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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Looking at potential candidates Obama could face in 2012, 1B

Central Michigan University

Boxing instructor has been teaching since 2008, ending classes, 3A

| Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011

[cm-life.com]

Fact-finder favors CMU on FA pay, benefits Sides with faculty on retirement, promotion increments By Annie Harrison Senior Reporter

A state fact-finder is supporting administration proposals on salaries and health care benefits in its negotiations with the Faculty Association. Fact finder Barry Goldman’s non-binding set of findings came Tuesday in an attempt to break an impasse in the four-month old contract talks, in which mediation already has failed. In findings for Central Michi-

Reactions mixed on report by state fact-finder

gan University proposed zeropercent salary increase for 201112 and small increases in years two and three, Goldman dismissed the FA’s contention that CMU had $228 million in unrestricted net assets that could be used to fund more generous raises. “The CMU proposal of a zero increase in the first year and modest increases in subsequent years is not an unreasonable offer, all things considered. Circumstances (in the Michigan

economy) are bad and getting worse. It would be extremely unwise for CMU to eat its seed corn,” Goldman said of the union’s contention. He also called CMU’s position on maintaining all employees on a less expensive heath care insurance plan “eminently fair,” saying that if FA members want the more expensive MESSA plan, its members alone should pay the difference. Further, Goldman said the FA’s proposal to give 12-month faculty a $600 signing bonus once the contract is resolved might be illegal. “Laudable as that goal may be, there is some question

D av i d s m i t h

CLASH

currently in place are more generous than ‘market.’ But I am going to assume that those increments were bargained into existence by competent negotiators acting in good faith,” he said. “The record before me does not show sufficient grounds to roll them back.” Goldman recommended the faculty members be required no more than one annual meeting with each non-tenured faculty member. He agreed with CMU that annual meetings with nontenured faculty are a good idea, but he also agreed with the FA that it was “redundant and

A cmu | 2a

laura frey

Academic Senate approves resolution to halt further action on medical college By Mike Nichols | Senior Reporter and Sammy Dubin | Staff Reporter

By Annie Harrison Senior Reporter

e r n est yo d e r

Mark Minelli

“At the heart of this motion is to get the university to be more forthcoming on the medical school.” Phil Squattrito, chemistry professor and former chairman of A-Senate

George Ross photos by charlotte bodak and jeff smith/photo staff

y e s : 76 p e r c e n t n o : 24 p e r c e n t

[INSIDE]

“Is (the administration) made of the young sapling maples that are peaceful students that really do speak their mind?” Joseph Finck, physics professor

video coverage w Watch Facebook, Twitter for a video of the meeting

In a hushed auditorium Tuesday, David Smith addressed the Academic Senate about what he called the “elephant in the room” regarding the College of Medicine. Smith, a professor of philosophy and religion, presented a resolution, which said “all work by, toward, and on behalf of the College of Medicine pertaining to curriculum, non-curricular policies and procedures, and faculty recruitment be suspended until such time as the above concerns have been addressed by and to the satisfaction of the Academic Senate.” The resolution with a 76-percent vote to halt further action was approved. However, it is unclear whether or not the motion will legitimately suspend action on CMED or remain symbolic. Phil Squattrito, a chemistry professor and former chairman, said although the A-Senate has control over curriculum, there is debate over who has authority over CMED. The A-Senate did adopt the CMED curriculum last year, but it was expected to be more involved with the process. “At the heart of this motion is to get the university to be more forthcoming on the medical school,” Squattrito said.

A fact-finding | 2a

w CBA ranks well in Academic Prioritization, 3A w Gary Shapiro talks prioritization in open forum, 3A w Editorial: Is CMED dissension too little, too late?, 4A

The fact-finder agreed with CMU’s argument to eliminate language regarding payments to faculty members attaining terminal degrees. Goldman agreed with the FA’s promotion increment argument that CMU’s proposal to roll back amounts to pre-2006-07 levels and allow the increments to rise back to 2010-11 levels over the next two years would penalize those who obtained promotions in 2011 and 2012. The loss to base would compound those faculty members for the rest of their careers, according to the FA’s argument. “Perhaps, as the university argues, the promotion increments

CMED

CMU ‘looks forward’ to agreement

Director of Public Relations Steve Smith said Central Michigan University looks forward to using factfinding recommendations to reach an agreement with the Faculty Association. “From the beginning of negotiations with the Faculty Association, our goal has been to reach a collective bargaining agreement that is fair and equitable to all parties,” he said in an email. “With the recommendations of the independent, third-party fact-finder now in hand, we look forward to moving quickly toward reaching an agreement.” Fact-finder Barry Goldman’s non-binding recommendations were released Tuesday. FA President Laura Frey declined to comment but the FA bargaining team reviewed the report Tuesday evening. Chris Benison, president of the Students for Faculty registered student organization, said he believes Goldman gave his best advice to both parties involved in the contract negotiation. “My general impression is that Mr. Goldman did make an attempt to be as fair and impartial as possible given the circumstances,” the Mount Pleasant senior said. Benison, who is married to Kathleen Benison, professors of Geology and Meteorology, said his reaction to the fact-finder’s report was “neither favorable or unfavorable.” He said he is noncommittal because the report is non-binding and it will be up to the FA to review the specifics of the report.

whether the proposed bonus would violate Public Act 54’s prohibition against retroactive benefit increases,” he said. “I find the record before me does not justify the bonus.” Regarding retirement, the fact-finder sided with the FA and rejected CMU’s proposal for retirement contribution for those on a 10-percent plan to be based on base salary only. “I do not see any compelling reason for the change to contributions calculated on base salary only,” he said. “The fact that the university could save the money is not sufficient to justify eliminating an existing, bargained-for benefit.”

A-Senate voted to halt development of CMED.

A-Senate’s constitution states insofar as it is charged to “consider any matter relevant to the general welfare of the faculty” and to “deliberate and legislate upon matters of concern to the faculty, involving students, staff, instruction, financial policies, university planning and university organization when related to academic affairs.” The constitution states several concerns they can deliberate, including: Standards for appointment, promotion, tenure and dismissal of faculty members; except as covered by collective bargaining agreements. It is still undecided if CMED faculty will be includ-

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

ed in the Faculty Association, since the contract negotiations are at an inpasse. Squattrito, Director of Public Relations Steve Smith and A-Senate Chairman Jim McDonald all said the area in the constitution was gray, and were unsure what authority A-Senate has in the matter. The concerns regarded the university’s lack of detailed account about the feasibility of the CMED with the ASenate, faculty and students. The main complaint of the motion was the university’s lack of public communication and low participation with faculty and students.

A a-senate | 2a


2A || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || central michigan life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY w A Secret Sale will be held from noon to 3 p.m. at the Central Michigan University Bookstore. w Nuremburg: Its Lesson for Today will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Education and Human Services Building’s Lecture Hall, room 118. w Cycle to Modern Family will be from 8:45 to 9:45 p.m. at the Student Activity Center’s Cycling Center.

THURSDAY w The Department of Journalism will hold an Internship Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Bovee University Center’s Rotunda. w Fiction Writer Kelcey Parker will be speaking from 8 to 9 p.m. in the Charles V. Park Library’s Baber Room.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2011 Volume 93, Number 32

cMu |

fact-finDinG |

Fact-finding recommendations

CONTINUED FROM 1A

pointless” to require so many. He recommended current contract language on salary adjustment and reappointment applications. “I see no compelling reason on this record either to extend the period before a faculty member can apply for a salary adjustment or to reduce the number of reappointment applications required before a tenure application would be required,” he said. Goldman recommended a blending of the CMU and FA proposals on tuition remission. He said he sees no reason to increase the number of eligible credits or extend the program to courses taken outside of CMU, and also sees no reason the program should not apply to CMED or any other CMU program if it is capped as the FA suggests. Goldman did not give a recommendation on recognizing coaches hired on or after July 1, 2011 or faculty who are primarily appointed to the College of Medicine or other CMU First Professional Degree programs. He agreed with the FA’s argument that the issue of unit composition was not properly before him and adopted a past fact-finder’s ruling that the proposal will not be addressed in the report because both parties have not submitted the issue to the fact-finder.

CONTINUED FROM 1A

Salary: Recommendation: University’s proposal to freeze wages first year with modest increases next two years

“It’s my hope that the issuance of the fact-finder’s report will encourage the administration to reopen fair and equitable contract negotiations with the CMU FA,” he said. Michelle Campbell, a representative of Students for Faculty RSO, said the factfinding report is very similar to what she expected, and her biggest concern is with the recommendations on faculty salaries. The Cedar Springs graduate student said she believes the fact-finder used faulty reasoning about Michigan’s economy to accept CMU’s proposal. “There are some assumptions that are underlying this

Benefits: Recommendation: University’s proposal to give FA same amount for benefits as other employees. FA can choose MESSA if they pay the difference Letter of Agreement X: Recommendation: University’s proposal not to give 12-month faculty a $600 signing bonus Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion Policies: Recommendation: Current language. Fact-finder disagrees with both sides Salary Adjustments for Promotion and Completion of Appropriate Terminal Degree: Recommendation regarding eliminating language: University’s proposal to remove language about faculty attaining terminal degrees Recommendation regarding promotion increments: FA’s proposal not to change the Professor Salary Adjustment timeline

Dr. Gary Ralph, a board-certified psychiatrist in mid-Michigan since 1993, is now accepting new clients for outpatient psychiatric services. A native of Philadelphia, Dr. Ralph maintains diverse clinical practice in both hospital and community settings. He welcomes the opportunity to work with clients in a collaborative manner, both in the development and attainment of treatment goals.

Recognition: Recommendation: University’s proposal to keep the current contract language Conferences for Assistance to Bargaining Unit Members: Recommendation: FA’s proposal of no more than one annual meeting with each non-tenured faculty member

“I will stand firm that any increase in student tuition due to CMED is absolutely unacceptable,” said the Clinton Township senior in an email. “Having said that, if CMED can be funded from outside sources and maintained by the tuition of students attending that college, I take no issue with that.” ARGUMENTS INSUE At one point in the meeting, Laura Frey, Faculty Association president and associate professor of counseling and special education, corrected Ross when he stated the faculty went on a strike. “Just a semantic clarification, it was a legal work stoppage,” Frey said. “With all due respect, I disagree,” Ross responded. “It was an illegal strike and you can put that in the record.” The meeting took another turn as physics Professor Joseph Finck sarcastically questioned Ross on what his cabinet was made of. “Is it made of tall oaks like faculty that can withstand all the changes that are happening? Is it made of the young sapling maples that are peaceful students that really do speak their mind?” Finck asked. After laughter from those in attendance, he continued by

OTHER BUSINESS Claudia Douglass, interim vice president of Academic Affairs, spoke on the strategic planning process as a cochair. Douglass asked the senate why they bother to engage in strategic planning. Douglass brought up CMU 2010 Vision Fund which, according to the Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs website, “was established by the president to demonstrate institutional commitment to the outcomes of the five priorities in the strategic plan. One million per year for the five years of the plan (totaling $5 million) was allocated to provide seed money for innovative projects that promised to move CMU toward successfully achieving those priorities.” In order to prevent this from happening again, it’s essential to engage multiple parties at many levels, she said.

CONTINUED FROM 1A

university@cm-life.com

Board-Certified Psychiatrist

Tuition Remission: Recommendation: A blend of both proposals

saying, “Or is it made of weeping willow administrators who bow and sway with the wind or deans who are invasive species? The question is, is this cabinet someone who is beholding to you or are you getting advice from people who will speak freely?” Ross stood by the work his administration has done. “That was real cute,” he responded. “There is not one ‘yes person’ there, if that’s a direct question, that’s a direct answer.”

document that are very problematic and there is some logic underlying this document that is very problematic,” she said. Just because the economy is struggling in Michigan does not mean that things are going to be bad for CMU, Campbell said. She said Goldman assumes CMU is going to save unrestricted assets for a “rainy day fund” instead of paying the faculty, but CMU has not said anything about how the money will be used. “My interpretation of that is he’s confusing correlation and causation,” Campbell said.

Dr. Gary Ralph

Retirement: Recommendation: FA’s proposal to keep the current contract language

university@cm-life.com

a-senate | McDonald had been asked to withhold debate over the motion. He would not disclose where this decision came from. “I think it’s been discussed in my parliamentary inquiries that perhaps it is my discretion to do this without debate,” he said. University President George Ross said he wished there had been open debate on the topic. As the next step, he said he would discuss the motion with the administration and get back to the A-Senate. Ross said he would do his best to respond before the Liaison Committee on Medical Education’s visit to campus Nov. 13. One of the concerns included in the motion included the absence of Ernest Yoder, founding dean of CMED, from A-Senate meetings since Jan. 8. Yoder did attend Tuesday’s meeting and said he has a busy schedule and unless the A-Senate’s agenda specifically deals with CMED, he has other work to do. “I don’t intend to devalue the Academic Senate,” Yoder said. “It’s just that I can’t always be here.” Student Government Association President Vince Cavataio said he would like to see the administration answer the senators’ questions.

cm-life.com/category/news

[NEWS]

“It was something that maybe you didn’t engage in, it was something that you felt might have been underfunded, maybe you felt some of the initiatives just fell flat,” Douglass said. A bachelor of science in computer engineering degree, and a master of science in administration-research administration, graduate concentration and graduate Certificate were added as new programs. Deleted programs included BSED Elementary certificate history major K-8, and a Teaching Elementary K-8, BSED Elementary Certificate history minor.

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3A

INSIDE LIFE Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Theresa Clift, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Shapiro fields questions about prioritization at forum By Mike Nichols Senior Reporter

The preliminary Academic Prioritization report of Central Michigan University is going through its round of analysis by the CMU community. Provost Gary Shapiro, the author of the report, held an open forum Monday afternoon in the Charles V. Park Library Auditorium. About 50 people attended to ask him questions about the implications of the report. According to the report,

about one-third of CMU’s 401 academic programs are listed to either receive less support or be targeted for elimination. Shapiro will turn in his finalized report to University President George Ross in December and expects to make the changes starting in the spring semester. Shapiro said there were four aspects that determined the ranking of the colleges — quality, importance, potential for growth and potential for improvement. Faculty made reports on their programs and gave them to the

deans, meaning there should not be any major surprises in the rankings, Shapiro said. “In most cases, we accepted the rankings of the department,” he said. “It should be no surprise for anyone when they say, ‘I rated my program a three, and then my dean gave me a three and it’s ranked at a three.’” Prioritization dealt only with currently existing programs with one exception — the College of Medicine. Shapiro said it was a unique category and they had to approach it differently.

Although not in use, Shapiro said it did deserve its priority one ranking. “We looked at it in terms of potential costs and benefits,” Shapiro said. “Yes, it’s a priority one program.” Salma Ghanem, dean of the College Communications and Fine Arts, asked about students currently enrolled in programs targeted for elimination. Shapiro said the university has an ethical commitment to students in such programs and appropriations would be made for them. In some cases,

the university might offer lower enrollment for a class or use a directive reading course. Whatever they decide for each program, Shapiro said the students are more important than the costs. “Even though it might cost us some dollars in the short term, we need to do it ethically for those students,” he said. “They’ll be able to complete their courses.” Jeff Davies, a Commerce sophomore, was one of the few students who attended the forum. He went because he said

he was interested in which programs were going to be cut. Davies, who is studying broadcast and cinematic arts, said he was pleased to see his program was ranked in priority one. He felt academic prioritization was a good process that would help the university move forward with the future. “I’m pretty excited they’re doing something,” he said. “I agree we need to focus on certain areas to change and develop.”

A FORUM | 5A

B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

College ranks well in priority report Dean Crespy: Rankings are ‘no surprise’ By Mike Nichols Senior Reporter

Editor’s note: This is the second story in a series about Academic Prioritization.

PHOTOS BY PERRY FISH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Vestaburg resident Lonnie McQueen works out by punching a speed bag Tuesday morning at Morey Courts, 5175 E. Remus Road. McQueen teaches boxing and self defense classes at Morey Courts to adults and children. “I am happy,” McQueen said. “I have a passion.”

The Last Punch Boxing instructor ends classes; Morey Courts to replace with Zumba By Kirsten Kearse | Staff Reporter

Vestaburg resident Lonnie McQueen will be soon throwing his last punch as an instructor in the boxing ring of Morey Courts. He started teaching boxing in 1998 and has taught in Mount Pleasant since 2008. In Mount Pleasant he began at JP’s Gym until its closure, then moved on to teaching at Morey Courts, 5175 E. Remus Road. “I would like to help the community and even CMU,” McQueen said. “Just a little bit of self defense goes a long way.” Mount Pleasant resident Chip Neyome, who occasionally fills in for McQueen when needed, said McQueen is very personable, happy and outgoing. “As far as first impressions go,

he’s really open to people, so anybody can come in and box,” he said. Bringing people up to the ring can be intimidating, but McQueen said he is trying to build

Vestaburg resident Lonnie McQueen wraps his hand before doing his boxing warm up Tuesday morning at Morey Courts. McQueen started boxing at the age of 9-years-old after his father built a boxing ring for him and his brothers. “My oldest brother told me, ‘You’re going to be great,’” McQueen said.

their self-esteem. McQueen built the boxing ring at Morey Courts from scratch by himself two years ago with funds from his sponsorship with Everlast.

Now, Morey Courts wants the ring removed by the end of November, making it so McQueen will be unable to teach his classes. A BOXING | 5A

The College of Business Administration ranked as an overall favorable program in preliminary Academic Prioritization released Thursday. Karl Smart, business information systems chairman, said the data was collected by forms filled out by the faculty and deans. The forms looked at programs’ demand, the student enrollments for the past five years, the role of the professors, the occupational projection and other qualifications. Smart said he wrote the majority of the narratives that were submitted to Provost Gary Shapiro. Smart said no one has brought forward appeals to the findings. “No one has voiced complaint,” Smart said. “The faculty were pleased with what the ratings were.” The college designed a new international business and sustainable development minor and applied business practices minor. Charles Crespy, CBA dean, said in an email prioritization was essentially developing a roadmap for the future of the programs. In an email sent to his staff after the report was released, Crespy said the department had already done a respectable job redesigning their programs. When it came time to prioritize, the faculty and staff were already ready to rank their programs, he said. “There’s really no surprise,” Crespy said. “Most of the faculty in the programs that were likely to see some retrenchment

were aware of that.” Crespy said the college had a global business minor that became obsolete after the creation of a newer and more current international business and sustainable development minor. The new program helped students understand money as well as sustainable impact. The new program was ranked a category 3 and the old was ranked a category 5. It was a perfect example of why prioritization is needed, Crespy said. “We have a program now that addresses issues that are important today that weren’t issues yesterday,” he said. “That’s probably the best example of what prioritization is about.” The operations management BS in BA major is ranked a 5, and will be relocated to another program. It is one of the smallest majors in the college with 21 signed majors this fall, Shapiro wrote in the report. “The curriculum has not been significantly revised for decades,” Shapiro said. “One of the four regular faculty will retire in 2012.” The marketing BS in BA major with a retail strategy concentration is ranked a five as well. It is a small program with little added value to students, Shapiro said, and the department lacks faculty expertise in this area. The retail management major BS in BA also received a 5, and Shaprio said there was no need for the program. “Retailing major provides little if any additional value for program graduates. Retailers hire from all majors,” he said. The gaming and entertainment concentration of hospitality services administration BS in BA received a 5 since only 9 students selected the program in Spring 2011.

A REPORT | 5A

Fifth year for classroom renewal brings unsuccessful changes By Tony Wittkowski Staff Reporter

The 10 worst classrooms have been renovated over the summer each year, as part of the future living/learning classroom renewal. This year, some laboratories in Brooks Hall have been renovated to fit 24 students instead of 18. But to some professors and students, the changes were only minor and made the rooms too crowded. “The changes that were made were cosmetic and the rooms remained the same size,” said Martin Steinbis, Earth and atmospheric sciences adjunct. “Creating a computer lab was the highlight of the renovation.” Steinbis said the chairs and desks were too small and the commercial carpeting was important to the classroom

environment. Linoleum floors were put in, which caused the acoustics of the room to suffer. “What was done is nice, the lights and partial blinds are nice,” Steinbis said. “We just have to allow enough space to teach in.” Gladwin senior Anthony Vanhorn said he felt there could have been more done for Brooks Hall. “It’s hard to quantify with the combination of the geology and meteorology departments,” Vanhorn said. “We are already congested.” From 2008 to 2011, 47 classrooms and auditoriums have been renewed through the project. Anspach Hall has received the most classroom renewals, at 15 classrooms and one auditorium. Pearce Hall comes in second with nine classrooms and one auditorium, and Brooks Hall

comes in third with six classrooms and labs. In 2007, Jessica Ebels, director of academic space and remodeling, started evaluating each classroom on campus and chose the 10 worst rooms each year to be renovated. “I went through every single classroom and rated them based on several categories,” Ebels said. All 330 rooms were given a rating between one and four, with one representing the poorest condition. If a room was given a four, then it was not a candidate for replacement, Ebels said. “During renovation, the lighting is being redone, there is window treatment, some flooring and sometimes a chair rail is added,” Ebels said. There was also an addition of new painted walls, furniture and an upgrade in technology accounting for

2008-2011 completed projects Future Living/Learning Classroom Renewal Anspach Hall – 15 classrooms, 1 auditorium Brooks Hall – 6 classrooms Dow Hall – 1 classroom Grawn Hall – 3 classrooms Moore Hall – 4 classrooms Pearce Hall – 9 classrooms, 1 auditorium Powers Hall – 4 rooms Rowe Hall – 2 classrooms Sloan Hall – 1 classroom the projectors in some of the classes, including those in Anspach Hall.

PERRY FISH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kalamazoo senior Ian McCaffrey works on homework Wednesday evening in Brooks Hall Room 307 meteorology lab. Room 307 is one of the classrooms renovated over the summer. McCaffrey said while he finds the rooms comfortable he thinks they could be improved.

“The goal was to improve the environment for the students we’re trying to impact,”

Ebels said.

A RENEWAL | 5A


4A

VOICES Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Theresa Clift, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Brad Canze, Staff Reporter

Eric Dresden Editor-in-Chief

A website in transition Saturday morning cm-life.com went down and it has yet to recover. For those checking on the football game, our site was unresponsive and others looking for information related to Central Michigan University couldn’t find the news they wanted to read. For that I can only say this: I sincerely apologize. This should have been better planned. During the past several weeks, the newspaper has undergone many problems with an old server (which was equipped to only send five requests to the server simultaneously; anymore and it would cause errors). Some avid readers may have seen the consistent ‘503 error’ that became a regular problem throughout the day. The newer server will eliminate this problem. I understand frustration with this and I can agree — I’m one of several members on this staff running with little sleep this week until this problem is resolved. The new server will give readers a better chance to read our information without errors and will ultimately create a better website. Some people did ask if Central Michigan University had taken the site down because of several stories we published Friday, including one on Academic Prioritization and departments opposing CMED. Let me make this clear, CMU didn’t have anything to do with our server being down. CMU does not have any authority over me, this newspaper or what it publishes in print or online. But like I said before, this process is not easy or simple but rather difficult when dealing with a website that still has some cobwebs from when it was created 11 years ago. Getting the new server is just step one in a series of moves Central Michigan Life has to make to continue to create great content and focus on the university as a whole. For those of you upset, as I said before, you have my sincerest apologies. I can understand your frustration. I want to keep people as enthralled as I am with the current stories going on at CMU and the online product is more important than anything else in getting this news out. Looking forward, I expect the website to be down only a short while longer. Currently, we are using our Twitter and Facebook, as well as a Tumblr, http:// cmlife.tumblr.com, to give as much information as we can. The moment the website is up we will promote it in full-force. We will continue to strive to give you the news through as many means necessary.

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805 Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

EDITORIAL | Adminstrators should heavily weigh opposition of medical school; concerns should be voiced

I

Divulging Dissent

t has become evident that there is widespread dissent to current plans for the College of Medicine throughout Central Michigan University.

The Academic Senate, two full academic departments and the Council of Chairs, made up of all department chairpeople, have voiced opposition to CMED as it currently stands. These actions would have been welcome sooner, but hopefully they are not so late as to be rendered futile. A-Senate passed a motion by a 76-24 percent vote to suspend all work toward CMED curriculum, policies, procedures and faculty recruitment. Both the department of journalism and the department of Earth and atmospheric sciences in recent weeks took a vote to oppose CMED if revenue from existing academic programs is used to fund it. The Council of Chairs sent a letter requesting a meeting with the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the group responsible for accrediting medical schools. The letter lists a number of grievances regarding the medical school and how it has been handled. It is understandable why these actions are coming now; last week saw Provost Gary Shapiro release his preliminary report on Academic Pri-

oritization and Monday saw the release of state-appointed fact-finder Barry Goldman’s report on the Faculty Association contract negotiations. Shapiro’s report recommended reducing funding to, cutting or consolidating onethird of programs on campus while giving CMED a hallowed No. 1 ranking. Goldman’s report had no specific recommendation on whether or not CMED faculty could be a part of the FA, and ruled in favor of the university on the matters of salary and benefits. There probably would have been better times to present such opposition — ­ in the case of the Academic Senate, for example, before they approved the CMED curriculum in 2010. This show of mass dissent by faculty, department heads and senators, no matter whether it has any effect, makes it clear that the administration, board of trustees and CMED deans need to stand up, pay attention and react appropriately. The financial plans for CMED need to be made public. The faculty, students and taxpayers deserve to know how much

they are paying to what. Up to this point, CMU has disclosed very little money pledged to CMED. If there is any money coming, it had better come quickly and CMU ought to disclose it immediately. Central Michigan Life’s editorial board has previously stated its opposition to the establishment of CMED, and continues to believe the money going into the medical school could be better used supporting and expanding the existing programs on campus. With this outpouring of opposition to the project, it is time for all those with a pertinent opinion make it heard. Departments, instructors and groups thereof should voice their support or dissent. Student groups, including and especially the Student Government Association, need to make clear whether or not this is the direction they want their university to be moving. Certainly taxpayers should do the like. State universities are supposed to act in the interest of the students and taxpayers they serve, so those parties need to make their interests known. If these interests are known and betrayed, major reconfiguration of the power structure governing CMU may be necessary.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

No such thing as fairytale endings

In preschool, they say boys are mean to girls on the playground because they like them. But past grade school, it’s just BS no girl should have to put up with. It is time for every girl to take off the rose-colored glasses and see that in reality, only a few men, yes I said men not boys, are going to respect you. I grew up watching Cinderella be swept away by her prince and Sleeping Beauty kissed back to life. But these images of a fairytale ending are fading from my mind as I grow older and realize the only decent man in my life right now is my dog, Jake. As I listened to my friends tell me “He’s not worth it” on repeat, I continued sending texts to the boy who ripped out my heart and smashed it to pieces without flinching. Now three months have passed since the moment I learned my “high school sweetheart” was still stuck in high school with the random girl he let give him a hickey. My whole life felt like it came crashing down all in one moment. The moment when, for the first time in three years, I didn’t know the person I was “best friends” with. The moment where I realized love means nothing. “I didn’t tell you because I didn’t want to hurt you,” runs through my head as I still try to organize what exactly happened on that night out with the guys. Even when we started talking again to try and forget his regret, he strayed once again. And now I sit here with a new stereotype of boys. When I was 16, I was the hopeless romantic who dreamt of the days I would tell my children how I met their dad in 10th grade. Fast forward three years and I second guess every smile, text, gesture and word any guy says. I don’t care anymore if you want to ask me on a date, flirt with me or “get to know me better” because I sure know I couldn’t care less about every male specimen at the moment. This is for all of the selfish animals who don’t know what the word “commitment” means and are singlehandedly ruining the fairytale some naïve girls still believe in. It is time for all of you to learn the difference between flirting and effing. But by the looks of it, no girl is going to put up with that any longer. With the divorce rate creeping up to 50 percent in America, the chances of finding a match are 50/50. In other words, marrying your best friend may not even work anymore, especially not when your best friend finds a new BFF to screw. But don’t worry too much girls, there are still those to give you a musical pep talk. “Who run the world?”

Central Michigan Life [LETTER TO THE EDITOR] As student representatives of the “Students for Faculty” RSO at Central Michigan University, we wish to express our concern and displeasure with the continuing contract negotiation impasse. Since we are chiefly interested in the speedy resolution of this issue, we assign the burden of blame to neither of the two parties involved in this protracted stalemate. However, we feel that the longer the administration allows the impasse to continue, the greater the chances irreparable harm will be done to CMU. Therefore, in the interests of a fair and equitable settlement, we as CMU students hereby petition the administration and board of trustees to accede to the CMU Faculty Association’s very reasonable requests regarding (1) reinstatement of meaningful and Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

effective shared governance between the CMU FA and the administration; (2) levels of compensation consistent with fair-market COLA adjustments; (3) a fair arrangement with regard to employee contributions to monthly health care premiums; and (4) the continuing unabridged right of department chairpersons, counselors, and library and coaching staff to associate with fellow colleagues as full members of the CMU FA. In addition to petitioning for these particular and reasonable requests, both for ourselves and on behalf of the CMU Faculty, we wish to formally declare a lack of support for the CMU College of Medicine. As CMU students with a vested interest in the longterm stability and viability of CMU, we are concerned that Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

continuing with the Medical School initiative jeopardizes the sustainability of CMU as a four-year undergraduate university institution. Moreover, we believe that the medical school initiative stands in diametric opposition to the erstwhile and present mission of CMU. By our own free will and through this published notice do we express our full and unqualified support for faculty and instructors at CMU, an educational institution of which we are very proud. The time for the administration and the board of trustees to do right by the CMU community came and went some time ago. Thank you very much. Chris Benison, Mount Pleasant senior Representative of Students for Faculty (an RSO at CMU) Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Theresa Clift, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lonnie Allen, Designers John Manzo, Sports Editor Matt Thompson, Assistant Sports Editor Jeff Smith, Photo Editor Andrew Kuhn, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Jackie Smith Online Coordinators Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || 5A

[NEWS]

REPORT | CONTINUED FROM 3A

BETHANY WALTER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Students watch as Paranormal Investigator and Medium Chris Fleming uses his spirit box to test radio frequencies for paranormal communication on Monday night in front of the CMU seal in the Warriner mall. “I’ve been having paranormal experiences since I was younger,” Fleming said. “I’m a normal person, I’ve just had some extraordinary experiences.”

Chris Fleming presents about paranormal, leads ghost hunt

Many business students did not seem to notice the prioritization release. “I hadn’t even heard about it,” said Canton junior Brad LaRose. LaRose is studying accounting and said all he heard was the majority of the accounting staff were ready to retire. Traverse City junior Jennifer Terbrack, also studying accounting, said she thinks prioritization was good because if professors are ready to retire, a new wave of younger professors could come in. Terbrack, along with every CMU student, has the documents available to her online, but she said she has not looked at it. “I got an email, but I didn’t really read it,” she said. university@cm-life.com

BOXING | CONTINUED FROM 3A

By Rachel Dybicki Staff Reporter

Can electronic voice phenomenon, or EVP, photos and videos reveal the truth about ghosts? On Halloween in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium, paranormal expert and TV host Chris Fleming gave a presentation on ghosts and other paranormal phenomena. In more than 35 years, Fleming has worked on more than 500 paranormal cases. He works with scientists and engineers to make equipment to hunt paranormal activity. Fleming said he believes activity is able to happen anywhere. “While I was giving my presentation, I saw something out of the corner of my eye and looked into the upper part of the auditorium,” he said. “There was a fast movement of a figure who then disappeared into the wall.” Fleming said he didn’t know what ghosts were, nor did

FORUM | CONTINUED FROM 3A

Shapiro said the university first discussed the prioritization process in July 2010. The plan was finalized that November and began in January. Although he had previously said there was no former prioritization, Shap-

he believe in them until he moved into a new house with his family when he was a child. Then he started seeing dark figures, apparitions, faces and ectoplasm (mist). After his experiences in the house, he said he has been able to sense and sometimes see any activity going on around him. “I’m definitely a believer because I’ve had many experiences throughout my childhood. I can relate to many of Chris’ stories. It’s kind of nice being able to relate to someone else,” said Livonia sophomore Andrea Shaw. “This experience was very interesting and a great way to celebrate Halloween.” After an hour of lecturing, Fleming took a small group of students around campus for a ghost hunt. Students had the chance to pick out any places they believed to be haunted. Many stories were called out and put to the test. Grand Ledge sophomore Deanna Staton attended the ghost hunt and said she was

very intrigued by what Fleming had to say. “It was interesting to actually be informed on all the different tactics and ways that people hunt for paranormal activity,” she said. “Chris explained things in depth, he didn’t just tell spooky ghost stories.” Fleming used devices such as his spirit box to pick up conversation from paranormal activity through radio waves. Shaw said any words could be heard and responses to questions were quite clear. Fleming told students ghosts and paranormal activity does indeed exist. “My reasoning for coming out and telling everyone my stories is to prove paranormal activity is real. It’s interesting to see everyone’s experiences and know how similar to mine they are,” Fleming said. “Many people don’t want to tell their stories because they’re embarrassed by them, but I’m here to let them know it’s okay.”

iro said he was mistaken and he thinks a form of it took place in the early ‘90s. In a meeting with Central Michigan Life on Monday, Shapiro said the possibility of using academic transformation, using more online resources to cut university costs, was considered by the administration as a separate initiative and was not related to prioritization.

Shapiro said it was difficult to mark some programs to be cut, but it is best for the future of CMU. Although some might say their program is just as important as all the others, Shapiro said it is not the case. “The answer, although it’s not politically correct, is no,” he said.

CONTINUED FROM 3A

However, it is not just classrooms that receive the renovation, but auditoriums as well. “The classes that are renovated are the ones that

Finance and Law: BLR UP Courses - 4 MHSA and Management: Purchasing and Supply Management Major - BS in BA - 4 Management: Management Minor - BA, BAA, BFA, BS - 4 Operations Management Major - BS in BA - 5 MHSA: Marketing Major - BS in BA (Retail Strategy Concentration) - 5 Hospitality Services Admin. - Major - BS in BA (Gaming & Entertainment Concentration) - 5 Retail Management Major - BS in BA - 5 Accounting: Accounting Information Systems - Major - 5 Undergraduate Business Studies Committee: Global Business Minor - BS in BA - 5 General Business Administration Major (Health Services Admin. Concentration) - BS in BA BIS: Information Systems Non-Business Minor - BA, BAA, BS - 5 *All are undergraduate programs *Priority 4: Retained but at a lower level of support *Priority 5: Candidate for reduction, phase out or consolidation with another program that he should get a percent for each member in his class, but May was the last time he saw any compensation. Representatives from Morey Courts declined comment. He wants to keep teaching, though he has no future endeavors planned at the moment. “Boxing, as far as the program goes for individuals in the community, is a really good opportunity for people who want to learn fighting or self defense,” Neyome said. “It’s a big morale-booster and it helps with the ability to feel good about walking around and (to) help other

people.” McQueen’s other job has been working as a correction officer at night for the last 12 years. He said being a correction officer is a negative atmosphere, which makes his stress level go up. He said boxing is what helps him lower his stress because he has a passion for it. “After you learn the self defense moves, your selfesteem is boosting another percent,” McQueen said. “I don’t degrade or judge anybody here.”

need it the most,” said Steve Lawrence, vice president of Facilities Management. “Even the auditoriums are looked at, but there has only been two changed so far.” The university has spent more than $100,000 alone on seating in the audito-

rium, Lawrence said. The total number of rooms that have been renovated since 2008 is 45, including this year. Funding for these rooms is approved by the CMU Board of Trustees each year.

metro@cm-life.com

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In place of the ring, Morey Courts plans to put in Zumba classes, he said. “Community interest is what it’s all about I guess but I have not had anything negative about this,” McQueen said. Although McQueen said people leave his boxing classes with smiles on their faces, he has not seen any kind of reward or pay since May. He said he has in writing

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6A || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

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Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers show off debut album, 3B

VIBE

Central Michigan Life

Section B

| Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011

| cm-life.com

[INSIDE] w Students prepare for upcoming elections, 3B w Election coverage of local races, 3B w Men’s basketball opens exhibition season against Marygrove college, 5B

ELECTION PREVIEW Brad O’Donnell Columnist

Nathan Inks Columnist

Obama at top of mediocre pile

Romney’s unwanted balance best bet in general election

W

ith the 2012 election just a year away, it is time to assess the state of American national politics. The simple assessment? Poor. Polls show President Barack Obama is doing well against his toughest Republican opponents, beating out Mitt Romney by something like five points. However, it is still incredibly early, so a mere five points is, in all reality, very good news for Romney. The lagging economy is not doing Obama any favors. Although most people rightfully attribute the bad economy to Obama’s predecessor, most have a sneaking suspicion he is not doing everything he could to help bring the economy back. On the Republican side, the current front-runner and flavor of the month is Herman Cain, who appears to be the “anybody but Romney” candidate that is most acceptable. He has trouble articulating his views and is certainly not ready for prime time. He is a very solid conservative and has no trouble appealing to Republicans, however his big issue is appealing to the electorate at large. Next on the GOP side is Romney, who cannot seem to convince Republicans he is conservative as opposed to moderate, while also defending against attacks that he is a flip-flopper. The more time passes, it looks as if he will not be the eventual nominee, as Republicans cannot stand that his health care plan for Massachusetts is incredibly similar to Obama’s national health care reform. Finally there is poor Rick Perry, who had a meteoric rise and a precipitous fall. He is not very fond of America, which is reflected in a statement made in 2009 in which he said Texas could possibly consider seceding from the Union. He is not well-liked by Republicans because he is somewhat in favor of science, highlighted by his decision to vaccinate all middle school girls in Texas against HPV. Then there is a general smattering of lesser-candidates. In my humble opinion, I think Michele Bachmann is going to pull off a come-frombehind victory in Iowa and eventually clench the nomination. Newt Gingrich is not going anywhere, neither is Rick Santorum (don’t Google him), nor is vanity candidate Ron Paul. If Republicans want to win the presidency in 2012 they will nominate Mitt Romney, and even then things will be an uphill battle. If they want to be strict conservatives and nominate a candidate as such, they will go with Herman Cain, who has very little appeal with voters who trust science or have an iota of common sense. Obama does not have impeccable approval ratings and he will find it difficult to persuade voters to re-elect him. The one thing the president has going for him, however, is that no matter how unimpressed voters are with him, they are significantly less impressed with the Republicans. Editor’s note: Brad O’Donnell is a former president of College Democrats.

B ILLUSTRATION BY KIM PATISHNOCK

Pure Enough? Cain, Romney lead crowded Republican field, for now By Ben Harris | Senior Reporter

P

rofessor of political science James Hill thinks it is too early to guess who will win the Oval Office in the 2012 election, but he promises it will be interesting. “This will be the most expensive campaign we’ve ever seen,” he said. The Republican Party wants a candidate that is ideologically pure, Hill said. “Right now the field is ABM, which stands for anybody but Mitt (Romney),” Hill said. “It’s been apparent Mitt doesn’t sit well with true conservatives or evangelicals and they are two important parts of the party.”

According to a FOX News poll taken from Oct. 23 to 25, Herman Cain leads Romney 24 percent to 20. In the same poll, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich is third at 12 percent, followed by Texas Governor Rick Perry at 10 percent, U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-TX, at 9 percent, with the remainder of the field all

polling at less than 5 percent. A RealClearPolitics poll taken in Michigan from late June to early September shows Romney leading the field by more than 16 points. Hill said he thought Perry might have been a good candidate to oppose Obama until Hill heard him step up to the microphone and saw

Perry could not debate. “I listened to him and thought there wasn’t anything there,” Hill said. “He couldn’t debate and I think the whole party saw Barack Obama would make him look like an idiot.” The recent surge in the polls of Herman Cain is a sort of litmus test Republicans have for candidates to see if they match the party’s views when put in the spotlight and Hill is certain he will fade. “Herman Cain’s ‘9-9-9’ (tax) plan is a disaster,” Hill said. “If your theme is ‘9-9-9,’ your electoral score is going to be 0-0-0.” The Republicans want a candidate who is a good fit for their beliefs, but Hill said their only passion stronger than finding a candidate who is a good ideological match finding one capable of beating Obama. “These people are smart enough to realize it de-

National Poll Herman Cain 24 percent Mitt Romney 20 percent Newt Gingrich 12 percent Rick Perry 10 percent Ron Paul 9 percent Candidates polling at less than 5 percent Rick Santorum, Michele Bachmann, Jon Huntsman, Gary Johnson SOURCE: FOX NEWS POLL OCT. 23-25 MARGIN OF ERROR +/- 3 PERCENT

feats their whole purpose to nominate someone who’s as ideologically pure as they’d like them to be but can’t beat Obama,” Hill said. Hill said Romney will likely take the Republican nomination. “The conservatives will probably end up holding their noses and supporting A FIELD | 4B

MICHIGAN POLITICAL RACES

What voters should look for in 2012 By John Irwin Staff Reporter

The 2012 election season is shaping up to be one of the most intriguing in recent memory for Michigan voters. After the Republican Party made huge gains in 2010 both nationally and at the state level, Michigan Democrats are looking to win back seats in 2012, starting at the national level with incumbent Senator Debbie Stabenow. The junior senator is running for a third term in 2012. She was comfortably re-elected in 2006, beating her opponent, Michael Bouchard, by 16 percent. It is less likely to be that easy for Stabenow this time around, though she remains the favorite against Republican frontrunner and former U.S. Representative Pete Hoekstra. A Public Policy Polling report from July 26 had Stabenow beating Hoekstra 50 percent to 41 percent, even though only 46 percent of those polled approved of her job as senator. “I do believe Senator Stabenow will prevail, but I think it will be a closer race than her last campaign,” said Central Michigan University Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government Maxine Berman. She said a historical trend of higher turnout among Demo-

R e p . crats in Senate Race Paul Scott, presidenR-Grand tial elecB l a n c , tion years won easwill play ily last year in Stabenagainst ow’s favor. his laborPolitico backed named the D e m o potential Debbie Stabenow Pete Hoekstra cratic opmatchup ponent, between but labor Stabenow might be the force and Hoekstra one Facing that makes him the of the top 10 U.S. Recall first state politician Senate races for to be recalled since 2012. 1983. In the House of The Michigan Representatives, Education AsRepublican Dave sociation (MEA) Camp is seeking has spent at least his 12th term as $140,000 in trying U.S. representative to remove Scott for Michigan’s 4th from office, accordDistrict, of which Paul Scott ing to campaign fiMount Pleasant is nance reports filed a part. The 4th Distwo weeks ago. His trict is seen as solidly Republican and will likely most ardent critics are members of unions such as the go for Camp. Meanwhile, at the state lev- MEA because of his support of el, things are already starting Snyder’s budget plan. Political Science Professor to heat up. Following sweeping budget James Hill said he sees the cuts and tax reforms, Gover- outcome of this recall as an nor Rick Snyder and several indicator of what is to come other Republican lawmakers in 2012. “If the incumbent Repubfaced potential recall elections this year. Most efforts lican is ousted, look for some failed to collect enough sig- interesting local race upsets natures, but one state rep- in November of 2012,” Hill resentative will face a recall said. In the 99th District, Mount election on Nov. 8.

Pleasant, voters face the choice of whether or not to re-elect Republican incumbent Kevin Cotter, who is serving his first term as state representative. No Michigan state senate seats are up for re-election this upcoming election year. An increasingly frustrated and angry electorate, combined with a bad economy, makes the 2012 elections hard to predict. The same elements of anger and frustration that led Republicans to victory thanks to the Tea Party movement in 2010 might lead to Democratic victories in 2012 thanks to the Occupy Wall Street movement. “If the demonstrations emerge strong in the spring and the public debate in 2012 focuses on the need for Wall Street and millionaires (to share) the burden of fixing the national debt, the Democrats could stage a comeback to challenge Republicans,” Hill said. Hill said only time will tell, though. “We are a year away and that is a lifetime in politics,” Hill said. “We are prone to major events and October surprises that could change the election climate dramatically.” metro@cm-life.com

ill Clinton once said, “Each and every election we see a new slate of arguments and ads telling us that ‘they’ are the problem, not ‘us.’ But there can be no ‘them’ in America. There’s only us.” Failure to heed this wisdom could very well determine the outcome of the 2012 presidential election. As the Republican Party chooses its candidate to challenge President Barack Obama, they need to pick someone who not only represents the party, but someone who has a chance at winning the general election. So far the frontrunner in the field of candidates has switched on an almost monthly basis, with no clear leader being established. Consistently performing well has been former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, an overall conservative, with enough moderate tendencies to attract some independent voters. Texas Governor Rick Perry, Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann, and Georgia businessman Herman Cain have all had their time in the lead as well, with Herman Cain currently enjoying the front spot in the polls. Perry and Bachmann both faded quickly, something that has not happened to Cain. Eventually Cain’s lack of political experience will likely be his downfall, and Mitt Romney will probably come out as the GOP’s nominee, but crazy things can happen in elections, and nothing is set in stone. Romney certainly stands the best chance of beating Obama in the general election, and this is something Republican primary voters need to take into consideration in order to be successful in the general election, at both the presidential and Congressional levels. Republicans will have to show they have been more than just the Party of “No,” and that they have put forward, in good faith, ideas to help get the country back on track. The success of the GOP in 2010 was not so much Americans voting for the Republicans, but rather against the Democrats, so the Republican Party is in no position to be overly confident about next year’s elections. If the party as a whole can prove they have been committed to bringing ideas to the table instead of just shooting down the ideas of their opponents, the Republicans have a chance at the White House and possibly more control of Congress. To win the White House, they need a strong candidate who can unite the moderate and conservative branches of the party as well as attract independent voters. If a Republican wins the presidency, he or she will have to be willing to work with Democrats in Congress in order to have a successful term and turn the country’s economy around. Mitt Romney seems to best fit this role, but it remains to be seen if the Republican electorate agrees. Editor’s note: Nathan Inks is the current president of the College Republicans.


2B || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/vibe

[VIBE]

Good Weather for Airstrikes’ latest well-executed play

By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

As a lone guitar fades in, so begins Good Weather for Airstrikes’ newest full-length album “To have our hearts emptied, to be left as we came.” The Howell four-piece consists of singer and guitarist James Radick, guitarist Joe Hillier, bassist Josh Fenn and drummer Bill Grant. Built upon the foundation of post-rock (long instrumental sections, ambiance and use of space), the music is epic and powerful, yet brittle and porcelain. Many times there are extreme dynamic shifts from sparse, resonating guitar filling the landscape to all-out sonic assaults with heavy guitar, hard-hitting drums and pulsating bass. On the opening track “Not if I see you first,” the album’s sonic template is laid out. The guitars are effects-heavy, relying on tremolo and delay to emphasize mood and atmosphere. The guitars sometimes get cranked up, but never venture

into heavy metal territory. As with the lighter and drawnout guitar parts, the heavier parts have a spatial aura about them as well, evident on “No fault of your own.” The drums are never flashy or drawn-out with solos, getting to the point with standard back beats and a rocking flow. The bass maintains structure here, lending a focus the songs might lack otherwise during long, instrumental sections. The overall musicianship is excellent but nothing unheard of on a post-rock record before. All of the textures are something that have been done before. What I really love about this record are the lyrics written and sung by Radick. He’s honest and heartfelt. He puts real emotion into his voice. On “25 years tomorrow” Radick sings “But maybe this is what’s best for all of us/To have our hearts emptied, to be left as we came” with such heart-wrenching emotion and sincerity, you can’t help but sing along. It’s honesty to its core.

‘to have our hearts emptied’

HHHHH w Artist: Good Weather for Airstrikes’ w Genre: Post-Rock/Indie Rock Later, on “Fault,” he sings “I realize now I’d rather die alone than love complacently” with an almost nihilistic drone if it weren’t for a tiny bit of melody seeping through. I sometimes get the feeling Good Weather for Airtsrikes is the post-rock equivalent of Philadelphia pop-punk band The Wonder Years. Save for the long instrumental sections, both bands have honest lyrics, heartfelt singing and intense and precise musicality that makes me love both bands so much. Where The Wonder Years’ singer Dan “Soupy” Campbell sings about not being sad anymore, though, Radick lays out his feelings of anguish and sadness on his sleeve. studentlife@cm-life.com

Florence and the Machine’s new album safe bet, clear vocals The highly anticipated second album from Florence and the Machine is finally here, and Florence Welsh makes sure you can hear it, literally. “Ceremonials” is the dark, dramatic follow-up to the British group’s wildly popular 2009 debut album “Lungs.” The five-piece group chose to work exclusively with one of their several producers featured on “Lungs,” Paul Epworth, British producer known for working with Bloc Party, Adele and Cee Lo Green. The 12-track album is introduced by Tom Monger’s angelic harp and, of course, the vocals of Welsh in “Only if For a Night,” which sets the pace for the entire album. The vocal layering from “Lungs” continues in “Ceremonials,” but the effect is more manipulated and interesting. Welsh’s vocals are showcased in every way possible, as lyrics,

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The answer to your first question is, “No, it isn’t worth that much money.” The answer to your second question is, “Yes, it is actually delectable sushi.” Midori Sushi and Martini Lounge, 105 E. Broadway St., is the first dedicated sushi joint in Mount Pleasant in at least several years and probably ever. The food is delicious, the best sushi I’ve had in Michigan despite a smallish selection, and the bathroom sinks are crazy cool. That being said, a filling meal for you and your special someone will cost at least a few liters of plasma. Connor Sheridan Online Coordinator

KRISTALLNACHT:

A NIGHT OF BROKEN GLASS, BROKEN BODIES, BROKEN HEARTS

Album Review

By Jamie Favazza Staff Reporter

PICK OF THE WEEK

TOP FIVES

Album Review

music and noise­ . Think of vocals as the pasta, sauce and meatballs and instrumentation as the garnish. It’s not as if Welsh’s vocals were immature on “Lungs,” but it is fair to say they have matured. “Shake it Out” is set to be their follow-up single to “Dog Days are Over,” and it is a safe pick. It sounds like another mainstream, overproduced MTV hit. It does have the full, epic sound to it that the group is known to encompass and is more elongated than the previous swinging, articulated hit. Much of the percussion maintains a simple tribal feel, like in “Only if For a Night” and “Heartline.” “Heartline” and “Spectrum” have fun, upbeat grooves with attitude, a nice change from seemingly cookie-cutter tunes like “Shake it Out.” As good as Welsh’s voice is, it’s like she can’t go more than a few seconds without belting out something. In the groovy and bluesy “Lover to Lover” she repeats “that’s alright” louder and louder,

‘Ceremonials’

HHHHH w Artist: Florence and the Machine w Genre: Indie Rock as if she belts it to believe it. The same desperation rests in “Never Let Me Go,” a ballad-like tune that features some cool panning electronic manipulation. She sounds much more gospellike, mimicking Adele. The end of the album plays it less safe than the first part, and it’s better. It’s not so predictable and is fun and groovy. The deluxe version of the album features electronically manipulated versions of the songs on disc one as well as beatific acoustic versions. With the second half of “Ceremonials” and the second disc, it is nice to know that Flo hasn’t become too safe.

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Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || 3B

[VIBE]

Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers release first album ‘On Being’ debut release from Mount Pleasant band By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

Joe Hertler talked with passion about writing a seminal track, “What It Feels Like To Drown,” on the debut album from Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers titled “On Being.” “It’s about losing yourself in the moment,” Hertler, a Lake Orion senior, said. “The title came from a photograph in the (University Art Gallery) of a big mountain-scape with ‘What it feels like to drown’ under it.” After more than a year of playing songs such as “Ego Loss on Grand River Avenue” and “Devil, Don’t You Steal My Bicycle” to crowds across Michigan and the Midwest, the band is holding an album release concert at 9 p.m. on Friday at Rubble’s Bar, 112 W. Michigan St. The Mount Pleasant event will feature performances from Prussia, Jetpack On! and American Opera. The album will be released

PHOTOS BY VICTORIA ZEGLER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

for purchase on http:// bandcamp.com Nov. 8. Lower Peninsula Records and Bigger Brush Media, both out of Lansing, are issuing a limited release of the album on vinyl, expected in December. Lansing resident John Krohn, Lower Peninsula’s founder, said the album has its roots in Michigan music in a similar vein to Detroitarea folk band Frontier Ruckus. “It’s very much a Michigan record. There’s references to Michigan places, sports teams, etcetera.,” Krohn said. “It’s an example of putting Michigan out there as a

place that inspires creativity.” Hertler said what he enjoyed most about the recording process was having a band to help bring the songs to life. “I really felt that I enjoyed watching my band put themselves into the record” he said. “There’s little pieces of songs I know I couldn’t have done and I completely credit my band.” This collaborative effort sparked many different ideas while recording, said Kevin Prichard bassist, producer and Lansing resident. “No idea is a bad idea,” Prichard said. “There was no risk.”

Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers perform a live set of music off of their upcoming album January 22 during the Rock Your TOMS Off Benefit Concert at Rubbles Bar, 112 W. Michigan.

Prichard used studio techniques such as reverse-reverb, which he said creates a sound similar to that of a ghost sneaking up on the listener. He said the Beach Boys popularized this technique. Electric guitarist and junior Ryan Hoger, from Commerce Township, said playing the songs live helped in the studio during recording. “I’m glad we played the songs out live before we recorded them,” he said. “By the time we get to recording, getting the song down

is the easy part. Then we can embellish the record with all the bells and whistles.” Fusion Shows owner Irving Ronk said the album, from beginning to end, feels complete and full. Fusion Shows is a Howell-based concert promotion company and Ronk is Hertler’s manager. “I like the way it came together as a full album. It’s rare to find that all the songs go together perfectly,” Ronk said. “It feels like the record was all done with purpose, which I think it was.”

MORE COVERAGE w Review of Album, 4B

Singer-songwriter Jeff Pianki, a Milford resident who has played many shows with Hertler and his band, said “On Being” has a very big feel. “You can hear that the songs start out very slow and quiet and by the end of the song you just have chills and it sounds big and you hear so much going on,” Pianki said. studentlife@cm-life.com

Students prepare for upcoming elections By Jamie Favazza Staff Reporter

Tuesday’s general election and Feb. 28 Michigan primary are prompting Central Michigan University students to prepare to cast their votes. Fred Woodhams, spokesman for Secretary of State Ruth Johnson, said he recommends the online Michigan Voter Information Center to students. The VIC is online at www.Michigan.gov/vote. “It’s a good resource for students,” Woodhams said. “They can find out polling locations, view a sample ballot, change their address and obtain an absentee ballot.” Absentee ballots may also be obtained at the Mount Pleasant Secretary of State office, 1245 N. Mission St. or at the Isabella County Clerk’s office, 200 N. Main St. room 240. According to the VIC, requests to have an absentee voter ballot mailed to voter

residences must be received by local clerks no later than 2 p.m. Saturday and completed by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Woodhams said the deadline to register for voting in the Nov. 8 election has passed, but students are still able to register for the Michigan primary. The VIC reports more than 7,275,000 Michigan residents are registered voters, including CMU students like Keith Phillis. “I’m registered to vote in Mount Pleasant because I don’t have a car and it’s hard to get back to my hometown, especially during the middle of the week,” the Grand Ledge senior said. Phillis said he changed his address to Mount Pleasant during the 2008 election because he didn’t feel comfortable with voting through an absentee ballot. “I’ve heard of previous elections where boxes of absentee

ballots go uncounted or missing, so I don’t feel confident that my vote would be counted under an absentee ballot,” he said. Phillis said he is mostly familiar with the Nov. 8 ballot, but is more interested in the presidential election and Republican primary. “I think it’s especially important for students to learn about the policies and the agendas of the different candidates because at this point, it’s the students that are currently at universities who are going to be affected most by the policies,” he said. “I’m looking very much forward to the primary coming up for the Republican Party because certain candidates may seal the parties’ fate for the upcoming election.” Like Phillis, Lake Orion senior Lauren Kellogg is registered to vote, and is looking forward to the presidential election. “I don’t think there’s enough

hype amongst college students for local elections,” Kellogg said. “People aren’t really informed, especially with the presidential election being so close, people are more focused on that.” Kellogg said she hasn’t kept up on proposals featured on the Nov. 8 ballot, but she stills plans on voting in her hometown that day. Voting precincts will be open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. studentlife@cm-life.com

Department of Journalism Internship Fair 2011

Three incumbent commissioners unopposed in next week’s election By Jackie Smith Online Coordinator

Three Mount Pleasant public officials are set to put on their City Commission hats once again after running for re-election uncontested this fall. Incumbent commissioners Sharon Tilmann, Jim Holton and Erik Robinette will be on next week’s local ballot — three individuals for the three open slots. The three-year terms for both Tilmann and Holton will end in December, whereas Robinette hopes to serve what would have been former commissioner David Maguire’s final year of a term before Robinette replaced him in April. Having filled in the past six months, Robinette said things are “so far, so good” in the position, but he will have to seek re-election in November 2012 for a full term. He said he takes a holistic approach in his decision-making and has always had a general interest in city government. “I always wanted to be on the City Commission, ultimately,” Robinette said. “I’ve been following city government for a while. It seemed like a comfortable fit.” He said he originally joined the Zoning Board of Appeals to “get my feet wet” and served there for close to six months. He was a member of the Planning Commission for more than a year before his appointment last April. Tilmann would return to the commission with a longer record of service than her fellow incumbents. She first served as a city commissioner from 1995 to 2001,

including a year as both mayor and vice mayor. She also sat on the Isabella County Board of Commissioners until 2005 before twice returning to the city, first in 2005 and again in 2009. Tilmann said she brings a balanced viewpoint with an emphasis on making sure people feel heard. “If individuals feel that they’re heard, even if they don’t get their way, they’re a lot more likely to feel satisfied,” she said. Holton is currently in his fifth year and second full term, also including time as mayor and vice mayor. He got his start on the planning commission, serving for seven years. THE ISSUES Holton said there is not any particular hot-button issue going into election that has seen a large concerned response from the public. However, he said that could always change. “You can’t please everybody, there’s no doubt about it,” Holton said. “My guess is, if there was some extreme problems with the City Commission, there’d be more than three people running for these seats.” Both Robinette and Holton said redevelopment of the Mount Pleasant Center property in the coming months could prove to be a large item of concern. Balancing the city’s budget will also continue to be a concern, Robinette said, despite calling Mount Pleasant “financially healthier” than other regions of the state. Tilmann said the city needs to look into finding other sources of revenue whether it be additional grant opportu-

Other Races Mount Pleasant Public School Board Candidates (Vote no more than two) Donald J. Chiodo Christine McKnight Wynne Winslow

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*Montcalm Community College Trustee Hopefuls

(Vote no more than two) Carol Deuling-Ravell Roger A. Thelen *Election limited to certain designated precincts nities or re-examining if the city’s millage is covering all of its necessities. Additionally, she said the city’s residents get more involved. She recalled situations in the past when public input didn’t come until after a decision was made. “I think there’s a sense of discouragement on the part of voters and if they’re truly heard,” Tilmann said. “We try to make sure we have special hearings and special meetings to involve citizens. I think that the state and national levels contribute to the discouragement in government. I think that carries over.” Robinette and Holton agreed more residents need to take an active role, even in Tuesday’s election. “We always encourage people to come out and vote,” Robinette said. “Contested or uncontested.” metro@cm-life.com

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4B || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

Video Game Review

‘Battlefield 3’ delivers, defies comparison to ‘Call of Duty’ By Jeff Ketcham Staff Reporter

“Battlefield 3,” one of the most anticipated games of the year, is finally here. The question on everyone’s mind is this finally a worthy contender to “Call of Duty”? The answer is not a simple yes or no, but rather that “Battlefield 3” is exactly what it should be. The game looks and plays beautifully. The controls are tight and smooth, and the weapons feel powerful. The game has some of the most spectacular lighting effects on the market. Even the sound quality is topnotch. The production values are all superb. This is in every way a triple-A title. “Battlefield 3” is undoubtedly one of the best looking games on the market, especially the PC version. “Battlefield 3” attempts to capture “Call of Duty’s” lightning in a bottle with its solo campaign, but it falls a little short. The seven-hour campaign is enjoyable, but also predictable and generic. Everything here has been done before, and while the campaign isn’t really

lacking in quality, it does nothing to set itself apart. It’s worth noting “Battlefield 3” is the first “Battlefield” game outside the “Bad Company” offshoot series to feature a campaign at all,. There is a separate co-op campaign that manages to be a little more interesting by requiring a bit of teamwork, however, the co-op missions can only be played with a friend online. The exclusion of split-screen for these missions is strange and uninviting. While newcomers may find the weak campaign off-putting, veterans of the series will hardly notice. The game, like its predecessors, can confidently stand on its multiplayer aspect alone. One of the most significant differences between “Battlefield” and other shooters is the inclusion of vehicles. Players can take control of everything from tanks and Humvees to helicopters and jets. Vehicles play a major role in multiplayer and can help turn the tide of battle. The maps in “Battlefield 3’”are well-designed and seamlessly incorporate tight, close-

cm-life.com/category/vibe

[VIBE]

BOO

‘battlefield 3’

HHHHH w System: X360, PS3, PC w Genre: First-Person Shooter, Vehicle-Combat w ESRB Rating: M for Mature quarters firefights as well as distances that require snipers to factor in bullet drop. Positioning, rather than a quick trigger figure, is your greatest weapon, ensuring ‘Battlefield 3’ stays true to its tactical shooter roots. Is “Battlefield 3” better than “Call of Duty”? No, because both games offer completely different experiences. If you want lots of game types, fast-paced action, and small, tight maps then wait for “Modern Warfare 3”. However, if you’re looking for lots of gameplay variety, massive maps and vehicle combat, you won’t find a better, more rewarding or more in-depth multiplayer experience than “Battlefield 3”.

Jeff Smith/Photo Editor

Mount Pleasant residents Damien Jacobs, 8, left, and his friend John March III, 7, react as they are scared by a clown Monday night at the Haunted Yard, 814 N. Lansing St. “It was scary,” Damien said.

A d v i c e Co l u m n

The importance of listening to your gut

studentlife@cm-life.com

Album Review

Hertler and Co. seek, find rainbows in excellent ‘On Being’ By Jay Gary Staff Reporter

Joe Hertler is a man in no need of an introduction around these parts. Originally one of the strongest acts in the Mount Pleasant area as a solo musician, Hertler decided to reinvent his music with a full band. The result is Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers, giving Hertler’s music new life as more than just a kid with a guitar, harmonica and a laptop. With the upcoming release of Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers’ debut album “On Being,” the question being posed is a bit different than usual, instead of asking “Is this going to be good?,” We should be asking, “How will this work as a full studio band?” Hertler has already established himself as a fantastic songwriter and there should be no reason to doubt his talents at crafting songs. However, his music takes on a whole new dynamic with a full-backing band behind it. After only the first track, all doubts and questions can be cast aside. Hertler’s music takes on a completely new pair of wings as it soars with the back-

field | continued from 1B

Romney,” Hill said. “A year is a lifetime in politics. But if things stay on this course, it seems Romney is the only candidate that will be able to beat Barack Obama.” Rochester Hills sophomore Mericelle Fermin said she thinks Romney’s differences

ing accompaniment of The Rainbow Seekers. This isn’t merely a case of throwing an extra guitar and set of drums into the music and calling it good. The Rainbow Seekers add a near mind-blowing amount of extra instruments into the songs “Ego Loss On Grand River Avenue” alone features the addition of accordion, xylophone, strings and horns to create what sounds like a folk orchestra. The brilliance in this is that regardless of all the production being thrown at the music, the songs never lose the intimate passion the original singersongwriter compositions contained. It acts like a spice, giving a new level of flavor to the music but not overpowering it like a fistful of jalapeño peppers. One of the smarter updates is “J.L. Hudson,” a song that is more than powerful enough by itself so it is recorded as such. Going back to the roots of Hertler’s harmonica and guitar, the song shows the emotions in this album are due in part of the fantastic songwriting. The diversity is also a grand aspect of this release. Most of Hertler’s music embodies a very passionate emotional with conservatives will be irreconcilable. “If Mitt Romney ends up being the candidate, with what their problems are with him right now, he doesn’t seem a viable contender in a race against Obama,” she said. “No matter what people say about Obama’s rates being low, Mitt Romney right now doesn’t seem a good contender.” Fermin said she is a political science major and follows

‘O n B e i n g ’

HHHHH w Artist: Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers w Genre: Folk strain as heard in songs like “Carbon C14,” but this isn’t to say the music doesn’t experiment with itself. “Devil, Don’t You Steal My Bicycle” represents a very fastpaced, happy folk song, while “What It Feels Like To Drown,” one of the most interesting tracks, utilizes a very soft fouron-the-floor dance beat that makes the listener pulsate ever so gently as they listen. “On Being” encapsulates an evolutionary state for Herter’s music. The decision on when and, more importantly, when not to add in backing arrangements from The Rainbow Seekers is the true power of this album. Chock full of expertly crafted and catchy songs, Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers have presented themselves in a fantastic light for their debut. studentlife@cm-life.com

politics because she believes it affects every aspect of her life. “I think that for anything to get done and for any improvement to happen in this country, the whole populace has to start paying attention rather than letting their country be run by people they feel powerless to,” she said. Fermin said she thinks the public has been too hard on Obama.

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Jordan Spence Senior Reporter “What do I do if I suspect my boyfriend is cheating on me?” First you need to decipher if your suspicions are well-founded or if you are just overreacting. Why are you suspicious? Do you get jealous of every woman he comes into contact with, which is unhealthy, or do you have a gut feeling? If you have a gut feeling, listen to it. Your instincts are usually right and it’s when people don’t listen to them when things usually go wrong. First you need to start collecting the “facts.” I don’t mean snooping through his phone or Facebook, because if you do start to snoop you’re going have to be prepared for what you may or may not find. You need to start piecing together the facts, that gave you suspicions to begin with. After you’ve done this you need to gently confront him. If you think you have some evidence simply and calmly say to him “I’ve noticed lately that you’ve been acting like or doing (fill in the blank) “There’s such a sense of instant gratification in our society that America expected too much of him right from the get-go,” she said. metro@cm-life.com

... is it because of another woman?” If he gets defensive and angry, then I don’t think he’s innocent. It also isn’t good if his reaction is “Stop being, jealous, crazy and insecure.” A guy who is truly innocent won’t turn the situation onto you and make it your fault. If your suspicions are right, know that it’s never your fault he made the choice to cheat, you don’t deserve to be treated like that. Once you find out he did cheat, decide on whether you want to stay together or break-up. After I found out a boyfriend I lived with cheated, I moved out the next day. I talked to him a couple more times to figure out what to do about the apartment we shared

and then I cut off all ties. I haven’t seen or talked to him since. It’s the best thing I ever did. Afterwards I was in a long-distance relationship with a man I completely trusted. It was wonderful to be with someone I trusted. It was then I realized I wasn’t a crazy jealous person I was initially accused of being. Hey readers I love answering the questions you send me, but I need to get more of them. Don’t forget any question you ask I will keep anonymous. In order to submit questions anonymously you can send them to my new formspring account, at http://formspring.me/JordanCSpence. Or email them to spenc1jc@cmich.edu


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Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || 5B

[SPORTS]

Field hockey team will face Missouri State in MAC tourney By Jeff LaHaye Staff Reporter

FILE PHOTO BY JEFF SMITH

Senior forward Andre Coimbra goes for a layup during a Dec. 2010 exhibition game against Marygrove College.

Men’s basketball opens exhibition season against Marygrove College

The Central Michigan field hockey team is ready to prove something in the MidAmerican Conference Tournament after a disappointing weekend to end the regular season. The team lost against Kent State and Ohio to last weekend. “The level of play in tournament games has a much higher intensity because its win or go home,” said head coach Cristy Freese. “Nothing is given to us and we have to suit up and work hard to win.” The No. 3 Chippewas open up against No. 6 Missouri State at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday in Athens, Ohio. The winner advances to play No. 2 Kent State at 2:30 p.m. on Friday. The Chippewas finished with a 5-5 MAC record this season, their best since 2006. CMU played the Bears twice, winning each game by a fourgoal margin. “We only have one game guaranteed and they want it as much as we do,” Freese said. “The team has to respect

everyone and fear no one to perform in the tournament.” However, Missouri State comes into the game with a season-best four-game win streak. CMU beat the Bears in last year’s MAC Tournament, 2-1. “The Bears have grown in the past few years into a consistent and powerful MAC team,” Freese said. “We have to keep focused on one game at a time or else we will be going home early.” Freese will use more subs, including sophomores Abby Roth and Erica Garwood to help goal scoring. CMU’s biggest challenge could be defending Missouri State’s offense led by two double-digit scorers, senior Casey Bayliss and sophomore Hillary Lawless. CMU constantly worked on getting the ball out of its zone and upfield. “The Bears play with four forwards instead of the usual three and try to keep the ball in our defensive zone,” Freese said. “They have a very good offense and thrive on stealing the ball and counter attacking.” The Chippewas are 19-

UP NEXT CMU (8-10, 5-5 MAC) vs Missouri State (7-11, 3-7 MAC) When: Thursday Time: 1:30 p.m. Where: Athens, Ohio

20 all-time in postseason conference play and have advanced to four-straight semifinal matches, outscoring opponents 11-2. CMU has won the MAC Tournament twice in its history (1990 and 2005.) Junior Erin Dye has thrived in postseason play, recording five points in her first two seasons. “We are a young team, but we respond to pressure well,” Freese said. “We go about our business and play our game and if we do that, we are a very tough team to beat.”

it points last season. Trey averaged 16.3 points per game and was the thirdThe Central Michigan men’s highest scoring freshman in sports@cm-life.com basketball team is approach- Division I. Despite the departure of ing exhibition season like it CMU (0-0,) vs Thomas, he said he doesn’t feel would the regular season. Marygrove (0-0) Tonight’s 7 p.m. exhibition pressure to score and expects When: Tonight against Marygrove College multiple players to step up. “This year we have a variety Time: 7 p.m. won’t effect the win or loss colWhere: McGuirk Arena umn, but the team uses it to of scorers, with Austin (McBlude. “We need to adapt room) here now, Andre (Coget ready. to their changes from last “We use it to get ready for imbra), Colin (Voss) and Derek time around.” the season,” said Trey Zeigler Jackson,” Trey said. As far as the Bobcats go, The team lost Thomas, cen- sociation of Intercollegiate sophomore guard. “We’re gotraveling on the road to ing to approach it just like a ter Will McClure and guard Athletics Conference last seaplay the three-time defendAntonio Weary to graduation, son. real game.” CMU (14-9, 7-5 MAC) @ ing champions won’t be an They shifted conferences a EMU (19-8, 7-5 MAC) Two starter positions making CMU a team filled By Kristopher Lodes easy task. opened up because of gradua- with youth. Nine underclass- week ago, moving to the WolStaff Reporter “Ohio has a history of verine-Hoosier Athletic ConWhen: Thursday tion, but no official announce- men are listed on the roster. Ernie said the bench could ference starting this season. Time: 7 p.m. ment has been made on who Four matches stand be- being good,” Dulude said. go much deeper than last The Chippewas look to imWhere: Yipsilanti those individuals will be. tween the Central Michi- “Their overall record isn’t gan volleyball team and the what it is normally, but we “We’re going to determine it year’s, but he eventually wants prove on a 10-21 record, which Mid-American Conference have to take every game setomorrow at the shootaround,” to establish a 10-man rota- resulted in a third place finish riously.” in the MAC West. Tournament. said head coach Ernie Zeigler tion. The Bobcats have said. “What concerns me is “It’s a very welcoming expeCMU wants to run a fastThis week provides comat practice on Tuesday. “It’s petitive road tests 7 p.m. clinched the MAC East title the next match.” some fierce competition there. rience I’m looking forward to, paced offense in Ernie’s sixth Thursday against Eastern and have punched a ticket We have 10 guys that all could just having more options to go year. His mindset has worn off “We just want to see if we Michigan and 7 p.m. Sat- to the MAC tournament, on his players as well. You start. I told our guys not to be- to,” he said. I think we’re going urday against Ohio, the despite having a down year won’t find them scoreboard come deflated because you’re to have the capability to go 12 can carry over the things we’ve been working on these past back-to-back-to-back MAC as far as wins and losses go. watching. not starting. It’s not about who or sometimes 13 deep.” “They graduated some Marygrove College enters three weeks,” Ernie said. “We Champions. starts, but it’s about who fin“We don’t look at the players, so we know they standings,” Dulude said. tonight’s exhibition looking to really want to get out and push The Chipishes the game.” have some different talpewas fell CMU averaged 59.4 points improve on a 9-23 season. It the ball, made or missed. And The team only needs one ent,” Olson said. “They win to lock up a spot in the two matches per game last season, finish- retains Marcus Hopkins, the see how well we do, making dehave been high error this MAC Tournament. In fact, the last time ing 11th in the Mid-American team’s leading scorer from a cisions early in the shot clock. Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU,year Life Mt. Pleasant, •ago. 436He Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • going 436 Central Moore MI a48859 Hall, Michigan •ofwww/cm-life.com Life Mt.they Pleasant, • 436faced Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436and Moore MI 48859 Hall, •arewww/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, •w season I think theyCMU, averaged 12.3 That’s to be pointCMU, every team in MI the48859 West diConference. good enough, but not con- vision controls their own emphasis.” the Eagles, Trey and former Chippewa points per game. aJalin Classifi edwere Ad Placing edClassifi Ad Placing ed a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad ed Ad sistent Policy &Classifi Rates ed Addestiny. Policy &Classifi Rates ed enough.” The Mustangs finished sec- Ad but charged Thomas the only a Classifi The Chippewas should back, wintwo who averaged double-dig- ond to last in the National As- sports@cm-life.com As it stands now, the enCM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: eddivision ad 15 word minimu Erik Olson beorigin, used to the road by now. ined five tire West would By Phone: 989-774-3493 Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national orning origin, and of CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or and of CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to discontinue, without notice, advertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Mediaduring which istheir discontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in been the opinion without of the notice, Student advertising Media which is inthe the opinion of the Stude They have on it for the qualify for tournament, ByPleasant, Fax: Board, 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and centered Bold, italic and centered Bold, italic and centered Mt. MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 p is not in keeping with the standards of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with the standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Life will$7.75 be respo entiretype non-conference seahometype opener. with the Chippewas having are the available along are the available along type are the available typographical errors only to the extent cancelling typographical thewww.cm-life.com charge errors for the only space to theused extent cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge along for the spa omBy Website: www.cm-life.com By ofWebsite: By ofWebsite: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p with other special features with half other special features with special features son and of an the confer“We need to start strong,” the No.Credit 6 other seed inanthe tourand rendered valueless by such an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such error valueless is limited by such to only an error. for such error is limited ed Ad Policy &fipicked like attractors. like ad attractors. like ad attractors. 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall the fiClassifi rst date of publication. Any credit due canthe be rstRates date up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due canthe befipicked rst Issues: date up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit cesaid duehead canad the becoach fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any offi credit ce due can the be fi picked rst date up of at publication. the CM Life Any offi credit ce due can be picked up at the CM Erik Olson. ence schedule. nament and would be fac-L within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the C 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: p BRING IN THIS COUPON “Being on the road “Last time we played them ing rivalforWestern a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. ept advertising which refl ects discrimination Dept. immediately. We are because only responsible for the Dept. fi15 rstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are onlyper responsible fored the Dept. fiad rstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible the first day’sMichigan insertion. Rates: word minimum classifi tional origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or (EMU), we had a lot of good doesn’t affect us as a team,” in the first round. TO RECEIVE A Fast. Fresh. Italian. vertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Dulude said. “We’ve plays with aEACH lot of That what ALWAYS makes this Bold, italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 32,000 REACH READERS MORE DAY! EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH AT READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATmixed READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY!beenOPEN ATis WWW.CM-LIF ePUBLISHING standards of CM Life. CM Life willTHAN be responsible for type are available along places that shot ourselves home for a while, so it’ll week so important. The e extent of cancelling the charge for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features ch an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only actually be nice to get away Eagles sit at the No. 5 seed in our own foot.” 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. y credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office A lot has changed around and be with the girls.” and a win over them would f the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue y responsible for the first day’s insertion. CMU isn’t worried about mean CMU moves up and the team since the last time CMU played its rivals from the standings at this point. faces an easier opponent to ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Its mindset is to take it one start the tournament. Ypsilanti. With purchase of “We’ve come a long way game at a time. A.Y.C.E. Pizza & Pasta! “They (the standings) sports@cm-life.com since then,” said junior outside hitter Lindsey Du- don’t concern me,” Olson By John Manzo Sports Editor

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Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • w

ed Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi eded Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

Classifi

wingly accept advertising CM Life which willrefl notects knowingly discrimination acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, r Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 CM word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu 989-774-3493 Phone: 989-774-3493 Phone: 989-774-3493 gin,By andPhone: CM Life reserves sex or thenational right to origin, reject By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, adv on of Student Media which Board, is in is the not opinion in keeping of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of and CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of and CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM BytheFax: 989-774-7805 Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: p ypographical errors only be to responsible the extentfor of typographical cancelling the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and charge for the are space us type are type are type om By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along available along available along by such an error. Creditrendered for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of with publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of with publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publicat Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 In up Person: Moore Hall In Person: Moore Hall In Person: Moore Hall other special other special other special features picked at the CM436 Life credit offi ce due within can 30 bedays picked of termination up at the CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the credit ad. offifeatures ce Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. offifeatures ce If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find a 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 p like ad attractors. like ad attractors. like ad attractors. sifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. discrimination because of race, color, religion,

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Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE DAY! THAN EACH32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF ALWAYS centered type are Placing a Classifi3-6 edIssues: Ad $7.50 per issue Classified Ad Policy & Rates

ect or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will cancelling the charge for the space used and limited to only the first date of publication. Any ys of termination of the ad. If you find an error, By for Phone: 989-774-3493 onsible the first day’s insertion.

7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

available along with other special features CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or like ad attractors.

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discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS In Person: 436 Moore Hall WANTED FOR NOTICES SALE TO RENT 8 a.m.-5 WANTED FOR NOTICES TO RENT WANTED FOR NOTICES SALE TO RENT Hours: Monday-Friday p.m. SALE

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Classifi eds Classifi eds lassifi ifiedseds 6B || Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

eds REACH MOREHall, THAN EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYSwww.cm-life.com/category/classifi OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF Central Michigan Life • 436 Central Moore Michigan CMU,32,000 Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436READERS Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. MIDAY! 48859 • www/cm-life.com Central Michigan LifePleasant, • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

ed Ad Placing a Classified Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Placing a Classifi ed Ad Classified Ad Policy

Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi ed Ad

Classified Ad Rates

Classifi

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising CM Life which willrefl notects knowingly discrimination acceptbecause advertising of race, which color, refl ects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimu By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, By and Phone: CM Life reserves sex or thenational right to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without notice, right advertising to reject discontinue, without the notice, 989-774-3493 sex the or national origin,or and CM Life reserves rightadvertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media which Board, is in is the not opinion in keeping of the with Student the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. not CM in keeping Life will with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p be responsible for typographical errors only be to responsible the extentfor of typographical cancelling the errors charge only for to the the space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the space used and centered type are centered type are be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and omBy Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along with available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit rendered for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the fi rst date of publication. Any rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such$7.25 an error is limited the firstIssues: date of publication. 7-12 Issues: per issueto only 7-12 $7.25 perAny issue other7-12 In Person: 436 Moore Hall other special features special features Issues: $7.25 credit due can be picked at the CM436 Life credit offi ce due within can 30 bedays picked of termination up at the CM of Life thecredit ad. office Ifdue you within find30be an days error, of termination of the If you find30 an error, In up Person: Moore Hall can picked up at the CM Lifead. office within days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like adIssues: attractors. like ad Issues: attractors. report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m.Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 13+ $7.00 report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

NOTICES SALE WANTED RENT• www/cm-life.com NOTICES Central Michigan Life • FOR 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant,TO MI 48859

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Placing a ClassifiedLOST Ad & ed CMU, Ad Policy ClassifiedAUTOS Ad Rates AUTOS FOR Hall, SALE FOR SALE SERVICES FOUND LOST & FOUND Central Michigan Life • 436Classifi Moore Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 32,000 REACH READERS MORE THAN EACH32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS CM Life THAN will not knowingly acceptREADERS advertising which reflects discrimination because ofDAY! race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ad REACH MORE 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS OPEN AT ed WWW.CM-LIF ByPleasant, 989-774-3493 a Mt. Classifi edMI Ad48859 Classifi ed Ad Policy & Rates sex or national origin, and CM LifeWANTED reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising , Life Mt. •Phone: 436 Moore MIPlacing 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Pleasant, • www/cm-life.com HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

FOR RENT FOR RENT which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad type are centered By Website: www.cm-life.com Classifi ed Ad Policy & Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Rates 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for without such an erroradvertising is limited to onlyisthe firstopinion date of publication. Any discontinue, notice, which in the of the Student Media SPECIALCMSECTION SPECIAL SECTION 7-12 Issues: $7.25per perissue issue other PETS In 436 Moore Hall WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT ByPerson: Fax: CM 989-774-7805 Bold, italic andfeatures centered special credit due can be picked up at theBoard, Life offiince within with 30 days of termination the If you find an error, 1-2 Issues: $7.75 is not keeping the standards of CM Life. CM ad. Life will be responsible for ept advertising which Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which 15 reflects discrimination because Rates: word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi edofad type are available along 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used ational origin, and of CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sex to or reject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only vertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media ad attractors. Bold,the italic and of centered italic andup centered 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like 1-2 per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue In Person: Moore Hall first date publication. Any credit dueBold, can be picked at the CM Life office ROOMMATES e standards of CM Board, Life.436 CM is not Life inwill keeping be responsible with the standards for ROOMMATES of CM Life.Issues: CM Life will$7.75 be responsible for TRAVEL TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES typewithin are TO available type are available along NOTICES SALE WANTED SALE TO RENT WANTED NOTICES RENT NOTICES WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT WANTED TO RENT 30 days ofalong termination of the ad. IfFOR you find anSALE error, report it to the Classifi ed e extent ofFOR cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to the used extent ofFOR cancelling the charge for the space used REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue NOTICES FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue Hours:and Monday-Friday 8to a.m.-5 p.m. with other special features other features Dept. immediately. We are only responsiblewith for the firstspecial day’s insertion. ch an error. Credit for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only

Issues: $7.25 per ny credit due canthe befipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due can7-12 be picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: per issue y responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

like ad attractors. 7-12 Issues:

$7.25 per issue

like ad attractors.

13+FOUND Issues: $7.00 per AUTOS issue REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SALE OPEN AUTOS SALE AUTOS REACH&FOR MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST FOUND LOST & LOST &FOR FOUND AUTOS FOR SALE FOR SALE SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP WANTED

GARAGE SALES FOR RENT WANTED TO BUY FOR RENT MIGHTY MINIS

GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT FOR RENT HELP HAPPY ADS GARAGE SALES WE ARE PLEDGED to the WANTED TOofRENT NOTICES letter PETS and spirit U.S. policy SPECIAL SECTION WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION PETS for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout SERVICES LOST & FOUND the Nation. We encourage support an DOWNTOWN, 2 BEDROOM loft apartROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES affirmative TRAVEL advertising and marketing ment, 20 foot brick walls, all amenities. Year lease. Available May 20. program in which there are no barriers SALES 989-444-1944. FOR RENT toGARAGE obtaining housing because of race, ESTATE REAL ESTATE2 bedPERSONALS color, REAL religion, sex, handicap, familial WOODSIDE APARTMENTS, PERSONALS room, includes washer and dryer. status, or national origin. $620 per month. Home Realty PETS WANTED TOTowne RENT 989-779-1539. WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES 20122013 RENTAL LISTS Available

lassifi ifiedseds NOTICES SPECIAL WANTED SECTION TO RENT

We Save SOLES!

LOST & FOUND ROOMMATES TRAVEL F

A OF MMILRENT FOR Y I Visit D MI., P FO REAL PERSONALS O C ou ESTATE wwwr webs (989)TCA .fam ite for 775- RE yfoo helpfu 8500 WANTED ilTO lh tcar RENT e.bi ints! z WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS ROOMMATES

FOR SALE SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO FORGET THERENT AUTOS FOR SALE LAUNDROMAT! TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES ROOMMATES Washer & Dryer in Every Unit HELP WANTED Appian PERSONALS REAL ESTATE Way SPECIAL SECTION BEHIND WENDY’S ON MISSION HAPPY ADS WANTED TO BUY (989) 779-7900 Call: TRAVEL

Now! Partlo Property Management , Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 in Moore 48859 Hall, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com SUBLEASOR WANTED FOR Campus Come forMIthe CFXCMU, www.partloproperty.com Come find all your favorites... Habitat for next semester. 2 bedroom http://www.partloproperty.com 306 E Sunday Movie all utilities included and completely furREAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS Suite 2. 989-779-9886 Policy Classifi ed Ad Policy ClassifiedBroadway Ad Rates Classifiednished. Ad Rates Only $479 a month and first

3.95

only $

AVAILABLE NOW: APARTMENTS month free. Ten minutes walking disdiscrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising of race, whichcolor, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, near Mt. Rates: Pleasant. inRates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad 15 $350word $450 minimum per classifi ed ad Call or text tance to campus. gin, ect or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising cludes water and trash. Partlo Prop989-430-6960. www.partlopropeping on of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. notCM in keeping Life will with the standards of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeerty will Management. Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue CM Life Classifieds 774-3493 989-779-9886. cancelling ypographical the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the space used erty.com centered type are centered•type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per and issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 436 Moore Hall • www.cm-life.com available along with available along with by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of Life the ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. sifi onsible ed Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the•fi13+ rst day’s insertion. celebrationcinema.com

WANTED TO BUY

DOWNTOWN 123 EAST BROADWAY

GARAGE SALES HELP WANTED HAPPY ADS OFFICE ASSISTANT YEAR round WANTED TO RENT position. Experience preferred, days SPECIAL SECTION and weekendsPETS available. Non smoking. Apply in person Riverwood Resort. SERVICES YARD SALE TRAVEL WANTED: MEDICAL RECORDS person part- time. Apply at 2480 W. Campus. Building B, Suite SALES 300. 779-7200. GARAGE Fax 989-779-7100. PERSONALS PETS HAPPY ADS YARD SALE

UNION SQUARE

1-2 Person PERSONALS 2 Bedroom

Spring HAPPY ADSSemester Leases FREE Internet, Cable & Shuttle

WANTED TO BUY

HAPPY ADS

at

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES WANTED TO BUY FOR RENT Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHIFOR SALE CLES we buy them we haul them. SPECIAL SECTION PETS 989-772-5428. WANTED TO RENT SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT! AUTOS SALE No matter what FOR you are looking for – TRAVEL YARD aROOMMATES couch, a car, orSALE maybe a pet! CM Life Classifieds • (989) 774-3493 HELP WANTED 436PERSONALS Moore Hall * www.cm-life.com REAL ESTATE SPECIAL SECTION HAPPYTO ADS WANTED BUY TRAVEL

772-2222

Pet Friendly LiveWithUnited.com

BROOMFIELD VILLAGE CLOSE to PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS “I’m not WALK TO CAMPUS

used to this much attention.” Get noticed with the Classifieds.

FREE:

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Park Place

Classifieds: Your system for connections.

caution:

campus. 722 W. Broomfield. 3 and 4 bedroooms. www.broomfieldvillage.com or 989-779-0410.

SORORITY WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT FRATERNITY

772-4032 SERVICES LOST & FOUND

www.cm-life.com • 774-3493 AUTOS SALE LOST &FOR FOUND

AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES

APPIAN WAY & WANTED TO RENT 1200 W. CAMPUS APARTMENTS SERVICES

GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

HELP FORWANTED RENT

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

Free Cable & SALES Internet GARAGE

AVAILABLE NOW: TWO BEDROOM HOUSES. In Mt. Pleasant and near CMU. Starting at $550. Partlo Property Management. www.partloproperty.com 989-779-9886.

7 BEDROOM COLLEGE HOUSE 2400 SQ FT. BASEMENT WASHER/DRYER 10 OR 12 MONTH LEASE $ 325 PER PERSON CONTACT KELLY 586-567-0699

SPECIAL SECTION PETS

WANTED NOTICES TO RENT www.rentparkplaceapts.com

FOR NOTICES SALE

A P A R T M E N T S

Central Michigan LIFE

1401 E. BELLOWS ST.

PETS WANTED TO RENT ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES

436 Moore Hall • CMU

SPECIAL WANTED SECTION TO RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL

HOUSE

NEW!

779-9999 TRAVEL YARD SALE

Washer & Dryer in every unit

PETS

Office Located at Tallgrass Apartments

M-Th 9-6, Fri 9-5,Sat 12-4

(YARD 989) 779-7900 SALE

BRAND NEW - Free Shuttle

NO DEPOSIT – 4-5 BEDROOM HAPPY ADS

Spring Semester Leases

Next to La Señorita FREE Internet & Cable

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2 Person 2 Bedroom 2 Master Bathrooms FREE INTERNET & CABLE!

779-9999 LiveWithUnited.com

CASA LOMA 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6

Bedrooms

N I S d r e o B o A m 6 E & s! 5 L 2, 3,O 4,W r N or next yea f

G

! DOWN T I S PO peed $0 DE • high s

ASS! L C O T LK

internet ded • expalne cab

E E FR

WA

ed • full-shizer was yer and dr

773-3890

AMGhousing.com

4 BEDROOM 2½ BATH WALK TO CLASS

• • •

Bus Shuttle • FREE Internet • & Cable Basketball Court

Washer/Dryer Exercise Room

T SIGNING A NO $ DUE 1240 E. Broomfield St. M-Thurs 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 12-4 www.tallgrassapts.com 779-7900

Ridge

2, 3, 4, 5 & 6

Bedrooms

G N I S A E ear! L W O N or next y ! f

DOWN T I S PO $0 DE 5/mo.

$25 t a g n i t r a Rent st • laundry ed internet

spe • highanded cable to campus • exp ttle service • shu tball court rt e u • bask volleyball co d • san

FREE

773-3890

3700 E. Deerfield Rd

lexingtonridgeapts.com

To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

PRESENTED BY:

(989) 773-1234

...when you ask about the Tallgrass Promise!

Lexington

SUDOKU GUIDELINES:

Call for today’s specials or order online at: papajohns.com

AF

772-2222 LiveWithUnited.com

CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

VE SA

N TU R O

3 & 4 Bedroom Apts.

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE WESTPOINT VILLAGE PERSONALS PERSONALS WESTERN ISLANDS WANTED TO BUY

E!

Great Apartments Close to Campus!

Trust the Midas Touch MT. PLEASANT 1303 E. Pickard St. (989) 772-2814

Across 1 Nice forecast 5 Blatant promotion 9 Entertain 14 Shoppe modifier 15 Hoosier city 16 Kitchen gadget 17 Sachs 20 Texas longhorn, for one 21 Shocked reaction 22 45-Down et al. 23 Hai or oui 25 Atop 27 Sacks 35 Detours, e.g.: Abbr. 36 Kitty 37 “Awakenings” actress 38 Start to sing? 39 Fawned over, with “on” 42 Uncertain word 43 Warren Buffett’s city 46 JFK listing 47 Matchmaker.com connection

component 9 Financing letters 10 Daytime fare 11 Coffee hour sights 12 Ooze 13 Misses the mark 18 GI rations 19 Date with an MD 24 Dirty Harry’s org. 26 Resistance unit 27 Refrigerant gas 28 Announcement at the door 29 Took in again 30 Pal of Tigger 31 Playful aquatic critter 32 Actor Malcolm-__ Down Warner 1 Turns opaque, with 33 Speak with style “up” 34 Tylenol alternative 2 Loads 40 Summer on the 3 Run in place Seine 4 Late-night flights 41 Computer fodder 5 Couples’s org. 6 Clubber __, nemesis 44 Really enthused 45 Buddy List co. in “Rocky III” 47 Act rebelliously 7 Bear in the sky 49 Homeowner’s 8 Plaster of Paris 48 Saks 52 __ bargain 53 Crunch targets 54 Uffizi offering 57 Couples with clubs 60 Comic pianist Victor 64 Sax 67 Audibly 68 Taj Mahal site 69 “Yikes!” 70 Sounds from pounds 71 Maintain 72 Conifers with elastic wood

option, in brief 50 Ancient Egyptian temple complex 51 “Fernando” quartet 54 Sports schedule column 55 Audition aim 56 Word with box or belt 58 On __: nervous 59 Calamitous 61 Storm 62 Eat away 63 Actor Byrnes and announcer Hall 65 OED entries 66 Suede feature

Nov. 2, 2011  

Central Michigan Life

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