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Central Michigan University

| Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Panera Bread to open Mission Street store Monday, 6

[cm-life.com]

Trustees to consider on budgets, CMED funding Thursday By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

The operating and capital budgets for the upcoming academic year, a College of Medicine update and financial plans for the university are among the topics to be discussed at Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. with presenta-

tions from the Academic and Student Affairs Committee, CMED, the Finances and Facilities Committee and the Audit Committee. According to an email from the Board of Trustees, a resolution for Central Michigan University’s 2012-13 financial plan will be discussed. The spending plan allocates a total of $442 million, including $6.5 million

increased funding for highpriority academic programs, a $1.1 million general fund increase in financial aid and a $3 million increase in wages for faculty and staff. The release states the plan includes no financial cuts. The board will also discuss the possibility of allocating an additional $1.6 million for the planning and completion of the Campus Facilities

Master Plan, which includes features such as a space utilization study, facilities condition assessment, utilities assessment and a 10-year plan addressing CMU’s capital needs, according to the email. An $800,000 request will be made on behalf of CMED for the design phase of a building for the East Campus, located in Saginaw. A previous allo-

cation of $950,000 was made to aid in site selection, programming and design. Dean of the College of Medicine Ernest Yoder will give an update on fundraising efforts, including the naming of rooms within the college. A total of 18 rooms will be named, and the names recognize donors who have provided a total of $2.1 million in support of the college.

Rather than holding the traditional pre-meetings the day before the collective board meeting, the board attended a retreat as a group. Thursday’s meeting will be a meeting as a “committee of a whole,” meaning that each individual committee will come together as one to discuss each item.

A BOARD | 2

Football

Judge denies attempt to revoke bond for White Former CMU RB also charged with home invasion in Livonia Aaron McMann Editor-in-Chief

An attempt by prosecutors Monday to revoke bond for Austin White was denied, but an Isabella County judge says the former Central Michigan running back cannot leave the state. Appearing back in Isabella County Trial Court, 20-yearold White, with his mom and brother looking on, stood silent as chief assistant prosecutor Risa Scully tried to convince Judge William T. Ervin to revoke his bond. Scully cited the three-count felony White has been charged with, stemming from an April arrest in which police allege he was growing and selling hallucinogenic mushrooms in his Celani residence hall room. She also reiterated recent charges — home invasion, larceny — ­ following his June 25 arrest in hometown Livonia. But, in a new development, it was revealed that Livonia police are also investigating White in relation to a November home invasion. Chalk said the alleged home invasion took place sometime on Nov. 26 or 27 and was reported on Nov. 30. White has not been charged in the case, but Chalk said a report has been submitted to the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office. “I guess I’m not sure why his bond hasn’t been revoked earlier,” Scully said. Scully called Livonia police detective Tim Chalk to the stand, who said a neighbor took a photo of White leaving the Livonia home in which he is alleged to have entered June 14 and stole the prescription drug Adderall.

A WHITE | 2

SCHEMATIC DESIGNS/SHWGROUP

Building Dreams Early plans for new Bioscience Building include four floors, 220-seat auditorium, space for 40 faculty members

First Floor

By Aaron McMann | Editor-in-Chief

A recent increase in funding through academic prioritization could have allowed Ian Davison to hire four new faculty members. His problem? He has nowhere to put them.

The dean of the College of Science & Technology said Brooks Hall, the current home of the sciences, is packed beyond 100-percent capacity. The number of undergraduate biology majors has tripled in the last decade, while the number of graduate students studying biology has increased by 25 percent. “When Brooks was built, I’m sure they designed it to meet the needs at the time,” said Davison, also a professor of biology. “Clearly, as time goes on, that is no longer adequate.” Space might no longer become an issue with the $95 million Bioscience Building proposed for the current site of the Washington Apartments. In a recent sit-down interview with Central Michigan Life, Davison shared tentative plans for the building,

dubbed the largest investment in an academic building in university history. CMU recently secured $30 million from the state of Michigan to help fund the project; the rest must be made up through fundraising efforts and university reserves. While not complete, a schematic design prepared by SHW Group, the same architecture company that built the Education and Human Services Building on campus, illustrates a fourstory, 157,000-square foot facility. The entrance to the building will be found on the south side, highlighted by a glass atrium visible from the outside, similar in look to the renovated Events Center. The amount of glass on the outside might change as plans evolve, Davison said.

Inside, plans include a 5,000-square feet, 220-seat auditorium on the east side of the building. Three teaching classrooms – one larger (holding up to 50 students) and two smaller ones (each holding 30 students) – and more than 2,500 square feet of open areas for students to study dot the south end of the building. “We know from students and observations that the places where students can sit and talk are very popular,” Davison said. “The building will have a lot of that.” First-floor plans call for a 1,000-square foot herbarium, which will house rodents and other animals for testing, and several environmental chambers and animal holding rooms. ABIOSCIENCES | 2

Mount Pleasant adopts anti-discrimination law By Phil Pomber Staff Reporter

Charlotte Bodak/staff photographer

Mount Pleasant sophomore Marie Reimers and former SGA president Vincent Cavataio clap as the City Commission of Mount Pleasant adpots the ordinance on Human Rights during the City Commission meeting at City Hall Monday evening.

Resounding applause filled the hall as a new human rights ordinance was unanimously approved at the Mount Pleasant City Commission meeting Monday night. Under the new ordinance, traits including race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental disability, family status, sexual orientation and

gender identity are covered to prevent discrimination in the employment, housing and public accommodation of individuals. Gaining the most attention were sexual orientation and gender identity, which are not covered under state or national anti-discrimination laws. The ordinance was subject to considerable deliberation as it was rewritten over a number of lengthy meetings since its initial proposal by a citizen group

backed by the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Michigan last November. “I want to thank everyone who came forward to speak,” Commissioner Sharon Tilmann said. “It made our meetings very, very long, but I think it exemplifies democracy at its best.” Much of the debate surrounding the ordinance during its development was regarding the proper enforcement without interfering with

religious freedom. “(The ordinance) has a way of indicating to the public at large, the people that move here, the students who come here, that we are a welcoming community,” Mayor Bruce Kilmer said. “At the same time, it’s indicative that we do not want to infringe on the religious rights of some that may not agree with everything.” A LAW| 2

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2 || Wednesday, July 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Ballot proposals double for Nov. election By John Irwin Fall Elections Coordinator

The number of ballot proposals Michigan voters might have to decide on in the voting booth in November nearly doubled Monday, as three more groups turned in their petition signatures just before the afternoon deadline. They joined three other groups that already turned in their signatures to election officials earlier and a seventh proposal that would repeal Gov. Rick Snyder’s controversial 2011 emergency manager law. All of the groups say they have turned in more than the required 323,000 valid signatures. If all are approved by state election officials, the number of proposals Michigan voters will vote on will be the highest since

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 93

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

1982, when voters decided on six proposals. The number of proposals that will actually appear on the ballot will not be known for some time, though. These are the six proposals with brief explanations: - A group of investors called Citizens for More Michigan Jobs says it has turned in enough signatures to get its proposal allowing for the construction of more Michigan casinos to get on the ballot. If passed, new casinos would be approved for construction in eight new locations around the state, including Grand Rapids and Lansing. The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, which owns and operates the Soaring Eagle Casino in Mount Pleasant, has come out against the proposal. - Protect Our Jobs, backed by many major unions, would amend the state constitution to prohibit the state Legislature from passing laws that would affect the collective bargaining rights of public sector unions. If passed, the law could have major repercussions, potentially nullifying recent changes in state labor laws and making it impossible to pass so-called “right to work” laws. - A group backed by the Service Employees International

Union says it has turned in a proposal to state election officials that would require the state to re-establish a registry of home health care workers, which supporters say would help Medicare recipients find cheaper care at home instead of at a nursing home. Opponents say it is a power grab by the SEIU. - A group backed by many Tea Party groups says it has turned in over 600,000 signatures for a proposal that would make it much more difficult for the state to raise taxes. Any tax hike would require two-thirds support by the state legislature if passed. - Michigan Energy Michigan Jobs, a group backed by environmentalist groups and labor organizations, turned in a proposal that would require 25 percent of Michigan’s energy come from clean, renewable sources by 2025. - Another proposal put forward by The People Should Decide would require a public vote on any proposed international bridge in Michigan. The proposal is designed to block construction of a second bridge from Detroit to Windsor. metro@cm-life.com

S c i e n c e i n Ad m i n i s t r a t i o n

Lelsey Withers named interim director Central Michigan University communications and dramatic arts professor Lelsey Withers has been named interim director of the Master of Science in Administration program, according to a release. Withers, who started at CMU

LAW| continued from 1

Mount Pleasant resident Norma Bailey was the first of two public commenters to speak before the vote took place at the Monday meeting. She began by thanking the city officials for their efforts in creating the ordinance and then asked everyone who came to the meeting in support of the passage of it to stand to show their support. A flurry of mo-

WHITE| continued from 1

BIOSCIENCES| continued from 1

The north side of the first floor will house four large instrument rooms and three smaller ones, along with nearly 1,000 square feet of instructional labs and 1,000 square feet in prep rooms. Much of the building’s utilities and electrical sources will take up much of the west side. Plans for the second through fourth floors are very similar, featuring departmental and faculty offices along the east and west sides of the building. Davison said the building will accommodate 40 faculty members, in addition to staff and graduate students. And while attracting graduate students is always a plus – the number of grad students studying biology has increased from 48 to 60 since 2001-02 – there has been added emphasis in recent years to push undergraduate research. Since 2001-02, the number of undergraduates studying biology has increased from 280 to 868, and the number of students taking biology classes has risen 28 percent to 7,515 per year, a figure restricted due to space. During that same 10-year period, external grants to students studying biology has increased 10-fold from $323,000 to $3.47 million last year. “Brooks Hall is inadequate to house those numbers of stu-

BOARD|

continued from 1

“The board will meet as a committee of a whole and discuss what they’d usually discuss in the open committee meetings,” Director of Public Relations Steve Smith said.

dents and faculty, nor does it provide the facilities needed for cutting-edge instruction and research,” Davison said. Floors two through four will each include 26 open-area lab modules, space for faculty and their graduate students to conduct research. The amount will be determined based on the size of projects and their grants. The second floor will also contain a 1,500-square foot seminar room on the east side of the building, with glass windows that look down on the auditorium and serve as a possible option for overflow crowds. What’s next? Now, Davison and university officials wait for approval from the Board of Trustees. This could happen as soon as September, he said, but is likely to go up for a vote in December. The Washington Apartments would need to be demolished, but a timetable for that has not yet been discussed. Following board approval, the university will begin ramping up its fundraising efforts. While CMU received word it would get $30 million in help from the state, it now must come up with at least $65 million on its own. Kathy Wilbur, vice president of development and external re“The board has held one-day retreats in September 2010 and September 2011. In those cases, they opted to add an additional day to their meeting schedule for the retreat and keep the traditional format in place for committee meetings and formal sessions.” Regular pre-meetings will

lations, has said the university will use reserves and likely dip into its operating budget – at least initially – to fund the initial groundbreaking. Sherry Knight, interim vice president of communications, has already planned meetings with Davison to discuss a marketing strategy to attract alums and potential donors. “A university like (CMU) should be building a building like this every three to four years if it wants to remain where it wants to be,” Davison said. “You have to make these investments if you want to remain current.” A preliminary end date for the project is 2017, although Davison and university officials said this might change depending on several variables with the design and date of the groundbreaking. Steve Lawrence, vice president of Facilities Management, has said the project would take approximately 18 months. As for what happens to Brooks Hall? Davison is unsure but said the dated building would be left at 25-to-50-percent capacity. Introductory and lower-level classes and labs will likely still be taught there, with a lot more space available. “That’s a conversation the university is going to have to have and come up with a new plan,” Davison said. “We’ve got a little while to work that out, but we do need to start thinking about that.”

Mary Chartier, the Lansingbased attorney representing White, refuted the charges after Chalk said White did not have the drug in his possession when he was arrested 11 days later. Chartier also pointed out that a witness failed to identify White in a suspect lineup. “This flies in the face of the presumption of innocence,” Chartier said. “Wayne County gave him bond, and he has made every court appearance.” Ervin called the charges “serious offenses” but said he did not consider White a flight risk

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tion and noise followed as the supporting audience responded in unison. “We’ve come here tonight because we are very firmly in support of the ordinance,” Bailey said. “But also in support of the process that this commission has gone through over a good number of months to in fact allow the city to work together to provide an ordinance that now is inclusive of everyone.” Marie Reimers, CMU sophomore and chairperson of the university’s diversity committee, then spoke. Reimers told

a personal story of a homosexual friend who had attempted suicide in response to discrimination in society. “Seeing that this City Council and that this city supports the individuals who are LGBT means so much to my friend, to me, to other people who feel disenfranchised,” Reimers said. “This sends the message that the city of Mount Pleasant cares about them, that they accept them and that they’re welcome here.”

and denied Scully’s attempt to revoke his bond. On June 29, citing the nature of the charges in Isabella County and recent charges in Wayne County, Isabella County judge Mark Duthie denied a motion that would allow White to leave the state with his family. AnnArbor.com reported in May that White’s father, Michael White, recently retired from his principal job at Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor to become principal at Bolingbrook High School in Illinois. “You can’t leave the state with the family until these matters are sorted out,” Duthie told White. Chartier said White’s mother would remain with him in Michigan until he al-

lowed to leave the state. Judge Ervin said Monday that White hopes to continue playing football in Illinois. Recruited by Rich Rodriguez at the University of Michigan, White left the program in August 2010 and transferred to CMU in January 2011. While sitting out the 2011 season due to NCAA transfer rules, White was “suspended indefinitely” from the program by head coach Dan Enos in October for undisclosed reasons. He was later reinstated before being suspended prior to CMU’s April spring game. White was kicked off the team following his April 18 arrest.

Lelsey Withers

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necticut. Withers replaces Nana Korsah, who died last month from an apparent heart attack. A national search to permanently fill the spot will take place this fall, according to a release from the university.

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Panera Bread to open Mission Street Store Monday morning

I S ABELLA CO U NT Y

By Brianna Owczarczak Staff Reporter

Panera Bread will celebrate its Mount Pleasant grand opening at 6 a.m. Monday. The bakery-café is located at 2111 S. Mission St., the site of the former Fazoli’s, and is complete with a drive-thru. The bakery-café will be open Monday through Thursday from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday from 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., and Sunday from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Panera’s menu consists of sandwiches, salads, breads and other food and drinks. The bakery-café will also offer catering, and the bakery-café serves antibiotic-free chicken, wholegrain bread and many all-natural ingredients. Every Panera Bread restaurant has a catering coordinator to handle all catering events. “We are thrilled to open our newest bakery-café in such a dynamic community,” said Brian Campbell, marketing director of Manna Development Group. “Our concept has been embraced by many surrounding communities in the past 12 years, and we look forward to sharing our signature Panera

PHOTOS BY CHuck Miller/Photo Editor

Animal Shelter seeks volunteers to interact with lonely dogs The ballad of “Doggy Crockett” doesn’t have an ending yet. Crockett, a four-year-old pitbull/boxer mix has been at the Isabella County Animal Shelter, 1105 S. Isabella Road, longer than any other current dog. He was brought in January after his owners were unable to care for him anymore. Crockett was adopted for a brief two weeks before his new guardian was taken to jail, and he was brought back to the shelter. Since then, the Humane Animal Treatment Society staff at the shelter have noticed something dying on the inside. “He’s becoming depressed,” said Baley Westers, HATS canine care specialist. “When he’s in his kennel, he’s in his bed lying down, and he won’t even look at people.” For months, Crockett has watched all his playmates get picked out of their cages to go home with a new family, said the Grand Rapids senior. Crockett loves kids, she said, but has slowly lost interest in barking for the attention of visitors to the shelter. Instead, the white mutt

with a brown puzzle-piece patch of fur over his left eye, lies in bed, looking everywhere except into the eyes of the people passing by who never adopt him. “It’s almost like being in a prison cell, except he didn’t do anything wrong,” said Angela Miedema, HATS canine care specialist. Every day, dogs get four 15-minute increments of walks or play time outside. Miedema, a Holland senior, said the dogs spend a total of about two hours a day outside their kennel. Jill Irving, executive director at Humane Animal Treatment Society, said the shelter housed about 145 cats and 45 dogs this past weekend. Animals brought into the shelter are strays, seizures or surrenders. Animals are only euthanized if they are dangerous, diseased beyond help or unable to be kept at the shelter longer. Dogs have an 88-percent adoption rate, Irving said. “When adoptions aren’t happening, it’s very difficult,” she said. “We have to consider euthanizing.” The staff keeps a thick book titled “Success Stories” filled with emails from new

guardians telling of how well the animals are doing. Many of the stories are so beautiful they tear up, Irving said. Other stories make them cry from laughing. One night a pitbull named Angel figured out how to open a door handle with her paws. By the time the staff arrived in the morning, Angel had freed the cats’ cages, turning the house of animals into an animal house. The surveillance tape from that night is one the funniest things Irving said she has ever seen. “We laugh a lot,” she said. “We have such an amazing staff, and everyone is here because they care so much about the animals.” Miedema said volunteers are desperately needed to play with and walk dogs. Interaction makes dogs more adoptable, she said, and if they don’t get attention, they go crazy and never get adopted. “People say they don’t want to help, because it’s too sad,” she said. “But if everyone had that mentality, they’d never get helped.” metro@cm-life.com

Number of minority students enrolled increases; university’s strategic plan By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Since 2002, Central Michigan University has made efforts to increase the population of underrepresented students on campus, and those efforts have paid off. In May, Central Michigan Life reported that minority student enrollment increased 11 percent since 2010, according to the draft of CMU’s Diversity Report Card. Recently, the Ten Year History of Faculty, Staff and Student Populations by Ethnicity was released, and CMU has increased diversity in nearly all areas. In the fall of 2002, 84.7 percent of CMU faculty members were Caucasian. According to statistics from 2012, that number has dropped to 79.7 percent. In 2002, there were 746 African American students recorded on campus. In 2012, that number rose to 879. Additionally, the number of Asians, Hawaiians and Hispanic students has risen, while the number of Alaskan Natives has slightly decreased.

CHarlotte Bodak/Staff photographer

Panera Bread, 2111 S Mission Street, will open at 6 a.m. Monday.

warmth here in Mount Pleasant.” Manna Development Group is a franchise of Panera Bread. Franchisee Paul Saber, who is also opening up a Panera in Midland, attended Central Michigan University from 1975 to 1979. Saber graduated from CMU with a Bachelor of Science degree. Saber became president and CEO of Manna Development Group in 2003. “We are happy to offer the many business professionals, families and students in the community fresh and wholesome food choices, paired with the convenient service

their busy schedules demand,” Campbell said in the release. Panera Bread franchises are active participants in giving back to the communities in which they serve. The new bakery-café in Mount Pleasant plans on giving back to the community through its daily DayEnd-Dough-Nation and Community Breadbox programs. The Day-End-Dough-Nation program donates all unsold breads and baked goods to local hunger relief agencies, and the Community Breadbox program puts all cash donations from Panera Bread’s customers to a local organization or cause.

Men’s Basketball

TOP: Crockett, a four-year-old Pitbull Mix sits inside his cage at Humane Animal Treatment Society. BOTTOM: Canine Care specialist Baley Westers of Humane Animal Treatment Society, plays outside with Crockett Monday afternoon.

By Mike Nichols Managing Editor

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, July 11, 2012 || 3

[News]

During the May 1 Academic Senate meeting, Associate Vice President of the Office of Institutional Diversity Denise Green gave a presentation summarizing CMU’s diversity report, saying minority student enrollment had increased since 2010. According to a May CM Life article, extensive efforts have been made by the Office of Admissions to recruit at high schools with a high population of underrepresented students. Kevin Williams, associate director of admissions, said in May diversity has been one of the strategic plans of the university for the past five to six years. Former CMU President Michael Rao started the diversity plan, which has been continued by the current president, George Ross. CMU’s recruiting for students of diverse backgrounds concentrates on schools in cities such as Detroit, Flint, Lansing, Saginaw, Muskegon and Grand Rapids. “For the state of Michigan, that’s where you’re going to find underrepresented stu-

dents,” Williams said in May. Vice President of Enrollment and Student Services Steven Johnson spoke about efforts to increase diversity at CMU during a forum held by President Ross in April. Johnson outlined plans to create an Enrollment Management Committee to analyze all aspects of enrollment trends, including diversity. “The committee will be a university wide representation from all enrollment areas,” Johnson said in April. “They will examine the mix of undergraduate students, including elements such as gender, size of class and diversity.” CMU has programs that pull in a high number of underrepresented students. Such programs include science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Additionally, the College of Medicine is expected to draw a high number of international and underrepresented students in the future. Green could not be reached for comment in time for publication. university@cm-life.com

Guard Finis Craddock sentenced to six months probation following April arrest By Aaron McMann Editor-in-Chief

Central Michigan senior basketball guard Finis Craddock was sentenced to six months probation following his April arrest for drunken driving. Craddock, 21, of Garland, Texas, appeared before Judge William R. Rush in Isabella County Trial Court on June 22. He was arrested by Mount Pleasant police on April 21 at the corner of Preston Street and E. Campus Drive. According to court records, Craddock pleaded guilty to driving under the influence only to have it knocked down to driving while impaired, a lesser charge. Rush sentenced him to six months probation. Under the terms of his probation, Craddock is not allowed to consume alcohol or enter an establishment that serves alcohol and must complete a substance-abuse program. He was also ordered to pay $1,200 in court costs and fees. If all terms are met, Rush will suspend a recommended 92day jail sentence. According to the police report, obtained by Central Michigan Life via a Freedom of Information Act request, officer Kurt Solmonson of the Mount Pleasant Police Department pulled Craddock over after he came to a complete stop at two blinking yellow lights on Mission Street. “I was traveling eastbound on High Street approaching Mission Street,” Solmonson wrote. “I stopped at the red blinking light for my direction of travel and thought it was strange there was a white Hummer in the passenger lane, which was stopped for the yellow blinking light.”

After turning right to travel south on Mission, Solmonson said the Hummer changed lanes and got in front him. It, again, Finis Craddock came to a complete stop at the blinking yellow light at Mission and Preston streets. “The vehicle then turned westbound onto Preston Street approaching E. Campus Drive,” he wrote in the report. “I then initiated a traffic stop on the vehicle for impeding the flow of traffic of motor vehicle traffic.” Solmonson said Craddock, who was behind the wheel of the vehicle, had “red, glossy, bloodshot eyes” and admitted

to have had a few drinks at a party. After several evaluations, Craddock agreed to a preliminary breath test, which registered a blood alcohol content level of .155 percent, nearly twice the legal limit in Michigan. “I asked Craddock if he felt like he was intoxicated,” Solmonson wrote. “He stated he did feel like he was intoxicated, but he was ‘all right to go.’” Craddock, who is entering his senior season, was “suspended indefinitely” by CMU head coach Keno Davis in April. The 6-foot-1, 179-pound guard was recruited by former coach Ernie Zeigler and averaged 2.8 points and 2.5 rebounds per game last season. sports@cm-life.com

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4 || Wednesday, July 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Two depart athletics communications, intern promoted to full-time spot By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

File Photo by Brooke mayle/Staff photographer

A committee of university presidents has decided to turn to a four-team playoff instead of a single BCS Championship game. “No matter what kind of format you have people will be complaining about it,” said CMU football head coach Dan Enos.

Dave Heeke, Dan Enos react to new BCS playoff structure By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

Since 1998, the most discussed, and arguably unpopular, entity in sports has been the Bowl Championship Series. The BCS, which is based on polls and computers, is how the Football Bowl Subdivision, formally known as Division 1-A, decided its champion for the past 14 years. Now, a committee of university presidents has decided to turn to a four-team playoff instead of a single BCS Championship game starting in 2014. “Something like this was coming our way,” said CMU athletics director Dave Heeke. “I think it’s the best of the options that have been discussed.” So how does the new format affect Central Michigan University, the Mid-American Conference and other mid-major conferences and their football programs? “In reality, it gets institutions like CMU and the MidAmerican Conference no closer to an opportunity to play on the field for a cham-

p i o n s h i p,” Heeke said. “It is what it is, and institutions like CMU around the country, and there are many, are left Dan Enos on the outside looking in.” Many college football experts and fans are in favor of a 16-team playoff that gives spots to each conference champion, with the remaining spots going to topranked remaining teams in the nation. Those fans and experts point to the Football Championship Subdivision, formally known as Division 1-AA, which decides its champion with a playoff that generates good ratings on the ESPN networks. “Expanding the system, in my mind, has a number of complications,” Heeke said. “Those levels of football did not have bowl structures in place, play fewer games, have a different time period, and it’s not driven by multimedia rights and the revenues generated by those partners.”

Since the BCS was created in 1998, it has generated a plethora of controversy. “Our game is not to determine or satisfy the masses … I don’t think that’s our goal,” Heeke said. “We want to maintain what has been good for college football, and this is a nice step forward.” In 2003, the BCS title game created a split national championship between Louisiana State and Southern California. In 2006, the format gave a one-loss team, Florida, a national championship, despite the fact Boise State went unbeaten and beat Oklahoma in a BCS bowl game. In 2008, the same thing happened to an unbeaten Utah team that was not rewarded, and a one-loss Gator team was given the national championship. CMU football head coach Dan Enos said, “no matter what kind of format you have, people will be complaining about it.” “That is the nature of sports in general. Everyone has an opinion.” sports@cm-life.com

IN THE NEWS

MIchigan coach Brady Hoke would change academic year By Mark Snyder Detroit Free Press

As many of Michigan’s freshman athletes arrived on campus last week, their biggest challenge is these first few weeks as summer term classes begin. Finding where to go and studying at a higher level is enough of a challenge. Not being able to spend time with their new coaches for the football players is one of the more daunting challenges. That’s why, if given a chance to change something in college football, University of Michigan

coach Brady Hoke, would choose this time of year — not only for the new players but the older ones as well. “They need to redefine what the academic year is in Division I football,” he said in early June. “We have contact, and we can be with our players for class issues, whatever it might be (during spring). Summer starts, academic year is over, and we’re not allowed to be with our players. But they’re going to make sure our (academic progress rate) is where it needs to be, make sure we all do. We all do it. Our players’

behavior is monitored and consequences for those things. Because we do believe in consequences. “I would change the academic year. Our guys are in class right now. They’ll be in class throughout the summer. I don’t know if there’s a Division I school that won’t have guys in classes during the summer who need monitoring. We can’t do class check like we normally do. If a guy misses class, we have a program set up to make sure he’s motivated not to miss class, and we can’t do that (during the summer).”

The Central Michigan athletics communications office is undergoing a staff shakeup this summer. The change-up started in the Sports Information Department, the department responsible for the content of www.cmuchippewas.com. It started with the departure of Associate Director of Athletics Communications Scott Rex, who left to be closer with his extended family in Columbus, Ohio. Director of Communications Jason Kaufman said, “he’s going to be missed a lot.” “He’s done such a great job the past six or seven years with his knowledge of the department and working with the media.” A national search for Rex’s

replacement has been narrowed down to a few finalists. The department hopes to have someone in office by the end of July, Kaufman said. “I wouldn’t be where I am without (Rex),” said Kyle Kelley, who was recently named the new assistant director of athletic communications. Kelley, another changing face in the shuffle, replaced former Assistant Director of Athletic Communications Erin Mowery, whose contract was not renewed by the university. Kelley worked his way up from a volunteer as a student to unpaid intern, to a paid internship after graduation and now finally a full-time staff member. “It makes me really proud to work my way up from an unpaid volunteer to a fulltime staff member,” Kelley

said. “I have a really strong passion and love for CMU, and I’m excited to start a career here at my alma mater.” The job of an SID is an extensive one, involving all parts of media. Kelley is responsible for connecting athletes and coaches to media members, writing articles, making videos, posting to social media sites and keeping statistics on assigned teams. “I’ll continue to be the contact for baseball, but I’ll be taking over for volleyball on top of general day-to-day responsibilities,” he said. “I’m really excited about the chance to spearhead the efforts of our social media team and build our communication through Facebook, Twitter and our new YouTube page.” sports@cm-life.com

Track and Field

Tecumseh Adams released from program for academic issues By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

Sophomore Tecumseh Adams has been released from the Central Michigan crosscountry team due to being academically ineligible following the spring semester. Adams was CMU’s best runner last year, finishing 69th in the NCAA championships. Director of cross-country Willie Randolph was not available for comment but released a statement through athletic communications. “Tecumseh Adams was declared academically ineligible following the spring semester and has subsequently been released from the track and field and cross-country program,” Randolph said in a statement.

“We fully support the academic mission of Central Michigan University as an institution of Tecumseh Adams higher education, as well as the consequences for those studentathletes who do not meet those expectations. While the subtraction of Tecumseh is both significant and unfortunate, we look forward to the coming cross-country and track and field seasons featuring a number of up-and-coming distance runners in the great tradition of Central Michigan.” Adams’ talent will be missed after he helped lead CMU to a

second-place finish in the MidAmerican Conference while being crowned the individual champion. Not only was Adams the top runner for the cross-country program, but he was one of the top runners in track. Adams holds a few records for CMU in indoor track. In the 5000-meter run, Adams broke the school record for indoor track with a time of 13:53 and broke the record for 3,000-meter run with a time of 8:02. At the indoor MAC Championships, Adams placed second. He was a heralded recruit out of Harbor Springs after earning all-state honors in cross-country twice and three times in track. sports@cm-life.com


cm-life.com/category/vibe

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, July 11, 2012 || 5

[VIBE]

MOVie reVieW

“The Amazing Spider-Man” a better, but still flawed, reboot By Mike Nichols Managing Editor

“The Amazing Spider-Man” is, in many ways, as heroic and immature as Peter Parker. Director Mark Webb’s (“(500) Days of Summer”) reboot of Sam Raimi’s trilogy is thoughtful, marvelously acted and, well, amazing. But it lacks the depth and focus to fully re-define the origins of one of the world’s most beloved superheroes. To be fair, any Spider-Man reboot was going to be as outnumbered as the web-head versus the Sinister Six. It would have to

contend with comparisons to Raimi’s films, which, well-made or not, did establish Spider-Man in popular culture for moviegoers. It would also have to fight for the spotlight amongst this summer’s mammoth superhero flicks: “The Avengers” and “The Dark Knight Rises.” And it would have to meet the high expectations of Spidey’s millions of fans, young and old alike. Being one of those fans myself, I do think this film is a better version than the 2002 original. At times, it felt like a new girlfriend showing up in your ex’s clothes; but, overall, it captured

the essence of a younger, inexperienced Peter Parker bravely trying to come to terms with the great power and responsibilities of being Spider-Man. The great acting makes the characters of the Spider-Man universe feel like real people. Andrew Garfield plays Peter as a sweet-natured yet cheeky outsider, who feels more like a punk than a nerd. The lovely Gwen Stacey (Emma Stone) has the right chemistry for him, and it’s enjoyable watching their romance spark. The film also boasts an A-list supporting cast with veteran talent like Martin

Sheen, Sally Field and Denis Leary. The plot is essentially true to the well-known origin but with different emphasis. The story begins as Peter’s search to uncover his parents disappearance. This leads him to Dr. Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans), his father’s old colleague, and Oscorp Industries, home to all things villainous in Spidey’s world. Naturally, we see the fateful trip to the lab, the bite from the radioactive spider and the irresponsible behavior leading to the death of Uncle Ben. But all the major moments feel rushed.

The real emotional scenes happen in the filler. The film has its humor, but the writing doesn’t compare to the brilliant wit of Joss Whedon or the psychological depth of Christopher Nolan. What it does excel at is giving the audience all of Spidey’s glorious acrobatic fighting style and web-swinging skills. A major flaw, however, is the way the film intricately weaves in many different plot-lines in its web but then never wraps them up. Peter never catches the killer, never really finds out what happened to his parents

‘THe aMaZinG SPider-Man’

★★★★★ w Genre: Adventure

and never finds out what’s up with the mysterious, and apparently dying, Norman Osborn. But not to worry, Spidey-fans. A post-credits scene reveals that Spidey’s troubles with Oscorp have only just begun. studentlife@cm-life.com

alBUM reVieW

Ellie Goulding’s ‘Lights’ combines electric sounds with folk-esque lyrics By Sarah Donetti Staff Reporter

Ellie Goulding is one of the American music industry’s most recent sleeper hits. Her debut album “Lights” was actually released in February 2010, and, while it obtained decent sales in Goulding’s native United Kingdom, she remained unknown in the United States until the titular single off her album gained traction this summer. With the single “Lights” at No. 6 on the Billboard Hot 100

as of July 7, more American listeners will be likely to pick up Goulding’s debut to see if it’s worthwhile. One can see why the hit single and first track “Lights” has appeal. Electro-pop influence is definitely present but doesn’t overwhelm Goulding’s mellow and, at times, haunting vocals. It also shows she has a clever hand when it comes to songwriting, as the song manages to come off as poetic in the simplicity of its inspiration (according to interviews, it’s her fear of the dark).

Goulding’s folk-songwriter roots are apparent throughout the album, as songs like “Guns and Horses” and “This Love (Will Be Your Downfall)” sound almost like folk-pop put into a dance-club remix. Productionwise, the album is very sleek, and the way it manages to act as a strengthening complement to Goulding’s singing instead of overdosing on distortion to the point of completely disguising her voice is something more dance-pop albums today could take note of. Lyrically, the album is inter-

esting because its content has much darker undertones than one would recognize upon first listening. While relationships take up a good portion of the album’s themes, emotional dysfunction seems implied in songs like “This Love (Will Be Your Downfall),” where Goulding seems torn as to whether or not a lover is good or bad for her, and “Under the Sheets” (“You left a blood stain on the floor... like all the boys before ... we’re under the sheets and you’re killing me”). Perhaps the most deceptive-

ly happy-sounding track is “The Writer,” where a bouncy piano disguises the lyrics, which appear to describe someone resolving that she’ll completely change herself for a lover who seems pretty apathetic (“I try out a smile and aim it at you, you must have missed it, you always do”). The album’s lyrical ambiguity in these respects will keep listeners guessing up until the last track: A cover of Elton John’s “Your Song,” which rightfully keeps to a simple piano background with Goulding’s vulnerable vocals as the star.

‘liGHTS’

★★★★★ w Artist: Ellie Goulding w Genre: Electropop

Goulding’s debut might not be the most earth-shattering, but its mostly seamless fusion of electronic and singersongwriter sensibilities will likely be a summer treat for fans of both. studentlife@cm-life.com

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Classifieds Classifi eds ifieds lassifi edseds Classifi Classifieds Classifi eds ifieds 6 || Wednesday, July 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/news

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“We’re supporting our town,” Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com “Toy Story” will be shown Aug. Blem said. “There’s something building at 320 W. Broadway St. “It gives an additional option for fami-ed Ad 11,Policy and Michael Curtiz’s 1942 for everyone.” The movieed began at 9 p.m. Placing a Classifi Ad Classifi & Rates PUBLISHING ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 32,000 PUBLISHING DAY! PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS film “Casablanca” will be shown ended with a round of ap- OPEN Couples,READERS families,DAY! teensEACH and and This free film screening was lies looking for low-cost activities over CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Aug. 18.Rates: 15 word minimum sponsored Michigan children gathered on the lawn plause at 11 p.m. per classifiby edCentral ad BytoPhone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or “We love E.T.!” said Mount next Mount Pleasant City Hall the summer and adds towhich the sense ofStudent MediaThe event committee re- University’s College of Commudiscontinue, without notice, advertising is in the opinion of the Bysnacks, Fax: 989-774-7805 centered Issues: issue Bold, viewed film 1-2 options that$7.75 wouldper nication with drinks and blankets Pleasant resident Denise Marand italic Fineand Arts, Isabella Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for type are available along place we’re typographical errorscreating only to the extentdowntown.” of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: appeal to families and$7.50 choseper Bank, Saturday night towww.cm-life.com watch a boy tinez. Max and Emily’s Eatery 3-6 Issues: issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad films of Issues: different$7.25 ages perand ride bicycle across the moon. the city ofattractors. Mount Pleasant. 7-12 issue Inhis Person: 436 Moore Hall Downtown Development Dithe first dateMichelle of publication.Sponseller, Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life offi ce that kids within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classifi ed enjoy,13+ Sponseller said. rector Michelle Steven Spielberg’s 1982 film 8 a.m.-5 CMU’s Issues: $7.00•per issue University Events proCentral Michigan Life • Director 436 Hall, CMU,would Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 www.cm-life.com Hours: Monday-Friday p.m. Sponseller said Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for theMoore first day’s insertion. Downtown Development “Additionally, we wanted vided the technical support for “E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial” was the city is planning for Movone movie thatClassifi was a ‘classic,’ ies by Moonlight toPlacing be an an- a Classified Ad first film shown at Movies thePolicy event. ed Ad & Rates ,the Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com REACH MORE 32,000 EACH ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS so ‘Casablanca’ was chosen,” nual event,READERS with screenings four PUBLISHING DAY! Moonlight, kicking offTHAN Mount In case of rain, the films will be ,byMt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Life will not knowingly accept sheadvertising said. which reflects discrimination because Pleasant’s outdoor summer film times per summer. shown in the Broadway Rates: 15 wordTheatre, minimu Classifi ed Ad “It Policy & Ratesoption adds to the sense of place we’re screening willCM By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, Saturday, religion, sex or national origin, andPleasant CM Life reserves the right to reject orE. Broadway St. Mount resident gives an additional be held series. The filmClassifi was projected 216 ed Ad Policy & Rates discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Fax: 989-774-7805 Donna Blem they of forBy families looking for low-cost downtown,” Aug. 4 and Board, will feature James onto an inflatable se- because 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p ept advertising which reflects screen discrimination is not in keeping with the standards of CMsaid Life. CM Lifelove will beall responsible for Rates: 15 word minimumcreating per classifi ed ad she said. ational origin, CMrefl Life reserves the reject or typographical only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space metro@cm-life.com used ept advertising which ects discrimination the city’s downtown events. activities over the summer and per The next Movies by Moonlight Frawley’s 1979 film “The errors Muppet cured withand ropes to stakes inright thetobecause By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p Rates: 15 word minimum classifi ed ad vertising which is CM in the ofthe theright Student Media and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only tional origin, and Lifeopinion reserves to reject or 1-2 436 Issues: $7.75Hall per issue Bold, italic and centered 7-12 Issues: $7.25 e standards of CM Life will be Student responsible for In Person: Moore the first date of publication. 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Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates PUBLISHING DAY! 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH PUBLISHINGALWAYS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN OPEN AT AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classifi ed religion, Ad Policy & Rates CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: word minimum per classified ad which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not with the standards of CMthe Life. CM Life will By 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and 1-215 Issues: $7.75 per issue By Fax: Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sexinorkeeping national origin, and CM Life reserves right to reject or be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent cancelling theischarge for theofspace usedMedia and centered type are discontinue, without notice,of advertising which in the opinion the Student By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue By Fax: 989-774-7805 italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, Board, is not keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for in such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any type are available along 7-12 Issues:$7.50 $7.25per perissue issue other errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used In 436 Moore Hall ByPerson: Website: www.cm-life.com special features 3-6 Issues: credit due can be picked up at thetypographical CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only 13+ $7.00 attractors. ad ad attractors. report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the day’s Central 436 Moore Hall, CMU, MI 48859 • per www/cm-life.com Monday-Friday 7-12Issues: Issues: $7.25 perissue issue likelike InHours: Person: 436 Moore Hall8 a.m.-5 p.m. the first date ofMichigan publication. AnyLife credit• due canfirst be pickedinsertion. up at the CM Life offiMt. ce Pleasant, WANTED TO SPACE NOTICES FOR SALE within 30 days of termination of theOFFICE ad. If FOR you find anSALE error, report it to the ClassifiedOFFICE NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT RENT 8 a.m.-5 WANTED OFFICE SPACE SPACE FORMonday-Friday SALE FOR SALE 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Hours: p.m. TO RENT Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

Placing a Classifi Ad Classifi ed AdOPEN Policy Classifi , Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH ed PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, LOST & FOUND AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES Rates: 15 word minimu LOST & 989-774-3493 FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND Policy Classifi edPUBLISHING Ad Rates By Phone: sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising Policy Classifi ed Ad Rates which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805

Classifieds

1-2 Issues: $7.75 p discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and discrimination because of race, color, religion, ect or discontinue, without notice, advertising By Website: 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p Rates: 15 www.cm-life.com word minimum per classified ad rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any ect or with discontinue, without notice, eping the standards of CM Life.advertising CM Life2-BEDROOM will Bold, italic and 1-2 436 Issues: $7.75Hall per PROGRAMMER issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 HOUSE ON attractively ANALYST IV Global In Person: Moore SENIOR DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT credit due be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, eping with the CMspace Life. CM Lifelandscaped will cancelling thestandards charge forofthe used and centered type are can Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: issue property. Five $7.75 minutesper Campus.! PA-4.! Req: Bachelor's deBusiness Administration Development 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue p.m. 13+ Issues: $7.00 report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 cancelling the charge for the space used and available along with limited to only the first date of publication.from Any CMU. Appliances centered type are are included. gree, preferably in computer science, & External Relations. P&A-4.! Re3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 1251 E. BROOMFIELD ST., MT. PLEASANT, MI 48858 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features available along limited to only theof first date publication. Any ays of termination the ad.of If you find an error, Utilities and horse boarding separate. or an equivalent combination ofwith educaquired: Bachelor's degree, 3 years exIssues: $7.25 pertion issue SHUTTLE SERVICE 13+ $7.00 issue likespecial ad two attractors. other features 2 4 8 - 9 1 8 -7-12 8 0 9Issues: 6 o r per and experience; years of proays of termination the ad. If you find an error, onsible for the firstof day’s insertion. perience. Applicants must apply online 13+ Issues: $7.00 pergissue extra.ideas@hotmail.com r a m m i n g likee xad p eattractors. rience; see at www.jobs.cmich.edu. Screening beonsible Public for the first day’s insertion. www.jobs.cmich.edu for complete list gins immediately and continues until Transportation 3 BEDROOM CLOSE to campus availof requirements.! Applicants must apServices of the filled. CMU, an AA/EO institution, able immediately. Includes water, trash Isabella County ply on-line at www.jobs.cmich.edu.! strongly & actively strives to increase washer/ dryer $300/per person Transportation CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly diversity within its community (see SPONSORED BY: Commission 989-621-0052. and actively strives to increase diverwww.cmich.edu/aaeo/). Kappa Alpha Psi and United Apartments sity within its community (see 3 BEDROOM HOUSE 1/2 block from ! cmich.edu/aaeo). SBX available 8/16. Low rent. Great cm life classifieds ! 774-3493 • 436 Moore Hall landlord. References required DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT COMwww.cm-life.com 231-627-2821. MUNICATION & Dramatic Arts Development & External Relations. P&A-4.! 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom, spacious, enRequired: Bachelor's degree, 3 years ergy efficient, WIFI, w/ d, MORE! experience. Applicants must apply on$1320/ mo. http:www.smwrentals.com CHRISTIAN COUNSELING/ LIFE CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of All race, color, Screening line at www.jobs.cmich.edu. FOX HOME BUILDER!S. Types of religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad 989-450-5289. Relationships, stress, Coaching. By Phone: 989-774-3493 begins and continues sex or national origin, andimmediately CM Life reserves the rightuntil to reject or improvements discontinue, without notice, home from roofing to advertising reabuses, addictions, more. Call Larry 4/ 5 BEDROOM Condo near CMU filled. CMU, an AA/EO institution, local modeling. Experienced and which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and Hoard, BA 989-842-3982. (christian1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue campus!! A/C, dishwasher, washer/for typographical strongly & actively increase 989-773-4665. be responsible errorsstrives only totothe extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are lifecoaching.net) By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue dryer. $1250/ mo! Partlo Property diversity within its community (see available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any 9-779-9886! www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features In Person: 436 Moore Hall M a n a g e m e n t ! 9 8credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, www.partloproperty.com items that lon- responsible for the first day’s insertion. 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classifirecycle ed Dept. yOUr immediately. Weyou arenoonly Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. ! ger want or need and gain extra cash! Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHIFOR RENT - 3 bedroom house near We are pledged to the cm life classifieds CLES we buy them we haul them no the Cabin. Available immediately. letter and spirit of U.S. policy 774-3493 • 436 Moore Hall matter how old or what they look like. $900 per month plus utilities. for the achievement of equal www.cm-life.com 989-772-5428. 586-264-8053 Email housing opportunity throughout diodia@sbcglobal.net

GARAGE SALES HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES MIGHTY MINIS

FOR GARAGE SALES FOR RENT RENT

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED FOR RENT

GARAGE SALES HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

PETS SPECIAL SECTION PETS NOTICES

WANTED TO PETS WANTED TO RENT RENT FOR SALE

SPECIAL SPECIAL SECTION WANTEDSECTION TO RENT RENT WANTED TO

PETS SPECIAL SECTION PETS NOTICES

PETS FOR SALE

OFFICE SPACE

MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES LOSTTRAVEL & FOUND

ROOMMATES ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES AUTOS FOR SALE

TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL SERVICES

MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES LOSTTRAVEL & FOUND

MOTORCYCLES AUTOS FOR SALE

SERVICES

PERSONALS FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE HELP REALWANTED ESTATE

PERSONALS GARAGE SALES REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

PERSONALS FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

EXPLORE

REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY!

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

989•772•9441 WANTED RENT HAPPYTO ADS

YORKSHIRE COMMONS

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF

POOL GARAGE PARTY SALES

SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS WANTED TO BUY WANTED RENT HAPPY ADS WANTED TOMichigan BUY Life WANTED TO BUY ADS HAPPYTO NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT• www/cm-life.com FOR SALE FOR SALE Central •HAPPY 436 Moore Hall, CMU,!Mt. Pleasant, MIADS 48859 ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVELClassifiedAUTOS MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES NOTICES OFFICE SPACE FOR SALE Placing a Classified Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Ad Rates AUTOS SALE FOR SALE SERVICES LOST &Please FOUND NOTICES LOST FOUND OFFICEFOR SPACE FOR& SALE join us in celebrating the beginning of SUMMER, AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES LOST FOUND REAL&ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES AUTOS SALE FOR RENT FORFOR RENT SERVICES LOST & FOUND meet new friends, get to know the property and staff HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT WANTED TO BUY WANTED WANTED TO BUY WANTED HAPPY ADS HAPPYand ADS HELP WANTED PETS GARAGESECTION SALES TO RENT SPECIAL TO RENTof allSPECIAL FOR RENT most have FUN! SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES SECTION PETS DAY! WANTED TO RENT REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS When: July 12th, 2012 ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES the Nation. We encourage support an Yorkshire Commons Pool ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE REAL Where: ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS affirmative advertising and marketing LARGE, 5 BEDROOM home near What time: 1pm - 5pm downtown. 2.5 baths, fireplace, large program in which there are no barriers central air. All appliances inyard, PERSONALS to obtaining housing because of race, REAL ESTATE cluded. $1500/ month plus utilities. color,REAL religion, sex, handicap, familial ESTATE PERSONALS WANTED TO BUY WANTEDPizza, TOIce BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS 772-2163. Cream and Drinks Provided! status, or national origin. APARTMENT LIVING! NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TOON RENT SPACE FOR SALE FOR Water SALE WOODSIDE APTS2 bedroom, inVolleyball andOFFICE GIVEAWAY’S $273/ person 2 bedroom duplex 214 WANTED TO15th, BUY ADS cludingHAPPY washer and dryer $650.00 per Pine Available August pets ok. S. WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS month. HOMETOWNE REALTY Ed. 989-644-5747. 989-779-1539. AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES• WALK TO CAMPUS SERVICES LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND 1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS avail-

WE HAVE THE “M ONOPOLY”

able summer and 2012/2013 school year NO PETS! Very Clean. Broadway & Brown Apartments. 989-772-3887.

FOR RENT

WE HAVE OPENINGS FOR ROOMMATES FOR NEXT SCHOOL YEAR PLEASE GO TO: WWW.BESTROLLC.COM OR CALL RON AT 586-321-1112.

1- BEDROOM HOMES available for 2012- 2013!leasing in and around Mt Pleasant!! Call for amenities.! Starting at $350/ mo! Partlo Property Management! 989-779-9886! www.partloproperty.com

2 BEDROOM-- SMALL QUIET com plex. 2 blocks from Meijers. Washer/ dryer. Available July 1st! $625. 989-773-7370

WANTED TO RENT ROOMMATES

4 BEDROOM APARTMENT. Close to campus includes water, trash, W/ D. $275 per person. 989-621-0052.

REAL ESTATE

HELP WANTED

SPECIAL SECTION TRAVEL

2 PERSON APARTMENT available immediately. Close to everything. Above Black Tie. For more information call 772-1430.

PERSONALS

Sit BackTO& BUY Relax WANTED and enjoy all our

HAPPY ADS

FREE AMENITIES

275 a month

• INDOOR HEATED POOL • PETS ALLOWED • ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! • FREE ELECTRIC, GAS, HEAT, A/C WATER & SEWER AND TRASH! • 24 HOUR MAINTENANCE

3300 E. Deerfield Road

(989) 773-3300

SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

presented BY:

• SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM APTS.

WANTED TO RENT

• NEW MANAGING STAFF

• IMMEDIATE ROOMMATES OCCUPANCY! MOTORCYCLES

Park Place REAL ESTATE

WANTED TO BUY A P A R T M E N T S

1401 E. Bellows St.- E7, Mt. Pleasant • 772-4032

$

SUDOKU

PETS

parkplaceaptscmu@yahoo.com • www.rentparkplaceapts.com

Apartments as low as 1, 2 or 3 BR Apts. Available

• ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

GARAGE SALES

SPECIAL SECTION

PETS

TRAVEL

MOTORCYCLES

PERSONALS HAPPY ADS


CM Life