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LIFE

CMU celebrates MLK Day Monday, no classes CENTRAL MICHIGAN

CMU’s Art Gallery presents “Drawing Clay” exhibition, 3

Central Michigan University

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Friday, Jan. 13, 2012

Women’s basketball defeats Western 93-85 Wednesday, 9

[cm-life.com]

FA ratifies contract, three quarters of members vote Leaders don’t plan to release vote numbers By Theresa Clift Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan University Faculty Association ratified its 2011-14 contract Thursday night after more than seven months of bargaining with the university, including a strike on the

first day of fall semester. Nearly three quarters of the members cast a vote, FA President Laura Frey said in the email obtained by Central Michigan Life. The FA has no plans to release the vote count, Frey said when reached for comment. The numbers were not being released to members. The contract was tentatively agreed upon Dec. 1 at the Isabella County Courthouse after about 14 hours

of bargaining. The agreement allows the FA to keep MESSA for health care if members absorb premium increases but includes no salary changes from the university’s original offer made before the fall semester began. CMU’s Nov. 11 offer allowed FA members to keep MESSA only until June 30 and under certain conditions. CMU Director of Public Relations Steve Smith said

year two and a 2.5-percent increase in 2013-14. The FA had originally proposed to accept a salary freeze during the fall 2011 semester, with a 2.2-percent increase spring semester, a 3.7-percent increase in year two and a 3.9-percent increase in 2013-14. On Nov. 22, the FA proposed a oneyear contract, which included a pay freeze for the 201112 year. At the university’s request, the contract also excludes

the university was pleased to see the contract ratified. “Without question, the extended process that ultimately resulted in this agreement was challenging and, at times, divisive,” Smith said. “We must now move forward as one university and do all that we can do — together — to make this institution even stronger.” The contract freezes salary for this year, with a 2.25-percent increase in

Graduate student housing to have 94 units

$290 hourly rate for lead attorney in FA dispute By Theresa Clift Staff Reporter

Breaking stereotypes University Honors Program Director Phame Camarena said he appreciates how Schuller helps break some of the stereotypes about who honors students are. “Although he is intellectually curious and very bright, part of what makes him special is his creative talent and drive,” he said.

Central Michigan University paid its law firm more than $77,000 for representation in the Faculty Association labor case. Robert Vercruysse was the primary attorney representing CMU in the FA case, said CMU Legal Counsel Manuel Rupe in an email. He is paid $290 an hour. Gary Fleak, of the same law firm, assisted him with the case for $245 an hour. “As with most law firms, the hourly rate is different depending on the attorney’s years of experience in a particular practice area,” Rupe said. Vercruysee, Murray & Calzone is a law firm from Bingham Farms that specializes in labor and unemployment issues. The firm has been representing CMU in the faculty case from July 2011 to January. The invoices, obtained by Central Michigan Life through the Freedom of Information Act, include all payments to the firm from July to Oct. 31, 2011. Legal work for this time included fact-finding hearings, unfair labor practices filed by both sides and an injunction to send the FA back to work after their strike on Aug. 22.

A music | 6

A firm | 2

By Tony Wittkowski Staff Reporter

A grad | 2

tanya moutzalias/staff photographer

After releasing, his album “Escape” last summer, Saginaw junior Ben Schuller contemplated his future sound. “I feel like I was taking myself way too seriously,” Schuller said. “Who am I kidding, I’m a college kid living the dream and I want my music to reflect that.”

school and rock

Honors student balances coursework, concerts By Jessica Fecteau | Senior Reporter Despite his stacked schedule, junior Ben Schuller still finds time for his passion for music. The Saginaw native is now focusing on promoting himself as an artist on campus after branching out from his band, Aurorealis. Since releasing his debut album ‘Escape’ in the summer, Schuller has played about 15 shows in Michigan. “It’s not the type of thing where I’m trying to get lucky,” he said. “I’m in the mindset of working my way up and not relying on luck for anything.”

Creating music is all about connecting with others and trying to relate to his audience, Schuller said. As a Centralis Scholar, he said balancing his honors classes with his music schedule is sometimes a struggle. Schuller is also president of Central Harmony and a competitive power lifter. “There have been times I had to choose between going to a show and going to my Friday classes,” he said. “But I guess I keep my goals as my

first priorities.”

BBQ business owner hopes second time’s a charm By Jordan Spence Staff Reporter

The Heath family could have fit their previous restaurant in the space of the kitchen of their new restaurant. Sure Shot BBQ, previously known as Robin Hood’s BBQ, moved from West Broadway Street to 1135 S. Mission St., and opened last week. At their new location, the family-run business has added a sitdown option for their customers. “It’s a fresh new start,” said Owner Robin Heath’s daughter, Adrienne Heath. “We have more of a family atmosphere, and with the new location, it’s easier ac-

A fa | 2

CMU pays law firm more than $77,000

Project on Bellows Street expected to be finished by March 2013 Construction on 94 apartments for the Graduate Student Housing project is expected to be finished by March 2013. “They’re already under construction,” said Stephen Lawrence, vice president of Facilities Management. “They’re doing underground utility right now.” The Christman Company of Lansing has been hired to contract out the work on Bellow Street next to the Carlin Alumni House, expected to be completed by March 2013 — later than the expected target of fall. The project, along with the introduction of a new biosciences building schematic design, was approved by the CMU Board of Trustees in December. A design for the biosciences building, to be located between Education and Human Services and Combined Services building, phase was submitted on Nov. 1. The design includes a plan for research and support labs and instruction and office space. It is waiting approval from the state in March. Upon

College of Medicine faculty from the bargaining unit. Originally, CMU proposed to also exclude coaches hired after July 1, 2011 and any other professional program. Under the contract, CMED tuition remission is capped at the in-state doctoral graduate cost. Tuition remission refers to faculty and other full-time employees at CMU receiving 24 free

cess to the best damn BBQ in town.” After opening his business a couple years ago, Robin had plans to start small and eventually move to a larger space after working out the kinks. To ensure the best quality food possible, Robin said they eliminated items on the menu that did not sell or did not stay fresh. “Everything here is homemade; that’s how we ensure the quality,” Robin said. “We never try for good enough; it has to be the best.” Robin said he believes the best way to make great BBQ is cooking the meat low and slow. His methods include smoking pork

and beef brisket for nine hours and ribs for two and a half hours. Robin’s son Jon said the reason for keeping the menu small and simple is so they are able to perfect what they offer the customers. Robin said he learned much of his technique from his friend and mentor Billy Bones. “Billy is who fanned the fire — I started cooking for friends and family here and there,” Robin said. “I then took catering jobs, and people fell in love with it. After being downsized from my sales representative job, I decided to make the move (to) owning

brooke Mayle/staff photographer

A bbq | 2

Robin Heath, owner of Sure Shot BBQ, 1135 S. Mission St., swirls homemade sauce on pulled pork nachos.

[INSIDE] w An estimated $10,000 in equipment stolen from Moore Hall, 3 w CommUNITY Peace Brunch, March, Vigil will kick off MLK Week Monday, 5 w Harvard’s Lani Guinier to be MLK keynote speaker Wednesday, 5

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

From Poverty to

Empowerment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Week January 16-20, 2012

Keynote Speaker

Lani Guinier

Wednesday, January 18

7 p.m., Plachta Auditorium in Warriner Hall

Make it a Day On... Not a Day Off!


2 || Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY w From Elea to Ascea will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the West Gallery of the University Art Gallery. CMU Associate Professor and Painter Brian Elder will exhibit work done during his Fall 2010 sabbatical. w Drawing Clay will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Main gallery of the Uni versity Art Gallery. This exhi bition features ceramics by contemporary artists from across the U.S.

SATURDAY w CMU Women’s Basketball vs. Ball State will start at 2 p.m. at McGuirk Arena. Admission is free for current CMU students and tickets are available at the CMU Events Center. For more information call 1- 888- 347- 3872.

SUNDAY w CMU Men’s Hockey vs. Lindenwood University will start at 12 p.m. at the I.C.E. arena on Remus Road.

TUESDAY w Faculty Artist : Oliver Henderson, tenor will start at 8 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 47

GRAD | CONTINUED FROM 1

approval, construction is estimated to take 28 months. ANSPACH HALL RENOVATIONS At the beginning of the 2012 summer, the university will begin renovating the first floor of Anspach Hall, along with the west side entrance. The hall will be worked on over the course of the summer and into the fall and winter of next year, ending in March of 2013. It is the first formal renovation to Anspach Hall since its construction in 1966. The university will replace ceiling tiles, floors, update the fire alarm system, install new lights and update bathrooms to American Disability Association standards, Lawrence said. In addition, the roof of the office wing will be renovated and a student lounge will be added. “The student lounge will be well-received among students, and the entrance will be scheduled for completion in 2013,” Lawrence said. The lounge itself, along with the west side entrance, also won’t be started until 2013. “The student lounge will be a small building addition,” Lawrence said. “And it will not take up any classroom space.”

BBQ | CONTINUED FROM 1

my own business.” Business has jumped up fast since the move, he said, because of the renovated building and location. A FAMILY AFFAIR Robin attributes his success to the help his children have given him. They both have been with him when he originally opened, and they plan on helping him for some time. Jon said he has learned how to do the cooking, and Adrienne said she helps with the business

FIRM | Not included in the $77,000 is payment for any work on the case since Oct. 31, including the 14-hour bargaining session to reach a tentative agreement Dec. 1 where Vercruysse was present. Also not included is any legal work provided when CMU released its “final” offer on Nov. 11, or rejected the FA’s counter offer Nov. 22. “For litigation matters in which a law firm is defending CMU, the legal services are paid through the Michigan Universities Self-Insurance Corporation,” Rupe said. It was not answered whether any tuition money was used to pay the firm.

FA | CONTINUED FROM 1

credit hours per year for themselves, their spouses or their dependent children. The FA originally wanted to increase the cap from 24 to 30 credit hours and offer reimbursement for courses unavailable at CMU but taken at other schools. Also included in the contract is the creation of a study committee to review issues re-

There was extra space where the student lounge will be added on, which allowed the university to build it in the first place, Lawrence said. The approval for renovation came from the board of trustees during a December board meeting. The total cost of the renovation is estimated to be $14,075,000, funded primarily through university reserves and maintenance funds. “We are in the process of awarding Clark Construction the contract,” Lawrence said. “They have done work on campus before.” Clark Construction Company, based in Lansing, helped construct the CMU Events Center last year and updated Brooks Hall and its DIY water system, Lawrence said. Two students who have a class in the room have noticed some areas of the room that could have some work done. “It seems too crowded — some of the seats are too close together,” said Taylor sophomore Kaitlyn McCombe. “There should be an aisle between the seats.” Gross Pointe freshman Alexa Materna noticed damage to some of the seats. “I noticed a couple of the seats and desks are broken,” Materna said. “It isn’t in the best shape.” university@cm-life.com

aspect of the restaurant. “I’m here all the time. I come early to help with bank deposits, payroll and bookwork. Last week I clocked in 62 hours.” Adrienne said. “I love it, though. It’s nice to be 24 years old and have a (family) business to call your own and help run.” Jon said because they are family, there is a high level of trust between them. It’s the best feeling in the world to work alongside his kids, Robin said. “At the end of the day, no matter what, we care about each other, and that’s what matters,” Jon said. metro@cm-life.com

“For litigation matters in which a law firm is defending CMU, the legal services are paid through the Michigan Universities Self-Insurance Corporation.”

CONTINUED FROM 1

cm-life.com/category/news

[NEWS]

PHOTO OF THE DAY

JEFF SMITH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

China graduate Xiaogan Wu holds a bouquet of flowers as he waits for his girlfriend China graduate Julie Zhang to leave class Wednesday afternoon on the first floor of Moore Hall. “I got in an argument with (Julie) this morning and I wanted to make up for it,” Wu said.

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Manuel Rupe, CMU Legal Counsel Vercruysse declined comment Thursday regarding the FA case. On the topic of his salary, he declined comment on behalf of himself and CMU. “I don’t think that’s really public information,” he said. In addition to the faculty case, CMU has paid the firm about $118,200 during the invoice’s time frame to represent the university in several other cases.

These include cases titled the Hari Bidasaria United States district court case, Wilson arbitration and CMU office professionals vs. CMU. Central Michigan Life is investigating these cases further. In total, CMU paid Vercruysee, Murray & Calzone more than $195,200 for the fourmonth period.

lated to ProfEd. In addition, the contract states if a faculty member goes on total disability leave, the member’s college will only be obligated to hold a tenure-track position available for two years, instead of four, in case the member returns to work. Faculty salary for supplemental activity such as summer sessions, offcampus/online courses and overload work will be capped at $2,750 per credit hour. However, the earn-

ings formula will remain unchanged. The contract will also allow CMU to void a course development contract if the course is not completed within the contracted timeframe. The FA Executive Board will meet Jan. 19 to begin planning for 2014, Frey said in the email to members. The Board of Trustees must ratify the contract as the final step, Frey said.

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INSIDE LIFE Friday, Jan. 13 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

SGA president’s PR internship focuses on FM green efforts By David Oltean Senior Reporter

More details have emerged about Student Government Association President Vincent Cavataio’s public relations internship with Central Michigan University’s facilities management office. Cavataio, a Shelby Township senior, will be paid $7.40 an hour for 20 hours of work per week. The job was not posted on the journalism majors and

minors or IPR LISTSERV, and Cavataio found it on his own. Associate professor of journalism Jim Wojcik said roughly half of the students who find public relations internships discover the opportunities on their own. Wojcik approved Cavataio for the internship after he said he met the criteria for the job responsibilities. “Maybe 50 percent of the internships that students get in IPR, they find on their own,” Wojcik said. “He found his own

internship just like a lot of other students.” Associate Vice President of Facilities Management Stephen Lawrence worked with other professors to hire Cavataio for the internship. Lawrence and Cavataio have served on Central Michigan University Strategic Planning Team together since Cavataio received his position on SGA last April. “I worked with Professor Krider and Professor Wojcik on the Integrated Public Relations

Student Internship in Facilities Management,” Lawrence said in an email. “I inadvertently learned that Vince is an Integrated Public Relations major and that he was looking for an internship.” Lawrence said the job responsibilities of the internship include public relations work, promoting campus sustainability, CMU’s green-cleaning program, recycling, energy and utilities operations and CMU’s carbon footprint. “He is assisting FM in com-

pleting various award applications, preparing information packages and presentations that explain the university’s sustainability efforts that are carried out by FM,” Lawrence said. Cavataio has said he does not see the internship affecting his position as SGA president, pointing out the internship is only part-time and he is only taking a seminar to round out his class schedule for the semester. “Normally I’d have five or six classes, so (this) is about the

same time commitment,” Cavataio said on Jan. 3. Tony Voisin, named interim Dean of Students in August, said he has “full confidence” in Cavataio’s ability to juggle both jobs. “We’ve had SGA presidents who have been RAs before,” Voisin said. “I would just advise a president make sure he or she can handle everything. He knows what’s expected of him, and he handles it very well. university@cm-life.com

RSO Campus Conservatives returns to CMU By Justin Hicks Staff Reporter

PHOTOS BY CHUCK MILLER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Mount Pleasant senior Meghan Borland laughs while talking with students at the ceramics exhibition “Drawing Clay” Thursday evening at the University Art Gallery.

life in clay By Chad Mitchell | Staff Reporter

Davis said the pieces provide an autobiographical narrative of his life with his friends and family. “It looked like a great show,” Davis said. “To be asked to do it was a great honor.” Davis said he fell in love with clay in high school and considers it his favorite medium. His love for clay stems from the infinite possibilities it can provide.

Gallery Director Anne Gochenour has been planning this exhibit since the summer of 2011. She said this exhibit came together quickly, as planning sometimes takes up to a year. She expects between 1,000 and 1,500 students to see the exhibit, she said. Gochenour said she thinks anyone interested in art will enjoy “Drawing Clay.” Clay art has

By David Oltean Senior Reporter

CMU students walk through the University Art Gallery Thursday evening during the “Drawing Clay” art exhibition.

evolved between civilizations, which is part of why Gochenour believes this exhibit is relevant. “It’s a snapshot of the great work being done in contemporary ceramics,” she said. Freshman Christina Proulx said she tries to visit art exhibits on campus whenever they are open. “It’s interesting to see stuff that I’ve been learning,” Proulx

A RSO | 6

An estimated $10,000 in equipment stolen from Moore Hall

American ceramics displayed in ‘Drawing Clay’ Earthenware, stoneware and porcelain pieces dominate Central Michigan University Art Gallery’s new “Drawing Clay” exhibition. Nineteen contemporary artists from across the United States lended more than 70 pieces to create the exhibit. These artists, focusing on surface decoration, depict themes of love, nature and the struggles of life in America through a centuries-old medium. The exhibit opened in the main gallery with a reception at 4 p.m. Thursday Grand Rapids artist Israel Davis contributed several pieces for the exhibit.

The Campus Conservatives of Central Michigan University has returned as a registered student organization on campus, despite past issues. The political group struggled in 2010 with leadership and eventually decided to pull the plug. It had its RSO status revoked in 2009 after failing to pay a $220 bill for security at an event featuring conservative speaker David Horowitz. “The group fizzled out but has been reinstated recently,” said Tom Idema, assistant director of Student Life. “RSOs can come and go all the time. It’s common.” Campus Conservatives was established in 1961, designed to give the conservative students at CMU a voice. Former group president

Rebecca Hodson said she was surprised by the news of the Campus Conservatives’ reinstatement. “I was unaware that the group was rebuilding,” Hodson said. “The Campus Conservatives that I was part of has a great history and had a great run. I hope whoever is rebuilding the group can continue that.” The shoes Hodson left behind will be filled by Mount Pleasant senior Taylor Jackson. “The process of creating a new RSO is inviting to students that are looking for something that is not currently available to them at CMU,” Jackson said. “It’s not a political party. Our goal is to engage in a critical conversation and serve as the conservative voice on campus.” Jackson, a marketing,

said. “I worked with clay in high school. It’s very fun.” Proulx is minoring in art and said she looks forward to further exploring ceramics in the future. The gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. “Drawing Clay” will be on display until Feb. 11. studentlife@cm-life.com

An estimated $10,000 worth of equipment was reported missing from Moore Hall 411 Thursday morning after a custodian noticed the room had been broken into. The break-in, believed to have occurred between 12 and 3 a.m., resulted in the loss of 19 or 20 camera lenses, including one valued at more than $3,000. Headphones, PocketWizards, tripods, strobe lights, wireless microphones and a reflector were also found missing from the room. The stolen equipment was not isolated only to room 411, as two pieces of electronic equipment were also reported missing from the Central Michigan Life office in room 436.

Cindy Gall, executive director in the department of journalism, said the alleged suspect must have known about the whereabouts of the equipment. Gall said the break-in must have occurred after midnight when the last journalism professor, Timothy Boudreau, left the building. “I’m thinking it had to be somebody who knew where the equipment was,” Gall said. “If you didn’t know that was an equipment room, you wouldn’t. It just has that narrow window and when you look in, you don’t see equipment at all. It’s all put away.” Gall said the missing equipment will be most detrimental for the photojournalism program.

A MOORE | 6

Prescription drug shortages affecting local pharmacies By John Irwin Staff Reporter

Local pharmacies in Mount Pleasant are feeling the pinch from prescription drug shortages affecting pharmacies and the patients that depend on them. The shortages are not limited to any particular area and are hitting all different parts of the country. Two local pharmacies, Cardinal Pharmacy, 2410 S. Leaton Road, and Mission Pharmacy, 926 S. Mission St., are both facing shortages. “You just don’t know anymore,” said Chris Tuller, a pharmacist at Cardinal Pharmacy. “I don’t know if it’s regulations or decreased manufacturing or what, but it’s tough now.” Prescription drug shortages have been a national

issue for the past few years, and things have been getting worse. According to a report by the Food and Drug Administration, the shortages are being caused by complex legal, economic and regulatory reasons. As generic drug companies consolidate, leading to less production, fewer drugs are being distributed to pharmacies across the country. The FDA also reported the number of drugs in short supply has tripled since 2005. The most critical shortages involve medication to treat cancer, for nutrition and to treat electrolyte imbalances. Another major shortage is medications for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. “A big shortage we’re having is with Ritalin and Adderall,” said Sam Nunn, a

“It’s tough when you get a shortage and customers can’t depend on what they’ve been using.” Sam Nunn, Mission Pharmacy pharmacist pharmacist at Mission Pharmacy. “It’s tough when you get a shortage and customers can’t depend on what they’ve been using.” The shortages cause pharmacists to change their approach to buying pharmaceutical drugs. “People usually let you know ahead of time if there’s a shortage, and sometimes you buy a few extra bottles if you believe that’s going to happen,” Nunn said. For thousands of patients, this means resorting to unconventional and more dangerous means of getting generic drugs online. Many of

the replacement drugs patients buy online are unregulated and are sold without a doctor’s prescription. Nunn said he is hopeful the worst of the drug shortages have past, but many experts believe things are going to get worse before they get better. In an attempt to ease the crisis, President Barack Obama issued an executive order in October asking drug manufacturers to do more to report shortages to the FDA. He also announced plans to expand the FDA’s staff that investigates drug shortages. In December, the Generic

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TANYA MOUTZALIAS/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Local pharmacies in Mount Pleasant are experiencing shortages when it comes to prescription drugs. Such shortages are affecting pharmacies and patients.

Pharmaceutical Association, a trade group that represents the generics industry, laid out multiple solutions to the crisis. One involved

creating a team within the FDA to directly respond to shortages. metro@cm-life.com


4A

VOICES Friday, Jan. 13, 2012

| cm-life.com

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Ariel Black, MANAGING EDITOR | Connor Sheridan, ONLINE COORDINATOR | Aaron McMann, UNIVERSITY EDITOR | Andrew Dooley, STUDENT LIFE EDITOR | Amelia Eramya, LEAD DESIGNER

EDITORIAL | Cavataio must choose between SGA President and Facilities Management PR

Ethical issues T

his editorial board congratulates Student Government Association President Vincent Cavataio on his new internship with Central Michigan University Facilities Management. We also believe it is appropriate to call for his resignation as president as long as he maintains his employment in the position. Though the internship is meant to be solely focused on promoting FM’s efforts in sustainable energy, there can be no room for a potential conflict of interest between the students’ best interests and those of the university for the head of our student government.

His pursuit of the position is understandable, as it is closely related to his desired career. It is only paid minimum wage, ruling out any concerns of palm-greasing, and as stated in previous articles, the time commitment will not be demanding enough to detract from his other pursuits. Cavataio’s position on CMU’s Strategic Planning Team with Associate Vice President of Facilities Management Steve Lawrence

simply gave Cavataio a good chance to seek out and attain the opportunity. He cannot be blamed for taking the job, but he can be questioned for retaining his position as SGA president while doing so. It is important to note Cavataio will not be working for direct CMU public relations, which could very well put him in the middle of a disagreement between the university and students. But because the first role of SGA president is to be the voice of the student body, the ties with CMU his new job will form may pose an ethical problem. How can one represent the students while, at the same time, work for the university in a public relations position? Interim Dean of Students Tony Voisin referenced Cavataio’s enrollment in only one seminar

class as a reason his schedule is open enough to handle both jobs. While this editorial board has no disagreement that Cavataio could handle the schedule, we question the ethical problems this creates. The Public Relations Society of America’s code of ethics advises its members to avoid conflicts of interest and act in the best interest of clients or employers. As an elected official by the students, he needs to avoid any conflict of interest that could even potentially come with this job. As long as he is burdened with even the slightest responsibility to serve the university’s interests over any others, including those of the students, he cannot be trusted as their ultimate representative on campus. To use an old proverb, he cannot have his cake and eat it too.

KIM PATISHNOCK [CENTRAL SQUARE]

Nathan Inks Columnist

Newt Gingrich campaign gone from positive to negative Since his defeat in Iowa, where he finished distantly behind Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Ron Paul, the attitude from Newt Gingrich has gone from that of a positive campaign to extremely bitter. In a recent interview, he blamed negative ads against him as the reason he performed poorly in Iowa. He pledged not to run negative ads and said he would focus on contrasting himself to others in the field, but he then went on for several minutes contrasting only his pros with Romney’s cons. It would be one thing if he truly compared and contrasted his stances with Romney’s on various issues, but he carried on for several minutes comparing Romney’s “worst” with his own “best,” and doing so made him look even more negative and more desperate than if he would have just run a negative ad against Romney. He may not be running any negative “ads,” but when he criticizes negativity against him and goes on to blast Romney with negative comments in every speech and interview, he looks like a hypocrite. Later in that same interview, he said there is a split in the Republican Party between “people who worry about the safety of America versus people who don’t care about it” and that Ron Paul falls into the latter category. Many in the GOP may disagree with Paul’s foreign policy, but Gingrich would be hard-pressed to find even 1 percent of the GOP who truly does not care about the safety of America. From those who agree with Gingrich’s foreign policy, Paul’s foreign policy may seem like it makes America more vulnerable to countries like Iran, but that does not mean people like Ron Paul do not care about their country. What made it even worse is the context of who was on the giving and receiving end of the statement. Paul served this country as a flight surgeon for five years. Gingrich avoided going to Vietnam through deferments but has since admitted that “a large part of me thinks I should have gone.” Paul’s concern for our safety should not be in doubt. Why Gingrich has had such a turn of attitude is a mystery. If it was to win over voters, it has had the opposite effect — people have noticed his anger and are being driven away from supporting him. If he wants to remain a relevant figure in the conservative movement and the Republican Party, Newt Gingrich needs to tone it down and lighten up a bit. At the very least, he can have faith that his fellow candidates care about America’s safety.

Take time to research when it comes to buying books I’ve been in college for, counting this new semester, three and a half years. Before coming to Central Michigan University, I was a student at Lansing Community College. During my first semester of college, I had enough financial aid at my disposal that I didn’t really need to worry about the ridiculous textbook prices. Granted, I still griped and grumbled as I slogged toward the purchase counter with books in hand. The same trend of having enough financial aid to get by continued for the majority of my time at LCC. LCC would try, sometimes successfully, other times not, to give me at least half of my money back at the end of the semester. Although this was a nice incentive that they seemed to recognize and empathize with students on the topic of book prices, this didn’t stop me from realizing the prices of textbooks would only continue to go up and, at some point, I knew I would run out of precious financial aid. Only toward the end of my time at LCC did I learn about book rental services such as Chegg.com

and Half.com. Even my favorite seller of all of my favorite music biographies, Amazon.com, jumped into the book-renting fray. At the beginning of my first semester at CMU, I wanted to try my luck at buying my books at the CMU bookstore, hoping the buyback at semester’s end would be worth buying them five months prior. I only had 12 credits for the fall semester; a geology class, two journalism classes and a political science class. I ended up spending about $350 on my books this past semester. This isn’t as horrifically high an amount some people I’ve heard spent, but I knew I would be spending a decent amount, at least more than I would have liked. I ended up buying one of my books online for $.40 only to find

[YOUR VOICE] Comments in response to “EDITORIAL: Time to decide alternative parking on campus”

and get some people some exercise. A parking garage does none of that.

UTFmember, Wednesday Or, the university could encourage walking/biking/bus by raising the parking fee substantially, and / or restricting it to people who actually commute from far away. Why should someone who lives in Tallgrass or University Meadows or Campus Habitat drive to school? Eliminating such “commuters” would open up lots of spaces, cut congestion, help the environment,

frmatmn2ashes, Thursday As a former Tallgrass resident, business student, and SAC employee, I sure as hell wasn’t going to spend a good hour or so a day walking around campus to reach all of these destinations. Time to put your soapbox away and realize there are practical reasons for commuters who leave in an apartment complex relatively close to campus.

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Editor’s note: Nathan Inks is the president of College Republicans.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

out it was the wrong edition, then spending close to $100 for the correct book. Of course, I only opened the book about 10 times all semester. Another one of my books, for a geology class, I didn’t even crack open once. To add insult to injury, I got a grand total of $2 for one of my book buybacks. Do the best you can to rent your textbooks or at least find used editions online. As I’m writing this, there’s a wall-to-wall line at the bookstore of people who are most likely begrudgingly buying a $200 book that they’ll probably open 10 times all semester. This semester, I have another 12-credit class load; three journalism classes and a nutrition class. The latter class has a new textbook and packet bundle for almost $200. I knew I wasn’t going to buy that. So, I hunted online and found the textbook for $50 used and bought the packet separately for $9; definitely a better deal. I rented all of my books from Chegg.com, and according to my account there, I’ve saved $489.94. You can save that much money, or more, if the time is simply taken to research.

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

912, Thursday Sorry, Life, but I have to take issue with this one. CMU issues more permits than it has spaces because there’s never a time when all of those permitted cars are on campus. I drive in daily and rarely, if ever, have problems finding a spot if I’m willing to walk a short distance. No, I’m not entitled to a space next to the building, but I can always find a place on the fringe of almost any lot. Walking, taking the bus or biking to campus are far better solutions than more ugly parking structures.

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

John Irwin Staff Reporter

An open letter to Cee-Lo Green The following is an open letter to popular singer/rapper/reality TV judge/ lyric butcherer extraordinaire Cee-Lo Green, because I know he reads Central Michigan Life on a thrice-weekly basis. Where else can he get the latest scoops on where coffee shops are opening on CMU’s campus and find out who has been elected chairman of the Isabella County Commission, all in the same place? Nowhere. Dear Mr. Green, I can’t believe you’re reading my letter! Wow! I’m a big fan of all, well, almost all, of your work, especially your songs with Goodie Mob and Gnarls Barkley. You’ve always come across as a breath of fresh air on the radio, which is filled with artists who all too often decide to follow the rules and never dare to be creative or unique. You’ve recently committed a musical cardinal sin, though, and you’ve made me upset. And if hearing that a reporter for a college newspaper who hails from suburban Detroit doesn’t cause you to rethink what you did (and it should), know that a huge portion of the music community is just as upset as I am. You know what I’m talking about by now. On NBC’s New Year’s Eve program and “The Voice” promotional show, you changed the lyrics of John Lennon’s 1971 classic, “Imagine” from “Nothing to kill or die for, And no religion too” to “Nothing to kill or die for, And all religion’s true.” If I may quote the cast of Sunday NFL Countdown, “C’mon man!” What made you think this was a good idea? Changing the lyrics of any of John Lennon’s (or any of the Beatles’) songs is sacrilege. He was part of the most innovative band in history and, without them, the music scene would look so different, you probably wouldn’t be where you are today. More than that, he’s arguably the greatest songwriter of all-time. You do not mess with lyrical genius, under any circumstances. Ever. Lennon said “And no religion too” and not “And all religion too” for a reason. He was a huge critic of organized religion. He saw it as a force of division among people across the world, as the root cause of many of the conflicts and wars throughout history. “Imagine” is a song about peace and unity, and Lennon thought religion was an obstacle on the path to peace. You’re free to disagree with Lennon, of course. Many do, and you’re not the first one to change or omit that line over the years. But that doesn’t make it right. If you don’t agree with Lennon’s message, don’t sing the song. It’s that simple. It’s like changing the words of your hit song “Crazy” to “Does that make me lazy?” It’s not fair to you. You wrote the song to say what it did, not something else. The same rules apply to Lennon’s songs. Sincerely, John P.S.: Next time, don’t wear expensive jewelry and a fur coat while singing a song about having “no possessions.”

Central Michigan Life EDITORIAL Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator ADVERTISING Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers PROFESSIONAL STAFF Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


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Central Michigan Life || Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 || 5

[NEWS]

Harvard’s Lani Guinier to be keynote Wednesday Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. G u i n i e r ’s publications include six books “The Tyranny of the Majority,” law Lani Guinier review and journal articles and many newspaper editorials. Southfield senior Eris Taylor said he will be attending this year’s events after having positive experiences in the past. “I plan on attending the brunch, the walk and vigil and the MLK charity bowling event,” Taylor said. “The experience

By Anamaria Dickerson Staff Reporter and Andrew Dooley Student Life Editor

FILE PHOTO BY ANDREW KUHN

13-year-old Mount Pleasant resident Sierra Snyder listens to speakers at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Peace March and Vigil Jan. 17, 2011 in downtown Mount Pleasant. The annual peace march starts on the CMU campus, and ends downtown with participants joining along the way.

CommUNITY Peace Brunch, March, Vigil Monday By Jalisa Cannon Staff Reporter

Central Michigan University will be kicking off Martin Luther King Week on Monday with the CommUNITY Peace Brunch. The program will include comments from University President George Ross and essays written by the MLK Oratorical Contest finalists from 10 a.m. to noon in the Bovee University Center Rotunda. Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce President Lisa Hadden will be giving a keynote speech. Detroit sophomore Jawanza Hill said he took part in last year’s march and also performed at the brunch with his gospel choir. “I really want to make time

this year, because it’s important to get out and experience exactly what MLK stood for,” Hill said. In addition to the Peace Brunch, a CommUNITY March and Vigil will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. The march will begin at the Bovee University Center, as well as various residence hall locations and convene in downtown Mount Pleasant where the vigil will be held. Transportation will be provided back to campus for hot chocolate and donuts in the UC following the vigil. Hill said CMU does a great job of representing what King wanted through the events. A residence hall council competition will determine how many students take part in the march. The residence

hall with the most attendees will receive $500 to add to its hall council budget. Assistant Director of Multicultural Academic Student Services Keisha Janney said students didn’t always have this day off from classes, but after seeing the value in it, asked for the day off to participate in service and recognition events. Janney said the overall goal of MASS is to get students, faculty and the community to think of this as a day on, not a day off. “This day should be about things like giving back to the community and helping to raise awareness about equality in the U.S.,” Janney said. “MLK Day was enacted to honor Dr. King’s legacy and work.” studentlife@cm-life.com

MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY EVENTS CALENDAR MONDAY w The CommUNITY Brunch will be held from 10 a.m. to noon in the Bovee University Center Rotunda. w The CommUNITY Peace March and Vigil will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. starting at

the Bovee University Center Rotunda and ending at the Mount Pleasant Town Center.

WEDNESDAY w Lani Guinier, MLK week keynote speaker, will speak from 7 to 9 p.m. in Plachta Auditorium.

THURSDAY w MLK Charity Bowling will be held at University Recreation from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $5 for two games and shoe rental and all proceeds will benefit the Isabella Community Soup Kitchen.

Central Michigan University will feature a speech by another inspiring champion of civil rights in honor of the trailblazing effort of Martin Luther King Jr. Lani Guinier will give a keynote speech at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium. Guinier became the first African American woman to be appointed to a tenured professorship at Harvard Law School in 1998. “Lani Guinier will be talking about rethinking race and class in America,” said Keisha Janney, Multicultural Academic Student Services Assistant Director. Guinier graduated from Yale Law School in 1974. She served as special assistant to Assistant Attorney General Drew S. Days in the Civil Rights Division in President Jimmy Carter’s Administration. In 1981, she joined the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund as an assistant counsel, where she rose to become head of its Voting Rights project. Guinier was nominated by President Bill Clinton to be Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. After facing political opposition, especially toward her perceived views on voting and affirmative action, Clinton withdrew the nomination. Guinier was Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School for 10 years before going to Harvard in 1998. She has lectured at law schools and universities including Yale, Stanford, New York University and the University of Chicago. In 2007, she was a visiting professor at Columbia Law School and in 2009, she was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the

(last year) overall was great. I appreciated the diversity and the opportunity to be with fellow students to come together for one cause.” Last year’s MLK Week events brought in more than 2,000 students, Janney said. “We had to turn some people away from events due to lack of seating and fire code,” she said. This year, she expects even more students and said she hopes they walk away with a deeper appreciation for the work done by King and other members of the Civil Rights Movement. studentlife@cm-life.com

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6 || Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

MOUNT PLEASANT COMMUNITY

Hopefuls seek homeless shelter By Brittany Wright Staff Reporter

Two men are hoping to give the Mount Pleasant community a place for the homeless population to seek shelter. Pastor Robert Griffus of Open Arms Ministries is in the process of providing a location for the less fortunate to bathe, eat and reside. The only thing standing in Griffus’ way is support. Griffus is in the process of organizing board members in order to establish a 501(c)(3), one of 28 types of nonprofit organizations that are exempt from some federal income taxes. In order to achieve this status, he needs an additional reliable board member. Griffus said a few Mount Pleasant residents have complained about the number of homeless individuals who were found sleeping in public areas around Mount Pleasant and Isabella

County during the summer months. “Stop complaining and come forth,” Griffus said. Griffus is waiting patiently for a group of participants to help the process. However, he said he has come to the conclusion that this project may be a one-man show. Mount Pleasant’s Salvation Army is trying to make its own contributions. Instead of trying to create a shelter for the homeless, Brian Reed, Captain Area Corps Officer for the Salvation Army, is taking the transitional approach. Reed said he believes there is a need for a homeless shelter in Mount Pleasant, but he believes the majority of homeless people in Mount Pleasant are in a transitional stage in their lives, perhaps moving from one city to another. Reed helps low-income and homeless individuals find temporary shelter in hopes they can then find

their way after aid is offered. In the future, Reed said he would like to create a set of transitional homes that are offered for little pay to help low-income individuals to decrease the amount of homelessness in the Mount Pleasant area. Irene Little, Emergency Services Program Coordinator of the American Red Cross, said they serve anywhere from 320 to 400 people a month in their food pantry. The number of homeless people living in the community is unknown, Little said. “I don’t have an exact number, but I do know that more people are homeless than we expect,” she said. The food pantry serves about 15 to 18 homeless individuals a month. Little said she knows a family currently living from their car. “There is definitely a need for a homeless shelter in Mount Pleasant,” she said. metro@cm-life.com

Spread of a virus affects more than 200 students in district

RSO | CONTINUED FROM 3

professional sales and logistics management major, recently traveled to Iowa to campaign for former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, who is seeking the Republican nomination for president. “It was an honor to be a part of such a historic election,” Jackson said. “I fully support Governor Romney for president because, fundamentally, he is the bestpositioned conservative to defeat President Obama.” Jackson said he has no connection to the recent struggles involving Cam-

MUSIC | CONTINUED FROM 1

pus Conservatives and said this group is a new and refreshed group looking to be involved and engaged on campus. He said he didn’t believe the past issues were relevant to the current operations. “We are proud of both past and current accomplishments, including this Saturday’s Republican Senatorial debate,” he said. “The campus community can expect a fully engaged and involved Campus Conservatives.” The RSO will host a Republican U.S. Senate debate Saturday at the Charles V. Park Library Auditorium. The five candidates de-

bating include physics and astronomy instructor Scotty Boman, former Vice President of Hillsdale College Clark Durant, President of American Family Association Gary Glenn, Former Prosecutor and Juvenile Court Judge Randy Hekman and founder of National Building Inspections Chuck Marino. “The vast majority of students at CMU are politically conservative,” Jackson said. “They may not be partisan, but instinctively they are conservative. It’s important that these students have a voice on campus, and that’s what Campus Conservatives is about.”

does not care to make money off of his music. “At all of the shows I play, I burn about 20 to 30 CDs to hand out to just get my name out there,” he said. “I just want as many people to hear it as possible.” His next album is set to debut next winter. “I want this to be the kind

of album you jam to with your friends in the car, or rock out to in your dorm room before you head out on a Friday night,” Schuller said. “Who am I kidding; I’m a college kid living the dream. I’m having a blast and I want my music to reflect that.”

metro@cm-life.com

studentlife@cm-life.com

YOU BE ! THE JUDGE

MOORE | CONTINUED FROM 3

“This is going to put a real crimp in the photo program, and it’s unfortunate for photo students,” Gall said. Lt. Larry Kraus of Central Michigan University Police said the door appeared to have been pried open by the suspect. The department investigated the room just after 5 a.m. in the morning. “It looks like a prying tool or something had been used to get the door open,” Kraus said. “We’re trying to determine whether they had brought a tool or found it in the building.” Kraus said he couldn’t speculate about the suspect’s plans but felt that the crime might have been premeditated due to the amount stolen. “It looks like it might be more than a crime of opportunity,” Kraus said. “With the amount of stuff that was taken, I think it was more of a pre-planned idea.” An Apple Mac mini and audio-mixer board were also noticed missing from the CM Life office on Thursday. Neil Hopp, CM Life adviser and director of student publications, estimated the value of the two items stolen to be $700. Hopp said the audio mixer board was stored in a file cabinet and surrounded by other items of value. “There was other stuff laying around in there that they could have taken and they didn’t,” Hopp said. “So it’s almost like somebody who does videos knew that would be a valuable thing. Why would you take a mixer board?” This is not the first theft to occur in Moore Hall. CMU’s journalism department has suffered other losses in the past. More than $7,000 worth of equipment was stolen in October 2002 when a video projector, computer and clothes and accessories were reported missing. In March 2008, an estimated $10,000 worth of

computer equipment was found stolen from a fourthfloor lounge. A member of the custodial staff reported that someone broke into the lounge, stealing two computers and two flatpanel display monitors. In both situations, equipment was replaced through the

department’s insurance policy. The CMU Police Department is offering a $250 reward for any information about the break-in and can be contacted at 989-7743081. university@cm-life.com

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As a final project for his class trip to Beaver Island, Camarena said Schuller co-created a music video. “The fact that he and his partner filmed, wrote, performed and edited the video within a short window of time with limited tools on the island made the work all the more impressive,” he said. Schuller said he will play anywhere and will never deny a show. Ohio junior Brock Thatcher booked Schuller to play at a fundraiser for Phi Kappa Tau last semester. “Ben was a good friend and I knew his music was mellow and great for a big crowd of people to listen to, but also not overpowering to the point where people can’t still talk,” Thatcher said. Thatcher, a public relations major, said he hopes one day he will get the chance to promote Schuller on the big stage. “I’ve heard a lot of concerts in my life and listen to all kinds of music and one of these days I swear (to) you will hear of Ben Schuller somewhere famous,” he said. Until then, Schuller said he

a one-and-a-half day incubation period, with the illness itself lasting usually one to three days. “This is pretty common in winter months, and it does tend to circulate when people are in close proximity,” Graham said. As symptoms started to show up in other Mount Pleasant school buildings, Graham recommended the entire district shut down. “Because we share transportation, we were afraid it would spread to other students and families,” Pung said. With no school for Mount Pleasant Public Schools on Monday because of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, students will be out of class for five consecutive days. All extracurricular activities are also closed until Tuesday morning. Officials from Central Michigan University Health Services were unavailable for comment about the potential for any problems on campus.

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Mount Pleasant Public School students got a long weekend after officials made the decision to cancel school because of rapidly spreading illness. Although it hasn’t been officially confirmed, the virus is thought to be the Norovirus, which is a highly contagious illness caused by an infection that can cause acute inflammation of stomach and intestines. Superintendent Michael Pung made the decision to close schools with the recommendation of Isabella County Central Michigan District Health Department Dr. Robert Graham when nearly 200 students were infected with the virus. Graham said the rapidity of its spread from person-to-person contact and the fear that it would affect other students were taken into account when deciding whether to cancel classes. “There’s a high attack rate.

It’s very contagious,” he said. “What we believe is the most common way (to catch the virus) is through the fecal and oral route.” Graham said although the virus is rapidly spreading, the virus itself isn’t something too serious. “It’s nothing that is life-threatening,” he said. “Most people get over it in 72 hours. It isn’t as serious as Influenza.” Pung said students were showing signs of the virus — which include vomiting and stomach pain — Tuesday morning at Ganiard Elementary. By the time school was out, 40 students were absent because of common symptoms. “Forty students was a pretty good amount,” he said. “It wasn’t until after the kids went home (that) we put an eye that the symptoms were matching.” By Wednesday evening, Pung said four staff members were affected along with 200 students, which was nearly half of the building. Pung said the virus itself has

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By Melissa Beauchamp Senior Reporter

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[NEWS]

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 || 7

[NEWS]

Textbooks still greatly outsell e-books at CMU By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

E-textbooks and tablets promise an academic world where it takes five minutes to buy books, 25 pounds of textbooks only weigh 1.33 pounds and $400 worth of paper textbooks could be had for about $240. Though Apple iPads and other tablets alike have been popping up in classrooms across the country, adoption of e-textbooks has to take place on a broad scale. “The current generation grew up learning with books. Today, students K through 12 use books, not computers,� said Barry Waters, director of the CMU Bookstore. “Until kids are using such devices (tablets) in secondary education, I don’t see it as a big trend.� Waters said the CMU Bookstore has been selling e-textbooks for almost four years, but sales are not competitive with paper-bound textbooks.

“The pull for e-books comes from the publishers,� Waters said. “They want them to go electronic, but faculty and students aren’t ready for it.� Six summers ago, all four major publishing companies increased textbook prices 13 to 35 percent, Waters said. Despite e-textbooks selling for about 60 percent of the cost of a new textbook, the digital price ceiling is way too high, he said. Functioning more like a rental than a permanent purchase, most e-textbooks expire at the end of the semester. Some students agreed with Waters when it comes to the prices of new technology. “I have an iPad, but I feel like renting textbooks is cheaper than e-textbooks,� Cheboygen senior Isabelle Rose said. Rose said her preference for paper books was about more than just cost. “I also like to write notes in my book and will often keep it after the semester,� she said. So even with the invention

of e-textbooks and the option to buy textbooks online, the CMU Bookstore has seen little change. “I’m too lazy to look online,� Midland senior Reed Phillips said. “Buying books here is very easy.� Alexis Boscarino, a junior from Richmond, agreed with Phillips. “It’s more convenient. Going online takes too much time,� Boscarino said. But not everyone is against the idea of e-textbooks. “Science books are huge. To have everything electronically would be much more convenient,� said Detroit senior Arrionna Dryden, who is studying biomedical sciences. Dryden said she uses her iPad mainly for organization, though she wishes she could use it more because of its convenience. There are currently four classes at CMU that require the purchase or rental of an iPad.

Religion department searching for new faculty member By Justin Hicks Staff Reporter

The religion department is searching for its newest tenure-track faculty member and has lined up three potential candidates. Each candidate will have the opportunity to give a presentation in front of faculty and students later this month, and from there the faculty will make their decision. “We’ve been lacking a tenure faculty member for about four years after Gregory Spinner left,� Religion Area Coordinator David Smith said. “We finally got clearance from the provost to search for a replacement for this position.� Upon gaining permission, the program placed an ad for the job through the American Academy of Religion and invited applicants who were interested in the position. “What we’re searching for now is someone who can help expand the diversity of the coverage in the program,� Smith said. “We advertised for someone with a specialty in an area not covered by current faculty.� Spinner was a specialist in Judaism, thus leaving a hole in the department upon leaving. St. Lawrence University assistant professor Maria Rethelyi is one of the three candidates in the running for the job, bringing her specialty in Judaism to the table. The other two candidates

are Indiana University graduate student Aimee Hamilton, whose specialty is in Hinduism and Laurel Zwissler, whose specialty is in new religious movements. Zwissler has some history with CMU. The professor from the University of Toronto spoke at the Charles V. Park Library in February 2010 about the difference between being spiritual and religious. Faculty members that are fixed-term are reappointed every year or two, depending on their type of contract, while tenure-track faculty have the chance to receive tenure. “They can earn tenure, which is a special kind of status where the university kind of commits to keeping them on unless there is some sort of misconduct to result in them being terminated,� Smith said. Religion minor Bradley Rito, a Grosse Ile senior, said he liked the idea of the department becoming more diverse with the addition of a new faculty member. “Quite a few of the professors have specializations in Christianity,� Rito said. “So to require that a professor have a different specialty would bring not only a different perspective, but it would be from the viewpoint of someone who specializes in a religion other than an Abrahamic one.� Religion professor Michael Ostling said he looks forward

to the new candidate, not only for their added specialty to the faculty but the addition of a more feminist study of religion. “As feminist scholar Rita Gross has said, the feminist study of religion is not about adding women to our picture of religion, it’s about ‘repainting the whole picture,’� he said. “All of the candidates are qualified to bring such feminist perspectives to CMU.� Religion major Jordan Rife, a Plainwell sophomore, said hiring a candidate who can bring this feminist idea to the table is fantastic. “I think it will challenge students to look at religious values and rituals in new perspectives,� Rife said. “I think being able to offer more classes for students who are looking to critically think about how religions have lost the development of women is a great step for the CMU religion department.� While the candidates have been narrowed down to the top three, Smith said the new faculty member won’t necessarily come from that group. “If none of these people seem like the perfect fit and we want to try someone else in the pool, we might do further interviews. That’s happened in the past,� he said. “The question is, will the candidate we choose accept the offer?� university@cm-life.com

      

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8 || Friday, Jan. 12, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Photo by Jeff Reid

www.cm-life.com

Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial “

From Poverty to

Empowerment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Week January 16-20, 2012

“The ultimate

measure of a man

is not where he stands in moments of

comfort &

convenience, but where he stands in times of

challenge &

controversy.” - Martin Luther

Make it a Day On... Not a Day Off! Join the Central Michigan University community in celebrating and honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with these special presentations and activities.

King, Jr.

Keynote Speaker

Lani Guinier

Wednesday, January 18 7 p.m., Plachta Auditorium in Warriner Hall

In 1998, Lani Guinier became the first black woman to be appointed to a tenured professorship at Harvard Law School. Before joining the faculty at Harvard, she was a tenured professor for 10 years at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. While a member of the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Guinier investigated the experience of women in law school, leading to

the publication of a book, “Becoming Gentlemen: Women, Law School and Institutional Change.” The author of many articles and oped pieces on democratic theory, political representation, educational equity, and issues of race and gender, Guinier has written “The Tyranny of the Majority” (Free Press, 1994) “Who’s Qualified?” (Beacon Press, 2001); and “The Miner’s Canary” (Harvard Press, 2002).

Monday, January 16

Join

• CommUNITY Peace Brunch and MLK Oratorical Contest Finalists

10 a.m. to noon, Bovee University Center Rotunda Brunch program will include remarks from President George E. Ross and the keynote speech from Lisa Haddon, Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce President and MLK Oratorical Contest Finalists. Seating is limited and on a first-come, first-served basis.

Us

• CommUNITY March and Peace Vigil

3 to 5 p.m., March begins at 3 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Rotunda and various Residence Hall locations. Vigil begins at approximately 4:30 p.m. in Mount Pleasant Town Square.

Tuesday, January 17

in celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by remembering

• Soup and Substance: Civil Rights, Science, and the Dream: What We’ve Learned About Creating Inclusive Communities 12 p.m., UC Rotunda – FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC.

his dream to advance civil rights and

Wednesday, January 18

doing what is needed to fully make

• Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote Speaker Lani Guinier

7 p.m., Plachta Auditorium in Warriner Hall

his dream an American reality.

Thursday, January 19 • Martin Luther King Jr. Charity Bowling

– Denise O’Neil Green, Associate Vice President

6 to 8 p.m., URec Lanes, $5 for two games and shoe rental Proceeds benefit the Isabella Community Soup Kitchen.

• Diversity Advocate Reception

Office for

3 to 5 p.m., Center for Inclusion and Diversity, Bovee UC 108

Institutional Diversity EXCELLENCE THROUGH INCLUSION

Listen, understand, appreciate! WARRINER HALL 319

(989) 774-3700 GO TO:

www.cmich.edu/institutional_diversity.htm to find out how you can help us in our efforts to create an environment of inclusiveness.

For Information

Multicultural Academic Student Services, Central Michigan University Bovee University Center 112, 989-774-3945 All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

diversity.cmich.edu/mss Co-sponsors:

The Office of the President, Office for Institutional Diversity, Multicultural Academic Student Services, Office for Diversity Education, King/Chavez/Parks Visiting Professor Fund, College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Education and Human Services, Political Science, Office of Residence Life, Athletics, City of Mount Pleasant, Mary Ellen Brandell Volunteer Center, University Recreation, University Communications, Isabella County Transportation Commission, CMU Police, Mount Pleasant Police, ARAMARK, Program Board. CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity within its community (see cmich.edu/aaeo). CMU provides individuals with disabilities reasonable accommodations to participate in university activities, programs and services. Individuals with disabilities requiring an accommodation are asked to call 989-774-3945 at least one week before the event.


SPORTS Central Michigan Life

Section B

| Friday, Jan. 13, 2012

CENTRAL FOCUS | See the latest top sports photos at photo.cm-life.com

| cm-life.com

[GO ONLINE] Check CM-Life.com for previews of Wrestling and men’s and women’s basketball. Then, after they play, go back on to read recaps of gymnastics and the rest of the sports.

Women’s basketball fights back to stop Western’s early run By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

Basketball can be a game of runs. The Central Michigan women’s basketball team found itself on the winning end of a sprint with rival Western Michigan 93-85 Wednesday night in front of 831 fans at McGuirk Arena. “It was nice to be home, and I think we were a little shell-shocked early,” head coach Sue Guevara said. “Western Michigan put us on our heels and played their offense pretty well.” The Broncos (5-11, 2-1 MAC) jumped out to a 21-6 lead on the Chippewas (107, 2-1 MAC) in the first five minutes of the game. But CMU used its bench to answer with a 26-6 run of its own to take back the lead. The Chippewas went into the locker room with a 41-34 lead. Sophomores Niki DiGuilio and Taylor Johnson, along with junior guard Jalisa Ol-

Scoreboard

93

85

UP NEXT Saturday 2 p.m. CMU (10-7, 2-1 MAC) @ Ball State (7-9, 2-1 MAC) ive, combined for 24 points off the bench in the first half. “Our bench came in and did a nice job for us,” Guevara said. WMU didn’t go down without a fight. After falling behind 53-36 within the first two minutes of the second half, CMU freshman guard Crystal Bradford left the game with a leg cramp. “We weren’t switching fast enough, and they were hitting threes,” Guevara said. “They got the momentum going a little bit.” In Bradford’s absence, the

Broncos went on a 14-1 run and tied the game at 59 with 9:50 left. “My legs started cramping up, and I tried to stretch them out so I could get back on the court,” Bradford said. Five Chippewas scored in double figures with freshman Jessica Green leading the way with 22 points. “At first, things weren’t going in my favor,” Green said. “Coach told me to stop and gather myself, and things started falling.” Bradford had 22 points, along with six rebounds and five steals, blocks and assists. “I knew I had to bring intensity and pump my team up,” Bradford said. “We couldn’t afford a loss.” Sophomore forward Jordan LaDuke had 13 points, while Johnson and Olive added 11 and 12 points off the bench. CMU hosts Ball State at 2 p.m. Saturday.

Freshman guard Crystal Bradford fights her way to the basket against Western Michigan Wednesday evening at McGuirk Arena in Mount Pleasant. Bradford finished the game with 20 points, five assists and six rebounds during the 93-85 win over the Broncos.

ANDREW KUHN/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

sports@cm-life.com

Men’s basketball beats EMU, improves to 2-0 in the MAC By John Manzo Senior Reporter

Free-throw shooting has been a point of emphasis for Central Michigan head coach Ernie Zeigler throughout the season. Freshman point guard Austin McBroom proved he could make them when it counted Wednesday, knocking down two free throws with nine

seconds left, sealing a 6056 win against Eastern Michigan in Ypsilanti. “This is a really good win for our young Ernie Zeigler team,” Zeigler said. “To go on the road and play one of our arch-rivals in a really competitive, tough

game. To be able to persevere and make the tough plays down the stretch, particularly in the second half, was really encouraging.” McBroom was forced into a pressure situation after a turnover by senior center Andre Coimbra allowed EMU to cut the score to two on a basket by freshman guard Antoine Chandler. CMU was 13-of-21 from the

free-throw line, but McBroom went 4-for-4, including the two that kept the Eagles from being able to tie or winning on the final possession. “It was all about confidence,” McBroom said. “Ever since we came back from Christmas break, that’s all we’ve been working on — our jump shots and free throws. Just coming in and acting like it’s practice and

knocking them down.” Sophomore guard Trey Zeigler missed 5-of-8 free throws but took care of business elsewhere. He hauled down a game-high 14 rebounds, also becoming one of three Chippewas to score double figures, finishing with 11 points. The Chippewas opened the half without scoring a basket

Scoreboard

60

56

UP NEXT Saturday 4:30 p.m. CMU (7-8, 2-0 MAC) @ Northern Illinois (113, 0-2 MAC)

A MEN | 10

Balanced Leadership

Senior gymnast aiming for third straight MAC title By Seth Newman | Staff Reporter

At five years old, Kristin Teubner’s back flips and stunts off the back of the couch weren’t amusing to her mother. So Kristin’s mother Connie Teubner decided it would be safer to put her daughter into a gymnastics program. “My mom thought that it wasn’t very safe, so she stuck me in a program at the local Y,” Teubner said. Now a senior at Central Michigan, Teubner hasn’t stopped doing flips. Last year, she was the Mid-American Conference co-gymnast of the year, following a season she was named to the MAC all-academic team. Teubner was also the MAC’s top performer on the vault and floor.

BECOMING A LEADER Since her freshman year, when she won the MAC Freshman of the Year award, Teubner has been producing for the CMU gymnastics team. But now, during her last year on the squad, she faces a different challenge. “I’m one of the captains, so I’m going to have more of a vocal role this year,” Teubner said. “In the past, I’ve been a leader by example, so I’m pretty excited about that.” Head coach Jerry Reighard expects Teubner to lead. “She is the captain this year’s team, she’s very inspirational to the entire team,” Reighard said. But Teubner still expects greatness from herself. “I’ll be more vocal in the gym and be a leader that way. But also in the gym being PHOTOS BY JAKE MAY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER an all-arounder and current MAC champiLEFT: Senior all-arounder Kristin Teubner takes a breath as she prepares to compete in the balance beam at the gymnastics meet Sunday at McGuirk Arena. Teubner scored an 8.525 in the event. on,” she said. “I try to step up my game by RIGHT TOP: Teubner stretched out her arms and legs with poise at the gymnastics meet Sunday. Teubner scored a 9.025 in the event. RIGHT BOTTOM: Kristin Teubner takes a moment to compose herself with associate head coach Christine MacDonald at the gymnastics meet Sunday.

A LEADER | 10

Gymnastics team travels to Bowling Green for MAC opener By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

Gymnastics head coach Jerry Reighard isn’t looking forward to the four-hour bus ride awaiting his team Saturday. The Central Michigan gymnastics team will travel to Bowling Green to compete in its first Mid-American Conference meet at 6 p.m. “In our sport, away means

we get on the bus early Saturday morning,” Reighard said. “We travel, we eat on the road, more importantly we get off the bus and we compete.” Sitting on the bus is more detrimental to gymnasts than in most other sports. “That’s a big hindrance,” Reighard said. “It’s difficult after sitting three or four hours on a bus when your sport requires flexibility, to walk off,

and get limber and get ready to compete mentally. It’s not a good situation.” Freshman Jamilah Ali and sophomore Megan Harrington will lead Bowling Green. They finished second and third in all-around scores at the Kentucky Classic last week. CMU will count on it’s own duo of senior Kristin Teubner and sophomore Brittany Petzold. Since Bowling Green has

moved into Anderson Arena, the Falcons are 3-0 in home openers. “We need Teubner and Petzold to step up their competition this weekend,” Reighard said. “If they do that, and I know they will, it’s going to be a separating factor between Bowling Green and us.” Petzold is coming off winning the MAC Gymnast of the Week award. She was just off her

career-high on the uneven bars and had the best all-around score in the MAC last week. “That is a really prestigious award that all of our athletes are vying for each week,” Reighard said. “We hold that out in front of them, because we want that to be the carrot. It’s a big deal; it carries with each person throughout the season.” This week, the team has

been practicing in specific areas as a part of the game plan, Reighard said. “We are really emphasizing leaps and jumps for this meet,” he said. “We had a lot of easily fixed deductions in the first meet. We need to be a half of a tenth better per routine. That will be a big deciding factor.” sports@cm-life.com


10 || Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Trice closer to Olympics By Ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

JAKE MAY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Freshman all-arounder Kylie Fagan completes a flip mid-air as she competes on the balance beam at the gymnastics meet Sunday at McGuirk Arena. Fagan scored a 9.775 in the event.

Freshmen set to make impact for gymnastics By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

Gymnastics is different than most college sports teams that rely heavily on seniors and upperclassmen. In gymnastics, youth rules since athletes put such a strain on joints it ends up taking a toll. Collegiate teams all across the country are heavily filled with freshman talent. Central Michigan does too, with eight of its 15 gymnasts being freshmen. “I’m really excited about this freshman class,” said head coach Jerry Reighard. There is a lot of talent; it’s a different concept.” The coaching staff, along with the upcoming medical program, helped freshman Taylor Noonan decide to come to CMU. “The gymnastics obviously drew me in, but I’m also really into the medical field, and I knew they were building a medical facility here, so that drew me in too,” Noonan said. “Coach Reighard’s way of coaching and the fact that he wants his gymnasts to get better before they leave here really left an impression on me.” Freshman all-arounder Halle Moraw’s decision was more about the program and its standards. “They have a really good gymnastics program, and they like to keep learning new skills, which set them apart from a lot of other colleges,” Moraw said. Others like the close-knit feel the team has. “I liked the coaches and I liked the gymnasts,” said freshman Kylie Fagan, “They were more like a family and seemed to bond together.” Reighard is working with them to get out the freshman jitters. Noonan, Fagan and Moraw will all be contributing to the team this year; they

LEADER | CONTINUED FROM 9

showing everyone how to do it right the first time and how it should be done.” Fellow senior captain Samantha Piotrowski has been with Kristin from the beginning. “Kristin is one of the most valuable girls we have on the team. She is one of the most outstanding all-arounders on the team,” Piotrowski said. “You can’t replace Kristin’s gymnastics. It’s a statement to how hard she has worked since coming here, because she wasn’t as phenomenal as she is now.” After racking up awards her first three years, Teubner has pushed her goals higher. “I just try and focus on mak-

MEN | CONTINUED FROM 9

within the first four minutes and ended similarly in the final four minutes of the half until junior forward Zach Saylor cashed in on a jump shot with three seconds remaining. The inconsistent scoring forced a 25-19 deficit heading into the locker room. Those inconsistencies were quickly fixed in the second half. McBroom and Coimbra knocked down back-to-back 3-point field goals and the game was tied at 25. That was just the beginning of an improved offensive game. The Chippewas scored 41 second-half points. “We talked about at halftime not to panic,” Ernie said. “We thought we were panicking in the first half when we

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[SPORTS]

Jarod Trice is coming closer and closer to his goal of making the Olympic team. But he knows it will take a lot of training, something he’s excited for. Trice is heading to Maryland soon to train before competing at the Dave Schultz Invitational in February. Then he goes to Cuba to continue to prepare for the Olympic trials, which begin in April. “I am really amped to be able to go to Cuba to train and compete there,” Trice said. “This has been a goal ever since I started wrestling.” This will be the second Olympics while Trice has been in college. He admits he was not mentally ready the first time around. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and I just couldn’t let it pass me this year,” Trice said. “My freshman year in college was also an Olympic year, but I wasn’t quite ready to compete at the next level yet. Now that I’m older, I’m ready to go for the gold.” TRICE WINS MIDLANDS In two days, Trice had five matches decided by two points or less on way to winning the heavyweight division at the Midlands Championships Dec. 28. Trice is taking an Olympic redshirt this season from Central Michigan University for the opportunity to compete for Team USA in the upcoming 2012 Olympics. He competed unattached to CMU. His perseverance helped him as he defeated Bobby Telford of Iowa 3-2 in over-

time for the title. It was his third overtime bout of the tournament held in Evanston, Ill. “When I wrestle, I usu- Jarod Trice ally attack and defend really well. Trice said. In those close matches, I know in my heart I want to win,” The two-time All-American also won the Midlands in 2009 and finished runner-up last season. FACING A FRIEND. Trice was a couple of matches away from facing his friend CMU senior Peter Sturgeon in the championship match. Their relationship has grown this year training together in Mount Pleasant. “We have a real good relationship,” Trice said. “He’s competitive. He doesn’t like

to lose. And the mistakes that he makes, he makes sure he doesn’t do them again.” Trice was an All-American the past two seasons for the Chippewas, while accumulating a 56-10 record. He was 10-0 in Mid-American Conference matches. Although Trice is not competing for CMU, he is still training with the team and has been helping Sturgeon develop on the mat. “I think him and Peter have helped each other,” CMU head coach Tom Borrelli said. “But the tough part for Jarod right now is his focus is on a different style then the folkstyle we wrestle in college.” Despite the difference in style, Trice admires Sturgeon’s work ethic. “He is always looking to improve,” Trice said. “I’m here to help him this year to hopefully be a national champion.” sports@cm-life.com

LaSenorita Presents . . .

OPEN M C NIGHT With Dave Martin January 19th - 8 pm -11 pm

ANDREW KUHN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Freshman all-around gymnast Taylor Noonen performs during the floor exercise Sunday afternoon at McGuirk Arena. Noonen scored a 9.575.

even have a few goals in mind. “My personal goal is to be a MAC champion on bars and help my team out as much as I can,” Fagan said. Noonan’s goal is “to compete every meet on beams and hopefully contribute on bars and floor.” For Reighard, the challenge is preparing his freshmen to compete in unfriendly atmospheres. “That’s our challenge. The skill level is there, it’s just can they perform in an uncomfortable meet atmosphere,” Reighard said. sports@cm-life.com

ing myself better each day, and focusing on my goals like going to Nationals this year, and I’d like to repeat as MAC champion. So if I take care of those goals, other things will take care of themselves,” Teubner said. Teubner has been a key member on back-to-back MAC championship teams. But not winning it her freshman year is what has Teubner motivated. “It feels awesome to win a MAC championship, but my freshman year we missed out on being champions,” she said. “It was heart-breaking so it’s great that we’ve done it the past two years. To get a third would be amazing.” The health-fitness major with a 3.7 GPA has caught the public’s eye with her academics. Recently, Teubner received the Dick-Enberg Scholar Athwere struggling to make some shots and I thought we were passing up some shots from the outside against the zone after we got the penetration.” Sophomore guard Derek Jackson scored a game-high 15 points, making 3-of-5 baskets from behind the 3-point line. The Eagles were led by junior forward Jamell Harris, who had 12 points. EMU shot 42.9 percent from the floor in comparison to 39.2 percent from CMU, but the Chippewas knocked down three more 3-pointers and as many more free throws than the Eagles. CMU tries to become 3-0 in the Mid-American Conference for the first time since 1991-92 at 4:30 p.m. Saturday in DeKalb, Ill. against Northern Illinois. sports@cm-life.com

lete of the Year award. The award recognizes a junior athlete that excels in both academics and athletics. “It’s a great honor. There are so many awesome athletes here at Central that do well in academics as well as on the field, and the fact that they thought I was the top person for this year is a really great feeling,” she said. Teubner said she wants to go out on top as a senior. “My goal for this year is to be MAC senior of the year, repeat as MAC champion and compete at nationals,” she said. sports@cm-life.com

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