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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

MHTV gives broadcasting students opportunity for real-world experience, 3A

Central Michigan University

| Monday, Jan. 30, 2012

[ I N S I D E] w Mount Pleasant heats up with 21st Night of Louisiana, 5A w Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe opposes planned casino in Lansing, 5A w Indian night brings 500 to Plachta, 6A w Medical amnesty bill supported by local representative; heading to the House of Representatives, 6A

[cm-life.com]

Three more units endorse vote of no confidence

Eight departments now support A-Senate decision By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Eight departments have now endorsed the Dec. 6 vote of no confidence against University President George Ross and Provost Gary Shapiro. The Biology Department voted to support Academic Senate’s vote of no confidence last Tuesday, and the Department of Journalism and the Department of Teacher Education and Professional Development voted last Friday. This makes a total of eight departments that have endorsed the vote. The Department of Journalism also voted against the Faculty Association’s decision to withhold vote totals after their Jan. 12 contract ratification. “In a separate vote, the department’s personnel committee — tenured and tenure-track faculty — unanimously object-

ed to FA’s refusal to release the vote totals on the recent contract,” said Associate Professor of Journalism Tim Boudreau in an email. In addition to a unanimous vote of support, the Department of Teacher Education and Professional Development passed a resolution. Faculty member Norma Bailey said the resolution was outlined in an email to Central Michigan Life on Friday. “We direct our chairperson to forward the resolution to the Board of Trustees with our call that its concerns be addressed,” the resolution states. “We also give the authority to our chair to support such a measure when this matter is discussed and/or voted on at the Council of Chairs.” Biology Department Chairman Stephen Roberts said the department endorsed the motion to support the vote of no confidence after being introduced by Phil Hertzler at a recent staff meeting.

By Justin Hicks Staff Reporter

Two of the Office of Information Technology’s largest projects this academic year are beginning to grow in popularity, according to the January OIT update. One project, the virtual lab, can be downloaded to the computer of any Central Michigan University student, allowing them to access the software in on-campus labs from any location in the world. Software available via the virtual lab includes Microsoft Office and Adobe Design Premium CS5, which would normally cost more than $2,000 combined. “I think it’s awesome, and it’s going to help me a lot for what I want to get done with school and on the side,” Westland freshman Amy Hein said.

back to

A VOTE | 2A

Two technology projects increasing in popularity Virtual lab, printing kiosks seeing more use

PHOTOS BY BRAD LOWE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jeff Kline, Flushing junior and Student Activity Center employee, swipes Central Michigan students’ ID cards as they arrive on Sunday afternoon.

New year fitness rush continues; average visits jump 50 percent from January to March

B

Hein is a graphic design major who said she looks forward to using Photoshop and Illustrator for different projects. Adding this virtual lab for the ease of students cost CMU about $100,000 last summer, according to a previously published story by Central Michigan Life. Along with the software, students can also use the virtual lab to print to one of the kiosks on campus. “The intention is to get rid of the restrictions of only being able to use PrintQ from specific physical locations, like our physical public labs,” IT Vice President Roger Rehm said. Two print stations were introduced in the Charles V. Park Library in October 2011, and more recently, stations were installed in the Bovee University Center, Grawn Hall student Lounge and the Wo l d t / E m m o n s / Fa b i a n o lobby. A TECH | 2A

By Catey Traylor | Senior Reporter

etween New Year’s resolutions and spring break weight loss goals, the Student Activity Center has been the busiest it will be all year in the past three weeks. On average, 2,000 people visit the SAC daily, but between the months of January and March, the average number of people per day jumps to about 3,000. It takes 250 student employees to operate the SAC on a daily basis. Building Supervisor and Fitness Specialist Robbie Williams has worked at the SAC for five years and said the increase in visitors happens yearly. “Typically, we’re really busy in the fall when everyone gets back to school. After about a month or so, it mellows out a lot,” he said. “Once everyone gets back from Christmas break though, it’s the busiest time of the year. For two to three solid months, the SAC is packed.” With so many people frequenting the SAC, equipment maintenance is essential. “We have a phenomenal

equipment maintenance team. They check every piece of equipment each night and make repairs immediately,” said Jennifer Nottingham, director of programs and administration at University Recreation. “Vendors are amazed at the life we get out of our products, and it’s largely thanks to the maintenance.” Nottingham said equipment is replaced approximately every three years.

Student volunteers feed the homeless By Mike Nichols Staff Reporter

DETROIT — Homeless stomachs in Detroit were filled this weekend thanks to a collaboration of college volunteers. Students from Central Michigan University, Mid Michigan Community College and Ferris State University traveled to Detroit on Saturday to pass out bagged lunches and winter clothing to people living on the streets. The students volunteer with Homeless Outreach Ministry Equipping, a Midwest nonprofit aimed at helping provide for the homeless. In Mount Pleasant, they meet through His House Christian Fellowship. Nikki Steffes, a Grand Blanc

Grand Rapids sophomore Sydney Larosa uses a sitting press machine on Sunday afternoon.

“We always try to have the best machines for our students,” Williams said. “We’re constantly looking at the most up-to-date things and we try to be conscious of what the latest trends are.” Each machine costs between $2,500 and $3,000, and the SAC houses between $150,000 and $200,000 worth of equipment. “Due to the usage, we always get the most high-end

A SAC | 2A

W O R K- S T U D Y

Program receives 500K cash infusion

CM-LIFE.COM w Visit the website for a video

By David Oltean Senior Reporter

junior and His House member, organizes the volunteers. “We meet at His House one Friday a month to bag lunches and gather clothing donations,” she said. “Normally, we bag anywhere from 200 to 250 lunches.” After prepping on Friday, a total of 17 volunteers carpooled on Saturday morning to Detroit. In 20-degree weather with a chilling wind speed of 15 miles-per-hour, the volunteers ventured down the streets surrounding Cass Park in search of people who might need food and warm clothing. “We met two guys ... one was probably a little drunk, but

machines,” Nottingham said. “We take pride staying up to date with what students are looking to do.” Director of Facilities Operation at University Recreation Demond Pryor handles equipment replacement and said each machine is inspected carefully before being replaced. “Whether we replace a piece is dependent on usage of the machine and the user

VICTORIA ZEGLER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A homeless Detroit resident examines a felt fabric sports scarf given to him by members of His House Christian Fellowship Saturday morning in downtown Detroit. Most of the clothing items were donated to the church, while some had been made especially for the occasion.

he was entertaining,” Mount Pleasant junior Victoria Wawrzyniak-Fry said. “We got to talk to him and give him some food and some jackets and stuff.” Wawrzyniak-Fry has been on multiple trips, and she said one of the hardest parts of volunteering is witnessing suf-

fering. She has seen homeless people with mutilated faces, on crutches and in wheelchairs. She said there have been times when the situation turned threatening. A DETROIT | 2A

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

Central Michigan University’s work-study program offered more than 200 additional jobs to students this year after receiving an additional $500,000 in funding from the university. The 2011-12 school year began with more than 1,400 students enrolled in workstudy, which generally accounts for a third of CMU’s student work force. Previous contributions to the program usually amounted to about $600,000, making this year’s extra $500,000 from university administration a substantial increase. Jon Goodwin, manager

of Student Employment Services, said the average pay for students involved in the work-study program is about $7.90 per hour. Goodwin said some of the biggest employers in the work-study program include University Recreation, Facilities Management, the Charles V. Park Library and labs throughout the university. Goodwin said the additional funding has given an increase to the program unseen in recent years, though the number of students enrolled is hard to estimate, as the number fluctuates throughout the school year.

A CASH | 2A


2A || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

VOTE |

EVENTS CALENDAR

CONTINUED FROM 1A

TODAY

w RecycleMania will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Bovee University Center as part of a 10-week, nation-wide recycling competition. w Clicker Cohort Overview will be held at 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. in the Charles V. Park Library, and the Faculty Center for Innovative Teaching will announce a new initiative focused on classroom response systems.

TUESDAY

w American Red Cross Blood Drive will be held from noon to 6 p.m. at Kulhavi 142 in the Towers. Appointments can be made or walk-ins are welcome, and bring a picture ID. w Faculty Artist Brad DeRoche will be playing the guitar at 8 p.m. in the Music Building. Tickets are $3 for students and senior citizens and $5 for all others.

The motion read as follows: “The faculty members of the Department of Biology support the Senate’s motion of no confidence and call upon the Board of Trustees to address the concerns expressed therein,” Roberts said in an email. Boudreau said with numerous departments expressing unhappiness with the campus leadership, he hopes action will be taken soon. “I’d like the board of trustees to sit up and take notice of the widespread dissatisfaction with campus leadership,” he wrote in an email Sunday afternoon. “This is more than just a few disgruntled faculty members. I think that dissatisfaction is why almost 90 percent of the journalism faculty joined with colleagues across campus in

CASH |

Corrections In Friday’s story ‘‘Ticket prices for MSU football game set at $55,’’ the article states last year general admission was $20. That is incorrect; it was $22, the same as this year. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 53

Central Michigan Life EDITORIAL Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator

CONTINUED FROM 1A

“We’ve hired as many students or more as we ever have this year,” Goodwin said. “It’s great when there’s not as many jobs off-campus for students to go to that we’ve seen in years past.” Along with the $1.1 million contribution to the CMU workstudy program, the university also receives $900,000 in funding for the federal work-study program. Flint senior Aurielle Wilson has worked at the Charles V. Park Library through a work-study program since August 2010. Wilson said the pay isn’t near enough to contribute to tuition, but the networking opportunities and on-campus location make the job enjoyable. “I think that working here with a lot of different professionals gives students some networking opportunities,” Wilson

endorsing this vote of no confidence.” William Wandless, chairperson for the department of English, said a vote regarding the endorsement of the vote of no confidence would occur by ballot at a staff meeting scheduled for Friday. Five other departments, including sociology, anthropology and social work; philosophy and religion; political science; foreign language, literatures and cultures have since endorsed the December vote. The Department of Mathematics voted to support the vote on Thursday. Though no specific solution has been suggested by any department, faculty members continue to watch for action to be taken. “I’ll let the board of trustees decide what the next step should be, but acknowledging the problem would be a good start,” Boudreau said. university@cm-life.com

said. Marlette graduate student Alexandria Spinks has been enrolled in the work-study program for a year and a half, and said the ability to work on campus is nice for commuting purposes. Spinks began at University Recreation as a lifeguard, and has since moved up to student manager of the Student Activity Center. “It’s definitely nicer to work on-campus and it’s closer,” Spinks said. “It’s nice to be able to work holiday breaks too and not have to commute back-andforth.” Goodwin said the increased funding for the program has been marvelous, and said he hopes students will continue to enroll. “The work-study program provides a way for students to help cover their college costs and gain valuable experience in the workplace,” Goodwin said. “It’s a great program.” university@cm-life.com

ADVERTISING Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers

DETROIT | CONTINUED FROM 1A

VICTORIA ZEGLER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Big Rapids sophomore Becca Cechura places finished peanut butter and jelly sandwiches into brown paper bagged lunches during H.O.M.E. Prep, Homeless Outreach Ministry Equipping, Friday night in the basement of His House Christian Fellowship. Members of the church packaged more than 200 lunches to pass out on the streets of Detroit Saturday morning.

“God opened up my eyes to see that people that are homeless are still children of God, just like we are,” Gilpin said. “It might be a job loss or mental instability ... but they’re moms, dads and people’s children, no different than anyone else, except they’re homeless.” Gilpin developed HOME into a nonprofit in January 2011. They have worked with volunteers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana. Although many of those helped have expressed gratitude, some are suspicious about

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the group’s intentions. “There was a homeless guy who asked me that question once, and I didn’t know how to answer him,” Steffes said. “I just told him we wanted to love on him. It changed my perspective on the homeless ... Until you meet that one person, then it’s no longer a statistic. It’s a heart.” For more information or to get involved with HOME, contact Steffes at steff1nm@cmich. edu. studentlife@cm-life.com

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Troy senior Mike Parker takes a shot and is deflected by goalie West Bloomfield senior Matt Lenzi while playing hockey Sunday afternoon on Rose Pond. “We’re out here three days a week, Friday through Sunday,” Parker said. “It’s a marathon, we’re trying to get in shape.”

TECH | CONTINUED FROM 1A

After sending a print job to one of the kiosks, students can visit the print station within 24 hours and select their document from the screen to be printed. “We’re giving people a free dollar of print quota for logging in to the virtual lab, and then another dollar for printing through one of the stations,” OIT Help Desk Manager Jeffrey McDowell said. “Our hope by giving people a couple dollars of free credit is that they’ll tell others about it.” Since its release to students, 1,025 students have used the virtual lab and 581 have printed from the two stations in the library. As the number of users begins to increase, CMU will

SAC | CONTINUED FROM 1A

PROFESSIONAL STAFF Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

“One time, we had guys that were falling behind us that were saying nasty stuff,” she said. “You’ll get that sometimes, but you just keep walking.” Of the 200 bags they brought, only a handful remained. “We had a few leftover bags, because I think (people) try to stay out of the weather,” Mid Michigan junior Jared Shepardson, of Mount Pleasant, said. “It’s harder to find people in the winter, but we still seem able to.” HOME was started in 2009 by former Mount Pleasant 911 dispatcher Shelley Gilpin. She saw poverty in Detroit on a mission trip and said she felt God was calling her to do something. The sight of a homeless boy about the same age as her son, she said, broke her heart.

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demand. Ellipticals and treadmills are the most popular, so those get replaced the most frequently,” he said. “We do a full assessment of the machine and look at how many miles have been put on them. Then, we’ll decide whether to get a new machine.” The efforts of employees do not go unnoticed by students. “The equipment works well, and they’re constantly fixing things if they break,” Grand Rapids Sophomore Courtney Heeren said. “My only complaint would be that sometimes there’s a lack of cleaning supplies, but they are typically very helpful in getting more.”

need to increase hardware and licensing, which will cost the university about $25 per user, McDowell said. He doesn’t believe the virtual lab will reduce the traffic in CMU’s physical labs because of the other perks of using those areas. “This is all about enabling mobility, though there are certain appeals to labs, too,” he said. “People like to go there to get away from other obligations to focus on work, and that’s not going to go away.” The OIT department has also improved equipment throughout classrooms on campus. “CMU spends approximately $300,000 per year from an annual allocation on keeping classroom equipment up-todate and working,” Rehm said. In addition to the technological advancements, CMU has made online forms of 2011 W-2

forms available to university employees, which Rehm said has been successful in providing convenience to employees and saving time in the mailing process. The switch to online W-2 forms speeds up the availability for employees and would save CMU more than $6,000 a year, according to the OIT report. The OIT released its annual report in August, comparing CMU to 11 other universities, including Eastern Michigan University and Western Michigan University. CMU’s total IT budget of almost $14.7 million makes up 4.26 percent of the campus budget, which is almost $5.5 million less than the benchmark, according to the report. Director of Public Relations Steve Smith was unavailable to comment on the report.

Brighton sophomore Emily Huckabone frequents the SAC and said she has never been unhappy with the experience. “The employees are always friendly and helpful, and the machines are

always clean and in really good condition,” she said. “Little things like that make me way more likely to want to come and work out.”

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IN FOCUS Monday, Jan. 30, 2012

| cm-life.com

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

PHOTOS BY LIBBY MARCH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

MHTV crew members prepare for their broadcast of men’s and women’s basketball games about half an hour before the women’s game on Saturday at McGuirk Arena. The crew began their preparations at noon with three hours to spare to ensure everything would run smoothly.

a key role MHTV gives broadcasting students opportunity for real-world experience By Jessica Fecteau | Senior Reporter Countless hours of practice and preparation culminates at the tip-off for the Moore Hall Television crew. “Think through what you need, and make sure it’s on there,” MHTV Sports Director Stephanie McClung said to her crew of about 20 while packing up the Gator utility vehicle. Every gameday the equipment needs to be transferred from Moore Hall to McGuirk Arena for set up, the Lake Orion senior said. “We’re always going, going, going,” she said. “Long days are one of the things we anticipate.” While brushing shoulders with the Central Michigan University basketball team and athletic crew, MHTV members take over the nearly empty arena about three hours before game time to set up their equipment. “We’re kind of a well-oiled machine at this point,” McClung said. Four cameras, switchboards and monitors are among the many items required for a smooth game while filming. “On game day, my main job is to make sure everything at our ‘crazy box’ is hooked up and working properly,” said MHTV Sports Producer Chad Pothoff while describing the broadcast station set up. Pothoff said something goes wrong every game, and there will never be a perfect broadcast. “Students are going to make mistakes, and this is the place for them to make those mistakes so you can teach them and they’ll learn from it,” he said. As the stadium progressively fills with fans, players and athletic crew members, the MHTV crew huddles for a final production meeting before the game. “If you have a question, now is the time to ask it,” Plymouth graduate student Kelly Armbruster said to the staff. Although the game is live to tape, McClung said the crew still treats it as though they are filming for live television. As the director, she tells each camera operator what to do and when to be ready. “Even though we are a student organization, we want to make this as professional as possible,” she said.

One key role in the flow of production is the floor director. Clarkston junior Megan Shire’s main goal is to make sure the commentators know what to say at all times. “The director tells you what to say in the headset, and we basically give the commentator information when needed,” she said. “We also let them know information about player stats and the key players of the game.” Pothoff said there is more to broadcasting than a lot of students think. “A lot of people come here thinking, ‘I’ll major in broadcasting,’ and thinking, ‘Oh, that will be easy; I get to play with cameras all day and touch cool equipment,’” he said. “And they don’t know what they are actually doing, so coming here is showing them how broadcasting works.” McClung said being involved with MHTV puts students in a good place for landing a job upon graduation. “For anyone who wants to go into sports broadcasting, not only is the experience helpful, but MHTV Sports will give you a wonderful opportunity,” she said. “It doesn’t matter what skill level you are. It doesn’t matter who you know. If you just show up and are willing to do anything, you’re going to get opportunities.” studentlife@cm-life.com

St. Ignace senior Taylor Dykstra grins while meeting with other MHTV crew members to decide roles for Saturday’s broadcasts of women’s and men’s basketball on Tuesday at Moore Hall.

TOP: Jackson junior Chance McBride readies audio equipment before MHTV’s broadcasting of Saturday’s basketball games on Saturday at McGuirk Arena. BOTTOM: MHTV crew members prepare for their broadcast of men’s and women’s basketball games about twenty minutes before 2 p.m. Saturday at McGuirk Arena. Though the women’s game started at 3 p.m., the crew began their preparations at noon with three hours to spare to ensure everything would run smoothly.

Bangor senior Amber Barnett shows Sterling Heights senior Mike Arondoski how to set the white balance on a camera before MHTV’s broadcast of Saturday’s basketball games at McGuirk Arena.

Clarkston junior Megan Shire readies electrical cords before MHTV’s broadcast of basketball games on Saturday at McGuirk Arena. Shire was working on the MHTV crew as floor director for the women’s game and technical director for the men’s game.


4A

VOICES Monday Jan. 30, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | Fight during women’s basketball game should leave athletics embarrassed

A black eye

Andrew Dooley Student Life Editor

Falling Down

T

he fight during the women’s basketball game Wednesday between Central Michigan University and Ohio University at McGuirk Arena was embarrassing for everyone involved but was worsened by a poor response from the university’s athletics department. Following CMU’s 67-53 win against the Bobcats, highlighted by a first-half fight that resulted in the ejection of two players, players did not speak to the media, and head coach Sue Guevara would not speak about the incident. Instead, the department issued a four-sentence statement from the university and Athletics Director Dave Heeke touting sportsmanship and accountability before closing: “The incident will be reviewed by the department and by the conference office. Until that process is done and we clearly understand what occurred, it would be premature to comment any further.” It was clear sportsmanship was thrown out the window during those few minutes, so why not spend a few minutes after the game taking accountability for it? Every one of the 543 listed people in attendance saw what happened. Thousands more that

evening on YouTube did, too (and still are). Officials should have immediately said players involved in the fight would be suspended. Instead, athletics waited to comment until after the MidAmerican Conference had handed down a two-game suspension to CMU freshman guards Crystal Bradford and Jessica Green and freshman forward Jas’Mine Bracey, along with OU junior forward Porsha Harris. Punches were thrown, benches cleared and, while most tried to stop the melee from worsening, others tried to get involved. Let’s call it what it was: a schoolyard fight on a basketball court. And for what reason? Bracey and Harris may be the only ones to know. So why not come forward right away and take accountability for the situation? Instead, the athletics department tried sweeping it under the rug by diminishing the

andrew kuhn/Staff photographer

A benches-clearing brawl broke out during the first half of Wednesday night’s women’s basketball game between Central Michigan and Ohio University at McGuirk Arena in Mount Pleasant. Ohio’s Porsha Harris and Central Michigan’s Jas’Mine Bracey were ejected following the altercation, and the Chippewas went on to beat the Bobcats 67-53.

incident and not directly addressing it. To this day, no mention of the fight, ejections or suspensions have been made on cmuchippewas.com. A passionate, unfiltered reaction from Guevara after the game could have gone a long way in taking responsibility for her players’ actions. Letting Crystal Bradford and Jessica Green speak on the team’s behalf, apologizing for what transpired on the court, would have been the adult thing to do. It wasn’t until 36 hours later,

after suspensions were handed down by the MAC, Guevara and her players — reading off a prepared statement apologizing to the school, fans and community — were allowed to discuss the situation. CMU should not have waited until it was punished to apologize or admit something wrong happened on the court Wednesday night. Enforcing self-imposed suspensions immediately would have been the responsible way to handle the situation.

Fighting for Republican establishment Nathan Inks Columnist During the past week, there has been a lot of talk about the “Republican establishment” coming out in opposition to Newt Gingrich in a campaign to ensure Mitt Romney is chosen as the Republican nominee. What exactly people mean by “Republican establishment” is not exactly clear, but apparently they are a bunch of mean, nasty people who go around slandering Gingrich in order to get the “moderate” Romney elected ­— at least that is the story coming from the media, the Tea Party, and lately, Sarah Palin. Palin recently wrote a Facebook note accusing “Cannibals in GOP Establishment” of “Employ(ing) Tac-

tics of the Left,” saying “we need a fair primary that is not prematurely cut short by the GOP establishment using Alinsky tactics to kneecap Governor Romney’s chief rival.” The “Alinsky tactics” Palin refers to are those of Saul Alinsky, who wrote “Rules for Radicals,” a book focusing on how to rebel against the establishment. How she figures the establishment is using “Alinsky tactics” against Gingrich is a bit of a mystery, considering Gingrich likes to accuse President Barack Obama of using Alinsky tactics, and if the establishment used such tactics, they would somehow be rebelling against themselves — so clearly there is some logic lacking in that accusation. The theme of her note is two-fold: that the establishment should stop pushing for Romney and consider Gingrich, Santorum and Paul as viable options as the party’s nomi-

nee, but also that this is bigger than Romney versus Gingrich — it is a fight between the “establishment” and the Tea Party. The reason Palin and others talk about this fight is because of recent attacks against Gingrich being a “Reagan Republican.” But are accusations such as this really indicative of a schism in the GOP? Not really. Ultimately, it comes down to primary election politics and nothing more. Gingrich was the Speaker of the House of Representatives — second in line for the presidency. Romney was a governor. If anything, Gingrich is the Washington insider who has been a part of the “establishment” longer than Romney. So why are more of the “Old Guard” Republicans backing Romney? They have witnessed more elections; they know which candidates can win. Gingrich has a lot of

baggage, while Romney has shown he can compromise with those on the other side of the aisle to get things done but still abide to Republican ideals. Romney is the electable choice, and those who have been involved in politics see this. The Tea Partiers support Gingrich as the more conservative choice, because they mainly vote on principle — but voting purely on principle without factoring in electability typically ends in a loss on Election Day. Palin is right — the GOP needs to let the primary process play itself out, but in doing so, Republican voters need to think about electing someone who can actually win. It’s time to pick a nominee, not throw around conspiracy theories to cloud the nomination process. Editor’s note: Nathan Inks is the president of the College Republicans.

[your voice] Comments in response to “Faculty Association contract voting figures unlikely to be released after denied FOIA request” Trying to be Objective, Friday Ratification by the faculty of the new Agreement is by a simple majority of those voting. While the rancor surrounding the 2011 negotiations far exceeded any prior year within recent memory (and 2008 was no ‘picnic’), and interest about the process this year is reasonably higher than in the past, the FA has never released the specific vote tally. It has always simply announced “yea” or “nay.” One could therefore defend the decision not to release the vote tally. What’s more interesting to me is Dr. Frey’s reported comment, “The main disadvantage [to releasing the actual vote] is that this information can be misinterpreted and also could be used against the FA in future bargaining.” I’d like to hear more from her on these two points. How could the actual vote tally be “misinterpreted” (and by whom?), and how could that same information be used against the FA in the future? Based on other reported comments by Frey (the Executive Board was “fairly evenly divided” about the vote release), it appears to me the FA Executive Board is confronting some interesting internal dialogue these days. Perhaps the real rift at CMU isn’t between administration and “faculty” but between leadership within the FA. Too bad this same leadership refuses to be open with the public, even as it stands by its accusations of the CMU administration for lack of transparency. Who’s being honorable here?

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

Chip, Friday Why not FOIA each and every email sent and received by not only the union president but union officers and senior members. You’re bound to find something.

Pbg, Saturday They apologized. Live, learn and move on. Don’t act like it’s the first time, and it probably won’t be the last time in CMU history. But let’s hope so. Keep it moving.

Interested Observer, Saturday In fact, the vote totals after the 2008 negotiation were made public. So, it’s not true that these numbers have never been released. But I agree with you on another point: how, exactly, could the figures be misinterpreted? Why does it matter if the administration knows that the vote was close or not?

FomerGDI, Saturday So what you’re saying is we should toss every student that gets into a physical altercation? In that case, many of your Greek groups, would have been kicked off campus numerous times. And FYI if you think your tuition is helping to pay for an athlete on scholarship, you are sadly miss informed.

Comments in response to “Suspended women’s basketball players sorry to fans, community and CMU” formergreek, Saturday If a fight occurred anywhere else on campus, the students involved would be arrested and possibly expelled, yet these girls can just apologize and everything is fine? Why are the rest of the CMU students footing the bill for these girls’ tuition? Fan14, Saturday I am still confused to why Green was suspended. I was at the game, and I did not see her throw any punches. I understand the suspension of the other two. My real question is, why did Coach Gallow Bradford to continue to play the rest of the game? If the behavior wasn’t tolerated then Bradford should have been benched (since she wasn’t ejected) for the remainder.

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

Comments in response to “Redesign of cmich.edu to separate student portal, website; iCentral to be eliminated for ‘Central Link’” 912, Friday Almost two years and more than a half-million dollars invested “for a good web experience”?!? Is this the same website that CMU contracted to an outside firm, even though it had the expertise to do the job right here on campus? The folks in charge here barely bat an eye when it comes to this sort of nonsensical spending, but they plead poverty when their janitors or secretaries ask for a paltry pay hike to feed their families. Who’s running this show? 1111, Saturday I’m sure central has funds allocated to certain projects that need to be spent. Also, having a few inexperienced IT students handle a big project like this is really not a good idea. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Comments in response to “Obama in Ann Arbor; ‘Make college more affordable’” Michmediaperson, Sunday Obama agrees with me about bringing down the costs of the crazy spending at colleges. He must be reading my posts. Cut faculty and staff in half, and cut the tuition in half. Cut President Coleman’s U-M salary from $800,000 down to $175,000. Likewise with George Ross. You could cut his salary in half! Get rid of expensive guest speakers, PC courses and development, and college will be affordable again. Thanks Barack for agreeing with me. I noticed he only could get 3,000 people to show. I remember those campaigns when he drew 15,000 to 20,000 in venues like liberal Ann Arbor. Guess most of the people know now they got fooled when he was promising free college for everyone! As far as green energy, all the green energy companies are going bankrupt. Nobody wants green energy and electric cars. No demand! Jay L, Sunday You cannot make college more affordable by handing out more federal loans to students who do not belong in traditional college in the first place. It is the federal loans that IS the direct reason tuition is so high in the first place. Increase federal loans and increase in tuition.

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

I have never been a particularly graceful person. Despite brief stints on the track and tennis teams in my glory days, I have never been an athlete. In grade school, I bowled a 27 at my cousins’s birthday party. There were bumpers involved. Still, I have fallen a record number of times this winter. While the sidewalks on campus are finally being regularly salted and cleared, the sidewalks in my neighborhood and downtown remain thoroughly glacial. In a lot of places, it makes a lot more sense to walk in the street or on people’s lawns, which isn’t exactly safe or fair to the homeowners. Pedestrians shouldn’t have to choose between falling, risking getting hit by a car or trespassing. This might seem like a trite subject, but don’t confuse slip and fall accidents with cartoon banana peels. I have never come away without anything more than a bruised ego or backside all the times I have biffed it, but there are plenty of people who aren’t so lucky. I was speaking to a student in one of my classes last week who is dealing with neurological problems after falling, hitting her head and suffering a concussion. For people with pre-existing mobility issues or the elderly, falling isn’t silly — it’s dangerous. It might be a pain for me to navigate our frosty footpaths, but it’s a much more daunting proposition for someone on crutches or in a wheelchair. People with disabilities, like my Mom, who has a knee replacement and has a very hard time getting around in a supermarket, let alone on a rink, shouldn’t be forced to stick to cars as the only means of safe transportation. Obviously, there are economic and environmental reasons every sidewalk can’t be cleared, sanded or salted. But that’s no reason to collectively give up on better, safer infrastructure. In order to continue to move toward a healthier and “greener” future, cities need to be walkable. It’s very hard to see how an impassably icy sidewalk helps us toward that admirable goal. With budgets stretched, maintenance is one of the first things that gets trimmed, but maybe a bit of perspective is needed. Funding for winter sidewalk maintenance would make cities safer, more assessable to more people and encourage healthier habits. According to a 2010 report from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, falling is the leading cause of non-lethal injury for Americans across every age category. While many of these occur inside the home, falling on ice remains a clear and present danger. It’s also one that’s entirely preventable. Continuing to ignore the concrete luge leading from Bellows to Broadway leaves us on a slippery slope.

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805 Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life. com in the order they are received.

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


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Central Michigan Life || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || 5A

[NEwS]

Retired English professor leads charge against lack of learning by college students

HIT IT|Students compete, exercise

“We found some very interesting results.”

By Kelsey De Haan Staff Reporter

brad Lowe/Staff photographer

Central Michigan University students play a games of racquetball in the Student Activity Center on Sunday afternoon.

Mount Pleasant heats up with 21st Night of Louisiana Sienna Monczunski and Jordan Spence Staff Reporters

People looking to alleviate their cabin fever and escape the cold with Cajun food and dancing attended the 21st annual Night of Louisiana at Finch Fieldhouse Saturday. The event was co-hosted by Central Michigan University Public Radio and University Events and drew approximately 900 people to dance, drink and enjoy live music. “There is no question it’s a celebration of life,” Bob Ebner, director of University Events said. “It’s like a huge block party, and I think it’s the most fun event University Events puts on. For me, it’s the most gratifying, because everyone leaves here with a smile on their face.” Amid the tables decorated with Mardi Gras beads and masks were couples on the dance floor two-stepping. Perhaps the brightest and most noticeable of everyone were Lansing residents Linda and Paul Loeffler. The Loefflers

adorned themselves in traditional Mardi Gras costumes. Paul’s costume was bright with orange, red, green, purple and complete with a mask and an accordion. Paul made his costume from scratch, using pajama pants. Paul said his mother was a seamstress and taught him how to sew at a very young age. The couple danced and took pictures and posed for pictures with others in attendance. The Loefflers said they promote Mardi Gras parties in Lansing, and Paul taught himself how to play the accordion and joined a Cajun band. “We’ve been in love with this culture for 30 years,” Linda said. “The music just has so much drive and pump to it. The first time we went, we had a blast, and so we decided, ‘Why not come in costume the next time?’” Ebner first brought the event to Mount Pleasant 21 years ago after falling in love with the people and music of New Orleans during a trip there. Purple and pink lights illuminated the bands on stage, “Balfa

Toujours,” led by Christine Balfa and “Terrance Simiem and Zydeco Experience.” Ebner said he tries to bring both Zydeco and Cajun tunes to the dance floor, because they provide different styles of music. “I’ve always had a Cajun band, because it has some of the more traditional dances such as waltzes,” Ebner said. “While Zydeco has more of a rockin’, faster sound to it.” Along with traditional music, food was provided by Aramark, along with a full bar serving mixed drinks, including “the hurricane,” which Ebner gets the mix for from New Orleans. Shepherd resident Gina Del Castillo said she has come every year for the past 18 years to celebrate her birthday. “I love that all types of people and all ages of people come here,” Castillo said. “I especially love the old-time dances and how everybody’s together and included. It warms my heart to see all ages of people dancing together.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe opposes Lansing casino By Jordan Spence Staff Reporter

The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe is one opponent against a Northern Michigan tribe’s plan for construction of a casino in downtown Lansing. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa wants to build a $260 million, 279,000-square-foot casino on Michigan Avenue, said Public Relations Director Michelle Bouschor. “The reason we don’t agree with what they are doing is because they are not following the gaming act,” said Frank Cloutier, public relations director for the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe. “Also, that was our original land, not theirs.” The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has joined together

with Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi FireKeepers Casino near Battle Creek to rally against the Sault Ste. Marie tribe and Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero. Bouschor said Bernero has supported the cause because of the 1,500 permanent jobs and 700 construction jobs the project could bring to the area. “We think it’s going to be a great project for the city and tribe,” Bouschor said. “It’s going to bring jobs and tourism to the city. It will also bring a plan for us to provide services such as health care to the Sault Ste. Marie tribe that we’ve had to cut back on.” The revenue from the casino will also be used to go toward sending every Lansing School District graduate to college, Bouschor said. To get the rights to the land,

the Sault Ste. Marie tribe has to ask the federal government to approve the tribe’s filing of taking the land into a trust. Cloutier said the new casino will not only cut into the Saginaw Chippewa’s market share, but it will water down a competitive market. This will not only decrease the quality of gambling, but the number of jobs as well, he said. “We’re going to continue this fight through the legislation state-wide and federal, and how illegal these actions are, and the negative implications it will lead to,” Cloutier said. Bouschor said the casino they plan to build will be more of a mid-level size with approximately 300 slots and 48 gaming tables. metro@cm-life.com

  

The Teaching and Learning Collective at Central Michigan University hosted a conference Friday in response to the presentation last fall of the book “Academically Adrift.” The book, written by Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, questioned how much students really learn in the classroom. Friday’s conference highlighted correlational studies that link certain attributes of faculty members to their popularity among students. Peter Koper, the conference keynote speaker and retired English faculty member, along with other academic colleagues, authored a 2008 article pointing out strange patterns between a teacher’s “helpfulness, clarity, quality, easiness and hotness” to the ratings of faculty members teaching in American and Canadian universities. Koper and his team used websites such as RateMyProfessor.com to collect student evaluations based on the listed categories. “When we did our study, we were given the data set for RateMyProfessor.com by the man who was then the president and founder,” Koper said. “That meant that we had the postings for more than 6,000 teachers in the United States and Canada who had at least 20 ratings.” Koper said as a team, he and his colleagues were interested in how valid the recommendations were when studying the correlations between categories and student opinions.

Peter Koper, retired english faculty member “We found some very interesting results,” Koper said. “Some departments were marked high. Others, such as sciences, were marked very low. However, when we subtracted the scores for hotness and easiness from the scores for quality, the rankings suddenly flipped.” Because Koper’s findings were so striking, he admitted it was not hard to have his article published. Universities in both the U.S. and Canada showed their students were more apt to picking easier classes with teachers who would, in a sense, “spoon-feed” them, rather than provide challenges for the students. “This study came out with pretty depressing findings,” said Merlyn Mowrey, codirector of the conference and associate professor of philosophy and religion. “Students are not learning complex reasoning, and the amount that they do learn from the time that they enter into the university until two years after or four years after shows negligible improvement.” For six hours, the Bovee University Center flooded with students and staff who came to listen to retired faculty members and student speakers respond to Koper’s study. Activities included thinking assessments and adaptation methods, questioning whether faculty members should adapt to the mindset of the students or vice-versa. Student

speakers were able to address how they felt about their student life and challenges within Central Michigan University. “I think that this information is applicable to some students, but not all of them,” Talia Rybak, a graduate student in the school of music said. “I am a graduate student at this university, and I feel very overwhelmed. I guess I feel that college is really what you make of it, and sometimes that results in students not showing enough effort.” The lack of dedicated learning on campus may not entirely be the fault of the students. Faculty members who spoke during the conference said some students simply have different learning processes that may come across as being less advanced as universities would like to see. With the addition of these changes in the curriculum, Koper, along with other faculty members, believe they will begin to see exactly what should be happening: students working hard, buckling down and preparing for their futures. “The sorts of things described in ‘Academically Adrift’ need to become the normal way of teaching classes on this campus,” Koper said. “This means more reading, more writing, more serious studies and more intensive development of critical skills.” university@cm-life.com

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6A || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life/category/news.com

[News]

College Republicans to hold presidential straw poll Tuesday By Sienna Monczunski Staff Reporter

photos by Jeff smith/Staff photographer

Midland resident Sangeeta Kar performs and leads an Odissi dance during India Night Saturday in Plachta Auditorium. Odissi is the oldest classical dance form of India, characterized by its sculpturesque postures and rounded, liquid movements.

Indian night brings 500 to Plachta Auditorium Anna McNeil Staff Reporter

Community members entering Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium Saturday night were greeted by the smiling elephant-headed Hindu deity, Ganesha. Religious symbols were just a small part of Indian Night, which included a brief history of India, song and dance. Members of the Indian Student Association (ISA) put on the event to educate the Central Michigan University and Mount Pleasant community about the traditions, fashions, dance styles, languages, history and overall culture of India. Ashita Goswami, India graduate student and ISA president, said more than 500 people attended. “From 6 to 8 p.m., it was jam-packed; we actually had to open up the balcony,” she said. “I am still receiving compliments on how organized and well the night went.” The night started out with the national anthems of the United States and India. There was a brief slideshow that gave an overview of the history and background of India. “I didn’t know much

Mount Pleasant resident Shylesh Valiyavettil laughs Saturday afternoon during rehearsal for Indian Night at Plachta Auditorium. “I like the Indian spirt and can’t wait to share it,” Valiyaveettil said.

about Indian culture. I learned that every state is like its own country,” Germany freshman Sarah Einwag said. “Each state has its own culture, food, gods and fashion. That was overwhelming to me.” The audience was told the event coincided with an Indian national holiday, India’s Republic Day, which celebrates the creation of the Indian constitution. There were performances given; two dance groups brought to CMU for the night, as well as a group of students. Traditional dances with

Sarah Einwag, Germany freshman

ghoonghroos (foot bells) told the story of the gods and their powers, as the crowd clapped and whistled along to the music. The night’s events in the auditorium ended with a fashion show displaying the style of western India. After the dancing, singing and fashion, the event moved to Powers Hall for a meal of traditional Indian food from Lansing’s Swagath Indian Cuisine. The meal included dishes such as chicken biryani, chicken tikka masala, dal makhani, aloo gobi and basmati rice, said East Lansing resident Sid Reddy, the restaurant’s owner. “I think the night went extremely well. It went beyond my expectations,” Goswami said. “It was a definite success.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Film crew captures CMU-led research on Great Lakes wetlands Central Michigan University researchers have been given the opportunity to oversee important scientific work in the Great Lakes region — and all of their hard work has been caught on film for a new documentary. A University of Notre Dame film crew followed the researchers from CMU and other universities involved with the work, creating a documentary that emphasizes the importance of the wetlands. CMU was given the opportunity to oversee the grant and administer the funds after Don Uzarski, founding director of the Institute for Great Lakes Research, helped to write and submit a $10 million grant. Other schools working with CMU under the grant include the University of Notre Dame, Grand Valley State University, University of Minnesota-Duluth, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Lake Superior State University, University of Windsor, SUNY Brockport and Oregon State University.

Kathy Backus, assistant director of public relations, said the research was a great opportunity for the many schools to collaborate and work toward a common goal. “This is one of the first times that all of these separate entities are working together and creating one collection point for the data,” Backus said. Carli Gurholt, a Scandinavian graduate student in biology aiding with the research, said the wetlands are more than just an environmental issue. They are key for other important purposes, including fishing, hunting, preventing floods and trapping carbon dioxide. “Wetlands are important,” Gurholt said. “They’re slowly declining; we don’t have as many as in the past. In the Great Lakes region, there are less than 50 percent of the wetlands than what used to be there, so it’s time to start doing some preservation.” Jessica Sherman, a field crew leader and lab manager for the grant, said one of the long-term goals for the research is to create a uniform monitoring system to better measure the health of the wetlands. “The wetlands are in good condition but need conser-

vation and preservation,” she said. “We don’t want to lose any more and restore as much as we can. It catches me off guard, the impact of invasive species to the once really high quality, beautiful areas that are now degrading.” The film crews did a great job of portraying the importance of the work being done in the Great Lakes, Gurholt said. “(The documentary was important) to get the word out,” Gurholt said. “It was an outreach. People undervalue the worth of the wetlands, and the Notre Dame people that made the documentary did a good job targeting many people — not just scientists, but it was able to reach everyone really well, even if they don’t know much about wetlands already.” Sherman said the magnitude and importance of this research opportunity is quite broad. “This is an excellent opportunity for our research lab and CMU to be at the forefront and involved in a movement of bringing attention to coastal wetlands and their importance,” she said. university@cm-life.com

Ben Greene, College Republicans Vice Chairman lege Republicans Vice Chairman Ben Greene said the name “straw polls” came from an old term used to describe informal polls. Such votes do not have an official outcome but rather gauge public opinion. “We want to do something special for this year, because Michigan is an important state in the presidential process, due to the pretty sizeable number of delegates,” Greene said. “This is a good way to keep track of where CMU stands and who has the most support.” Tuesday’s poll will be the first-ever conducted by College

Republicans, but Greene said it will not be the last. Michigan’s primary is scheduled for Feb. 28. “Anytime students hear about things going on with the primary, they become more apt to get involved,” said Stephanie Jaczkowski, first vice chairwoman of College Republicans and Clinton Township senior. “Since students will be more aware of when primary votes will take place, they will have more incentive to register to vote and get their absentee ballots.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Drinking amnesty bill for minors sitting in House after passing committee By Hailee Sattavara Senior Reporter

“I didn’t know much about Indian culture. I learned that every state is like its own country.”

By Alayna Smith Staff Reporter

Students will be able to decide whether they think Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney or Rick Santorum should win the Republican nomination in Michigan’s 2012 presidential primary. College Republicans at Central Michigan University will conduct a straw poll in which students vote for their favorite candidate through ballots that will be counted by members of the registered student organization. The poll will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday in front of, or inside, the Bovee University Center and in the Charles V. Park Library. Members of the College Republicans will also be walking around and collecting votes from students. Grand Rapids senior and Col-

“This is a good way to keep track of where CMU stands and who has the most support.”

Minors who have had too much to drink may experience less hassle in seeking medical attention in the future. Legislation is making progress that would exempt intoxicated minors and their friends who help them get medical attention from receiving a minor-inpossession charge. Rep. Kevin Cotter, RMount Pleasant, is a member of the judiciary policy committee and voted in favor of the legislation. “It’s an effective bill in light of my district,” he said. This medical amnesty legislation was passed in a judiciary policy committee and now stands of the floor of the Michigan House of Representatives. A similar bill was passed through the House in 2010 but died in the Senate. Some thought the bill was an excuse for underage binge drinking. But Cotter said minors seeking help when needed is a major problem. “We want to encourage students to seek help when they need it ... student safety is a primary concern,” he said. Clinton Township senior Sam Randolph said

“We want to encourage students to seek help when they need it... student safety is a primary concern.” Kevin Cotter, Rep. R-Mount Pleasant she wondered why medical amnesty was not already in effect. “It’s not like they came in there (the ER) with a beer in their hand,” Randolph said. Randolph said she does not agree with the current minor-in-possession laws in place. “The first priority should be to help the minor,” she said. Cotter said he looks forward to this bill receiving a

vote on the House floor. “We have accounted for safety measures within the bill to protect those who are also underage to bring friends where they can receive help,” he said. Marketing Manager at McLaren Central Michigan Hospital, Nicole Sanders, could not comment as to how the hospital’s policies would change. metro@cm-life.com

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SPORTS Central Michigan Life

Section B

| Monday, Jan. 30, 2012

| cm-life.com

[ I N S I D E] w Catch up with NFL rookie Nick Bellore, 2B w Wrestler’s wins vacated by NCAA, 3B w Bowling Green coach misses game because stroke, 3B

GYMNASTICS, 3B

Two track and field records set over weekend

Adams, Kettlewell both break school marks in events By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

A couple of Central Michigan men’s track and field athletes entered the weekend eyeing a couple records. Two reached those goals. At the Penn State National Saturday, senior multi-event athlete Josh Kettlewell won the

s e ve n - e ve n t heptathlon with a careerhigh score of 5,673, which broke a CMU 13-year record. “He set the multi record, Tecumseh Adams that’s for sure,” assistant coach Matt Kaczor said. “With all the work he’s put in, it’s nice to see the rewards.” The score was 300 points higher than both the runnerups Saturday and the previous CMU record. The record was

set in 1998 by Nathan Parker. Kettlewell won the 60 meter hurdles with a personal-best time of 8.33. He also finished fourth in the 1000 meter run with a time of 2:42. He marked 16-10.75 in the pole vault. At Indiana, sophomore distance runner Tecumseh Adams also set a school record Saturday. He finished second place in the 5k event with a time of 13:53.08 in Bloomington, Ind. He said Thursday he was aiming for a sub-fourteen minute race to give him a good chance

of qualifying for the NCAA Championship in March. It was the first CMU 5k to be under the 14 minute mark. The 5k automatic qualifier for the NCAA Championship is 13:44. The top-17 runners in the nation are selected. Adams said he will not know for a while if his time qualifies. “My time might make it in,” he said. “I have a pretty good chance. Last year, my time was the final spot (in the championship).” Coach Kaczor, who traveled with Adams to Indiana, said

the drive there was not a problem. “We try to keep it as simple as possible,” he said. “When we got there, you could see his nerves a little bit about a halfhour before the race, but I just reminded him he’s been training for it.” Adams said during the race, there was a “rabbit,” a runner who leads and sets the pace. It helped him settle into a pace. He averaged 4:27 per mile. He said his techniques to A TRACK | 3B

By John Manzo Senior Reporter

ANDREW KUHN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Senior 197 pounder Chad Friend wrestles Lehigh’s Kadeem Samuels Friday night at McGuirk Arena in Mount Pleasant. Friend lost to Samuels by a decision of 10-4.

Losing grip Team loses at Kent State, no longer controls its own destiny in the MAC

T

Track and field records fall Seven-event heptathlon w Old record holder: Nathan Parker (1998) w Old record: 5,373 total score w New record holder: Josh Kettlewell w New record: 5,673 total score 5,000 meters w Old record holder: Geoff Goolsby (1989) w Old record: 14:06.7 w New record holder: Tecumseh Adams w New record: 13:53.08

Men’s basketball drops fifth in a row to Akron

WRESTLING

By Jeff Papworth | Staff Reporter

he Central Michigan wrestling team lost to No. 16 Kent State 22-13 and a shot at clinching the outright Mid-American Conference title on Sunday. Although things looked grim for the Chippewas when they were down 13-0 and Donnie Corby was losing 2-0 in his match, they battled back. Corby tallied five unanswered points to win a 5-2 decision to gave CMU a spark at Kent State, Ohio. Fast forward to Chad Friend’s match against KSU’s Keith Witt and the Chippewas losing 16-13 with the score 1-1 with less than two minutes left in the third period. But the CMU comeback attempt was foiled when Witt snagged a takedown with seconds remaining. “I knew the (last) two were both going to be pretty close” CMU wrestler Ben Bennett said. “I felt like we had a pretty good chance.”

Team wins one, loses one over weekend

BRAD LOWE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Freshman 149-pounder Joey Kielbasa struggles to hold down Lehigh’s Kyle Rosser Friday night at McGuirk Arena. Rosser defeated Kielbasa with a 11-5 decision.

MAC wrestling title Scenario’s: w For CMU to win it outright Kent State has to lose its remaining two games w For CMU to share Kent State needs to split its remaining two games

Kent State schedule: w Friday, Buffalo (5-11, 0-1 MAC) w Sunday, EMU (11-4, 2-1)

A WRESTLING | 3B

Derek Jackson looked like a player who was a part of a team that just lost its fifth-straight game. The sophomore guard, who had a game-high 21 points, sat dejected at the post-game press conference after the Central Michigan men’s basketball team lost 74-64 against Mid-American Conference-leading Akron Saturday at McGuirk Arena. “It’s hard, but like I said before, we’re going to keep fighting,” Jackson said. “We have Kent State coming in here on Tuesday, and that’s a good team. So we’re going to prepare for them, and hopefully we fight, play and hopefully we’ll get a win and get off this losing streak.” The Chippewas were overmatched in the first half against the Zips, trailing 40-28 heading into the locker room but made it a game late. The momentum shifted when Jackson knocked down a three-pointer from the corner with 3:21 remaining, cutting what was once a 19-point lead, down to three. The crowd stood to its feet, but it was shortlived. Junior center Zeke Marshall tipped in a missed free throw by Quincy Briggs with 1:35 remaining, making it a six-point lead for Akron. Jackson fouled Briggs with 1:37 remaining, and the forward knocked down the first free throw but missed the second, allowing Marshall to score the tip in. “I was battling and playing my hardest, and I’m pretty sure my teammates were, too,” Jackson said. “We cut it down to three, we played hard, we just didn’t get the rebound. If we would have gotten the rebound, it probably would have been a differ-

Scoreboard

64

74

UP NEXT Tuesday, 7:07 p.m. CMU (7-13, 2-5 MAC) @ Kent State (14-6, 4-3)

ent outcome right now.” It was a downward spiral after. CMU head coach Ernie Zeigler received a technical moment after guard Trey Zeigler turned over the ball. Trey, who knocked down 4-of-5 free throws, scored 16 points. The Chippewas shot 84.6 percent from the freethrow line but didn’t nearly get to the line as much as the Zips. The Zips made more free throws (22) than CMU attempted (13). “Those are numbers you usually see when you’re on the road,” Ernie said about the free-throw margin. “I guess that’s what comes with wearing that mantra or that bulls-eye as the number-one team in the conference.” Junior forward Olivier Mbaigoto and senior center Andre Coimbra helped lead the attempted comeback. They scored eight and five points respectively, all in the second half. “I’m really encouraged with the way our guys showed some spirit to come back and continue to fight and battle,and we put ourselves in a position where we had an opportunity there down late with the best team in the conference,” Erie said. “We just came up a step short.” The Chippewas look to snap their five-game losing streak at 7:07 p.m. Tuesday against Kent State at McGuirk Arena. sports@cm-life.com

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Team loses to top-MAC team It takes Bowling Green overtime to beat the Chippewas By Brandon Champions Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan women’s basketball team faced plenty of adversity Saturday when it faced first-place Bowling Green at McGuirk Arena. Without its three-leading scorers, the Chippewas lost to the Mid-American Conference leaders 77-72 in overtime. BGSU (18-3 overall, 8-0 MidAmerican Conference) won its eleventh-straight game. “That was a really tough game we just played,” CMU head coach Sue Guevara said. “I thought our players followed the game plan perfectly, and I was very happy with our effort

and our execution.” CMU (12-10 overall, 4-4 MAC) was without freshman guards Crystal Bradford and Jessica Green and freshman forward Jas’Mine Bracey as they served the first of their two-game suspension from the on-court fight against Ohio Wednesday. Combined they average 36.2 points per game. “We had a lot of people play today that have not been playing,” Guevara said. “I couldn’t have asked to compete any harder, considering how the last couple days have gone. We practiced really well. We were ready for this game, but it just didn’t turn out the way we wanted.” Things didn’t start well for CMU when the Falcons jumped to an 8-0 lead. Sophomore forward Taylor Johnson scored the the first CMU bas-

Scoreboard

72

77

UP NEXT Wednesday, 7 p.m. CMU (12-10, 4-4 MAC) @ Miami (Ohio) (16-15, 6-2) ket at the 16:06 mark of the first half to make it 8-2. The Chippewas trailed 2616 with 7:22 to go in the first half. After three free throws by CMU, junior forward Brandie Baker made a three-point shot. Seconds later, junior guard Jalisa Olive stole the ball and made a layup to cut the Falcon lead to 26-24 with 6:19 to go in the half. LIBBY MARCH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A WOMEN | 3B

Senior forward Skylar Miller leaps up to attempt a pass during Saturday’s game against Bowling Green at McGuirk Arena.


2B || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/sports

[SPORTS]

Men’s Basketball CMU 64, Akron 74

Women’s Basketball

CMU 72, BGSU 77 (OT) CMU (72) MIN FG 3PT FT Miller 26 1-5 0-0 4-6 LaDuke 37 3-7 0-2 2-4 Johnson 34 6-19 2-9 4-6 Welch 15 0-2 0-1 0-0 DiGuilio 36 2-8 0-3 3-4 Olive 29 3-9 2-4 3-4 Tamm 14 1-1 1-1 0-0 Bellamy 6 0-0 0-0 0-0 Baker 28 8-18 1-4 2-7 Totals 225 24-69 6-24 18-31

CMU (64) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Zeigler 35 6-17 0-0 0-2 2 2 10 Myrick 9 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Jackson 34 7-14 3-6 4-5 3 1 21 Harden 14 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 2 0 Coimbra 29 2-10 1-4 0-0 4 5 5 McBroom 31 5-12 4-9 0-0 6 5 14 Keel 8 0-1 0-1 0-0 0 1 0 Saylor 5 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 3 0 Craddock 5 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Mbaigoto 28 2-9 1-3 3-3 7 4 8 Barnes 2 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 22-66 8-21 11-13 36 24 56 Assists (7): Zeigler 3, Jackson 2, Myrick 1, McBroom 1 Steals (2): Zeigler 1, Jackson 1 Blocks (0): Akron (74) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Cvetinovic 26 3-6 0-1 2-6 4 3 8 Gilliam 13 4-7 3-4 0-0 1 3 11 Marshall 30 3-4 0-0 7-11 8 2 13 Walsh 30 2-5 2-4 2-2 7 2 8 Abreu 32 2-8 1-5 3-5 1 0 8 Treadwell 11 2-2 0-0 0-0 2 2 4 McClanahan 15 1-6 1-4 2-4 4 0 5 Harney 19 4-4 1-1 4-4 1 3 13 Diggs 24 1-3 0-2 2-4 6 1 4 Totals 200 22-45 8-21 22-36 38 16 74 Assists (14): Abreu 4, Walsh 2, McClanahan 2, Diggs 2 Steals (6): Walsh 3, Abreu 2, 1 McClanahan 1 Blocks (5): Marshall 5

Men’s MAC Standings Team

West Division

EMU Ball State WMU Toledo CMU Northern Illinois Team

Akron Ohio Buffalo Kent State BGSU Miami (OH)

MIN Rogers 29 Havel 39 Matthews 41 Slagle 37 Steffen 42 Halfhill 9 Yoder 3 Papenfuss 6 Pastor 3 Stein 16 Totals 200

LIBBY MARCH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jordan Taylor

Women’s MAC Standings West Division

Overall

Team

5-2 4-3 4-3 2-5 2-5 1-6

10-11 12-7 10-11 10-11 7-13 2-17

EMU Toledo CMU Northern Ilinois Ball State WMU

MAC

Overall

6-2 6-2 4-4 3-5 2-6 2-6

14-7 13-7 12-10 9-11 7-14 5-16

East Division

MAC

Overall

Team

6-1 5-2 5-2 4-3 3-4 1-6

14-7 17-4 12-6 14-6 9-11 5-14

BGSU Miami (OH) Kent State Ohio Akron Buffalo

MAC

Overall

8-0 6-2 4-4 3-5 3-5 1-7

18-3 16-5 5-13 10-12 9-13 6-16

CM Life Athlete of the week: Taylor Johnson With the top three leading scorers suspended from the women’s basketball team, Taylor Johnson had her best performance of the season. She had 18 points and 10 rebounds against Bowling Green Saturday. T hat was following up a 16-point showing Wednesday against Ohio.

FOOTBALL

Catching up with NFL rookie Nick Bellore By Matt Thompson Sports Editor

Cubicles and water-cooler talk put some Central Michigan graduates facing the real world to sleep. When Nick Bellore walked into work after his CMU career, it was a bit different. The NFL lockout ended, and he walked into the New York Jets locker room to begin his first day of work. “You get Nick Bellore a little starstruck seeing guys like Plaxico (Burress), (LaDainian Tomlinson), (Antonio) Cromartie and all these guys that you’ve watched on TV,” Bellore said. “But that goes away very quickly.” The linebacker played mostly special teams, racking up 19 tackles as an undrafted free agent. Bellore said the NFL is a faster game with less room for error, but at the end of the day it is still football. “It’s the same game you’ve

been playing your whole life,” he said. “It’s just at a bigger scale.” As a part of the Jets organization, he has seen one of the biggest soap operas in football. Before this season, head coach Rex Ryan said the Jets would win the Super Bowl, but failed to make the playoffs. Bellore loves playing for the enthusiastic, players-coach. “He’s awesome,” Bellore said. “A delight to work for and play for. He’s kind of got a player’s mentality as a coach. He’s a brash guy. Puts himself out there, and I love that from a head coach. “He speaks his mind and believes in his team. On an every day basis, he really fights for us and loves the guys he has on the team.” Bellore couldn’t have felt very loved when he went undrafted in the NFL draft last April. He feels like he has been overlooked his whole career, something that helps drive him. He believes that’s why many Chippewas are successful in the NFL. “A lot of us were kind of

overlooked coming into college, and it’s something that kind of stays with you in terms of moving forward with our work ethic unmatched,” Bellore said. “There’s always that drive to prove people wrong.” He was a senior linebacker for CMU when head coach Dan Enos was in his first season. Although the Chippewas went 3-9 that season, and again in year two, Bellore likes what Enos has done. “It’s always tough coming in as a new coach and trying to establish what you want to do,” Bellore said. “There are growing pains obviously, and there will always be those. With young guys brought in, there’s some talent there.” But Bellore is off looking for a championship at the next level. And although the Jets players may have come out and bad-mouthed each other in the New York media, he still thinks it comes down to one thing. “Win,” he said. “Winning solves all problems.” sports@cm-life.com

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PF 4 5 4 1 5 2 1 0 1 23

TP 6 8 18 0 7 11 3 0 19 72

Assists (5): Welch 2, Olive 2, Johnson 1 Steals (9): Olive 3, six others tied with 1 Blocks (2): LaDuke 1, Baker 1

MAC

East Division

Rb 9 3 10 0 8 2 0 1 6 43

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TP 5 10 14 19 14 4 4 2 0 5 56

Assists (10): Slagle 5, Havel 3, two players tied with one Steals (3): Steffen 1, Slagle 1, Stein 1 Blocks (1): Slagle 1

Women’s Schedule Past five games

Jan. 22 at Kent State L, 64-67

Jan. 21 at Western Michigan L, 61-64

Jan. 25 Ohio W, 67-53

Jan. 25 at Bowling Green L, 58- 71

Jan. 28 Bowling Green L, 72-77 (OT)

Jan. 28 Akron L, 64-74

Next two games

Next two games

Wednesday Miami (Ohio), 7 p.m.

Tuesday Kent State, 7:07 p.m.

Saturday at Akron, 5 p.m.

Saturday at Ohio, 2 p.m.

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BGSU (77) FG 3PT FT Rb 2-6 0-1 1-2 11 3-8 2-3 2-2 12 3-9 3-8 5-6 4 8-15 1-3 2-3 4 5-12 1-6 3-5 6 1-3 0-2 2-2 3 0-1 0-0 4-5 1 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 2-5 0-0 1-2 3 21-25 2-16 12-16 47

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Central Michigan Life || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || 3B

[SPORTS]

WRESTLING

Gymnastics wins one, loses one over weekend Stays undefeated in MAC play By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan gymnastics team (7-1, 3-0) split over the weekend but won its Mid-American Conference match over Eastern Michigan. On Friday, CMU competed in a tri-meet at EMU along with Texas Woman’s University. The Chippewas were able to hold off EMU 193.325 to 192.725. Texas Woman’s University placed third with a score of 190.550. The same Texas Woman’s University pulled off an upset on Sunday in Mount Pleasant. After performing well on the vault, the bars proved to be a complete disaster for the Chippewas. Freshman Rebecca Druien landed awkwardly and was unable to continue the rest of the meet. Senior Kristen Teubner also struggled maintaining momentum on bars, which led to the team’s final score being 46.175. Sophomore Brittany Petzold scored a 39.300 all-around score. A score of 39 or higher has eluded CMU this season until this point. “I was really excited on how I did,” Petzold said. “I felt like I didn’t let the pressure get to me. There was a lot of pressure on me, because we had a few mistakes on the past events.”

WOMEN | CONTINUED FROM 1B

A three-point shot by freshman guard Kerby Tamm made it 31-29 BGSU with 3:02 left in the first half. The Falcons went on a 4-0 run to end the half and held a 38-31 lead at halftime. CMU was outrebounded 30-19 in the first half but held the edge 24-17 in the second. “We got more aggressive in the second half,” Guevara said. “We were actually going after the ball.” Baker scored the first four points for CMU in the second half. A three-point shot by Olive made it 40-38 Falcons with 16:21 to go.

If there was any blame to be passed around, head coach Jerry Reighard is asking to take it. “I take full responsibility of what happened today,” Reighard said. “I had totally changed my approach to this meet. I wasn’t Jerry Reighard; I was low key.” CMU did some experimenting this meet to find out who is comfortable in which events. The results were not pleasing. “We made some line-up changes, put people in different positions to see where they will compete best,” Reighard said. “That did not seem to work in our benefit. We are having a real difficult time putting 24 positive things together in a meet.” While the loss stings CMU, it doesn’t hurt them in the MAC standings, in which they are still undefeated. Reighard believes Druien’s injury might be a torn ligament in her elbow. The injury forced freshman Kylie Fagan to perform on the floor. The timing gave Reighard and Fagan 10 minutes to make up a routine. Fagan ended up scoring a 9.650, a great score for just making up the routine. “Bless her heart, she came to me and said if you need someone to go on floor I’m here,” Reighard said. “We made the tumbling up in 10 minutes.” The team has not performed up to the standards of scoring 196s during the meets. A jumper by Baker at the 6:08 mark of the second half tied the game at 52. From there, the teams traded baskets until there was just 57 seconds left in the game, and the score was tied at 62. A missed 3-point shot by CMU sophomore guard Niki DiGuilio gave BGSU the ball with 17 seconds left. That’s when Bowling Green senior guard Jessica Slagle drove to the basket and scored with seven seconds left. She led the Falcons with 19 points. With only seven seconds to work with, Olive brought the ball up the court and passed to Johnson on the right wing. She drove to the basket and scored with just one second left in regulation. Tied at 64, the game went to overtime.

WRESTLING | CONTINUED FROM 1B

No. 12 Chippewas wrestler Peter Sturgeon closed out the dual against No. 20 Brendan Barlow and lost in riding time after four overtimes. Bennett put the Chippewas within striking distance by earning a pin to narrow the deficit to three. “(Bennett) wrestled really good today,” Chippewas Coach Tom Borrelli said “He was dominant. He really controlled the match (and) hand fighting.” The Golden Flashes wanted no part in being second fiddle any longer. Their five MAC losses since 2005 have all been dealt by the Chippewas. It was the first KSU win against CMU at home since 1996. The two programs have finished in the top two every season since 2005-06. KSU only has two first place finishes in the MAC to show for it be-

TRACK | CONTINUED FROM 1B

stay focused in the race include studying other runners’ shoes and jerseys. “It really helped me to have the rabbit pull me along,” Adams said. “The last three minutes I was struggling, but I focused on the techniques I talked about before to stay in it.” Kaczor said the team can do nothing but work harder than it has before. “You just got to keep moving forward,” he said. “Like I told Tec, ‘You won and you have a day to celebrate, then it’s back to work.’ When you run well like that, people know you the next time you run — you have to keep working.” sports@cm-life.com

cause of the Chippewas. CMU has won at least a share of the MAC regular season championship for two straight years and 12 of the past 13 seasons.

Craig Kelliher wins vacated by NCAA By Ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

Central Michigan wrestler Craig Kelliher was ruled ineligible to wrestle at 174 pounds for the remainder of the year. Although he has remained in compliance with the NCAA Wrestling Weight Loss Certification Plan guidelines, Kelliher’s competition in four matches at 174 pounds violated NCAA wrestling bylaw 8.3.5.4. It states: “A wrestler weighing in two weight classes above an original certified weight class shall forfeit his or her right to return to the original wrestled weight class.” “It wasn’t brought to my attention until this week,” head coach Tom Borrelli said. “Unfortunately, I’m to blame for that, because I didn’t give him really good advice. I wasn’t really aware you couldn’t wrestle two weight classes up, even if you were following your weight decent.” Kelliher initially certified at

KAITLIN THORESEN/ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Freshman Taylor Noonan concentrates on her balance beam routine during the Chippewas meet against Texas Woman’s University.

Reighard was surprised that a day where the team struggled hasn’t happened earlier. “To be honest, I’m surprised it hasn’t happened before this,” Reighard said. “We have been competing very well, but perhaps we were due.” WIN AT EMU Druien continued her strong season with the top all-around score of 38.775, scoring a 9.725 in three-out-of-four events. Johnson finished with 18 points and 10 rebounds in 34 minutes of action. “Starting out the game, my mind was set on being physical,” she said. “I didn’t feel any extra pressure. I had to come out and do what was best for the team. I gave everything I had today.” Bowling Green scored the first five points in overtime. A layup by senior forward Skylar Miller made it 7068 with 2:38 to go, but the Chippewas would score only a free throw and a late three from Johnson for the rest of the game. BGSU made its free throws down the stretch to win by a final of 77-72. In addition to Baker and Johnson, Olive added 11 points and three assists. Sophomore forward

Petzold notched the top score of the meet with a 9.850 on bars. The floor exercise proved to be the Chippewas toughest event. The team had two falls counted against them and scored a season low 47.800. The victory over EMU marked the 25th consecutive win for the Chippewas in the MAC.

the 174-pound weight class prior to the 2011-12 season. However, he wrestled unattached to CMU in the 197-pound weight class at the Eastern Michigan Open on Nov. 5, 2011. He wrestled three matches at 197 pounds at the tournament. Kelliher also competed in four dual meets for CMU at the 174-pound weight class between Dec.10, 2011 and Jan.22, 2012. “It was an honest mistake,” Borrelli said. “Craig Kelliher had nothing to do with it. He did everything right. It’s just unfortunate.” Kelliher’s results for those matches are vacated, but team scores and all other results for those four dual meets are not changed. He is still able to compete at any weight class above 174 pounds this season. He will be able to begin wrestling at 174 pounds again next season. sports@cm-life.com

sports@cm-life.coms

Jordan LaDuke had eight points and three rebounds. DiGuilio had seven points and eight rebounds. Miller had six points and hauled down nine rebounds. BGSU had 20 turnovers. The Chippewas had 13. “The next time we play Bowling Green, it might be a different outcome,” Guevara said. “ We played very hard today against the best team in this league. I thought we had them.” The Chippewas will play the last of their three-game home stand against Miami on Wednesday. sports@cm-life.com A

D V

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For the Chippewas to finish tied in first this season, the Golden Flashes will have to lose to Buffalo or Eastern Michigan. CMU is done with the MAC regular season. The Chippewas face George Mason and Old Dominion next week. sports@cm-life.com

Award winner Amanda Alpert (Left) and fellow UREC Employee Heather Curtis (Right)

IN CELEBRATION OF SMITTY The Smitty Tournaments Smitty Sports Tournaments were established in honor of LaMott Smith, former University Recreation (URec) employee who passed in a sudden tragedy. The Smitty Sports Tournaments were created by former Intramurals Associate Director Gary Baker.The tournaments also serve as a fundraising effort toward the honorary scholarship in remembrance of Smitty. The LaMott Smith Scholarship Award is given each year to a CMU student who exemplifies the leadership, charisma, and passion that LaMott demonstrated while a

student and employee of Central Michigan University. To be eligible for this one-time, $1,000 award, the student must have a GPA of 2.7 or higher and be enrolled in a major within the departments of Physical Education and Sports or Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Every spring the staff at URec, along with LaMott’s friends and family, come together to celebrate Smitty’s life and honor him with a series of sports tournaments, including softball and basketball in past years. Open to the public, these tournaments not only pay tribute to a beloved friend

and coworker, but offer an off-season opportunity to get active in your favorite sport. “We want those individuals (recipients of the award) to be ambassadors for his legacy,” Stan Shingles, Assistant Vice President of URec said. The winner of the 2012 LaMott Smith Scholarship Award was Central Student Amanda Alpert.For more information about this cause or to participate in these annual events, contact Scott George by e-mail at georg2sw@ cmich.edu or by phone at (989) 774-3686.


4B || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/sports

[SPORTS]

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Scoring threats scarce for Chippewas on Saturday night By John Manzo Senior Reporter

Olivier Mbaigoto’s free throws with 11:43 remaining snapped an unusual streak during the Central Michigan men’s basketball 74-64 loss Saturday against Akron in McGuirk Arena. Prior to the free throws, Austin McBroom, Trey Zeigler and Derek Jackson were the only Chippewas to score. “Those three have been a constant all season,” head coach Ernie Zeigler said. “We know we lean on that freshman and those two sophomores offensively. It is tough when you look at our shooting percentages, particularly over the past five games. We’ve been consistently in the thirties.” Mbaigoto finished with eight points on 2-of-9 shoot-

ing, and Andre Coimbra scored five points before fouling out in a crucial point of the game with 1:35 remaining. Freshman guard Jorddan Myrick and junior forward Jevon Harden made unusual starts for the Chippewas in place of McBroom and Mbaigoto. The regular starters were the only players to score consistently. “Just to shake things up a little bit,” Ernie said of the different starting lineup. “When you’ve lost four games in row, things just don’t stay the same. We started Myrick, because we thought he could start off and get some pressure on the ball. We didn’t allow Derek to wear down because we knew we wanted Derek to pressure as well.” McBroom, Trey and Jack-

son shot 18-of-43 from the field, but the rest of the team was just 4-of-23 for 13 points. “Our young guys, they have to attack more,” Jackson said. “Us as leaders, we have to coach them how to come out and be aggressive.” On the opposite side, the Zips had nine scorers and have three scorers within the top 30 of the Mid-American Conference. When the Chippewas had balanced scoring with Mbaigoto and Coimbra, they played better as a team. Despite losing by 10, the Chippewas outscored the Zips 36-34 in the second half. Junior guard John Morris, who is usually the second point guard off the bench, didn’t play because of a coach’s decision.

JEFF SMITH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore guard Trey Zeigler fights Akron senior forward Nokila Cvetinovic for the ball during the second half Saturday at McGuirk Arena. CMU lost 74-64.

sports@cm-life.com

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Bowling Green coach Curt Miller misses game with stroke By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

The Bowling Green women’s basketball team had more on their minds than just basketball at McGuirk Arena on Saturday.

BGSU head coach Curt Miller did not make the trip with his team after suffering a stroke during a game Jan. 22 against Eastern Michigan. “I know how passionate and how emotional he is, and for a 43-year-old to

ANDREW KUHN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Bowling Green assistant coach Jennifer Roos celebrates as the Falcons beat Central Michigan Saturday. She took over head coaching duties when Curt Miller suffered a stroke

suffer a mild stroke I know he has a couple kids, and I want to see him around long enough to see his grandkids,” Central Michigan head coach Sue Guevara said. Associate head coach Jennifer Roos took over for Miller on Saturday during the team’s 77-72 overtime win over CMU. “I think teams always look at the assistant coaches as the good guy and the head coach as the bad guy, because the head coach controls the playing time. Today I went from good guy to bad guy,” Roos said. “We wanted the routine to be the same even though we were missing coach Miller.” CMU gave Roos and her team all it could handle, despite being without its top three scorers (Freshman guards Crystal Bradford, Jessica Green and forward Jas’Mine Bracey) due to suspensions. Miller normally controls the offense. The Falcons struggled without him committing 20 turnovers. “I’ve got to give coach Miller credit; something just wasn’t there today,” senior guard Jessica Slagle said. “I think we were all a little more off than we planned to be because we’re used to coach Miller on the floor controlling everything.” Miller, 43, became head coach of the Falcons on May 8, 2001. He has won 74 percent of his games with a record of 251-88 overall, and is 128-39 in Mid-American Conference play. He is the third-winningest

coach in MAC history and in his fourth season, the Falcons won the regular-season and tournament championships. They haven’t lost the regular-season title since, and they are heading in that same direction again this season. Miller has taken BGSU from MAC powerhouse to a national player. The Falcons have made five tournament appearances, including a trip to the sweet-sixteen in 2007, after beating Oklahoma St. (70-66) and Vanderbilt (59-56). He has a 2-5 record during March Madness. Both teams came into Saturday’s game with some adversity; in fact, Roos called it Adversity Bowl 2012. The two teams don’t play each other again this regular-season, so a rematch could only happen in the

“I think we were all a little more off than we planned to be, because we’re used to coach Miller on the floor controlling everything.” Jessica Slagle, senior guard MAC Tournament. It is very possible that the two could meet up again for the conference championship, and

Get your team together and enjoy a night in Margarelayville.

Monday Jan. 30th @ 7 pm in the U.C. Rotunda

Contests • Mocktails • Prizes

Inquiries regarding any EVENT space on campus: Events Central

CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

FEBRUARY 3-5, 2012

Phone: 989-774-PLAN Inquiries regarding any EVENT Email: plan@cmich.edu space on campus: Website: www.cmich.edu/uevents Phone: 989-774-PLAN Email: plan@cmich.edu Website: www.cmich.edu/uevents

“The Will” a play by Susan Seaten “The Will” a play by Febuary 16, @ Placta Auditorium, Susan 7:30pm Seaten As we mark 150th anniversary Febuary 16, the @ Placta Auditorium, of the beginning of the Civil War, 7:30pm Thewe Will dramatizes theanniversary human As mark the 150th consequences ofof the war as War, of the beginning the Civil experienced by the Websters, The Will dramatizes the humanan African American family consequences of the warinasa small town in Tennessee. experienced by the Websters, an

For More Information

Call 774-2547

or send an email to sibscmu@cmich.edu Sign up to register online at: stulife.cmich.edu & click on programs

sports@cm-life.com

2012 Relay for Life Kickoff

Events Central

SIBS WEEKEND 2012

if that is so hopefully coach Miller will be there.

African American family in a small town in Tennessee.

Dr. Jane Goodall

March 28, 2012 @ McGuirk Arena, EventsJane Center, 8pm Dr. Goodall The legendary environmentalist and March 28, 2012 @ McGuirk Arena, chimpanzee researcher Events Center, 8pm will share her The legendary environmentalist and chimpanzee researcher will share her

Ticket Central

Purchase tickets to CMU events:

Phone: 989-774-3000/888-347-3872 Ticket Central Email: ticketcentral@cmich.edu Purchase tickets to CMU events: Website: ticketcentral.com Phone: 989-774-3000/888-347-3872 Email: ticketcentral@cmich.edu Website: ticketcentral.com

“Beoga” in Concert March 1, 2012 @ Placta Auditorium, 8pm From bluesy sounds and jazz, to a raunchy “Beoga” in Concert New Orleans jamboree vibe, Beoga’s music March 1, 2012 @ Placta Auditorium, 8pm always returns to a wonderfully Irish From bluesy sounds and jazz, to bouncy a raunchy sound. With their uniquevibe, blend of inventive New Orleans jamboree Beoga’s music arrangements, talents and beautiful always returns instrumental to a wonderfully bouncy Irish sound. With their unique blend of inventive as they captivate audiences on a global arrangements, instrumental talents and scale. beautiful as they captivate audiences on a global scale.

Planet Money April 10, 2012 @ Placta Auditorium Planet Money, hosted by primary Planet Money correspondents Adam Davidson and Alex April 10, 2012 @ Placta Auditorium Blumberg, has been growing steadily in Planet Money, hosted by primary popularity on NPR. TheDavidson team exhibits the unique correspondents Adam and Alex ability to present andgrowing explainsteadily even the Blumberg, has been in most complex issues so that listeners gain popularityeconomic on NPR. The team exhibits the unique a complete understanding of not ability to present and explain evenonly thewhat most happened and why, but alsosothe importance of complex economic issues that listeners gain these news understanding stories in theiroflives. a complete not only what happened and why, but also the importance of


cm-life.com/sports

Central Michigan Life || Monday, Jan. 30, 2012 || 5B

[SPORTS]

Wrestlers miss opportunities in loss to No. 14 Lehigh

PRO BOWL | Two CMU alumni played with the NFL’s best

By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan wrestling team lost to No. 14 Lehigh by a deceiving score of 23-11 at McGuirk Arena Friday night. “Obviously Lehigh has a good team, but I think we made them look good in certain situations, too,” head coach Tom Borrelli said. Borrelli pointed to missed opportunities such as Ben Bennett and Zach Horan’s losses in overtime. “If we convert just those situations, the dual meet is a lot closer, and we feel a lot better about ourselves,” he said. No. 5 Bennett lost to No. 4 Robert Hamlin in a rematch from the Midlands Championships. Hamlin defeated Bennett 3-1 on a takedown as the clock went to zero Friday. It involved a maddening tussle. “He kept attacking and kept coming after me,” Bennett said. “I felt like I wrestled pretty well for the most part, just didn’t do the little things right.” CMU and LU felt the wrath of a wrestler shunning their school to go elsewhere in this matchup. Mike Ottinger lived in the Mountain Hawks’ backyard but chose the Chippewas. He

In his second season in the NFL, Antonio Brown made the Pro Bowl, representing the Pittsburgh Steelers and rest of the best players in the league. Him and San Francisco 49ers offensive tackle Joe Staley are two Central Michigan alumni in the game.

ANDREW KUHN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore 141-pounder Scott Mattingly wrestles Lehigh’s Steve Dutton Friday night at McGuirk Arena. Mattingly lost to Dutton by a technical fall.

has no regrets about the decision. “Honestly, the team here and the coaches, I can’t ask for anything more,” Ottinger said. “It’s a great family here. I couldn’t be happier anywhere else.” He defeated Sean Bilodeau 3-2 in a heated match that involved the Lehigh bench clearing at the end as a result of not being awarded any more points. LU senior Kyle Rosser returned to his home state and

defeated Joey Kielbasa 5-2 with a boisterous contingent in the stands. The Chippewas won three of 10 matches and was 0-4 against ranked Mountain Hawks. When the dual concluded, Borrelli was recognized for winning his 300th career game in December, and the team was awarded their Mid-American Conference Championship rings from last year.

Super rematch: Giants-Patriots II

ful game for the first time what Manning said he wantsince that Super Bowl, and ed. once again, it was the Giants “I’d rather be down by who came away with a stun- three with a minute-thirty It’s Super Bowl XLII, Part II. ning victory. than up by four with a minThe teams traded the lead ute-thirty with Tom Brady, After spending most of this postseason beating teams three times in the fourth with their offense on the that had beaten them, with quarter, just as they did in field,” Manning said. “You Charles Bronson-like ven- Super Bowl XLII. The Giants like those situations where geance, the Giants will have won the game, 24-20, when you have a chance to go win to get used to a new role Eli Manning hit Jake Ballard the game.” as they prepare to face the with a 1-yard touchdown Of course, that’s what he Patriots in Indianapolis on pass with 15 seconds re- did in February 2008 when maining. Sunday. he engineered the winning The Giants had kept the drive against the Patriots to Instead of being the sports@cm-life.com wronged party looking for re- game-winning drive alive become Super Bowl MVP. venge, the Giants find them- with a 38-yard catch by BalThis season’s win over the selves facing a team that is lard on third-and-10, and Patriots was a high point in much was made of the play the regular season for the trying to even a score. It was four years ago that being similar to the one that Giants, who improved to the Giants somehow de- David Tyree made in the Su- 6-2, had a three-game winfeated the unbeaten (and per Bowl. ning streak and seemed to be Ballard and Tyree even comfortably in first place in believed to be unbeatable) Patriots, 17-14, in Super wore the same number: 85. the NFC East. “I knew we would win,” Bowl XLII. That scarred what But after that game, in would have been a perfect Brandon Jacobs said after the which they hoisted Tom season for the Patriots, who game. “It definitely took me Coughlin in the middle of the were 18-0 at the time and back to the Super Bowl.” locker room, they lost four in The Giants won that game, a row and had to win their filooking to become football despite playing without lead- nal two games to make it into immortals. How deflating was that ing rusher Ahmad Bradshaw, the playoffs. loss for the Patriots? The cur- leading receiver (at the time) Since then, they’ve beaten rent postseason is the first in Hakeem Nicks and starting the Falcons, and also the which they have won a game center David Baas. Packers and 49ers, two of the “Half our offense wasn’t teams that defeated them in since the AFC Championship Game victory that put them here, and we still came out the regular season and made and beat a great football it so difficult to get back to in Super Bowl XLII. Now they’re back, after a team,” Osi Umenyiora said at the playoffs. 23-20 win over the Ravens. the time. Some of the players noted The Patriots were in good the last two weeks were like a And they get to face the team • 436 Central Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com , Life Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 Michigan • www/cm-life.com Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt.that Pleasant, 48859 • www/cm-life.com position to win. Tom Brady “Revenge Tour.” crushedMItheir dreams the last time they made it hit Rob Gronkowski with BRAD LOWE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Now it’s the Patriots turn ed Ad &Classifi Rates aFreshman Classifi edClassifi Ad Placing Ad a Classifi ed &Classifi Rates Ad ed Ad Policy Rates ed Ad aPolicy Rates pass to use that motivation. And 14-yard & touchdown this far. &Classifi 149 punder Joey Kielbasaed struggles toPolicy hold down Lehigh’s Kyle Rosser Friday nightPolicy at McGuirk Arena. Rosser defeated It was only this season that with 1:36 left to give them a they’ve been on tour for four Kielbasa with a 11-5 decision. CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because ept advertising which reflects discrimination because CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi edmet ad Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed But ad 15 word minimum classified ad 20-17 lead. that was just per teams in a meaningyears. race, color, religion, sexto orreject national CM Lifecolor, reserves the right or origin, andof Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 ational andof CM Life reserves the right or origin, andof race, religion, sexto orreject national CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national orthe origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or By Tom Rock Newsday (MCT)

lassifi edsedseds ifiClassifi edsClassifi

without which isdiscontinue, in the opinion of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media vertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media without which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media Bold,1-2 italic and centered Bold, italic centered 1-2 $7.75 per Board, is not keeping with the standards of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifeinwill be responsible for 1-2 $7.75 per per issue e standards of CM Life. CM Lifeinwill be responsible for Board, is not keeping with theissue standards of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Life will$7.75 be responsible for type are available along typetypographical are the available along typographical errors only to theused extent of cancelling the charge for the space used e extent of cancelling the charge for the space typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to the used extent of cancelling the charge $7.50 for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: per issue with other special features with other special features and valueless by such an error. Credit for rendered such an error is limited to only ch an error. Credit for rendered such an error is limited to only and valueless by such an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad attractors. 7-12 $7.25 per issue rst dateup of at publication. Any due canthe befipicked the CM Life officredit ce 7-12 $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per ny credit due canthe befipicked the CM Life officredit ce rst Issues: dateup of at publication. Any duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due can7-12 be picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you fi nd an error, report it to the Classifi ed f the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: per issue Dept. We are only responsible for the firstimmediately. day’s insertion. y responsible for the firstimmediately. day’s insertion. Dept. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

By Fax: 989-774-7805 omBy Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall a.m.-5 Hours: p.m.Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Recruiting process for coveted players culminates with National Signing Day 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

wooedAT big-time. and Ronald Darby, a corner- OPEN next Randy Moss.” Mike Far- OPEN aPUBLISHING wideAT receiver from Mis- OPEN By Michelle Kaufman athletes will drag out the PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 32,000 REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

lassifi edsedseds ifiClassifi edsClassifi Classifieds McClatchy Newspapers (MCT)

MIAMI — National Signing Day is Wednesday, which means all over the country this weekend, college football programs are pulling out all the stops — “rolling out two red carpets,” recruiting guru Tom Lemming said — in a last-ditch effort to impress the still-uncommitted high school stars. Dorial Green-Beckham,

souri, is considered by most experts to be the crown jewel of his class, and he is among the players getting the royal treatment. He is 6-6 and 220 pounds and has football and track coaches drooling, because he runs the 100 meter in 10.5 seconds. Word is Green-Beckham will wind up at Arkansas, but he still has Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma and Alabama on standby. Lemming calls him “the

rell of Rivals.com compares him to Calvin Johnson. Other players still up for grabs include 307-pound defensive tackle Eddie Goldman of Washington, D.C.; wide receiver Stefon Diggs of Olney, Md.; defensive back Tracy Howard of Miramar, Fla. who is visiting the University of Miami this weekend; Nelson Agholor of Tampa, Fla.; a NigerianAmerican who can play wide receiver and running back;

back from Potomac, Md., who committed to Notre Dame but recently decommitted and is now leaning toward Florida State, Clemson and Auburn. Last-minute campus visit invitations went out in the past 48 hours to players who had committed to Rutgers, only to find out on Thursday that coach Greg Schiano is headed to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. You can bet those players are being

“Everyone amps it up and goes all out this weekend,” Farrell said. “They’ll tell you how important you are to their program, how high they have you on their depth chart, make you feel like they have to have you. There is more of a sense of urgency than earlier in the recruiting process. They want the kids to leave campus at least confused or, at most, convinced.” Meanwhile, some of the

• 436 Central Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com , Life Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 Michigan • www/cm-life.com Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

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process as long as possible, even if they already have their mind made up. “I think most of these kids have an idea where they’re going, but they like the drama,” said Lemming, national recruiting expert with CBS Sports Network. “They love the attention, the media, Facebook, Twitter. They can’t get enough. They’re like opera singers. Prima donnas. “The longer they wait, the more attention they get.”

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wingly acceptbecause advertising which refl discrimination because of Life race, color, religion, discrimination CM of Life race, will color, notects knowingly religion, accept advertising which will refl notects knowingly discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad Rates: 15 CM word minimum per classifi ed ad Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad Phone: 989-774-3493 gin, and CM Life reserves the right advertising to origin, reject or discontinue, without notice, ect By or discontinue, without sex or notice, national and CM Life reserves sex or the national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising on of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will eping the standards which of CM is in Life. theCM opinion Life will of the Student Media which Board, is$7.75 in is the not opinion in keeping of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of and CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic Bywith Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: per Bold, italic Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per issue 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue ypographical only extent of typographical cancelling the errors charge for to thethe space used and type cancelling the errors charge be for to responsible thethe space used for and only be responsible extent for of typographical cancelling the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and charge for the are space used and centered type are centered type are centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered om By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along by suchto anonly error. Credit for such an error is by limited the first rendered date of publication. Any available along available along with available along with limited the first rendered date of publication. valueless Any suchto anonly error. Credit for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of with publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features In Person: Moore Hall other special features picked up at the CM Life offi ce within 30 days of termination of Life the ad. Ifdue you find30 an error, other special special features ays of termination of436 the credit ad. Ifdue you can find be an picked error, up at the7-12 CM credit office within can be days picked of termination up at the CM of Life the ad. offifeatures ce If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issuefor thelike attractors. Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like attractors. like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. sifi ed Dept. immediately. We are responsible forp.m. the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. onsible forp.m. the first day’s report insertion. it toonly the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. We are only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 32,000 REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

AUTOS SALE SERVICES AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND WE ARE PLEDGED to the

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2- 7 BEDROOM houses, apartments & duplexes for rent. Available 20122013. Brand new 5 bedroom house for rent 1 block from campus. Contact Amy at 989-773-8850, ext. 245 or visit www.labellerealty.net.

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with other special features

and by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only 6B || Ad Monday, Jan. 30, || Central Liferendered valuelessAd like ad attractors. ed Placing a 2012 Classifi edMichigan Ad Classifi Policy ed Ad Classifi Ad Rates Classified Ad Rateswww.cm-life.com 7-12 Issues: $7.25ed per issue the first date of ed publication. Any credit due canClassifi be picked up at the CM Life Policy office Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • Central Michigan • Moore Hall, Mt. MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com within 30 days of termination ofLife the ad. If436 you find an error, report it toCMU, thewww/cm-life.com Classifi ed Pleasant, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

a.m.-5 p.m. Dept. immediately. We are only responsible forbecause the first day’s insertion. CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising CM Life which will refl not ects knowingly discrimination accept advertising of race, whichcolor, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad Phone: 989-774-3493 sex national and CM Life reserves sex or theed national rightAd to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without the notice, rightAd advertising to ed reject or discontinue, notice, advertising edByAd Classifi ed Adorigin, Policy Classifi Policy Placing aorClassifi ed Ad Classifi ed Policy Classifi Ad Rateswithout Classifi ed Ad Rates Classified Ad Rates which is in the opinion of the Student Media which Board, is in is the not opinion in keeping of the withStudent the standards MediaALWAYS Board, of CM Life. is notCM in keeping Life will withAT the standards of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will By Fax:READERS 989-774-7805 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING DAY! OPEN WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue be responsible for discrimination typographical errors only be responsible the extent for of discrimination typographical cancelling thebecause errors charge only for the the space extent used of discrimination cancelling and thebecause charge for space and wingly accept advertising CM Life which will refl notects knowingly acceptbecause advertising ofto race, which color, refl religion, of to race, color, religion, centered type minimum are centered CM Life will notects knowingly accept advertising which reflects of the race, color,used religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed 15 ad word minimum per classifi ed ad Rates: 15 word per classifi ed ad type are om By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 989-774-3493 available along with available along with rendered valueless by such an rendered foror such an valueless error is by limited such to an only error. the Credit fiwithout rst date forthe such of publication. an advertising error is limited Any to only the fiwithout rst date notice, of publication. Any gin,By andPhone: CM Life reserves sex or thenational right to origin, reject or and discontinue, CMerror. Life Credit reserves without the notice, right advertising to origin, reject or discontinue, notice, sex national and CM Life reserves right to reject or discontinue, advertising 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue InthePerson: 436 Moore Hall other special other special credit due can picked upStudent at CM Life credit offi ce due within can 30 be days picked ofthe termination at CM ofIssues: the Life Board, ad. offi ce If you within find 30 an days error, the ad. If $7.75 you nd an on of Student Media which Board, is inis the not opinion inbe keeping of the with thethe standards Media Board, of Michigan CM is Life. not CM in keeping Life will with thethe standards ofHall, CM Life. CM Life willof termination which is in the opinion of Media is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life.fi• CM Lifeerror, will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and Bold, italic features and Bold, italic features and 1-2 $7.75 per issue 1-2ofIssues: per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Central Life •upforStudent 436 Moore CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 www/cm-life.com Issues: $7.00 perand issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. report it toextent the Classifi ed Dept.p.m. immediately. report We are itspace toextent only the used Classifi responsible ed Dept. the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are onlyused responsible for the the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 ypographical errors only be responsible to the for of typographical cancelling the errors charge only for to the the of cancelling and the charge for the space and be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling charge for the space used centered type are centered type are centered type are omBy Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue

available along with by such an error. Creditrendered for such an valueless error isby limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an error is by limited Any the first date of publication. Any to only valueless suchto anonly error. Credit for such an error is limited the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue In up Person: Moore Hall other special features picked at the CM436 Life credit offi ce due within can 30 bedays picked of termination up at the CM of Life the offi ad.ce Ifdue you within find 30 an days error, of termination of the If you find30an error, credit can be picked up at the CM Life ad. office within days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: per issuefor thelike Issues: $7.00 per issue attractors. sifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. report it toonly the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are$7.00 only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and By Website: www.cm-life.com rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any In Person: 436 Moore Hall Life willoffi notce knowingly whichofrefl ects discrimination because credit due can be picked up at theCM CM Life within 30accept days advertising of termination the ad. If you find an error, ByHours: Phone: 989-774-3493 8 a.m.-5 p.m. of race, color, sexresponsible or national origin, andfirst CMday’s Life reserves the right to reject or report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. Wereligion, are only for the insertion. Monday-Friday

available along with available along with Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy Classifi Ad Rates 7-12 Issues: $7.25 ed per issue other special features other special features 32,000 REACH READERS MORE THAN EACH32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH PUBLISHINGALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 13+ $7.00 per issue like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH32,000 PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS REACH MORE THAN READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue centered type are Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy3-6 & Issues: Rates$7.50 per issue available along with

7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media ByPleasant, Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and centered , Mt. MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 1-2 SALE Issues: $7.75 per issue Board,TO is not inRENT keeping with the standards of CM Life.SALE CM Life will be responsibleWANTED for FOR NOTICES SALE WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT WANTED NOTICES FOR NOTICES FOR TO RENT WANTED TO RENT type are available along typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only Policy Classifi edMt. AdPleasant, Rates 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. Central Michigan Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall Life • 436 Moore the first MI date 48859 of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office AUTOS FOR SALE 8 a.m.-5 AUTOS FOR SALE WANTED AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE WANTED FOR SALE TO RENT WANTED NOTICES TO RENT FOR NOTICES TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE TO NOTICES FOR SALE TO RENT SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES within 30 daysRENT of termination of WANTED theLOST ad. IfFOR you find anSALE error, report it to the Classifi ed LOST &Monday-Friday FOUND LOST & SALE FOUND &FOR FOUND 13+ Issues: $7.00 per WANTED issue SERVICES Hours:because p.m. 15 word minimum per discrimination of race, color, religion, Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Rates: classified ad

fiect ed Ad Classified Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE OPEN AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP WANTED 1-2 Issues: $7.75 perdiscrimination issue SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES REACH MORE 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE GARAGE SALES FOR RENT LOST & FOUND LOST FOR &FOR RENT FOUND FOR RENT LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND CM LifeTHAN will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad SALES

cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are 3-6reserves Issues: per issue sex or national origin, and CM Life the$7.50 right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising available along with limited to only the first date of publication. Any which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, $7.25 is not inper keeping with other the standards CM Life. CM Life will 7-12 Issues: issue Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue specialoffeatures ays of termination of the ad. If you find an error, responsible for typographical errors only to the extentper of cancelling charge for the space used and centered type are 13+ Issues: $7.00 issue the like ad attractors. om for the first day’sbeinsertion. onsible 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any BEST DEALS7-12 NEAR CAMPUS! Issues: $7.25 per issue other JAMESTOWN APTS - 2ad. PER 2 BED, 2012/ up 2013 SCHOOL TWO30 days ADORABLE BREED: SHIfeatures CHI PUPspecial credit due can be picked at the CM Life YEAR. office within of termination of the If you find an error, CHERRY STREET TOWN HOUSES 3 3, 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to PERSON house for rent. Walk to PIES. $300 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 989-365-3914. like ad attractors. report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. or 4 people 1 1/2 bath. Free Cable & Campus, (989)775-5522 campus. Utilities paid and pets welInternet + Washer & Dryer. Starting at www.LiveWithUnited.com come. Call Jody 989-430-0893 or $280 per person 989-773-2333. email jodygirl12000@yahoo.com. SHUTTLE SERVICE $255 PP/ MONTH. 4 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE 2012/ 2013. Walk to DANCERS WANTED. NO EXPERIPublic campus. Dishwasher, washer, dryer, ENCE NECESSARY. PART TIME Transportation free expanded cable and wireless ONLY. HIGH EARNING POTENTIAL. Services of the Isabella County high speed internet. Locally family APPLY AT MICELI!S CORNER. Transportation owned. 989-772-9577. 989-539-3401 AFTER 6 PM. faceCommission quick1g@cmich.edu book.com/micelis.corner.showgirls.

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION FOR RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES MIGHTY MINIS

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES PETS FOR RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION FOR RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION PETS FOR SALE

GARAGE SALES PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS PETS PETS ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL ROOMMATES PETS MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES AUTOS FOR SALE WANTED WANTED TO RENT TO RENT WANTED TO RENT OPEN SERVICES LOST & SECTION FOUND

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SPECIAL SECTION PETS TRAVEL YARD SALE AUTOS FOR SALE

AFFORDABLE DOG SITTING in Mt. Pleasant area. Contact Pam at rowla1pj@cmich.edu

EXPLORE

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION PETS RENT FOR SALE

32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! TRAVEL ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES HELP WANTED

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL YARD SALE YARD SALE MOTORCYCLES HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS

FOR ESTATE RENT REAL PERSONALS

PERSONALS

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS NOTICES ROOMMATES WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS FOR 989•772•9441 LOST & SALE FOUND REAL ESTATE AUTOS FORFOR RENTSALE

SPECIAL SECTION REAL ESTATE PERSONALS HAPPY ADS FOR SALE TRAVEL DEERFIELD VILLAGE - 2 PER 2 BED, WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS Warm 4WANTED PER 4 BED, 5 PER 5 BED. TO RENT AUTOS FOR SALE Shuttle to Campus. (989)773-9999 www.LiveWithUnited.com PERSONALS SERVICES LARGE 1 BEDROOM apartment on HELP WANTED Chippewa River. 1 block from downtown. $475. Call 400-8358. HAPPY ADS GARAGE SALES WESTPOINT VILLAGE - 2 BED 2 SPECIAL SECTION

PETS REAL ESTATE PERSONALS WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO RENT MOTORCYCLES OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS BedroomsNOTICES Each With Personal Bath SERVICES Full Size Washer & Dryer Includes

PETS TRAVEL

2012 SCHOOL YEAR 2 person apartment close to campus. Water garbage paid 805 1/2 douglas. Call John 989-560-1701.

WANTED TO BUY HELP WANTED WANTED TO RENT

1 BEDROOM APARTMENT $490/ month includes water/ trash/ Directv and internet. Available immediately. Spacious, very clean, NO PETS! 989-772-3887.

SPECIAL SECTION ROOMMATES TRAVEL REAL ESTATE

Internet & cable 989-773-2333 www.olivieri-homes.com

LOST & FOUND GARAGE SALES

2012 SCHOOL YEAR 7 person house close to campus. Own room 2 bath, garbage paid. 805 Douglas. Call John 989-560-1701.

FOR RENT PETS

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UNION SQUARE APTS - 2 PER 2 BED, Beside Target, Warm Shuttle to Campus. (989)772-2222 www.LiveWithUnited.com

REAL ESTATE

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ROOMMATES WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS FOR SALE GRADUATE STUDENT LOOKING for roommate beginning January for two bedroom apartment in quiet setting. REAL ESTATE .$297 per month. 989-772-1061. AUTOS FOR SALE nptdev@gmail.com

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HAPPY ADS

...ask about the Tallgrass Promise!

2 & 4 BR Free Internet/Cable Vball & Bball Courts

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Jan. 30, 2012