,:ty welc9me was given on the 19th mst. to Sir �er Casement, who was mainly �mental abollt the building of the splendid college at �ly, and who also finances a pnze scheme un y for proficiency in Irish in the schools of eely and Gweedore. � �G. Moonan, B.L., and Mrs. !4oonan, D�b�. ha"' visited the College where they mtend remauung The attendance 4ariPg ID09t of the second session. ..... the seui.on just concluded has _been a record

m

,,,

cao n.ce n.o tt.().nn .&5us .& curo c e.mnce. ni 5A'O 'O.&m A ttA'O 50 OfUttlm buri>eAc 6 cttot-6t; �o n.&

'O.&tc.\10 5o te,r-1-0111 buAcA1tH Asur cA1�1n1--oo rsrioo l t f1e4CA cu5.&m AS cur r1or Aft A t.&et:eAnnc.& f.601f1e .&5ur .Aft An fPOf1'C A5ur An AOtoneAr A5ur An Ob..\tft ..\5Uf Aft An CAtteAm Atmrtfte 01 Af1 flUOAt _ACA .&nnro A5ur .&nnru-o Af' fUAt"'O nA d,,e. CA rutl, A5.&m 50 OfUtl. ftA"'O Utte 50 breAs, 'Cf'eAn, tArottt AS 'OU\. AS ObAtft Af11r Af1 fCOtt ASUf AS bAtl.e .&5ur 1 n5A�. eon .61'C 01\.e, .ASUf 50 'n"OeAnfA1'0 flA"O 50 \.etft A9!n-oteeA\.\. 1 f11C An 5ettnf11'0 Af' " �ttte 65" '00 neAf1CU .o.sur "'00 CUf' cun Ctnn.

"OU.& 15- t, 1 C 1 ft. cronnus .6. �.&1Ce45 n.& ueee.&nc.& s.e.o tne.

O S40R.&.

carefully and neatly corrects the following aeiiW.il which are purposely set down here incorrectly. I CA re reAtt m6p. 2 Oi 01 me Af' r501t 3 CA 5f1U4'15 "OeAttS At' mo ceAnn. 4· '):'nA}\ tn6f1 A5ur f>eAn OOAS, 5. CA re u. b,,eA5 .

All letters for the competition must reach 19th.

BEFORE THURSDAY, SttPTi,'MBt-R

me ()

ce,o 1 t.ce ne, rt.6.nn, 25 CeAttn65 PA1tnel.t.

.c\f;


�n OtA1'0&Aih 80lU18.

me.&'66n f65m.o.1r\ 7, 1912. September 7,

1912.

(..&JI

-an-

Patron: THE MOST REV. OR. TOHILL.

SESSION.

(Establislttd October, 1005).

'THE INAUGURAL MEETING WILL BE HELD ON

in the College premises. Bank Street, Belfast. Distinguished Gaels will address the Meeting.

--·:-

-Classes will be held in the College premises on:Mondays & Fridays Saturdays

... •.

7 p.m. 2 p.m.

- 9.30 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Class work commences on Monday, 16th September, 7 p.m,

I

men o1RetC (By

noistn n'i

,.il),dltt:�rs.

p1L1b m o c �n t'.>&mu.

Special arrangements (as to travelling expenses, terms, etc.) for teachers travelling over ro miles to attend the College classes. A large number -0f Scholarships will be awarded. For Prospectus, apply to

REGISTRAR, Colaiste, Chomhghaill, Bank Sl., Belfast.

Desmond

College,

-0.c& 1 runn 6 5cu,0,n,0,c. Master Irish for the King's Scholarship in a few months.

A

SPECIAL King's Scholarship Class will be formed at Desmond College. Ring. on September roth. It will be in charge of an experienced teacher. Every facility is afforded for the rapid acquirement of a conversational and literary knowledge of Irish. It is the language of the Professors and Students and of the whole countrvside: of the classrooms, the dining room and the recreation grounds. Nowhere can a more rapid or more perfect mastery of Irish be acquired. And remember Irish is becoming every day a more important subject for those intending to adopt teaching as a

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.. . leA1t'Mt'

XIV.

Vol. XIV.

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...........................

I

b.0.1 t e .(\t.o.

No 28.

Ct1f1fA1 An

ct.tez, me.o.'0011 ro:5m.o. rn 14, 1912.

DUBLIN, SEPTEMBER

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to115 .o. .o. n e1 t-ceo15. (O 11-.&v 11u.6.1'6e.a.cc.01'6e rem).

11.0.

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The Irish Cutlery Manufaeturing Co., Ltd., 17 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN . 111 t.o.c.o.m.6.t' .o. t.u1Ue.o.'6 ..iCC C�\m.0.01'0 .0.5 cu.a.r 50 orac.o.m.6.t' 'Oe1rea'6 11.6. c.o.U.o.1t111e .6.t' '6615 .6.f 'O' .J.r'Ot115e.l\m.a.r .&r reolt:.o. .o.5ur ..it' .6. b1t. ci115 ..(\ cto5 1.6.rn6111 '00 ou.o.1le.o.m.o.t' bot.or 11.0. C.6.1'f'1':Se, .6.K .6 r.0.10 "c.o.t.0.01f\ 5.0.11 c".o.p.o.U" .o.r ,;.n tl...i11' cmnce te rmne t.6.o.a.1vc cum n.o. C.6.C'f'.o.c', a5ur b.o. 5e.J.r'f' 50 r.a.oam.o.r 1 Sre1t 11.0. 'tt1:c;.o.m.o.11 r:s1t11r'O .o.5t1r t'i11'0e 111.o.f\t.ov.a.15e. .o.1111r.o.111 r.&n 5c.o.t.o.1'f' .:SO cr1c 'C.6.p.6.1'0 f.:S10bt.o. r:so.rJ11c.o. .o.5ur '00 biom.6.f\ .o.r .a.1r 1 Sre1t 11.6. 111.o.rt.a.v.o.1te r1ce n61m10c 'O'e1r .6. re.a.cc .o.:sur '00 tu1c .6.11 Cf110lt .6.f l\11 C'f'e.6.ll .0.5.0.11111 11t1.6.1f\ '00 nocc orr.a.ro1r e15111 'OD111n r.a. rc.&1r1i111 11.0.c be.o.'6 q,.o.en .0.1111 50 'Oc:1 ce.a.tr.J.m.o. '6.J. l1occ ! -0.:SUf f1n11 1 11-.&r 'OC'f'Or5.o.'6, 'Oi1111e1p le l:)e1t .o.5.o.111n .6.t' .0. re.a.('c m.a.v b.J. 511.&t.o.c, .o.:sur .6.l1 u.o.1r -0.CC 1r :S41f\1'0 5up f111 C1.6.11 or.o.1t111 ce.o.n.o. ! C:6}:iLJ.6.'0 .o.11 b'f\611 f.6.111 'O'.Jr scvo1'6e, m.J. l:)1 re 'Oo ou.o.1l 'Ourne u.1ro.l t11111f\Mri1 01,.c.11111. '011me 1.o.r.o.cc.a.-.0.11 1'.)011c n.J. cr.o.e11.a.c .o.:sur 'Oo cu111 re ru 11.J.11 or.6.11111, .o.:sur 'O' t1.6.r11u1s r:se.o. t.a. n.;, n-.o.0111Jl.Jn.&11 '01l1ll, r.o.1r11e1r <lfl b1t '66 ti1:5Amo.1' A'f' 11t1.c..1'6e.a.cc '06, .o.r ct1m.o. rut.o.. .6.f1'0-10115.o.11c.o.r cmve.a.m.a.r :Stlt' .0.1t', :so 11'0t1l).o.1rc re " :So 'Oe1n1111 rem, cl. .o.r1 nu.o.1'6e.a.cc 'Oo t.o.01l 1r 'OP1'6eL\11.c-r5e °'1' b1t .0.5.0.c-r"- ! " re r.0.11 t1.a.1v rm rem, 1r '06c.6., 5t1t' n'te.a.vr nu.o.1'6e.o.cc pnn 11.& ".o.n 'Ce..::\cc.u.1re 'Ce111c11e.a.c" 116 ".<.\11 1lli,l.o. 'Cr1.J.t11611,1" 116 ".<.\n bour501re 11 u.0.11" 'Oo mnrel\m.o.f\ '06 50 'Cri.tn6n.o.." or.o.ct.o.r .6.r1 'O.& tum:s .o.r enceo15 or c1011n be11111e t1<.'.\o.'O.l\1r r.& '6eo1'6, 'Oob' e15el\11 'Otimn .a. 110CC..::\'O '06 C1.6. l1i .6.11 De£\11 U.6.f.o.l '00 111111f .6.11 rse.6.t rc-111 'Oi111111-tJ1 r1re 1 mt1U.o.c .o.n c15e b.o.11'1', 'mo lJ.6.t'.o.m.o.1l, .6.'f' CC1l.o.1l'> 11.0. C.o.111r:se, -0.CC .6.11 roc.o.l r.a.111 11t1.o.1r d C01111.6.1C 1'1 1.6.'0. .c.'Ot1l'.>.a.1rc re, 1 'Ocesol) 'Oe1'6e.a.n.o.15e mo nt1.o.1'6e.c,.cc.o., 'O't.&:s re r.J.r.o-m e15111 .o.15ne orm 'Oo 0.0.111 .111 c-ocr.a.r 'Oiom 5i111 l).ome.a.r .o.n b.a.1le .o.m.a.c .a.r1r. 1)1om.a.r .0.5 'Otll 1 5c.o.11t.o.11n.o.r le 11-.6. ce11,e :so m6r. 'Oo nocc re '0.6.m :so r.o.1l) re rem 1 mb.o.1le 11.6. lol:)o.r .0.11 l.J r.0.111 .o.5Uf 50 t'.l)'.'.6.C.6. fe m. S.o.lmec .6.5 e1ce.o.U..i15, .a.cc 5t111 b'm e .o.n 1)1 re .(\:s 'Oul 6 b.o.1le mern 'Oo con11.o.1c re. ,(\t.o. CU.o.t :so bv1 Cu.6. l.6.11111' l\CC '00 cu11, 5116 11.o. l1e1ce.o.ll.o.r5e c.1tu5.a'6 .o.1r .6.:St1f, .a.r ;sctor '06 so l:)ru15e.o.'6 re qi.a.en e1le so br1 5.0.11 nob.o.'6, 're 1111'0 '00 r11111e re n.& ct11pl1115 "'.:S C.o.'f't'.6.1:S 11.0. S101111.o.c .c.;sur .o. .0.5.0.1'6 'Oo to.l).o.1f\C YOU ·w11.:;L-LIKE·1THE LATEST

..,.

MODELS

IN

"LUCANIA" AND "PIERCE"

-- CYCLES. -They are absolutely the Finest Bicycles ma<le, and they're

IRISH.-Does that Matter? DEPOT:

GAELSSupport the Only Picture House in Dublin owned· by an Irishman.

THE

IRISH CINEMA

84 84

pon.c c.o.01m5111

"CAMDEN"

STREET, DUBLIN.

CAPBL S7REBT (next to Trades' flail),

NOW OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30 PRICES,

30.,

40.,

60 .

Change of Pictures, M nday, Thursday and Sunday.

NoTE,-\Ve sell Irish Bikes only, and sell them on their We repair all makes, properly and cheaply. merits.

Does that Matter


�n ct�1'0eart1 souns, tAlf G..A1••u1111 SOLUJS.1


September

Cl.6-1'0e�rh sotu1s.

6.fl

me.6:06t1 f6$ril.6.11' 14, 1 1�·.

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5

{AM (;LAIJUIJIA.IOI SOLVl&J

14, 1912.

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co. R.<\ 11.<\ m b o Ct:. 1f '06c.o. n.lt' t.l1t115 .0.011 'Oume 'O.lr t'>.6.111 .0.1\1,.,m te H.1.0.5.0.LC.o.f .8.6.f.6.11.6. 'Oo'n C.6.00 cire reo C01'i'1 5f'.d'0-'01.<\ll1.6.1t te1r .<\ll mb.o.111c15e.c.r11.o. U.6.f'.O.C, 110 Lady Dudley 111.0.r 'Oe1rce.o.r. 1 11-1noe.1l' normuc .6.Cl. .&rur C61i1t1.6.1'0te .6.1C1·fe fU1'0Ce be.o.n 50 'Oe.6.f .&f' one.&n 1 5ce.6.f't:l.lf' toc.o.. .o.n-cil'e..11i1.o.1t tm1pt1'6e 5.c.n ro1,c porc.1mL.o.cc.1 Ct.lf'e.6.nn r1 .6.f' b1t 're.o.'6 .6.n l)e.6.11 U.6.f.6.l reo. 'C.l fe.6.11-eot.&f .6.11-Cftt1m 'f11.6. bOC'C.6.10. .6.1C1 .6.f' .o.n mem .<.\11f61$ .6.:SUf cr1obt61'0e .1C.6. Le '6u L tri'O .0.5 mu111c1r n.o. 5ce.o.nnc.o.r mbocc. 11it .ion ru'O 'O.lf' fe1'01J' te1te .6. 'Oe.6.n.6.m 11.6.C 5ru11 r1 t>.l ue�nM:1 50 'Oe.l5-cro1'6e.o.c L15ur 50 f0l1111i'l.6.f'. 1 f'1t .an Cf i\ri1f'.6.1'0 CU.o.1'0 t.6.f'.6.111t1 Ct11J\ fi cu15e.c.f' 110 re1re.o.r '0.6.0111e bJ\€01'0Ce 50 horprne.o.t 1 mb.o.1te -&t.o. CLMt, .o.;sur 'Ourne .o.r, b1t .6.f' ce.o.p r1 'Oroc-te.o.c c6m11t11'6te .o. t)e1t M5e ce.o.11nu15 ri ce.o.c te 11-.6. ..0.5..0.1'6. foc.6.nn fl 5.0.c COfC.6.f .o.f .6. p6c.o. te111 .6.5Uf bionn fl .6.5 'Out 6 te.1c 50 ce.6.c .0.5 bf'e.o.tnu5.6.'6 .6.r '6.o.01111t'> bf\e61'0ce ..o.5ur 'Oe.o.n.o.n11 ri .o. t.ln-'Oic10U Le b1re.c.c .o.:sur comp61f'C .o. t�t'.>.6.lf'C '0611'>.

-c1mt1 n.e m11 �Cc.f.6.'6 re.l\r .o.r C1f' 1 Of.6.'0 6 l).o.1Le orm .o.n U ce.o.n.o. .u5ur 'Oo f'elf' m.o.r, tu15e.6.f t1.o.1'6 b.o. re.o.f' e .o. f\.6.1t'.> ru1m tnor .o.15e mr 5.0.c ni .o. o.o.111e.o.r te he1l'111n .o.;sur ;so mor-mol' 5Cu1r n.o. "r vu15e, " .6.f' re1re.o.n, " n.o.c .t,.1e'61t5e. 11'0e.o.n.o.nn f10-fe 'C1mtlf11 'Oe 11.1 mnJ1t'> .\Cd 1111' .o.n 5Connp.o.'6 .c.5..,10 ? 11.o.c h-1oncu15te urn :SUf' m6 :so mop .o.n .&1FD .1 C1U0.6.f'f.6.1'0e .6.f\ C.6.111ce61f' m.o.1t mn __,? rn 1110115.onc.o.r .6.f' b1t .6.no1r re..1r, .6. t:>e1t .c.;s 'Out 6 . .,1c 50 hJ.1c .c.:sur .o. oe1t .0.5 uo.o.1l'c .0.1, .6. 1·e.1cc mite -01c10Lt. 'Oe.o.nr.o.1t>e .o.n-10115.0.nc.o.r 'Oe 1i1n.o.01 .o. t;e.o.'6 5te.o.rc.o. 50 bf'e.6.5 5.0.t.lnc.o. .6.Stll' "f.6.01 T'Uf.6.H> 50 b.lrr .o.n C& t10r .65.0.m :so t'.>fU1l c.o.1Uni .0.5.0.10 te1r." r 1.6.'0 .c.s 'Out.. o r:so1 t ;so r501 t .o.:su r o te.o.c .o.5t1 Srn ob.o.1p 50 ce.).c 1 t&1, .J.n -ouo-5e1ti1r1'6. Cf'U.6.1'0 .6.f' '6t11ne ..11, b1t .o.5ur 50 h-.l1f'15te .6.f' c.o.1Un. "Ci,1'0 1 5conc.o.o.o.11,c .1 rt.(\111ce ..o. c.11tte.J.ti1.o.mc, .u5ur '00 f'e1f' mo t'.>.&T'.6.rilL.c.-r.o. b.6. 6611' t\11 Ob.6.1f' tpom ..._1 belt .6.f' ll.1 fe.6.f'.o.10 m.1t' 1f 1�\'0 11' fe.o.1'11 CU1C1, .15t1f .6.ll Ob.6.1J1 e..o.'OCf'Om (m.&r ob"-\lf\ e.o.'Ocpom i) . ., oert ..6.5 no. mn.l1t'>. "C.l mn.l .6.5..11 o cotn D1,e.J5, co1i1 t.&1'01f', coti'l te15e.o.11 n c.o. te C1Ji .6.f b1t e1te f.6t1 'OOtil.6.11, .o.5ur ClCe.6.J'\ 'OOtn-r..1 SUJ'\ tllOl' .111 re.1tt n.o.c t'>f'U1l .6.C.J.-f.6.ti

for5t.6.'6 .o.n Cot.a1rce .o.5ur m.& ror5L.6.t> t.o.n 1 5.0.n t1or '00 ll.6. '0.6.01t111:'.> : m.:i'r 'Oe.6.5com.art.o. .o.n .o.1mr1l' ne1t 50 m.o.1t .o.5ur cLe1l' n.o. Cif'e t>e1t 1 t.o.t.o.1p, 5.0.n Cf'.&cc .6.l\ .o.' mem 5..c.e'61t .0.5-ur mor·u.o.1rte e1te .6. l)i ..1m1' 111 11e.o.5.6.t 'Oo tucc Cot.l1rce bf'15'0e. 0 oi Mi lu.o.n .1n11 c.& n.o. m1c te15111n .0.5-ur n.o. hott.o.m..0.111 .0.5 ob.c.1r com m.o.1t .o.5ur coti1 'Outr.o.cc.&c Le6ot.6.-r.o.n .6.C.l f.6. CoL.l1rce $.o.e'Oe.6.L.6.C 1r rme 1 ne1rtnn. 11i f'.6.t'.>t.o.r .6.S 'Ore1m 1 11-.6.m .6.r b1t Le CU1'0 ti16tt f50l.6.1Jii .6.CC c.& 1110f m6 .c.5 rre..o.fC.6.l .6.t101f no f.6.01l 'OU111e .o.r b1t .6. t'.>e.6.'0, .6.5Uf f5e.o.t 1f fe.6.f'J'\ no rm, c.l, .o.r .o. t.o.15e.o.'O, 01f'e.o.'O e1Le te te.o.cc e.o.'0.6.f' reo .6.5ur cur n.o. mior.o. reo cu5.o.mn. -C.& ce.o.c mor ..c.:sur be1t> .l1c r.a n-.o. 5comne u1t15 .&'f 5..0.n .6.1' t'.>e1rc .6.f' b1-C fU1'0e .o.r .6.0n C.6.-C.6.01J1 .o.m.&tn. 5n1.<\11pont .<\5us nost:ne-0.t>o1n. 'C.l " Student of Irish History " .0.5 e1teMn

Of'm C10t1t1Uf CUf' flOf .6.f\ .6.ll 'O.d .l1C feO tU.6.f mul' cu1l' me c.a cupt.o. re.o.cc1i1.o.111 6 torn r.o. Cl-0.1'0e-0.ti1. S.&n .o.m ftn 1110f' 'OU0.6.1f'C meCl.6.CU t'>i .o.n 'O.& .o.rnm ce.6.f'C no conq,.&1Lce. CA,n fU1t me '5.0. r.lt> .1t101f .6.CC 01f'e.6.'0. b'te1'01f' 50 t>ru1L Ml ce.o.rc ..0.5 ..c.n " Student" reo .6.5ur '6.& 11U.6.1f' .o.'Oe1r re 5UJ'\ t'.>fe1'01f' t1.6.C t)ftt1l, 5f'1.6.t1 01r .6.ll C-..o.111m Ce.o.rc .6.f' $rMnporc .6.Stlt' nor 'Cf'.&5.0. rh6f' ..o.f' norcre.6.l'.>011'. 1f :sre.o.nnm.o.r .o.n $.o.et>1t:s i nor t:r.&:s.o. ti1op. 5.o.e'61L5 11.d. 1f cpe1re 5n.&r · no .6.on Le..o.t'.1.6.f' 'OA f'lf'1t'.>. '0Lr5e.o.t> .o.5ur 6 t.6.f'L.& :sul' 511.&t.ac Le mumc11' n.o. h-.l1ce ur.l1'0 .1 l'.>.6.mc .6.f n.& h.o.mmne.16.& reo, t'>.6.m m1re .6.fC..6. fOfC.6. e; .6.5Ul' Ce t'.>e.o.'6 'n.o. '01.6.1'0 Ottm ? m.&. c.& eol.6.f flf'111l1e.o.c Le f.6.5.&.1L f.6. 11.6. t1.&1ce.1c.o.1t'.> reo 11iof' t'.>fe.lf'r ru'O '0.6. n'Oe.o.nf.o.1t>e n.:i & cutt 1 n-uril.6.1L 'Oumn 1 n5.o.e'61L5--o.i t>on.1cc 1-mJ.'r remtl' e. b. 6 '00rht1.c. 1 l l.

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5e-04 c.l me 'm to:s.o.rr.o.c 5 cMn .o.1f' 111' .o.111e6t 'S.a C.o.1rce.6.L-nt.1.6.'0 'r.o.n C.6.00 -Cu.6.t'Oe.So.rumn, b1t> cir mo uu-cc.1.1r .o.' c15m11 r.o.me.o.r6 t>om : .<\n c-e1te.o.n m.o.01te.dc bu tur.o.c 7 be.o.nn.0.10.

3. b' t.lLl.6.-in cuor,.0.1'6 'r bu l'e1'6 .o.n c-.:i1te.o.n,8

le bUt.o.n m.6.ot-005 bu c.o.ome f.l1Le.�'6 9 ; bu 51.c.n n.o. bpu.o.c.c.n mu'n 'O' fU.6.lf' me m' .&r.o.c, 10 .<\ n-'001re-Cu1t11111 c.15 bun bernn-L>.i1pne.o.c. 4. $e1oc1'6 'n ru.o.'6-ce.c.f'C 'rn.o. co1ttce-.,rn ior.c.t, 'S .o.n co1Le.o.c cC1c.1n..16 11-otut '5.0. bf'10'0.o.t12; 'S 5e'O oi n..1 be.6.nnt:...\n 13 5.0.n t.0.1115 14 5.0.n r:·r1te.6.11, 1'.>1 'O.o.1m n.o. Cf'61ct· 15 'n ,rn corr.o.1t'.> Uon1i1')t'·

5. b'e 'n rot.o.r-111nc111 110m oe1t .0.15 e1rce.<\cc

le co1r1r 16 0111n-5ut.o.1c, 5p111n .o.' Ce1ee111 17 -0.' remn 50 runn'0.6.6 18 .6. 11-'0tut n.o. n-5eu5.o..n, -0.' co1U f..101 l..1.6.t-'Oe.j.lC 19 'r .o..' Sf\1...\11 .o.s e1p1s. 6. CL.o.on 5.0.c rot.o.r 'OlUO f1U'O m.6.f' 01\tl..1'0.6.Ji,20 'S m.o.f' Of'1re.o.'6 bu1t..5em .o.1r u.&rr n.o.t1 rcu.1.'6tonn 21; .<\c rof'.0.1'6 22 rtJ.11 te1r 5.0.c tomn 23 1r bU.6.1'024 .6. 1'.>1 .o.1r e1Le..c.n .l'61i1.o.1t.. n...\11 J.r'O-t'.>e.o.nn f'U.6.fl.o.. 'OJ. mb' .:i1c comnt11'6e 'OO 'Ou5.o.U n.1. " fU.6.J"oe.o.nn.o. .lf''0.6." 1 n-1on.o.'O '06 t>e1t, m.c.t' ..c.cJ., :so re.o.r5.1f't.6. .6.f' .0.5 . .\1'0 :sreme t10r ti'O r.o.n t& buroe C.o.1rce.o.t Ylu.o.t>, b'tem11, rorn1 be:.lc.J.111e . 50 mbe1'6e.1'0 .ltf'U$.J.'6 'n.o. POf'C ""\Re mo.5 UlU1n. "\Vhich the sea encircle5 ; 2 green spots ; 3 secluded ; 6 i though ; 5 exile ; obtruding i�scl_f; 1 beautiful;. � green plain ; •fragrance; 10 npbrmgmg; 11 hoarse; 15 12 caressing; 13 bens, mountains; H vulture; antlered 7 1fay; 1:s joyously; u heavy dew; u 1 choir; stags; 22 20 dream ; 21 breakers dashing against cliffs ; farewell, 23 beauty; 24 virtue ; 26 Mull. ; blessing [-Ou5.¢..l,l, ffi.lC -p..i1t, A cum An "C-Amt1�n reo.J 1


â&#x20AC;˘n c\A1'0e.6.ril souns,


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September

I,4, 1-;1 2·

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,

1912.

IRISH LITERATURE.

To sustain our own claim to it we have of set purpose chosen the title adopted for this article. Though the term is still applied to Irishmen's efforts in the English language such an employment thereof remains just as false as when it first obtained any currency. In other words, there can be no Irish literature except the Irish language be used as its medi.urn. Before the English ever set foot on the soil of Ireland Irish literature was in the native language of the country, and so must the story remain so long as the Irish retain any native linguistic power in their own land. It cannot be said that Irish literature is in a vigorous state at the present moment. It is, unfortunately, a very tender plant just now and needs every encouragement. Most of what is being done probably appears in the CLAIDHEAMH SOLUIS-in saying most we mean of the original literary attempts of to-day, for literature for the purposes of this article does not include efforts of a past period or folklore of to-day. It is probably a true statement of the case if we say that the literary spirit in our young Irish writers in or of the Irish-speaking districts is willing, but the means of producing it are weak or rare. In other words, the tendency to produce literature in Irish, even though the writers be few, is far stronger than the desire of the Gaelic League or others to Who place it before an Irish-reading public. but a rank Philistine would not encourage attempts like Cleamhnas Choil an Chrompain which appeared in a very recent number of the CLAIDHEAMH from the pen of a young Connacht writer? A good simple little tale well and graphically told, that is a truthful description of it. Unfortunately the canker of materialism, so common everywhere to-day, has even affected the Irish language movement, hitherto known as possessing spirituality and enthusiasm. A great blow to our current attempts at literature was the stopping of Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge, which had lived so long and battled through the storms of the darkest periods that the Irish " We language movement had to endure. must drop the things that don't pay," said some un-literary people, and, lo ! an encl was put to this quite venerable journal which had done so much in the past in encouraging the writing of Irish. The resultant loss has been simply incalculable, for a period of discouragement has since set in in the production of literature. No wonder, for many people, not only in Ireland, but elsewhere, had all along been regarding Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge as the chief embodiment of the movement, on account of its long connection with it. What sane man connected with a movement like ours ever asked that a thing must pay? Certainly the founders of the Gaelic League and its early single-minded members never thought of such a thing. That is only one aspect of the question, however. The necessity of inducing the children and the youth of the country to learn to read. write, and speak Irish is another. This is, we are glad to say, being effectively looked after at the moment by the CLAIDHEAMH. W e wish every success to Caoilte na Rann who is doing so much to create a spirit of interest in writing Irish amongst the rising generation. Every nerve must be strained to get our writers to produce vigorous prose which, whilst being idiomatic, should reflect the spirit of the present age. It must contain neither pedantry nor hyper-poetising. We have probably more than enough of poetry itself. It is a curious fact that a plethora of verse is a clear sign of the decay of a language. Let us quote the present case of Cornish, no longer a living Sonnets are being produced in it, tongue. as Mr. ] enner its grammarian admits, with great success, but no prose. Why ? Because prose, commonly a real thing of vigour, belongs to the life of a language. In Kerry and Galway, that is, in two counties m \\ hich the native

CLAIUHEAM.11 SOLU!ii.l

tongue is still in common colloquial use (westwards at any rate), there are several young writers striving to raise their voices in popular prose who are receiving only the scantiest of Are they to be told by our encouragement. materialists that they must keep Anglo-Irish silent ? What are the National Board, the Intermediate Board, etc., in comparison with the production of literature ? A hundred years hence they will be all forgotten, whilst, to quote a trite adage, litera scripta manet, Father Flanagan, on his return from America, made it absolutely clear that the production of Irish literature is a necessity if the interest of the Americans in the Irish language movement is still to be kept up, thus proving how wrong the "materialists " were. Once reduce any language to the condition of a mere patois without periodicals or books in it and it may be said that the end is in sight. One of the commonest arguments against the Irish language m cultured society m Dublin and elsewhere in Ireland is that it has no modern literature that one could read, after having This no spent one's time in studying It. doubt exaggerates the position, though it must with truth be admitted that we are very much behindhand as compared with almost any literature in Europe, even the smallest. Hence it is clear that the production of literature must be encouraged at all costs if our language is to live and flourish. Irish writers, owing to their poverty, cannot themselves produce their efforts. Our organisation must do more than it has hitherto done to help these along, and there must be no question of materialism or market value in regard to production. Only intrinsic worth should tell.

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5leo Census Figures of Leinster Fireside Irish. Most of us know that the only districts of Leinster in which native or " fireside " Irish still lingers are a few of the extreme north of the province (in Co. Louth) or of its extreme south (in Co. Kilkenny). The former shows up much better than the latter. From a carefully compiled article in a contemporary, " The Language in Leinster." we extract the following: " The capital of Irish-speaking Leinster is Drummullagh, in Louth. The electoral division contains a population of 1,403 persons over 3 years of age, out of which 527, or nearly 40 per cent., are Irish speakers. "Drummullagh is situated in the Dundalk Rural District. The great majority of the people over 40 years of age are native Irish speakers-334 Irish speakers against 216 nonIrish speakers. Between 21 and 40 years of age the English speakers are in a majority of 253 to 106. Between 9 years of age and 21, there are 74 Irish speakers and 169 English speakers. Between the ages of 3 and q the Irish speakers number only 13 to 156 English speakers- Can we not save them? Cannot the Leinstermen, nine-tenths of whom will learn now for the first time that in their native province there exists a district where the Irish language is still spoken by four out of every ten people, and where it is still the prevalent language of all the men and women about forty years of age, conserve that district ? It can be saved through the children who are being permitted to grow up ignorant of the tongue in which one-half of their parents and most of their grandparents think and speak amongst themselves. Drummullagh is the capital of Irish-Ireland Leinster. Let us of Leinster who did not know that such a district existed within our province combine to hold it for the Gael. The women of Drummullagh have held the Out of 303 language better than the men. women over forty years of age there are 195 Irish speakers. The Irish speaking men of similar age number 139 out of 247. In all 297 women and 230 men form the Irish-speaking populace of Drummullagh. " From the religious census of Drummullagh we learn that of the total population, 1,327 are Catholics, 155 Church of Ireland members, and 6 persons of other persuasions." Drummullagh, we may add, is one of Deicb mBaile O M eith, the ten townlands of Omeath. In it the writer of this note had many a chat in Irish with Inghean Pheadair Duibb (Eibhlin Ni Anluain, Nelly Hanlon), a famous local seanchaidhe who died a few years ago. Our quotation shows what a strong effort the ne:vly

established college will need to make in order to save the firesides of Omeath from the irreparable loss of the language of Cuchulainn The only district in Kilkenny in which fireside Irish counts appears to be Kilmakevoge in the barony of Ida. Its total population in 19n was 391, and the number of Irish-speaking people 46, almost 12 per cent., a far worse tale than that of Drummullagh. The decay of Irish in Ossory since 1830 has been far more rapid than has ever been the case in Louth The comparative cause is probably to be sought in ascribing a bilingual condition to the former and a monoglot state to the latter in the early roth century. Colaisde na Mumhan. The closing meeting of the second (August) Session of the Munster Irish Training College, Ballingeary, was held in the College on 6th inst. About 150 students and some 200 people of the district were present. The whole proceedings were, as a matter of course, conducted in Irish, and the enthusiasm displayed at the salient points of the addresses bespoke the keen interest of all present in the work of the College. The battle for supremacy between Irish and English in the district is at present fierce and terrific, and though the strong battalions seem to be on the side of English, the people of Ballingeary are of fighting stuff, and the Irish is yet well holding its own. Starting from small beginnings, the Munster Training College has grown and expanded beyond all hopes and anticipations in its sphere of useful endeavour. Its influence on the side of the Irish in Ballingeary has been great, and during the Session just closed it was evident that the inroads of English were for the time arrested, and to the English speaker Ballingeary was practically a foreign land. The number of students of Irish visiting the district during July and August was over �oo. }'he bare.statement gives to the question, What is the economic value of Irish,'' an answer in the minds of the people of Ballingeary which some who ask it might do well to learn. The Rev. Gerald O'Nolan, M.A., B.D., Head Master, presided at. the closing meeting of the College. Mr. Diarmuid O'Leary, Professor of Method, asked why was the Munster Training College established in Ballingeary, Because the Irish language was sp_oken there. '!'hat was a fact he would like to impress, particularly upon the younger people of the locality. All the improvements they saw about them-the neater and better houses, the greater comfort, the circulation of money in the district, the fun and the sport and pleasure-those were due to the establishment of the College there, and the College was there because Irish was there a He appealed to the young living language. of the young men and women, place, people to speak Irish habitually, to carry on the traditions of the older people. It was to tr.eir own best interests to do so, and it was their duty to their native land as we!l. He understood an Irish teacher and orgamser was to be appointed for that district soon, and he trusted that whoever was appointed would get every help from the people, as it was for the good of the language and the good ?f the place th�t !he Committee of the College mtended appomtmg such a man. The following resolution received , from Dingle Irish College, prop�sed by Sean O Shea, was carried with acclamation:" That we, the Students of the Munster Training College, . strongly ur�e the Commissioners of National Education to agam demand from the English Treasury power to pay the expenses of National teachers attending the Gaelic Colleges. \Ve call upon .. the Irish Members of Parliament to take such action as will compel the English Treasury to grant this small and reasonable de�and. We consider it a grave slur upon the National language to deny expenses to teachers attending those Colleges while paying the expenses of those attending Kindergarten �nd ot�er classes, and we trust the matter will receive immediate attention."

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Miss Mary Synon. The Illinois Women's Press Association and the Gaelic Society of Chicago tendered a reception and musical evening on 23rd ult. at the Hotel Sherman to Miss Mary Synon, the wellknown writer who recently returned from Ireland whereshe was sent by the Gaelic League for the 'purpose of writing a. series of articles on the Gaelic movement. Miss Synon formerly was a member of the" Journal" staff. Her recent


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to-day-c-and does not this indicate that we arc ,•ery _luke,�·am1 in our elev otion ? -the Irishspeaking districts are still the poore parts of lr<-'!an,l,_ with a consequent continuous stream of em1gr�t1on, out of c;aelic-s1Jeaki11g families, to Am .rrca. I1:1sJ1 people in the humiliating po ition of having t o le,,�n their n1other tongue do not, pcr�1a1>s, suff1c1entl)· reali e that the debt they o,,� the people of tne Gaedh -altach! i.., not to be paid by mere thanks and admiration. In the l(fl· of the Gaedhcalrachr there 1c; onlv a narrow , line bet,v,·en <ufficiency and 11a11t, and we ran hardly expect th,· c;at·ul1ilgcoin to �o on keeping UJ> th« la11guagc for the benefit of the 11at1o11 unl-ss we 011 our . ide are prepared to rlo all in our power to aid them -and let us remember that all we can clo i · only i11 the nature of a11

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\\'I. l>I. � l 1' OI \l Tl .1.' I(>.·. On I· r1da,· , 1ng a , n· pl nt f t1on ook P c . th of c I l'lg th ,, rk >I U: C,,11 tor th }" ar 1n th prPtt nd J tu ,u , tu , cd h 1 hou • Glindore fht'·, ,,a a vcn· la.r '<' att ndanc.-i of pupils pnc paly I fh I{ , J I.{) H a, 1> J>, \\'ilS mo, ed. to tl1 • l1a1r and amr 'l , t t I S<' pr nt ,,·ere - l{e, Fr La · on, C ( • p , I{ v I ,i•hl'r lei T>llan1 C \rdfi, lei , I Ion Jud,; (l 0!1111, n, !\1 rs. J I Burke l'I L • \I ( I> 11r,11nhane G L () , I }I 11rl \', d:... J Dono, an • • T , J '. L) on. • ;>. l' , < tc etc The l{e,· Cha1nn,1n who,, r c1vecl ,,,th appl,,11sc S.'l, I 11 <l emro 11 a,1 honour t,, I a k l to pr 1dc at t�e m <_ Lin; that , cn1n�. and he , sur th v �onSlllercd •! a great 11,,n ,ur to lia,·, there for tl1 l1rst time a <l1s•1n"111 !le<I ,·1�11,,r 1n tl1c p r- on of thl" Hon J11dge Col1alan 111<')' ,,ere !am1!J,1r ,v1th the o'htr lace , as tl1c,· . :i."· tl1('1n a• tit ,lasse� ur at co, rt.� from time to tin<' fl1e,, \\<'r tl11 r<' that c,cn1n, to •ake account a t,, •he \\(>rk of the ,;c s1on and h 11nderstood the '>ecrctar,· ,,·uuld tel th 111 of th<' progre th�)· had mad ancl a'•cr th.it the \\'orking Comn11ttcc ,,·ould meet tc, arra11ge oth�r matters. }le ,,·as per,;o:iallv 1>IC'a rel t1.• sec U: 1t tl1 re ,,. · <uch a large atttndance during the pa t 1n Jnth 'fh<• ,vc.1th r ,,·as against their c,,111,ni: regular!}·, l)ut till the,· pen;c, <.'red, a11rl he ,,. s J,· pp� t·> l<',1rn from tlte tea hl'rs tliat thl'1r efforts ,,·erl' .. •tr n1lc<l ,,·,th gornl re ults ·rhat w,1 Vl'r)' satisf 1ctor,, as ,,·as also ti, fa, t that U10 trophy o! 1111111,_ur �<'r11rc1l l,y tl1e teachl"!"l 1n th<' past ,,·oul;l Le r,·ta111e•l a1•d bcron1c tl1cir 1iror1 rt,·. fl1s hart ,v,1s ,,·1tl1 the"" 11,e, and 11 \\'a a grea• pica urc to l11n1 t,, ,,·1t11es.� ,11:!1 ,1 large attt•nd.:.n < l'cacl1 rs c,1n1e tl1C'rr fr, '.11 f,,r an,l near, and ,vJ, .. n till'\. ,,·tr so anxio11s to ar,111irp a k11r,,\'ll·dge of tl1<· langu,,g,· of tl1,·ir co.:1ntry tl1e )·,,unge• ,n, n1l1ers 11 iul<l fc,Ilc,,,. tl,c,r cxamJllc. \\ lien su, 11 a �11111t w,1 n1a11lfest,•1l lte sa11l tl1at the m<>1·c·111e11t 111 tl1at dislr1c t l1ad C'o1nc lo �ta1. n1ul tl1at c;J,,n<lore ,v,,11ld 1,.. ree1>gn1 cd as ,1 cc11trc for the tc-acl1111g of tlte lr1sl1 langua�l' n111l tl1at 1r1 tl1c future tl1cre ,,·oul,I lie a gr,·at cl,·,,! mc,r,· sa11i acid l1ear,l ab,,ut it :'llr \!11 !1,,cl 111ll1r1a11c. 111111. Sec ,vt,,, ,v,1s recr1,·r,i ,,·itl1 ap11Ia·1s,.• g,1, e :1n accr,11111 of tl1P ,,·1,rkrn� of tl1e Sch,,c,I Ill lri,lt, ,11111 pr1,cc,·,l111g 1n r ngh�lt, o;.11,l lhl' s1l1<iul ,,·as st,,rte,L tl1r('e yc·ar, ago. l l1l' tir�• y'e,tr tl1e}· had an att,·11,t,,n, ,. ,,1 to, • lie s,•, l')J11! )'car 38, nnrl tht' prt'se11t )·1·,,r tl1e n•1111l>cr 11i1 th!' r,,ll ,,·a� �,; Sonic lrme agu tl1t'�· ,vr(>l<" t<> 111.:, ('01n111i,;sion(•rs ,,f :-.at,onal Edu• a•,u,1 t,) r<'c••gni ·c· tl111r 1eacl1l'rs a11,l give thC'nl a certifiLate, .111<l thev got a11 Gn'i,vt•r ,vlucl\ le1l tC• ct lrn\� LOrrc,p,,n,lt'llc('. ,\t first the lloard rt>f1t�e1l. I,ut ev,·ntn,'lll;· tit<'\' S..'ll<l llH�}' ,,,,ul,t s ·n,t ,t,,,,·n ar1 T11. J>tct,1r ,vl1,, Fri1t in a r,'J><•rt, ar,,I 11£'\' Ju,,! r,•as,,n tc, 1,eli,·ve tl1;1t 11,e .-t•rl1iJ(;1t,· ,,·,,111.l I><· rt·co;;n1,c,l ti,· tl1e <.'01111t1i · ,1c•11crs. ·r11,•,· ser,t tl1re,· st11,t nts f1,r exa1n1nati11n last \'l'ftrl a.n,l tJl,-.)' ,,·ert· iortu11atc· e11011glt in �c, \1r1n� a. t 11�). I lie)· St'nt stuclent� ag-o:L1n tl1is \'P<\r, an,l thrv 1,C'lit•\ f·1l tl,c)' 1\'0111,t suc,,·e<l in ,,J1tai11ir1� tl1,:, :'lla.tltl'r Ct1Jl ,tgair1. .\l1ss ·r.,,, 11,t1P11rl, \\ 110 ,,·as c,,rcl1;1l\\' ,grectc,I, S,licl ,hf' sh,,ul,l like tc, "-'l\. ,l ,vor,t ;1s I<• tl1e g,,o,I ,,·r,rk tl1:1t ,,•as he1ng ,l1,11e tl1rre .\•; ,,nc' ,, l1r, attcn<lc•l the cl,,s�es, sl1e co11l1l tc·st1f\· t<> tl1e al11l1t1· a11rl C'liic1rn,}· ,,( the 1.,,1chc1 s. ,,·ho rl1d nr,t �pa.re' thc111sPlve, 111orn1ng or CY�n1n1.;- -+h,·1· al,va)I, ,,·ork(•1l l1ar1l. ancl tl1ey 11,,,l J;ecn 111,tailing in t]1('ir ki11,Jness and ,:ourtesv to tl1C' ,tu•lcnts. In s,,ving tl11s sl1e ,,·as ,,nly en,lor,ing tl1c opin11,n ,,f all ;,tt,·11,!1ng tJ,,. sl"hl,r>l. /\. ,·<1lleg!' like tJ1,1t ,vas ccrt,1in t11 l1avc :,n cir, at1ng i111l11c·n,·f' ,,n tl1e peopl". . -\ l·1,u11try shuulil l,a,·,. its o,1·n l:1ngn,ti::<.'. an,l she, ho11ecl tl1cre ,,.1s a lic·ttcr d:t}' i11 store fr,r Irelan,! .\lr J. ;\I. l{,1rkc, l3.! •. , ,,·ho '"as rcce1,·e,I ,,1tl1 appl.l11sc, sa11l ,is cu,c ,,·h,, l1a•I t, ... en 111 a sn1.:1ll and hun1Llc ,va)· a,sr•ciatc,l ,v1tl1 tl1e n1anagc1,1c11t o! tl1at s,·h,>ul. lie ,,·a, , er)' gl,111 lei see Sll<'h a large asse1nl1lagc of 1ntcll1gl'nt a:icl ,·ntl111s1ast1c st111l•·nts, ,,n,t lie l1opecl a11d trust,,,! th,·}· l1a1l all pro!i:<'<l �.,.. tht•ir rnontl1's sta,· 111 l;Jan,L,1re. \\-lien the,• ,vent ha(lc t,, tl,r,r hon1es he ltc111,,l tl1e�· ,,·oul,I go "not al,,11,• ,.,.,,11 pl1·,1�1ng r11emories of (;l'1.n,lr1rc, <>f its (�}1armin� sccn'·r;· ;Ln,I g,,o,l-n:it11re,I 11en1,tc, lint also ,,·it!, a b,•ttcr lo,·r- of the oh! t1,11g11e, anrl the r,lcl lan<l. an<l ,�1tl1 a dctcrn11n,1t111n tl1at Irish 1rlcals a11d lr1sl1 na+1,,nhor1r! ,,·,,ut,I not <lie Ile 111ight I><' j>crn11ttcd 10 c1>11grat11l:1te tit,• goo,! and encrgetir te.,cl1er� of this ,,·ho,,l. not ,,nly c,n their <.11(, ,·ss 1n ,,·,nninl( this J1:1n,lso111c . ,_,,,! 1n11cl1.,:ovetc1! prize, bu• also [or l,r1n1,.,ng there' <'nth11,1astic pupils, ,\'l10 ,,·,1111,l yet t,c a fact1ir 111 hurlrl1n1r up tl1e I r1sl1 nat1or, He l10J•e<I l>t fore 111any }'<•:ir, the s,·!11,ol ,vould l>e<:0111c a real , ,·ntre o[ nat1on:1l .- •tlturc·. ,\n•l national

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eildrcn 1111dcr ten gel abso!11!el_v 110 instruction r Irish, and as they often, girls as well ,1; boys, lt\'l' school at eleven )'c•ars of age to RO with tei r elders to Scotland, t he Gaelir- cause can sarcely be expected to flourish ! '\ t present except as teachers there is practie,I}' 110 demand for Gaelic speakers as such, and ,1·ile this is the ease it is not for tl1e rest of Ir,ancl to criticise tl1c· apatll}' of 11ative sptkc'.rS to,,·,1rcls tl1e langu,tge. tr1 ,1·J1at ,l clifi'ere11t foriting tlic Gaelil' 1rt}t1lcl l1e J)lacecl tl1 ro11gl1011t !lie Gaecll1e,1Jtacl1t if prcllc· fo1111cl tl1at tl1ere ,,·as :1 real clc1nancl for nat1e speal,ing ,,·orker:, i11 Irelancl, as there 011gt to l)e if \\'C ,ire reall)' i11 c'arnl'St ;1l)ot1t the Janµage. If t lie c;aclic I.eag11e start eel tl1ese labour cxcl 11ges ,,·itl1 tl1e olJjec:t c,f fi11<li11g e111ployn1rn· for 11ati,·e s�)eal,ers in Irel;111cl, it coultl, ,,·e are a:1nficlPnl. rou11t 011 tl1e 1vl1ole-l1e,1rted s11prn·t of ,111 S}'t11patl1iser<; ,,·itl1 tl1c language n1t)\'t,1cnt. Far1ners \\',ti1tir1g- l1ar,·est l1ands cotilLl l)e s11ppliecl ,,·ith Gaelic speakers ,vl10 n1iglr tl111s, l)t sitlcs l,eeping up t lie lang11age tl1e111tl,·es, be llf great beneti.t to districts ,,·l1ere the lmguage l1as J1ad to be 111ore or less ,\notl1er ,·ery useful artifi<ll.11)' repla11ted. l)r,111cl ,,·ci11!Ll l)e t l1e suppl)•i11g of Gaelics11t:·;1kiig 111aitl; to fa111ilies ar1xi<lUS to l1a,·e tl1eir 1·J1iltlrG1 gro,,· 11p i11 a Gaelic at111ospl1ere, a11d 1 J1i,: ,,u11lcl be pa, ticularly· 11�eful ;1,: regarcls n11r:c,·s :u1d n11rser,· 111aicls. In the sa111e ,,·ay t1\111rrs of 5J1ops a1;<l offices of e,·ery· clescri1)tion l·o11l1l ap11l)' _to the labo11r ex,l1.a11ges fo� Gaelicspl'aki111! assistants, and th11s g1,·e practical l1e)p in the ,,·ork of keepi11g 11ati,·e �1-1L•akers 1n I re lane!. 'l'l ( p�t:iblishn1ent of Gaelic Labour Excl1ant::e ... ,, 0111<1 l1e a prnL·tical encouragL'111ent to 1>arents to kt-Pp up Gaelic in tl1ei !101ne::, anll to -;ee tl1ar tl1eir cl1ild1en nt last got in�truction in tl1c 11nt1011al language in tl1e • 'atio11:il Scl100!. r111 re. ,,11 Ir,, 11 tC' 1i' ,, rt .. ti 11�,

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CLANDORE IRISH COLLEGE.

atonement. Throughout the Gac·,Ihe,tltucl1t there is, of course, a ronsiderahlo ,1n11,11nt of individual effort !J1•i11g rxpendr-d- all honour to the galla11t Iew l -but the Iar-t remains that a more universal effort is needed tl1rc.111gl11,11t Ireland if the native speaker is t,, get ;tn)· real assistance, Take, for instance, Aclrill Island, ,,·J11�r,� there is still a vast store of native Gaelic ,1·J1i1·]1 could saved for the nation. At present in spite of the r-xistr-ncc of the Congested Districts Board, nothing practically has been dono to render it more JJO�si]J)c· for the people to live 011 the island : there are no industries, and although repeated demands fur purchase 11,1,·1· lJP(•11 made the tenants have not )"c·t l1L'Rll1i to lJ11,· ,111t their • Janel. Paren ts 11,1 ve Io chose hot wven sending t heir children to 1\ merica to join t lie relat ives already over t lu-rc, and letting tl1e111 form part of the annual exodus of all t he able-bodied 11c111lJers of the populat ion to Scotland or :;:ngl,111cl for J1;1lf the }"Car-,,·itli for the sons lie third choice of putting tl1e111 into the ar111y r 11a \'}' ! !11 most of the schools 011 the I sland

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)tr I' 0 l{o nh.1ne, (111,f <,.1 '1 L,. 11 <>, n · r ,,·ho ,,� ,,·, nnl,· r 1,cd d,lrt c! 11 at length in Irish. -peaking ,n I· n l1 11 h ,.-ant cl ,,ork ancl p king t<JO Tht I' ,,. �. pr t"dt'<I h1n1 hacl 1n J irc I th• ·11 11,l tl-t• 'I I th<' tittle l1r ,,tu h tl1 ,. had 11 '1• 11 11 r , 1,. bc<on1 a lilai:r ·1 h•, had l>< <n o Ion• ,Jr1•1k1 , ,� I • t ·a h1n.g fr11m a for 1 n I, n ua •, , 1111 f ,, ,,1, sandwi hNl into 1t th1t 11 "·,1 ,1 , ,1111, r ti • 11 l ;in, lri 11 1n tl: 111 :1t all !'I Jtt<I · (' ,1 1 11 I 11 I tl1 could Jia,e 110 na•·,,n ,,,tltuut , I ·i •·1 · 11111 Cohalan l1.1cl J>ra tiscd "·ha• lie pr h 1 1 ,111 . h lia,1 ent 111 < hi dr n to ti, , I, 1t,.J t•,,·r, 11 ,. nI t true a,,,! terl1ng n1rn. "1U10 11 , 11 r•,1, , "'•, \\'01•1<1 ,vc,rk fr,r Ir la11cl 111 bright ,1 ,v, 'I 1 11'1111 k ,t. \ \'ote� ol thauk.,; t,, tl1e l{c, I 1 f)'fJ, J> I t, r g,, ing tltl' •rl1·iol. a11cl to tl1 t,n !1,•r • r Ll1, 1 ,,r· , \OIILl111ll'!l th .. prO(ted1ng

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s501l ,\rl" li;1s just e!i, ;1·1! ,1f1,.r I· o �,111,t, rfull · s11<'cessful · si,,n . It OJ><'n t.l un July 1<111 .. \n•l tlte orig111al ><l<'a ,,! 111., 111anagC'tn<'nt ,va..� It•, l1Js 1,11 \u•• 1 t T<>tl1, 11ut ,vl1 ·1t tlt:-,t 1l.;1v, .1111 ro11n<l. ,,n1y I tu l,·nt (,vJ1,, ,verc c,J,l1�e1! t,, go/, ,,·,,uld IC',1vc : ,, l1<'r j<1inl'rl, anti so 1111 WC' ,vPnt kc·,•nrr tll'.'1 ,.. "'· for t,vo \Vl'ek 1norc, :111,l tl1cn t,, th,· • n,l ,t tl1.· rn,,n•h ,tn<l l bel!r <· ,vc ,v,Julil J,e still 1n : ion, but i1>r th" I -;1r of k1llrn • our tc.1cl1,·rs. 1,.-,L r, ,. .... urt<1 11 1-lil.Oj' ,.· l>e;,ut1f11I v,,icc wa, bt·ginning to �011n<I l1k • :1 f•il( !,om, 111111 111:ill ,von1lt!r, fur lice i,l,·s lll"li11 · a� �I''' olL6, ,. 11 1.,,1·•]1t singing an<l <l,111,.1nt in tl1c scl10,Jl. p!p111 • 111 tJ1e , 111,,v· . an,! h1· 1vas tht' hie ,1n•l �,,ul ,,I our 1v,1nclerf11I , h1, I ceilulhthe and ,,i tht' villagt· ,ind ,ou,1trys1d,• ,\ ,v,·ll. a11,l ,ve kne,v he 1,.i.d har(lly had rJnt· g,,od r,· t J t ,nany ye:1rs. CJur •• �,n �·''"!' 11161' (t'. �. (.'he ,ri6f6) tir,·I" a ltc· is, ,,·as l1cginn111g t,, locik Jad<'<l. a11d t'oln1 ti S ''•I' ,1nrl ,\n fic111i;•'-.\l! l1a1l 11lsr, t,, he con icl,·r"11. ·,, wit!, deepest regret ,,·e clr,st·•l ,,ar ,!oors on th· l;�.t day ,,[ Sept•·n1l,er, t,, <•J>en tl1en1 ,1••ain L" c1<n n.,n, 'l>l• 1n ,\11g11,t. ,,,13 \\'r l>atl 11,cd thrc1u�l1 ti •ht of tho l>11s1est a11,I l1ap1iicst year� ••I our liv<'s an,l ;nanv wl10 came t,, 11se fro1n afar, ,,·ith J1,1rcllv a ,v1,r,l ,,f C.:arl1c on tl1C"ir li()S, I ·It us flu<'11t rie;1kers, to �1)rc:1,I the li�ht i11 1nanv a d1Sta11t 11t:1cc lf the O'Curr}• t'c,!l('gc ,vas jcst1ni;ly ,, cU.c<l of advertising thcn1scl,·cs "like f'car's Soap,'' I a1n afraicl ,vc have la1cl ourselv,·s r,1i•?n tc, t!1(' c l1.1rge of acting tl1e " !)ark llr1,tl1l'rs." \\'e 1li<l kt·C'J> a little to<) 1lcnt abo,1t our <l,,ings, I fear, but 1t w:Ls ,,nly lK·cause ,vc were too unsy, to,, happy tc, tl11nk about tilt' ,,ut ;i,L,. ,,·orld or tt,c <·x1stence ,,! ne,\'SJ>apers 'J"h1q is 111trc·lv to tell )'(,11 �,ncl yc,ur r,>arlcrs that we, ltave ,lc,se,l L.1tcr OOml.' of 11s will give <lc·tJ.1ls ,,( the "·1,rk done, an,J tl11' manv hap1)Y •lays sr• nt in (i1\.1•.\n , c'\.6. 0

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7.9.1912. � -

cclul ation.

I hC' (.'ha1m1an S.'litl he ,,·0111,l no,,· i,tro<lu, e to tl1em J 11,l" C ohalan ,�·ho,c naml' ,,·0111fl be long reme1nliercrl in connection \\'1th the cl1ool. 'Jl1e Ho11. Judge Cohalan. ,,ho ,,·as recei,·e,I \\'ith lcu,l antl continued a1•pl1u,;c, saic! of l.Ourse 1t ,,·as unne.:.e,sar}· fc,r anylx,cly , 1S1t1ng Trelan1l sa,,11g an,·th1ng aoo11t tl1e Garlic I.eagne me,, ement, or of +be amo11nt of gootl it ,,·as doing. I-le thought an\·one �t11d1"111: lr1,l1 sho11lrl he struck by ti�[." t that c,crv ,,here the peop1e ha,1,: lack ot,onf11le1 Cf' l'l them Pt,,�; and too l,'l'C1t :, rlk,pc. 1bc,n to f,,llo," the cu ton1 an,! habit set b\ somcho<l\ else. fhe Gael, Lragut" 1f 1t ha,! 1lo11e noth1n" el,,-, had su <eed..,,l 10 m,1k1n,: the people look le) th mse!,·es. 1n tea0h1ng them that tr,-y had cO'll of a great ra• <' tl1at thP\ !':a.cl a great past, and a great tradi lion and great I le Is. an·! 1f t l1ev ,,·ere on!,· true to tl.�mscl, c<; t'lc} '"ou l l•a,·e a great futur f:,·en· movC'rr,�nt of that Jortl r,•qu,re<i ,,·ork, and h.'lnl ,,ork; 1t ,,·a,; not c·a \ to learn a lang11 :ige, and c,·en m'l,cm _1t of that klnd "a l1able to m t ...,1h grt, -, clitlicul 1, but trc,, hou· I .ir.J . and a' _;o tha f'\tr\' rung \\"Orth stn,1ng to. \\a .r,1}' J:;'l1 by hard" �k ard ..a nf c It "a mu '1 � lt'f' tog<> �1 h th , urr nt that, to 1cmp to '"a• :in:• t It "·ou'.d be n1u h •. r •o �o Jl<l v In r L, r,ot ,,·or>h ' a,i1r: :. bcca.1 � pt -op' l1i.gh 1n pv.1t,on kno"-n nn•lurg of I an I are ,er,· lit• about 1t hit tho uho kno"· V· thing of this. coun•n· know !ha• the g a• h1sto...., of the In r ra, t' i · bonn<! up , 'l · he lustorv "f • he languag and unt,l the langua t" a· r torcd he Insh pie rou'<! uot und ,rg•and the ra c and could not pro •I" look o th tu•ur The C.a !t l.e.i;ue ,ould do ,;rea ,, ork ont,· b)· , li sa nfice on the p;irlt of md1,"lli ,.:.I <n n n. I h r, '1• be no,.· 1n a mall

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JRISH-ll{E'L·\ ·1i C:<J. \'I·., f Ill Ill AT'. llr,n 1:hcar l,a;;a1r, J\ cl1ara, In .. ,,nnect,on \\1th ubu, , th , 111 r ,t l,r,,ncl, · of the C,a.,l1c l.cague 1n l)ul1l1n ,,u l, •u L t I matter up. let t.hem put t,,n,-arll the na n ,,f their best singer'!, clancers, elocu ion,· , le t·1rrr , t c , who '"ould be Y.'111.tn, to� ,�t , ountrv b,. n h c,n th,., l,ncs. ugg · te<l b, Jjnan na lla'ltia'l and a,1 J•, 1'1rc.1' I) S£a-;hclha I am certain Bnan , 1ul1l r· t rv !iii.: I. I <r1 >1111 I pro te,n until the llur,a'J ,,1 c l.,as1 . Hoping th1, bur,..au ,, 1'1 Ix- t ,ib!1 11• ,! "' once o as to Ix 1n or·l· r l,c •nr n xt <'"n 11 , lit season. I misc le mor-mh '"· f • C,H \. (J < f· \l,LAIG�I.

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THE ABBEY THEATRE.

On Thursday e� ntn" in the \l)l,ey Thcatr h f" will be produced for th · fir; time 1n Ir ! 1nd •• la 1n Harte, a p!ay 1n two a • • bv ·r. (. lurra,· Ir lurrav v.1,l be rcmcmb(>retl a th a th � cf that po"·edul p',y, ., Birthright' and h nt 11'. ;;, "'' h \\'a'I pro<luc d for the fu t t1mr 1n l..c ndc :1 la • Jun , ,ill be fo·1nd Jc-t 1 • p ,,, rlu an•! h· pll:' 1ou ,, :Jrk ' \1 ur1 11 ar+ <! • the trag dv of a man d lcT th J>n tr. ,o<1 who fird5 at th,. t moo: nt at • I rt •1, o� d1r t ca1• to 1t. 1\1 I <K-1 a •I , • �. r o • ,·oun,; man g,,c a p r I I r ,. r. l' T ,r and on wh h on btr h1,11 i:· 1 '• r1 • I,


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to have no J,anguage l'rc,cc�s1on this year, and to_ nx t he next Language \\eek in Dublin for the week comrnc:iiri11g �t. Patrick's Day nr-xt in order that Language \\',·ek rniglit be t he same throughout. Ireland, 'Lhe question of the Language Procession being held on SL. Patr« k's day next will be dccirled at the January meeting of i\a 'l'cachtair1

FIX'l'URE.

Sept. 22.-�\ep1u,,.,i,c , -ocut,"c 1i16q1 0 lil-'<1,1l5e cu\.u,mc1l,Le.

THEATRE. ABBEY THE

1f' tll1fC,

THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY NEXT at 9.15 p.m., and SATURDAY MATINEE at 2.30 p.m,

••COATS,"

Fir.st production in Dubiiu of

'' MAURICE HARTE,"

A Play in Two Acts, by T, C. Murray,

•• THE

A Play in One Act, by Lady Gregory,

-

Martnee Prices-3s., zs, 6d 1 2 ricess., s-, s ., · 3 P Is. Booking at Cran1er's. P. P. CURTIS, Late Manager Dollard, Printinghouse, Dublin ; and Sealy, Bryers & Walker, Dublin. Head Teacher School of Printing.

LETTERPRESS & LrrHOGRAPHIC

PRINTER,

Bookbinder and Statio11cr,

DUBLIN.

12 TEMPLE LANE, -

High-class Work.

-

-

Moderate Prices.

TEAS.

E buy &II our Teas by comparison and tir,t baa4 \\'e, the re Iore can otter the pick of the, �larkel ••

following 1)r1ces :-2/6. 212. 'J/-, and l 2 r�r lb.

'00 11,\CCA ·nit,r, b111'51-0111 111 C.,'\Olrh.

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1/10. 1, 8, t,6. ti•

BECKER BROS ., ,

C<l-0 I Lee 11 �, 11 ...,1111. 25 CeApn65 JJA1'1l0Cl.

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l\IEl\1BERSHIP

C,\RDS.

Every men1ber of '' e,,,e Os'' should possess one of tl1e ne,v l\Ien1 bership Cards. Neatly and artistically printed, with border of Celtic design, the Cards are 3uitable for framing, and will be looked upon as treas11rcd mementoes in years to come. One Card post free to any address for t\vo penny stan1ps. 1'went)' cards post free for 2s. 6d. WRITE TO

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coupon.

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OUR COl\lPETI1'ION. I thought I had hidtl�n a,,·ay so carefully in those �ix " Jt1mbles" tl1e nam<·s of six Irish to,vns that the lJO)'S and girls ,vl10 arc only beginners ,vould never fine! tl1tm out, but I ,,·as mistake11, a;t tl1e big [)ile of correct solutions in front of me at tl1c present mo,nent Not even _one con1petitor ,vc.s ,vrong in a r.roves. single solut1011, and 1n tl1e end tl1e con1petition had to be dccidtd on ihe merits of tl1c handwriting.

-

FINEST •

,:6511,0, I Next ,veek I hope to have a ,vord ,vitl1 the 'new Another simple men1bers ,vho have come to me. con1pebtion will be announced also.

BROOKLYN GAELIC LEAGUE OUTING. On Sunday, July 21st, tl1e members and friend,of the Brooklyn Gaelic Society journeyed to Green,vod Lake, it being the annual outing of this progres,ve brancl1 of tl1e Gaelic League. Tl1rot1gl1 the cour�sy of l\lr. E. H. Barto, Passenger Agent of the :rie Railroad, a special car ,vas reserved for t!1e party 01the train which left Erie station, Jersey City, at 9.10 .. m. 1'he rainv weather did not dampen tl1e entl1usia,n of tl1e cro,vd, and tl1ere ,vas 11ot a dull n1on1ent untitl1e train reached the station at tl1e lake. liere tl1e �trty boarded the steamer " 1lontclair '' enjoying ailOSt an J1otir's sail admiring the n1any beauty spots CJI the 1\.rrivi11g snortly before noon at tie De landscape. Gra,v's \Villetts Point Hotel, dinner ,vas served slvrtly after one o'clocl{, and after tl1at tie real fun oI th, day started. l\Iany took ad,·antage of the bathing facilities, otl1er ]?referred ro,v1ng across to Chapel Island, the othe,: side of the lal<e, explorin.g parties penetrat,'Cl the interior fc r some distance, and at the dai1ci11g parillion a goodly cro1vd hacl a rare old time. The Irisb figure dances, four hancl reel, four l1and jig, etc., were thoroughl_y apprecic.ted by the host of villagers and other visitors at the place ,vho were 11ot afraid to Shortly before four applaud in vigorous fashio,1. o clock the rain disappeared, and for the next 1:\vo hours all was sunshine, �,nd it ,,as a tirecl but happy lot of Gaels who embarl,ecl for tl1e ret11rn trip to the station. Both l\lr. Barto of the Erie Road and l\1r. De Graw of the hotel tlid their best to make things merry. �

Large Assortment of Irish Poster Type.

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RISING OF THE MOON,''

CURTIS

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11J,.p t.,,5,,1-6 -o,"' tu, " 1)11151ui11, " c"I'", ·'5"1' .:,"I'"' F.6."0 ...\ btt.6.n tl1 i::1.0.p .6.11tlflll 1 n"51..C,(l,.11TI 116 1116."0.1.\1'.J ,.,_,5,1r c\l "5 ob.i.111 .:,o "OIA!l uui:p.\Ct"AC •'1' ron n" h<',pc,,nn ! 1r Ct'll-'S 11<\.C DFUll cu1Li11i "" 1,e,pe..-1111 tt1\,(' c61i1 c 1101-6e"1i1 ,,, L ,,5,1r i:61i1 5,,cuc "t"e \.e ;..c--r "• "i: b' re1-o 111 CUl\le-'J' .6.11 C6.JIC.6. 50 n1berC> \,,6 Cl:c,111, le C011$11Am "Oe. Ct1$c\t', ;1.:,Uf C<\1111 Cltlll e $0 tttbCl-0 C\I f.6J'CA lC11' ! UC'll bu"t'O ,,:,UI' bC,\1111:\C'C !

A Comedy in One Act, by Lady Gregory.

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It was arrange<L at the Annual General Meeting of ·rcachtairi ni tJ1n IJ11blin 13rancl1_es of the Gaelic League J,,..!d at 2s Parnv!l Squ are, <>n_S,Lt11r<lay last, j t st ult.,

AS

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Lu5nArA s�n ;\Oil. 11101)'•

1

tee

"l'

ti"'lt�.4\"'C�r)t�

I

mb.0-11.e

f.iiuf,A\, 4 \',c1i" I n1tJ4,\1ll:" �i:'6 l�tlAC I ,!))1

,

September 14., 191:i

AERII>HEAC I-IT AT l IS�EACH. To inaugurate the winter <;t"ssion of. the South Westmeath Coist� Ceannthlr a great gathenng ""'.5 held on Sunday last at Toghl'rstown House, near 'historic Uisneach, ,\ strong appC'al to the young people to come rnto the Gaelic League classes, .an� to par nts to �e that the children are taught Irish in the .schools, "as

made in an eloquent adrlress by Boan Oh Uig1nn. and it was evident from the frequ(;"nt outbursts of applause his which punctuated the speakers remarks words did not fa'l or, he,·dless ears. Stirrmg sonzs and recitations were dc·livc·rl'd by Sean O Seaghdh.-i (Atha Cliat h}, J. Hughes (Atha Luain), etc . and the ?.'pers from Beal Atha Luam aroused unbounded cnthu,ia.sm. Fathers Casey, Coyn� and O'I{aghallaigh, and Sean O I{aghallaigh, rnuinteoir tnistil, are to be congratulated on the success of the fixture.

14, 1912

Tea Dealer, and Importers,

I STH, GT. GEORGE'S ST., 17 NTH. EARL ST.,

DUBLIN.

s,

I

MARK

YOUR

LINEN.

RUBBER STAMP

With your name in Irish or Engli&h, 1/6 Post Free,

BROADBERY & Co.,

l ·�:�.��.•mp 19 Hendrick St.

DUBLIN. NOTE.--The only Rubber Stamp Firm in Ireland a lh · d t the Irish Trade Mark Oo04. u or,se o use

COD LIVER OIL.

I + GREENE'S Celebrated Pure God In

Half-pints,

liver

Pints and Quarts,

To be hacl at

17

William

Street,

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&vi? .-.,one)' an• Vi!ioit the.

SOUTH CITY TAILORING UP-TO-DATE,

GENTS�

9 Lord Edward Street, Dublin.

SPE.CrJl\..

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DUBLIN-MAD�

SUIT81 To Meaeure, 36 -

Our 3:; - Suit, worth. 42 -. SPECIAL 4S -. aoooa •• • • 37 6 •• 30 ... , FftOM . � •• • • 4.,. •• • 55 -. IRlSH •• •• 45 - •• MAKE.RS . •• •• 50 - •• �i•' TaiteriaC I StHi&Jitr, CattleC RHIU a Work lttllU ••

Buy >·our next Bcots frcm us.

-

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We nave thtm 1n all leathers and JI · d h ourao,vsn zeM 1 s anf s apes at 18/6 and 21/-, and every pair anu- acture

& R. PAGE,

31 Parliament

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Street.


(A•

THE BELFAST COLLEGE OF IRISH

-an-

PatPOn I THE MOST REV. DR. TOHILL.

SESSION.

(E,ta/Jls'slud <kto/Je,,., rqo.r).

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<:lass work commences on Monday, 16th September, 7 p.m.

Professors :

se-0.5.<\n O c-0.t.61n, (Principal). mzme nt rh-0.t:5-0.rh no, m . .o. seernus o se-0.RC.<\15. noistn nt -0.b-0.Rc-0.15. pnrn mcc -0.n l).61R'O. m1ce.dt m-0.5 u15fn.

I

men o1Reac

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REGISTRAR, Colaiste, Chomhghaill, Bank St., Belfast

.& M mn

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..& 'R.o.1nn)

f

m.& t.6.:S.6.tltl r1l) :so 11.&f'.6.1nn rtl61t' c.c,.5.c,.ro �U1:S mo bero �.ci1tce t'Ot11.c,.1t'> te.c,.c-r.c,.. '5eALW1m "Oil) 50 mbero f1t'.> fAfC.A terr .Atl Ce.AO ASUf terr .6.tl t,,:t'eAfC.6.t. Le t1c1t' no t:eACC.6.1f'e.6.CC cmnct'e.c,.C 'Oo cut' Cu5.c,.m, bero mq C.c!f't' f'01rh .c,.n "mb.ci'O." 'C6S.6. """ 5.c,.e'01t:se .c,.5 be.c,.5 .c,.5ur "":S m61', mz 1 nctn uc concecncmn,

(By Dr. S. P. MacENRI) 1

n.c,. Se.c,.Cc 'O'Ce.c,.mpo1tt,

IS THE

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Corroee n.c,. 5.c,.1ttttfle.

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The Book which makea Speakera.

---+-

.

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M. H. GILL & SON

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-classes will be held in the College premises, Bank Street, Belfast, on :Monday• A FPldaya ... 7 p.m. - e.ao p.m. . . 2 p,m. • & p.m. &atul'daya

n..a••a.o•• SOLVII.J

SOME RECENT PUBLICATIONS OF

cot.srsce coril:5'°'1tt. EIGHTH

11

..\fl CtA1'09At11 80lUHI.

me.c,.'06n f6SriM1t' 14, 1912. September 14, 1912.

REVISED AND ENLARGED.

PLUO

Part I. now sufficient for First Year's Irish. Part II. now sufficient for Second Year's Irish. Special Edition for each Province.

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'°'" ne�tc eot�1s, Part I., Price 2d. To be had bound in one book, or in parts from

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Collected among the Irish-speaking people principally in Connaught. With an exhaustive vocabulary.

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1 /8 net; by poat, 1 /7!.

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no

eM:cnd .6.n ce1te.<lftn.d1F; C'101L-nM1'.>.6.15 uo nem "On umge. �nt1i U6. mu1115e6.r6.. :SL.An O 8 eocero mac ni 'o-euunn, o m.1,Lte. :SL•n o 4 posc-seancas. 2 Parts. Each 5L.An 1 c:, ceacce 5n.a1mem. C.A"O:S o "Oonnc.A"0.1. :SL.An o a te.6.1'.>.6.n .6.n .cime.6.ril. m1ce.1t O mi,tt.e. :st.An o 4 St::.6.ln-Ce.6.Ct::A. An Irish History Reader, by Eoghan O Neachtain. Illustrated by Seoirse O Fagain. Part I. 8d. Part II. :SL.An 1 O me..1tt,05 tlA m..1c..1om. Se.an U..1 Ce..1tt..11s. I O bf'u1'6e.an C.aol't.6.mn.

C..1t F10nncr.&$.d.

p.

Situation Vacant and Wanted. Articles for Sale alld Wanted, &c., etc., 16 words for &I., and 3d. fer every additional eight word.11. Three iaser•aa for the cost ot two Half-penny stamps for aaia, under Five Shillin�. Trade Advertisements in this column, 6d. per nne All "''"'"unicalion.s r•.sf,11cling A tlu11rli.111,,.,,nl•, Dl•:Pl,Yt a ,,.. olls1r-'•1, lo l,1 adtlr11u1d lo " Tl, Ma11a,1r, ..

9 O 6

Russell's Hair Cutting, Shaving, and A. BOUT Sha.mpoQing Saloon, SS South King Street, Up

..

of Grafton Street, Dublin.

c.cS. mumce61t1 :S.Aeiut;se .A "Oit .Af1 �otr'Oe te.Annc.Atf1 m<\1n1rc11e.AC bet"O fMt1mu15e. t::tti Cf1.AOb.dC.d. 'CU.dft6f'04\L ffl.dtt te f.d:SAtl. CU1f1'C'e.(!f1 Tl,d h1.d'fl'fl.6�4rtf'1 i:1115 'C' "ti 'Oe b'-'t1l1<l, RUn6.t'Oe, COTITif1.d'O n.4 5.Aei>1t5e, 1 m4101-rc111 j:e.At1mu15e. WANTED, Gaelic Teacher, one evening weekly. Classes from 6.30 State terms before Wednesday, 18th inst. nun.-Connf16.'0 n.A 54'e"Otl;se, btti Cu.AL<.\nn.

rnec f.)Mf'.6.1f. 5t.6.n

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Complete catalogue or Gaelic League Publications sent post rree on application.

M. H. GILL & SON Lro.,

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TEACHER, experienced, native Irish-speaker, holding College certificate, would give lessons to private pupils, or teach branches of Gaelic League or Convent classes. Highest personal references. Apply " A," Cl.'11-6um Office. IRISH-SPEAKI�G Servant required by small family ill Dublin. Apply" C6.1Li11," this Office . 'C.6.rcu15e.).n m(11nt:l.!UIJI °C.).l)''Otl t.o.,tre.o.c 1 5Cot1C.Alf. Ctl.<\l'O cun murneA,u 1nr n.d rco1Le.6.f1TI.d a5ur inr O,d Cf1.0.0U.O.C.6. fe.O.f' fumnC.o).lllalt meanmn4\C 50 oru1t. ce1rc1me1re.ACC 6 Cot.11roe ..<\t5e. 'OeUTif.d'O r1nnce 1r amr..iin 15eacc m.dtte6.f '00. Cu111ce.o.11 t.At1t1"c.A1ri .d Ct11.dtl .6.JI 'Ol.6.t1mUl'O 6 s,otc!in, Run an co,roe Ce.o.nn· ca1r """t n4, tinrn, Morne Abb:!y, Mallow .


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led�-<\f' Vol.

xrv

XIV.

rosm-0.1 n

b.o.1te J.c.o. c1

t111rnr 29.

21, 1912.

pm5mn.

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ONE PENNY

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D.11> 6e4f't. no S"'� :S.6e'Ot1.Se0t1' 1 m1)41t.e .6t.t Ct1.&t S4n 40n 41'An '00 0e,nn4e 4ec

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le4t>.61' XIV.

U11t11i,

Vot. XIV.

n.o.

ton5-0.

No

29.

.o.n

e1tceo15. · rem).

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DUBl,IN, SEPTEMBER

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29.

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21, 1912.

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£4JJ

....1

pm5mn. [ Retfistered as a Ne'lllspaperj

21, 1912.

.

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so

INSIST

ONE PPRT

ON GETTING

l�ISH-M'"At>E et1TLE.�g FROM YOUR IRONMONGER•

If he does not stock it, or has not what suits you, drop a Post Gard to the Manufacturers,

The Irish Outlery Manufacturing Oo., Ltd., 1. 7 MERCHANT'S QUAY, DUBLIN. 4m.4C nU.41f' 4 conn.41C A:SUr 4 r:Sf'U'0.415 'OOC'CUf' n.4 mbe1te.i1t>4c e n4c l'le 4n cmne4r .i1 r»i .d1f' COf' 4f' b1t, 4CC re.4f'-f'01tte4C.&fl 4 rri 1 n·.d ce4nn. n.4c 1on54nc4c r4'0-nt'eAtnu15eA6 5e4f'-Cu1re.c1c 14'0 n.4 pite4t'r reo 4:SAmne? n4c be.45 .4n c-rutm 4CJ. .4C4b C.4nnc.4t A CUf' te15e4nn rM'O Of't.4 tem .4f' n.4 '0Aom1n ! mbionn me.4t'.'>41f' 4C4 m 'cutte ni. ni r:S�.At. .&'t4r4c 'O' .i1on 'Oume r:se4t 'Oe'n C-f6'f'C rm, A:SUr b'fe1'01f' TI.4C l'le .4n 54t'f'4 4 t)ior m 50 te6t( .a.1ce4nn.4 4 r.4mtu15ce4l' '06 4 t)e1t. 'Oe1t'Ce.41' :so mbionn cu1teo54 4:Sur be4c.4m 'Oit-t)eo 1 mbUt4nn.6.1r, 4.stJr 1 n'01orA'O.&n41t'.'> 4f' ru'O n.4 bp.&1'f'ce.4nn.4 n.A A15ur nu.411' 4 pt.4c.4nn be1tro15 n.4 '01or4'0.&m reo 1 n-4 mbionn nA re1t1'0i 50 5cu1f'e.4nn rM'O :S.4t 1 mb�.4t410 n.t. mbe1t1'0e.4C. 'tu5.4'0 '06 re<> CMtt .4 t)ett te1r,mA1' niol' ctume.c1t> ror 50 1'.41t) Aon 6401'4 n.& 4on muc bu.41tce te1r. 'C.ciU'f' .45 CAmnc .41' 1lMSAtc4r 'Outc.A1r 6om m41t; .45ur TI.AC t)re1C1mir U b01CCe.4fl41r :SO bf\At .4f'irc .4CC � .c1 t'>e1t 45.i1mn 4:Sur .4ff 'f'U'O 4 r,ru1t mumc11' n.c1 cil'e 45 b.4mc rt15e t)e.dt'.;.4'0 4r t>.& r.&S41t 41' .te.c1tcA01t'.'>, 're rm, 'Oiot n.6 mbe1t1'0e.4c, .4:Sur cu1fe.c1nn.c1 'OA bpt�roe n46 nru1t te4t com c.&n.4cc4c te1r reo 4.stJr A:S 'Out rA 'O nn'01Uf'.41t) ! 4CC .4n 'f'U'O .4 t',f.U1t cotuSA'O n.4 n'04ome .41f' b.4 ce.c11'c re4c4mc te n-4 te15eAr n6 1r .:SMf't' 50 mbe1'0 re 'f'6-rhAtt. °CA An 'O'f'OC· cor4rht.4CC te re1ce.&t CMTI.4 t�m. CU1f'Mnn r� An fMTI·f'.&'O 1 :scu1mne 'Oom : .c1:s p10CA'O '0�1re .c1:sur .45 'Out t.41' 'OOf'n.&n. lr .i1mU1'0 te n.c1 541tt .4 t)ru1t me.41' .4C4 1 n5n6t.4i1) n.A ci1te fOO e. lr l'iS-t',e,4:s 4n cru1m 4 CU1'f'eAnn mumc1l' n.4 cu.4t4 1 bp01t1c1t>e.c1cc te l'141r A n:sno tem. 'C.& r14'0 4:S 'Out cu15 4oncA1511) be.c154 �.:sur cu1:s 4onc.4151f> m61'.4 te e.i1tt46 4.5ur .5.4n fe4t' r14rt'u1se Of't.4, 4:SUr 'f'01rhe feO n.4C mbe.d'O .4nn 4CC 50 mberoir 1rc1S 41' .An .40TI4C nu.41f' 4 t)e1'0ir r:SU.4bt.4. be1'0 41t':Se.4'0 .45 ce.c1rc.&1t te1r 4n 5cior 4 ioc, 4.SUr CA t)ru1SfeA1' e ? be1't'.> re4t' 4n cr1op4 4:S ru1t te n-.4 tu1'0 tem f.&'n O'otu15 4:Sur c.a nru1sre.4f' .411'.SM'O te n-4 .4S41t> ? be1t> :so leof' 'OA1ome e1te com m.41t C�4'0TI.4. mun.4 'OC1.:S1'0 Atf\US.4'0, .c1:sur 4Cf'US.4'0 m41t, be1'0 4TI f'U'O te re1ce.cit n.&f\ f4CC4r 1 ne1rmn_ te r.4'04 4TI U--'040me 'OA .SCA1te.4m 4m4C Af' t.4of, .4n t'.'>6t41t' 4:SUf 4n 'CeA�

:so

YOU WILL LIKE THE LATEST MODELS IN

" LOCANIA" AlfD " PIERCE"

-- CYCLES. -They are absolutely the Finest Bicycles made, .and they're

IIU.SH.-Does that Matter P

84 pone c.401rhSm� 84

11

CAMDEN11 STREET, DUBLIN.

NoTE,-We sell Irish Bikes only, and sell them OA their merit,;. We repair all maku, properly and cheaply.

Does that Matter


rneaoon f6$til.o.tt' 21, 1912. September

en cts 1'00.Atfl SOlU13.

-:-

(.6.t' le.o.11.c.rn.o.1nc). 'Oul:'.>.o.tp'C .6.tl re.o.r mo p teir , "Sin-re .am.o.c Ce111, io nnuj- :so 5cm1,e.a'O-r.o. 'Oo coj-, .o. btleo5.o. lUf 1f te15tf te1t1 ; bf'U1'01'0e 1f 5n6t.o.1'0e .6.SUf e m.6.f' e15e.an'C.a f o pm 'OOt .6. u'e1rce.acc .ao1l:'.>111r :so 11e.a5t.a1r 1i161t' n.a Rorme 1 m.&r.ac.'' "111 'Oul:'.>.a1rc Ct.an mac ri1.ao1Lmu.a1u, t111re.a'O-f.6. .o.m.ac mo coirrn .6. cur brteoj; tur no te151r te1t1 so n-111np'O cur.a '0.6.til-r.a 501'Qe tu5 nae v.a1l:) e.6.5t.a1r .d5.a1l:) re111 1 Loctzmn 5.011 .a l:'.>e1t .d' -oot. .a u'e1rce.acc .ao1l:'.>111r so mun.a 11e.o.5u1r m6tf' 11.a R61me 1 m.&r.dc. me.att.d1'0 cu rm' .o.1tne m.a1t me 1r cu m.ac.an .an .6.t.at', mac t'105 Loctzrm." 'Out'.M1t'C Ml fe.6.f' m6t', "11ior me.alt.of 'OU111e no .d1t11e m.a1t rMm ; 1r me .an 'Ou111e ce.d'On.a. 'C.&1m .o.no1r .o.' 'Oot 'O.& 111nr111c 'Ou1c czrne .dn r.ac nae l:'.>ru1t e.a5u1r .0.5.011111 1 loct.0.11111. 't.&11115 m61t'1"e1re.at' ctoc.a1r1 .a 't65.&1t e.a5t.o.1re .o.5ur l:'.>10'0.6.f\ re111 1r m' .o.t.6.1f' .0.5 'Oe.o.n.o.m m.ap5.a1'0 f.3. 't65.&1t 11.0. l1e.o.5t.a1re, .a5ur e r.o. tn.ar5.d'O .6. l:'.>i fM'O 'Mf'f'.6.1'0 50 t'.6.C.6.'0 mo 1i1.&t.6.1f\ 'r mo 'Oe1t'l:'.>t1ur 'O'te1cr1nc 11.6. l1e.o.5t.o.1re .a.sur .6.11 'C.6.01l:'.> 1f'C1:S '01 11tl.6.1f\ .d l:'.>e.6.'0 f1 re1'(> ; .dSUf l:'.>i .o.n 111 reo ro-'t.o.1cne.o.m.o.c tem .o.'t.o.1r 50 t'.>f.6.1$e.o.'O fe .6.11 e.a5l.&1f .6. CUf' fU.df com f.6.0f\ 'Oo re1'0et5e.o.'0.6.f' urme f111 ; .a:sur 111f 1f ro. "111 111.6.1'0111 CU.6.1'0 11.a ctoc.&1f'1 '0'101111ru15e 11"1 11.an;e 'n.o. r.o.1t'.> r1 te berc .o.r n-a c65.&1t. Com.ar'tu15 m' .o.'t.o.1r .c.m.o.c '061t'.> .an .&1c r.a comne 'Out'.>tu15e 11.c. 11e.o.5t.c.1re. 'to1r1:s fM'O 111r .c.n 111.6.1'0111 u1pt1 .o.:sur rut r.& 'O'C.6.11115 co111te.ars.o.r .6.11 1.6. f111 fe111 l:)i .6.11 e.o.5t.6.1f fU.6.f. 11U.6.1f\ .6. l:'.>i ru.o.r 'O'Mt\f\.&'O.&f' .o.r mo m.&t.&1r .1111 e.c.5t.o.1r .6.SUf mo 'Oe1rl:'.>fM1f' 'OOt 1rce.o.6 'O'te1cr111c bpumne n.o. 11e.&5t.&1re; .a.sur com tu.o.t 'r .a CU.6.'0.6.f' 1rce.o.c 'OU11.6.'0 11.6. '001pre, .o.5ur '0'1mt15 .&n e.c.5t.o.1r '11.0. be.c.c.&11 ceo 1r11.o. rpe.o.pt.o.1t'.>. Sin-re .c.m.c.c 'Oo tor, .o. Ce111, 50 5cutre.o.'O-f.o. biteog tur 1r te1:s1r te1t1 ; brum1ue 1r 511ot.o.1ue, 'r e m.6.t' e15e.o.t1'C.6.f opm 'Oot .6. -o' e1rce.o.cc .o.01lJ111r 50 11e.o.5t.c.1r 111611' 11.& R61me 1 m.&r.o.c." '' 111 'Out'.>.&1rc CM11 mac ri1.o.01tmu.o.1'0, finre.&'0-r.o. .o.m.o.c mo cor .6. cur brteog tur no te1:s1r te1t1 so 11-11111r1r-re u.o.m-r.o. .o.n nru.o.r.&t'.>.o.1r r.o.1rne1r .o.r 'Oo m.&t.o.1r 'r .o.r 'Oo ue1r lJfM1r cM m.&t' 'O'e1t'1:s uott'.l." " ,(\ ! " .c.rr' .6.11 re.o.t' mop, " 'C.6. .6.tl '0011.ar ore; C.6. .6.11 f5e.o.t r111 f.6.'0.6. le 11-.a 11111r111c; .ace 11111eOf.6.'0 'OU1'C t11f\r5e.at be.0.5 .6.1f\, tH m1re .6.f\ r1ut'.>.o.t .6.11 t.a f111 .6. t'.>i rM'O .0.5 Ob.6.1t\ .6.f\ .6.11 e.o.5t.o.1r r.c. lJe111n fine 1r te1t5e ; .asur 11t1.6.1f\ .6. t.&11115 me .6. t'.>.dtle f .6. co111te.o.rs.o.r '0'111111r mo 'Oe.o.11t'.>r.&t.o.1r '0.6.111 CM m.&r .6. tute .o.m.o.6 SUf\ 1mt15 mo 1i1.&t.6.1f\ 'r mo 'Oe1rt'.>f1ur te1r .6.11 e.o.5t.&1f 'n.a he.6.C.6.11 'O'e1r1:s me com ct'ore.o. 'r com re.o.rs.ac ce6. 'r SUt' cu1r me t'01i1.o.m :so rsr1orr.a11111 .6.11 r.0.05.0.tso t>ru1511111 .o.m.o.c c'.&t'C .6. r.a1t'.> mo 'Oetpt'.>f1Ut' 'r mo m.&t.6.1f' ; .o.5ur '0Ut'.>.6.1f''C mo 'Oe.dr t'.>r.at:.&1t' l10m n.o.c f'.6.1t'.> 101111.am .ace 'OU111 e .d.tti.o.me.c.c 1r rm.o.0111e.i1u .o.r .o. te1te1'0 ; ' .o.cc 11111eOf.6.'0 'OU1'C, ' .c.rf ' e1re.an, ' 5ome 'Oe.6.11f.6.f 1mteoc.o.1'0 cu '.o.5ur re,1cr.o.1'0 cu .0.11 cu. t>ru151t> cu .c.m.o.c c' .&1c .o. t'.>futt rM'O cum corM5. 11u.o.1t' .c. :seot'.>.ar cu .o.m.ac c'.&1e .o. t>ru1t rt.o.'O Mrrf.6.1'0 CU te r1t M'O, .6.SUf mt111.6. t'.>fut51'0 'CU le fit M'O t'.6.C.6.1'0 cu 1 5co5.a'O .o.r .6. ron.' "'0'1mt15e.&f .6.1111f111, .6.,5Uf '00 $t.6.C.6.f C0111.6.1f'te mo 'Oe.&rt'.>r.&t..o.r, .o.sur '00 cu1re.o.r tons 1 t'.>fetree cum tmte.&cc.o. ; .o.5ur '0'1mt15e.&r ; .o.5ur ni t'.6.tt'.> .0.5.0.m .o.ce me te111 r.an tu1115, .a5ur '00 CU1t'e.&f cum CU.6.111 me .o.m.ac .6.t' .an l:'.>f.o.1rrse m61r, t.&11115 ce6 mor orm .annrm ; .asur t.&11115 me .o.r Otte.an ; ..o.5ur t'.>i U.att'.>.6.f 'Oe tOtnS1f .6.t' .6.TIC.6.1-Jte .0.5 .6.11 Otle.&n f111; 1f '00 5.at'.>.ar 1fee<.\C 'n.o. ·me.&'0611 ..o.:sur '00 cu.or .ar cir, .asur '00 C01111.6.C bo111e.o.nn.o.c mor m6t' .6.11nf111, .o.5ur 1 .0.5 bU.6.111 tu.o.cv.o.c ; , . , , , , , t1.&.1r 'Oe 11.6. 11u.a1r10 t.&11115 me .o.r cut.a1t'.> tM c.o.1tt15e, .d5ur r1u5 me :Sre1m t.&1me .o.r .6. t.&tm 'Oetf, .a5ur 'OU t'.>.6.11\'C me lett1, ' .0. fM'011.6.1fe ore tern, .6. t'.>e.an, :SUt' ' 'Oo-cim r111, .a m1re 'O.o.tc.o. 'Oo t.&tme 'Oe1re.' f.o.01t m61r,' .arr' ..o.n c.a1Ue.o.c; ' .ace 're mo com.o.1rte t>u1c .a t'.>e1t 'r.&5.&1t .an 01te.&111 reo co111 tu.o.t 'r 1r re1'01fl 'Ou1c.' ' C.o.'O cut:se r111 ? ' .arr.a tlltfe. ' 'C.& f.6.t.ac m6p,' 'Ot1lJ.o.1pc f1fe, ' 111r .an 11i't lon5 '00-Cl 'Ctl .annr111 U.6.1ril reo tU.6.f, 11.6.C 'OCUS re 1rce.o.c .6.f .6.11 nr.a1rr:se te n-.c.. .6.11.citt; .asur 'O'rt 1r 111.6.'f't'.> re 11.6. '0.6.01t1e. 'C.& re 'n.a co'Ol.6.'0 f.& t.&C.6.1'f\ .a5t1f m..i 'OU1ft$e.ann re be1t> cur.o. .6.1:se .6.'f' .0.11 '0615 ce,:1'011.0.. -c.a comt,:1

5

\AN CLAll\lH ...UIK SGl:UJS.)

21, 1912.

1i16p Mf'.6.11111 .o.5ur COti1l.6. 'O.df'.6.C .6.f' .an u atm ; .6.�ur tlU.6.tp .6. t'.a1pn5e.ar .6.11 f6.C.dC te 11·.6. .6.11.dtt bt'O 11.6. C0111l.6.'0.6. .0.5 fOr�.att'C, .o.5ur 11U.6.1f' .a c�1re.ar. re .o.m�c .o. .0.11.&t bi'O 11.0. com L.o.t>.a .as 'Ol111.<1'0 , .a5ur bt'O rM'O com 'Ce.0.1111 'OU11'C.6. 1r 'O.& mbe.at> re.o.cc 5cpo1nn, .o.5i1r re.ace n'Oruttt, m cu1rre.a'6 6cc .dSU� re.ace n5t.o.r.o. Of\t.6.. n5po'O.ann.a Mf\.atnn 1rce.ac Af\ .a n·.o.tr M'O te com ce.ann 'Otitl�.6. ''r .a t'.>e1'01f.' 'OulJ.arc re-111 tetr .an 5c.a1tt15, .6.11 lJfU1t '0615 f.6. mbtt Ml CU* I' I' '1 nneor.a'O-f.a 'OU1'C, ' .df'f ' .an c.o.1Ue.o.c, .ar'O·;>' o · some .an '0615 te tl·.6. 115.0.lJ.ann re 'Oe.an.o.m. 'C.a .arm .o.t5e ?f c1on11 .o.n '00f'tl1f r1r .o. 11·.o.bt.tpte.ar .o.n cSte.05 �e.o.rt' ; .o.5ur m.& tet'O .0.5.0.c .0.1 , .o. 1 ce.ann .o. cur t>e .o.p .o.n ce.o.'O lJu1tte 1r m.o.1t, .o.cc mun.o. 'O'Cet'O bet'O .an cu1r nior me.o.r.o. n.& t'.>i cum cor.0.15.' '' 'O'tmt'15e.o.r .o.5Uf f'.6.11.0.5 'OOf'Uf 11.6. l1U.6.1i1.o. .o.:sur 'O'tor5.o.1t .6.11 '0.6. comt.0.1'0 .o.nnpn: .a.sur '00 fl.6.0'0 .d .o.n.&t 1rce.o.c m1re r.o.n U.6.1111, .6.SUf ni r.0.11'.) n1 .6. t'.>i 1f'C1:l) r.0.11 tt.o.1ril 'Oe tu..1rm.o., 'Oe 6.o.t.o.01r 116 'Oe poc.o. n.o.c f'.6.10 .a:s bu.auu . .a ce1te te 11.c1.n.J.1t .o.n t.o.t.o.t:5, 'r 1.6.'0 1 n-11111me mo cor.6.-r.o. lJr1re.a'O. 'Oo 'Oun .o.11 'OO�ur _nu.a1p, .o. CU.o.1'0 m1re tree.de, .o.5ur t'.)i re COm 'OU11'C.6. r '0.6. mbe.a'O fe.o.CC SCf\011111, .o.5ur re.o.c'C t1'0ru1tt, .o.5Uf re.o.CC n5Uf.6. "1.1f' ; .o.5Uf 111 cutr�e.o.u re.ace n:sr6'l'>.o.nn.o. 1rce.6.c .df' '.a1r e ; .o.sur l:)1 m1re 1m Pt'ioru11.o.c 1rc15. 't.o.rr�.1115 o.n r.o.t.o.c .o.r .0.1f .0. .o.n.J.t .o.r1r, .a.sur 'O'tor5.a1t n.o. COml.6.'0.o. ; .a5ur ttr5.o.f rent 50 l1.&p'O, .a.sur conn.ate me .6.11 cSte.0.5 Se.arr, .o.5ur rus.o.r :Sf'e1m u1pt1, .o.sur '00 t.&m 1m t..itm·re r 'Oo _u.a t.J.1m '5.& f.o.op.o.t>, t'.o.rt'.0.1115 m1re .o.n cSte.a:s Se.arr, .&5ur C.df' t.&:s fl fU1'0e.o.tt .6. b�1me � te1t5 me .o.n ce.o.nn 'Oe. tu:s.ar .o.n ce..o.nn r1or 'O 1011nru15e n.o. c.o.1tt15e m61pe t'.>i .as bu.0.111 11.o. t.u.acr.o.c, .a.sur 'OUlJ.o.rc te1t1, 'S1n .05.ac �e.o.11n .an t.o.t.0.15 m61p.' 'Ouo.a1rc .o.n c.o.1ttedc � 'OU111e f05.6.111'C15, 'O'"1.1C111 me SUf' $.o.1f5"1'0e.o.� t'u ; .a5ttf 'C.& re1'0m .a:;s .6.11 01te.&11 ro .ar tur.a mun.o. me.6.U.o.t'O cu 1m .a teM:c .o.nn 111'01u. .a1t11e m� 1r �u m.o.c.J.n .o.n .6.c.o.r, m.ac rio:s lHor me.atur 'Ou111e n6 .a1t11e loct.ann. !11.o.tt f'Mm ; tr me .o.n 'OUtne Ce.o.'011.o.,' .apr.a mtfe. 1r b.o.111-t1or.o.1'0e m1re,' .arr' 1re, '.o.sur 'C.6. r1or .6.5".6.m .O.f' ce.ann '00 fe1'0 'r '00 t1ut'.>.a1t. '"C.& cu .a:s 'Oot .o. '0'1.o.rr.c1.1u 'Oo m.at.o.r 'r 'Oo t>e1rr>re.at.ap.' ' m.& c.a,' .O.f'f.6. m1re, ' 'C.6. me com f.6.'0.6. r ro .o.r .6.11 crt1:se, 'O.& mbe.o.'O t1or .d5.am c' .&1c .6., �.6.C.6.11111 .o.r .o. 'O'C61p.' ' 11111reoc.o.1'0 m1re 'OU1'C 'C.J. r1.a'O 1 f\10:l).6.C'C n.a C .6.1C .6. lJfU1t r1.o.'O. S5e1te '?e1r5e : �sur c.& pi n.a S5ette 'Oe1r:se .6.S cup 1101me 'Oo m.c..t.a1p .a por.o.u. 1nnreoc.o.t'O me 'OU1'C m.ap .6.C.d .o.n b.o.tte .o.r fU1'01U:l).6.'0. 'CJ. C.an.J.1t m.J.;scu.a1pc .o.n t'.>.o.1te 1 n-.o. t'.>ru1t .a te1te1'0 reo 'Oe te1te�'O, .a;sur c.J. 'Of'Otce.o.'O c65t'.>..it.a .ap .o.n 5c.o.n�1t, .asur c.& ce.o.nn 'Oe 11.6. pe1rc1t'.> m6r.o. .as '01011 .o.� 'Opo1c1'0 r.o. t.a, .a.sur c.an t.a:s.6.nn 'Oume 1rc15 n.ac mu1rbf1'0 fL l1u.a1r .o. t1;s .o.� Ot'Oce c.J. �n 'Of'01Ce.6.'0 .ap n-.o. t'65t'>.&1t, .o.5ttr 'C.6. .O.tl pe1re 11.6. CO'Ot.6.'0. 'C.J. b.o.tl.6. m6r m.J.��U.6.1f''C ?.attire .o.n pio5 1 11·.o. l:'.>fU1t .o.tp'Oe 1i16f' mor. S111-re .am.at 'Oo cor .o. Ce111, so scutptu m1re b1teo5.a tur 1r te151r te1t1 ; bpt11'01'0e 1r: 5116t'.o.1'0e, .a:sur e m.ar e15e.anc.o.r orm 'Oot .6. t> e1rce.o.cc .o.01r>111r n.o. n.01me 1 m.J.p.o.c." " m.a' r 1 cor Cem 1 no m.&'r cor 'n.o. ue1u ;," .6.rf.o. Ct.an mo.c m.o.01tmu.a1'0, " c.o. r1111m-re .o.m�c mo co1r111 Ce111 � cup b1te tur n6 te151r te1e1, so n-111nr1r·re 'O.am·r.a .0.11 n'Oe.6.6.o. ('u - ' 111_ b fU1'0e .6.f' t01f' '00 m.J.t.ap 'r '00 'Oetflt'.>fe.o.t'.o.p no .O.f' t1tt1r .6. lJ.o.tte 116 CM m.o.f' .o. 'O'e1r15 ''OU1'C." ",&.!" · .O.f\r ' .6.11 fe.6.f' mop, " e.& ,6.11 '0011.0.r Ofle ; _ 'C.6. .6.11 rse.o.t rm f.0.'0.6. te n-.a 11111r111c, .ace 11111eor.a'O 'Ot11c tnpr5e.o.t be.0.5 e1Le. '0'1mt15e.ar .annr111, .a.sur r.an.a:s b.o.1te mop n.o. s�e1te 'Oe1p5e-, .o.sur 01 c.o.n..i1t m..i5cu.a1rc .C. 11 t'.>.a1te-� m.o.p 'O� 111�1r .o.n (�.11tte.ac mop u.o.m, .o.:sur t'.>1 'Opotce.a'O co5t'.>.o.l.d .Of' .o.n · :SC.6.11 &1t, .o.5ur t'.>i o.n 01'0Ce .o.nn n_U.6.1!\ .6. r..111.0.5; .o.;sur t'.>1 .611 'Of.01<'.'e.a'O t:65t.o., .a5ur t'.>1 .0.�1 pe1rc �.6. CO'Ot.6.'0, .a5ur t'Om.o.1re.ar 'O.& t'po15 .o.r mo t'.>e.atdtt'.> .a:sur cro15 .o.r mo cut.attJ 'Oen c.o.t.o.m .o.r .o. t'.6.t'.>.ar 1m fe.arMn, .o.:sur 'Oo t�1�e.o._r .ar t'.>.O.f'f' mo tte15e 'r .6.f' ce.ann.a1l:) m Of\'005, .6.5"Uf t.J.11.0.5 m.ap .6. f'.6.1t'.> .o.11 petf'C 'n.a CO'Ol.o.'O, .asur t.a1r115e.o.r .6.11 cSte.0.5 Se-.o.rr, .a:sur mo t.&m 1'0 l.6.1m-re .asur mo '0.6. t.J.1m 'sJ. r�or.o.:o_ 1:Ju.a1te.ar .o.n pe1re 1 scut .o. c11111, .o.sur n10r f.6.:S .o.n crte.a5 ru1ue.c1.tt .o. be1me. tos.o.r Remembei-

LARKIN,

�n ce�nn, .a.5ttr 'Oo Cf'Oc.o.r ruo.r te porc.o. 'Oe porc.c1.1lJ .o.t1 'Of'otc1'0 e. '0'1mt1:se.ar .dnnrm ;�ur_ �.J.n.0.5 _ .o.n b.o.tt.a l'.li m.<15cu.o.1pc p.a1Ure p105. 1:'.>1 .o.n b.o.tt.o. com 11.J.p'O 'r n.o.c r.o.1l:) re rurur'D� u.o.m .o. te1me, 1r to1r15 me te1r Ml 'C�tet5 51f'f', 1f tott me Cf'l'O .o.n mb.att.a SO n'Oe.dc.o. - me 'Cf'i'O 1rce..1c. R.J.11115 me 'Oorur �.6. p.o.tttre, .o.5ur lJU.o.1t me A:S .6.11 'OOf'Uf, .6.5'Uf 5uo1u .an '001rreo1p, ' Ct.a c.& ..o.nnru'O ? ' ' m1re,' .6.1t'111 mo m.J.t.0111 .o.sur mo 'Oe1pl:'.>�r!'°' m1re .. mo r1ur. :S�Of', 1r 5Wo1'0 mo m.J.t.a1r, ' O ! 're mo m.o.c .ac.o. .o.nn ; te15 1rce.ac e.' Cu.a1'0 me .o.nn r111 1rce.o.c, .o.sur 'O' e1p15 fM'O 1m co111ne te rour, mop. fu.o.1r me rre.afc.at te bt.6.'0 'r le 'Oeoc, r mo te.o.b.o. 50 'Oc.J.11115 .o.n m.a1'0m n.111:e.a� .6.t111r111 .6.11 bpe1Cfe.6.f'C.6. .a CUf\ 1 n·Of''OU:$.6.'0 r .6.f' mbe�t.6.10 ; .o.sur 1 11'01.6.1'0 .6.11 l'.lpe1cre.&rc.a 'OU��tf''C me _tem 'Oetf'lJt1.a1p 'r tem til.J.t.atp 50 mb re.apr.d '001t'.> cur opt.6., .o.sur :so 11-1mteoc.d'O r1.o.'O ten:, co1r .a o.a1te. 'Ott t'.>.o.1pc r1 n.a s:se1te 'Oe1rr�e, C.an m.o.r r111 .6. t'.>e.ar .ace m.o.r ro. '"C.& �1re ;ur rom.o.m '00 m.J.t.o.1r .o. por.at>, .o.:sur mo m.ac .o. cur po1me 'Oo ue1rl:'.>t1ur .a por.o.t>.' ' c.an m�t' f111 .a t'.>e.o.r,' '0Ul:'.>.o.1f'C me te111, '.o.C'C mJ. c� co1t .o.�.o.1lJ r111 .o. ue.0.11.0.m 1mt'151u tern co1r 'O 1onnrt115e mo l:'.>.a1te, .a:sur 5eot'.>o. r1r> .o.nnr111 M'O.' _ 'Out'.>.a1pc r1 n.a S5e1te 'Oe1r5e, ' m.o.t' f111 btO'O re, m.a1re.a'O.'

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5. De.an .o.n ro5m.o.r 'Oe'n 5e1mpe.o.u,

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Sad�es·�; 2 resounding; 3 noble; � ascending the !11ou�tam-s1de; 6 derte; 6 eagle ; 7 well-cut; s mirth burial-ground ; 1o refuse ; 11 last fortnight of winter · 12 rocks ; 13 rare, scarce ; H squirrel; 16 get, catch : ' 16 often ; l 7 deceit. 1

The Cheapest House in Town For Chand1ery,

99 Lower Dorset Street

J. C. LARKIN,

Plumbing, £igbting amt ffeatinQ.

36 "WEXFORD STREET:

. FOR,


41; f-'5-'1l st am ..c.\5 cot.aisce An sproert.

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when orflering Goods from any of its


�n ct.eroecrn soturs,

me.o:oon

f65ri1.6.11' 21, 1 12, September 21, 191 z.

[AN CLAIDHRA.M.H

an ota1ueatil soturs

THE DIGLOT'S READING. In a previous article it was said that one of the contributory causes of the diglot's love of speaking the English language is the weekly newspaper This, indeed, is the only produced therein. mental pabulum he commonly depends on for his intellectual sustentation. He is a wonderful individual, this diglot of ours. His eyes are not only on his own little patch of, land, as may be, but also on the ends of the earth. He rivals the o'l,¢ Athenians of in his inordinate desire for news. Having to a large extent lost touch with the past, his hunger for every '' new thing " is intensified thereby. He feels interested in the telegrams that describe what is going on in China, but does not know that the same distant country is the origin of the Sorcha of his folk-tales. He is also quite ready to discuss the Balkan situation and would give short shrift to the Turks. He has a close eye on the affairs of Morocco even. As to the United States of America, he has quite a. minute knowledge of the chief happenings there, for it may be safely said that the Irish-speaking population of the West are practically much nearer to New York than they are to the capital of their own land. It is well known, indeed, that many of them have emigrated to the States without ever having been to Dublin. It is true, however, that the <liglot takes an interest in Irish news also. This, nevertheless, is a purely selfish and materialistic interest. Not only does he suffer from news hunger, but also from a strong desire to have his little holding on easier terms and be better off generally in the world, certainly a very natural feeling on his part, which, however, should not make him so materialistic as to be often quite unnational. Who can forget that a group of Connacht peasants working 1n the fields once said to a stranger that they had something more important and more vital to think ·of than the Irish language, with the result that they ordered him to move on and not interfere with their work. The pity of it a.II is that he remains just as poor after all his exertions, and the cause of this is certainly largely the foreign atmosphere which he himself is helping to create by his sheer materialism. The iron of the English language has, alas, entered deeply into his soul. It has destroyed the honest simplicity still -characteristic of the monoglots, and given nothing in exchange but gross materialism. Some, no doubt, think that the diglot may be brought over to the common use of the Irish language by supplying him with news in Irish. 1n regard to this we must just take him as he is, illiterate in Irish, too lazy to learn to read it, materialistic in everyday life, quite foreign in his desire for news from the ends of the earth, and without any enduring national sentiment. The cause, therefore, lies deeper. Such a low-in-clay individual must first of all have instilled into him some rudimentary idea o.f patriotism before he can he got to take to reading even news in Irish. When that has been done, it will then be possible to dispute the field with his present weekly instructor. Of course we must remark in conclusion that 'there are diglots and diglots. Probably all of the Irish-speaking people who are either members of the Gaelic League or otherwise interested in the 1rish Language movement are diglots. In fact, sad though it be to confess it, one may assert with certainty that no monoglot Irish-speaking man or woman is engaged in the movement as an organisation. No doubt they perform their part in only speaking their own tongue, even though some of them would much rather know and he able to speak English. So much has the tyranny of even primary education only through the medium of English eaten into the linguistic condition of the -country that one who takes part in a movement for the resuscitation of Irish must know English also. To these diglots then we of course did not allude, even though some of them may be set on a lower plane than others, the former as materialists in contrast with tne latter who are the original salt of the movement, several of them its founders, indeed. and therefore not to be classed otherwise than as enthusiasts. · The word <liglot in our present acceptation of the term in so far as it relates to what we have in mind in this article is applied here solely to the ordinarv run of unsophisticated bilingual person who is found in the Irish-speaking districts, the production of the National schools in particular, these- having conferred the '1 benefit" of -'' English education ·, upon him by which he is

enabled to spell through his weekly English newspaper, more or less fluently according to his capacity. He corresponds very largely to "the man in the street " of the cities, that careless individual who lets all great movements pass him by and is only affected transiently by some palpably clear and convincing argument. The conversion of these two classes of people in fact, but especially of our diglot, is the great problem of our movement. Let us hope that it is not an insolvable one.

)

7

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Omeath Irish College. A contemporary states : " Although Omeath College has been but a short time at work, it has already achieved a measure of success which its most sanguine promoters had not ventured to predict. Every week has brought a fresh influx of students from the sutrounding counties, and several from a considerable distance. One of the most encouraging features of the new College is the progress made by the students in speaking Irish. Rarely do the students use anything but Irish either when speaking to each other or to the native Irish speakers of the neighourhood. It is pleasing to note that both the teaching staff and the students are working so cordially and so earnestly to make the College one of the foremost, if not the foremost, in Ireland j while the influence of the College in promoting the habit of speaking Irish in the neighbourhood is decidedly encouraging. The Omeath Feis did something to give a stimulus to the speaking of Irish, but its effects were necessarily of a transient nature, and for some reason or other it was discontinued a few years ago. It is believed that the College will produce more permanent results."

...

Gathering at Uisneach.

A great gathering was brought together at the Hill of Uisneach on 8th inst. by the Uisneach Coiste Ceanntair. The proceedings were opened by Rev. P. Casey, P.P., Ballymote, who was ably seconded by Rev. D. Coyne, C.C., Ballymore, and Rev. P. O'Reilly, C.C. The appearance of Brian O'Higgins on the stage was warmly He addressed the meeting first in applauded. Irish and afterwards in English, devoting the major part of his address to the Language Revival. A brief address was also delivered by Father O'Reilly, C.C. There can be no doubt that the result will be a sustainment of the enthusiasm that exists in the district.

...

Gaelic League Opposition. A letter was read at the meeting of the Roscommon County Council, Mr. J. Fitzgibbon, M.P., presiding, from the Gaelic League, Dublin, protesting against the Birrell scheme, as Irish was not made an essential subject. The effect would be to nullify the decision already come to by the County Council. On the motion of Mr. M. H. Grogan, seconded by Mr. P. J. Waters, a resolution was unanimously passed expressing surprise and regret on this aspect of the proposals, and declining to part with their legal and natural right to frame the course of studies required for the scholarships.

Evening Schools. One of the direct results of the work done in the evening schools of Treilic is that a home culture, native and national in character, has begun to grow 3:rr:iong the people.. The singing le�sons were utihs�d t� populanse songs with The Irish style of I�1s� words _and Insh airs. smgmg was mtroduced and is now widely known among the young people. Eithne Ni Oisin did lasting work in the Treilic schools. Her style a1:d songs. may now be heard among the homes m the little glens of this part of Tir Eoghain where Irish singing as well as the Irish language had died. The girls of the summer evening schools are sweet singers who have brought some true culture into their homes. Even the teaching of English is utilised to strengthen the nation-building influence of the �vening school scheme. Irish history is taught m a way that makes the learner feel that his own district is part of the greater Ireland. The civil and ecclesiastical history of the parish and its connection with political events of national importance have been taught. Just now a number of school libraries are being established. A big collection of books relating to Ireland and of the works of world authors have already reached Treilic. Each school will have its own bookcase and the books will form one large parish circulating library. The possession of such a collection of ready reading matter will enable the directors of the nightschool scheme to give the students a taste for decent reading. It will be seen that the whole aim of the scheme is to inculcate the importance of home life. The songs make life merrier ; the dance serves the same purpose ; the reading matter supplied by the library deals particularly with the importance to the Irish people of their own country ; the hygiene lessons teach the girls how to keep better homes ; schoo] gardens show the boys and men how to take the maximum crop out of the land. An tAthair Mac Uidhir, the school manager, has succeeded where many others have failed in turning the national system of education to an Irish national The teachers, regular and extern, purpose. have helped him very considerably in achieving that purpose. Without their wilJing aid success would have been impossible. What is there to prevent other parishes or districts emulating the good work that goes on for its people in and about Treilic? Or why should not the aimlessness of the present methods of most of our schools be replaced by the national purpose that gives life to the Treilic scheme ? The teacher, no doubt, has some purpose in teaching his pupils the prescribed courses in each subject, but the curse of Irish education is the absence of the purpose of making the pupils feel that Ireland is theirpiece of the globe, and of making them feel that on their shoulders falls the duty of winning for Ireland her place in the sun. A modern artist has pictured the departure of the fairies from England. He meant his cc little men " to stand for ideals, we have no doubt. Ideals have fled from Ireland also, and it may be to a We have pioneers in very damaging degree. many noble causes, we have scholars, we have writers of a high order, but unless we succeed in giving to the men and women of the fields and of the country homes the ideal of a great Ireland and the purpose of realising it we shall not leave our mark on the page of Irish history that is being written in our time.

Opera in Gaelic. Public Meeting and Aeridheacht at Aunaseaul. The" Kerry Weekly Reporter" writes:" A large meeting was held at Aunascaul on 8th inst. This was the third of a series of meetings for the preservation of the Irish language in the Irish-speaking districts. Conspicuous for their absence from these meetings are the lately elected public representatives. The sooner the representatives of the people recognise that organisation of the people for the preservation of their native language and pastimes is necessary and worthy of support, the better for them. These meetings will bear good fruit, and I would appeal to the promoters to remember that they are engaged in good work, the placing of everything Irish in a foremost place in its native land, especially the language. Any movement carried on in Ireland will have its opposition while English influence holds sway in Ireland. A section of Irishmen even object to govern themselves: they are entitled to their opinion, but the will of the vast majority of the people must prevail. Much credit is due to those who at Aunascaul took part in the aeridheacht. I trust that the meetings will become at least annual fixtures throughout West Kerry."

..

We extract the following from the "Chicago Daily Journal," of August 30th :Opera in Gaelic is one of the musical possibilities of the near future, according to Dr. Hugo Felix, the Viennese composer of cc Tantalising Tommy," who is making his first trip to America to attend the premiere of his latest opera. Dr. Felix was deep in the mysteries and miseries of a last rehearsal when he turned his back on the stage for a few moments to comment on opera in America. " I believe opera in English is inevitable in America and England," said Dr. Felix, " although at times it has not seemed as great a success as expected. But I think the time must come when those two countries will demand opera in their own tongue, as Germany and Italy always have done. "But what I am anxious to hear is an opera I think it is one of the produced in Gaelic. most interesting of languages, and if some of the operas, ' Lucia de Lammermoor,' for instance, could be translated into Gaelic, I am sure it not only would be a great success, but


8

an ct.eroeern sotuis. [AN CLUDHEAMH SOLUIS.j

MAYO COUNTY COMlll'ITEE. An important meeting of the above Committee was held in Castlebar on Saturday, the 31st �ugust, 1912, to consider the report of the Sub-Comm1tte� to deal with the question of Irish in the Schools m Mayo. The Rev. j. \V. Meehan, B.D., C.C .. presided, �nd there were also present-Mrs. E. �- ��ddall, Ac�1ll '. Maire Ni Riain, Castlebar : E. N1 Riain (St. lta. s) , Joseph Gilmartin, Chairman, Castlebar �oard of Guardians ; T. J. Loftus, Co.C. ; J. J. Colhns, L .. C. O'Loughlin and J. Mullen, Dublin ; Messrs. J. Fitzhenry, Gaelic League Organiser, and C. W. Ryan, Provincial Secretary, were also present, as were numbers of the general public. The minutes of the last meeting were approved of. THE LATE FATHER MORGAN.

meeting be tendered Mr. C. W. Ryan fer done and done so-welt. Mr. Fitzhenry said they would still want a secretary, and he would ask )Ir. Ryan to with all the help he wanted. Mr. Ryan sta bis inability to cope with the work that seek relief. PROPOSED PUBLIC MEETING.

On the suggestion of the Chairm&Q., it to adjourn the question of the holding of ill public meeting to a later date. The Secretary was directed to call next receipt of instructions from the Chairman. On the proposition of Mr. J. Gilmartin, Mrs. E. M. Weddall, a cordial vote of passed to the Rev. Chairman for presi Chairman suitably replied, and the proce�Qi-1 a close.

--.. ,;:�--

A vote of condolence was passed to be tendered to the relatives of the late Rev. J. A. Morgan, C.C. THANKS TO THE COUNTY COUNCIL.

It was ordered that the Secretary convey the best thanks of the County Committee to the Mayo �unty Council for having at their last meeting declined to be led away from their stand in regard to the �os1tion of the Irish language in the National University, and that the Committee's congratulations be tendered to the County Council on refusing to recognise any candidates for these scholarships who will not take Irish as one of the subjects. • TEACHERS AND GAELIC COLLEGES.

Resolved-" That we,· the members of the Mayo County Committee of the Gaelic League strongly ur�e the Commissioners of National Education to agam demand from the Treasury power to pay the expenses o:f National teachers attending Gaelic Colleges. We call u.pon the Ium �bers of Parliament to take c ti · o 1 the Tr u to rant this

The follo�ing additional subscriptions received and are acknowledged witJi Remittances should be sent to the TffllllJI League, 25 Parnell Square, Dublin. Already acknowledged .. ·� Ancient Order of Hibernians State of New York, per Stephen W. �town, President, $:250.00 •. •• coij-ce ce.Annt:Atf' t>Ml>pe1ttrce, c� 4'10'0 msc 'O!tf>t"O, c1rt"e01f' (4n '04� CU1'0)

••

••

••

People of Windgap, Co. Kilkenny, per Pr. Fintan Phelan, per Editor :Cub'lui "Leader"

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The Guardians do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any Tender. Intending Contractors are particularly requested to read over carefully the Tenderutd Bond before signing same. Contractors will be required to strictly:eompfy with Articles 7 and 13 of the Union Account$ Order, 1905, which state that the second meeting of each month shall be the Stated F'miµice Meeting, and that Accounts (which should be furnished monthly on official forms only) must be in the hands of the Clerk three clear days at least before such Stated Finance Meeting. Contractors will also be bound by Section 5I (7) of the Local Government (Ireland} .Aet, 1898, which provides that goodssupplleddUfh,lg any half-year must be paid for within three months after the close of such half-year, and iWt afterwards. The half-years end on the 30th Septemtier and 31st March, respectively. (By Order),

JOHN P. OOlfflON� Clerk of the U�

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Moderate Prices.

lbates la ..._strral and Ordinary Departments

Applications invited from capable and energetic men who can inftuenc:e bu--. Goocl wma and prospects. Speedy promotion to successful canvAS11Cni. Write for P� aacl Full Particulars. HAIUtY ,. IIACIUlltB. Sec.

FUNUAL ••TAIILMII,,,.,,.,,•

H AVIIGIBB STR.11:ft. ............ c. eftQ � _. Ben,.,. •-• tun

c,..- u� ...,.,11 .

Large Assortment of Irish Poster , Type.

Foot Balla. Jerseys. •

H•d Office: 1 :JPPER O'CONNELL STREET, DUBLIN. Telephone No. 785.

Knickers •

Bnurob Otllen :-

COH-81 Soath •atL

IBLFAST-11 High Stnet.

Boots, etc.

District Offices in all important centres.

FLEMING

BROS.,

HURLEY ''CAMANS"

140 DRUMCONDRA ROAD, famity Grocers, Pun>eyors & Wioe Mercbaots.

6d., I/·, 126, 2J·, 2/6, 3/6.

filgbtSt Standard 600ds Stocktd. ,.,,-. �TL

+

A

FOil SALB OR HIRE,

.6.et'l'Oe.6.cc-0.nn.(\ 1 fe1re.6.nn-0., Jl'BTBS, BAZAARS, & CAMPING-OUT.

F.

HURLEY BALLS

TRIAL SOLICITED.

TENTS AND MARQUEES J.

KELLY A CO.,

9 & 10 CHANCERY ST. (Formerly Pill

,,,,.,,,., • ...

J. W. ELVEl{Y & CO.

4

Telegraphic Address :..l." UNl'l'BDLY." Dublin.

...

€1tulllbtcl 1850

l!Dlhlw•,at -._nd Whole Ufe Auarance Transacted at Lowut AGBNTS WANTED IN AU. PARTS OP IRELAND.

F.AN.A.G.AK'S

Lane)

Alllo Jt1 UPPED ORMOND QUAY. DUBLIN.

6d., I/·, 116, lf9, 21 ·, 2/6, 3j ••

PRINTING.

••••ra Plot. MOMn llttll....

CAHILL & CO.,

40 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin.

CATAL06UI: FREE DUBLIN.

coa

LOIDOI


At1 Cl6.1'0eAXm sotu1s.

4

n1et.'06n "}'.'65111..111, 28, 1912 September 28, 1912

( A:S CLAIDRJ'!:AMH SOLGIS.1

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MARK YOUR LINEN .

RUBBER

STAMP

With your name in Irish or English, 1/6 Post Free.

BROAD BERY & Co.,

nut,:!te::.amp

19 Hendrick St.

DUBLIN ..

NOTE.--The only Rubber Stamp Firm in Ireland authorised to use the Irish Trade Mark 0504,


rn eaoon j'.'05m.6.1f\ 28, 1c12. September

6.n ctcroe.crn sotuis. [AN Cl..AU>RJtA M" <iOl.UIS.]

28, 1912.

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GAELSSupport the Only Picture House in Dublin owned by an Irishman.

THE

IRISH CINEMA

CAPEL STREET (next to Trades' /fall),

NOW OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30 PRICES, 30., 40., 60 . Change of Pictures· M nday,

Thursday and

Sunday.

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me.6'6on f65ti1d1'f' 28 September 2.8,

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An ct.o.1'0e.6-1'tl sotuis.

191 �

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[AN CLAIDHEAMH SOLUU,.]

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n ot.o.me.o.m sot.uis med'6on f6$rhd1f' 28, 1912.

I ----THE PUBLIC AND THE GAELIC LEAGUE DEMANDS.

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BESIDES the work of teach ng the Irish language in Gaelic League classes which, in itself, is very important, there is another side of Gaelic League work which must not be neglected. Propagandist work must be carried on among those who are not in the League and who have The demands of the Ardnever been in it. fheis must be made known to the people that the people may support them, and the aims and ideals of the League must be preached in every parish and in every association to Several public which Gaels 'may belong. bodies have shown what most similar bodies will do if our organisers and voluntary workers have the missionary zeal thatis necessary for the success of the cause. At last meeting of the Munster Provincial Clerical Managers'. Association, Very Rev. Canon Ryan in the Chair, the following resolution was unanimously adopted :" With regard to the teaching of Irish in our schools :-(a) We strongly recommend that in purely Irish-speaking districts no teacher be appointed who does not possess a certificate of competency to teach all subjects school through We believe that Irish should enjoy Irish. equal status with English as a medium of instruction, and that, therefore, in purely Irish-speaking districts the mother tongue should be the exclusive medium of instruction in all school subjects, except the .second language, and that in bilingual districts as much as possible of the school work be done ' through the medium of Irish. (b) With regard to other districts, we strongly recommend that in future appointments managers, other things being equal, should give preference to teachers who possess a certificate to teach Irish, and we hope the time will shortly come when no teacher will be appointed who is not com(c) We believe that petent to teach Irish. the National Board should make provision in the training colleges for the training of a sufficient number of teachers competent to teach all school subjects through the medium of Irish when required; and we recommend managers to require from the candidates for training under their control that the second •1anguage presented for admission to a training (d) We repeat our oftcollege shall be Irish. made request to the National Board that fees be paid for the teaching of Irish in respect of the pupils in all standards." The North Galway Executive of the United Irish League passed the following resolution regarding the position of Irish in local schools :" \Ve, the Executive of the United Irish League of North Galway, deplore the fact that the recent census shows a heavy decrease in the number of Irish speakers in the Parliamentary division, which we attribute to the fact that the language is not properly taught in many We, therefore, demand that of the schools. the bilingua programme be introduced into the schools of the division at the earliest possible moment, and that the history of Ireland be likewise taught to the children so that they may grow up to reverenc€i the language, history, and traditions of their native land." · A resolution adopted at the Home Rule demonstration held in Xenagh on September 15th stated:.. In reviewing our determination to insist that the national language be restored to its legitimate place in the curricula of the schools and colleges, we have to strongly disapprove of the admission of 'teachors to training colleges without making Irish an obligatory sub ect for entrance." The ollowing spirited declaration from the Roscommon Countv Council rezardine the position of Irish in- the proposed sche�1e of primary school scholarships gives a headline which will, we trust, be followed by the majority of our Countv Councils �" That we,"'the members of the Roscommon -Council, hear with surprise and rezret that )fr.

Birrel1 has expressed the intention of not making Irish an essential subject for his Scheme of Scholarships from the Primary Schools to the University, and that at the same timehe will require the County Councils to accept the winners of such Scholarships without any further examination. " That as the Roscommon County Council has already made Irish an essential subject for its University Scholarships and that as the Council must pay for them, we definitely decline to part with our legal and natural right to frame the course of studies required for them." The summer has. been a record time for the Irish colleges. Let us make the coming winter a record one for fighting propagandist work. The public bodies whose resolutions we have There are quoted have made a fine start. enough workers in every county to keep the The fight going for the Ard-fheis demands. National Board says that it is in advance of Let us show the Compublic demands. missioners that Ireland is not behind the demands of the League.

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An American Folklorist. A young American lady who is deeply interested in the folk-tales of Ireland has come Her name is Miss Vida to visit our shores. Ravenscroft Sutton, and to Ireland she has come becau�e the fame of the folk-tales published by the Gaelic League, the Craoibhin, and others has fo_und its way to America, and compelled attention, a sufficient answer to the materialistic Miss Sutton showed opponents of folklore. great appreciation of the humour of " Paidin O'Dalaigh," and listened with great interest to an In Miss explanation of "An tEinin Ordha." Sutton's opinion it represents a fusion of two tales, and so she intends to treat it in her work. Even the Irish_ idioms literally explained were by We no means unmteresting to our visitor. wish her every success in her research in our own Our latest news about her is that she land. has gone to delve in Co. Galway, which may be regarded as one of our richest mines of folklore. The Americans by many here are supposed to be concerned merely with business and That the notion is false materialistic ideas. is quite evident from the fact that the only recent visitors to Ireland who came expressly to investigate its romance and folklore are three Americans, Professor Cross, Miss G. Schopperle, and Miss Vida Sutton.

...

Canon O'Leary and Dr. Kuno Meyer. As we go to press Cork is following the good example of Dublin in conferring the freedom of the city upon Canon O'Leary and Kuna Meyer.

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,

Mr. Jaspar Nicolls. News comes from Bolivia that our well known representative there has entered the bonds of His wedding card reads thus:matrimony. " Gaspar Nicolls participa a Ud. su matrimonio con la senorita Francisca Guizrnan efectuado privada1;:ente en {!ncia (Bolivia) el 7 de Agosto \Ve wish the newly married couple de 1912. long life and happiness together. " Gurab fada sona seanamhail An dis ud le n-a cheile,"-(Amhran eigin.)

�r..·

Meeting at Portaferry. A meeting which did " good propagandist work for the language and industries " was recently held in Portaferry on Loch Cuan As a contemporary remarks :(Strangford). The men of the Ards are fired now with a better A spirit and more earnest zeal than ever." lecture was delivered in the evening in St. Patrick's Hall by the Hon. William Gibson on :'.\Ir. the " Work and Prospects of the Gael." F. ]. Bigger, :'.\LR.I.A., was also present and addressed the meeting. 4 Congress of the " Association Bretonne.'' The annual congress of the Association Bre�onne was �eld fron:i the Sth to the 1..gh uf September m the picturesque little town of The congress was preceded bv a Moncontour. Breton fete under the auspices of the Municipality, although the weather was verv 1tnfavourable. During the SCSS!OilS numerous

The efforts and interesting reports were read, of Breuriez ar Brezoneg in favour of the Breton language in Treger and Cornouaille were once more referred to. A communication was also read from M. Vallee concerning new finds of Breton songs and guerzes which had escaped the investigations of Luzcl and :\lention other collectors of Breton songs. was also made of the efforts of .:VlM. de Calan and J:?u Cleuzion in favour of the teaching of the history of Brittany in the schools of the diocese of St. Brieuc.

....

Meeting and Aeridheacht at Cloghane. The fo:1rth of a series of meetings for the preservation of the Irish language in West Kerry was held in the little village of Cloghane, at the foot of Mount Brandon, in the CastleThe meeting was one of the gregory parish. largest and most enthusiastic yet held.

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Aeridheacht at Lisdoonvarna. A very successful aericlheacht was held at Lisdoonvarna on r yth inst. in the Rathbane grounds, kindly placed at the disposal of the local Branch of the Gaelic League by Mrs. The chief MacNamara, Rathbane House. feature ot t_he gathering exclusive of pastime, was a stirring address by the Organiser, Mr. Seaan O Muirthile. The following resolution was subsequently passed with acclamation :" That we beg to call the attention of the County Councils to the recent statement made by Mr. Birrell, that he did not propose to make Irish a1: essential s_ubject for the Scholarships to be given to pupils of Primary Schoo s, and that at the same time he would require the County Councils to accept the winners of such Scholarships at the end of their Secondary School career for their University Scholarships without further examination. ''. That we are confident the County Councils, which have already made Irish essential for their University Scholarships, will indignantly ref�se to part with their own rights on this subject, or that they will admit the claim now made for the first time by a British Minister -that he should be allowed to dictate the conditions governing these Scholarships in future."

...

An Ardsgoil i mBeilfeirste. The Irish college for the training of teachers and for general students of Irish, which has been established by the Belfast League, is We wish about to begin on its second year. The Belfast branches the Ardsgoil success. h�ld a general inaugural meeting on Wednesday night.

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The London League Inaugural Meeting. The League are holding an inaugural meeting at St. Andrew's Hall, Newman Street, W., on Saturday evening, at 8, when the principal Liam speaker will be Padraig O Dalaigh. An Mac Giolla Bride will take the Chair. attractive musical programme has been arranged and all Irish residents in London will be welcome. Admission will be free.

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Ard-Chraobh Session begins. The Ard-Chraobh is beginning the season's campaign with a pleasant ceilidh for members and intending members, to-night (Thursday). The many prizes won by the choir during the On Tuesday summer will be distributed. On next (rst October), the classes begin. Thursday, 3rd October, Dr. Douglas Hyde will deliver a propagandist address in the Gaelic The general League Hall, at 8.15 o'clock. public are cordially invited. It is expected that Eoin :\lac ?\eill, Una :'.\Ii Fhearcheallaigh, Xlichea Smidic, Maire X. Aodain, and others A full copy of the programme will speak. may be had on application to the Secretary, Ard-Chraobh, 25 Parnell Square.

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Held Over. Contributions by Padraic O ConairC'," Toma," ")Iac Tire," S. 0 C., " Ro::; FailghE-," Seaghan Mac Maclain. and Caitlin Xie Ghabhann arc held over. The report of Craobh nagCuig gCuigi inaugural meeting and several letters reached us too late for insertion in tln- J',!->UP.


an ct.6.1Ue�m soturs.

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(AN Cl.AIDHBAIIH SOLUIS.j

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CLAIDBF.AMB

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Do they receive it?


me.A'06n f65ri1.dtf' 28, 1912 September 28, 1912. with full accompaniments. They have been collected For the bene�t of the from all parts of Ireland. meref English speaker Mr. Hardebeck himself has supplied an English version of each ... Altogether the collection has been made, and the editing done, 'Yith a care and an affection that are, as I have said, a compliment to our music. I need not comment in detail on the songs. I have heard Mr. Hardebeck himself sing and plat the:11 all and he fairly carried me around Ireland with him to the scenes amidst which, and amongst the people from I am more or. less of a whom, he collected them. Philistine in the matter of piano accompaniments .to Irish songs, but I. yield to Mr. Hardebeck when _he sits Accom_panu:�ents to a piano and sings these songs. are all or mainly a matter of the player havmg his ear tuned to the rhythm and message of the song accompanied and I confess I have hopes that the book under notice will help so t� tune the ears of m�ny a The pian<? has be.en a formidable young Irish player. foe to Irish music; to make a friend of rt were no small ad vantage gained. . A word as to :i\lr. Hardebeck's English v�rs10n�. They are not all literal or even nearly so. Neither is there any " Bells-of-Shandon�that-sound-so-grand-on " juggling with English vowels in them. No, the aut�or has or seems to me to have, merely got the Irish singer's message. into his h_ead and heart and to have given it out again m English terms. Here rs how he gives out the opening lines of" b.o.n-cnu1c eq,eAnn 615." 11 Bear blessings from me to land of Erin Hills of Eire O ! To the few who in thraldorn yet remain On hills of Eire O ! Fair hills where the birds still sweetly sing Their 'plaint for exiles now far away Who despairingly, vainly their eyes turn To hills of Eire O ! " The reader will possibly think this not as good as other famous versions of the famous song. It may not be, but it sings much more kindly to the music than any of them.

---·:--THE O'CURRY COLLEGE. REPORT OF AUGUST SESSION. The work of the Eugene O'Curry College, Carrigaholt, was brought to a conclusion on Friday, August 30th. Notwithstanding the varied nature of the work done in the College in July, it was found necessary to add new features to it during August owing to the large number of students with different bents who flocked to the College. In all some eighty-seven students were present during the past month, and included clergymen, lawye.rs, doctors an?- teachers. An� every one of them, without exception, was loud in his The praises of the teaching given in the College. classes could be divided into four groups. First, practical beginners; secondly, those with a fair elementary knowledge of Irish ; thirdly, those students sufficiently well up in Irish to aim at obtaining the College certificate ; fourthly, advanced students and scholars of the language interested in Old Irish, Dinnsenchus, etc. METHODS OF TEACHING AND COMPOSITION. The methods of teaching, Irish composition and History (through Irish), were in charge of Mr. Hehir. Mr. Hehir, a Clare man, is Principal of the well-known St. Kevin's Senior Boys' School, Dublin, This school has won the Philip Barron Gold Medal and the Carlisle Prize. Mr. Hehir is well known in Gaelic and educational circles in Dublin. He is external examiner to the Leinster Col1ege of Irish, and he also examines under the Scholarship Scheme of the Gaelic League. It is not a matter for surprise, therefore, that his lectures were highly appreciated and often loudly The demonstration applauded by the students. lessons were given in the morning, and in the evening the students were given an opportunity of displaying their skill in teaching methods. A special time was set apart every day for this practice in teaching by the students. Individuality in the teacher is the most important factor in imparting instruction, a fact that was constantly impressed on the students bv ?.Ir. O'Hehir with the best results. The students' criticism of each other's work- a necessary portion of the teaching demonstration-was most beneficial. While awarding due meed of praise to the good points in the lesson the weak points were fully investigated and suggestions offered as to how Under this system the they could be remedied. students' progress after the first week was simply The subjects for composition were of a astonishing. wide and varied nature, and ranged from the characteristics of Tadhg O'Briain on the picture chart to that of the history of Carrigaholt Castle and the " Wild Geese." OLD !RISH. One lecture in Old Irish was delivered each dav bv :\lr. O');olan. :.LA., F.R.U.I. A sound knowledge of Irish imples a certain knowledge of the older language and literature. The lectures in Old Irish were attended by Rev. J. O'Donoghue, B.D., St. Flannau's, Ennis; Rev. J. :\Iolloy, B.D., St. Flannans, Ennis ; Rev. D. O'Brien, D.D .. D.Ph., St. Munchin's, Limerick ; Rev. M, Hayes, C.C, Limerick; :.liss Charlotte Dease, Miss Bridget Foley, Miss Ryan, Miss Knox, Miss O'Gorman, )liss O'Rahilly, l\1. Keating, B.A.: :\Ir. Michael Sheehan. The interpretation of Strachari's stories from ·· The Tain " was completed during the session. Irish alone, of course, was the medium of instruction. HISTORY AXD Dxx.:-;sEXCHLS. Mr. O'Hehir lectured each dav on earlv Irish historv in Irish and Mr, O'Xolan lectured dailv to the Ven; advanced students on Dinnsenchus. He used with advantage the works of l\lr. T. J. Westropp, M.A., and the Life of St. Senan in the Book of Lismore Both classes of lectures were delivered exclusively in Irish. TRA);SLATIOX A:SD ::',{ETRICS. .\ h1ghly popular class was that conducted by the Ard-Ollamh in the art of translating into good Irish a passage of idiomatic English. In some of these classes a passage of verv idiomatic Irish was.translateo into standard Eri<.:lish and this served as a model for the students when translating from English into Irish. The art of turning technical words and phrases into

an Ct.6.1'0e.o.rt1 souns (A• CLAIDRSA MH SOLUIS. j

Irish was also taught. Metrics, old and modem, was taught, the examples being always taken from some literary gem in the language. Special lectures in Irish were also delivered by the Ard-Ollamh. TONIC SOL-FA. A unique feature in the College course was a series of lessons in the Tonic Sol-Fa method of singing, conducted entirelv in Irish by Tomas O Hacdha, the wellknown Irish author and dramatist. Mr. Hayes has won many distinctions in this subject, and holds diplomas and certificates from the Royal Irish Academy of Music, the City of Dublin Technical Schools, and other bodies, for the teaching of singing and choir This, it is believed, is the first time that training. an attempt has been made in any Irish College to teach singing scientifically through Irish, and the experiment has been highly successful. The students were delighted with the courses, and they profited not only The musically but linguistically from the lectures. technical terms selected are simple and natural, and no difficulty was experienced in carrying the students to the point at which they could sing harmonized It is intended to develop and extend pieces in Irish. this department of the College work in future years, since singing has now been made such an important feature in the curriculum of our schools and colleges. Besides the Tonic Sol-Fa lecture in singing of Mr. Hayes, another lesson in singing was given each day by Mr. Micheal O Siofhchain, Gaelic Teacher in West Clare. PHONETICS. A course of lectures on Phonetics also formed an important part of the August as of the July session. These lectures too were delivered by Mr. Hayes and were followed by the students with great interest. The professor's knowledge of voice production enabled him to introduce features which helped the students very much in acquiring the correct sounds of the The modulator was largely availed of in language. the drill work, and voice production exercises were ingeniously introduced to enable the non-native speakers to acquire the correct " blas " and to assist them in bringing the vocal organs into proper play. TEXT BOOKS. The teaching of a class text book of his own novel, " An Gioblachan," was also in the hands of Mr. Hayes. Grammar, conversation and teaching method were all combined by him while teaching. LOWER STANDARDS. The lower standards were mostly in the hands of Micheal O Siothchain. Gaelic teacher and Oireachtas Gold Medallist. Mr. O'Nolan saw after the same standards in reading, and the Ard-Ollamh taught them numbers and elementary Arithmetic. Irish was. of course, the only medium of instruction. Mr. O Siothchain, too, conducted a dancing class, and was the complete manager of the College sgoruidheachtanna or concerts, a most enjoyable one of which was held each evening from half-past eight to ten. A special word of thanks is due to Mr. Sean O Gruagain, Birr, and to Mr. Seosamh O Conchubhar, Lissycasey, who very kindly taught classes by request during theirsojourn in the College. The above is a very bald account of the academic side of the work of the O'Curry College. Those wishing to get a detailed and entertaining account of the social and domestic side of the College life are referred to an article in AN CLAIDHEAMH S0Lu1s for September 7th, written by Maire de Buitleir, the genial Bean an Tighe of the College. GAOLA.

carbouc crutb Soci¢tp or lrdana. THE TENTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE (Under the auspices of the above Society), will be held in

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ON OCTOBER 9th and 10th,

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10th-AT THE SUPPER ROOM. MoRXING--1:2 o'clock, noon to 1 o'clock, p.m. Paper will be read on " Capital and Labour, and the Catholic Church," by Rev. R. Fullerton, B.D.,C.C., Belfast. AFTERxoox-�.30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Papers will be read on " Spiritualism and Christianity," by Rev. P. J. Manly, C.C., Carrick-on-Shannon, and " Is the Catholic Truth Society of Ireland fulfilling its Mission ? " by Mr. Francis Guy. ADDRESS BY Hrs GRACE THE ARCHBISHOP OF TuA:.f. Admission 6d. to each Se. "ion.

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co Lits cc to 1i1 $ .., t Lt. HEARTE);'IXG REPORT. At the largely attended inaugural meeting of the Belfast College of Irish, held in the College premises on Monday night, the following summary of the committee's report on the past session's work was read by the Principal, Seaghan O Cathain i-cThe past session was by far the most successful in the seven years' history of the College. The total number of students in regular attendance was much greater than that of either of the two preceding sessions. whilst the number of qualified teacher-students exceeded that of any previous year. More encouraging than even the crowded classes were the students' splendid spirit of enthusiasm for the language, their comradeship, and their loyalty to the College.

Currlculum. Courses were conducted in Modern Irish, Method. Phonetics, History, Middle Irish, and Philology, and also on Irish Music and the tea.chin� of Irish songs. At intervals during the session Public Lectures were delivered, always to very large audiences, by Rev. Gerald O'Nolan, 1\1.A., B.D., Rev. Canon O'Connell, 1\1.A., Professor Eoin l\lacNeill, Philip \Vard, Carl Hardebeck, F. J. Bigger, M.R.I.A., J. J. Doyle, and W. B. Reynolds. Important Statistics. During the Session 161 students were enrolled, of whom 133 were teachers in primary and secondary schools. Of the teacher-students, 120 attended up· to the very end of the session-a record in this respectand this number was accordingly registered with the educational authorities with which the College is connected. For the sessional examinations 75 teachers entered, being the largest number yet examined at the close of any session of the College. Of these, 2 obtained the Diploma in Advanced Irish Studies, I 8 the Teachers' Certificate, and 26 the Interim Certificate. During the past twelve months, 20 certificated teacher-students, for the first time since they obtained the College Certificate, taught Irish in their schools to the satisfaction of the Inspectors of the National Board, thus making a total for the past four years in respect of such students of the high number of 42. Including all the primary and secondary teachers who have obtained the various certificates of the College since its establishment in 1905, 182 teacher-students of Colaiste Chomhghaill (the great majority of whom knew little or no Irish before entering the College) have introduced the teaching of Irish into their schools, and have, at a moderate estimate, taught the language to at least I 2,000 pupils. The large number of speakers of Irish returned in the last census from Belfast alone is chiefly due to the work done, through their schools, by the students of Colaiste Chomhghaill. A Very High Standard of Excellence." Towards the close of the session the classes were visited by an Inspector from the Department of Technical Instruction. The following report of the Inspector, as furnished by the Department, is given in full:The organisation of the Classes of this School is very satisfactory, and the students have been well classified. " The teaching generally reaches a high, and in many of the classes, a very high standard of excellence. "The students exhibit a marked interest in their work: they have attended punctually and regularly, and have made sound progress."

II

II

The Students' Union, During the past year the Students' Union has again been very active. Many enjoyable and largely attended Ceilidhthe, as well as some instructive debates of a The Union propagandist character, were organised. wa.s also very successful in its Seilgi and brake excursions during the summer months. The various activities of the Union have proved of the greatest assistance to the College during the past two years. The College and the Gaellc League. In last April, a Conference of the recognised Gaelic Colleges was called by the Education Committee of the Gaelic League, with the subsequent sanction of the Coiste Gnotha, the Central Executive of the Gaelic Delegates from this College League organisation. attended the various meetings of the Conference. The Conference, which, at its first meeting was constituted a permanent and independent body, has made some very important arrangements as to the courses of study, certificate examinations, etc., of its constituent colleges. In this respect, it may be well to state that Colaiste Chomhghaill has ever been in the closest and friendliest connection with the Gaelic League Executive, whose suggestions-including that of a constitution for the College-we have always loyally carried out. The consistent support of the Coiste Gnotha has greatly helped the College in the national work of training Irish teachers, whose motto is that of their Alma Mater, " 'Oo-cum 5L61re 'Oe 1r on611.o. n.o. h-e111e.6.nn "-" for the glory of God and the honour of Ire land."

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Offices-BLACKHALL PLACE, DUBLIN.

Telegraphic Addre-« :-"

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�!ANUll'.\.CTURERS,

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N. B.-Our �nalysis guarantee Is higher than others. Price

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AND

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MARQUEES

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.6.tl

8

De11te.so l,\/$1·1,,1J\ 12, 1912. October : .2, 19 r 2.

[AN CLAIDHEA.MH SOLUl:-,J

Ciste na Teangan. The Cisteoir acknowledges £15 from Craobh Phortlairge and £8 from Craobh K aomh The Port Lairge Padraig, �Iagh X uadhat. Gaels have now contributed a total of £25 for 1912. Many craobhacha have yet to complete Seachtmhain na Gaedhilge work, while many others appear not to have made any collection. �

Philadelphia and Springfield Feiseanna. Philadelphia is to have its first Feis, and like all American cities it wants it to be carried out on a big scale. Philadelphia feels that, as New York, Boston Chicago have had their Feiseanna on large scales, it must have. its Feis on record-breaking proportions, and with that end in view the largest Hall in the " Quaker City" has been engaged for three nights, z rst, zznd, and 23rd November. Convention Hall, in which the Feis will be held, accommodates 20,000 persons, so that the organiser will have his hands full from now on to advertise the event sufficiently to " draw " the crowd. The " Clar" of the Philadelphia Feis includes 40 contests, including essays, storytelling, recitation, singing, dancing, Irish pipes, HighJand pipes, War pipes, violin, piano, flute, but what is expected to be the drawing card is the contest for the championship of the United States in step-dancing. Entries have been received from all over the country, from as far West as Chicago, and entries in the essay competitions have been received from the Pacific coast and from Canada. A special effort will be made to secure contestants from Ireland. The Philadelphia Feis is the seventh organised by Donal O'Connor, who is exactly one year in the United States, making on an average a record of a Feis every two months. If this Feis is as successful as Donal expects it to be, there will be several thousand dollars added to the Gaelic League's treasury. The Springfield Feis will also be held early in November, and Padraig O Hegarty and James ]. Fitzgerald are working as ever. They are making a special effort to outdo their previous records, and there is no doubt but that the Feis will be everything that they hope it to be, Go neirighidh an t-adh libh. In connection with the Feis there will be an Aonach, and arrangements are being made to make a good showing of Irish-made goods.'" Entries for the essay contests for ... the Philadelphia Feis may be sent to Room 207 Parkway Building, Philadelphia. The subjects are left to the competitor's own selection. One is for juniors, and the other is for seniors. Entries for the Springfield Feis may be sent to James J. Fitzgerald, 35 Allendale Street, Springfield, Mass.

...

Craobh an Cheitinnigh.

The work of Craobh an Cheitinnigh is now in full swing in their new premises, 8 North Frederick Street. A very interesting clar has been arranged, which is likely to cater for the wants of all. The first, second and third classes meet on Tuesdays and Fridays; the fourth on Mondays and Thursdays ; and the fifth on Mondays. A special composition and conversation class meets on Wednesdays. Lectures, debates, etc., are also being arranged.

Irish Orthography. An tAthair Peadar O Laoghairc is reported to have advocated, at the Mansion House on Monday, the giving of freedom to all systems of spelling that it may be proposed to substitute for ot:r present system. If every county is to have its own system, how arc we to arrive at anyt�1i11g like a stan�dard system ? Nothing new m favour of the J, ola system was said at the �Ionday meeting. Abuse of the Gaelic League is not argument. The League stands for a national system, and for Gaelic as against Roman type. An tAthair Peaclair, we believe, Any Make of

Typewriter Repaired. Gaels remember! an Irish-Irelander when you want 't\. ew or Second-hand Typewriters, Duplicators Stencils Stencil Ink, �.i?bons, Carb�ns, Paper, etc. Typewriting and Duplicating in Irish or English at reasonable rates.

The Foley Typewriter Trading Company, Tel. 117 Y.

cto.1'6e6-ti1 sotuis.

11 Lower O'Connell Street, Dublin.

The Adver tisers in AN

...

does not claim that the Fola system is suitable to any district outside of Cork.

Irish in "Thom." The forms issued to Dublin householders bv Messrs. Thom. for the Post Office Directory, should be filled in Irish. They will be collected very soon, and Irish names can hardly be refused if occupants of houses stand by their Irish names.

Meetings.

..

Mr. Bigger and Mrs. Stopford Green spoke at the opening of the Droichead Atha Gaelic League last week. Seaghan O Ruadhain and Colm O Gaora several successful meetings in organised Clochan district. An tAthair O Riain presided at the Iorrusmor meeting, and An tAthair O Glaisin at Cloch na Ron. The speakers at both meetings urged the necessity of using Irish habitually. The annual meeting of Craobh Sgibrin was held on Monday night. The Baile an Bhrunaigh and Dun Dealgan branches have begun work for session r9r2-r3.

--•:. --

COMPULSORY IRISH IN THE NATIONAL SCHOOLS. I notice that one of vour leaders in last week's issue of the CLAIDHEA1:IH is headed " A Fighting Time Ahead." I cannot help wishing that it had been titled " A Fighting Time Af0� t." For, if anything be obvious, it is the necessity for immediate fight-not " to-morrow or next day " but at once. The hitherto more or less latent discomfort, or indeed dissatisfaction of Leaguers generally with the progress or rather want of progress of the Language Movement in recent years, has somewhat manifested itself since the appearance of the latest Census Returns, but there is still a great body of pentup feeling awaiting a decisive lead towards compulsory Irish in the so-called National Schools. In common with, I am convinced, the great majority of Leaguers, I have for weeks past been hoping to see the Coiste Gnotha inaugurate a public campaign on the lines suggested recently by the Editor of "Sinn Fein." All Leaguers will not agree in all things with " Sinn Fein," . but I think the disease was most ably diagnosed, and the true remedy prescribed in the articles on the Gaelic League to which I refer. The real seat of trouble is not the University, not the native speaker who will not speak Irish, not the English-speaking Pension Officer, but the socalled National School. For the National School is the only school accessible to ninety-five per cent. of the children of the present Gaelic Ireland, and, outside of the towns, it is the only school accessible to the great bulk of the children of the rest of Ireland. Therefore, the National School once seized and held means the Language restored. The University, the League itself, and even the Irish-speaking Pension Officer, will never revive Irish except through and with the schools of the People's children. I repeat that the National School is the key to the situation, and I venture to add most deliberately, that a determined campaign for compulsory Irish in the National School ought at once to be On the whole, the opened by the League. country will back the demand, the very instincts of the people will answer, "Yes." And the will come from the much strongest backing maligned native-speaker=-once the case is put clearly before him-for, ignorant and illiterate though he be, he has--Irish, and more than that he will speak it so soon and no sooner than he and his children " can read and write it." It has been repeatedly pointed out that the Gael is so innately ashamed of illiteracy that he will insist on speaking the language of the " educated." This is the root-reason why the native speaker who, though he can only just scribble his name in English and not in Irish will revert to English in spite of the nativeIrish-speaking Pension Officer. And the rootreason why his son of ten will unhesitatingly speak and continue to speak Irish to the Pension Officer is because "he is learning it at school," because it is a serious and business matter there. Yet, the native speaker is the kernel of the Language Revival, but his true value will only reveal itself when his child is efficiently taught Irish at the National School, the only school for him. Enough has been said to indicate my feelings and faith, and I write solely with a view to a consensus of opinion, and a unity of action. I believe in immediate fight for compulsory Irish in the National Schools. What do Leaguers, including the Coiste Gnotha, believe in ? GU AIRE. 1

OiAIDHEAlUB

d=serve vour support.

A MISSION TO THE IRISH-SPEAKING WOMEN OF IRELAND.

. The Ga�lic Le�gt:t.' mission so far has been m the mam_ a mission �o the male portion of the population. Public meetings have been held up and down the Gaedhealtacht at which the men attended in their hundreds and thousands. Aeridheachtanna have likewise been attended mostly by men. At Irish etc., the women of c<:mc�rts, �he Irish-speaking districts have had a look m, but otherwise the q-aelic League mission has been preached �:mly 1:1 t�e ears of the men of the Irish-speaking districts. Inasmuch as the mission has . not been a pronounced success I suggest a change of methods, and instead of holding meetings, etc., that the energies of the Gaelic League should be directed towards getting the women of the Irish-speaking districts on the side of the language movement. Otherwise the movement is bound to fail. One Irish-speaking mother who teaches her children Irish is a greater asset to the language movement than the average Branch of the Gaelic League. I have known many cases where fathers of families tried to teach their children Irish and failed owing to the fact that the mothers of the children did not know Irish. I have never known a case to the contrary where the Irish-speaking mother set about teaching her children Irish, and failed The owing to the father not knowing Irish. Children in explanation is not far to seek. their infancy are almost completely in the hands of their mothers. While fathers of families are working out in the fields, etc., the mother and children are at home, and as a result the mother's influence in the children's lives is preponderant. Whatever tongue she teaches them to speak, they speak that tongue and no other. It will thus be seen how important it is to get the Irish-speaking mother on the side of the Language movement. There are difficulties in the way, inasmuch as Irish-speaking mothers do not as a rule attend public meetings. They can only be approached in their own homes or in the churches. Friendly disposed clergymen can do a lot to influence them in the churches, but the Gaelic League being a lay movement has no alternative than to approach them in their own homes. It is a colossal labour to do so, but it has got to be done somehow. There is no other alternative. At the last Ard-Fheis it was decided to spend £r,ooo on providing organisers and teachers for the Irish-speaking di, tricts. What programme is to be placed before those Hitherto the main organisers and teachers ? energies of organisers and teachers has been directed towards the founding of Branches of the Gaelic League and teaching in the schools. The latter work is no longer as urgent as formerly inasmuch as Irish is now taught in the majority of the schools situated in the Irish-speaking districts. I suggest, therefore, that such organisers and teachers should be directed to make arrangements towards having every house in the countryside visited where there are Irish-speaking mothers and to appeal to them to teach their children Irish. It does not necessarily follow that the organiser or teacher must visit every such house personally.. The work can be done in a much simpler. fashion. The Gaelic League Branches can help especially in the towns and villages. The countryside is a separate problem, but the countryside can be reached through

� FLOWERS ONE OUGHT TO I HA VE IN THE GARDEN.

(J) The Spring Snowflake. The Spring Snowflake is far from common in gardens generally, yet it is a beautiful plant, quite hardy, easy to grow and very cheap to buy. In appearance it reminds one of the Snowdrop, but the Hewer is much larger. They are bellshaped, drooping, snow-white, marked with green on the tips of the petals. Plant it freely among grass, in the rockery and in the flower border. It will come up yearly and rejoice you in the early Spring. Procure and plant at once, Extra large bulbs, per 100 4/•, per 1,000 57 /6. carriage paid. -

SIR JAMES W. MACKEY, Ltd.,

___________.... SEEDS:M:EN,

25

UPPER

DUBLIN·

O'CONNELL

Catalogue of Bulbs free.

Do they receive it?

STREET.


Conerpe.

5�n 1/-•

•r a..11o "-eue ,........

8 o

15

O

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6

L111., • Dublia-

Waterford.


�N CLAIDH!MIH SoLUI-SJ

t A5U[ fAJnne AD 1.AQ e I le�l'.>-Af' XIV Vol.

U1m1t' 33. No. 33. [Registered as a Ne•spaper.]

XIV.

b4'0 �re "Oo 54c 54e'01t.5eo1t'

1

mtJ41tt• .6.-e..:1

CtM't 5..:1n 40n '1f'An 'OO ce4nn..:1c ..:1cc.

KENNEDY'S

BREAD

Finest Quality Made. ��

127 &

128 GREAT BRITAIN

S!.

bone st:« cuez, 'Oe1tt.e.o.t.> DUBLIN.

fOStil�ltl 19, 1912.

OCTOHER 19,

Support New Irish Industry.___..........

''TITAN" SOA·P. Made PH<ENIX WORKS, DUBLIN.

AGAIN

.,.+0

AGAIN

AND

Let me call attention to my

ST. PATRICK'S BAKERY,

IRISH HOMESPUN F�ANNEL- SHIRTS,

DUBLIN.

Extra Well-made and Cut,

8/9, 4/6,

'' EMERALD''

CALF MEAL

&fe to

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HOMESPUN NIGHT SHIRTS from 6;6. • PYJAMA SUITS 7/6, •

"

Undervests, Pants, Socks, Etc., Etc.

is a First Quality Cream Equivalent.

Requires no cooking, is highly digestible, and contains nearly twice as much Oil as the Average Calf Meal.

pm5mn. ONE PB�NV

1912.

.ALL IRISH.

Lo UGH LIN'S 19

Pa111iament

St.,

NO RU BBINC 11 J

I

� IRISH GROWN TOBACCO. -----..

" VERY NICE INDIE..11 This is the u.ni11enally axpress,d opinion about our products.

• TRY THEM YOURSELF • and we have no doubt you will be pleased. Any respectable Tobacconist can supply you with our Banba's Cigars, Tarcirish Cigarettes, Banba's Straight Cut Cigarettes, Virginia Flavour, R D.S. Smoking l\lixture, Broad Cut, a Connoisseur's Tobacco; BanW1o's Smoking Mixture-mild and medium-Irish Plug, I risb Cut Plug. 'Ard Ri ' Cigarettes. or our Irish Coul"ts, all of which fOII will find are excellent value.

Grower• and Maaufacturera,

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�-------------------:!..

N. 8.�ur aualysls guarantee Is higher than ot�_!"._8'._

Price 17/8 per �., carriage Paid.

PAUL & VINCENT, LTD., MANUFAOTURERS,

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The Irish United Assurance Society. Tile Oaly lriu Mataal Office Founcled aad Worked 011 a,-to-date lian aader coatrol of N,reseatatiN Irishmen. Bndowment and Whole Ufe Assurance Transacted at Lowest Rates In Industrial and Ordinary Departments. AGENTS WANTED IN ALL PARTS OF IRELAND. Applications invited from capable and energetic men who can in· fluence business." Good terms and prospects. Speedy promotion to successful canvassers. Writ<! for Prospectus and Full Particulars. HAIUtY J. MA6UlltE, Sec:.

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Ladies' and Gentlemen's Umbrellas at all prices, including Pia.In, Fancy, Xeat-Iolding (on steel tubes). The New Coloured Silk Umbrellas, Travelling Umbrellas . (which fold into small space), Golf Umbrellas, Douhle-Ribbed Umbrellas, Shooting Chairs. Horse Measures, Xilgherry Canes, Irish

F..AN.AG.AN'S l'UNERAL EffAIJLISHMENT, 1541 AUNGIER STREET. ........, n.r.., c.clles, •ad n.J' l'IIWIII RII....... Paactaallty C.-try

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FRAS. SMYTH 8J. SON,

Knickers

DUBLIN.

family

140 DRUMCONDRA ROAD, Grocers, Purveyors & Wioe Mercbaots.

fihlbtst Standard 600ds Stocked. A

PRICES MODERATE.

TRIAL

SOLICITED.

IN THE MARCH OF CIVILISATION.

Some years ago our grandmothers prided themselves on their ample feather beds, but now-a-days no good housewife cares to use one of these unhealthy and not too cleanly if luxurious articles. Any housekeeper wishing to dispose of one or more feather beds could not do better than to communicate with the Irish Feather Co., Ltd., Tara Street, Dublin, who supply Curled Hair Mattresses in part or whole exchange, or purchase ror cash as may be desired.

••

T

J. W. ELVEl{Y & CO.

HURLEY ''CAMANS" 6d., I/·, 1:(6,

HURLEY

21·,

2/6, 3/6.

BALLS

6d., I/·, lf6, lf9, 21 ·, 2/6, 3/·. AND

TENTS

MARQUEES

---+---

PHOT_O_GFAP�Y.__;)

,\ett1t.>e, cconn« 1 re1re(\tlt1 <.\1

FINNERTY' S,

FETB:S, BAZAARS, & CAMPING-OUT.

The Old (Irish) Firm, Still Leading, Still the Best

FOR SALB: OR HIRE.

J,

F.

KELLY

&

CO,,

9 & 10 CHANCERY ST. {Formerly Pill

Studio: 46 Lane)

Also 21 UPPER ORMOND QUAY, DUBLIN.

HENRY

DUBLIN.

STREET,

Boots, etc.

But-No longer on the Quays.

FLEMING

....._

Bce-7

Uaclertu.... ••••....

Blackthorns. &c , &c.

Grafton Street, } Lr. Sackville St., cl. Parliament St.,

'

THE IRISH TOBACCO 00.,

IRISH OOTFITTllfG HEADQUARTERS,

Grafton St.'s of world wide fameRich and poor have heard its name ; It is known in every land, For 'tis there, I understand, F Smyth makes the " Griffon Brand " Of Umbrellas, farfamed and Not equalled in any land.

Wonderf•I Cleanser.

CATALOiltf flff

DUBLIN. CORK LONDON


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OP

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LAK.KIN,

0

99 Lower Dorset Street

A Nu la.Gae Act. • St. ololul G. Enue.

:Y P.AIUNG.'•

c, •• ., la fllNe Adil. • w-.

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The Claeape8t lloae ill Towa For Claancllay,


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�e adqption of th� r�, referred to the d.tan 19f �e PfOvision ol. sclio�p,s froqi Pripiaryi Scloo1' to �� Schools, and said he W3$r � q� with the maiD object of the scheme, but there were a few details of it that seemed to be ra� extrinsic to it. and that The scheme was one required amendment. which for the first tftne in express words recognised the vecy vital distinction in the provision of programmes and methods of organisations for Irish education. It recognised that tlieJ;e were different regions in the county. but it had not carried out that distinction properly. In other parts of the scheme region came to mean county. That was not satisfactory. The scheme should recognise a line of demarcation different from counties. They were calliDg out for special provision for the Irishspeaking districts, and surely if any scheme of scholarships was to be set up it should recognise Irish-speaking districts falling into certain natural divisions, so that Irish speakers would be put on the road to higher education, not merely as teachers. of Irish, but of other important subjects throih Irish. There should be definite provision for the Irish-speaking districts as such. One result of the county organisation was that it was possible for a student even from an Irish-speaking district to pass through the entire scholarship course from the Primary School to the University without being necessarily asked a single question about the Irish language. That was a fatal flaw in the scheme. The scheme also made it a question whether the County Councils should be led away or coerced away from the attitude which -they had taken up in supporting the National University for its recognition of the claim that the Irish language should be an essential part of � niversity education in Ireland. The

�me

AC.6.ttt., 12.10.191.2.

..

Who rules the Boud--the

Commissioners?

How Ireland Is Goyemed. An official of the ational Board baa � the following letter to the "Irish Indej>eftdeill'" iu reply to the letter c:J Se.aghan O Rmdhain,ha ccmplained of the refusal � an � a, sanction a roll kept in Irish :11th October. 1912. Sir, I have just seen in your issue of the 7th. coatafning a letter from Seaghan O Ruadbaio on the subject stated above. As he appears to be amdous lor information concerning the regulations of the ....I, Board on the subject, I gladly give him an experience of my own. I, too, found a school in wbicla tlle ..... of the pupils attending the special class in ldlh wse entered in Irish. I did not " order " or " · or " direct " the teacher to write the names ia�, having no authority to do 80 from any .Baud • anyone else. I visit schools other than Model Sdloola only by the pennission of local ...,.,,... But I am directed by the Co1D iMio..... of atioaal Education to check the accmacy Olf the teadler's

!1!!


�n ct�1ueAtfl sotuis.

8

'Oe1)'e4'1)

l,"69'141" f

-October 19. 191&.

Ci�oli Restaurant, PATRICK STREET, CORK. The C111eJ 's Rest. SA6

The Adve1 tiF�rs in A:N

CLAIDBEA.)[B

AOn

n1'6

SAO'k.

d=serve vour support.

SIR JAMES W. MACI

��B»•••••DV•·-......,..�

23 PPPER o·coNNE� �T

c..io1••

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a.a. ,,...

Do they receive it?

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. , THE ANTI-IRISH INSPECTORS.

.

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The " Irish Independent " of T:nesday P:1�'lished the. following letter from Eom MacN eill : Sir, . The strong reference made by Mon�1gnor O'Doherty, at the opening of the Lem_s�er ·College of Irish on Friday,_ to the ho;tility shown by some of the Nati_onal Boards Inspectors to the teaching of Insh deserves to be followed up. Constant complaints are h�ar_d -of the conduct of certain Inspectors, but it is naturally difficult to b�ing the �ases to book. The victim, in the first mstance, is the teacher. An Inspector, acting wi.thin his regu�ations and authority, can penalise the teachmg of Irish without any overt act that can be definitely complained of. Her� is a recent ins�ance. Irish is taught in a certam school. The child:en like it and the parents are pleased. There is a chang� of Inspectors. . The new. Inspector �s In his unfriendly to the teachmg of Insh. first report on this school, though he has never been in it before, he is able to say that the school has " retrograded! " For years the school has been marked " good." The new Inspector marks it down to " fair " and puts a stop to the teaching of Irish accordingly. What is the remedy? A hundred details go to make up the general character of the teaching in � school. By seizing on one or two �eak pomts and making much of them an unfair Inspector can justify a hostile report. It might be thought that advocates of the teaching of Irish were hard to ple3:se and r�ady to blame without just cause. But m your issue of the r rth inst. there is a letter written by one of the National Board's Inspectors which gives the public a glimpse of the kind of perfor11:ance that is carried on. This gentleman's attitude be from some of his remarks. judged may " I have much to be thankful for that, as a Civil Servant, I am not in the position of the National teachers, whom the Gaelic League would drive out on the road after long and .faithful service."

I

1�

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't .... •

Campaign of Falsehood. Some of us had a pretty good idea of the sort of persons who were in the background trJ'."ing to work up this campaign of falsehood agamst the Gaelic League, and a pretty good guess of the interests that the campaign was designed to serve. I now invite the � ational teachers, including any that may have been led to think that the Gaelic League wished to treat them unfairlv, to judge out of his own mouth this champion of theirs against the League-this Inspector who confessed!y would like to see the teachers and the League at variance. We -shall learn from himself his own idea of justice towards the teachers. He tells us in his letter that, in his inspection of the rolls of a certain school, he found that " the names of the pupils attending the special class in Irish were entered in Irish !" He admits that in this there is nothing irregular, that he had "no authority from the Board or anyone -else " to require the names to be entered "in He charges no inaccuracy against English." the teacher in the keeping of the roll. Though there was no complaint of irregularity and no complaint of inaccuracy, though the teacher was within his rights in keeping the roll in the manner described, this champion of the teachers' rights found a way to compel the teacher to humiliate himself before him and to do what there was " no authoritv from the Board or anyone else " to require l1im to do, Let him describe the triumph in his own words. " I informed the teacher," he writes, " that unless the rolls were kept in a manner that I could understand I would refuse to certify to their correctness." Please mark what follows. " This, of course, would lead to a refusal of 'fees for Irish in this case." He proceeds to gloat over the abasement of his victim. " The teacher had sense enough to grasp the situation, and when next I called the names were all duplicated in English." Arbitrary Conduct. Here we have an Inspector of National Schools who, on the pretence that he could not " understand " a roll of names in Irish, threatens to deprive a teacher of fees duly earned, and compels the teacher to do what

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(All CI.A.. !I.AIIB SOLU18,]

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an-CtA1'0eAtt1 souns. 'I,

·oe111e.6'6\65ti'l.<11p 19, 1912. b,;tober ·19,

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Sufficient to make from 15 to 20 cups of delicious cocoa

S

ro.COA AVO, made· · in\.., I rela.ncl

Savoy Cocoa is entirely free from the heavy H fatty •t flavour you dislike in other cocoas. It is cocoa at its best-more nourishing, more sustaining, and more stimulating because made only from the richest grade beans, with the excess fatty matter-the part you dislike-eliminated. Savoy Cocoa is just as good and as nice as the famous SaToy Chocolates. PROVE this at ourt expense. Simply sign annexed coupon and hand it to yourt g,.ocel' who will give you fol' one penny a la ..ge 3d. packet (sufficient to make fl'om 15 to 20 cups). If he cannot supply you send us his name, with coupon, fol' sample packet. •

Savoy Cocoa ls sold in 3d. &Sfd,pkts.; t}b. tins, 7td.; t]b. tins, J/3 KANUFAOTURED BY THE SAVOY CONFECTIONERS'

co.,

LTD., DUBLL'l & BFT,FAST •

Not already having tried Savoy Cocoa I wish to get 3d. sample packet for Id.

Name ------Address iiiiililiiiiilliiilliiilliiiiiilliilllilliliilllillJ

" no authority " required. As if it mattered a pin, for the checking of accuracy, whether a boy's name appeared on the roll as " Seaghan Seoighe" or" John Joyce." It is obvious that a gentleman with an " understanding " of this order is wasting time in the inspection of schools. It remains for the Commissioners of National Education to inquire into this case and, if they find that the facts are as their inspector has stated, to effectually prevent the recurrence of such gross breach of duty and such arbitrary and unjust conduct towards the teacher. We obtain further light on the spirit which actuates officials of this kind from the letter in question, and on the notion they have of their duties. " Your correspondent may inquire (others have inquired)," he writes, "why I am not compelled to learn Irish, so as to be able to read the names of the roll-book. My reply is that there is no power to compel me. Twenty years ago I was appointed to my present position after a severe Civil Service competitive examination. I was recognised as fully qualified." Just so ! He emerged from the examination a perfect expert in all the work of an Inspector of Irish schools. And being perfect twenty years ago, he remains perfect to-day. " My employers, the Commissioners of National Education, have no legal right to insist on further qualifications. Consequently, I will learn Irish only on two conditions-first, that I am able to ; and second, that I want to." Live and Learn. Now, miserable public that you are, read that ultimatum, and then "pay up and look pleasant." Nevertheless, it has long been said that a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client. I also have been more than twenty years in the public service, but I never

]earned that I entered it in a state of perfection. On the contrary, I was always led to believe that, if I showed myself incapable of adding to my initial qualifications as the work of my office might require, I might find myself left at the bottom of the ladder, and if I went further and declared myself unwilling to improve my qualifications I might find myself where I was before the "severe Civil Service competitive examination." Were it not that this Inspector, on his own showing, is unfit to be continued in his position, I would recommend him to consult some of the eminent lawyers among his " employers" as to their " powers " and " legal rights " before he again undertake to pronounce. I should anticipate that they would have little difficulty in assuring him that, though they might not be able to compel him to learn enough Irish to " understand " a list of names in a roll-book they would be quite entitled to dispense with his services. This gentleman's ideas of public service, like his qualifications, are at least twenty years out of date. Much water has flowed under the The Irish bridge during those years. public has wakened up somewhat towards a sense of its rights, though it has not apparently as yet learned how to deal locally with t?e domineering anti-Irish officials who take its monev. It has gained certain rights for the Irish language in the schools, and a public duty has arisen to see that no official shall be allowed to attempt, by any device, to defeat those rights, much less to brow-beat and mulct the teachers in giving effect to them. I repeat that this case, as stated by the Inspector, demands full inquiry, and that, if his statement is found true, he is plainly unfit for his position. EOIN MAC�EILL.

'


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RELIA{NCE 11\e o E11gi-aving eompcmy. Telephou 117 X.

PRINTERS, --STATIONERS, ACCOUNT •

PROCESS ENGRAVERS,

AND LINE ..,,m,� FLAMW'S HOTl:L,

WHI • nil

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BOOK IIAftUFACTURERS.

I

tJ With a largely increased Plant cl Up-

lli4.tle Abl,ey Street, Dahlin. lhueN, l.eecllelftl,-T-.

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T. GARDINER,

_::•n:,b::e�.

tn"J.\ft.i,Ji4 Wo,t. W., 11<>1

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· it clone at home, und,ry.ar own eyes, by the IRISH Fiim.

BOUT Russell'• .jfair Cutting, Shaving, and

Shampooing Saloon, SS South King Street, top

of <b'al\on Street, Dublin.

1a...c��

qf 4an�wg w�nted one night 'weekly. Write to Secretary, Gaelic League, St. Margaret'.s,

Co. Dublin.

��'01t.5e.-.d"C! · b41n1�eo111 45

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• • • in Ireland of lriah-mado •

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WELLINGTON QUAY, a

DUBLIN

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DIXON'S

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connR4'0

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l...argeat Papers.

GAl!l:.10 �EAGUI. ,

to-date Machinery can produce rapidly and

tJ

Moderate TarUI

� tttMII.., .W

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Teu by colllp&liMn .ad �-...... can ofter the piak ttf '- ll'arket at :-1/6, i/1, I[-, f/fO, 1/1, t/1, f/6,

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DUBLJN .. MADE

NEILi NI BHRIAIN,

B.

FQ

Bl. R. PAGE, 11 Parliainent


dn oumeArh sotu,�

'Oe1t'e4t>

October 26, 1912.

DOLLARD, Printinghouse, . Dohlin, Ltd., PRINTEltS, Lll�HERS, _, STATIONERS, ACC98NT •

BOOK MANUFACTURERS. • f W,� �lj increased Plant oE t)p-,,

� M�QD produce rawiclj-'11

at reason.i»\ c;ost any work entrust"ed to them. • , •

tJ Largest users

in Ireland of Irish-made •

ADVERTISEMENT RATES. Single I nse rnon.

Page £6 Q Half-Pare 3 U) One-third Page 2 5 I · Quarter-Page ... 1 17 Per Inch .... -0 ' Reduced prices for series of insertions. Announcements of Births, Marriages, or Death� ti(, Irish or English, five lines or under, 2s. 6d,, and fkl. " Jine after.

SUBSCRIPTION Subscription for One Year Do. for Six Months Do. for Three Months

OHI0/18 a( lVOrb: ..

WELUNOTON Qt}AY,

ESSBX STREltt DUB[

OB.D�B.

FO&M.

CUl'Oe4-t1l so uns," .25 Rutland .$qmrre,

months, for which

RATES.


NICE INDEED.• n- u • -;w,-117 � .,.... .,,..,, OW' rwJw:ts. • TRT TBB• YOURSELF •

aacl we haw no doubt you will be pleased. AaJ � Tobacconist can supply you itb oar Baaba"s Cigars, Turcirisb Cigarettes. Banba s Straight Cut Cigarettes, arcinia FlaYOUr. R D.S. Smoking Mixture, Broad Cut. a Coanoisseur'e Tobacco; Banba·s Smoki!'I{ ICaxture-mild and medium-Irish Plug, hisb Cat Plug, ' Ard Ri ' Cigarettes, or oar lrisb Courts, all or which 700 will 6Dd are excellent value. 0

THI IIISB TOBACCO CO.,

t"A t sonn 4J\ mo �me-,-e tom clo1'-"ba01.& ......_ cA t>p:">n 41' m'1nna11n � a� e,att

lr

.4:S fSA�·

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IRl8H TRADE IABK. Telephone

31189 27fh Octolir,

��of�� 1 '

IEffHER, DUIUI. 11

HOPKINS & HOPKINS fflGnufGcturing Jewe Ilers, Op�te O'Connell Monument

1

touBLIN.

...

I

• llii4t·lf6)<,,l']f

•d'e � al · Cork, and up to recently an 9e!!Jrbw Clllate was stationed in that portion of it in which Die man Irish is spoken---eome a& the people ill this portioa This prieet ued 1'D....llJW do not speak English.

is one of the most hish

another�--

regularly in Irish up to the time he�y -� a month. He has now been aent to is succeeded by a curate who neither spea,b nor�stands the language. _..... �· J I consider that this is neitlier fair to tie Irilh � nor to the Irish language, and it ia to � 1'ape4 that the present appointment is only a temJ)O?IY one. and that a priest able to converse with the Irish epeakep in their native tongue will .soon be appointed. Every one acquainted with the Ima 9J)eaking dl8bicts knows that the appointment of DOD Iriah qeeJria, priests to these districts is one of the chief� l!lff illtPI'l the decay of the Irish �. aad j,er'ldas" 11111tit•� in the preservation of the language should protest against appointments of this kind. Yours, P. C•


•1

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�r

T�No. 185-

" VERY NICE INDEED." '

.

#

c�

r

77ai.r is IIN t1n"iw1sally. �re�d �

- TRY

ilbovt °""�·

...-�-----

BBM YOURSELF -

and we have no doubt you will be pleased. Any respectable Tobacconist can supply you with our Banba's Cigars, Turcirish Cigarettes, Banba's. Straight Cut Cigarettes, Virginia Flavour. R D.S. Smoking Mixture, Broad Cut, a Connoisseur's Tobacco; Banba's Smoking Mixtttte-mila and medium-Irish Plug, Irish Cut Plug. 'Ard Ri ' Cigarettes, or our Irish Courts, all of which you will find are excellent value.

�-

THE IRISH· TOBACCO CO., Growers &ad Jlasufacturers,

17 llerchaats' Quay, DOBWt.

t=--------------------�

AGAIN Let me call attention to �

IRIBR HtllfSPUN FLANNEL 8HIIT8. Extra Well-made aiid Cut,

S/9, 4/8, 8/8 to l..0/& HOMESPUN NIGHT SHIRTS from 6/6. • • PYJAMA SUITS 7/1J. Undervests,

Pant.,

Sock&.

"

Etc..

Etc.

I

==

A.LL IRI9H.

LOUGHLIN'S 19

Parliament

St.,

DUBLIN.


mi ,... cu ..-..--....J

n4

&mn4 9, 1911.

• Tovembes 9,

1912.

sse�tA10e. 5Rean11 na cumce . I.

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mit deut" d'emb, Cl6t)4tt' 'O�mn u,ree ('O'ot>.a,;1"). q�I ur mieh, or eupan {11S10 eu.af). Chetn � � park-se, tn,� 6 t� �a�c fe6.

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TS in Irish Tweeds 37/6.

GaaraateeL &114 -·· Flt

._1111• Costaaes, :.•.:=

From 4S/•.

•B TS ARRANGED TO SUIT ALL CUSTOMERS.

lfleal Tallorlng Go•• 18 Grow St. (OW

n.....

atr..t>. P.

auac-v ... .,...••

(Late of Sct,tt91, Lr. Sadmlle Stffct).

ure and mention AN

G.&lll:Lll-

•,111,t tile °"" Plat.. - ......

THE

IRISH Cl

CAPBL STllBBT (Nzl t•

NOW OPB1' DAILY U PRICES, 30., 40. Char1e of Plctue• 1


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T•

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inspector. The Board stands to beat t.hem unless Mr. Welply be removed. Resolutions, questions in Parliament, testimonials, or anything else, will not defeat the Board. £1Ir. Birrell will defend its everv action, but a combination of the teachers and managers of Tipperary would bring the Board to its knees in a week. Let \Velply be removed and the system of inspection must be reformed. On the other hand, if the Teachers' Executive side-track the splendid agitation for the freedom of the teachers that has arisen in a lethargic land and leave Mr. Welply in possession they will make an irreparable mistake. Their organisation shall become impotent, and the Board will find it possible to snap its fingers at all future demands. We do not mean to suggest that the demand for_ Mr. Mansfield's reinstatement should not be persisted in, but we hold that unless the teachers strike where they find the Board vulnerable they are bound to be defeated. Mr. Birrell has whitewashed the Board, and the Board has attempted to whitewash Mr. Welply, who is a notorious goad. An official at Tyrone House was ordered last week �o sound the inspector's praises in the Press. W 111 the Board deny that Inspector W el ply was severely censured from headquarters just before the appointment. of Mr. Purser's. successor_? Excellent an official as Mr. Welply is Dr. Starkie found it necessary or prudent to connive at what may have been a move to prevent Mr. Welply succeeding Inspector Purser. The Board censures him privately and piles on him praise for consumption by the public. It refuses to appoint him to a higher post, but when his removal is called for by all Ireland it begins whitewashing operations with a vigour worthy of a better cause. The letters of Dr. Beatty and Mr. Purser will serve to make the public question all statements of the Board regarding the teachers. An Irish article on " Freedom for the Teachers " appears on page I.

...

Teachers without Irish in Waterford. An assistant teacher who is unacquainted with Irish has lately been appointed to the girls' school in Baile na Meallach (Whitechurch), Co. Waterford, in a district where 59.4 per cent. of the people are Irish speakers. The principal teacher of the school also is unacquainted with Irish. In Baile Nua (Villierstown), which is also in Waterford, and in the same parish, another assistant teacher ignorant of Irish has been appointed. The percentage of Irish :speakers in The manager, the Baile X ua district is 62. 5. Father Burke, P.P., is reported to have set his• face against the teaching of Irish. The Bishop of Waterford and the X ational Board have a veto on the appointments Father Burke has made. It is quite evident that the assistants appointed are unqualified, and Father Burke will, we trust, be compelled to reconsider his attitude towards the language of the majority of the people of his parish. The action of the Munster Association of Clerical Managers, whose members have pledged themselves not to appoint teachers unqualified to teach Irish, is in striking contrast to the attitude of Fr. Burke.

The Gaels of Alba are showing admirable activity in spreading their Comunn Gaidhealach. A recent issue of " The Oban Times " contains reports of a tour in the Gaedhealtacht on behalf of An Comunn by Rev. C. A. Macdonald, B.D. He is acting as the agent of the Propaganda Committee. Branches were established during the tour at Ballachulish, Kinlochlevan, and at Liosmor. At Ballachulish Gaelic is spoken by old and young. The village is situated in the historic Glencoe. The Liosmor meeting was held in one of the island schools. There are strong branches at Dalmally, Crianlarich, and Tyndrum. A children's Mod will be held in Crianlarich in April at Liosmor. " It is not forgotten," according to the "Oban Times," that '' the Dean of Lismore shed lustre on the island, nor are the labours of Rev. D. M'Nicol, G-ae1 s remember !

the author of ' 1Io Shuil ad' Dheigh.' and the great work of the late Dr. Alexander Carmichael forgotten.'' In the same issue of the "Ob�n Times," Major Cameron makes an appeal for more careful teaching of Gaelic, and the Hon. R. Erskine writes on the Drama and the Gaelic movement.

...

Dublin Corporation Scholarships. The Christian Brothers deserve praise for the efficiency of their teaching, which secu�·ed for their pupils a large number of the Dublin Corporation scholarships at the National University. The Corporation itself has stood faithfully by its decision to reserve the scholarships to universities where Irish is or will be a compulsory subject. Speaking at Monday's meeting of the Corporation the Lord Mayor said :-" It is well perhaps it should be known that if these scholarships are all going to the National University, that is not the fault of the Corporation. We are prepared to allocate them to any University, but it is a condition precedent that Irish should be a compulsory subject. Trinity College should, of course, have the same condition if the scholarships were to be conferred on them. If Trinity College had given way to the general demand for compulsory Irish, it is but reasonable to assume that we would be in a position to apportion a scholarship there. In this matter we are not governed or actuated by any consideration of a religious kind."

..,

Irish Ireland Artistes' Bureau. On last Saturday week a preliminary meeting was held for the purpose of setting on foot in Dublin a Committee or Bureau that would help promoters of Irish Ireland entertainments (especially in the country districts) to secure suitable artistes at a minimum of expense. All present agreed that the project was an important one, deserving of immediate attention, and there was a long discussion on various matters which would be likely to come within the scope of such a Bureau. Another meeting was held last Saturday when a list of Irish Ireland artistes was made out and approved of, and it was decided to communicate with those artistes immediately and solicit their cooperation. Suggestions will be welcomed by the Secretaries, b-r1.o:n O 11U151n11 �5t1r eo5.o.n O Ce.0.-rno.5 f)c.-r11etL A 25 -<\t.& Cl1.o.t.

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An Example frcm Luimneach. Feis Thuadh Mhumhan will be held next May, but the syllabus is already out. The advantage of early publicatiou is that students of Irish in the Feis area are given exact information in clue time and may prepare for the Feis competitions. When the syllabus is not published in time competitors have frequently to "grind," and many would-be competitors are excluded through failure to give them timely notice of the competitons. Limerick has given a lesson in punctuality to our Feis committees.

..

.

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A new society for the promotion of Irish in student circles was formed in Galway College last week. The Gaelic Society of the Dublin College of the National University will hold its inaugural meeting on Saturday evening at 8 o'clock. An The inaugural meeting Craoibhin will preside. of the Trinity Gaelic Society will be· held on Tuesday next. What of the Cork College?

Trading Company, I l Lower O'Connell Street, Dublin.

THE CASTLEBAR CONFERENCE. The people of Muigheo have decided to d their utmost to redeem the fortunes of the Jri,� language in their cou:1tY. and to do so at once. Dr. Hyde, who was invited to the Conference held on Monday, arrived in Caislean an BharA deputation of teacher: raigh on Saturday. met him in the evening to discuss with him matters of urgent importance regarding Irish An tAthair O )Iiodhchain in the schools. who introduced the deputation, said that th� National teachers of Muigheo did not look upon Dr. Hyde as an enemy of their profession or their interests. They trusted him as a friend and recognised that the Gaelic League, of which he was head, was also their friend. Dr. Douglas Hyde, who was enthusiasticallv received, said these were stirring times not only over eastern Europe, but at home. The The old breath of freedom was in the air. pike, the miscalled National Board, hclf1 really, he thought, got the hook in its jaw this time and they might soon see it- landed if the teachers and the Gaelic League comThe Board bined and played it properly. was called into existence by a stroke of the Viceroy's pen, and at any moment it might be wiped out of existence in the same way. It was at present in this position of amaz. ing strength-that it was a government inside of Ireland over which neither the public nor Parliament nor the Chief Secretary had any It was free, not only from local, but control. from Imperial, control. It was now occupying the same position that Trinity College, he deeply regretted to say, seemed to have asked to occupy in the Ireland of the future-in it but not subject to it. It worked out as a dread· ful denationalising agency. They were prepared a few years ago to believe that the National Board was in earnest in helping the cause of the Irish language and of Irish nationality. They did not believe it now. The Board is very great on " tone," said Dr. Hyde, amid the laughter of the audience. "We also can be a judge of tone-of their own toneand we know that tone is an Anglicising, antinational tone, and we know that many of their inspectors take their tone from the Board and their official disclaimers of any intention to penalise the Irish language are just so much dust thrown into our eyes, and neither I nor, as far as I know, anybody in Ireland believes. one single word of it any more. Continuing, Dr. Hyde said that when the Commissioners appointed six organisers of Irish instruction some years ago and promised to make a second language obligatory for entrance into training colleges the hopes of the League rose high and they had the incredible stupidity to believe that the leopard was about What had they for the to change his spots. result ? Within the last two years the number of schools in Mayo in which Irish was taught, even as an extra subject, had fallen about one in three because of the attitude of the Board . Working through the inspectors, who came to realise the true feelings of the Board, they saw that the path of official favour and promotion did not lie in the promotion of the Irish If the inspectors destroyed the language. teacher's future by lowering the marks of the school, of course it was not on account of Irish Dr. Hyde, continuing, said the he did it. Irish language was now compulsory for County Council scholarships and for entrance into the , National University, and to say that the people did not want Irish was fantastic. They did

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tr A1� 411 r:s�..c1t � fl.4 '0.6.0fl1e .6.'CA .6.S 14f'ltA'° t>�'tn4tf f �uf 1 n-u4�i.a� f.ci 't'.>�..c1r.!'m 14!'1'.6.ff> ��4mt1�bJit .6.�f 4tr '0�.6.m ..c1c.& �Uf\ 1 n·U.6.C'C.dt' 1 P.9u1bee, 'C� A'O �S ��,li t'\nn n-ii�w; t{ .4'Cl14$ m� 1f o � f.4:S.411\'t t> . c1 .4�f ..c15 t>u.4n11 � � r..c1li '04 .ale. t'r offi1r.4� '0.41' tsom «!t11e..c1nn..c115 .,a ��.anAril r..c1n, "A'<!: 1f' cuypA tmn-ne .6.flflfO 1 ne-t111t1n C.4'0 � Afl � AS Cu1t>ec no AS Atl m b1«'<11t'..c11h. t.&1ri1f'O ffhn t'0 5nOt;..c16 'O"'iM\�1'0 An bei5an be.A'S tae\o\t� AC4 f�J' 1 n�:t'mn '00 COfA1flC h'.11 A11 ffit;.itf. 'CA fAn 'OA 'Ot!A'11.4ril .6.SAmn .6.t' .Al' n'Olce.11tt: 1 rt11t .if�.6:mft scom-ctor '00 csc 1 n�rmn. te C.4t)A1� 6 SAC 'OUtne 1 n�11mn. lt � 'Otl.41,g.ar ..c1n urte '()u�ne 1 neirmn Aft CA1)A1t' fl'TI :4 ntt, oume 1 ne111mt1 TIA� eot, t;At)A1t''C 'Otitnn. '00 ..c1n QbA1t' ..c1 eere At' r1unc1t. t.& A f:1or AS Ann 1 -oume t:u1r�e..c1nAc n..i16 f�1'01t' '6u111n-11e-.4i'I 'Of\e.6.ffl beA5 so 'Ot:u5t:At' " tutt: nb: 5Ae'Ort.5e ., 'Oumn-t'le, A'Oe1t(ttn, An Ot'U-nAc ft!1'011' S..c1e'01t5 '00 teAt:nu .41' fUA1'0 e1t'e.dnh i1t'1f ff� t corAmt: .41' .4n mb.&f r�m. m.&(.4 n1>etni'O tu�t n.A coti'IAC'C.4 CUt'Affl '01 ASUf 5.4C 'Oice".dU.: 4'CA 114 5cumAf ..c1 '0�.4nAm .41' A j-on, · St&t> t:cttc tt.4 cori1.4Ct:A A CU1J'f1'0 .6.n Ob.411' Cun C1'1� .6.So'f 1r � .4n ;sno tr mo bA ce.4f'C 4 f>e.4'0 �.& <.o�.4'11.Am .454mn-ne n.& S.& 'O'CeA5AfS r.6.n ASUf S.& 'H1ntnic '001t) CA'o bA ceAJ'C A5ur C.4'0' 'OOb' t�ro111 ':A · '0�.4n.4til.

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E PU FLA NEL SHIRTS, l!xtra Well-made and Cut,

Kuxo MEYBR BY some of his friends and pupils on the occasion of his appointment to the chair of Celtic philology in the University of Berlin, edited by Osborn Bergin and Carl Marstrander. Halle a. S.• Max Niemeyer. 1912. 488 pp. 16s. nett.

, 4/8, 8/8 to 10/8.

MISCELLANY PRESENTED TO

HOMESPU IGHT SHIRTS from 6;6. PYJA A SUITS • • ,, 7/6. Ulldervesu, Paau, Socb, Etc., Etc. l!l.LL Xl:l::IBH.

HLI 'S

WSB ODTFtmftG IIIADQO.AITIIS,

• , DUBUN.

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.

It is pleasant to see that Dr. Kuno Meyer has been honoured, not only by the Corporations of Dublin and Cork, but also by his own friends and pupils. It will be seen from what is set out above that the Miscellany is fairly bulky. It contains 37 contributions of which 34 may be said to deal with Celtic subjects. We notice that the editors have not followed the excellent example of Windisch in Wh. Stokes' Festschrift which included a dedicatory mtroduction from his pm� doubt their own idea in the matter was "silence is golden." Two contributors, however, R. Priebsch and J olm Sampson, have made up for this omission in quite a charming manner. 1lle contribution which is first in order is by Alfred Anscombe, a well known writer on early British hi&to�at qttestions. It is entitled Lucius Rex and Eleutherius Papa, and attempts to solve Ore Lucius Jegt-n:<!, -wliich, Mr. Artscombe believes, refer!S te a real pe,senage, a King Lucius of Londinium Augusta in A.D. 363-364. George Henderson, whose recent death is a great lo• to Sootti$n scholar$!lip, deals with Arlhu,ian Monfs in Gadhelic Litet-atu,e. Whilst recognising these in (r) EatM,aUA an Atnadain Mioi,, �) A• Br� (3) .Am Br6n Binn, he c;oncen. him.wf fut the moment only 'Willi the

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exactly as it stands and translate cc gladden the sovereignty of unster," The change of the final word to cc meabhroig� •• due to another's suggestion, seems to have been unwarranted Prof. R. Thurneysen then contributes Da Futurum von Altiriscl agid ,er lreibl. c R. Priebsch edits from a British Museum MS. the Low German peasant-song of imoa Dach, entiu.i Alia e, Now, Cafttileu Afflalona Rustiu. It ia in a dialect showing strong influence of High Germaa and opens : Grethke, war umb hei!stu mi doch SC) sehr bedr6 t ? wetttta och aoc1a � ick di lebb an tidt � ck ; belr6vet=betriibt wettstu wejss.t da; · ; hebb== babe

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ge)ev.tt-ce1ilbt: The We1sh grammarian, E. An!VY,� tna Tie Yerbal F""'" in lhe Wiw Booi � o

Pow. B,-aflCies of llt6 M� 11. ltenri Gaidoz, formerly Revua Cdtiqw, contributes tWb ,.� 111 .....". under the Jieactiq At, JM,l, � trA.

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A"fllb11 ; la _,. •

LG•••

he find9 an analogy in tile in dent Aittiochus a.ud Stratonice in 1'J:tttate1t� • of Demetrius '' which he consid

merely a " no\tit:" 1f6 aliS fflMIMI 11,�., 1.1o analegie9. IManee ---w ........IMMl�li 1

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physician

latter.

The Danish �bilologist, Chr, Sarauw, well known in Ireland for his similar visit to Corea Dhuibhne, contributes Specimens of Gaelic as .tu.I.w b.9ih ittphonetic and orthod� �Mr. W'a'Rer J.'.· Pattri � • � i'tVllose ceangal has fr� � �ed and is, therefore, familiar, wJiilst the Dody of the :uite ovel to -.ost refpers. ·fMfRW1.•a.t:�..di-s slig� alt.rfJ.. in 1f tUA1'

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ure and mention A.1.·

eoce 'Oo t)fr.

The titre of tbe contribution is The Dove ol �-I-Roy � R6igh, for one &hould ... use «s an Anglicised form what is n�t)., aW the .W. �-,,.,i opens .6. �u eaMt Mr. Purton makes good use of n110n.A1S, etc. his two )ISS.,. Qllt has not corrected ms text by a critical employment of the metre ••;,11*1[1 pilSelJt wdte1 fo\llld of immediate na*1•af: straightening out the first and ••1t1i•fi1 flte 9taftza- a'hlwe. The proofs ale9 � .... been more carefully read, for o:ae notices " Cartin," leg. Jfa.c Curtin ; " c�,,, k,., in �.. ; Corcomroy's, reality " Domlmaill," leg. Domhnaill; whifsf " � croidh '' in the second line should of coarse be mo chroilhe. For laich, p. 50, OM shoukl deu-ly aead ei� laech or laoch. It 8aat uo tile �l� scnbal �pelling occasionally improved without Jilstoricid aehiment. Next in order comes From '11. Booi oj Clanaboy by the present writer, in which the conln"bub>r deals with a poem whereby the aa.tao1:,, Seumus O h Uid, petitions Cormac O Nein the chieftain· of Line circa 1680, to restore him to the poet's lands of his ancestors. It open.; thus:

•*

se•• might---...

'R4t4 m� tu11 mo fe4tt)4 J'911' SO C01S 1110 t�e4J11A f.A te41'C �Ott4 mo t)41te 4 re.dtC ROril.d 6n 11foS114roe.

A remarkable, but necessary, conclusion of_ the contributor is that the family of O hUidstill found at Ampurtane or Upperlands in Co. Derry-is descended from a Norse ancestor. As regards the line in stanza 9, righe na !lunrhan meadhroigh, I _... would now take it CLAIOHEA11u

,.n

'CA1111s Cf"M�,.1'S go C,a.A�.A1n" tom.i111'0.A 4'0�6 'n.A U11flr11tot O 411'fflbe.41'C41f> fl.4 fl-e111\l4ffl, C411'1'nse.41'C.41S c11tot f>f�.A1'Sl.4n t>f.A1t.

Prof. E. J. Gwynn corrects Thurneysen1 rendering (" recapitulation ") of beim Joris � suggests instead " ' a fundamental definitiolt or decision ' ; hence m� g111csall 'a principle or rule.' " Dr. Douglas Hyde contriba� a lfayo folk�tale " Seilg Mh6r Shliabh Luachra!' Miss Maud Joynt edits The Fale of S..,,,,,, by which Engli�h name she mew a pdtSli ill the D:ndsenchas of the Book of Lecain. m.6c cf Re n-6 p.&11tce. (To be continued.)

when orderinz trom any of its r- Goods

dverti. ers.


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Stti1t1.6. 16 1 12

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191

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[AN CLAIDHRAMH SOLUJS.)

Grafton St.'s of world wide fame-

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Rich and poor have heard its name ;

An olA1t>eAri1 sotuis

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It is known in every land, For 'tis there, I understand, F Smyth makes the " Griffon Brand "

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() 1ai\' au .Ahar Pe.tduir 6 L:i.eri •rishdi, "hgi:lll:i. Iiliocht .. l!..!U:- ,h�1;1l.1 a d.iv ., mien er slnil a ::-.:�1:ing agus a gen Pmpn ':in mi. 0 Ghlor na Ly,

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'Oo m.0.01'0 ,0.11 r.6.11 Cr.0.011:'.>111 ,0.011:'.>11111 01'0ce 'OM S.6.t.o.1r11 :so f\.6.11:'.> cez'o .o.:sur occmo5.6.'0 1 n.c.. 111otr501te 5Cot.6.1rce 5.o.e'01t5eo1r l1.6.1r1u11c.6. 1 mb.6.1te .&t.6. Cl 1.6.t. 'Oo 11111np5e.6.'0 r:se.o.t.6. .c..r .6.11 :scru111111t1$.6.'0 ce.o.'011.6. :so l'.>p11tce.o.r c.o.r e1r .6. 'Ocromf't:1.6.11 '00 cur '0101:'.> 1 :sCot.6.1fCe 11.6. 111otr501te .6.C.6.1 5Corc.6.15 .o.5ur r.6.11 5Cot.6.1rce elle.6.c.6.1115.o.1tt1m. 1r .6.011'.>11111111111 .6.1111u.o.1'0e.6.cc ro. 'S1.6.'0 t.ucc te1511111 n c 111otr501te, 1'011' CU.6.tC.6. .6.:SUr ct.erp, .6.11 'Ot'e.6.m 1f m6 ter511111 1 11e1p11111. le.6.TI.6.1111 All c-omoj- .6.:SUr .0.11 me.6.r .6.11 te15e.6.t111. m,6. 1:)101111 omo r .o.:sur me.o.r .0.5 t.ucc 11.0. 111otr501te .6.t' .6.11 115.o.e'01t5 bero .6.n c-ornor .o.:sur .o.11 me.o.r .0.5 .6.11 bpobu t t11rt1. rut, t.ucc 11.6. 111otr501te uite f.6. t'.>p.o.c 11.0. ::S.6.e'01t5e, .6.CC C.6. .6. t.6.TI .6.C.6., .6.5ur C.6. .6.11 'Oo ccurp U.o. Co\Jt.6.1$, U.6.CCAt'.6.t1 Cot.6.1fCe t'.>.6.1te .&t.o. Ctl.o.t, f.6. 11-.6. bt'.6.C, .6.:SUf 1f fe1'01t' .6.t1 $.6.lt'm C.6.t.6. "Su.6.r terr .o.n n5.6.e'01t5" 'DO ctoir-ceat .o.:sur 'i '0.6. f65.c.1rc 50 buzcac .6.5 11.o. m.6.C.6.1t'.> te15111n. le.c.n.6.1'01r ·00'11 5.o.1rm c.6.t.o. ro111 .6.5ur me.6.ttf.0.1'0 r1.6.'0 t.ucc n.6. 111otr501te .6.r f.o.'O f.6. n-a mbr.6.-c. "C15 teo e rm .o. 'Oe.6.11.6.m te :surc.6.t .6.5ur te 'Outr.6.cc .6.:Sur te rn1.o.1m. 11; mo p e .o. 'Oe.o.n.6.111. ll'i ti1Mrf1'0 .6.TI 5.6.e'01t5 .6.t' .6.n 5Cum.6.t111 ::S.6.e'Oe.o.t.6.c. C.6.1tfe.6.t' 'i 'Oo pre.Mnu5.o.'O 1 115.6.c cum.6.1111 erte r.6.n 1otr501t. be1'0 mor.6.11 ru'0.6.i .6.5 Leo bero .0.11 te15e.6.1111 r.6.n ob.6.lt'· cu1'01u5.6.'0 .o.c.6. '0.6. 'Oe.6.11.6.m r.6.11 1otr;so1t .6.:S cu1'01t1$.6.'0 t.eo, be1'0 nz, me.6.'0011 r;so1te.6.1111.o. .6. cu1rfe.6.r be1'0 5.o.e'01t;seo1r1 cuca .o.;s cu1'01u5.6.'0 teo. 5tu.6.1re.o.cc curre n c r.6.01rre .o.;s cu1'01u5.o.'O teo. Dero ob.6.1t' Connr.o.'O 11.6. ::S.6.e'01t5e .6.:S cu1·01u5.6.'0 teo. Dero '01.0. Leo r.6.11 ob.o.1r, m.o.r 1f .6.:S co1mU011.o.'O ce.6.5.o.r5 'Oe .6. fle.o.r rM'O .1. .0.5 C01i1.o.1rt1u5.6.'0 '00 :5.o.e'Oe.6.tL\11:'.> tor5 A l.6.ocr.6. '00 te.6.11.6.ri1.o.111c. S111 Su.6.r terr .6.11 115.o.e'01t5 ! 1 .o.11 5.o.1rm c.o.t.o. 1r b11111e '0.6.r f65ru15e.6.'0 r.6.11 1otr501t .0.1,1.0.m. C.6. 5.0.c coj-zmt.acc 50 1:'.>fU1t f.6.0t'.>At' .6.j\ 111U111Clt' 11.o. 11e1re.o.11t1 1 11-.0.5.6.1'0 .o.11 5.o.tl'O.o.C.6.1r t.o.r m.o.r t'.>'i .6.r1.6.ti1. C.6. 5.o.e'01t 1tlt115eo C.6.r e1r .6.11 C.6.t '00 t6:S.6.1'f\C A'f\ .6.n n::S.6.tl'O.o.C.6.f. C.6. Cr.o.olJ lu1m1115 c.o.r e1r C01iM1rte t'.>r105ti1.&t' '00 C.6. Co1rce Ce.6.1111"CA1t' .o.:sur Ctl'f\ CU11 C111t1. cr.o.ot'.>.6.c.6. CorcM5e A'f\ A mbonn.6.11'.> .6.5ur 1.o.'O C::::-6. Co1rce Ce.6.11t1re1'0 cu11 c.o.t'.>ru5.o.'O t11111. C.6.1r Ce.o.c.o.ptoc.6., ce :so t>ru1t re 05 f6r, :so ce.6.1111, l.6.1'D1r. °C.6. .6.11 Ct.6.t' beo le tucc r.o.otrur5te n.6. 5.6.e'01t5e, .6.:sur 1 t.6.r t'.>e1tre1rrce C.6. 'Ore.6.m 5.0.e'Oe.6.t com ·outr.o.cC.6.C ll'i rh.6.1re.6.t111 .6.11 1r "C.6. le fAE;.6.1l 1 ne1r11111. .o.c.6. .6.1101r 1 5com11.o.1'0e. .o.r 5.o.e'Oe.6.t.6.10 f.6.ooo.r ro 111 bu.o.n .o.11 f.6.0l'.>.6.'f\ .o.C.6. ort.o.. Cl:S "Cl\Omco'Ot.o.'O .o.5ur 'Ot'.6.01'0e.6.cc opt.o. :so m1111c. '°'t' .0.11 .o.'Oo.6.r rm 111 mor 'OU11111 11.0. ::S.6.e'01t .6.'f\ f.o.'O '00 cur 1 11-e.o.'O.o.11 01bpe 5.6.11 ti101U. "Su.o.r le1r .6.11 115.o.e'Oll5 "-b'io'O .o.n 5.o.1rm C.6.t.o. rom 11.6. 111otr501le .o.5.o.1t111 m.6.r 5.6.1rm c.o.t.o. 'O'e1r11111 ,0.5ur bio'O 'Out cu11 c11111 .o.:sur ce.o.cc .o.rt f.o'O. te celle 111 5.6.c .6.1-c. S51,-C1'0u15teo.1, .o.:sur .6.1tte15te.or COtnAlf'te 11.6. 11,6.f\'O-te1re .o.5t1f fe.6.CC.6.r te 11.0. cur 1 t>fe1'0m. ::S.6.c .6.K .o. 1,.6.1D cr.6.ol:'.> 'Oe Co1111r.c.'O 1M 5.o.e'01t5e .0.1111 .6.r1.o.m b.6. ce.6.rc .;so mbe.o.'O cr.6.ol:'.> .6.1101f .o.11n. ,0.1101f .o.11 C-.o.m Ct111 lli ril.c.1f\f1'0 .6.11 f.c.Ot'.>.6.t' 50 bU.6.11. Cf10'0.o.. b.o.mce.6.t' re1t:m .o.r .6.11 t.6.1'0 1r .c.c.6. re .6.'f\ .6.'f\ 11'0.6.01111 lJ.

MACKEY'S BULBS.

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100 15 25 I3 25 25 25

Crocuses, in 4 Varieties Hyacinths, in 3 colours Tulips, single and double Darwin Tulips, mixed Daffodils, various, named N arcissi, various, named Snowdrops IO English Iris, mixed 45 Spanish Iris, mixed

25 25 25 25 20 30 25 I5 10

10/6

Spring Snowflake lxias, finest mixed Grape Hyacinths Ranunculus, mixed Sc1lla siberica Scilla campanulata T ritelia uniRora Anemones, mixed Camassia csculcnta

5leo

:sc�t.

...

Wexford and Tolerance. We regret to see that \Vexford County Council has receded from the position it took up at the time of the fight for compulsory Irish in the University. The Council has made its scholarships tenable at Trinity, the Chairman, Mr. Bolger, insisting that " we need to be tolerant at present." Trinity has an income of £90,000 from confiscated Irish lands, yet Irish is not compulsory for its entrance examinations or for lectures. Trinity is a self-governing institution, and although it takes Wexford's money, it will allow Wexford no voice in its Councils as the National University does. Trinity does not object to be on the Irish rates, but it objects to throw in its lot with the Irish nation. Mr. Bolger says we need to be tolerant at present, and we must on that account hand over Irish cash and send Irish students to an institution which even the " London Times " rebukes for its refusal to change its attitude towards Irish Ireland. We should be tolerant at all times just as at Mr. Bolger's present, but this plea for tolerance is a mistake. For those who recognise and respect Irish Ireland we should have tolerance, but with the enemies of Irish nationality there should be no armistice. The " Freema�'s Journal " which has lately confessed that 1t opposed to compulsory Irish in the National Univer�ity, has succeeded in deceiving Mr. Bolger and a few others in Carlow and Waterford. We trust that workers in the Gaelic League will see that no other Councils are humbugged into breaking their bargain with the National University. Mr Birrell's Threat. Now that Mr. Birrell's bribe has been rejected he threatens to penalise the Councils. We take the following report from the " Irish Independent" :Replying to Captain Craig, }Ir. Birrell stated in Parliament that he was aware of the report of the Standing Committee on Legislation to the Executive Committee of the General Council of Irish Co. Councils, from which it appeared that 24 of the County Councils had pledged �hemsel_v�s to expen� t�e ratepayers' money m prov1dmg scholarships m the National University alone, to the entire exclusion of Trinity College. " I should be sorry," he said, " if these 24 GAELS-

Support the Only Picture Hou�e in Dublin t'Aned by an Irishman.

IRISH CINEMA

THE

NOW OPEN DAILY 2.30 to 10.30

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de�erye your support.

(

The Councils and the Birrell Scholarship Scheme. Gah,·ay Council has refused to approve of the Birrell Scholarship scheme. It has also refused to hand over to Castle control its own University scholarships. At a meeting of the Proposals Committee of the Council held last week, l\Ir. Griffin, Chairman of the Council moved the following resolution:' "That we, the members of the Co. Council of Galway, have learned with surprise and dis�ppoi�tment tha� . Mr. Birrell expressed the mtenhon of excludmg essential Irish from his Scholarship Scheme, ' from the primary schools to the University,' and at the same time he expects the County Council5 to accept the winners of these Scholarships without further examination. That as the Galway Co. Council have already made Irish an essential subject for its University Scholarships, and that as the Co. Council must pay for same, we refuse to give our natural and legal rights to frame the course of studies required for such scholarships." He said he did not se� why the Chief Secretary should seek to overrule what the County Council did. They made Irish an essential condition and it was not for the Chief Secretary to overrule that by giving them a bribe, but they had no intention of yielding to it-not as far as he was concerned. Mr. MacN eill seconded. Even that day they had shown that they meant to adhere to the condition they had adopted. The motion was passed.

CAPEL STREET (next to Trades' Hall),

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n.11 s.11mn.11.

11

�fl Ct�1'00Attl 80lU15.

16, 1912.

November 16, 1912.

"THE DEMAND FOR A POLICY OF FIGHT."

SOME RECENT PUBLICATIONS OF

To the Editor of AN CLAIHDEAMH Sor.urs.

M. H. GILL.& SON

_,,_

A. Chara,

It would be well if " Guaire," instead of vague "demands" for "a policy of fight" which may mean anything or nothing, would place before your readers the details of his policy of combat so that the Coiste Gnotha and the Gaelic League in general might consider them. The Ard-Fheis has already "formulated " its "irreducible minimum demand." This is before the country and it would be interesting to know what further fighting steps can be taken by the Coiste Gnotha Does beyond those which have been already taken. " Guaire " wish the Coiste Gnotha to imitate the fighting policy of Russian Revolutionists by placing bombs in the office of the Board of National Education, or the somewhat milder tactics of the militant Suffragettes by breaking the windows of Tyrone House and throwing hatchets at Dr. Traill ? To judge by your correspondent/s last letter his " fighting " policy seems to be rather the passing of more resolutions than any such extreme measures. Otherwise what is the meaning of "calling upon the Board" " with the country's warrant in its hand " ? Are we not sick of " calling upon the Board ? " If " Guaire " cannot give us any better "fighting policy" than that he had better relapse into silence. In the name of Heaven, let us hear no more vague "demands" for "a fighting policy," but let us have details, details, DETAILS, of how such a rolicy is to be carried out better than at present. FEAR TRODA. obo.1 R .0.11 1i1 u mc eo n.o. c.o.1sc 1 'L. ... .o.n-tot11Am fAn mboc.sn ASUf An to cl.e, Al' 'oeA5an." .0.5 fCO mAl' CU1l' Liem 6 m1ouc.&1n f10f 1 "OCAOf> 5.c1eu1t5e 1 sc t.o.1"0 e.o.m nA fCACCth.01ne fCO 5.0..1\', to11.c11nn. b'rennt1 so oru1t .on CCAt'C .05 ti.om 1 'OCAOO nA\ h..il"C'e A15t1f An ce.onnCAll' fin ACC Ill "0615 Lrom A111 SUI' ore1'01l' e f11l '00 t1A"O 1 'OCAOO .6.ICC..\nn.o.. oito .1. mA tu151m .ob.0..1t'C 110 COl' CA1111lCC Li em 1 SCC..\l'C .1." .o.nfOCt1Am 1fA11 mbo cSn 1t1t." 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eHOTOG�APH)'.!_;J

an moo olReac

FINNERTY' S, The Old (Irish) Firm, Still Leading, Still tile Bnt

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mi ti.A S.6rilt1.&

November

28. 1912

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23, 1912

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PRINTING.

Modern Plant. Modern Methods.

co ..

CAHILL &

40 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin.

p . ."t' ..,1ri-e.&L. •

5

(AN CLAlDHRAM.N SOLUJS.}

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We employ 50

: skilled

workpeople,

: and make everything

I possible in

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Jewellery and Silver Gooas. Before buying elsewhere examine our Goods, and see the

IRISH TRADE MARK. Telephone 3569 Telegrams-

,, MEYTHER,

II

DUBLIN.

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