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Course of Study 2018-2019


ENGLISH Our curriculum is designed to help students navigate the expanding seas of information and communication and to foster an appreciation of the power of language. We ask, “What is worth reading -- and why?,” and we maintain that what is worth saying is worth saying well. We teach texts that represent a range of voices and points-of-view that offer windows into the experiences of others, and mirrors into students’ own experiences. Whether they are grappling with Shakespeare or preparing for a visiting Baird Symposium author, our students consider how texts reflect the human condition and how an author’s choice of genre, form and diction affects meaning. As teachers of writing, we strive to instill in our students a sense of pride in their written work and to give them the tools to make their writing reflect their thinking at its best. Weekly assignments range from critical analyses to personal essays, from journals to blogs, from stories to poems. Through one-on-one conferences, peer critiques, and multiple drafts and revisions, we teach writing as a process, and through the study of vocabulary and composition, we encourage students to experiment with language and style. Every English class also provides substantial practice in speaking and listening skills, as these are essential for effective communication. Through Harkness discussions, formal debates, presentations and impromptu speeches, students learn how to know an audience and build confidence in their ability to think and speak on their feet.

>>MIDDLE SCHOOL Upper Prep English — Empathy The goal of Upper Prep English is to teach reading and writing skills through literature in a nurturing environment that encourages students to become comfortable and confident in those areas. Students learn the concepts of plot, theme, setting and character development through their reading of short stories and novels. Focus on reading and writing includes grammar, sentence building, and vocabulary lessons. Students practice expository, narrative and descriptive compositions in order to develop clear sentence structure and coherent paragraph development. We introduce and emphasize process writing, and students learn to brainstorm, draft, revise, edit and publish their work. Fishbowl discussions establish the skills necessary to explore and discuss literature as well as the development of listening and speaking. In addition, students will study a poet while reading, writing and reciting poetry. Course readings center on the idea of empathy and the ability to walk around in another person’s shoes. These works include Wonder by R.J.Palacio, The Giver by Lois Lowry, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor, When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead and A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. Every student will read independently throughout the year in classroom book clubs.

English 1 — Perspective Organized around the central theme of understanding and appreciating perspective, this English course for students in Form 1 continues to stress the skills of reading and writing. The literary focus is on vicarious experience, the fundamental value of literature. In a range of novels, short stories and poems, students read about individuals who experience adversity to gain a broader perspective of the human experience. Writing development begins with a variety of frequently assigned, organized paragraphs and evolves into larger writing projects, including an original short story in the spring. The study of grammar, sentence building, and vocabulary is coordinated with students’ reading and writing. Fishbowl discussions remain central to the growth of skills necessary to explore and discuss literature, as well as the development of listening and speaking ability. Readings Page 2 of 60

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include The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton, The Arrival by Shaun Tan and Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by Gary D. Schmidt. Every student reads independently throughout the year in classroom book clubs.

English 2 — Exploring the Human Experience Form 2 English students build on their strong foundation of previously established skills to meet the increased demands of reading and writing at a more sophisticated and complex level. Guided by the central theme of the human experience, the literary focus is on character development with a gradually increasing emphasis on interpretation. Writing assignments encourage students to create fuller, more subtle prose by continuing to take a process approach to writing with particular emphasis on revision. Harkness discussions are central to developing the ability to analyze and discuss literature, as well as the development of listening and speaking skills. The study of grammar, sentence building, and vocabulary continue at a deliberate pace and remain intertwined with the students’ writing. Students respond creatively to various literary genres and practice developing coherent arguments by using direct references to the text in their writing. The year long autobiography project stresses an anecdotal approach to personal writing. Readings include To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie and a wide selection of short stories and poetry. Every student reads independently throughout the year in classroom book clubs.

>>UPPER SCHOOL

English 3: The Stories We Tell As memoirist and essayist Joan Didion observes, “We tell ourselves stories in order to live.” In English 3, we explore storytelling in its many forms. The course uses the lens of storytelling to develop students’ ability to think for themselves, to grapple with abstraction, and to read, write and speak with increasing proficiency. Readings focus on fellow storytellers across genres and epochs. Students explore a graphic novel, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, and several more traditional novels including The Catcher in the Rye. The drama of the course consists of William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing and the August Wilson play, Fences. Short story and poetry units round out the curriculum. Students not only study the practice of storytelling but also become storytellers themselves. Sentence construction and vocabulary are focal points both in formal study and in practice while students are writing expository and creative prose. Furthermore, each student is required to join Harkness discussions and to practice public speaking. Page 3 of 60

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English 4, 4 Honors: Challenging Convention Designed to increase students’ confidence and sophistication as readers, writers, thinkers and speakers, English 4 focuses on texts whose characters or structure challenge convention and ask students to challenge their notions about what a literary analysis, a sentence, or a topic of academic discussion should be. Works read include short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies, Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer. We round out the curriculum with Shakespeare’s Macbeth and a selection of poetry. Students are challenged to assume leadership roles in discussions and to develop their own theses to become more independent thinkers. Particular attention is paid to helping students develop a sentence style commensurate with the increasing complexity of their ideas. To this end, Longknife and Sullivan’s The Art of Styling Sentences complements continued vocabulary study. In addition, all Form 4 students participate in the Speakers’ Forum, an interpretive reading contest. Students in English 4 Honors read additional works, including Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, cover composition and vocabulary at an accelerated rate, and hone strong speaking skills. Designed for those students who have excelled in all aspects of English and require additional challenge as readers, writers and speakers, this course is by departmental recommendation.

English 5: Voice and Vision The purpose of English 5 is to help each student discover his or her critical and creative “voice.” The emphasis is on reading a variety of literature to refine the student’s ability to identify, describe and defend thematic ideas, and to show how these ideas are grounded in the text as well as in an author’s individual style. All students are expected to take an active role with responsibility for the direction and topics of the discussion. While each class follows an independent syllabus, together the classes adhere to common skills and objectives as well as to a core curriculum that includes Hamlet by William Shakespeare, a work by Toni Morrison and one by Ernest Hemingway, poetry, and one work by that year’s Symposium author. Students are required to write analytically and creatively about their reading and to keep a rigorous pace in reading assignments. A portion of the year is devoted to a writing workshop, so that after careful examination of style and technique, students may work on their own personal style – to write so that they reveal themselves as much as they do their ideas. In concert with this, all Form 5 students practice various forms of the personal essay, including (but not limited to) anecdote, diatribe, apology and elegy.

English 5 AP® Voice and Vision Running parallel to the English 5 class, the Advanced Placement ® sections follow a more extensive bibliography, and the literary analysis, both in class and in writing, assumes a greater depth of reading experience, maturity of mind and the capacity to draw on wider and more independent sources. Furthermore, individual students carry responsibility for leading the seminar occasionally. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement ® Examination in English Language and Composition, which they take in May. Generally candidates are drawn from honors sections in English 4. Placement is by department recommendation only.

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ELECTIVES Elective: Journalism (Forms 4-5) (Fall) and (Forms 3-4) (Spring) Journalism is not simply a mode of writing; it is also a mode of thinking. In addition to introducing students to the writing techniques integral to news, feature and sports writing, this course trains them in the more abstract observation and thinking skills required to identify news when it happens. The hope is that students gain a new perspective on their writing and critical thinking skills while wrestling with the accuracy, objectivity and responsibility to an audience that characterize solid journalism. Students can expect regular article assignments as well as readings of The New York Times and the Hartford Courant. The course is a prerequisite for a staff position on the KO News. This course, an elective offered outside the required English curriculum and open to students in Forms 3-5 for 1/4 credit, meets three times every two weeks. The following two electives are open to students in forms four through six who enjoy English, and who would like additional opportunities to explore literature. Students may choose either the Fall or Spring elective independently, or take both consecutively.

Elective: Crossing New Frontiers (Forms 4-6) (Fall) There always seems to be a significant public interest in how the western territory of the United States was tamed and settled. In so many ways, this story has come to define our identity as self-reliant, hard working, success-inthe-face-of-overwhelming-odds Americans. However, what we have learned from an early age about the West through the stories and mythologies, not to mention what Hollywood filmmakers have promoted throughout the years, has not always been the truth. Our cultural biases would have us believe that only white Anglo-Saxon males tamed the West, and that it was the Native American savage who stood in the way of our manifest destiny. Through an intensive reading of some of the fictional and first hand accounts, this course will investigate how the West was really won and at what costs to the people and to the land. Readings will include such works as My Antonia by Willa Cather, Fools Crow by James Welch, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie and Montana, 1948 by Larry Watson. This course is open to seniors and to sophomore and juniors interested in pursuing additional coursework in English.

Elective: The Literature of Sports (Forms 4-6) (Spring) Sports have been an inextricable part of our social fabric for a long time as they reveal the drama of life on the field of play. One reason we are so drawn to the sport spectacle is because it is so unpredictable; we just want to see what might happen. The old axiom, that sport is a metaphor for life, rings true in various forms of literature of twentieth and twenty-first century America. This course will consider an array of literature, both fiction and nonfiction, that concerns itself with a variety of sports and how these reveal humankind’s struggle for that which is only occasionally attainable: moments of grace, of strength, of perseverance, of transcendence. Readings include The Natural by Bernard Malamud, On Boxing by Joyce Carol Oates, Seabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand, and My Losing Season by Pat Conroy. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors interested in pursuing additional

coursework in English.

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FALL SENIOR ELECTIVES Senior English at Kingswood Oxford offers semester elective options. During the fall semester, students must choose one class to fulfill their English requirement, but may elect to take an additional semester course according to their interest and availability. The spring semester electives are divided into two quarters. During the third quarter, all seniors write a senior thesis, a fifteen-twenty page original, research-based essay on a topic of their choosing. The fourth quarter, described by the course’s title, is a mini-course designed as an exploration of a topic that is both focused and fun.

English 6 Fall Elective: The American Dream Since America’s earliest days in the late 18th century through to today, there has been a concept of an “American Dream.” While the idea was not formally coined until the mid-20th century, there has always been an idealized vision of what can be in America. This concept has evolved (and continues to do so) throughout the years. In 1931 James Truslow Adams more formally coined the phrase “the American Dream,” describing "a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position." Whether sincerely believed or attacked as delusion, this dream has been a motivating force in our civilization. Even when denied, the dream is distinctly American. There are many books, songs, plays and movies that have celebrated, questioned and even denounced this vision. This course explores the American Dream, past and present, to better understand and assess the “truthiness” of this ideal.

English 6 Fall Elective: Shakespeare This course examines each of William Shakespeare’s genres of drama, by studying one example of comedy, tragedy, romance and history. By reading a variety of plays including The Merchant of Venice, Othello, The Tempest, and, if time permits, Henry V– students improve their ability to understand Shakespeare’s language, to picture the plays on stage and to recognize common themes, motifs and ideas. Emphasis is on appreciating and understanding the plays. In addition, students undertake a variety of written assessments, both creative and expository, as a way of evaluating their improved understanding of all things Shakespeare. Page 6 of 60

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English 6 Fall Elective: Creative Nonfiction: New Narratives in the 21st Century This course will immerse you in the genre of creative nonfiction or, what Lee Gutkind refers to as “true stories, well told.” We will explore various types of creative nonfiction, including personal essays, Op-Eds, profile pieces, longform journalism, and podcasts with an eye for how these narratives are taking on today’s important social, political, and cultural issues as well as how creative nonfiction is adapting to the digital world in which we live. While the course will include some older essays and articles, the bulk of our reading will be comprised of pieces published in the past ten years. The stories in this course will not bore you. They will captivate you and even at times enrage, sadden, shock, humor, and move you. After exploring a form and taking note of various authors’ different techniques and styles, students will produce their own creative nonfiction.

English 6 Fall Elective: Poetry: Keats to Kanye Say this line aloud: lucent syrups tinct with cinnamon. And this: swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim. And now: I drive through white suburbans in the black Suburban swervin. As Calvin, from the incomparable Calvin and Hobbes, says, “Good poetry gives me goosebumps.” Reading one poet a week -- from John Keats to Gwendolyn Brooks to today’s best rhymers -- this course will examine what makes a poem a poem. And, of course, why a good poem gives us goosebumps. We’ll write, imitate, and argue poetry, paying particular attention to imagery, metaphor, and rhyme. We’ll memorize, recite, and rap-battle it out. We’ll take the Wallace Stevens Walk here in Hartford, and end the semester with a student-designed creative project. The required text for this course is The Norton Anthology of Poetry.

English 6 Fall Elective (Honors): Dystopian Futures Social chaos. An overreaching authoritarian government. Repression of free speech. Food shortages. Climate catastrophes. If this vision of the future sounds scary to you, then prepare to be even more terrified by the worlds constructed by writers of dystopian fiction. A form of speculative literature that imagines a horrifying not-toodistant future, dystopian fiction exaggerates contemporary social problems in order to critique them. By reading dystopian novels such as George Orwell’s 1984, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, we will analyze the techniques writers use to warn their readers about what the future might look like if the present world goes in a drastically wrong direction. In written work, students will examine the distinctive conventions of this genre of literature, and assess the genre’s effectiveness in urging readers to action. Eventually students will apply these storytelling strategies by writing a short work of fiction in which they identify a social problem they care about and imagine a future in which this problem has spun out of control. As we read, discuss, and write, we will consider the central function that this kind of fiction serves for readers: does dystopian fiction work to comfort readers by reminding us that our current world isn’t as bad as the ones these writers imagine? Or does it work to unsettle readers by implying that we might not be too far removed from disaster? Ultimately, this class will invite students to grapple with the kind of future they do (and don’t) want to see.

English 6 Fall Elective (Honors): The Invention of America Wendell Berry once said: “If you don’t know where you are, you don’t know who you are.” Berry is part of a tradition of “placed” writers in America including Thoreau, Frost, Faulkner, O’Connor, and Steinbeck. These writers and others helped to both define and create an American identity through their literature and artistry, turning away from Eurocentric expectations towards the landscapes, diverse regional cultures, and expanding cities. By doing so they reflect a national identity first created by many displaced people, those who immigrated to and migrated within this country first towards the invention of this nation. From the principles upon which it was Page 7 of 60

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founded, to the politics and people who inhabit it, to its own varied geography, the identity of the United States has been slowly but surely shaped into being. This course will take a close look at the emergence of this unique identity through the eyes of its artists and writers from the 19 through the early 20 centuries. While this course will draw mostly from literature, a study of relevant paintings and film will also be included. Admission to this course is by department recommendation only. th

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English 6 Fall Elective (Honors): Senior Seminar This course studies the work of a renowned living author and his or her life and literary environment. It also examines the critical assessment of the author’s work and those writers who influenced his or her style and focus. Independent discussion, extensive writing and peer teaching are fundamental to the course as a means for developing a mature understanding of the symposium author. The course culminates with the author’s visit to the School as part of the annual Warren Baird English Symposium. Students meet with the author and participate in a master class, both rich opportunities to question and discuss with the author the careful and thorough perspectives that they have developed in their semester’s study. Designed for those students who have excelled in their study of English, admission to this course is by department recommendation only.

SPRING SENIOR ELECTIVES Senior Thesis The Senior Thesis, the culmination of the long-range objectives of the English program at Kingswood Oxford, requires students to use all of their acquired reading, writing and thinking skills in an independent research paper with a substantial literary component. An assigned thesis advisor works with a small group of students in class to cover topic selection, methods of research and technical procedures, while the student pursues his or her independent research and writing. All Form 6 students are required to write a Senior Thesis during the third quarter.

English 6 Spring Elective: Hitchcock: Master of Suspense Suspense in movies, the dramatization of a film’s narrative material or the most intense presentation possible of dramatic situations, is what keeps us interested in the spectacle. It is what compels us to return again and again to the darkened room of the cinema. For 53 films, Alfred Hitchcock worked at perfecting this particular art form. After an introduction to the study of film as art form, we will analyze an array of Mr. Hitchcock’s great films, including The Thirty-Nine Steps (or The Lady Vanishes), Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, The Birds, North by Northwest, and Psycho among others. Besides learning the technical vocabulary necessary for film study, students will also be responsible for writing one shot analysis and one film analysis of their choosing.

English 6 Spring Elective: Monsters, Inc. “By monster I mean some horrendous presence or apparition that explodes all of your standards for harmony, order, and ethical conduct.” So says Joseph Campbell in “The Power of Myth.” This course explores the dynamics of horror, past to present, with special attention to monsters as manifestations of cultural values. What does a particular culture label as “monstrous” and why? What makes a successful monster at a given time? What exactly have certain authors (and filmmakers) captured (or unleashed)? Toward answering such questions, we explore Page 8 of 60

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history, myth, literature, art and film. We begin in the Dark Ages with the shadowy monsters slain by Beowulf and end with a movie genre that just won’t die – the slasher film. Works studied may include John Gardner’s Grendel, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Katherine Dunn’s Geek Love, Stewart O’Nan’s The Speed Queen, Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are and George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead.

English 6 Spring Elective: Novels and Their Film Adaptations Is the book always better than the movie? What makes an adaptation successful? This course considers the challenges involved in converting novels to film. Must one be faithful to plot or are there more important issues inherent in adaptation? What pressures does Hollywood bring to the process? By examining four novel and film pairs – The Natural, Fight Club, Deliverance and True Grit – the class tackles some of these questions to define the qualities of a successful adaptation.

English 6 Spring Elective: Robot Dreams Smart phones. Smart homes. Self-driving cars. Google. Facebook. There’s no question that artificial intelligence is ubiquitous these days. So ubiquitous, in fact, that we often forget how much of our lives have become dependent on--and perhaps even controlled by--it. And yet, no technology today seems even close to the personality and autonomy of Rosie the Robot Maid on that old cartoon, The Jetsons. There is no machine today that can make both an omelet and a bed. The simplest of human chores are challenging to program. Nevertheless, we persist, always feeling that pull between dreams of the perfect neurosurgeon and nightmares of the rebellious drone. Why are we obsessed with creating smarter and smarter machines? And what are the potential benefits and harms of our success? In this course, we will look to literature and film for answers. We’ll start with selections from The Book of Genesis, Greek myths, and Frankenstein, and move into the 20th and 21st centuries with Karel Capek, Alan Turing, Philip K. Dick, Isaac Asimov, and others. We’ll watch Ex Machina, Her, and Blade Runner. We’ll end the course with student-designed presentations.

English 6 Spring Elective: You Are What You Eat Imagine your favorite meal: a perfectly seared and deliciously greasy cheeseburger. A spicy, savory serving of chicken tikka masala. An oven-fired, gooey slice of cheese pizza. A zesty, herbaceous taco. What you love to eat says a lot about who you are, and because food can tell us so much about a person, writers have long drawn on culinary muses to spice up their work. From Marcel Proust’s crumbly madeleine cookie that made its consumer feel an “exquisite pleasure,” to Ralph Ellison’s sweet, buttery yam that with one bite transported the narrator to his Southern home, this class will examine the thematic, social, cultural, and historical meanings writers inscribe through representations of food in literature. In addition to fictional images of food, we will also analyze contemporary non-fiction food writing, exploring the way food reviews achieve both practical and literary goals. Readings for this class will primarily consist of selections from Eating Words: A Norton Anthology of Food Writing. In written work, students will analyze the ways authors entice us to read more through their mouth-watering descriptions of food, reflect on their own own food memories, and experiment with crafting their own food reviews. Be prepared to turn a sharp eye towards your favorite restaurant, your dad’s specialty dish, or a meal from the cafeteria to hone your skills as a food critic. By the end of the class you might just learn to savor the written word as much as your favorite meal.

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English 6 Spring Elective: The Art of Watching Film Not only is there an art to making films; there is also an art to watching films, which students will discover through viewing a variety of different movies. There is required reading for homework (The Art of Watching Films), which will allow us to use class time efficiently to view the movies with a critical eye. Students will sharpen their powers of observation and develop the skills and habits of perceptive watching as they begin to see films — and the artistry behind them — in a new way. We will view a range of clips that showcase the various aspects of film (thematic elements, fictional and dramatic elements, visual design, cinematography and special visual effects, editing, color, sound effects and dialogue, score, and acting) and then fully analyze Mike Nichols’ The Graduate as well as an additional film that the class votes on. By the end of the course, students will write an argument for why a film of their choice is good, and the class will have an opportunity to view a few of these films.

English 6 Spring Elective: Doing Time What do Gandhi, Anne Boleyn, Martin Luther King, Jr., Oscar Wilde, Nelson Mandela, Johnny Cash, Lil Kim, and Martha Stewart have in common? They all have spent time behind bars. Whether it’s called the pen, the clink, the big house, the slammer, the joint, con college, or club fed, prison has created literary fodder for centuries. Using various literary texts, this course explores the institutional response to crime: punishment. Writings by American prisoners, essays by Michel Foucault, excerpts from Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, prison letters by Martin Luther King, Jr and others, as well as song lyrics and poetry provide the basis for class discussion. We will also examine why we punish, some issues related to the prison system, and our own perspectives on why we as a society punish, culminating in writing our own essays and/or editorials.

SCIENCE No human endeavor has been as successful as the scientific method. The spirit of innovation may be a natural consequence of the complexity originating in the nervous system, but the substantial progress in every field of modern science is rooted in a sturdy, globally accepted design. Our courses are structured to grant each student access to the foundational principles of the scientific process. Our excellent facilities, infused with natural light, provide optimum conditions for inquiry and the development of an evidence-based perspective of modern science.

>>MIDDLE SCHOOL Upper Prep Science This course focuses on the organization of the human body from cells to organ systems. The students will learn how these systems work together to allow the the body to function. The last month of the year is spent studying world health issues and how they impact various populations. The essential questions that drive these units are : • •

What makes up our body and how does it work? What role do humans play in the environmental issues we see today?

All areas are studied through scientific inquiry, which involves hypothesizing, conducting labs/activities, making observations, collecting data, analyzing information and drawing conclusions.

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Form I Science This course incorporates the Form 1 theme of questioning by exploring three central questions of Earth Science: • •

How do the Sun, Earth, and Moon interact to form a working system? How has the dynamic nature of earth’s systems helped shape the geology of the planet in general and Connecticut in particular? o This exploration culminates with a Form trip to investigate the state's geology. How do the different atmospheric conditions influence the shaping of the earth’s surface and the existence of life on the planet?

Form 2 Science This lab-centric course incorporates the form 2 theme of ownership. The first half of the year will be chemistry based with a focus on the development of lab skills and scientific reasoning, as they study characteristic properties with the goal of separating a mixture. The second half of the year will be physics based with a focus on motion and energy through open and guided inquiry. These two units will lead into two culminating projects in which the students will incorporate the concepts and skills they have learned in class to answer the following essential questions: • •

How do you separate a mixture of different substances into individual components using minimal materials? How can you move a mass a certain height using simple machines? Then determine which machine is the most efficient in terms of work needed to move the mass.

>>UPPER SCHOOL

Earth and Environmental Science The Earth and Environmental Science course essentially addresses the concept of origins. Students entering this class with a basic background in Earth Science will initially address the emergence of the solar system in order to reveal possible conditions for the formation of the Earth and moon system. Using this foundation, students learn about global climate patterns and possible explanations for the origin of life on Earth. Employing basic chemical Page 11 of 60

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principles, this course, which includes extensive lab investigation, will cover the various hypothesis applied to the formation and use of organic molecules, the link between food and energy, phylogeny, and a wide range of population dynamics. All of these topics are introduced in the context of evolution and natural selection. The study of origins will be complemented by a trip to the Natural History Museum in New York City prior to the March break. At the close of the school year, dynamic instructional and experimental methods allow students to examine local, regional and global ecological conditions, with a focus on enhancing a student’s understanding of human impacts on the environment. Required for students in Form 3.

Earth and Environmental Science Honors Students in the Honors Earth and Environmental Science class will focus on the same basic curricular foundation outlined in the description for the regular level of Earth and Environmental Science (see description above). As a basic lab course, all topics will encompass a greater depth of investigation and project-based application in order to extensively understand stellar, biomolecular and human origins. Honors students will be expected to exercise a greater level of independence with assignments, using multiple resources to supplement information from a textbook. Compared to the regular level placement, this course requires a greater emphasis on writing in the context of research papers and other assessments. This course is also complemented by a trip to the Natural History Museum in New York City prior to the March break. At the close of the school year students continue to examine local, regional and global ecological conditions, with a focus on enhancing a student’s understanding of human impacts on the environment. This course is for students in Form 3 with department approval.

Biology This general biology course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts of cell biology, human anatomy and physiology, genetics, evolution and current topics in molecular biology and genetic engineering. This course includes a lab component. Laboratory work mirrors the course work and promotes careful observation, analysis and synthesis of data, and the ability to develop sensible conclusions. Open to students in Form 4.

Biology Honors Much of this course employs a similar contextual framework for the basic biological processes listed in the description for the regular Biology course. In the Honors sequence, greater emphasis is placed on the biochemical processes associated with molecular biology, including the important relationship between cellular respiration and photosynthesis. This objective reflects the current trends in modern scientific research, especially within the realm of gene expression. Students in the Biology Honors class should expect to cover topics in greater depth at a faster pace, with a greater emphasis on writing for tests and labs. Lab reports are modeled after the style associated with scientific journals. All chemical and physical properties are viewed within the framework of evolution and natural selection throughout the school year. Open to students in Form 4 with department approval.

Chemistry This general chemistry course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts of atomic structure, bonding and molecular properties based on current atomic models. The course also explains qualitative and quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, states of matter, chemical equilibrium and acid-

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base relationships. This course includes a lab; laboratories promote careful observation, analysis and synthesis of data, and drawing sensible conclusions. Demonstrations provide visualization of concepts. Open to students in Forms 5-6. Prerequisite: Algebra 1.

Chemistry Honors This lab course begins with the same spectrum of topics as the general chemistry course but at a greater depth and faster pace. Students in this course are expected to be comfortable with frequent use of algebra to allow a mathematical methodology for study of chemical concepts. Reaction kinetics, equilibrium and acid-base chemistry are also covered. Students complete homework reading, homework problems, and practice worksheets independently. The laboratory requirement is more expansive and quantitatively oriented compared to the lab activities in the general chemistry program. Open to students in Forms 5-6. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (can be concurrent) and department approval.

Physics This introduction to physics is a year-long course involving both theoretical and hands-on approaches to the study of physical phenomena. The class focuses on motion, forces, momentum, and energy. Lab work and hands-on investigations are an integral part of the program. These activities are designed to provide students with insight into the functional relationship between experimentation and theory. Through continuous mathematical and conceptual problem-solving, students practice and hone their developing physics skills. This course is open to students in Forms 5-6. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 either completed or taken concurrently.

Physics Honors This lab course covers the same range of topics as the general physics course--such as Newtonian mechanics, waves and momentum--but at a greater depth and faster pace to allow for additional material. Emphasis is placed on developing quantitative skills and an understanding of everyday phenomena from a scientific and mathematical viewpoint. This understanding as well as the related quantitative skills are tested in laboratory experiments, which call for more independence and creativity. Open to students in Forms 5-6. Prerequisites: Precalculus either completed or taken concurrently and department approval.

AP® Biology The AP® Biology program follows the first-year college biology curriculum with special attention to the four Big Ideas identified by the College Board, including the premise that evolution is the central theme in all biology. The sequence initially includes a focus on organic molecules, biochemistry, and cellular metabolism in all types of organisms. When applicable, cell processes are linked to specific explorations of human physiology. Substantial time is allotted to the study of heredity and gene expression, which mirrors the current expansion of biological information and published research. While little quantitative ability is demanded, considerable abstract and conceptual reasoning is a precondition for enrollment in AP® Biology. Substantial independent study and laboratory work are required. All lab exercises are chosen from a list of investigations approved by the College Board. Students who enroll in this course take the Advanced Placement® Examination in May. Open to students in Forms 4-6. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry and/or department approval.

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AP® Chemistry This lab course follows the first-year college curriculum in inorganic chemistry. While intended to be a second chemistry course, it may be taken, with permission, by students with no chemistry background. Designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement® Examination, this rigorous course covers the same spectrum of topics as the introductory course at a considerably more sophisticated level. Students engage in substantially more independent laboratory work and apply increasingly complex quantitative reasoning skills. They also develop a systematic approach toward study that allows them to organize data or facts within a conceptual framework. Students who enroll in this course take the AP® Exam in May. Open to students in Forms 5-6. Prerequisites: Precalculus (can be taken concurrently), chemistry and/or department approval.

AP® Environmental Science The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. By its nature environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. Topics will include energy flow in the environment, geochemical cycles, population ecology, and biodiversity. This is a lab science that will require some outdoor landscape investigations and field studies. Open to students in Forms 5-6. Prerequisite: Earth and Environmental Science or department approval.

AP® Physics C: Mechanics AP® Physics C: Mechanics is a college-level, calculus-based course that explores kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, oscillations, and gravitation. This course combines the fundamental principles and guiding theories covered in general physics and encourages students to imagine the study of physics as interconnected pieces of a universal puzzle. Through inquiry-based explorations, students develop their own experimental procedures, collect data, and analyze results by applying their developing course skills. Less time is spent using traditional formulabased learning in order to direct more time and effort toward the development of critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students enrolled in this course must take the AP® Physics C: Mechanics exam in May. Prerequisite: AP Calculus either completed or taken concurrently and department approval.

Marine Biology (Year) This year long lab course is designed for students with a particular interest in marine biology and oceanography. The course provides an excellent background for students who are interested in a detailed study of the oceans, the organisms that inhabit them, and our dependence on them for food, climate regulation, and oxygen. Major concepts developed in this course include the examination of interrelationships between marine and terrestrial environments, geology of the oceans, the ecology of coral reefs, and the threats posed by human activities within each of these categories. Laboratory activities, including the examination of marine specimens, and frequent discussions of current events (as they apply to real world applications) are utilized throughout this course in order to develop increasing levels of student knowledge. Students use the classroom tank ecosystems to examine habitats and discuss the possible reasons why specific organisms occupy them. A fall semester project on ecosystems and a spring project on the theoretical design of a dream tank are highlights of the year. Students should emerge from the Page 14 of 60

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Science


course with a better understanding of the conditions that currently impact our oceans as well as their role in preserving this natural resource in relation to the choices they make in their daily lives. Open to students in Forms 5 and 6. Prerequisite: Biology.

Forensic Science (Fall) The role of scientists in the judicial system has become increasingly relevant. Many previously unsolved crimes have been resolved with the help of science and modern technology. “Science” is a key witness in our court system. This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to put science and problem-solving skills to work. It introduces a series of methods used by real forensic science specialists (or police officers) associated with the preservation, identification, collection and analysis of evidence found at a crime scene. Students compare and contrast what a forensic scientist actually experiences as opposed to the images or storylines students view on television shows like “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.” Subjects covered in this course include the collection of physical evidence, trace evidence, blood typing, spatter analysis, toxicology, forensic anthropology, DNA evidence, and fingerprint analysis. Case studies (real and fictional) supplement the content covered during the semester. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Psychology: The Brain and Behavior (Fall) Ever wonder how the brain works? Or how you learn? Or why certain behaviors persist while others don’t? The Brain and Behavior is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include the biological basis of behavior, memory, sensation, and perception, thinking and learning. Students learn how a psychological perspective provides insight into human behaviors. They read various theoretical perspectives, learning to employ research methods that allow them to become knowledgeable readers of psychological research and findings. In this course, students will cultivate the ability to think critically about topics in psychology. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Psychology: Thoughts, Emotions and Personality (Spring) Ever wonder about why we express certain emotions the way we do? Or what influences our personality? Or how groups can affect an individual’s behavior? This course serves as an introduction to mental processes. Topics include motivation, emotions, stress, personality and abnormal and social psychology. Students will be taught how a psychological perspective provides insight into cognition, emotions and personality. Additionally, they become knowledgeable readers of psychological research and findings. The goal is to teach students how to think critically about topics in psychology. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

MATHEMATICS Mathematics is a discipline with broad applicability throughout the natural and social sciences: Whether we are modeling climate change, forecasting financial markets, or securing Internet sites, we are using math. Yet there is also a more subtle beauty in mathematics: an elegance arising from its interconnectedness and simplicity. We strive to develop logical, creative-thinking students who can apply technology and hands-on techniques to real-world and abstract problems. Our learning environment fosters active participation, self-discipline, and perseverance. Page 15 of 60

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Mathematics


Our program begins in the Middle School, where math is presented as an active and exciting subject. Working in groups, in pairs or alone, students explore a problem-centered curriculum; how to observe relationships and patterns in complex sets of data; and learn that asking "why" and "how" leads to deep understanding of the material. In the Upper School, students continue to strengthen their reasoning skills and their ability to manipulate and apply mathematical concepts. After completing geometry and two years of algebra, students will take courses from a rigorous curriculum that includes Precalculus, Calculus, Statistics, and Computer Science, with AP options in Calculus, Statistics, and Computer Science.

>>MIDDLE SCHOOL Upper Prep Mathematics In Upper Prep Mathematics, students are asked to look for patterns, estimate, comprehend data, reason and problem solve. Students interact with teachers to do hands-on, rich experiments and must be prepared to be part of an active learning process. Working in pairs, in larger groups and on their own to discover new methods of solving problems, students deepen their understanding of mathematics. They are often asked to justify their answers and thoughts. “How?”, “Why?” and “What if?” are just as common as “What is the answer?” Students learn how to discuss, conjecture, validate, generalize, extend, connect, document and communicate. As a result, students develop a deep understanding of concepts and the inclination and ability to reason and make sense of new situations. Students learn about algebra, geometry, measurement, number, and operations. There is an emphasis on making meaning of the relationships between numbers and being able to connect key concepts and big ideas. Curriculum is integrated so that Upper Prep students understand and recognize the correlation between different topics in mathematics. In order to be successful, Upper Prep students are expected to have a working knowledge of basic facts.

Form 1 Mathematics This course continues the work begun in Upper Prep mathematics, adding a more in-depth look at topics important in the understanding of algebra and number. Students extend their understanding of proportional reasoning by developing an understanding of congruence and mathematical similarity. They are challenged to understand why procedures work and to discover rules for operating with integers, three-dimensional geometry and foundational algebraic processes. They review rational numbers and how to use them to make comparisons. Students also participate in an intense investigation of linear relationships. Students learn to transform and manipulate all four modalities of linear functions: the contextual problem, numeric table, coordinate graph, and algebraic equation. Students apply all of these skills to problem solve. Students are expected to build on and connect to prior knowledge in order to build deeper understandings and new insights. This course does all of this through a pre-algebra lens.

Form 2 Beginning Algebra This Form 2 course begins the formal study of algebra. Standard algebra topics, such as multi-step equation solving, linear, inverse variation and exponential equations, quadratic patterns, and statistics are covered.

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Additionally, students develop an understanding of rational and irrational square roots through the discovery and application of the Pythagorean Theorem. Students connect types of functions and contextual situations, and they are expected to be able to decipher each situation and understand the relationship between them. They then use these skills to solve problems, make predictions and defend their reasoning. This course continues at the same level and pace as the Form 1 and Upper Prep math courses. Students in this class will continue their study of algebra in Form 3.

Form 2 Algebra 1 Algebra 1 builds on the algebra topics developed in Form 1 Mathematics, with a significant increase in pace and expectation. This high-school level course focuses on linear, inverse variation and quadratic functions. Students analyze the data tables, equations and graphs in order to recognize the different functions according to their distinguishing features. The study of linear functions emphasizes solving equations in one variable and systems of equations in two variables, including inequalities. The quadratic portion of the course includes solving by factoring and the quadratic formula. In addition, the course includes the laws of exponents and the simplifying of radical and rational expressions. This course uses a combination of a traditional algebra text and the Connected Mathematics series to challenge students to discover and understand the why behind the how and to continue to develop their fluency with mathematical vocabulary in the expression of their understanding. Algebra 1 is designed for students who possess the necessary background, motivation and intellectual development to handle the increased complexities of a demanding one-year Algebra 1 course. Students who have attained a B average, combined with the teacher’s recommendation, will be allowed to enroll in Geometry in Form 3.

>>UPPER SCHOOL

Algebra 1 Algebra 1 provides a formal, in-depth development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in subsequent courses. The key content involves writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations in two variables. Quadratic equations are solved by factoring, graphing, or applying the quadratic formula. The course also includes studying monomial and polynomial

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Mathematics


expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratio, and proportion. Algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. For many students this course is an extension of concepts that they’ve been introduced to in a previous course. Upon successful completion of this course students advance to Geometry.

Geometry This Geometry course provides students with a thorough exposure to Euclidean geometry in two and three dimensions. Students analyze the fundamentals of geometry through properties, proofs, and arithmetic/algebraic problem solving. This course begins with an introduction to deductive reasoning and the development of written proofs while uncovering properties of polygons, parallel lines, and perpendicular lines in the plane or in space. The Pythagorean Theorem and an introduction to right triangle trigonometry lay the foundation for the study of area of plane figures as well as the area and volume of solids in the spring. Upon successful completion of this course students continue their study of Algebra. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Geometry Honors This Honors Geometry course provides students with a rigorous exposure to Euclidean geometry in two and three dimensions. Students develop strong problem solving skills using inductive and deductive reasoning. Students will be able to apply previously learned concepts to new situations by making connections between ideas and referring to past experiences. Basic spatial and physical definitions, as well as mathematical reasoning, are explored. This course focuses on an in-depth study of the properties, congruence, and relationships of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles. Area and volume as well as the relationships between them are also studied. The goal of this course is to enable students to navigate through geometric problems, and to logically break down and solve them. Upon successful completion of this course students advance to an appropriate level of Algebra 2. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Advanced Algebra This course expands upon the concepts covered in Algebra 1 and Geometry, with a goal of solidifying and reinforcing algebraic operations and skills. Students will revisit topics from geometry including perimeter, area, volume, and Pythagorean Theorem, using these concepts as tools to solve algebraic problems. Students will also use algebraic methods and graphical tools to further investigate topics from Algebra 1 including linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Upon completion of this course students will advance to Algebra 2.

Algebra 2 Algebra 2 further explores the topics studied in Algebra 1 with a concentration on functions. Topics covered include inequalities, imaginary and complex numbers, as well as radical, linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a focus on problem solving, and students work to solidify their skills in applying the properties of algebra. An introduction to interpreting and understanding connections between equations and graphs is explored utilizing graphing calculators. Upon successful completion of this course students advance to either Precalculus, Functions and Trigonometry, or Statistics. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

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Mathematics


Algebra 2 Honors This honors level course offers students a rigorous and in-depth exploration of functions and further builds upon the topics covered in Algebra 1. The course focuses on inequalities, systems of equations, imaginary and complex numbers, and the following families of functions including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, as well as conic sections, and matrices. Through an algebraic, numerical, and graphical approach students learn to analyze functions and become familiar with their individual characteristics. Students are expected to be able to move quickly, have a strong math intuition, and have fluidity in computation. There is significant emphasis placed on sophisticated problem solving. Upon successful completion of this course students advance to an appropriate level of Precalculus. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Functions and Trigonometry This course expands upon the concepts covered in Algebra 2, and introduces students to the concepts covered in Precalculus. It is designed for students that need to fine tune their algebraic skills prior to entering Precalculus or an equivalent course. The topics covered in this course include matrices, set notation, as well as linear, rational, polynomial, functions and their graphs. Algebraic skills are used in a wide variety of applications in this course. Advanced functions including exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions are introduced from an algebraic and graphical approach. Additionally, students work to develop concrete problem solving skills, to take ownership of their learning, and to read and interpret mathematical writing and notation. This course provides students with a foundation for continued studies in Precalculus, Statistics, or other quantitative courses in college. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Precalculus Precalculus builds on the concepts mastered in Algebra 2. The course begins with a study of functions and their properties and goes on to explore different families of functions, including polynomial, rational, radical, logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric. The major focus of this course is solving and graphing equations in each of these families of functions. Through a graphical, algebraic, and numeric approach, students will develop a conceptual understanding of problems and develop mathematical reasoning and problem solving ability. Facility with Algebra 2 concepts, as well as the ability to think critically and apply reasoning skills are essential characteristics of a successful Precalculus student. This course provides students with a foundation for continued studies in Calculus, Statistics, or other quantitative courses in college. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Precalculus Honors Honors Precalculus builds on the topics mastered in Algebra 2 with a significant increase in pace and expectation. Students entering this course must have a solid number sense and strong math intuition. Also, they must be able to apply concepts quickly and be fluid in computation. This course covers different families of functions and their properties including polynomial, rational, radical, logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions. It explores advanced topics such as vectors, parametric equations, and polar functions as well as their graphs. The Calculus topics of limits, rate of change, and sequence and series are introduced. Through a graphical, algebraic, Page 19 of 60

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Mathematics


and analytical approach, students will develop a conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning. Mastering these skills will prepare students for Calculus. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Statistics Statistics offers students an introduction to the concepts of statistics and probability. Topics include graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and variability, the elements of experimental design and observational study, and the fundamentals of probability, random variables, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and linear regression. This course focuses on the many applications of statistics in the natural and social sciences and makes use of the graphing calculator and the computer. This course is open to students in Form 6 who have completed Algebra 2 and students in Form 5 with department approval. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

AP® Statistics This non-calculus based course encompasses the material covered in a first semester college-level statistics course. The conceptual themes that students are exposed to are exploratory analysis of data, planning an appropriate datacollection study, producing models using probability and simulation, and using statistical inference to guide conclusions. Students use statistical modeling tools to solve a variety of problems in economics, the physical and biological sciences, law, geography, and political science. This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement® Examination in Statistics, which they take in May. The course makes extensive use of the graphing calculator. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Calculus This course covers the traditional topics of differential and integral calculus. Students begin the year with a review of families of functions and trigonometry before moving on to the study of limits, continuity, the derivative, the definite integral and their many related applications in the social and natural sciences. Algebraic and problemsolving skills are reinforced throughout the year, preparing students for continued study of calculus in college. Precalculus is a prerequisite for this course, and department recommendation is required. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

AP® Calculus AB This course is designed to cover all of the material of the first semester of a college calculus course. It begins with topics in differential calculus, including limits, continuity and techniques of differentiation, followed by applications of the derivative in problem solving. The second half of the course covers topics in integral calculus, beginning with Riemann sums and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, continuing with techniques of integration, and ending with the consideration of a range of applications of the integral. Students in this course take the Calculus AB Advanced Placement® Examination in May. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

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AP® Calculus BC This course is designed to cover all of the material of the first two semesters of a college calculus course. The focus is on the derivative, the integral and their applications, including maximum and minimum problems, velocity and acceleration, related rates, linear approximations, areas and volumes, and curve sketching. Students will study polynomial, rational, trigonometric, and exponential functions, as well as conic sections, parametric and polar equations. Separable differential equations and sequences and series also are part of the course. Students in this course take the Calculus BC Advanced Placement® Examination in May. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Multivariable Calculus Honors The course begins with the study of vectors, lines, curves and surfaces in three dimensions as well as partial derivatives and their applications, double and triple integrals and applications, and, time permitting, an introduction to line and surface integrals (Green’s, Gauss’ and Stokes’ theorems). The latter portion of the course includes a review of separable differential equations as well as an introduction to linear homogeneous and nonhomogeneous differential equations. The course integrates the study of mechanics, which students have covered in physics, with the application of calculus to physical concepts. This course is open to students who have successfully completed Calculus BC. Department recommendation is required for this course. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES

Introduction to Engineering (Spring) Build a bridge -- and get over it. This course studies the engineering involved in constructing bridges. Students will be introduced to the engineering design method and focus on analyzing a problem, solving the problem, and safety testing. They will explore the history of bridges including bridge design, disasters, and construction, and they will learn how to create and test models. The students will construct bridges of varying scales and analyze the cost involved in the building process. Each bridge will have a goal that the students will need to consider when building Page 21 of 60

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their bridge. Students will collaborate and work in teams on the projects. They will gain an understanding of architecture as they learn about the different bridge designs. This course is open to students in Forms 4-6 and students in Form 3 with department approval.

Game Theory (Spring) Games, in the mathematical sense, are all around us. Every decision made represents a choice among many possibilities, and game theory is the study of how humans make those choices. Most of the semester will be spent playing and discussing different types of games, such as sequential move games, simultaneous move games, zerosum games, repeated games, and bidding games. In addition, topics such as dominant strategies, Nash equilibrium, mixed strategy equilibrium, and backwards induction will be studied. Game theory has wide applications across many disciplines as well as in daily life, so this course will make use of hands-on applications. This course will enhance the way students think about the world and will inspire them to make better, more rational decisions. This course is open to students in Forms 4-6 and students in Form 3 with department approval. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Probability and Contest Math (Fall) What are the odds? This course attempts to answer that famous question in a variety of settings. Examples from history, science, and cinema will be used to unpack the math behind probability. Over the course of this semester, students will develop their ability to problem solve both independently and in groups. Topics such as Combinatorics, Simulation, Expected Value, and Conditional Probability with Bayes Theorem will be studied. There will also be time spent preparing for various math competitions. This course is open to anyone who has completed Algebra 2 and will require strong logical thinking. Graphing calculators are required for this course.

Introduction to Computer Science (Fall) This elective is an entry/intermediate level computer programming course that introduces the basic principles of generating computer code with clarity and elegance. Classroom projects include textbook exercises, simple textbased gaming, fundamental graphics, and creating Apps for Android Phones. Program structure, conditionals, looping, and style are presented in this course using the Visual Basic. The course covers the fundamentals of using the OOP approach including objects, classes, methods, data types, application, and applet design. This coursework provides a possible lead into further studies in the Advanced Placement® Computer Science course. This course is open to students in Forms 3-6.

AP® Computer Science This is a yearlong advanced level computer science course for those who have completed Introduction to Computer Science. Following the Advanced Placement® Computer Science A curriculum, the Java language is used to present “programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development.” It models a college-level, first semester computer science course and includes an introduction to data structures and data abstraction. Students who enroll in this course take the Advanced Placement® Examination in May. Department recommendation is required for this course.

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Mathematics


Discrete Math 1 This course provides an introduction to the applications of contemporary mathematics to real-world problems. Topics include linear programming, decision paths and circuits, scheduling optimization, recursion, growth and decay, and fractals and chaos. Students are exposed to a variety of problem-solving strategies and techniques, with emphasis on applications from the business world, government, and social and biological sciences. Students use graphing calculators and computers to model problems presented in the course. Open to students in Form 6 who have completed Algebra 2 and students in Form 5 with department approval. Graphing calculators are required for this course. This course will not be offered in 2018-19.

Discrete Math 2 This Spring semester course continues the introduction to the many applications of contemporary mathematics in the areas of business, government, economics, and social and biological sciences. Students explore methods of voting, fair division, and game theory as they apply to sharing, rational decisions, and greed and cooperation. Students investigate mathematical models used in studying population dynamics and look at natality and mortality rates, density dependence, predation and sustainability. Calculators and computers are used to model problems. Open to students in Form 6 who have completed Algebra 2 and students in Form 5 with department approval. Graphing calculators are required for this course. This course will not be offered in 2018-19.

Introduction to Web Design This elective introduces the basics of Web design and development. Students learn a variety of Web development tools including HTML, CSS, PHP, and Javascript. The focus is on creating dynamic user-friendly Web pages. For final projects, students work closely with the instructor or other interested faculty members to develop a functional web site to be used the following year as an academic tool for other courses. This course has no prerequisites, although students are encouraged to have taken Introduction to Computer Science. This semester course is offered every other year and will not be offered in 2018-2019.

Physical Computing This course will introduce students to a new way of interacting with computers, from desktops and laptops to smartphones and microcomputers. It will begin by asking the question, “How do we, as humans, interact with the physical world?” For instance, how do people “sense” the world around them, and how are these principles applied to computer hardware and software? Once students understand that their actions can be measured by changes in energy or more simply interpreted as changes in numeric value, they will learn how to build interactive modular devices that are able to respond to various sources of input (e.g., light, sound, touch, etc.). Students will use microcontrollers, breadboards, and sensors in conjunction with the code they will develop using Arduino’s integrated development environment (IDE). Physical computing takes a hands-on approach to learning with a focus on creative expression. Students will be building circuits, writing computer programs, and integrating sensors in an effort to interact with the physical world around them. This course may be of particular interest to those students who have taken Design Technology, Coding, Electronic Music, or Robotics in the Middle School. Open to Forms 3-6. This course will not be offered in 2018-19.

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Advanced Computer Science: Algorithms and Artificial Intelligence This elective is an advanced level programming course that allows students to explore algorithms and artificial intelligence using the Java programming language. During the first half of the course, students examine different methods of algorithm design while also implementing some of their own algorithms to solve problems correctly and efficiently. In the second half of the course, students explore artificial intelligence and examine how machines can think like a human brain. They complete the course with creating Apps for Android Phones. Throughout the semester, students design and work on individual programming projects under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: completion of Introduction to Computer Science or department approval. This semester course is offered every other year and will not be offered in 2018-2019.

HISTORY History often seems like a remote subject to young people. Could it really matter what happened to people and nations in the distant past, certainly before many us us arrived on the scene? As parents and teachers, however, we know better. There may be no more important subject for today’s students to study than history. Our students learn to appreciate as well as to critique historical events. To read mindfully, to write effectively, to think objectively and to speak authoritatively: these are the goals we have for our students as they come to understand the past on their way to a bright future.

>>MIDDLE SCHOOL Upper Prep: Geography and Culture This course studies the earth and the relationship of people with the earth. Students become familiar with the questions and tools of the geographer, learn about maps and globes, and develop a mental map of the world. The course looks at how the physical environment has influenced people and how people have changed the earth. Students also explore what it means to be a good global citizen in the twenty-first century. They study relationships between countries, develop greater cultural understanding, and look at how international politics play a part in addressing world issues. Writing assignments vary from creative pieces to analytical essays. Readings include textbook, literature, poetry and myth. The year concludes with students researching a country of their choice and looking at the geography and history of the country as well as current events. Students express their learning through writing, maps, graphs, and oral presentations and conclude the year by representing that country during a Model UN activity.

Form 1: American History This course traces the nation’s journey from its origins through the dawn of the modern era. Using primary and secondary sources as well as historical fiction, students compare the diverse geography and cultures of the first Americans and consider the history of the contact and conflict among Native American, African and European cultures during the colonial age. Topics include a study of the nation’s colonial life, the path to revolution and

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independence, and the creation of a constitutional government. In the second semester, students examine America’s industrial and geographical expansion and the social, political and economic forces that divided the nation during the Civil War. The year concludes with the beginnings of America’s recovery from that war and its emergence as a modern nation. Throughout the course, students evaluate the ideas and ideals that have guided America’s journey. The use of historical imagination and the critical evaluation of varying historical perspectives are emphasized.

Form 2: Political Ideology and the Twentieth Century In this course, students explore America’s emergence as a modern nation with special attention to current events and their relationship to the past. Students examine major issues of the twentieth century as America evolved from an isolated agrarian nation to an international superpower in the atomic age. The course begins with an exploration of political ideology, focusing largely on how liberals and conservatives approach certain issues and problems. The goal is to understand different ideologies and then connect them to both past and present issues. Other topics include America’s urban and industrial growth, isolationism and imperialism, evolving political institutions, rapid social change and the ongoing struggle for civil rights. In the process, students analyze contemporary global issues and America’s place in the world. Students will also study the rise of leaders and new systems in different countries such as Josef Stalin in the USSR and Adolf Hitler in Germany. By evaluating primary-source materials such as documents, letters, political cartoons and video footage, as well as literature and a variety of secondary sources, students engage fully in the learning process. With step-by-step guidance from teachers, students complete a fully documented research paper on a topic of their choice. Skills such as the insertion of footnotes using MLA (Modern Language Association) guidelines will prepare students for the researching and writing demands that they will face throughout their academic careers.

>>UPPER SCHOOL

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Empires and Republics Beginning with a look at the emergence of civilization in early Mesopotamia and its development in Egypt, this course examines in detail the major ancient civilizations of India, Greece and Rome. Throughout the course, the importance of non-western civilizations is emphasized. Students explore the political, intellectual, economic, religious and artistic contributions of each culture, seeking to compare civilizations and to trace the causes of their rise and decline. In-depth study of Greece gives students a chance to focus on their individual areas of interest. The course examines Golden Ages and assesses the differences between empires and republics as well as the contributions of significant individuals. The growth of the great world religions is traced. The course ends with the Rise of Islam and Medieval Europe. Required for all students in Form 3.

Modern World Studies The course focuses on selected comparative historical themes from both western and nonwestern cultures, from 1500 through World War II. Along with major events, personalities, philosophical ideas and scientific developments, this course examines the social, political, religious, economic and military aspects of a variety of areas in the modern world. Through reading, extensive essay writing, class discussion and research projects, students expand their understanding of varied historical cultures with the overall goal of developing a greater appreciation for the differences in the people who make up our ever-changing world. Required for students in Form 4.

U.S. History The history of the United States is investigated through a thematic and project based model. The course focuses on a treatment of major themes in American political, social, cultural, economic, religious and military history. The course begins with a study of Public History and the notion of historical memory. It then follows along a researchorientated consideration of various topics in U. S. History, from Pre-Columbian North America to the end of the 20th Century. Among the recurring themes is the question “what does it mean to be an American”? The course centers on student investigation of various topics in United States History through both individual and group projects. The depth of of study is based on the student’s willingness to look beyond the surface of issues and ideas from the past in order to develop a means to look more carefully at the events in their own lives. They learn to ask questions of themselves and their assumptions in order to find greater meaning in the decisions of those that preceded them. As Faulkner said, “the past isn’t dead, it isn’t even past.” Required for students in Form 5. Under special circumstances and with department approval, a student may take this course during their Form 4 or Form 6 year.

AP® U.S. History The history of the United States, from pre-Columbian to present, is studied with frequent use of primary-source materials and varying historiography. Because all students in AP® U.S. History take the AP® Exam in May, the demands for reading, writing and research go beyond those in the regular sections. Students taking this course must expect additional summer reading to prepare for the class and must commit significant extra time to U.S. History during the year. An extensive and fully documented term paper is required. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement® Exam in May. Open to students in Form 5 after consultation with their Modern World Studies teacher and with department approval.

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AP® Economics An introduction to fundamental microeconomic and macroeconomic theory gives students a basic background in the subject. Students begin by examining the development of capitalism and exploring basic economic concepts such as supply, demand and opportunity cost. After this introduction, the focus moves to the behavior of individual firms and individual markets, concentrating on profit-maximizing habits in the economy. Graphic analysis, the use of economic models and the economic philosophies of Smith, Marx, and Keynes are emphasized. Students use these ideas when examining measures of economic performance such as GDP, inflation, and unemployment. Graphic models are used frequently to measure the health of the economy and then to formulate corrective monetary and fiscal policies. The course concludes by looking at the impact of international trade on the economy. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement® Exams in both microeconomics and macroeconomics, which they take in May. Open to students in Form 6.

AP® Political Science What are the essentials of the American political culture? What are the elements defining both social cohesion and political involvement? The course begins with a study of America’s Enlightenment philosophical roots and moves to a detailed study of the formation and evolution of the Constitution. Primary source material is emphasized for the study of Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Rousseau and Marx. In preparation for the AP exam, the emphasis turns to the contemporary workings of the federal government, the organization of political parties, the demographics of voting patterns, and the role of media and interest groups in creating the American political culture. The course also studies the significant implications of e-politics and how social media and big data bases influence how democracy works. Assessments include short essays, a research essay, and quizzes designed to review the AP content. Open to students in Form 6.

HISTORY ELECTIVES

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Elective: Cultural Anthropology (Fall) By studying the cultures of non-western peoples, students learn to appreciate cultural differences among nations as well as those within the United States. Topics explored include tribal culture, the role of ritual, nonwestern religions, family life and the impact of modernization. Students read several classic pieces of Third World literature. The course is based on a sociological approach to the study of the nonwestern world. Open to students in Forms 5-6.

Elective: History of Religions (Fall) To give students an increased understanding and awareness of the world’s diversity, this course offers a historical overview of six of the world’s major religions: Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Students examine basic philosophical similarities and differences by comparing the tenets and dogmas put forth by these religions and their followers. The course incorporates the works of one of the foremost religious thinkers, Huston Smith, through his writings and his video series “The Wisdom of Faith.” The conclusion of this course examines the issue of hatred in the context of religious history. Students must participate actively in discussion and are responsible for classroom presentations and a major research project. Open to students in Forms 5-6.

Elective: International Human Rights (Fall) When the Allies liberated the Nazi concentration camps at the end of WWII, they encountered the remnants of modern and methodical state-sponsored genocide. They responded by trying perpetrators for “war crimes,” creating the United Nations and promulgating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The UDHR marked the first time that the rights and freedoms of individuals were articulated in such detail and made applicable to everyone, everywhere. This course will begin with an overview of Hitler’s rise to power and the steps along the way to the “final solution.” The class will then study other cases of genocide as well as other human rights abuses, both current and historical. Each student will conduct independent research on an on-going UDHR violation and propose practical solutions. Students will deliberate their findings in class, and have the opportunity to apply their knowledge at a Model UN conference. The course will use primary sources, secondary sources, firstperson accounts, photographs, video, and web sites. Assessments will include tests, essays, debates and a research paper. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Elective: American Law (Spring) The bedrock on which all societies rest is the rule of law. This course examines the way the American legal system operates. Students begin by learning how law is made in legislatures and courts. Then the class studies the way in which general legal principles are applied to specific facts through the study of various actual and hypothetical cases. The students gain an understanding of the trial process and conduct a mock trial in front of a jury of their peers as their final project. Open to students in Forms 5-6.

Elective: Applied Economics (Spring) This course explores the choices and decisions people make about how to use the world's limited resources. The goal of this course is to equip students with knowledge that is strongly rooted in economic principles so they will be

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able to differentiate among economic models, understand issues pertaining to global and national economics, gain insight into choices that businesses make, and learn the importance of managing personal finances and planning for future financial security. Open to students in Forms 3-4.

Elective: Geography (Spring) This course focuses on historical and current political and cultural developments within the sphere of regional geography. Students acquire skills in reading several different map projections, as well as a working vocabulary of geographical concepts and terms. The course includes analysis of issues such as resource scarcity, overpopulation, political conflict, human migration and global interdependence. Students will conduct various research projects, both individual and group based, that connect the assigned readings to current global events. Public presentation of their findings will be a regular component of each project. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Elective: American Culture through Sight and Sound (Spring) Through the examination of music and musicians of the recent past, students will study the correlations between music, musical styles and societal development in the United States over the past century. By looking at the wide variety of American music (from Tin Pan Alley and Ragtime to Rock ‘n Roll and a whole lot in between), students will be exposed to the rich and diverse links between music and culture, and how they shaped each other. Students will also have an opportunity to delve into special music genres of their individual choosing (i.e. film scores, Broadway, Hip-Hop, etc.) Students will be expected to listen to music outside of class and to keep journals about what they hear and read. They will also participate in numerous discussions and interact with local artists and their instruments. The course will conclude with student projects and presentations that will draw from a variety of academic disciplines. Open to students in Forms 5-6.

Elective: China Through Film Film as a visual media creates all kinds of questions about how observers construct history and learn about culture. This course explores contemporary Chinese life and 20th century history as seen through the director’s lens. The content is built around a series of Chinese language films centering on social themes and political issues. The themes include the challenging lives of migrant workers, environmental issues, the contemporary urban experience, international tensions, economic inequities, globalization questions, rural society and the rural and urban gap, Chinese nationalism, Chinese schools and education, and women and society. Readings on specific issues related to each film are assigned, and the assessments include short papers and other projects. The films include Beijing Bicycle, To Live, The Story of Qu Jui, Coming Home, Shower, Flowers of War, Back to 1942 and others. Open to students in Forms 4-6. This course will not be offered in 2018-2019.

Elective: Voices of the World: Listening to Many What is music? Why do all cultures create, experience, and share music? How can we use music to gain a better understanding of the human condition? By examining a wide variety of musical traditions, this course will enable students to gain a greater level of appreciation for the importance of music in the overall development of world cultures. Starting with non-Western music, students will make connections between various cultures and styles

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ranging from Taiko drumming (Japan), to Tuvan throat singing (Tibet/Mongolia), to the reggae and ska traditions of the islands (Caribbean/Hawaiian). During the second half of the course, students will learn about the development of traditional Western music, relating earlier styles (Gregorian and Madrigal) to more contemporary genres (Classical/Folk/Spiritual/Rock). Students will be expected to listen to music outside of class and to keep journals about what they hear and read. They will also participate in numerous discussions and interact with local artists and their instruments. The course will conclude with student projects and presentations that will draw from a variety of academic disciplines. Open to students in Forms 5-6. This course will not be offered in 2018-2019.

Elective: Sixties This course explores both the domestic and foreign issues that so significantly influenced social change in America during the polarized decade of the 1960s. From the Kennedy election and administration through Nixon’s first term, the focus is on issues such as the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement, and the search for racial, social, and sexual equality within the United States. Students are required to prepare regular in-class presentations as well as written assignments. Open to students in Forms 5-6. This course will not be offered in 2018-2019.

Elective: The End of Empire The world has been transformed dramatically since the end of World War II. This course seeks to understand the changes—economic, political and social—that have occurred outside the United States since 1945. The collapse of European empires and the consequences for Europe, Asia and Africa are examined. The rise of nationalism, the industrialization of former colonies and disputes about borders provide focal points for discussion. By using primary sources and novels and by participating in group projects, students investigate how these changes affect contemporary political crises in the world beyond U.S. borders. Open to students in Forms 5-6. This course will not be offered in 2018-2019.

MODERN LANGUAGES In our ever-shrinking world and increasingly diverse country, the ability to communicate effectively in a minimum of two languages is essential to responsible global citizenship. The cultural lessons presented at all levels facilitate the development of cross-cultural skills. The use of technology encourages authentic interaction in and out of the classroom experience and provides an increasing independence for student learning. Ultimately, our goal for our foreign language students is to create opportunities for true leadership and responsibility, both personal and global. We encourage and facilitate participation in foreign travel and study-abroad programs, as we believe this is the best way for students to practice their language skills and to test their ability to interact across cultures. Ideally, all students will have enjoyed an international experience prior to graduation.

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>>MIDDLE SCHOOL All Middle School students must choose a modern language or Latin (Classics) to study, and they are placed in a level based on their background and language mastery. Placement tests are given to new Form 1 and Form 2 students who do not want to start in the beginning Level A course.

Spanish A Spanish A is an introductory course that assumes limited experience with the Spanish language. During the year, students will simultaneously develop speaking, reading, writing and listening skills that will allow them to express ideas accurately and confidently. They will use their new vocabulary and grammar to create authentic skits and dialogues similar to situations they would experience were they to travel to a Hispanic country. Students will be able to greet others, express personal preferences, discuss what they are studying in school, talk about sports, and order foods from typical menus. They will also learn to recognize and manipulate various grammatical structures, including regular verb conjugations in the present tense, expressing negation, articles, adjective agreement, forming questions and basic sentence structures. In addition, through the use of authentic materials, students will be introduced to Hispanic culture throughout the world, and they will use technology, both in the classroom and at home, for an engaging and interactive experience. The course culminates in a fashion show, a simulation designed to incorporate all of the written and oral communication skills developed over the course of the year.

Spanish B Spanish B is the second course in the Spanish sequence. Students continue to develop their speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills in a full immersion environment. They hone their ability to express themselves in increasingly detailed sentences, with special emphasis on communicating clearly in conversation and in writing. Students learn to discuss people, places, leisure activities, body parts, animals, household objects, food, and movies. They are challenged to apply new skills in meaningful scenarios, and learning is student-centered and projectbased. Examples of driving questions behind projects include: "How can I, an agent, create a Facebook profile for my Spanish-speaking celebrity?" and "How can I, a travel writer for the New York Times, create a '36 Hour' guide to my favorite city?" Students use technology to collaborate, demonstrate their understanding, and receive feedback. By the end of the year, students will be able to describe themselves and others, ask questions, describe actions in the present, and narrate actions from the past.

Spanish C Spanish C is a full-immersion course, where student-to-student interaction is just as important as that of teacher to student. Students start to build more complex and detailed sentences, allowing them to find their voice and express their personality in the target language. Topics that are explored include: childhood, professions, healthy living, community, and travel using present, past, and future tenses. Students are assessed based on their ability to apply vocabulary, grammar structures and verb conjugations to reallife scenarios, such as interviewing for a job, planning a trip, making baby scrapbooks, giving tours of their town, or filming a gym commercial. Through exposure to varied and culturally authentic materials, students work to achieve a balance in the four core language skills: speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension. Blogs,

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discussion boards, video and other technology allow students to extend their use of the language beyond the classroom.

Chinese A Chinese A students begin the study of Mandarin Chinese by learning to differentiate between and accurately pronounce pinyin and tones, in order to develop a solid speaking foundation. Their knowledge of pronunciation allows them to transition into the study of simplified characters. Emphasis is placed on all four areas of communication: speaking, writing, reading, and listening. Chinese A students learn fundamental vocabulary and grammar patterns that allow them to identify and describe a range of topics such as greetings, family members, classroom items, favorite foods, hobbies, and time. By the end of the year, students are able to communicate their thoughts and opinions in full sentences both orally and in written form. In addition to building elementary language skills, students develop a deeper understanding of Chinese culture through experience, class discussions, and videos.

Chinese B During their second year of Chinese study, students build upon the foundational skills from Chinese A that allow them to communicate more effectively and articulately. They learn more specific vocabulary and more complicated grammar structures in order to develop paragraph writing skills. They are also able to express themselves in a more effective way verbally and give brief presentations in Chinese. There is a transition from talking about oneself to communication with others. Discussions of modern culture are woven throughout the course. Class topics include weather, animals, shapes, colors, shopping, and directions.

Chinese C During the final year of the Middle School Chinese curriculum, students solidify their language foundation in preparation for the Chinese 2 course at the Upper School. Chinese C students review material introduced in earlier courses, while learning new words and grammar structures to deepen their understanding. Students are expected to internalize common vocabulary and grammar patterns in order to communicate spontaneously. The aim of the course is for students to become more fluent readers and writers. Students also research Chinese holidays and traditions to develop their cultural awareness.

French A French A is an introductory course that assumes limited experience with the French language. Students will develop speaking, reading, writing and listening skills that will allow them to express ideas accurately and confidently. They will use their new vocabulary and grammar to create authentic skits and dialogues similar to situations they would experience were they to travel to a francophone country. Students will be able to greet others, express personal preferences, discuss what they are studying in school, and talk about their families. They will also learn to recognize and manipulate various grammatical structures, including regular verb conjugations in the present tense, expressing negation, articles, adjective agreement, forming questions, and basic sentence structures. In addition, students will be introduced to francophone culture throughout the world, and they will use technology, both in the classroom and at home, for an engaging and interactive experience.

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French B French B is the second course in the French sequence. After revisiting the topics presented in French A, students will learn to talk about places in a town, manipulate food and restaurant vocabulary, and discuss sports, hobbies, weather, and clothing. Students will use their more advanced speaking skills to participate in simulation activities, such as a meal in a restaurant or a surprise party. In addition, the course will include a greater number of authentic materials—videos of television programs and movies produced in francophone countries—about which students will share their understanding and opinions using such tools as Flipgrid and SoundCloud. Throughout the year, students will use new vocabulary and grammatical structures to create longer and more complex pieces of writing. They will learn how to use regular and irregular -IR verbs in the present tense and will begin their study of the past tense with the formation and usage of the passé composé. Students will continue to develop their communication skills in the four core areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Various technology tools will be used to enhance each student’s experience including Google Classroom, and Pear Deck.

French C French C is the culmination of students' middle school study of French. Their oral language skills have reached the level where student-to-student, authentic communication is possible. Students begin to build more complex and detailed sentences and compositions, allowing them to find their voices and express their personalities in the target language. By the end of the year they will be able to differentiate between the simple past and imperfect verb tenses. Various vocabulary topics are discussed through the medium of current francophone films and popular English films in translation. Students develop their writing skills through the creation of self-directed, creative projects like creating a vacation scrapbook. Developing students' cultural competency is a primary goal of this course; this is achieved through comparing and contrasting their own culture with those of various francophone countries, in addition to analyzing various authentic materials such as films, images and news footage. FlipGrid and SoundCloud technology allow students to extend their use of the language beyond the classroom, and various tools will be used to enhance each student’s experience including Google Classroom, and Pear Deck.

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>>UPPER SCHOOL

Spanish 1 Studying a language is more than just a matter of grammar. The excitement of any language is learning how to speak, but of course a command of grammar and vocabulary have much to do with the ability to communicate on diverse topics: the cuisine, the geography, the customs and the humor of another culture. Along with the language, students also are introduced to cultural and geographical aspects of Spain, Central America and South America. Ultimately, the emphasis in Spanish 1 is building the elemental foundation of oral and written expression: the vocabulary, the structure of sentences, paragraphs and idiomatic phrases. This year is a stepping-stone for the more comprehensive challenges of Spanish 2

Spanish 2, Spanish 2 Honors The second year of Spanish continues the work of building a linguistic foundation. Students learn the music of Page 34 of 60

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sentences and of questions and answers, the choreography of dialogue, of having fun, of participating in the giveand-take of in-class discourse. The study of culture expands to the study of art, music, and literature. The idea is to experience – to get a flavor of the cultures. In the process, students discover the connection between Hispanic culture around the world and in their own community. In contrast to the regular level language class, Spanish 2 Honors moves at a faster pace, has a higher level of expectations and a broader scope. Spanish 2 Honors incorporates details and exceptions of grammatical structures, presents an in-depth study of advanced cultural and literary readings, and requires communication skills with greater depth and analytical style. Prerequisite: Spanish 1 and department approval.

Spanish 3, Spanish 3 Honors Spanish 3 is where everything comes together. The goal for this year is the solidification of the grammatical structures of Spanish, concentrating on the nuances of real linguistic command. At this level, students do much more writing, tackling longer and more comprehensive readings, beginning literary analysis and developing topical oral and visual presentations. By this level, students are dealing directly with authentic materials – the arts, literature and cinema generated by the cultures studied. The goal of all of these activities is fluency. All teaching in this level is done in Spanish – no se habla inglés aquí. This course focuses on reinforcing and combining basic skills along with the study of new advanced grammar structures. In contrast to the regular level language class, Spanish 3 Honors moves at a faster pace, has a higher level of expectations and a broader scope. Spanish 3 Honors incorporates details and exceptions of grammatical structures, presents an in-depth study of advanced cultural and literary readings, and requires communication skills with greater depth and analytical style. Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or Spanish 2H and department approval.

Spanish 4, Spanish 4 Honors In Spanish 4, students cash in on the hard work of the past three years. What makes this course different is that now students can really communicate in Spanish in classroom discussions on a variety of topics. This year is more of a team effort as students work more in-depth, sharing ideas and insights through discussions and oral presentations. The goal of this year is a comprehensive and comparative look at the history, art, literature and cinema of the entire Hispanic world. Students are expected to make interpretative conclusions and put these reactions on paper in clear and well-constructed language. Grammar is a tool for engaging in insightful dialogue with matters of culture. Expectations are high, but the rewards are gratifying. In contrast to the regular level language class, Spanish 4 Honors moves at a faster pace, has a higher level of expectations and a broader scope. Spanish 4 Honors incorporates details and exceptions of grammatical structures, presents an in-depth study of advanced cultural and literary readings, and requires communication skills with greater depth and analytical style. Practice for the subject SAT and for the AP class the following year is incorporated in the curriculum. Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or Spanish 3H, and department approval.

Spanish 5 ¡Vámonos! Spanish 5 focuses on a high level of fluency while exploring the culture of Spain and Latin and South America. In this course, students focus on their ability to communicate in spoken and written Spanish with confidence and fluidity. Students discuss art, literature, history, politics and sports. Spanish comes to life by reading literary excerpts and short stories, watching movies, writing poetry, delivering speeches, listening to music, and Page 35 of 60

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taking advantage of the wealth of authentic Hispanic materials for reading and listening on the internet. Examples of topics range from contemporary literature to Mexican soap operas, pop and traditional music, Hispanic films and sports. All units of study substantially increase topical vocabulary, improving the quality and richness of conversation and written expression while refining and perfecting advanced grammar skills. Prerequisite: Spanish 4 with department approval or Spanish 4 Honors.

Spanish 5: AP® Language This course is designed for students who really love language. The groundwork is well begun; now is the payoff – by Spanish 5 AP®, students not only find that they can speak Spanish, they discover that they have begun to think in Spanish (some of them even begin to dream in Spanish!). The challenge of the Advanced Placement® Examination is its precision, its expectation not only of fluency, but also of sophisticated analysis of a wide range of current and classical writings. Students are expected to shift seamlessly among aural, spoken and written Spanish. Students must be able to listen to long dialogues and lectures by native speakers and and write about them articulately. Students are expected to step up to the challenge of ongoing vocabulary study. With each new reading on the arts, current events, and scientific or business research, students must commit to the necessary topic-specific vocabulary. Students who enroll in this course take the Advanced Placement® Examination in May. Prerequisite: Spanish 4 or Spanish 4 Honors and department approval.

Chinese 1 Chinese 1 is open to all Upper School students interested in studying Mandarin Chinese. Students begin the year studying pronunciation, tones, and radicals, then quickly transition into the study of simplified characters. The course aims to develop students’ reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills, as well as give them a solid understanding of the basic principles of the Chinese grammatical structure. Discussions on history, culture, and issues in modern China give the students a complete context for language study.

Chinese 2 At the beginning of the second year of the study of Mandarin Chinese, students should be comfortable with basic written and spoken Chinese. The second year places particular emphasis on the further study of the Chinese grammatical system, as well as on vocabulary acquisition. Written compositions and oral presentations are longer and more detailed. Cultural discussions permeate all aspects of the course. Prerequisite: Chinese 1 or Middle School Chinese C.

Chinese 3 Students entering Chinese 3 have developed a solid foundation in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as well as a personalized, meticulous approach to character, vocabulary, and sentence pattern acquisition. The course focuses on the expansion of vocabulary as well as crucial grammar patterns to help students become more articulate writers and speakers. There is an increased emphasis on the difference between colloquial and formal Chinese. Discussions on Chinese history and culture are present throughout the course, preparing students to engage in meaningful cultural discussions in the target language. Prerequisite: Chinese 2.

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Chinese 4 The fourth year of Chinese study is dedicated to the development of reading and writing longer, more formal passages and engaging in more meaningful discussions in Chinese. The textbook is used in conjunction with authentic reading materials to give students a working vocabulary and expand their grammatical foundation. There is a continued emphasis on differentiating between colloquial and formal Chinese. In the second half of the course, students are introduced to classical Chinese, where they read selections from Daoist and Confucian texts and form their own individual philosophy of translation. Prerequisite: Chinese 3.

Chinese 5 APÂŽ This Chinese course is designed for students who are committed to taking their language skills to the next level. Students continue to use their textbook as a guide in the process of character and grammar pattern acquisition and supplement with various authentic texts, videos, and songs. In addition to reading short stories from authors such as Lu Xun, students watch modern Chinese television shows, read newspaper articles, and continue to discuss Chinese life and culture in the target language. Students who enroll in this course take the Advanced PlacementÂŽ Examination in May. Prerequisite: Chinese 4.

French 1 French 1 is an introductory course open to all Upper School students interested in studying French. Students will develop speaking, reading, writing and listening skills that will allow them to express ideas accurately and confidently. Students are exposed to the basics of grammar, pronunciation and sentence structure. They learn their new language's vocabulary and idiomatic expressions through the use of popular music and interactive games. In this course, the students get a glimpse of the cultural and regional diversity in France and the Francophone world through readings, virtual field trips and short videos. They also learn about notable people, pastimes and landmarks. While learning about life in the Francophone world, the students begin to reflect on their own lives, families and school. They demonstrate their skills and understanding through writing assignments, projects, skits, conversations and recordings using various apps and web-based tools. These experiences allow students to build the foundation they need to communicate successfully in their new language.

French 2, French 2 Honors The second year of French is filled with authentic language, popular music, cultural readings, projects and writing tasks designed to help students expand their communication skills to develop a greater understanding of Francophone culture. They are urged to immerse themselves in the language and take risks by participating in discussions, performing skits, writing and illustrating a story about their childhood, creating a food fair and giving presentations with various applications like Google slides and Powerpoint. Through these experiences, students continue to practice the grammatical structures and vocabulary they need to communicate effectively, and they begin to perfect the pronunciation. In contrast to the regular level language class, French 2 Honors moves at a faster pace, has a higher level of expectations and a broader scope. French 2 Honors incorporates details and exceptions of grammatical structures, presents an in-depth study of advanced cultural and literary readings, and requires communication skills with greater depth and analytical style. Prerequisite: French 1 and department approval.

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French 3, French 3 Honors The students review second-year grammar and vocabulary and continue with more complicated structures that will complete an overall study of the target language. The new material covers verbs, questions, reflexive and reciprocal verbs, descriptive adjectives, the passé composé and the imperfect, negations, double object pronouns, the subjunctive mode, prepositions, demonstrative pronouns, the present and past conditional forms, the future perfect and “si clauses.” The students will begin to learn the three modes of communication – interpersonal, interpretive and presentational -- as well as the 5 C’s of 21st-century language study: communication, community, comparison, connections and culture. The students learn to strategize better as readers as they extract meaning from a variety authentic texts. The students use the internet as a resource for research projects, and they present to their classmates to demonstrate their French proficiency. In contrast to the regular level language class, French 3 Honors moves at a faster pace, has a higher level of expectations and a broader scope. French 3 Honors incorporates details and exceptions of grammatical structures, presents an in-depth study of advanced cultural and literary readings, and requires communication skills with greater depth and analytical style. Prerequisite: French 2, 2 Honors or department approval.

French 4, French 4 Honors The students continue their study of advanced structures and authentic media and texts. At the beginning of the course, they examine more complex grammatical structures that allow them to communicate at an intermediate to advanced level in the target language, using verb forms such as the subjunctive and the conditional, irregular verbs, comparatives and superlatives, the "faire causatif," indirect discourse, and the passive voice. In the spring, students will listen to radio broadcasts, write short emails, and engage in more complex discussions of current events. The class continues its study of literature by reading Flaubert's short story "Un Cœur simple,” Jean-Paul Sartre’s play "Les Mouches," and Ionesco’s masterpiece “La Cantatrice chauve.” The students continue to work on speaking and writing proficiency, and they begin to explore various online magazines and newspapers. Upon completion of the course, the students are prepared for the AP French Language and Culture course, with department approval. Prerequisite: French 3, 3 Honors or department approval. In contrast to the regular level course, French 4 Honors moves more rapidly, and the students complete their study of advanced structures by using the text “French 4 Years: Advanced French with AP® Component." The students explore the various components of the AP® program in French by taking practice tests, listening to radio broadcasts, writing short emails, and engaging in more complex discussions of current events. The class continues its study of authentic literature by reading Jean-Paul Sartre’s play "Les Mouches,” Ionesco’s “La Cantatrice chauve,” and Albert Camus’ novella “L’Etranger.” In the spring, the students read our last work, a collection of francoafrican poetry entitled “Négritude et Nouveaux Mondes.” The students continue to work on speaking proficiency, and they begin to consult various online magazines and newspapers. Upon completion of the course, the students are prepared for the Advanced Placement® French Language and Culture course. Prerequisite: French 3, 3 Honors or department approval.

AP® French Language and Culture It’s the grand finale. Vive le français! This course provides a college-level experience for students framed by six central themes: contemporary life, personal identity, family and community, world challenges, science and technology, and aesthetics. The students explore each theme in depth via literary texts, surveys, magazine articles, maps, films and music, and podcasts from Radio France Internationale and TV5Monde. The students are also Page 38 of 60

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encouraged to access various language apps. They will learn to identify the theme and goal of a text, maintain a verbal exchange, organize ideas in writing and create an oral presentation about a cultural tradition. They strive to be precise in their grammar as they continue to perfect their pronunciation. The students continue to work on listening proficiency, and they explore various online magazines and newspapers. The students experience weekly AP practice tests in class to better prepare themselves. The students who enroll in this course take the Advanced PlacementÂŽ Examination in May. Prerequisite: French 4 Honors or department approval.

Advanced French: Le Monde Francophonie Students in this course will explore the francophone world. This is a project-based learning course with an emphasis on collaboration, communication and cultural competency. Students will investigate the following questions: How can we use technology to learn about other cultures and build relationships? What is life like for young people in France and in the francophone world? Do some live differently than others? What do they do in their free time? What are their traditions, political views and challenges? What books and music do they like? Through the use of media, students will learn about the people who make up "la francophonie" and share their findings through posts, snaps, tweets, videos, presentations and podcasts. Prerequisite: French 4/ French 4 Honors or AP Language and Culture or department approval. This course will not be offered in 2018-2019.

CLASSICS The Classics Department provides students with the necessary skills for comprehending original works in Latin and Greek through reading and translation and teaches students about the relevance of the Greco-Roman world in our daily lives. Students study not only the Latin language but also Greco-Roman culture and history. We use a comprehensive approach to language study in which students approach elements of Latin grammar and vocabulary in the context of the literature. In higher-level courses students will be prepared to read authentic Latin selections from some of Rome’s greatest authors: Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Ovid, and Vergil. Classical culture, history, and the foundations of Western literature are examined at all levels in many ways, including projects, films, and field trips. The study of ancient Greek may be added after the successful completion of Latin 3 in the Upper School.

>>MIDDLE SCHOOL All Middle School students must choose a modern language or Latin (Classics) to study, and they are placed in a level based on their background and language mastery. Placement tests are given to new Form 1 and Form 2 students who do not want to start in the beginning Latin A.

Latin A In Latin A, students begin to explore the language of ancient Rome, classical cultures and history, and the contemporary relevance of these subject areas. Students are introduced to the Latin language via reading, translating, speaking, and listening as well as through playing games and interacting with each other in English and Page 39 of 60

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Latin. Through the study of vocabulary and English derivatives, students learn about Latin roots as they build more sophisticated English vocabularies. Students in Latin A also consider aspects of Roman daily life including the Roman family, entertainment, the role of women, and the institution of slavery. They also get to know Roman and Greek art forms, developing a critical eye as they examine frescos, mosaics, statues, and other artefacts from the ancient world. This class’s main cultural area of study is life in the ancient city of Pompeii. Students learn about the uses and layout of the physical spaces in Pompeii, such as the Forum, the theater, and the bath complex. Among other projects, students create a 3D model version of a typical Pompeian house.

Latin B Latin B builds on the language skills and cultural knowledge acquired through the first year of Latin. Students continue their study of grammar and syntax through reading. They advance their understanding of Latin grammar and vocabulary as they widen their knowledge of English through study of derivatives. Students learn through a range of activities including in-class reading, English to Latin translation, verbal use of Latin, group projects, performance, and friendly competitions. In addition, students continue their studies of ancient Greek and Roman culture, history, and art. Students begin the year by studying the methodology of the Roman system of education. Students learn about significant Roman orators, such as Cicero, and perform their own debate in class. They then study the career path of upper class Romans and how they influenced the city and citizens around them. Students finish Unit I of the Cambridge Latin Course with an examination of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE. Archaeological remains from this period are studied and students complete a project on one aspect of the eruption. The latter half of the year in Latin B takes students from Pompeii to a Roman settlement in ancient Britain. Here students begin to learn about the expansion and influence of the Roman empire. Students deepen their understanding of ancient material culture by engaging in a variety of group and personal projects involving written work, presentations, and art.

Latin C In the third year of Middle School Latin, students prepare for a more rigorous study of Latin at the Upper School through even deeper explorations of the Latin language. They continue to learn Latin through reading, translation, writing, speaking, friendly competition, and Latin-based composition projects. Students advance their understanding of English through study of derivatives. In the first semester, students continue learning about the expanse of the Roman empire that they began studying at the end of Latin B. Students examine the process of Romanization throughout the empire and create a travel brochure for a province of their choice. As a complement to their continued study of Romanized Britain, students complete a 3D or digital model of a Roman style villa (large palace). After studying life in the northern part of the Roman empire, students move their focus of study to the ancient city of Alexandria. Students study the influence of Rome on Egyptian culture and become acquainted with the materials and art forms, such as frescoes, mosaics, and glass making. Throughout the second semester, students learn about Egyptian mythology and compare it to the beliefs of ancient Roman religion. Students conclude their study of ancient Egypt with an examination of ancient medicine and science.

Art and Architecture This survey of ancient art includes Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, complementing Upper Prep students’ studies in Geography and Studio Arts. Students first study the ancient Egyptian pantheon, learning about gods, goddesses, and Egyptian culture through designing their own tombs and engaging in the mummification process. Page 40 of 60

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They think about how culture contributes to written communication and art, as they contrast their own way of representing ideas in writing with ancient Egyptian ones. Students go on to learn about the deities and heroes of Greece and Rome as well, designing and glazing their own black-figure style Greek plates. Finally, they move on to ancient Rome, searching the campus for Roman architectural elements and completing a scavenger hunt through Blue Back square. This study of mythology and ancient art informs the students’ visual analysis of the art and architecture in the world around us. From the Acropolis to the Washington Monument, from Aphrodite to Zeus, students explore the traditions of the western past and its influences on the present. This course is required of all Upper Prep students.

>>UPPER SCHOOL

Latin 1 The influence of Latin on Western culture and thought, even in today’s fast-paced world, is significant. Students in their first year of study will begin to investigate Latin’s importance and elegance, as they acquire basic grammar and vocabulary in their journey toward reading the original works of great writers such as Vergil, Julius Caesar, and Ovid, among others. In addition, students are exposed to some of the basics of Roman culture, with particular stress on Roman daily life, education, mythology, early history, and public spaces. Students explore Latin words and grammar through reading, speaking, listening, writing, and interactive games. Throughout the year, the course reinforces the grammatical rules that students encounter in English 3 in the context of Latin, with particular stress on parts of speech, sentence structure, and the etymological roots of English words. By year’s end, students will have a better understanding of their cultural roots and how Latin and Roman culture remain to this day vibrant, important, and very much alive.

Latin 2 Starting with a cumulative review of the work done in Latin 1, this course continues to bolster students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary as they gradually transition from basic grammar to more complex syntax in the context of the Latin texts. Students are gradually introduced to reading and translating connected passages in prose

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and work toward the goal of reading a sustained prose narrative near the course’s end. More sophisticated cultural topics are investigated, including the influence of ancient Rome in the provinces and the mechanisms of the Roman army and government over time. Rome’s transition from a republic to an empire is also a major topic as students prepare to read original works from this time period in the next level of Latin. Prerequisite: Latin 1 or its equivalent.

Latin 3: Intermediate Latin Literature Like Latin 2, this course begins with a summative review of the grammar topics covered in previous courses. In the first semester, students review and explore more challenging Latin grammar in context and begin to explore authentic readings written during the golden age of Latin literature. This course prepares students for AP® Latin by department recommendation. Prerequisite: Latin 2 or its equivalent.

AP® Latin: Caesar and Vergil This course follows the Advanced Placement® Latin: Vergil and Caesar syllabus. Students read extensively in Latin from Vergil’s Aeneid, and Caesar's De Bello Gallico. Students also carefully study meter and other poetic and rhetorical devices. At the start of the year, the focus is primarily on building a strong reading pace and honing translation skills, but figures of speech and interpretive writing exercises are introduced early and incorporated increasingly as the year progresses. Students also read about and discuss the literature’s historical and literary context. Students practice for the format of the exam by completing assessments in multiple-choice questions, translations, spot questions, and comparative essays on known Latin passage, and by completing sight-reading multiple-choice questions on unknown Latin passages. This course is cross-registered as CAMS 3102: Topics in Advanced Latin with the UConn Early College Experience, and students may earn three college credits for their work in this course. To take the ECE course, there is an additional cost of $125. Prerequisite: Latin 3 or its equivalent.

Ancient Greek 1 “Naturally I am biased in favour of boys [and girls] learning English; and then I would let the clever learn Latin as an honour and Greek as a treat.” – Winston Churchill This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Attic Greek. While acquisition of at least a semester’s worth of college-level Greek language is the primary objective, students also explore how Greek culture has influenced Western thought and traditions from its origins in antiquity all the way to the present day. Projects in this class focus on the layout of the greek house and polis (city), Greek warfare, comedy, philosophy, and art. Comparisons of ancient works of art to such modern ones as painting, writing, warfare, and thought challenge students as they use their deepening knowledge of classical language and culture to better understand the threads that link the distant past and the modern world. Prerequisite: Latin 3 or Advanced Placement® Latin and department approval.

Elective: Mythology (Fall) This course seeks to explore the rich and eternal world of classical mythology. Students will learn about the GrecoRoman pantheon of gods and the age of heroes and will explore these stories using various media such as literature, visual art, music, and film. Additionally, students will be asked to look at myth with a critical eye, investigating and

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discovering the common metaphors and symbols that occur and how they speak to humanity’s need and production of mythologies. Finally, the class will also trace the history of Greco-Roman mythology from its origins to present day with the aim of learning how different eras have used and interpreted these tales. This course will include projects and readings that sometimes will be completed outside of class. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

CREATIVE ARTS The arts represent something far more important than something to do with your hands, or in your spare time, or to wile away the hours while you chat with your friends. They are not only as serious and elevating as anything else we offer in the curriculum, they are an accessible training ground for the kinds of human interaction that will be necessary to flourish in the decades ahead. Our disciplines put a premium on the skills that are needed to answer the challenges of contemporary times, namely: •

creative problem-solving;

task analysis and constructive critique in mediums that are intuitive, improvisational, inferential and context- based;

focus on process as its own end, not just as a means to an end product;

holistic articulation: a facile command of many media – not just the linguistic; and

flexibility: the ability to move between realms with confidence.

We know that creativity is not just nice; it is necessary. The arts are not just for “the talented” – they are for those who will otherwise leave this place without a healthy skepticism about how “media” delivers a “message,” or how feelings and intuitions can be made manifest. The arts we teach educate the soul as well as the mind.

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>>MIDDLE SCHOOL

UPPER PREP All courses are required for all Upper Prep students.

Introduction to Drama (Quarter) In this course, students are exposed to the fundamentals of drama with an emphasis on fun, creativity, teamwork and self-confidence. The initial focus is on the fundamental acting skills of pantomime and improvisation, as students engage in a variety of acting games and exercises. Then, they work on character development, blocking, and overall stage presence. The course culminates in a demonstration of what the students have learned in front of an audience of their peers. The skills of cooperation and group problem solving are as important as learning how to perform!

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Introduction to Studio Art (Quarter) This course provides an initial experience in the basic visual processes of drawing, two and three-dimensional design, and critique. The goal of this course is to allow students to explore a variety of artistic materials, styles, and techniques while providing them with a basic foundation of the elements of art. Emphasis is placed on individual expression and visual problem solving.

Art and Architecture (Quarter) This survey of ancient art includes Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, complementing Upper Prep students’ studies in Geography and Studio Arts. Students first study the ancient Egyptian pantheon, learning about gods, goddesses, and Egyptian culture through designing their own tombs and engaging in the mummification process. They think about how culture contributes to written communication and art, as they contrast their own way of representing ideas in writing with ancient Egyptian ones. Students go on to learn about the deities and heroes of Greece and Rome as well, designing and glazing their own black-figure style Greek plates. Finally, they move on to ancient Rome, searching the campus for Roman architectural elements and completing a scavenger hunt through Blue Back square. This study of mythology and ancient art informs the students’ visual analysis of the art and architecture in the world around us. From the Acropolis to the Washington Monument, from Aphrodite to Zeus, students explore the traditions of the western past and its influences on the present. This course is required of all Upper Prep students.

UPPER PREP MUSIC BLOCK ELECTIVES All Upper Prep students are required to participate in one of these performing arts groups.

Upper Prep Choraliers (Year, meets once per week) This course emphasizes the development of individual and ensemble vocal technique. Students are introduced to the ear- training pedagogy of Zoltán Kodály, sight-reading, independent musicianship and study repertoire from various genres and world cultures. The Choraliers present three or four programs throughout the year.

Concert Band (Year, meets twice per week) This course is open to all woodwind, brass and percussion players. Ensemble skills are developed through varied repertoire. The Concert Band performs during assemblies, concerts, and special trips and events. Students in concert band must know how to play a band instrument. Open to students in Upper Prep-Form 2.

String Orchestra (Year, meets twice per week) The String Orchestra is open to all experienced string players (violin, viola, cello and double bass). Ensemble skills are developed during rehearsals using carefully graded method books, practical exercises, on-the-spot corrections, and working with soloists, both instrumental and vocal. The String Orchestra performs in KO’s Candlelight Concerts, a spring concert, special events and school assemblies. Open to students in Upper Prep- Form 2.

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FORM 1 All courses are required for all Form 1 students. In addition, all Form 1 students take Life Skills 1 (a health course) and Coding during this block.

Art in Every Dimension (Quarter) This course is designed to build upon the foundation formed in Introduction to Studio Art by exploring more complex materials, techniques and concepts while providing avenues for students to fully explore and develop their own ideas and artistic voice. It provides a continued introduction to the approaches and media of both two- and three-dimensional design. Students will build both technical and creative-thinking skills through a variety of studio assignments. Required for students in Form 1.

Public Speaking (Quarter) This course is designed to help students overcome their fear of speaking in public and to provide them with the fundamental skills and confidence needed to be good speakers in any setting. Students create a basic speech outline, then participate in a variety of games and exercises designed to improve eye contact, tone, volume, pace, articulation and body language while speaking. Working in pairs, small groups and individually, students speak daily on a wide range of topics, either spontaneously or after more long-term preparation. Through sharing a personal story, defending an opinion, delivering a campaign speech or selling a product to the class, students learn to persuade, inform and entertain at the podium in a clear and poised fashion.

FORM 1 MUSIC BLOCK ELECTIVES All Form 1 students are required to participate in one of these music electives. Form 1 students may also elect to participate in both Band/Orchestra and Cantabile.

Cantabile (Year, meets twice per week) Cantabile is the largest of the four middle school choirs. Individual musicianship is an important goal, as members perform repertoire from various periods and countries and commissioned works from acclaimed composers. Students further develop sight-reading, ear training, and harmonic skills, as well as healthy vocal techniques. This ensemble participates in the all-school Choral Expo concert in January, the Middle School Choral Fest concert in the Spring, and occasionally performs off campus. This choir often works closely in master classes and workshops with visiting composers, conductors, and clinicians. Open to students in Forms 1-2.

Concert Band (Year, meets twice per week) This course is open to all woodwind, brass and percussion players. Ensemble skills are developed through varied repertoire. The Concert Band performs during assemblies, concerts, and special trips and events. Students in concert band must know how to play a band instrument. Open to students in Upper Prep-Form 2.

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Jazz Band (Year, meets twice per week) This course is open by audition to woodwind, brass and percussion players as well as pianists, bassists and guitarists. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in the jazz, rock and Latin musical traditions. In addition to ensemble skills, students explore various approaches to improvisation. Open to students in Form 1-2. With the exception of pianists, guitarists and bassists, all Jazz Band members must participate in the Concert Band.

String Orchestra (Year, meets twice per week) The String Orchestra is open to all experienced string players (violin, viola, cello and double bass). Ensemble skills are developed through varied repertoire. The String Orchestra performs in KO’s Candlelight Concerts, a spring concert, special events and school assemblies. Selected players also perform with Upper School students. Open to students in Upper Prep- Form 2.

Electronic Music (Year, meets twice per week) In this course, students explore music through a wide array of topics, including using GarageBand and other software for beginning composition, creating music for video, text and spoken word, and studying and creating the music of world cultures. Open to students in Form 1.

Octopipers and F2B (Year) These select ensembles perform commissioned works and published music in the jazz, pop, contemporary, Broadway and a cappella genres. Selected by audition, this ensemble participates in the all-school Choral Expo concert in January, the Middle School Choral Fest concert in the Spring, school-day performances, and occasionally performs off campus. Students utilize sight-reading, ear training, harmony, vocal techniques and choreography throughout the year. Membership in Cantabile is not required. Both ensembles rehearse after school. Octopipers is open by audition to girls in Forms 1- 2, and F2B is open by audition to boys in Forms 1-2.

FORM 2 Form 2 students should choose courses from either the Theater and Visual Arts electives or arts block electives that are offered in other disciplines, such as Robotics. In addition, all Form 2 students are required to take Life Skills 2 (a health and wellness course) during this block.

THEATER ELECTIVES Advanced Public Speaking (Quarter) This course is a sequel to Form 1 Public Speaking. After reviewing the speech outline and the basic elements of delivery, students sharpen their skills as they explore all six areas of speech competition, working alone, with a partner and in small groups. Speech activities include a character monologue, a group choral reading and a parliamentary-style debate, in addition to several individual speeches. This is a creative and engaging course that helps any speaker rise to the next level of competence and confidence.

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Acting for Theatre (Semester) A wonderful choice for Form 2 students interested in exploring the art and craft of theater, this class offers the opportunity to become immersed in the study of acting, theater, and performance. This course will develop students’ acting skills through improvisation and imagination and enable students to work cooperatively as they learn to develop characters and dialogue. This will be supplemented with lessons in theater history, text analysis, and scene study. Through games, guided activities, and explorations, students will develop skills of performance, storytelling, and characterization. Working with their peers, students will have opportunities to perform improvisational skits, monologues, and short plays, culminating in a final performance.

VISUAL ARTS ELECTIVES Ceramics (Quarter) This course introduces students to clay as an artistic medium. In this course, students will use hand-building techniques and processes to create projects that are both sculptural and functional. Students will experience a variety of projects designed to develop their technical skill, explore their visual expression, and learn about the complex ceramic process.

Drawing (Quarter) In this course, students will advance their drawing and design skills through the study of the fundamental elements and principles of drawing, including observational drawing. Using a wide variety of materials and methods, students will be encouraged to develop their own drawing vocabulary, strengthen their problem-solving skills and develop an artistic voice.

Painting (Quarter) This painting course builds upon students’ visual and technical foundation and focuses on introducing them to advanced painting techniques as well as a sophisticated study of color and paint mixing. This course focuses on visualizing and interpreting images on a two-dimensional surface and builds problem solving skills. Students will work with a variety of media that include acrylic paint and canvas. The course will engage students with both abstract and representational art – exploring the ways that color, drawing, and composition can affect the meaning of what we see.

Printmaking (Quarter) This course introduces students to the basic printmaking methods, including intaglio, relief and monoprinting in both an historical and contemporary application. Students will explore each of these techniques, as well as ways in which they may be combined. They learn how to translate their drawings and ideas into prints by exploring mark making while further developing the form and visual content of their composition. Throughout class assignments, focus will also be placed on building and developing an artistic voice, creative problem solving, and the process of critique.

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Sculpture (Quarter) Sculpture students explore ways to construct three-dimensional artwork and consider how an object can represent ideas. A variety of materials and processes are introduced as students design and build their sculptures. Emphasis is not only placed on physical construction and structure but also on the problem-solving skills needed to work in the third dimension. Students are challenged to create work that communicates their own ideas and are encouraged to find their own artistic voices.

Private Instrumental and Voice Instruction Families who seek to arrange private vocal or instrumental lessons may contact Creative Arts Department Chair Todd Millen for the names and contact information of local music professionals who offer these services. Times may be arranged directly with these tutors during or after school.

FORM 2 MUSIC BLOCK ELECTIVES All Form 2 students are required to participate in one of these music electives. Form 2 students may also elect to participate in both Band/Orchestra and Cantabile.

Concert Band (Year, meets twice a week) This course is open to all woodwind, brass and percussion players. Ensemble skills are developed through varied repertoire. The Concert Band performs during assemblies, concerts, and special trips and events. Students in concert band must know how to play a band instrument. Open to students in Upper Prep-Form 2.

Jazz Band (Year, meets twice a week) This course is open by audition to woodwind, brass and percussion players as well as pianists, bassists and guitarists. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in the jazz, rock and Latin musical traditions. In addition to ensemble skills, students explore various approaches to improvisation. Open to students in Form 1-2. With the exception of pianists, guitarists and bassists, all Jazz Band members must participate in the Concert Band.

String Orchestra (Year, meets twice a week) The String Orchestra is open to all experienced string players (violin, viola, cello, and double bass). Ensemble skills are developed through varied repertoire. The String Orchestra performs in KO’s Candlelight Concerts, a spring concert, special events and school assemblies. Selected players also perform with Upper School students. Open to students in Upper Prep- Form 2.

Cantabile (Year, meets twice a week) Cantabile is the largest of the four middle school choirs. Individual musicianship is an important goal, as members perform repertoire from various periods and countries and commissioned works from acclaimed composers. Students further develop sight-reading, ear training, and harmonic skills, as well as healthy vocal techniques. This ensemble participates in the all-school Choral Expo concert in January, the Middle School Choral Fest concert in Page 49 of 60

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the Spring, and occasionally performs off campus. This choir often works closely in master classes and workshops with visiting composers, conductors, and clinicians. Open to students in Forms 1-2.

Octopipers and F2B (Year) These select ensembles perform commissioned works and published music in the jazz, pop, contemporary, Broadway and a cappella genres. Selected by audition, this ensemble participates in the all-school Choral Expo concert in January, the Middle School Choral Fest concert in the Spring, school-day performances, and occasionally performs off campus. Students utilize sight-reading, ear training, harmony, vocal techniques and choreography throughout the year. Membership in Cantabile is not required. Both ensembles rehearse after school. Octopipers is open by audition to girls in Forms 1- 2, and F2B is open by audition to boys in Forms 1-2.

Electronic Music In this course, students explore music through a wide array of topics, including using GarageBand and other software for beginning composition, creating music for video, text and spoken word, and studying and creating the music of world cultures. Open to students in Forms 2.

Private Instrumental and Voice Instruction Families who seek to arrange private vocal or instrumental lessons may contact Creative Arts Department Chair Todd Millen for the names and contact information of local music professionals who offer these services. Times may be arranged directly with these tutors during or after school.

>>UPPER SCHOOL MEDIA ARTS ELECTIVES

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Digital Music (Fall, Spring) This course introduces students to a wide range of music technology applications, including sequencing (recording) with computers, sound design, and scoring music to video. It also introduces them to the techniques of recording and editing digital sound using computerized software and hardware. Utilizing the flexibility of the 12station music technology lab, students can work independently and in small groups. Students use GarageBand, Ableton Live, Logic, Sibelius, and cloud-based applications to create and develop their own music projects. Prior experience with music is not required. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Digital Filmmaking 1 (Fall, Spring) In this course, students create digital video projects using professional editing software. They also learn how to operate digital video cameras. Students learn how to write shot sheets to plan their projects. Proper shooting techniques and shot composition are also stressed. Students are taught how to edit digital video on the computer and how to add a variety of special effects and transitions to enhance their projects. Students learn how to add and balance voice-overs and music audio tracks to their work. Other topics include the use of blue and green screens, and how to post video to Google Drive and the internet. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Digital Filmmaking 2 (Fall) Video students work on longer and more complex projects in this course. Students learn how to create storyboards for short plays or original scripts, then direct and film these projects after scouting out proper locations for their shoots. Forming concepts and techniques on how to direct actors is another important component of this course. Learning how to use video to tell a story, either fictional or documentary, is stressed. Students learn the proper techniques for recording live sound, and how to use music, sound effects, and natural and theatrical lighting to enhance their video projects. In the post-production process, students learn how to create animation and use special- effect filters. Prerequisite: Digital Filmmaking 1. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Graphic Design (Fall) This course introduces students to a practice-based, hands-on approach to visual communication design. Students will learn how to create in both vector and raster graphics, how to design with specific clients in mind, and edit images using industry standard photo editing software. Topics also include the elements and principles of design, color theory, typography, logos, design thinking, and information design. Students will engage in peer critiques of their visual work to reinforce their understanding of the principles of design and the language used to describe them. Open to students in Forms 3 - 6.

Digital Photography 1 (Fall, Spring) This course will introduce students to the artistic, scientific, and technical aspects of digital photography. The primary goal will be for students to develop and expand their creative practice by learning the anatomy of the camera and applying the elements of principles of art to their photographs. Using photographic software, students will also learn how to manage large collections of images, edit the formal qualities of their photographs, print their work in color, and share their work via online photo sharing services. Although the primary focus of this course will be on digital photography, many concepts also apply to other photographic disciplines such as film and video.

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Students will be introduced to the following topics, among others: Light, Aperture, Shutter Speed, ISO, Exposure, Bokeh, Focal Length, Depth of Field, Focus, Rule of Thirds, White Balance, and more. It should be noted, that unlike most other studio art courses, this class will require time outside of class and school to be spent working on projects. Cameras will be provided for each student by the school assuming a liability waiver is signed by a parent or guardian. Prerequisite: Foundations in Art. Open to students in Forms 3-6. Preference is given to upperclassmen in the fall semester.

Digital Photography 2 (Fall) This course allows for individualized exploration from within the broad range of technical and conceptual possibilities with photography and new media. The class is designed so that students work on broad independent projects, with regular consultations, discussions and critiques with the instructor. With the advice and guidance of the teacher, students independently explore in-depth topics of media arts from an individualized perspective. Individualized schedules and meeting times are discussed based on specific project needs. Students also are expected to work on projects outside of class as needed. Prerequisite: Digital Photography 1. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

MUSIC ELECTIVES

Choral Music: Concert Choir (Year) The foundation of the school’s choral program, Concert Choir, emphasizes the development of music reading, aural skills, healthy vocal technique, and confidence in performance. Students study and perform choral music in various languages from diverse historical backgrounds, working with guest conductors, and professional musicians to master the basic elements of the specific style appropriate to the work. This ensemble participates in the allschool Choral Expo concert in January, the Upper School Choral Fest concert in the spring, and occasionally performs off campus. Members of the Concert Choir are given priority in the audition process for the select and a cappella groups. Receives one-half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

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Choral Music: Outlook (Year) This select coed ensemble performs in several genres including jazz, madrigal, classical, pop, and multi-cultural. Selected by annual audition, students participate in festivals and various concert venues both on and off campus. Outlook members meet as a group in addition to meeting with the entire Concert Choir and learn the Concert Choir repertoire in addition to their own music. The singers may also perform in separate a cappella ensembles (Crimson 7 for boys and Oxfordians for girls). Receives one credit. Open to students in Forms 4-6 by audition from Concert Choir.

Choral Music: Voce Novissima (Year) This select women’s ensemble performs classical and contemporary music from all genres. Emphasis is on musicreading skills and development of choral musicianship in a smaller ensemble. Students participate in festivals and various concert venues both on and off campus. Membership in the Concert Choir is required. Voce Novissima members meet as a group in addition to meeting with the entire Concert Choir and learn the Concert Choir repertoire in addition to their own music. The singers may also perform in the separate a cappella ensemble, Oxfordians. Receives one-half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6 by audition from Concert Choir.

Instrumental Music: String Orchestra (Year) This ensemble is open to all experienced string players (violin, viola, cello, and double bass). In addition to preparation for major concerts, students concentrate on the development of ensemble skills and individual playing techniques. Students perform repertoire in both string orchestra and chamber music settings. Receives one-half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Instrumental Music: Concert Band (Year) This performing group is open to all woodwind, brass, and percussion players. Attention is focused on standard repertoire as well as new music and transcriptions for band. The Concert Band rehearses three times a week and performs at concerts and other on-campus events. Receives one credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Jazz Combo (Year) The Jazz Combo, open to advanced jazz students, performs various styles of music within the jazz repertoire and learns advanced concepts in jazz improvisation. In addition to several on-campus performances a year, the combo also performs at the Berklee Jazz Festival or the UMass High School Jazz Festival (calendar permitting). Receives one credit. Entrance by recommendation or audition only.

AP® Music Theory (Year) This course teaches a wide array of musical concepts. Along with music theory and beginning composition the students also deal with aural skills, dictation, and sight singing. Students learn the basics of music notation and score analysis along with knowledge of basic tonal harmony in the eighteenth century common practice period style. The ultimate goal of the course is to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand, analyze, and describe the aspects and processes of music that is heard or seen on a score. Students engage in a variety of written, singing, and compositional exercises that teach them the many aspects of musical composition and analysis. At the Page 53 of 60

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completion of this course students will be prepared to take the AP® Music Theory exam that is offered in May. Students who pass may earn college credit at a number of colleges and universities. While not all students will likely attain this level of success, the instruction and practice in this course will serve to greatly enhance and improve a student’s ability to comprehend, analyze, and notate music in a traditional style. Receives one credit. Open to students in forms 4-6 with permission of instructor.

Wind Ensemble (Year) The Wind Ensemble is open to advanced wind, brass, and percussion students. Attention is focused on advanced wind ensemble literature as well as transcriptions of well-known orchestral composers. The ensemble performs several times a year on campus and in the community. Receives one credit. Entrance by recommendation or audition only. Open to students in Forms 4- 6. This course will not be offered during the 2018 - 19 school year.

Private Instrumental and Voice Instruction Families who seek to arrange private vocal or instrumental lessons may contact Creative Arts Department Chair Todd Millen for the names and contact information of local music professionals who offer these services. Times may be arranged directly with these tutors during or after school.

THEATER ELECTIVES

Intro to Acting (Fall) This acting course is designed to introduce students to the basic skills needed of a stage actor. Beginning with an understanding of how to control and utilize the voice and body, this course will use classical and modern techniques to strengthen the actor’s instrument. Using sense memory, characterization, and personalization, the students will begin to develop vocabulary and strategies to achieve effective actions on stage. Receives one-half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

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Creative Arts


Scene Study (Spring) In this course, students will strengthen their skills as actors through studying and rehearsal of scenes from important works of drama. Through utilizing these texts, actors will create believable worlds in which communication with their scene partners is the key to achieving their goals. Action, objective, obstacle, physical gesture, and personalization will be emphasized and developed to help actors live truthfully in the moment of the play. Receives one- half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Public Speaking (Fall, Spring) This course offers practice in public speaking emphasizing both style and content. Assignments focus on the elements that make for effective presentation of ideas as well as the skills of effective communication in both prepared and impromptu settings. Several activities, such as debate, speed talking, and storytelling lead to greater student independence via daily presentation of material. Formal speeches, including research presentations, political campaigns, personal stories, and instructional lectures will be written, practiced, and presented in class. Receives one- half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Stagecraft (Fall, Spring) This introductory course covers the backstage operation of the theater, including how to hang focus- and cablelighting instruments and how to set up and operate sound equipment, including microphones, amplifiers, and mixers. Students learn how to load and operate the theater fly system and the principles of stage rigging. Students also learn how to operate the woodworking equipment in the scene shop and participate in building sets for productions in Roberts Theater. They often work with artists from the Goodman Banks Series or other professional dance and theatrical companies that rent the theater. Receives one-half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Design for Theater (Spring) This course is an introduction to set and lighting design. Students study computer-aided drafting and create designs for classical and one-act plays in addition to studying differing styles of design and composition for individual projects. Lighting design techniques are taught through chosen plays. Receives one- half credit. Open to students in Forms 4-6. Prerequisite: Stagecraft and department approval.

Winter Musical Theater Production (Winter Athletic Season) Students may participate in the winter Musical Theater Production in lieu of a winter sport. Auditions are held in early December, and rehearsals begin the following week. Students are expected to attend five days of rehearsal per week during the after-school sports period. The time will be devoted to learning music, characterization, blocking, and choreography. Students will always be involved in one of the rehearsal settings, or will work on improvisation and ensemble skills to help develop their inner lives for their various characters in the production. There will also be non-performing opportunities for stage managers, production assistants, rehearsal accompanists, backstage crew, and hair/makeup/costume crew. The musical will be performed at the end of the winter sports season. Open to students in Forms 3- 6; the cast of the musical is selected by audition only.

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Kingswood Oxford’s Course of Study 2018-2019

Creative Arts


VISUAL ARTS ELECTIVES

Foundations in Art (Fall, Spring) Foundations in Art is where you’ll begin your journey in our Upper School Visual Arts program. This course is designed for students of all artistic backgrounds, providing skill building with a variety of media and encouraging creative thinking and visual expression through each student’s unique interpretation of assignment prompts. The course will highlight drawing as a form of communication, color as an expressive element, and the design of forms in space through sculpture. Emphasis is placed on individual growth and development. Receives one- half credit. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Outside the Box: Innovations in Art (Fall, Spring) Outside the Box is for students who want to venture beyond the traditional approaches of representation in art to discover new ways of interpreting and documenting the world they live in. Beginning with a shared conceptual theme or problem to solve, students in this class will have complete freedom to select and/or invent materials and processes that will open doors to new ways of thinking about how art can be made, how people or communities can collaborate to have shared creative experiences, and how innovative thinking can draw upon multiple fields of study in solving a creative problem or communicating ideas. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Foundations in Art. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Drawing (Fall, Spring) In this course, students will discover the expressive and descriptive possibilities that drawing holds as an art form. Students will learn to use drawing as a form of communication while exploring the formal elements of line, value, color, and composition. Students will work from observation and imagination as they explore a number of different drawing tools to investigate various stylistic and conceptual approaches to drawn images. Emphasis is placed on individual growth and development. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Foundations in Art. Open to students in Forms 3-6. Page 56 of 60

Kingswood Oxford’s Course of Study 2018-2019

Creative Arts


Sculpture 1 (Fall, Spring) This course is where sculpture materials and creative ideas come together. We will learn a variety of techniques used to create sculptural objects, and explore different ways a sculpture can deliver a message. Processes include wood construction, modelling in clay, plaster carving, and the endless possibilities of working with found objects. There’s something for everyone in this course; from traditional clay modelling to thinking outside the box while turning everyday objects into works of art. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Foundations in Art. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Printmaking 1 (Fall) This course introduces students to the printed mark, exploring both traditional methods and more contemporary approaches to the graphic arts. Students will explore the creative possibilities as they experiment with a variety of processes including, relief, intaglio, collagraph, and monoprinting. Students will be challenged to create layered, dynamic compositions focused on a theme of their choosing that may incorporate drawing, collage, and painting. Emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking skills, as students venture into complex visual ideas and compositions with a goal of fostering an individual artistic voice. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Foundations in Art. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Printmaking 2 (Fall) This course continues students’ exploration of Printmaking I, introducing them to more complex printing methods and building upon their basic printmaking foundation, both visual and conceptual. Students explore different printmaking materials and techniques, including intaglio, relief, monoprint, and artist books. The pace of work is faster, and there are higher expectations with regard to the integration of the form and meaning of each project as well as their use of the basic art elements to produce more dynamic compositions. This course is for self-motivated students who are willing to pursue ambitious and more independent projects. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Printmaking 1. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Painting 2 (Fall) This course is for students who want to continue their exploration of painting as a form of communication and expression. Students will study a diverse range of painting styles and techniques to help inform their work as they strengthen their skills and discover new ways of using paint and color as a creative medium. Students in this class will be encouraged to pursue their own vision and personal style. We will end the semester with an independent project designed to allow each student to delve deeper into a subject matter that interests them. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Painting 1. Open to students in Forms 4-6.

Painting 1 (Spring) Painting 1 is for students who want to explore the creative and expressive qualities of color. We begin with an introduction to the basic techniques of painting and color theory. Students will develop an understanding of how color can be used to describe and express forms, ideas, and emotions. This course will introduce students to a diverse range of approaches to painting from observational representation to expressive abstraction. Receives onehalf credit. Prerequisite: Foundations in Art. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

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Kingswood Oxford’s Course of Study 2018-2019

Creative Arts


Sculpture 2 (Spring) Clay, cardboard, duct tape, papier-mâché, wood, wire, screws, and paint may all be used to construct sculptures, and in this course, the options are wide open. Using open-ended prompts as a starting point, students will apply their building skills and imagination to create their own unique sculptures. As a part of the independent nature of this course, students will research the methods and work of sculptors throughout history and the present day to give context to their own work. Receives one- half credit. Prerequisite: Sculpture 1. Open to students in Forms 3-6.

Advanced Studio Seminar (Spring) This is a course for advanced or post-Portfolio Prep students who would like to chart a more independent course of study. This is a completely student centered course which allows students to communicate ideas without the teacher specifying the medium. Since the central aspect is the development and construction of creative content, students may use any of the studio facilities – from computers to easels – for projects whose direction is independently generated and maintained. The seminar is framed by a weekly think tank – a critique session where students and advising faculty can discuss and evaluate concepts and projects as they unfold. Receives one-half credit. Prerequisite: completion of at least one advanced media arts or advanced visual arts course and/or department approval. Open to students in Form 5-6.

Portfolio Preparation (Year) This course is for dedicated art students. Whether you’re planning on studying art in college or simply a serious artist--submitting a strong portfolio of art work work can be an important element in your collegeapplication. Throughout the course, students will use a wide variety of media to explore both traditional and experimental means of creating images, with a growing emphasis on cultivating a personal creative process. The course culminates with the selection and documentation of each student’s strongest work in the creation of their digital portfolio. Receives one credit. Open to students in Forms 5-6 with department approval.

Advanced Placement® Art History (Year) This course examines the nature of art, its uses, and its meanings across diverse cultures from prehistory to the present day. Through daily slide presentations, seminars, papers, and assessments, this course prepares students for the Advanced Placement® Exam, which students are expected to take in the spring. Students learn and apply skills of visual, contextual, and comparative analysis to engage a variety of artforms. AP® Art History fosters an in-depth and holistic approach to the history of art from a global perspective, culminating in a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Receives one credit. Open to students in Forms 5-6 who have completed two semester electives in the creative arts.

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Kingswood Oxford’s Course of Study 2018-2019

Technology


TECHNOLOGY >>MIDDLE SCHOOL Upper Prep Tech (Quarter) This introductory course is designed to expose our youngest students to the technological components they will need to survive as a KO student. They will learn to navigate the KO email system and learn the proper etiquette for being a responsible digital citizen in an academic setting and the greater world. Students will also have opportunities to demonstrate their creativity while exploring many of the tools they will use in their academic classes. Upper Prep Tech coordinates with the Upper Prep Academic Team in order to teach students the tools they will utilize in their classes. Different ways to present material such as PowerPoint, Prezi, Google Slides and Padlet are presented along with the benefits of using each. Students learn how to conduct an internet search, find data and learn how to analyze it using a spreadsheet. Finally, students learn how to use the Google environment which includes Classroom, Drive, Docs, Gmail, Sites and Slides. All Upper Prep students take this course in the first quarter of the year in order to ensure that all students have the necessary technological skills to excel in their sixth grade year.

Coding (Quarter) This course introduces students to the basics of computer programming with an emphasis on visual storytelling. Students begin by exploring the history of computer science in an effort to better understand our contemporary digital world. Students will then be introduced to rational, analytic, and computational thinking in preparation for learning how to write code to support their creative ideas. Students will explore a variety of programming languages and environments (Blockly, Scratch, JavaScript, and HTML) to create animations and other digital content. The goal of this course is to explore a variety of languages and environments to better appreciate the ubiquity of code in disciplines as diverse as computer science, art, and engineering. No previous knowledge of computer programming is necessary.

Form 2: Robotics -- FLL (FIRST Lego League) Challenge (Semester -- Fall) This course allows students to be immersed in real-world science and technology challenges, and it represents an entrance platform onto the KO FLL team. Students will help design solutions to a current scientific question or problem and build autonomous LEGO robots that perform a series of missions. The FIRST Challenge Program has three components: The Robot Game, The Project, and The Core Values. Students will engage in all three dimensions of the challenge as everyone contributes to the team's accomplishments. This is a full, Fall semester course. Open to students in Form 2.

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Kingswood Oxford’s Course of Study 2018-2019

HEALTH & WELLNESS


HEALTH & WELLNESS >>MIDDLE SCHOOL Life Skills I (Quarter) In Form 1, students are enrolled in Life Skills I. This class is designed to introduce students to issues that are relevant to their developmental phase as young adolescents. Students learn about nutrition, self-esteem, managing stress, managing peer pressure, drugs and alcohol, and puberty. Students explore these topics through class discussions, research and independent projects. Additionally, students will be introduced to and will practice mindfulness for a few minutes each class period.

Life Skills II (Quarter) In Form 2, students are enrolled in Life Skills II, a course designed to introduce them to topics relevant to healthy social and emotional development. The curriculum covers leadership, language and communication, friendship, technology safety, media literacy, drugs and alcohol, and sexual health, among others. Students explore these topics through class discussions, research, and independent and group projects. Additionally, students will be introduced to and will practice mindfulness for a few minutes each class period.

>>UPPER SCHOOL VQV (Fall) Vincit qui se vincit. "One conquers by conquering oneself." During their first semester, Form 3 students take a weekly seminar, Vincit qui se vincit (VQV). Named for the School's motto, VQV classes are designed to help students "conquer themselves" as they transition into high school. Classes are taught by the school counselor and include the following topics: friendship, relationships, motivation, sex education and media. These are all examined through the lens of mindfulness.

Global Online Academy KO students began taking rigorous, innovative online classes in September 2013 through a partnership with the Global Online Academy (GOA), a consortium of leading independent schools from around the world. GOA courses allow students the flexibility to learn at their own pace, at any time of day and from anywhere. They also provide students the opportunity to study something they are passionate about, test their organization and time management skills, come in contact with alternative viewpoints and perspectives and build relationships with teachers and students in from 70+ schools and 15 different countries. In addition, GOA students acquire a host of valuable information and communication technology (ICT) skills by setting up video conferences across time zones, working collaboratively on assignments synchronously and asynchronously using Google Apps for Education, and navigating and publishing work on a learning management system. GOA courses are open to students in Forms 4 - 6. For a list of GOA courses for 2018-2019 visit www.globalonlineacademy.org/student-program/courses

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Kingswood Oxford’s Course of Study 2018-2019

Global Online Academy

Course of Study 2018-19  
Course of Study 2018-19  
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