Page 1

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Running back Austin White ready to return to the field, 7

Central Michigan University

| Friday, March 23, 2012

Pi Kappa Phi Brothers Raise $360 for Journey of Hope, 3

[cm-life.com]

LCME notes six areas needed for CMED improvement By David Oltean Senior Reporter

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education’s preliminary accreditation report for Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine highlights several areas that require improvement for compliance with medical school standards. The report, sent Feb. 24 to University President George Ross, counts three areas of strength, six areas of “insufficient prog-

ress toward compliance” and 10 areas in “compliance, with monitoring” after the evaluation of an ad hoc survey team. The Dr. Ernest Yoder LCME evaluation will also require CMED officials to submit three followup reports throughout 2012 on areas of insufficient progress or areas in need of monitoring.

Areas of insufficient progress toward compliance include a lack of detailed plans for medical students’ research plans, a need for a finalized operational plan for assessing medical students’ progress with educational objectives, a need for a better method of evaluating the learning environment, a need for improvement on the standards of conduct for faculty and students and a lack of instructional faculty. The Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medi-

cine, which received preliminary accreditation from LCME in February of 2010, had no “areas of insufficient progress toward compliance” in accordance with accreditation standards. The school was also evaluated to have six areas of strength: twice the amount given to CMED. Dr. Ernest Yoder, CMED founding dean, said the continued work toward fulfilling LCME’s standards will help to ensure the first CMU medical students will receive a proper education.

“This is the LCME validating for us the areas of focus. They’re helping to guide us in the timing of certain aspects of work and preparation we are doing for greeting our first class of students,” Yoder said. “They are an accrediting body that actually works along with the schools in assuring that the students will get what they should get when they come to the school. They’re a guiding partner in a way.” A LCME | 2

[INSIDE] w BCA department adopts motion of no confidence in university administration, 3

w Quick response codes placed on coasters at select Michigan bars aim to reduce drunk driving, 5

SGA forms review committee in response to bylaws allegations By Ryan Fitzmaurice Staff Reporter

Some Student Government Association senators are crying foul about new leadership playing fast and loose with the organization’s bylaws. SGA Treasurer Antonio Grettenberger will form a review committee in response to formal complaints about Senate appointments and executive council actions in the first week of Justin Gawronski and Anna Dvorak’s administration. According to the complaints, the elections in the Senate were in violation of Bylaw Article II Section 1, which in part states, “A Senate seat that becomes vacant shall be filled by the General Board.” By moving forward on Senate appointments without the General Board, the complaints allege the Gawronski administration has effectively negated the House. The review committee, will, according to the SGA Bylaw Article V Section 5, have the power to interpret the constitution and bylaws of the SGA and review the constitutionality of recent actions taken by SGA President Gawronski and Vice President Dvorak. Review committees can only be formed after the submission of three formal written complaints by members of the SGA. The committee would normally be composed of the treasurer, two senators and two House representatives randomly chosen by the House and a representative of the Office of Student Life. Grettenberger, a Lansing senior, said he will abstain from taking part in the committee because of personal bias toward the administration. The complaints were made by SGA senators Whitney Smith, a Northville senior, William Joseph, a Brighton junior, and House Representative Nick Kastros, a Saginaw senior. They submitted the complaints to Grettenberger, in regard to seven new senators assigned by the Senate Monday night. Those candidates, approved by majority vote by the Senate, have yet to be confirmed by the General Board, composed of the Senate, the House and the Executive branch.

PhOtOS BY KAitLiN thOReSeN/aSSIStaNt Photo eDItor

Livona freshman Carlito Robles, Flint junior Chaunte Jones, and Southfield freshman Trebion Wade get their cuisine at the APHAM Food Taster and Indian Dancing event Thursday evening at the Bovee University Center Rotund.

good eats Food taster brings more than 200 to UC Thursday By Melissa Beauchamp | Senior Reporter

Asian Pacific American heritage was celebrated Thursday evening with the help of traditional cuisine and Indian dance. More than 200 people attended a food taster in the Bovee University Center Rotunda to honor Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and absorb the culture. The month of May has been considered Asian Pacific American Heritage Month since 1990, but the university honors it in March because school is not in full session in May. Asian Thai soup, rice, vegetables, steamed dumplings and Indian coconut cookies were served by Classic Fair Catering. The Multicultural Academic Student Services organized the food taster, one of three held annually in honor of each ethnic month. Assistant Director of Multicultural Academic Student Services Keisha Janney said planning goes into the food taster months in advance. “The students recommend recipes that we give to a catering company,” she said. Janney said the $3 cost for

students covers the cost of the food. “People enjoy food,” she said. “And it’s just fun to taste.” Lansing senior Tony Vang, president of the Asian Cultural Organization, said there was a line at the door at 4:50 p.m. “It’s a good turnout,” he said. Graduate Assistant for the Multicultural Academic Student Services Amber Johnson said the event is an opportunity for individuals of different eth-

Detroit sophomore Catherine Brown (left) watches India graduate student Aiswarya Malepati as she tries to teach a traditional Indian dance at the APAHM Food Taster and Indian Dancing event Thursday evening in the Bovee University Center Rotunda.

nicities and cultures to explore and experience different food outside of their culture. “It’s the ability to participate in another culture’s culture,” she said. A table of six sat eating with chopsticks and enjoying each other’s company. Before the event, they were all strangers. “The chopsticks make it really hard to eat,” said Lansing senior Nichole Humes. She said China Garden is

about as fancy as she gets when it comes to ethnic cuisine, so the event was a way to broaden her taste buds. The only complaint, she said, is the plates were small. “You can’t fit as much on there as you would like,” she said. Allen Park senior Patrick Kaneko said his dad is Asian, so he is familiar with traditional Asian cuisine. A FOOD | 2

The potential senators will stand for confirmation by a process of individual majority vote by the General Board. The three complaints also address the appointments of Hesperia senior Killian Richeson as elections director and Grosse Pointe junior Anthony J. Smith as membership director. The complaints also address recent appointments made by the Gawronski administration to fill the elections director and memberships director positions. Both the elections director and the membership director are e-council positions, which require a campus-wide application process per the Bylaw Article V Sections 7 and 9. According to the complaints addressed to the SGA, the Gawronski administration failed to execute a campus-wide application process, which they claim is evident by the appointment of Smith and Richeson 45 minutes after the administration came into power. Joseph, one of the senators to issue a complaint, said he feels the appointment of the new e-council positions was troubling, because it did not give an equal chance for the entire student body to gain the positions. “How can you claim to have a campus-wide application process and elect somebody to an e-council position within 45 minutes?” Joseph asked. “It doesn’t make any sense, and it is unfair.” Grettenberger said Monday night’s Senate appointments also denied students a voice in the process. “Students deserve to have an election process that is fair,” he said. “Instead, what has happened is that Justin and Anna have interpreted the constitution to their own favor, and have picked students out of their own values and not out of any judgement of merit.” If the review committee finds either the appointments to the e-council or the elections unconstitutional, the committee can strike them both as void and call for elections or new appointments to fill the seven seats and two positions.

A SGA | 2

His House changes venue for worshipping to Wayside for one night By Hailee sattavara Senior Reporter

ChUCK MiLLeR/StAff PhOtOGRAPheR

Sanford sophomore Adam Alderton of His House performs on stage during Worship at Wayside, Thursday evening at Wayside Central, 2000 S. Mission St.

Speakers at Wayside Central were booming Christian tunes on Thursday night. His House service was not located in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium as usual, but on the stages and inside cages of Wayside Central, 2000 S. Mission St. More than 350 gathered to worship God. Campus minister Scott Crary said he saw new people at the Wayside Thursday night. “There are many people who will never come to a church

building, but they might check it out at the Wayside,” Crary said. “A lot of students come to the Wayside.” Crary said the mission of His House is to help students become close to God. Northville freshman Lindsey Fox said she would prefer service at the church at His House Christian Fellowship, 221 W. Broomfield Road. “This is more convenient, but it gives me a weird vibe,” Fox said. Bartender Danny Smith said he hopes worshippers of His House will come back in the future.

“It’s a great crowd, great music; can’t go wrong with that,” Smith said. Smith said alcohol was still available for purchase during the service. The regular Thursday night Wayside crowd did not interfere with the service, as doors opened early for the His House service. Wayside Central typically opens at 9 p.m. Thursday nights. “It’s an awesome opportunity to be with God. He opened up the right doors for us to worship with him tonight,” said Warren junior Aaron McCord. “God loves

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

us and wants us to love him.” McCord said he would absolutely come back to Wayside Central to worship with His House in the future. Knott said he was glad everyone was invited to worship with His House and wanted to thank the Wayside for making the opportunity possible. “Throughout this week people asked me why worship was at the Wayside, and I didn’t know what to tell them at first,” said Rockford sophomore Cody Knott. studentlife@cm-life.com


2 || Friday, March 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY

w Community Cultural Teaching will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Ziibiwing Center. Staff and special guests will teach about wild racing and create a pair of wild racing moccasins for the participants. w The Well Reds will be performing from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Rotunda. The alternative group is performing free of charge.

Saturday

w The 23rd Annual Pow Wow will be at 7 p.m. in the Events The event is hosted by American programs.

CMU 1 and Center. Native

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 72

FOOD | continued from 1

“The food is great,” he said. India graduate assistant Mobeen Shaik, a member of the Indian Student Association, was in traditional dress to perform in front of the crowd. The group of two men and two women wore brightly-colored dress with a headpiece. Barefoot, they danced to their culture’s rhythm. “The dress is a traditional Indian costume,” he said. The dancers invited the crowd to learn the dance and about six people decided to give it a shot. studentlife@cm-life.com

SGA | continued from 1

Gawronski and Dvorak both said all of the appointments were constitutional and gave equal opportunity to the student body. Gawronski, a Macomb junior, said the e-council appointments were not influenced by any personal bias, and his selection of Richeson who he ran against for the position of SGA president shows his lack of bias. “Every appointment that has been made has been based on merit and merit alone,” Gawronski said, pointing out he did hold a campus-wide application process for the e-council positions and that how the process was carried out is up to his interpretation. He said the Senators were only nominated by the Senate, and will be put up for confirmation Monday by the General Board, in order to conform with the SGA’s constitution. Gawronski said provisions in the constitution are by no means strict rules to dictate every action. “What is written in the constitution are guidelines, and they are somewhat vague,” Gawronski said. He said a similar appointment process has been used in the past

LCME | continued from 1

The three areas of strength for CMED, according to the LCME evaluation, include an acceptable “structure for planning and implementation of a regional approach to graduate medical education,” “the fact that the College of Medicine engaged members of the regional community in the creation of its mission” and “the university’s extensive experience with distance learning and multiple delivery methods for instruction.” The first two reports required by LCME will need to update the status of areas of insufficient progress toward accreditation and areas in need of monitoring, including student procedures, student assessment, bylaws, program objectives, standards of conduct,

cm-life.com/category/news

[News] and is nothing new to SGA. “I myself was elected as a senator this way,” Gawronski said. Grettenberger said viewing the constitution as guidelines is inaccurate. “That’s absurd,” Gretternburger said. “The constitution is not mere guidelines ... and it can’t be if the SGA wants to consistently represent the students.” Gawronski and Dvorak will form two SGA committees to address the complaints. The first is a constitution and bylaws committee, which will review the constitution and deem if any changes should be made. The second is an ad-hoc committee which will address student concerns outside of constitutional issues. Both committees will be chaired by Dvorak and composed of representatives from both the Senate appointed by her and members of the house appointed by the Speaker of the House, Westland junior Patrick O’Connor. Dvorak, an Alma senior, said both committees will be fair and neutral, and will not interfere with the review committee. “The students have elected us as their representatives,” Dvorak said. “They should trust that we will be impartial.”

PHOTO OF THE DAY

Jeff Smith/Staff Photographer

Campus Dining Retail Food Service Manager Greg Hall stands outside the “Mobile P.O.D.” Thursday afternoon in front of Brooks Hall. Out on its first day on campus, the mobile food cart offered meals, snacks, coffee and drinks throughout the day in several locations on Central Michigan University’s campus.

Small Pizzas

studentlife@cm-life.com

sufficient faculty and student research opportunities must be sent by April 15 and Aug. 15. The final report, which must update the state of medical school finances, medical student debt and the structure of the longitudinal care clerkship, is due by Dec. 15. Yoder said the required reports due in April, August and December will help maintain conversation between LCME and CMED and bring the evaluated areas into compliance with medical school standards. “If they have additional questions, then they would generate those for us and if they wanted anything additional besides what we sent in the reports, they would ask for that,” Yoder said. “It is an ongoing conversation between the college and the LCME.” university@cm-life.com

1100

$

Two Small Two Toppings COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES 4/6/12

Large Meal

16

$

99

One Large Two Toppings, and an order of Cheesesticks & 2-20oz. Carryout Only. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES 4/6/12

Large Family Special™

1999

$

Just a click of the mouse & Papa’s in the House!

OPEN LATE 7 DAYS A WEEK! Call, Carryout or Click

papajohns .com

Any Large Specialty Pizza & One Large Two Toppings COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES 4/6/12

773-1234

1504 S. Mission Street • MT. PLEASANT & ALL OF UNION TWP!

Celebrating

life

23rd Annual

Pow wow March 24-25, 2012 CMU Events Center

Grand Entry Saturday 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday Noon Head Veteran: George Martin Arena Director: Dave Shananaquet Head Female Judge: Heather Schuyler Head Male Judge: Nigel Schuyler Host Drum: Bear Creek Head Dancers: To Be Picked Daily Emcee: Jason Whitehouse Admission Prices General public $7 Elders and children $5 Weekend pass $12 CMU students and SCIT tribal members Free with I.D.

Sponsors

Campus Dining Central Michigan University CMU Athletics CMU Off-Campus Programs College of Communication and Fine Arts College of Education and Human Services College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences College of Science and Technology Dean of Students Finance and Administrative Services Native American Programs North American Indigenous Student Organization Office for Institutional Diversity Office of the President Office of the Provost Residence Life Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Student Budget Allocation Committee Three Fires American Indian Science and Engineering Society

Experienced Provider Specializes In Adult Medical Care Adult Nurse Practitioner Helene Vossos, R.N., M.S.N., A.N.P.-B.C., is now welcoming college students and adults of all ages to her new practice at 211 S. Crapo Street, Suite J, in Mt. Pleasant.

Helene Vossos, R.N., M.S.N., A.N.P.-B.C.

For more info:

Native American Programs 989-774-2508 cmich.edu/powwow CMU is an AA/EO institution (see cmich.edu/aaeo) UComm 8611

Helene has more than 20 years of experience in the health care industry and joined the MidMichigan Health family in 2005. She is currently on the medical staff at MidMichigan Medical Center– Gratiot and has also held nursing positions at MidMichigan Home Care and MidMichigan Medical Center–Clare. Helene received her associate nursing degree (RN) from MidMichigan Community College and completed bachelor of science and master of science degrees in nursing at the University of Michigan – Flint, where she received the clinical excellence award. She is dual board certified as a nurse practitioner in adult medicine and psychiatric mental health. Helene is dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases and chronic medical conditions. Appointments may be made by calling her office at (989) 773-6218.


3

INSIDE LIFE Friday, March 23, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

no confidence

BCA votes against administration By David Oltean Senior Reporter

Photos by Jeff Smith/Staff Photographer

Dearborn Heights junior Keith Jones of Pi Kappa Phi gets his hair cut for charity by Adrian freshman Beth Cameron during a fundraiser for Journey of Hope Thursday afternoon in front of the Bovee University Center. “I needed a haircut anyway,” Jones said.

Pedal for hope Pi Kappa Phi raises $360 for charity By Anna McNeill | Staff Reporter

Three Pi Kappa Phi members tackled the physically and mentally demanding task of riding a stationary bicycle for 24 hours to raise money for a charity trip this summer. The members of the social fraternity “rode” from noon Wednesday to Thursday in front of the Bovee University Center, raising $360 for their trip this summer while also raising awareness on campus about those with physical and mental disabilities. Their cross-country trip will be a part of the organization Journey of Hope’s annual nationwide summer disability awareness campaign. As the hot sun shown down on the two stationary bikes, with temperatures reaching 87 degrees, the brothers took turns riding one bike for two-hour intervals (in total each Pi Kappa Phi member would ride eight hours). The other bike was used by anyone who wanted to sign up and ride for half-hour intervals to help the guys along their stationary journey. About 12 students signed up from multiple different organizations to ride along with them, said Pi Kappa Phi member and Farmington Hills senior Spencer Haworth as he peddled his way toward the end of his first two hours on the bike. Peddling along beside Haworth was Kaleva graduate student Breanna Knudsen. “I signed up to support my friend Spencer,” Knudsen said. “To help him raise awareness about people with physical and mental disabilities, to help him raise the money he needs for his trip

with Journey of Hope, and to get a workout and some sun. Everyone wins.” Despite the weather and exhaustion, the bike was successfully manned for the full 24 hours. One of the volunteer riders, who was in favor of the steamy weather, was the woman who donated both stationary bikes to the Pi Kappa Phi brothers’ event. Skybox studio owner Heather Mills said while peddling with a smile on her face, “(The weather) could be worse; it could be windy, raining or even snowing.” The hot weather didn’t de-

The School of Broadcasting and Cinematic Arts has drafted its own resolution of no confidence in the university administration, targeting University President George Ross, Provost Gary Shapiro and the Central Michigan University Board of Trustees. The resolution, passed by the school during a March 13 department meeting, cites a lack of public notice on university projects, inadequate representation by the president and provost, and injurious financial and academic implications for CMU. The resolution brings the total number of academic departments to vote no confidence in university administration to 17, along with the Council of Chairs and CMU’s librarians. Members of the department read over the Academic Senate’s original vote of no confidence in Ross and Shapiro before member Patty Williamson proposed a new resolution. Unlike the A-Senate resolution, the department’s motion included the CMU Board Trustees. “The School of Broadcast and Cinematic Arts expresses its deep concern about the lack of public notice or

DEPARTMENTS ENDORSING VOTE w Biology w Broadcasting and Cinematic Arts w Chemistry w Communication and Dramatic Arts w Counseling and Special Education w English w Foreign languages, literatures and cultures w Human Environmental Studies w Journalism w Math w Philosophy and religion w Physics w Political Science w Psychology w Recreation, parks and leisure w Sociology, anthropology and social work w Teacher education Also: w Council of chairs w University librarians

input into the CMU Board of Trustees facilitation of projects, such as the College of Medicine,

A vote | 6

U n i v e r s i t y C a m pa i g n

Record number of donors pledge more than $1 million By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter Ubly sophomore Matt Eilers, left, and Rockwood sophomore Jeremy Osborne pedal on stationary bikes during a fundraiser for Journey of Hope Thursday afternoon in front of the Bovee University Center. The fundraiser began Wednesday at noon and continued for 24 hours.

ter any participants from riding alongside of the Pi Kappa Phi guys and sweating it out with them. “I got an email and thought that this was a very different event, but that it would be a great thing to do, so I showed it to my registered student organizaion, the Dogma Free Society, and they thought we should sign up,” said Lenox sophomore Ashley Robinson as she waited for her turn on the stationary bike. Five members of Dogma Free Society signed up to ride. Passersby were asked by the riders if they would like

to donate and that even small change was a big help. “We have gotten a few 20’s,” Haworth said. “We even had a guy come out and ask what we were doing, and after we told him, he pulled out his wallet.” Haworth said continuously riding for the duration in such unseasonably hot spring weather was “really intense,” but worth every minute. “My legs are fine; it’s my butt that’s killing me,” Haworth said, laughing after his first two hours. studentlife@cm-life.com

Donations made to the ninth annual University Campaign have been counted and although the money raised didn’t set a record, the number of donors involved did. A total of 1,033 donors gave $1,008,498 during the campaign, which began the first week of November and ended Feb. 24. Donors included faculty members, staff and retired employees of Central Michigan University. The previous record for donors was set in 2011 when 1,030 people gave and raised $1,233,927. Bryan Griffin, director of annual giving, said the campaign has seen steady growth since 2007, when 960 donors gave a total of $680,528. “Since 2007, we made it easier to donate online. This year, over 50 percent of donations

were made via the Internet,” Griffin said. “It’s been a really good growth pattern for us and this just goes to show the amount of generous people we have on campus.” This is the second year in a row the campaign has raised more than $1 million, and Vice President of Development and External Relations Kathy Wilbur said there are a few factors that contributed to the high numbers. “We’ve certainly used more social media this year than ever before, and the time frame was a little bit longer, which may have helped as well,” Wilbur said. “The fact that the Michigan economy is experiencing a rebound is helpful as well. Additionally, people are becoming more and more comfortable gifting to the university through online means.”

A Donor| 5

Clarke Historical Library is home to $40 million children’s book collection By Justin Hicks Staff Reporter

Famous novelist C.S. Lewis once said: “I write for children because a children’s story is the best art form for saying what I have to say.” Children’s literature is of extreme importance for students because it’s where reading and learning about culture begins, said Anne Alton, a Central Michigan University English language and literature professor with a graduate degree in children’s literature. CMU is home to the Clarke Historical Library, which houses a collection of antique kids books worth an estimated $40 million. It increases in value by an estimated $1 to $1.5 million each year, said Frank Boles, director of the Clarke Historical Library. “The funny thing about the monetary value is whether the book is a collectable or not, which depends on the eye of the beholder,” Boles said. “Some are worth $20, but are irreplaceable, while others we could buy another for $5,000-$6,000.” The collection originally belonged to CMU alumnus Norman E. Clarke Sr. Clarke signed an agreement in 1954 to donate his book collection. Originally, it was of first-

edition Mark Twain books. After completing his collection, he moved on to books about Michigan’s history and the old northwest. After his first wife Lucile Clarke passed away, Clarke began collecting children’s books, and in 1971 he donated the collection to CMU in Lucile’s name. Boles said Clarke Historical Library ranks as one of the finest collections in the state in Michigan history material, children’s books and Michigan fiction. Some pieces of the collection are bought, while others are donated. On average, the library spends $30,000 to $40,000 each year in direct acquisitions, on top of an additional $20,000 to $30,000 in gifts. The evolution of children’s books began with Bible stories and verses from Sunday schools in the early 19th century, Boles said. “From there, they decided to add pictures and then add a little color to those pictures,” he said. “You could see children’s lit developing in pre-Civil War literature.” By the end of the 19th century, children’s literature had migrated away from the church to stories based on good morals. “It’s interesting to see the change in children’s books in re-

lation to the world,” Boles said. “Having the collection gives students who are interested in these areas a rich resource to use.” Alton brings her children’s literature classes to visit the library each semester to become acquainted with the contents, and they end up using it for projects throughout the course. “I show them some of the treasures, though there’s too many to show all of them,” she said. “I show them some of the highlights of the collections and they have to go back for projects in the semester.” Clinton Township senior Sam Randolph said the library is a great resource as an English student studying about children’s literature. “It’s the first literature we’re introduced to as kids and is important for us to understand,” she said. “The library has a wide selection with a variety of authors, reading levels and genres.” Randolph completed a project in which she needed to pick a children’s book and present it based on its writing, artwork, message and effect on the reader. Her choice was Andrew Pelletier’s “Toy Farmer,” which can be found in the collection. Other pieces in the collection include “The Speaking Picture Book,” from 1880, which made

Zack Wittman/Staff Photographer

Eugene Thwing’s “The Man from Red-Keg” is one of the many antique children’s books on display at Charles V. Park Library. Thwing’s book was published in 1905. The oldest book on display is Thomas Cobbet’s “A Fruitfull and Usefull Discourse Touching the Honour Due from Children to Parents,” which was published in 1656.

animal sounds at the pull of a string, and the 1900 first edition of Frank Baum’s “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” with the complete 39-sequel set. The oldest piece of the collection, Thomas Cobbet’s “A Fruitfull

and Usefull Discourse Touching the Honour Due from Children to Parents,” was printed in 1656, according to a Detroit Free Press story. Books in the collection range from 1656 to 2000, as well pieces

from Europe, the Middle East, Japan and China. The Clarke Historical Library is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. university@cm-life.com


4

VOICES Friday, March 23, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | Other men’s basketball players should be allowed to leave

Unfair treatment S

no surprise. His dad, head coach Ernie Zeigler, was no longer leading the CMU basketball program, effectively eliminating his only reason for staying put and playing ball in Mount Pleasant. But the decision to grant Trey alone on the team the opportunity to look at other schools is concerning. Jason Kaufman, director of communications for the athletics department, told Central Michigan Life Tuesday that others — Austin McBroom, Derek Jackson and Austin Keel are also expected to transfer once the semester ends — will have to wait until CMU finds a new coaching staff. This is blatantly unfair. The embarrassing men’s basketball season is over. Players aren’t expected to be in prac-

ince day one, Trey Zeigler received special treatment.

He signed a National Letter of Intent to attend and play basketball for Central Michigan University in front of media, friends and the community, and announced it on national television. He was the poster boy, expected to take the men’s basketball team out of the rut that has plagued the program for the last 30 years. And rightfully so. The athletics department was losing its national recognition with former-

quarterback Dan Lefevour leaving for the NFL, and it needed a new champion. Zeigler, a Mount Pleasant High School graduate, was highly recruited by top-tier schools with basketball programs miles ahead of CMU. He was set to be the change of culture on a basketball team that had seen its struggles. When news of his request to transfer came out Tuesday morning, it was

tice anymore and with the firing of Ernie Zeigler, the players have no leader to look toward. There is no reason to force some players to stay while letting others fly the coop. Why play favorites for the former-coach’s son? Athletics may have forgotten that basketball is a team sport. But that doesn’t change the fact that the Chippewas were meant to be unified, whether in victory or defeat. Trey’s teammates are supposed to wait while the coach’s son crisscrosses the nation, visiting Duke this weekend, and reportedly considering Michigan, Michigan State, UCLA and Pittsburgh. Trey should not be given special consideration. He already proved he was not special on the court.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Brynn McDonnell Staff Columnist

Fight for women’s rights starts here As a young woman, college student and activist I see my rights being withered away on a daily basis. Men are gathering every day in local, state and national capitals to further corrode women’s rights. Every day, I see women being subjected to a substandard life because of rules of politically empowered men who seek control over our lives and bodies. The fight for women’s rights is closer than we think. Recently I was walking through Barnes residence hall’s first floor community bath section. I always look at what posters or signs RAs and MAs put up, but today, I found myself gazing upon a deeply disturbing “sign of wisdom.” The first statements were “10 Arguments for Abortion” and “10 Arguments Against Abortion.” Immediately, I was perturbed by the wording because no one is “pro-abortion” in a sense that a woman ever wants or wishes for an abortion. Abortion is not legal because women want one like candy out of a vending machine, they need legal access to abortion because one in three women will experience a legal abortion in their lifetime. Another statement was the following: “Those who choose abortions are often minors or young women with insufficient life experience to fully understand what they are doing. Many have lifelong regrets afterwards.” According to the Guttmacher Institute, only 18 percent of teen women receive an abortion. Women in their 20s make up half of women who get an abortion. Sixty-one percent of all abortions are obtained by women who already have one or more children. Surely, children are an “insufficient” life experience. There was more incorrect, disturbing information. The “Arguments against Abortion” column cited a relationship between abortion funding and tax dollars. This is false. The Hyde Amendment bans public funding of abortion. Tax dollars do not fund abortions. Coming across this poster in the men’s community bathroom section was extraordinarily disturbing. Why? Because a man will never bodily experience an unwanted pregnancy. A man will never have to feel chastised for being an unwed mother or a woman who made a decision to terminate a pregnancy. The fact that this was in an all-male corridor with incorrect data leads to the men we see in politics today. To provide privileged students, especially males, with falsified statements is a recipe for disaster for women’s reproductive rights. This column is not about changing informed, thought-out opinions about abortion. I encourage opinions; but when opinions blend with propaganda at the hands of individuals charged with nurturing ethical and social growth in students, that is where I believe the trouble begins.

[your voice] Comment in response to “Rick Snyder, Kevin Cotter quiet on votes against CMU administration” Guest Of course they are quiet. Outside of the campus community, this isn’t news... The fact that faculty members (the same ones that were in a bitter contract dispute) are now holding a grudge because they don’t feel like they were treated fairly and/ or do not like the decisions of administration. Now there are rumblings of a potential vote of no confidence against the B.O.T... Seriously... I really do not understand how out of touch with reality some in the world of academia can be. First off, it is frustrating to see how faculty believe they “run” the University. If you didn’t get the memo, simply look at article 3, section 1 of your FA contract. All management rights and control of how University funds are

Comments in response to “Ross to testify at higher education budget meeting in Lansing next week” Chip Any citizen can show up, fill out a testimony card and speak right after the CMU president by law. I encourage everyone concerned about CMU to do this. Michmediaperson Dear Lansing---We need to email these legislators and tell them what’s going on at CMU, mainly the $10 million payment to the Events Cen-

ter, the Medical School waste of money, the big pay raises per the Detroit Free-Press last year and the lack of transparency of Warriner Hall and the Granholm-appointed board. George won’t have his Granholmappointed board members asking questions and providing cheerleading. It would be great if Friday or Monday CM LIFE wrote an editorial summarizing the past 12 months so lawmakers can ask the tough questions. We can then all email to these legislators. I would think the $10 million dollars to the Events Center, the waste of money of the Med School, the huge pay raises for administrators, per the Detroit Free-Press and the lack of transparency by the Granholmappointed board and administrators would top the editorial. If we don’t make a stand here, then they will keep on going.

Bounty systems hurt football integrity

John Irwin Senior Reporter It turns out the only people who can keep Peyton Manning and Tim Tebow from being the lead stories on SportsCenter are New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. It’s been a colossal couple of days in the world of football. Manning, perhaps the most coveted free agent in the history of professional sports, ended up signing with John Elway’s Broncos on Tuesday, bringing an abrupt end to Tebowmania in Denver. Tebow was quickly traded Wednesday to the New York Jets for a couple of draft picks. Those two stories alone would make for a huge couple days in sports, but the suspension of Payton and others involved in a bounty scandal trumps them both and will have a long-lasting

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Brynn McDonnell is member of College Democrats. This column does not reflect the views of that organization.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

spent is up to administration. I’ll be the first to say that communication has been lacking but ultimately all of the faculty voting no confidence obviously do not understand that they do not have authority over funds and do not have management authority at the University.

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

impact on the league. From 2009 to 2011, Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams ran a bounty system in New Orleans, paying players to knock high-profile players out of games by injuring them. Everyone from Payton to Saints general manager Mickey Loomis was aware of this, but no one took action. Williams was suspended indefinitely and may never coach in the NFL again. Payton, one of the best coaches in football, was suspended for a whole season without pay. Loomis was suspended for eight games without pay. The organization was fined $500,000 and had to forfeit two second-round draft picks. Wednesday’s suspensions and fines sent shockwaves throughout the NFL, just as Goodell intended. He is sending a message that this type of behavior, which undoubtedly occurs within other organizations, will not be tolerated. “When there is targeting of players for injury and cash rewards over a three-year period, the involvement of the coaching staff, and three years of denials and willful disrespect of the rules, a strong and lasting message must be sent that such conduct

is totally unacceptable and has no place in the game,” Goodell said in a statement. Goodell has been criticized for making the NFL soft by protecting quarterbacks and other high-profile players too much. Much of that criticism is deserved, but it’s hard to criticize Goodell for this decision. Injuries are a part of football. So are big hits. There is nothing more exciting than watching a defensive player lay a huge hit on an opposing player, especially if he plays on a rival team or is a player everyone hates (*cough*Brett Favre*cough*). Players should make those hits to turn the tide of the game, keep the opposing offense from moving and provide a boost to the team. The motivation shouldn’t be to purely hurt the other player to make some money. Not only is that dirty football, but it undermines the integrity of the game. It’s no longer about doing your part to help the team win. It’s about making some money for yourself. Playing tough is much different than playing dirty. Players and coaches at the professional level, especially those in Goodell’s safetyfirst NFL, should know this.

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Sienna Monczunski Staff Reporter

Intolerant America

Sometimes I question the justice system in this supposed “land of the free.” I am sure many of us have heard about the case of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old black teenager who never would have thought a trip to a convenience store would end his life. Martin was gunned down by neighbor George Zimmerman. What sickens me most about this case is not only the fact that racial malicious intent seemed to be Zimmerman’s motive, but also the fact that our justice system in this country can be so horribly wrong. Since when do citizens have to sign a petition to get justice for an innocent young teen who has never done anything to anyone. I am outraged at our justice system for forcing U.S citizens to sign a petition for something to be done about murder, and at the same time I applaud those who are disgusted by this crime of hate to the point of taking action. Hate crimes are sad in that lives are lost, but also because it shows a lack of progress in the minds of many people. Zimmerman’s cruel instincts are the things that set us back years. In another hate crime, I am sure many have heard of the Dharun Ravi verdict. Ravi was recently found guilty on mostly all of the charges brought against him after spying on his homosexual roommate Tyler Clementi. Clementi committed suicide by jumping off the George Washington bridge after Ravi spied on him using a web-cam. Ravi’s whole goal in spying on Clementi was to catch him in a homosexual act. For this crime, Ravi could be sentenced for up to 10 years in prison and also deported back to India. Ravi, your actions were undoubtedly driven by a negative feeling for homosexuals and you should be punished to the full extent of the law. His actions were obviously homophobic and although he may not have meant for Clementi to commit suicide, it is important for him to realize that his ignorant actions drove his roommate to become so distraught. I would sort of expect the type of ridiculous homophobic behavior Ravi displayed from a high school student, but a college student? Aren’t we as college students supposed to be the new age of acceptance, knowledge and open-mindedness? Sadly not all of us are as progressive as we would like to believe and Ravi is a prime example. I have never heard of an act so immature. Just as Ravi should suffer the full consequences of his stupid unnecessary actions, Zimmerman should face life in prison without the chance of parole. We are talking about two young lives here lost as the result of pure hate and intolerance. Why can’t a homosexual be who they are without worrying about their roommates spying on them? There are gay people in this world; get over it! Zimmerman may have claimed self-defense, but how can you claim self defense against an unarmed seventeen-year-old boy? Hate crimes are train wrecks that ruin the lives of many people, it is proof that we do indeed live in a cold world.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

Downtown Summer Concert Series to feature returning, new artists By Melissa Beauchamp Senior Reporter

Familiar and new faces will perform this year at the fourth annual Max & Emily’s Summer Concert Series. Brian Vander Ark will return and perform on June 7 along with his band, The Verve Pipe at the 125 E. Broadway St. location. The Ragbirds are returning and set are to perform July 19. However, Jeff Daniels will not be returning this year, and the series will close Aug. 25 with a performance by Howie Day, who has never before performed as part of the series. Max & Emily’s Owner Tim Brockman said families, students and all ages should bring lawn chairs and enjoy food while listening to the concerts. “It’s a great atmosphere,” he said. “It’s good, clean entertainment. We haven’t disappointed anyone.” The idea of the Summer Concert Series started in the fall of 2008 when local musician Monique Berry asked to perform for a family reunion at Max &Emily’s. Brockman and General Manager Chris Walton both thought it could become something bigger and worked with the city to shut down the street. The show was a success, Brockman said, with more than 750 in attendance for the live show. Shortly after, 750 people turned into more than 3,200 people last summer lining the streets of downtown Mount Pleasant to

File photo by Chris Bacarella

hear bands perform. Brockman said he would like to continue to put on the Summer Concert Series as long as people keep coming and the sponsors keep supporting. In 2009, Isabella Bank and Downtown Mount Pleasant became sponsors with Max & Emily’s, and in 2011 Central Michigan University became a sponsor. Brockman said with the unstable economy, people don’t have the finances to go on vacation. “One of the reasons we are doing it is because it gives people who are in town something to do,” he said. Brockman said he talks with people about who they would like to see, as it varies each year. Last summer, Daniels returned to the series with Vander Ark. The Ragbirds and Toad the

Wet Sprocket also performed. Brockman said although Daniels drew the biggest crowd yet, he didn’t ask him to come back because he is in high demand at this time. Freeland sophomore Emily Doyle said she is a Howie Day fan and plans on going to the concert. “I enjoy going to concerts, no matter who they are,” she said. “It’s entertainment.” Doyle said the free event should draw in a large college crowd. Saginaw sophomore Mikasa Wolverton said going to a local concert is a way to take in the culture. “It would be a good way to start off the year,” she said, “especially for freshman coming in.” metro@cm-life.com

Codes placed on coasters at Michigan bars aim to reduce drunk driving By Brittany Wright Staff Reporter

Some Michigan bars around the state will soon be offering a tech-savvy way for patrons to safely find their way home. In order to decrease the amount of drunk driving around the time of March Madness and for the rest of the year, the Michigan Licensed Beverage Association and Office of Highway Safety Planning have teamed up to create a coaster that has a Quick Response Code that can be scanned to direct people to a nearby cab company. “The goal always is to encourage motorists to be safe and responsible when behind the wheel,” said Michael L. Prince, director of the Office of Highway Safety Planning in an article on digitaljournal.com. “The coasters are meant to reinforce this important message.” In a report from digitaltrends.

Donors | continued from 3A

Although the money raised didn’t exceed last year’s record-setting $1,233,927, Wilbur said she is optimistic about future campaigns. “We’re very pleased with the results of this year’s annual campaign. This was our second-largest ever and we had more donors than ever,” she said. “We came up about $200,000 short of last year, but the campaign has just continued to have a steady growth

Watchdog groups give Michigan an ‘F’ in government accountability By John Irwin Senior Reporter

Brian Vander Ark of The Verve Pipe performs June 2010 on Broadway St. in downtown Mount Pleasant during Max & Emily’s Summer Concert Series.

com published on Nov. 29, 2011, there was a study conducted with 500 participants to see how many college students were familiar with QR codes and how to scan one. “Even though 81 percent of those students owned a smartphone and 80 percent were familiar with a QR code, only 21 percent knew how to scan a QR code when given one,” the report stated. Around this time last year, during the men’s college basketball tournament timeframe (March 15 - April 4), law enforcement officers arrested 2,215 motorists for drunk driving, nearly 6 percent of the 38,000 people arrested for drunk driving last year. The intent is to have this coaster placed in bars throughout Michigan, hoping people who are too intoxicated to drive themselves home will scan the code on the coaster and find a cab in their area.

“As sellers and servers of alcohol, MLBA members are on the front lines of the fight against drunken driving every day,” said Scott Ellis, executive director of the MLBA. “This partnership with OHSP delivers an innovative new tool to offer our customers, promoting responsibility and safety across Michigan.” Patrick Glasson, bartender at L1 Bar and Grille, 1705 S. Mission St., said although the coasters are a good idea, L1 likely won’t be using them. “(They) would be more effective in a bigger city and maybe not effecitve in Mount Pleasant,” he said. Ashlee Satrman, server and bartender at Bennigan’s Grill and Tavern, 2424 S. Mission St., said she believes the coasters would be effective and the establishment would be interested in using the coasters.

and that’s a wonderful reflection on the commitment of the university faculty staff and retirees. It’s an important program for us every year and will continue to be so.” Donors choose where their gift will be used, and the money is used in a variety of ways, from scholarship funds and research work to departmental gifts. “Donors have the power to give to any account on campus,” Griffin said. “That’s the great thing about this campaign — you get to choose where your gift goes. Some people split their gifts up to four to six ways to help vari-

ous departments on campus.” Griffin said the focus of the campaign this year was mainly on the number of donors. “If we increase donors, the campaign will increase, too,” he said. “We looked to ask retirees to donate more than we have in past years.” Both the College of Medicine and the Athletics Department achieved a 100-percent participation rate from their employee group. Both of these groups will receive a plaque during a celebratory luncheon in April.

We want the

whole

SEEKING

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR & VIDEOGRAPHERS FOR SUMMER AND FALL 2012 Multimedia Editor: Leads production of local news videos posted to cm-life.com. Works with a staff of videographers and CM Life reporters and photographers. Position requires editing and voice-over production skills using Final Cut Studio 2 on an iMac G5. Broadcast skills a plus. This is a paid position.

metro@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

story. Add professional multimedia skills to your portfolio!

Videographers: Record and edit video news projects for cm-life.com as assigned by Multimedia Editor. Learn how to edit and produce digital video content for the internet. Canon HD camcorders and editing equipment provided. All positions paid.

EMAIL OR APPLY IN PERSON!

OFFICE: 436 Moore Hall, CMU

EMAIL:

video@cm-life.com

A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED LEADER IN UNIVERSITY NEWSPAPER MULTI-MEDIA PRODUCTION

Central Michigan Life || Friday, March 23, 2012 || 5

A study released by three government watchdog groups says Michigan’s government is one of the least transparent and accountable state governments in the nation. Michigan received an “F” with a score of 58 out of 100 in the “State Integrity Investigation” report conducted by the Center for Public Integrity, Public Radio International and Global Integrity. The study gauged the risk of corruption among each state’s elected officials. The groups took a look at each state’s campaign finance laws and how well each state enforced them, along with different loopholes. Michigan was ranked 43rd in the country, receiving poor scores in public access to information, campaign finance, ethics enforcement, state pension fund management, redistricting and accountability from the executive, judicial and legislative branches of state government. Ken Silfven, deputy press secretary for Gov. Rick Snyder’s office, said Michigan is taking strides toward becoming more transparent. “Michigan actually is a leader in promoting greater transparency and our achievements have been recognized. For example, a recent Public Interest Research Group in Michigan study just upgraded Michigan’s score in recognition of its accomplishments,” Silfven said. “We’re on the cutting edge in terms of putting out meaningful information about how the state is doing in various policy areas through its ‘dashboard’ system, which is online for the world to see.” Silfven also noted Snyder’s State of the State address, where he called on

the state legislature to pass tougher campaign finance laws. “There’s a lot of positive advancements being made and we’re always looking for more ways to expand openness, accountability and transparency in Michigan,” Silfven said. Political Science Department Chairman Orlando Perez said Michigan has fallen behind other states when it comes to transparency. “(Michigan) lacks effective campaign finance legislation or a strong ethics enforcement agency,” Perez said. “While Michigan law sets limits to the amount of money a person can donate to a candidate, there are significant loopholes that allow individuals to get around the limits. Other states seem

to be able to enforce donation limits more effectively and have developed independent ethics enforcement agencies.” Perez said “lack of political will” is responsible for the state staying behind. Political Science Professor James Hill said part of the problem may be having too many elected officials. “I think it begins with having too many elected positions — Supreme Court, Attorney General, Secretary of State and even some university trustee boards,” Hill said. “They have bought into the campaign financing system and thus, cannot be the probing watchdogs. We need to keep the playing field level.” metro@cm-life.com

NING E P O B JO

Central eview R 2012-13 EDITOR IN CHIEF

Editor in Chief is responsible for the overall content, design and publication of The Central Review, the official student literary magazine of Central Michigan University. The magazine is published once each during the fall and spring semesters. Responsibilities include organizing content and writing contests, publicizing categories for submission, supervising contributing staff writers, layout and design, securing bids for printing and distribution of magazine to campus locations. Apply at 436 Moore Hall, CMU

April 2 • 5 p.m. y, da on M e: in dl ea D The Student Media Board of Directors will select the editor-in-chief for this publication.


6 || Friday, March 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

Bullying expert calls for parents to be more proactive with kids

w a y s ide c e n tral

By Kelsey De Haan Staff Reporter

charlotte bodak/staff photographer

Lansing senior Marcel “XX Cel” James and Gary “G-Rob” Robinson of the group Cap La sing a song titled “Fire Up Chips” during Hip Hop night at Wayside Central, 2000 S. Mission St. on Wednesday night.

Student rappers showcase their acts at Hip-Hop Night By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

What do Asher Roth, Mac Miller and Sammy Adams all have in common? The three were just college students when they got their big break in music and now have thousands of fans and songs in the top charts. Wednesday was Hip-Hop Night at Wayside Central, 2000 S. Mission St. The event was an outlet for Central Michigan University students to showcase their skills. It was the second time that it was held at Wayside Central, after moving from the original location at Rubble’s Bar, 112 W. Michigan St. The event, which started just after 11 p.m., had about 70 people in attendance. The first event that was held Feb. 22 had about 150 people attend. The show was also sponsored by two studentrun businesses, Cool Life Livin’ and MVMT. “People do things behind closed doors, so now they get to come out and do that,” said Nick Reynolds, owner of Cool Life Livin’ and a Kalamazoo senior. “I respect that, because that’s what Cool Life Livin’ is all about; just doin’ you.” He sold various apparel at the event, all which feature his original designs. From accounting and marketing majors to health profession majors, the student artists displayed a variety of rapping styles. Each of the four artists had 15 minutes to perform, with music and entertainment in between. The show was a debut performance for opening artist Adam Rothstein, a Shelby Township junior.

vote | continued from 3

that carry overarching and injurious financial and academic implications for the institution as a whole,” the resolution stated. “Furthermore, the President and the Provost have failed to represent adequately the best interests of the institution to the board. Therefore, the school votes no confidence in the board of trustees, the president and the provost

“This is my first time doing a live show,” said Rothstein aka “ARo.” “I love having people appreciate (the music) and give feedback,” he said. “Of course I want to get my name out there, but it’s also about becoming part of someone’s memory. Just a chance to get into someone’s head for them to love.” Rapper Antoine Burks, known on stage as “Big Black,” has performed at Ferris State University and at the previous hip-hop events at Rubble’s. “This event means a lot, because I get to display my talents to the student body, and more importantly my peers,” Burks said. He also collaborates with his friends and said together they call themselves the “MitzPhits.” “When I can throw a couple friends on the track that are talented, I like to,” the Mid Michigan Community College senior said. He said he likes that the event moved to a larger, more wellknown place. “(The) venue is bigger and more notorious on campus; more people have heard of and are familiar with Wayside,” Burks said. Rapper Marcel Jones said he was also thankful for Wayside Central’s support. “Not a lot of venues would support hip-hop, so for Wayside to step up, that was really cool,” said Jones aka “XXCell.” Though the event centered around rappers and their music, there was also a featured performance by Bird and the Truth dance crew. “As a dancer, I represent real

hip-hop and I want to try and support it whenever I can, because we have to keep the art alive,” said Ricky Clarkson, who dances under the name “Bird.” Clarkson also teaches hip-hop class TAI 178B: Hip-hop, at CMU. Others agreed having both music and dance was important to the vibe. “I thought the event was pretty cool,” said Jackson junior Chance McBride. “It was really true to hip-hop too, with both the music and the dancers.” Alumnus Patrick Sulzman, “Stryve,” who graduated with a degree in marketing in 2010 was the last to perform and said it was a fun, new experience. “I just hope they keep doing it,” said Sulzman, who traveled from Lansing to perform. “There’s not much of a hip-hop scene in Mount Pleasant, but it’s good that they are trying to make something happen.” Cory Schafer, aka “DJ Schaftown,” is the owner of Dynamic Duo ENT. He currently manages three rappers and one acoustic artist, while operating a recording studio downtown Mount Pleasant. Schafer said he plans to have one more hip-hop night in April and then wants to come back in fall and bring in bigger names. Students wishing to perform at hip-hop night can post on his Facebook page, facebook.com/ DJSchafTown. “I don’t believe telling people not to follow their dream,” Schafer said. “I wish there was someone who helped me and (gave) me those opportunities.”

to uphold the principles of shared governance.” According to minutes from the March 13 meeting, 11 department members voted in favor of the resolution, two voted against it, two abstained and two were absent. Peter Orlik, chairman of the school of broadcasting and cinematic arts, said the motion was approved by the majority of the school’s staff. “The school of BCA carefully considered and crafted its own separate and dis-

tinct resolution from the one passed by the Academic Senate,” Orlik wrote in an email. The school of broadcasting and cinematic arts is the third member of the College of Communication and Fine Arts to endorse a vote of no confidence in university administration. Both the department of journalism and department of communication and dramatic arts have endorsed the A-Senate’s similar resolution.

studentlife@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

An expert on bullying called for parents to take more of an active approach in their children’s lives on Wednesday. Elizabeth K. Englander, director of the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University, said parents are largely at fault for the epidemic in childhood bullying for giving cell phones to kids as early second and third grade. “As future educators, we should know what we need to be sensitive to and what we need to think about,” she said. “Don’t look for bullying as it is depicted on television. I want adults to know what they are actually looking for so that they can frame it and it becomes easier to spot it in the first place.” Englander was brought in for the latest event in the annual T.R. Johnson Speaker Series, “Bullying in High School and Higher Education,” sponsored by the College of Education and Human Services in the French Auditorium of the EHS building. Her presentation consisted of a series of slides and graphs, both introducing what “bullying” is and how it has impacted the lives of students. Throughout years of research, Englander has studied these forms of bullying and their impacts within all levels of the education system. “This is a very unique kind of topic to study,” she said. “It’s one of those things that happens in childhood that people have a tendency to never forget and to really carry with them.” With her studies of child aggression and technology, Englander started MARC in 2004. This center provides programing and research that works with schools, parents, state legislatures and other groups to highlight the overwhelming occurrence of different forms of bullying within school systems. However, what makes MARC unique is the fact that the

programs and information they offer are free, whereas similar seminars cost schools money to run. “This was a big motivation to me when I started the program,” Englander said. “I wanted to get services down to children whose schools otherwise would never be able to afford this kind of programming.” Within the presentation, Englander broke down cyber bullying and the different forms it consists of. Children, specifically females, tend to escalade to bullying others throughout middle school, high school and even into college. “There is quite the need to do continued research,” said Dale-Elizabeth Pehrsson, dean of the College of Education and

You Are Invited! Psychology Advising Night TUESDAY

March 27

Bovee UC Isabella Room 5:00 -7:00 PM • Assistance with course selection • Sign a Major or Minor • Information on graduate programs • What can you do with a major in psychology? • Study Abroad information available

All Are Welcome!

Human Services. “This seems to be pretty important, and this is really a major health issue for our country.” Robert Pehrsson, professor of English at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, stood by his wife’s argument that more needs to be done about the issues of bullying in schools. “Teachers need to be more aware of this issue,” he said. “The only way to deal with it is through education. Do not be naïve as a parent or a teacher.” Englander concluded that, though many digital problems begin in elementary school, the majority of cyber bullying happens during adolescence. university@cm-life.com


SPORTS Central Michigan Life

Read about Zach Horan’s postseason run for the wrestling team, 9

| Friday, March 23, 2012

cm-life.com

spring football

GYMNASTICS

MAC tournament begins Saturday at Northern Ill. CMU will look to qualify for regional competition By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

After winning the MidAmerican Conference regular season title last week the Central Michigan gymnastics team will go for the MAC tournament championship Saturday in DeKalb, Ill. as the top seed. Head coach Jerry Reighard said he thinks they’re ready by doing mock tournaments at practice. “I think we are ready, I know the team does,” Reighard said. “We’ve had two MAC championships in the gym already Jerry Reighard at practice. We haven’t counted a fall, and they’ve done everything we’ve asked for. I need to make sure this team isn’t tired, it’s been a long season.” The Chippewas are currently ranked 38th in the country. In order to qualify for regionals they need to be 36th. Reighard said believes with a first place finish in the MAC

championship and a score of 195.7 they can obtain that. Reighard is excited for the MAC championship, but has a boxer’s mentality when it comes to his strategy. He said he would rather see the team go down swinging than play it safe.

Season team scores CMU Quad BGSU Ball State TWU & EMU Texas Women’s EMU Kent State George Wash. NIU Washington Seattle Pacific WMU

Alex Niznak waiting for his opportunity to becoming starting quarterback, 8

Score 192.525 193.050 193.350 193.325 192.225 192.200 194.475 193.600 194.950 195.300 192.725 195.525

“If you let the pressure get to you then you aren’t going to flow,” Reighard said. “In practice today we were guarded, and held back. That’s a two-edge sword. We want the team going 100 percent. We want to be on the edge. All out.” Under Reighard CMU has won 13 Mid-American Conference titles. The 13th came on St. Patrick’s Day over Western Michigan. For the second year in a row CMU finished undefeated in the MAC. The desire to compete is one reason why the Chippewas came out on top at the end of the season, according to Reighard. “Some teams compete and they do really well,” Reighard said. “What has really impressed me with the 2012 team is they enjoy what they do. I think that is a huge advantage for our team. They are comrades in arms; this team loves to see each other do well. They thrive on it, and it’s a real catalyst for us.” At the beginning of the season the team was plagued with injuries. Five athletes on the team were out with injuries, including senior captain Samantha Piotrowski. Reighard said he wondered whether his team could rise against the odds and win a championship. “I was doubtful, I have to admit that,” Reighard said. “I know the team was doubtful. Some of the key people we were competing with when they got injured had some big shoes to fill. This group has worked hard, and is doing skills they’ve never done before. Their work ethic is what solidified it.” Senior Kristin Teubner has led the team in everything. As a senior captain, she had to. Teubner was crowned MAC gymnast of the Year in 2011, and likely will retain that crown after her performances this year. Reighard has seen Teubner grow in the last four years, and said he is proud to have her on the team. “Kristin has really grown, and matured over the last four years,” Reighard said. “The competitive attitude has really been contagious. She has shown younger athletes how to compete, and has really produced for us.” sports@cm-life.com

cm-life.com Go online and check out the Champ and the Man podcast featuring sports writers Brandon Champion and John Manzo

After a two-year hiatus, Austin White has returned to the field with his...

PHOTOS BY MIKE MULHOLLAND/PHOTO EDITOR

Central Michigan running back Austin White is preparing for his first season actually on the field for the Chippewas. Last season because of NCAA transfer rules he had to sit out.

Eyes on the prize

Michigan transfer running back preparing to compete, first time in two years By Ryan Zuke | Senior Reporter

S

ophomore running back Austin White is hoping a second chance is what he needs to get his football career back on track. White, a transfer from the University of Michigan, sat out last season because of NCAA transfer rules. He was later suspended from the team indefinitely for unknown reasons. But White is back and says he is ready to make an impact for the Central Michigan football team. “I feel good,” White said. “It’s good to be with the team, and I think we’re coming along real well.” White has not seen live action in two years and is eager to get back on the field. “I just missed the competitive nature of the game,” he said. “There’s nothing like being on the field for the game so that is really my drive and motivation right now.” Along with White, the Chippewas backfield will have three returning from last season, sophomore Anthony Garland and juniors Zurlon Tipton and Tim Phillips — all of whom had more than 50 carries last season. “I think we can be real dangerous,” White said. “We’re all different types of backs; we all bring something to the table, so I think it’s going to be really difficult for a defense to prepare for all of us.” Head coach Dan Enos said he thinks the Livonia, Mich. native

can be a vital contributor on offense. “I think he can play a big role,” Enos said. “I think we will have one of the best running back groups in our league and when you add the two freshmen, I think we are going to be really deep and athletic at that position.” Despite the abundance of running backs fighting for a major role, White says the competition is healthy. “I think we all push each other,” he said. “We all give each other something to work toward and that’s going to make us all better.” Although White said he wants to be a main part of the offense, his main focus is helping the team win a Mid-American Conference Championship. After winning the MAC Championship in 2009, CMU has

Austin White talks to injured wide receiver Cody Wilson on the sidelines during practice Thursday morning at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. White, a sophomore, will be seeing his first game action since playing at Livonia Stevenson this fall.

had back-to-back 3-9 seasons. White said he believes he can be a critical part in bringing back a winning culture. “Whatever I get, I get, but it’s really just about getting a championship, getting this program back where we want it and creating a winning atmosphere,” White said. As for his past offthe-field issues, he said they are behind him and he is ready to focus on the future. “I feel like with this coaching staff and this team, it’s like a family and you keep growing every day,” White said. sports@cm-life.com

Baseball opens conference play against strong Buffalo offense By John Manzo Staff Reporter

FILE PHOTO BY LEAH SEFTON

Starting pitcher Zach Cooper will take the mound at 3 p.m. today at Theunissen Stadium against Buffalo. It is the Central Michigan baseball team’s Mid-American Conference opener.

Zach Cooper, Rick Dodridge, Ryan Longstreth and the rest of the Central Michigan baseball pitching staff has their work cut out this weekend against Buffalo at Theunissen Stadium. Those three will be the starting pitchers as CMU and Buffalo open Mid-American Conference play at 3:05 p.m. today. UB has the most potent offense in the MAC statistically by far. The Bulls lead the MAC in batting average, slugging percentage, on-base percentage, runs scored, RBIs, doubles, home runs and total bases, among several other statistics. The intensity level will be high as both teams enter what some coaches in the MAC call “the second season.” “There is a different level of in-

tensity for this weekend because this is the beginning of conference play,” head coach Steve Jaksa said. “My hope would be that we do similar preparation and just make sure we continue it for a full game. The whole thing is to play nine full innings.” The Chippewas posted a 9-12 record through non-conference play, but senior pitcher Jon Weaver said those games are in the past and the team needs to focus on MAC play because those are the games that have the most meaning. “We just need everything to come together,” he said. “The games before were good preparation for MAC play, but these are the ones that really count.” Jaksa said he wants his team to take it one game at a time. He said the team needs to focus on the game it is playing in and not look ahead to other

games throughout the weekend. Because he pointed out if the team splits the first two games, it has to start all over on Sunday’s game to win the series. “The level of your focus has to be good for the whole game and not looking forward to Saturday and Sunday,” Jaksa said. “Friday is the only game that matters.” Despite Buffalo’s potent offense, the team has a 6-9 record. These struggles come from a lack of quality pitching. Buffalo isn’t ranked in the MAC’s top 10 in earned run average, so expect high-scoring games throughout the weekend. This will end the Chippewas homestand as they head to Michigan State on Wednesday and Bowling Green next weekend. The Bulls haven’t played at home this season. sports@cm-life.com

Weekend schedule UP NEXT w 3:05 p.m. today at Theunissen Stadium CMU (9-12) vs. Buffalo (6-9) Probable pitchers: CMU sr. Zach Cooper vs. sr. Cameron Coppings w 2:05 p.m. Saturday CMU (9-12) vs. Buffalo (6-9) Probable pitchers: CMU jr. Rick Dodridge vs. sr. Jeff Thompson w 1:05 p.m. Saturday CMU (9-12) vs. Buffalo (6-9) Probable pitchers: CMU sr. Ryan Longstreth vs. sr. Kevin Hughes


8 || Friday, March 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

Alex Niznak waiting for his opportunity By Brandon Champion Staff Reporter

There isn’t much question as to who will be the Central Michigan football team’s starting quarterback once the 2012 season begins. That distinction will most likely belong to two-year starter senior Ryan Radcliff, but as the Chippewas continue through spring practice, other quarterbacks on the team are working to improve for when it’s their opportunity to be the guy. One of these quarterbacks is redshirt freshman Alex Niznak. The 6-foot-3, 225-pound native of Ithaca is spending his spring battling fellow quarterbacks, like junior A.J. Westendorp sophomore Cody Kater for the back-up spot on the depth chart. So far, he says it’s been going good and that things are much easier during his second spring practices. “The first couple weeks of practice have been great,” he said. “I think the fact that I’m a year into it now is nice. Being here last spring really helped me in the winter to condition and lift and do everything that would be important out here.”

Niznak, who graduated early from Ithaca High School and enrolled at CMU for the spring 2011 semester, admitted that last season’s spring practice was a little intimidating, but this year things are different. “I’m 500 percent more comfortable in year two, I know everyone’s name.” Niznak said. “I’m not stepping into the huddle with guys who are five and six years older than me looking at me like, ‘Aren’t you supposed to still be in high school?’ I think that once you’re out here sweating with these guys you develop a bond. We’re both more comfortable with each other now.” Niznak is used to being the man. While at Ithaca High School, Niznak led the Yellow Jackets to a perfect 14-0 season and a Division 6 state championship his senior year. He completed 150-of219 passes for 2,731 yards and 31 touchdowns and ran for 1,161 yards and 21 touchdowns on his way to firstteam all-state honors. At CMU, the challenge for him is learning a back-up role, while improving daily. “I think what’s important to what I’m doing now was talking to other people who were in my position,” he said. “I

w he r

[Sports] e

91.5

RIVERWOOD ROCK N' BOWL TONIGHT AT 9PM!

file photo by andrew kuhn

Freshman quarterback Alex Niznak practices with the CMU football team April 2, 2011 during spring practice at the Indoor Athletic Complex.

talked Ryan, Dan (Lefevour) and Kirk (Cousins) down at Michigan State, all of which were the back-up at some point. It’s always great to talk to people who have been there.” Niznak also talked about the importance of healthy competition, something he says is alive and well in spring practice. “We’re all out here competing, myself, Ryan, A.J. (Westendorp), Cody (Kater),” Niznak said. “But at the end of the day were all in meetings together, going out to dinner

and stuff like that. Ryan has been great in helping me with little things like getting in a huddle and taking command.” When the Chippewas take the field for their season opener against Southeast Missouri State on Aug. 30, Radcliff will probably be under center. Niznak will be on the sidelines, absorbing every play and waiting patiently for the time when he is the man calling the plays at CMU.

FREE

ADMISSION

TO THE SHOW!

ALL AGES WELCOME!

9pm: Ugly Broads

sports@cm-life.com

(Mt. Pleasant)

http://www.facebook.com/uglybroads

Team competes at LSU in first outdoor meet The recent heat wave could factor into a strong start for the Central Michigan outdoor track and field season in its first outdoor meet this weekend at the LSU Relays in Baton Rouge, La. Temperatures at LSU have been mild for the South, which is near the temperatures in Mount Pleasant. A twist of luck that may give the team an advantage in contrast to cooler springs of the past that keep the team train-

modern

ROCK

track and field

By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

sic beg mu ins

ing mostly indoors. Field events start at 10:30 a.m. today to begin the two-day meet. Running events will begin at approximately 2:15 p.m. Events will begin again at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. The Chippewas first outdoor meet of the season will pit them against the top track and field teams in the nation. LSU, the host, will compete throughout the weekend including Team Canada, Akron, Tulane, Arkansas State and Grambling State. For seniors, the outdoor season will be their last chance

to earn a Mid-American Conference championship. In the MAC indoor championship on Feb. 24 and 25, the men’s team finished third while the women’s team finished 10th. Director of track and field Willie Randolph said during the indoor season that Kent State would be a challenge in both the indoor and outdoor conference championships. The Akron men’s team finished in second place at the indoor conference championship and the women’s team won it. Thirty-four athletes will

compete for CMU at the Relays, which will mostly be sprinters, throwers and jumpers. Twenty-two athletes from the men’s team will compete, with the remaining 12 from the women’s. The Chippewas will host just two home meets throughout the rest of the season. The Lyle Bennett Open is April 28, followed by the MAC championship two weeks later on May 10-12. sports@cm-life.com

10pm: Ben Schuller Plus3 (Mt. Pleasant/Sagina w)

http://www.facebook .com/BenSchullerMus ic

11pm: Darewlielgl)htfuls (Clare/F

ls ion.com/delightfu at bn er ev .r w w http://w

Records, an at Moore Media by our buddies l Michigan ra nt Ce at el Sound provided lab ent-run record ud iarecords st , ed nt m re de oo en indep facebook.com/m w. ww :// tp ht : University

RIVERWOOD RESORT: 1313 E. BROOMFIELD RD. • MT. PLEASANT, MI

college basketball

Big Ten bruising in Sweet Sixteen By Matt Thompson Sports Editor

Thursday night saw two Big Ten teams fall within a hour as Michigan State lost to Louisville and Syracuse beat Wisconsin. After tying a league record with four teams in the Sweet Sixteen, the Big Ten started the round 0-2. Ohio State played Cincinnati late Thursday night that ended after press time. No. 4 Indiana will play No. 1 Kentucky at 9:45 p.m. today on CBS. Indiana beat Kentucky early this year in Bloomington, Ind. on a last-second shot. The Spartans were still in the game at halftime down five points, but quickly fell behind after the break and lost 57-44. In senior Brandon Wood’s final game for Michigan State he shot 4-of-11 for 14 points. Senior forward Draymond Green kept shot 5-of-16 for 13 points and 16 rebounds. It was his third double-

double in three tournament games. He was cold from beyond the arch making 1-of-7 attempts. No. 4 Lousville will play the winner of No. 7 Florida against No. 3 Marquette (also played late Thursday night) Saturday. Michigan State as a whole couldn’t find its touch from 3-point land. The Spartans made five of 21 3-point shots. Louisville and Syracuse are in the Big East Conference. Syracuse was previously 0-6 against the Big Ten in the tournament. The Badgers were the second Big Ten team to fall Thursday night losing to No. 1 ranked Syracuse 64-63. Badgers point guard Jordan Taylor took a last-second deep 3-point attempt that hit the rim and dashed any hopes left for Wisconsin. Taylor still had 17 points, six assists and four rebounds. Wisconsin had to make a comeback in the sec-

ond half after trailing by 9 late in the first half. Taylor made two 3-pointers within a minute during a Wisconsin 9-to-5 run that gave the Badgers their first lead of the second half with 7:57 left in the game. Syracuse will face the winner of the Ohio State-Cincinnati matchup that happened late Thursday night. Whoever wins that game Saturday will be the East regional champions and go to New Orleans for the Final Four. At 7:47 p.m. today the No. 13 Ohio Bobcats will continue to represent the Mid-American Conference when they take on No. 1 North Carolina. The Tar Heels starting point guard Kendall Marshall might not be available to play. Monday he had surgery to put a screw in his right wrist after an injury suffered in the third round of the NCAA tournament. sports@cm-life.com

WITH S IN A G R A B T S E B CATCH THE

n a m h c e e copper b OOMMATE? R A R O F G IN K O LO M 26TH FROM 5-6P H C R A M , Y A D N COME IN MO & GREET! T E E M P O P & A FOR A PIZZ UR OUT O CHECK TS & US UNI O I C A P S 12-2013 FOR 20 E S A E L SIGN A

Y!

TODA

LIMITED FOUR BEDROOM AVAILABILITY!

! u o Y s t Wan

Applications for Summer and Fall 2012 semester now available at the CM Life front desk. You must be enrolled as at least a half-time student in good academic standing to be eligible for these positions.

Editor In Chief is responsible for directing the overall news and editorial operation of the paper. The Editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The Editor has final student authority in decisions and is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Friday, April 13, 2012 to select the Editor in Chief for CM Life for Summer and Fall 2012. The selected CM Life Editor in Chief will later interview and select all other staff editors prior to the end of the spring 2012 semester. In order to facilitate electronic transmission of application materials to board members, PLEASE EMAIL a copy of your resume in a PDF format, email a Microsoft Word document answering the application questions and have your letters of recommendation emailed to: hopp1nc@ cmich.edu. Managing Editor is responsible to the Editor in Chief and oversees the news editors. News Editors are responsible to the Managing Editor and oversee the total news gathering operation and the content of the newspaper.

News Page Designers should be trained in journalistic and grammatical style as well as Adobe InDesign. Duties include page layout, headline writing and proofreading.

Sports Editor is responsible for the sports news gathering of the newspaper. The Sports Editor assigns articles, edits copy, designs pages and writes headlines for sports pages. Photography Editor coordinates photography for Central Michigan Life. Administrative ability and photography experience necessary. Person must be able to direct photography staff and make assignments. Must have Photoshop experience. Staff Photographers work under the direction of the Photo Editor in covering campus and community news, sports and entertainment events. Staff Writers are needed within the news, sports and

entertainment departments to cover a wide range of campus and community beats. Although journalism or writing backgrounds are helpful, they are not required Reporters should be mature, dedicated, responsible, hard-working and willing to learn.

Multimedia Editor, Videographers assist in the production of video content for www.cm-life.com. Are you interested in shooting and editing video clips for ongoing news and sports events, personalities, lifestyle projects, advertising and marketing clips, and podcasts? Desired skills: digital camcorder use and Mac computer video production using iMovie or FinalCut Studio. Editors are expected to work all day Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday during the semester. Experience is an asset, but not required.

(989) 779-8300 CBEECH.COM

APPLICATIONS DEADLINE: MONDAY, APRIL 2 • 5 PM 436 Moore Hall • CMU • Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • 989/774-3493 • Fax 989/774-3040


cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Friday, March 23, 2012 || 9

[Sports]

wrestling- Zach horan

Postseason run had improbable beginning By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

Zach Horan needed to be alone. He was just defeated in his first match by teammate Tyler Kesselring in a threematch series that would determine the competitor in the Mid-American Conference wrestling Championships for Central Michigan. Horan was one of six CMU wrestlers competing for three different spots in a wrestleoff on Feb. 24 because of a failure to separate from the pack. He finished the regular season 12-11 overall and 0-1 in the MAC. Kesselring was 13-9 and 2-1 in the conference. “The guys know each other very, very well because they practice against each other in the room,” head coach Tom Borrelli said. “It’s really more difficult to execute the things you’re good at (in a wrestleoff ) because the guy anticipates that.” It was a tough spot for the teammates and friends alike. “It’s not a very good situation,” Horan said. “It’s not a match you want to be wrestling too often.” Horan had one hour to recuperate until the next match against Kesselring. He spent the first 20 minutes sulking in an empty locker room. “I thought my season was about to be over,” he said. “I sat up in the locker room and just kind of thinking. Oh jeez I came out of high school with pretty high hopes. I was going to be a pretty good college wrestler and now at the end of the season I’m not even starting.” Horan was not accustomed to losing. He began wrestling at the age of 4. He had an illustrious high school career. He set the school record in wins in the ninth grade.

He won a state high school championship with a record of 49-0 in his senior year, after losing in the state finals to three different wrestlers, who were No. 1 in the country from his freshman to junior year. Horan would most likely not have been in the locker room inside McGuirk Arena, if it were not for his high school coach Dave Crowell. He became acquainted with Borrelli at a coaching clinic. Crowell, who kept in contact with Horan throughout the season, always reminded Horan to keep the Chippewas in mind. “I was actually kind of thinking about not visiting here and my high school coach is always like ‘You keep that one on the list,’” Horan said. “Then this ended up being the last school I visited and it was the one I liked the most. I committed right away.” Horan said he likes the campus and the wrestling coaches. “I think (Borrelli) is awesome,” he said. “He’s a great guy, great coach. It takes a lot to get him angry. He won’t really raise his voice at us when he’s disappointed, but he can still get that same effect.” Horan had lost five of his last six matches entering the wrestle-off. Everyone had their own reasoning to why he struggled. His roommate and teammate Mike Ottinger said he needed to improve on the little things; Borrelli said he was not relaxed enough and Horan said he needed to improve his strategy. All that mattered was Horan’s woes were washed away after he left the locker room. He started the next two wrestle-off matches fast. He grabbed takedowns in the

Wrestling, field hockey looking bright for 2012-13

Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

file photo by andrew kuhn

Zach Horen wrestled his way from inter-squad tournament to the NCAA Championships.

first period of both. That resulted in two wins earning a trip to Athens, Ohio for the MAC Championships. With his newfound confidence, he started the conference tournament by pinning the MAC’s No. 4 wrestler of the 133-pound weight division. Next was No. 1 Andrew Nowak. With the two tied at 1 after three periods, Horan held on to a 2-1 lead after escaping for a point in the tiebreaker. “When I was on bottom, he just let go and I was able to get away,” Horan said. “I could tell he was running out of gas, and I was feeling pretty good, so I knew just as long as I put pressure on him and did everything right on top, I was going to be able to ride him.” He finished the tournament giving a congratulatory hug to his coaches and parents after an easier win in the conference championship. In the first round of the NCAA Championships Horan defeated No. 12 Bryan Ortenzio in the final seconds to win 5-4. The postseason winning streak finally came to a close against No. 5 Joe Colon. But he rebounded with

two victories in wrestlebacks, including one over Mason Beckman, who had defeated Horan before. “I did not want to lose to him again,” Horan said. “I just went out and wrestled as hard as I could. Kept attacking him and kept going after him.” Horan’s luck ran out when the All-American status was at stake. He lost 5-3 after facing a 3-0 deficit in the third period again. “I was upset. I believed I was going to be on the podium and I was going to be an All-American,” Horan said. “I know it was unlikely. Most people probably don’t believe me, but when the coaches are saying everything to you, like if you wrestle well you can place… I was kind of sticking to all of that stuff.” sports@cm-life.com

What I can say with certainty from observing the Central Michigan wrestling and field hockey teams is success will be imminent for both programs next season. The wrestling team should have many members vying for All-American status and competing for national titles, and the field hockey team should have their sights set on a conference championship. Furthermore, wrestling coach Tom Borrelli and field hockey coach Cristy Freese’s pedigree shows they are up for guiding their respective teams to successful seasons. Both reached milestones in the last year. In their combined 26 seasons as head coaches, Borrelli surpassed 300 wins and Freese moved past 200 wins. They will have a roster that is a year older and wiser at their disposal. Their teams will only lose two seniors each from their last squad. Two seniors will anchor the wrestling team next year. Ben Bennett of the 184-pound class and heavyweight Jarod Trice, while the field hockey team will be led by midfielder Erin Dye and goalie Anastasia Netto. Trice took this year off to pursue the Olympics. He

GO FOR THE GREEN!

placed fourth in the nation the last time he was wearing maroon and gold at the heavyweight division. Bennett completed another season as an All-American. He would be first four-time All-American in CMU wrestling history, if he continues his success in his final year. Dye came out strong at the end of the field hockey season after a slow start, scoring six goals in her last eight games. Netto’s improvement came in her second year starting. She allowed 1.83 goals per game, an improvement from 2.68 in her sophomore season. She earned second team AllMAC for her success at guarding the net. The wrestling and field hockey team do not lack in talented underclassmen either. Freshman Mike Ottinger surprised many with his performances on the mat. When he declined in the postseason, freshman Zach Horan stepped up in another weight class, coming one match away from All-American status. Freshman Cayleigh Immelman of the field hockey team won Mid-American Conference Freshman of the Year for her efforts. She was the team’s leading scorer with 12 goals and was also second in assists with nine. Wrestling and especially field hockey will always be a backdrop to football and basketball. But next year, they will most likely outdo their cohorts, whom participate in mainstream sports.

SPRING SPECIAL! OPEN PLAY ONLY

lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi edsedseds

at

RIVERWOOD

1

Voted People’s Choice Four Years in a Row!

$ 00

per hole!

Golf Carts

, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com

AVAILABLE!

a ClassifiedClassifi Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Rates

1/2 OFF

ept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad tional origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or vertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media Bold, italic centered Bold, italic and Bold,1-2 italic and centered 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 per issue Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered e standards of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with the standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will$7.75 be responsible for typetypographical are the available along type are the available type are available along type are available along e extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge along for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features with and other special features with other special features with other special features ch an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad attractors. 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. y credit due canthe befipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due canthe befipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce

By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 omBy Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: per issue a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 p.m. y responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

RANGE Enjoy BUCKETS a great 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPENgame AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS of OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ROCK-N-BOWL golf at this BUY 1 GET 1 FREE ADD Crazy Bread! Central FRI. 9:30 SAT. 10:30 It’s HOTMichigan N-READY too! 772-5726 2 miles west of CMU on Broomfield Course! For Tee-Times: $ 99 www.riverwoodresort.com 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Good Thru 4/1/12

1 edseds lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi eds Classifieds

Good Thru 4/1/12

8 PIECE ORDER • CARRY OUT • PLUS TAX

To advertise your golf related business here, call your CM Life advertising representative at 989-774-3493

324 S. Mission • MT. PLEASANT • 773-1121

Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

Classified Ad Rates

Classified Ad Rates

discrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 CM word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad Phone: 989-774-3493 gin, ect By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of and CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling ypographical the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and charge for the are space used and type are type centered type are centered type are om By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along available along available along with available along with by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of with publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publication. Any Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features In Person: Moore Hall other special other special features special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the credit ad. office Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. offifeatures ce If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issuefor thelike Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like attractors. attractors. like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. onsible ified Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. We are only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall NOTICES WANTED NOTICES TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

NOTICES WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE

NOTICES WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered type are available along 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. WANTED TO RENT TO RENT FOR 13+SALE Issues: $7.00 per WANTED issue

AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

AUTOS SALE OPEN AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS LOST &FOR FOUND

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT WE ARE PLEDGED to the

Classifieds

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

2 BEDROOM APARTMENT in newer,

HERITAGE SQUARE TOWN HOUSES Only 1- 6 bedroom left! Free Cable & Internet + Full Size W/D CALL NOW TO START SAVING! 989-773-2333.

JUST TWO 4 br apts left for May or August. Prices for 3- 4 people. FREE c a b l e i n t e r n e t bomackprop@gmail.com<mailto:boma ckprop@gmail.com> 773-0785

private duplex. Spacious, oak, celetter PETS and spirit U.S. policy SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TOof RENT WANTED ramic tile W/D, AC,TO 1 car RENT garage. No for the achievement of equal

housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

pets. 989-772-3887.

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

WANTED HAPPY ADS $220 AND UP. 1,TO 2, 3 BUY bedroom houses/ apartments. Close to campus. Pets ok. 989-644-5749.

CHERRY STREET TOWN HOUSES 3 or 4 People 1 1/2 Bath Free Cable & Internet + Washer & Dryer Walk to Campus and Downtown Starting at $280 per person 989-773-2333.

WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

UNION SQUARE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

FREE Gym Membership to Endurance

WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS

WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS

(see office for details)

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

Have you heard all the PETS Buzzz at ? TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES

SPECIAL SECTION PETS Sign a lease and receive

FREE NETFLIX PERSONALS For a Year! Must present coupon at signing Exp: 4/16/12

HAPPY ADS

Enter to win the use of a

42 INCH FLATSCREEN TV! When you sign a lease

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

a Classifi ed Ad 1 AND 2Placing bedroom apartments. Close AVAILABLE JUNE 7TH . 2 BEDROOM

1-2 Person ed Ad Policy 2Classifi Bedroom

No $$$

Classified Ad Rates

Ask about

HOUSE. WASHER/ dryer. 1411 the Tallgrass m Due atRates: CMof LifeFreddie!s will not knowingly acceptShuttle advertisingto which reflects discrimination because & of race, color, religion, Bedroo15 word minimum per classified ad Promise! FREE Campus • FREE Internet Cable Granger. 2 blocks west By Phone: 989-774-3493 Signing! sex or national reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising Tavern. $600 Plus deposit/ utilities. origin, and CM Life Leases SAVE TIME! APPLY ONLINE TODAY! 1 AND bedroom apartments close to in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By 3Fax: 989-774-7805 le! Pets OK. 1- 2 person which duplexis 628 1/2 Bold, italic and $7.75 per issue ailabIssues: v1-2 A campus and downtown. Pet the Friendly South oak $375 plus be deposit/ utilitiesfor typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling responsible charge for the space used and centered type are By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 989-621-7538. no pets 772-5668. HOURS: MON.–THURS. 9-6, FRI 9-5; SAT. 12-4 • available www.tallgrassapts.com along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an errorLiveWithUnited.com is limited to only the first date of publication. Any to campus. Available May and August. Year lease. 989-444-1944.

772-2222

(989) 779-7900


Classifieds Classifieds lassifi ifiedseds lassifieds R A P T Y G N I ClassifiEeds AS 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 10 || Friday, Mar. 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

y responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, ed CMU, Mt.Policy Pleasant, 48859 • www/cm-life.com Classifi Ad & MI Rates PUBLISHINGALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising reflects discrimination Michigan Life • 436which Moore Hall, Mt. Pleasant, 48859 • www/cm-life.com ed Ad Central Classifi edCMU, Adbecause Policy Rates: 15MI word minimum per classified ad Classified Ad Rates of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or

ed Ad

om

cm-life.com/vibe

discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Bold, italic and centered will notwith knowingly accept advertising ects discrimination because of race, color,per religion, 1-2 Issues: $7.75 issue Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad Board, isCM notLife in keeping the standards of CM Life. CM Lifewhich will berefl responsible for type are available along sex or errors national and ofCM Life reserves the right reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising typographical only origin, to the extent cancelling the charge for theto space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such of anthe error. Credit Media for suchBoard, an errorisisnot limited to only with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will which is will in the Student in keeping Bold, italic and CM Life notopinion knowingly accept advertising which refl ects discrimination because of race, $7.25 color, religion, Issues: $7.75 per issue like 1-2 ad attractors. 15 word minimum per classified ad 7-12 Issues: per issue Rates: the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office be responsible for typographical errors only tothe theright extent of cancelling the charge for the spaceadvertising used and centered type are sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves to reject or discontinue, without notice, 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue available along with rendered byresponsible such error. Credit for such error is limitedwith to only the first date of publication. which is invalueless theare opinion of thean Student Media Board, isan not in keeping the standards of CM Life. CM LifeAny will Dept. immediately. We only for the first day’s insertion. Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue

Classified Ad Policy

Classified Ad Rates

7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue

credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error,

be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and om 3-6 Issues: 13+ Issues: $7.50 $7.00per perissue issue report it tovalueless the Classifi Dept. Wesuch are an only responsible the fithe rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. rendered byed such animmediately. error. Credit ALWAYS for error is limited for toAT only first date of publication. Any PUBLISHING DAY! OPEN WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

other special features centered type are like ad attractors. available along with

7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error,

report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. DAY! We are only responsible for the first day’sALWAYS insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media ByPleasant, 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for Life Mt. •Fax: 436 989-774-7805 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com type are available along typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only Policy Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Addue Rates 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. In Person: 436 Moore Hall Policy the first date of publication. Any credit can be picked up at the CM Life office WANTED TOClassifi RENT ed Ad Rates WANTED RENT NOTICES FOR SALE SALE within 30 days of termination of the ad. IfFOR you find an error, report it to the Classifi ed 13+TO Issues: $7.00 per issue Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. discrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising of race, whichcolor, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because

Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad

WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE FOR SALE AUTOS AUTOS FOR SALE OPEN SERVICES SERVICES REACH FOR MORESALE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS LOST & FOUND AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT n Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com MIGHTY MINIS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT Classifi ed Ad Policy Ad RatesSECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TOClassifi RENT edSPECIAL PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT PETS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS SPECIAL SECTION SECTION PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES NOTICES FOR SALE FOR ESTATE SALE REAL PERSONALS PERSONALS PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 989•772•9441 AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS 9am - 5pm

gin, ect or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. notCM in keeping Life will with the standards of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling ypographical the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the space used and centered type are centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with available along with by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of Life the ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. onsible ified Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master Bedrooms Each With Personal Bath Full Size Washer & Dryer Includes Internet & cable 989-773-2333 owingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad www.olivieri-homes.com gin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising SHUTTLE SERVICE on of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and UNION SQUARE - 2 $7.75 PER 2per issue 1-2APTS Issues: Public ypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space usedBED, and Beside Target, Warm Shuttle to centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue Transportation (989)772-2222 available along with by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication.Campus. Any Services of the 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features www.LiveWithUnited.com picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Isabella County 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. Transportation sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. NEW, NEW, NEW 1 block from camCommission pus 5 bedroom duplex Olivieri-homes.com 989-773-2333.

EXPLORE

e

ge In Hous d i R n e o t g n xi

L

L

rch 23rd a M y, a Classified Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates id HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES

Placing a Classified Ad

HELP CLES we buy advertising them we haul FORWANTED RENT CM Life will not knowingly accept whichthem. reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, 989-772-5428. Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHI-

Fr

GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising JAMESTOWN APTS - 2 PER 2 BED, DEERFIELD VILLAGE - 2 PER 2 BED, which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 3, 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to 4 PER 4 BED, 5 PER 5 BED. Warm SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL PETS PETS be responsible errorsSECTION only to the extent of cancelling thePETS charge for the space used and WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT for typographical CLASSES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE By Website: www.cm-life.com Campus, (989)775-5522 Shuttle to Campus. (989)773-9999 rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any www.LiveWithUnited.com SELF DEFENSE CLASSES offered at In Person: 436 Moore Hall www.LiveWithUnited.com credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, the Ice Arena. For details contact MAIN STREET LIVING! 3-5it to People ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL report the Classifi ed Dept. TRAVEL immediately. are onlyorresponsible for the first day’s insertion. MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES Hours: p.m. DUPLEX 214 N.Monday-Friday Arnold St. Mt. Pleas- 8 a.m.-5 AUTOS FORWeSALE Beckey at 989-464-3121 SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND

ant MI. 2 bedroom 1 bath/big backyard. Aug 10, 2012 to July 31 2013 $580 plus utilities. 517-403-4587.

Walk to class and downtown! 989-773-2333 www.olivieri-homes.com

GIRL AND GUY ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR 2012- 12013 school year. www.bestrollc.com 586-321-1112.

MASTER BATH LIKE NEW, Warm Shuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 www.LiveWithUnited.com

GREAT HOUSE. QUIET, clean, no pets, studious women roommates. $185/ month plus utilities. Summer and school year. 773-9191.

LOST & FOUND

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 ROOMMATES (989) 774-3493 FOR SALE www.cm-life.com REALFOR ESTATE AUTOS SALE

FOR RENT

WANTED TO BUY HELP WANTED

hopp1rs@cmich.edu

REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! WESTPOINT VILLAGE - 2 BED 2

REAL ESTATE GARAGE SALES

PETS WANTED TO BUY

REAL PERSONALS FORESTATE RENT

HELP WANTED PERSONALS

TO RENT WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS CM LIFE CLASSIFIEDS

BLOOMFIELD HILLS RENTAL Company needs summer help! Up to $12.00 an hour. Outdoor work, good driving record, and lifting required. Call Wayne at 248-332-4700.

436 Moore Hall

MOTORCYCLES NOTICES

FREE

FRIDAYS!

WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION

ROOMMATES

TRAVEL

Sign a NEW Lease ANY FRIDAY and Receive REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

M WANTED TO BUY FeeHAPPY EADS FREE Application E GY

FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE

FR ERSHIP B MEM URANCE

Large Pizza

D TO ENe office for

Internet

(se

Expanded Cable

s) detail

$50 Meijer Gift Card • WestPoint Village • Union Square

772-2222 LiveWithUnited.com

BLISS

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

GARAGE SALES

SPECIAL HAPPYSECTION ADS

PETS

TRAVEL WANTED TO RENT PERSONALS SERVICES

MOTORCYCLES NOTICES

DANCERS WANTED. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. SUPPLEMENT YOUR INCOME PART TIME. APPLY AT MICELI!S CORNER. 989-539-3401 AFTER 6 PM. facebook.com/micelis.corner.showgirls.

PRIZE GIVEAWAYS!

WANTED TO RENT

FOR SALE

AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES LOST & FOUND JOIN US FOR PIZZA AND THESE SPECIAL OFFERS: HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT No Application Fee ($50 Savings)

HAPPY SALES ADS GARAGE

IMMEDIATE OPENING PART-TIME SALES ASSOCIATE. Delivery person needed as well. Apply Sears, Mt. Pleasant with resume. Must be available summer, winter and breaks.

Sign a Lease and Get Either: PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION $25 TARGET Gift Card ROOMMATES or $25 Speedway TRAVEL Gas Card MOTORCYCLES

PETS

MOTORCYCLES

WORK ON MACKINAC Island This Summer- Make lifelong friends. The Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge Shops are looking for help in all areas: Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. Housing, bonus, and discounted meals. ( 9 0 6 ) 8 4 7 - 7 1 9 6 . www.theislandhouse.com

773-3890 AMGhousing.com REAL ESTATE

PERSONALS

WANTED TO BUY

HAPPY ADS

JAMESTOWN

FREE Gym Membership to Endurance (see office for details)

Firehouse Carwash

• Deerfield Village • Jamestown

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

by Harry Bliss

2-5 Person 2-5 Bedroom

NO DEPOSIT ON 5 BEDROOMS

FREE Shuttle to Campus • FREE Internet & Cable SAVE TIME! APPLY ONLINE TODAY!

775-5522

Pet Friendly LiveWithUnited.com

WESTPOINT VILLAGE BRAND NEW FREE INTERNET & CABLE!

2 Person 2 Bedroom 2 Master Bathrooms FREE Shuttle to Campus SAVE TIME! APPLY ONLINE TODAY!

779-9999

LiveWithUnited.com

DEERFIELD VILLAGE FREE Gym Membership to Endurance (see office for details)

4 Person 4 Bedroom 5 Person 5 Bedroom

NO DEPOSIT – 4-5 BEDROOM FREE Shuttle to Campus • FREE Internet & Cable SAVE TIME! APPLY ONLINE TODAY!

773-9999

LiveWithUnited.com

CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

presented BY:

(989)773-1234

Call for today’s specials or order online at: papajohns.com

Trust the Midas Touch MT. PLEASANT 1303 E. Pickard St. (989) 772-2814

CM Life Classifieds are always open @ www.cm-life.com

Across 1 Fast food sides 6 Turkey 10 Put away without restraint, with “on” 14 Unspoken 15 ‘30s boxing champ 16 Tea traditionally made with cardamom 17 Slate, for one 18 Keep a movie dog from wandering? 20 Forced (in) 22 Voted out 23 Emit 25 Angus, e.g. 26 Female padre? 31 Tropical reef denizen 32 Some claims 33 Brother’s title 36 Dhofar Rebellion country 37 Ski run 38 Pen used at sea 39 San Francisco’s __ Hill 40 Roller coaster cries 41 Let up

42 Ancient mounted police? 44 Where to see a chin rest 47 Cavils 48 Poem that ends “I am the captain of my soul” 51 Freewheels 55 Dance that reflects the pun-creating elements found in 18-, 26- and 42-Across 57 Mauritius money 58 Friends and acquaintances 59 Croat, e.g. 60 More distant 61 Barrie henchman 62 Big __: nickname for LPGA great JoAnne Carner 63 Coverage giant Down 1 Boil slowly 2 Kick back 3 Ill-natured

4 Rhea stat 5 How gas prices sometimes rise 6 Airer of the sitcom “’Allo ‘Allo!” 7 Honolulu’s home 8 Stingy 9 Eastern Australian seaport 10 Musical range 11 Indian loincloth 12 Not left over 13 Part of LED 19 ‘90s-’00s Dodges 21 Traffic-controlling gp. 24 Slicker 26 Shout of encouragement 27 __ erectus 28 Dhow sailor 29 Second-generation Japanese American 30 Futuristic sitcom family name 33 Blücher’s title in “Young Frankenstein” 34 Singer Coolidge 35 Like balsamic vinegar

37 Flight of fancy 38 Cookout condiment 40 Question of identity 41 Columbia River city 42 Old saw 43 First X, say 44 NyQuil maker 45 “I didn’t know he had it __” 46 Like aspen leaves 49 Troy Aikman’s alma mater 50 Fake 52 Cookout accessory 53 Typical “Hunger Games” trilogy reader 54 Blood components 56 Burt’s “The Killers” co-star

March 23, 2012  

Central Michigan Life

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you