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CMU baseball takes series against Ohio, 1B

Monday, April 4, 2011

Students relive high school tradition at flashback prom, 3A

SGA ELECTION REgister and vote at cmich.Orgsync.com today through Thursday

Central Michigan Life

Mount Pleasant, Mich.

[cm-life.com]

Husband charged with murdering wife Cheryl K. Reen worked as former CMU secretary By Jake Bolitho Metro Editor

A former CMU employee was found dead Friday and her husband is charged with open murder. Gary John Reen, 56, of Chippewa Township, was arraigned Saturday after turning himself over to police and telling them he shot his wife, Cheryl Kristine Reen. He remains jailed on $2 million bond. Deputies found the body of the 51-year-old woman in a pole

barn at a residence located at 7120 E. River Road, where Gary Reen told deputies he had shot her, said Isabella County Sheriff Leo Mioduszewski. Investigators determined Cheryl Reen was shot at least two times with a handgun. Cheryl Reen, whose name is listed in a past CMU directory, worked as an administrative secretary for the School of Health Sciences as recently as 2005. It was not clear whether she was working for the university at the time of her death. CMU Human resources officials did not provide any information regarding her current employment status as of Sunday evening. Reen is also charged with felony firearm possession. He

has asked for a court-appointed attorney to represent him. A date for Reen’s next court appearance will likely be set some- Gary John Reen time this week, Mioduszewski said. The alleged homicide stemmed from a domestic dispute at the home, about a mile and a half north of the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort, 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd. “They were having marital problems at the time,” Mioduszewski said. Sheriff’s deputies and Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police

arrived at the scene 6:57 p.m Friday after Reen turned himself in. Investigators from the Michigan State Police Crime Lab arrived later from Bridgeport to process the scene and collect any evidence. Their 15-year-old son was also staying at the residence prior to the incident. The teenager, who was inside the home at the time of the alleged shooting, has since been turned over to other family members. “He didn’t know what was going on,” Mioduszewski said. “ Beyond marital problems, a clearer motive behind the alleged homicide has not yet been determined. Reen is sayA murder | 2A

jake may/photo editor

Isabella County Sheriff Leo Mioduszewski, left, walks past police tape to joins members of the sheriff’s department at the scene of a homicide at 7120 E. River Road. Gary John Reen, 56, has been charged by prosecutors with open murder. “Homicides in Isabella County are very rare,” Mioduszewski said.

Attorney general supports prosecutors’ questions concerning marijuana law By Jordan Spence Staff Reporter

Local prosecutors are receiving support from the state level in their desire to clarify the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act. In the Isabella County case, Prosecutor Larry Burdick filed an appeal against Compassionate Apothecary challenging the legality of caregiver and patient transfers. Schuette filed papers supporting that case last week. “We welcome the attorney general’s input into the case,” Burdick said. “I think he’s taking the correct position on this issue.” Burdick’s appeal stems from the case State of Michigan v. McQueen, in which Isabella County Judge Paul Chamberlain ruled in favor of Brandon McQueen, owner of the dispensary that now operates as C.A. of Mount Pleasant, 311 W. Michigan St. Chamberlain stated the profits of the owners are legal because they fall under their role as caregivers. However, Schuette is supporting Burdick and argues dispensaries cannot

paige calamari/staff photographer

Harrison senior Nathan Heath participates in a limbo contest during Relay For Life Saturday night at the Indoor Athletic Complex. The event marked Heath’s fifth consecutive year attending Relay For Life. The event, which is the largest fundraiser for the American Cancer Society, attracted numerous students and community members to remember loved ones, support those in the fight, honor survivors and stand up against cancer.

Run for their lives Student groups, families raise money for cancer in relay event By Mike Nichols Senior Reporter

Relay For Life participants came together over the weekend to show people living with cancer they are not alone in the battle. Registered student organization Colleges Against Cancer hosted its seventh annual Relay For Life event, a fundraiser bringing volunteers to walk in

support of the American Cancer Society, from 10 a.m. on Saturday to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Hundreds walked laps inside the Indoor Athletic Center’s Jack Skoog Indoor Track. “It’s supposed to symbolize that cancer never sleeps, so neither shall we,” said Newport senior Andrea Wight, who served as the team development cochairwoman. Fifty-nine groups of RSOs, families and others raised just less than $10,000, bringing the total amount raised for the cause since September at CMU to $43,727.99. Katie Bosscher, associate director of the mid-Michigan

cm-life.com Watch our video coverage of the event! ACS office, said she was very proud of the job CMU has done with Relay For Life. She said the money raised has funded cancer research from 44 Nobel Laureates and has made an important impact in the lives of cancer patients. “We’ve upped our number of survivors to 360 a year and our goal is to reach 1000 over the next 20 years,” Bosscher said. “Events like (Relay For Life) will help us get to that goal.” Lapeer junior Billy Sanders

and Bronson junior Jonathan Milliman wore the medals of cancer survivors. Both developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia at age 4 and were pronounced cancer-free three years later. When they became roommates their freshman year, they were each shocked to learn the other had survived the same cancer. Milliman said he was thankful to see so many people donating to help fund the research that had saved their lives. “It’s sweet that so many students came out here for such a good cause,” he said. “Kids have

operate as a for-profit organization under the medical marijuana law, which was approved by Larry Burdick Michigan voters in the November 2008 election. Burdick said Schuette’s assistance is just another voice in the issue and he does not expect it to delay the case. “I’m not too worried about the change in the appeal,” McQueen said. “I don’t think it will end up hurting our business or patients either.” Schuette spokeswoman Joy Yearout said the attorney general chose to support the appeals because he wants to do all he can for those trying to protect public safety. She said because the laws are vague, they tie the hands of prosecutors. “The attorney general can offer a broader perspective on the cases,” Yearout said. “There are certain common sense public safety laws that are in effect that

A LAw | 2A

Don’t miss ... NEWS

SPORTS

w EDITORIAL: Who to vote for in this year’s SGA election?, 4A

w Part 2 of the Q&A with Ernie Zeigler, 1B

w Dean Pamela Gates wins CMU’s Woman of the Year, 5A

w Men’s track & field takes first in Toledo, 3B

A relay | 2A

A p ril s h o w ers ?

Snow, slush cause sharp increase in car accidents Smashed vehicles, downed electrical lines among effects By Orrin Shawl Staff Reporter

Unexpected winter weather caused a spike in accidents throughout the Mount Pleasant Area Sunday. A fallen tree totaled two cars and tore an electrical wire from a house at about 3 p.m. at 1025 Washington St. There were no injuries reported from the incident. Tecumseh junior Ann Travis, who lives at the home,

compared the experience to watching the film “War of the Worlds.” “We thought the world was ending,” Travis said. “Sirens were going off and I was about ready to see Tom Cruise and (Dakota Fanning). You never know how close to death you can be until a tree falls on your car.” Travis owned a Black PT Cruiser that was wrecked by the tree. An Audi A4 belonging to Rockford sophomore Kalyn Langfeldt was also damaged. Troy senior Lew Price said he and his roommates were not around when it happened.

“We pulled in five minutes after it happened,” Price said. “We saw all of (the emergency personnel) in the backyard and we were wondering, ‘What the hell are they doing?’ As soon as we drove up and saw, we were like, ‘Oh my God.’” One accident during the day occurred on Bluegrass Road about 1 p.m, where a vehicle rolled over and at least one injury was reported. The vehicles involved in the accident were pulled out by Ace Towing, 1504 N. Fancher Ave. Within the 3-to-4-hour period beginning at around

1 p.m., the company pulled out about 40 vehicles, said Tiffany Gepford, office manager at Ace Towing. The company dealt with at least three rollovers, including a few vehicles that hit guard rails on the expressway. “At one point, we had about 17 calls. We were very busy today,” Gepford said. “People were surprisingly patient and willing to wait.” A shift supervisor at the Mount Pleasant Police Department did not have information on the number of reported accidents and declined comment. metro@cm-life.com

Sean Proctor/staff photographer

A tree fell on an Audi A4 owned by Rockford sophomore Kalyn Langfeldt and a PT Cruiser owned by Tecumseh junior Ann Travis around 3 p.m. on Sunday at 1025 Washington St. Travis, who was outside cleaning off another car nearby, said it was like “War of the Worlds.” “You never know how close to death you can be until a tree falls on your car,” she said. “It was so surreal.”

91 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice


2A || Monday, April 4, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR

Law | continued from 1A

MONDAY w A TurningPoint (Clickers) & PowerPoint presentation for intermediate and advanced users will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. in Park Library room 413. w A session on Fifteen Strategies to Re-energize Mid-Career Teachers will take place from 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Charles V. Park Library 413. w A Griffin Policy Forum on Judicial Selection will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Powers Hall Ballroom. TUESDAY w A Graphic Design 2011 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the University Art Gallery, Main Gallery and West Gallery. w The Impress the Recruiter at Teacher Fair will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Auditorium.

should be followed.” In the separate Oakland County case — State of Michigan v. Redden — Schuette filed a brief with the Michigan Supreme Court arguing unregistered users of marijuana

Relay | continued from 1A

better medical research and a better chance of surviving now.” For Wight, the most emotional part of the event was when the crowd gathered for the Luminaria ceremony at 9:30 p.m. on Saturday. Decorated bags filled with glow sticks lined the course, each with the name of a cancer victim written on it. Wight said each bag represented the light of a person no longer with us. CMU alumna and cancer survivor Angela Emond shared her story and thanked the crowd for its commitment to cancer victims. “Darkness has a weakness: even a single candle is enough to hold it back,” Emond said.

Central Michigan Life

w A Percussion Ensemble will perform from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall.

Editorial Jackie Smith, Editor in Chief Connor Sheridan, Managing Editor Michael L. Hoffman, Student Life Editor Jake Bolitho, Metro Editor Carisa Seltz, University Editor Chelsea Kleven, Lead Designer Aaron McMann, Sports Editor Jake May, Photo Editor Sara Winkler, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor

Corrections

Advertising Shawn Wright, Paige Winans, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers

Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2011 Volume 91, Number 76

Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

[News] should not be able to use a defense under the Medical Marihuana Act against drug possession charges. The brief states unregistered users take advantage of such a defense if they are found in possession of marijuana. Burdick said there has to be a clear direction by the Michigan court system. metro@cm-life.com

“You should know that your love is a candle held bright against the night in their life.” Lynn Simons, mother of recently-deceased CMU student Hannah Simons-Scalise, also spoke, reminding the crowd to remember the joy in the life of each cancer patient. Wight was in tears as she asked the crowd to stand up in memory of the relationships lost to cancer. Most of the crowd, many of whom were also crying, stood when Wight mentioned losing grandparents. They then walked three laps in silence around the bags. “It was so powerful for everyone to see that they’re not alone in this,” she said. “When you see everyone stand like that, you really know why you’re here.” studentlife@cm-life.com

murder | continued from 1A

ing little to investigators, the sheriff said. The incident is the third reported murder in the Mount Pleasant area in the past year. On July 10, 25-year-old Iva Joy Fuller’s body was found in a field off of Remus Road near Nottawa Road on the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Reservation. Her brother, Daniel Lawrence Fuller, has been indicted on federal murder charges. Three days later, Kim “Kemp” Luchie, 25, was shot to death by Shepherd resident Justin Joel Luckhardt at The Cabin, 930 W. Broomfield St. Luckhardt later shot and killed himself after a high-speed police chase. “Homicides in Isabella County are very rare,” Mioduszewski said. metro@cm-life.com

cm-life.com/category/news


3A

Central Michigan Life

Monday, April 4, 2011

In focus

TOP: St. Clair Shores sophomore Laura Trombley, 20, dances with attitude among her friends in the middle of a dance circle to Christina Aguilera’s “Genie in a Bottle” at Prom 2011: ‘90s Flashback on Friday night in Woldt Hall. “You just can’t be afraid to make a fool of yourself and get into it,” she said. ABOVE: New Baltimore sophomore Katie Webb, 19, kisses her boyfriend Nick Fedore, a 21-year-old Niles junior, as he dips her on the dance floor during the prom. Webb and Fedore have been dating for three months, and met when he stumbled into her room looking for a dance partner. “I didn’t get to go to prom in high school,” Webb said. “This is a second chance, and it’s just fantastic.”

Prom me baby, one more time Students relive popular high school pasttime Story by Randi Shaffer | Senior Reporter Residents of Fabiano, Emmons and Woldt halls got the chance to experience or relive a classic high school Friday night at “Prom 2011: ‘90s Flashback.” Bay City senior Brad Bender, a resident assistant in Emmons Hall, said he organized the event as a hall program. “My goal was to make it even more fun than high school prom,” Bender said.

Photos by Jake May | Photo Editor

Between 125 and 150 CMU students attended “Prom 2011,” which exceeded Bender’s goal of 100. Bender was pleased with the turnout. “I didn’t actually think people were going to show up on time, and I had people show up exactly at 8:30,” he said. “I’ve never had a program where some people have shown up at the exact time we started. That blew

me away.” Bender said he realized many staff members and residents in the FEW area never went to their high school prom, and several did not even have the opportunity to go. After four months of planning and five hours of setup, a team of residents and staff members pulled the event together into a three-and-a-half-hour formal gala.

continued on 5A

Commerce Township freshman Madison Bartelt whips her hair around in circles in an open space by herself to Willow Smith’s “Whip My Hair” at the Prom 2011: ’90s Flashback Friday in Woldt Hall.

Manistee sophomore Kaylyn Lavender, left, reaches for the hand of boyfriend Zachery Drake, a Petoskey senior, while the two dance silhouetted against the lights lining the wall at Prom 2011: ‘90s Flashback, Friday night, in Woldt Hall.


voices Central Michigan Life

4A

Monday, April 4, 2011

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

[cm-life.com/voices]

Editorial Board: Jackie Smith, Editor

in

Chief | Connor Sheridan, Managing Editor | Brad Canze, News Copy Chief

Carisa Seltz, University Editor | Jake Bolitho, Metro Editor | Aaron McMann, Sports Editor | Michael L. Hoffman, Student Life Editor

EDITORIAL | SGA’s next elected leaders’ ideas should represent the student body at large

Ben Lambright Columnist

Fighting ADHD? I have ADHD but have performed strongly in college. So a few weeks ago I wrote a column on dealing with ADHD and college life. Now a new study, which has been widely reported, has brought an important new component of life with ADHD to my attention: food. Norwegian researchers found as many as 60 percent of children diagnosed with ADHD could be suffering from an acute hypersensitivity to certain foods. Among the food cited by the Norwegian study and others are: food dyes (red 40, yellow 5, etc.), caffeine and other heavily processed foods — especially sugars. When I read the reports it dawned on me that me that I take in very little of these types of foods and that could have played a major role in my success. In fact, aside from my morning coffee, I take in almost none of those types of foods. So, as much as I’d like to say my methods for coping were the key factor in overcoming some of my challenges, it would be wrong for me not to point out dietary considerations. But just like taking notes, studying in a quiet place or unplugging your computer to avoid its distraction, this method for coping with ADHD comes with great side effects. Eating less processed foods has been linked to a number of health benefits including reduced risk of diabetes, heart attack, weight loss, looking younger longer and increased energy. Furthermore, in the Norwegian study, subjects who changed their diets saw dramatic improvement in just five weeks. Many even reported a complete alleviation of all ADHD symptoms. The FDA has yet to confirm the research done in the Norwegian study and cautions against an overreaction to its findings. However, for someone struggling with ADHD, there is no good reason not to take to it seriously. Make the change for two months and see how your life improves. All you have to lose is a few pounds of fat and a few percentage points from your risk of serious health issues.

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805 Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received.

Vote Cavataio/English

Nathan Inks Columnist

B

ecause students are particularly apathetic to changes on campus, it is important to elect leaders who will bring the Student Government Association to the forefront, and those leaders are Shelby Township senior Vincent Cavataio and Jackson junior Bryant English.

The Cavataio/English ticket has what it takes to help make the SGA relevant to the student body again. Like the opposing candidates, Grand Blanc junior Robert Brooks and Brighton sophomore Colleen McNeely, who are running for president and vice president respectively, Cavataio and English want to create a unicameral legislature for the SGA that would be comprised of students who actually want to be involved. The change would mean a representative from every registered student organization on campus would not be required to attend the SGA meetings to receive funding from the Student Budget Allocation Committee. But unlike Brooks and McNeely, the Cavataio ticket wants to make the change from a bicameral legislature gradually instead of enacting immediate change. Cavataio told members of the Editorial Board he would wait until the fall semester to tackle the issue of the legislature by forming a committee that would find the best way to implement the change for spring in 2012. This would ensure that not only the transition is as seamless as possible, but also that the most dedicated students are involved.

Bottled water ban would do little good

perry fish/staff photographer

Student Government Association presidential candidate and Shelby Township senior Vincent Cavataio, left, and vice presidential candidate and Jackson junior Bryant English after announcing their bids for the positions on March 24.

Cavataio and English seem to be more concerned with understanding what the student body wants as a whole. Two of the primary legs of the Brooks/McNeely campaign are a bicycle-sharing program and increasing the amount of work-study jobs. While both of those are solid ideas, the bike-share concept has been shelved for more than a year because of the difficulty of implementing such a program. As for increasing work-

study programs at CMU, few would argue that it is a bad idea, but it is not an issue SGA has any control over. McNeely herself pointed out that the final decision rests with university administrators during the March 31 Live Chat streamed on www. cm-life.com. Cavataio and English also said they would like to increase academic input from students regarding courses offered in certain programs and increase diversity awareness on campus by

adding employee training for gender identity. SGA has had several large accomplishments over the past year, primarily the formation of a pro bono legal clinic and the passing of legislation in support of gender-neutral housing, which Cavataio co-authored with McNeely. It is clear if any candidate has the experience to lead the SGA the way it needs to be led and do what it takes to make it a stronger force for change, it is him.

KIM PATISHNOCK [CENTRAL SQUARE]

[your voice] Comments in response to “Central Michigan University needs to capitalize on its opportunity for a creative writing master of fine arts program” Michmediaperson - March 31z While I’m against the Medical School, this creative writing idea isn’t going to create jobs and get people ready for job openings in Michigan. With the limited amount of tax dollars available, we should be offering more programs in high tech, IT, health-related (not medical school), business, etc. So, we don’t have to bring in foreigners from India, the Phillipines and Parts Unknown to fill job vacancies throughout the state! Creative writing isn’t going to create jobs! Or, get students ready for tomorrow’s jobs! By the way, if the professors want it bad enough, why do

Central Michigan Life is the independent voice of Central Michigan University and is edited and published by students of CMU every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and on Wednesday during the summer term. The online edition (www.cmlife.com) contains all of the material published in print.

they need any money? They teach what 2 courses a week and a couple hours in the office. Why don’t they volunteer their time to have a Master’s course in Creative Writing? Teach an extra course or two for free. Another 10 hours a week for class and office time still will be within the 40-hour work week. Without sounding like Nike, Just Do It! Andrew D Devenne, in reply to Michmediaperson - March 31 “They teach what 2 courses a week and a couple hours in the office. Why don’t they volunteer their time to have a Master’s course in Creative Writing? Teach an extra course or two for free. Another 10 hours a week for class and office time still will be within the 40-hour work week. Without sounding like Nike, Just Do It! “ You don’t have any idea

Central Michigan Life is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of CMU or its employees. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association,

what you are talking about, so maybe when you figure out how much work a professor actually puts in to a given week of the semester, you can come back and lecture people on gratis labor.

they are, they’re slow learners. I’d love to come to CMU and teach the professors on time management. Of course, I’ll bill my time to typical professor consulting fees. Anytime, Andrew. Anytime.

Michmediaperson, in reply to Andrew D Devenney - April 1

happyfamily, in reply to Michmediaperson - April 1

Andrew, once a professor puts his or her power point presentation or lecture notes together, that’s good for the next 20 years. Find them in the file at 9:45 a.m. and off to class at 10 a.m. Let’s look at the history professor. Has World War II history changed in the last 20 years? Did Pearl Harbor not get attacked on 12-7-41? For the accounting professor, have debits and credits changed? Of course, not. I don’t see how any professor could possibly spend 40 hours focusing only on their actual two classes a week. If

You may be correct in saying that there aren’t a lot of creative writing jobs, but you’re also being too narrowminded about other ways a person could benefit from such a degree. Creative writers tend to be competent communicators and deep thinkers, who are very capable of identifying problems and developing useful ways to solve them. That said, these skills are appreciated in MANY jobs, not just creative writing jobs. Maybe we need more creative writing majors to rescue the world from the pit of despair it’s currently falling into.

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implied value of 75 cents. Non-university subscriptions are $1 per mailed edition. Copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life or its online edition (www.cm-life.com) are available for purchase at: http://reprints.cm-life.com. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices

They are all over campus, on doors, bulletin boards, and vending machines, I’m talking about those Take Back the Tap stickers. The principles behind Take Back the Tap are simple: the organization claims bottled water is not safer than tap water, it is more expensive and it hurts the environment, so we should remove the option to purchase bottled water from CMU’s campus. In an interview with CM Life last semester, Sam Schleich, the TBTT president at CMU, said, “There is no good reason to have bottled water on campus.” But is this really true? To determine the validity of this statement, the question needs to be asked, “Why do CMU students buy bottled water on campus?” The answer is not that they prefer buying vending machine water bottles. From a financial standpoint, this does not make sense. Vending machine water costs more than buying a case of bottled water at the grocery store and bringing that to campus. Most students will only buy bottled water on campus for one of three reasons: they suddenly got thirsty and want water for class, they usually bring bottled water to class but forgot it or they usually bring a reusable bottle of water and forgot that. So what will happen if CMU eliminates bottled water from its vending machines, and students still get thirsty on campus? On paper, the proposal seems like a good idea; in today’s era of wanting to “go green,” a large portion of students would probably say they would use drinking fountains instead. But this raises another question: why are you buying a bottle of water now when you can get water for free? The reason is because students want to be able to drink in class. Sure, some students will just go to the drinking fountain and get a quick drink. But the majority of the students buying water bottles do not want a “quick drink,” otherwise they would have just gone to the drinking fountain in the first place. Instead, most students will go to the vending machine and buy a bottled soft drink. This not only leads to plastic bottles still being used, but it leads to students choosing a less healthy beverage option. During a recent discussion on the elimination of bottled water, a friend of mine put it well: “You still use the damn plastic!” Instead of eliminating bottled water, which will do little to help the environment, TBTT should advocate for more recycling and help educate students on why recycling is important. This allows for students to decide for themselves whether or not they will purchase bottled water, while still helping the environment. If bottled water sales are eliminated, would CMU see a reduction in plastic bottles being used? Yes, but for the most part, the drop would not be significant. It is not the university’s place to restrict what kind of otherwise-legal beverages are offered on campus, and if there is a demand for water, water should be sold.

are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 4, 2011 || 5A

[News] w o m a n o f t h e y ear

Pamela Gates named to honor at CMU Dean keeps active in mentoring administration By Darnell Gardner Staff Reporter

Pamela Gates has carried several titles since coming to CMU as a graduate student in 1989. Now, she can add “Woman of the Year� to the list. Gates, dean of the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences, was presented with the Woman of the Year award by the CMU branch of the Michigan American Council on Education Network for Women Leaders in Higher Education. “It’s amazing,� Gates said. “You don’t do things because you expect to receive an honor, you do things because you love your work and believe in what you do.� Though Gates has been involved with CMU for 20 years, it was not always her plan to root her life in the education system. She did not initially intend to go to college at all, she said, but a fateful family move to Arizona altered her perspective. “I never even planned on going to college,� she said.

jake may/photo editor

Detroit senior Ashley Watters laughs as she dances with Steve Wincent, a Brooklyn senior, Friday night in Woldt Hall during Prom 2011: ’90s Flashback.

prom |

ized frames, a disk jockey playing `90s music, punch and thematic decorations. The free dance was open to all CMU students and designed to be as inclusive as possible. Plastic tiaras and paper crowns were available underneath a sign saying, “Everybody is prom king and queen.� Roommates Anna Mamassian, a Troy sophomore, and Negaunee junior Helen Collins came to “Prom 2011� to check out the festivities. “It was just something that we saw in the poster in the lobby and thought would be fun,� Collins said. “It’s an excuse to dress up.� The pair of friends went together wearing formal dresses and matching origami corsages and boutonnieres.

continued from 3A

“It’s a lot of fun, everyone there is just having a good time,� Emmons RA Grace Knoche said. “It’s already going wonderfully.� The New Baltimore senior helped Bender plan “Prom 2011� by advertising, deciding how to spend the $1,990 allocated by Residence Hall Assembly and setting up the event. “It’s just a great way for residents as well as the staff to have a good time together,� Knoche said. “Also, because people didn’t get to go to prom, or they didn’t have a good time at prom, so this gives them a second chance.� “Prom 2011� featured a photo station with custom-

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old.â&#x20AC;? Monica Holmes, professor of business information systems, has known Gates for years. She said Gates has always been a strong proponent of women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She has always supported our initiatives,â&#x20AC;? Holmes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think she does her job very well.â&#x20AC;?

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award. Beyond her work as a dean, Gates mentors women in the Mount Pleasant community fighting breast cancer. She is a survivor of the disease and her history with it reaches back to her childhood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My own mother died of breast cancer at 41,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has been a part of my life since I was about 12 years

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I moved to a place where they expected all of their students to go to college.â&#x20AC;? Gates said she has seen a great deal of positive change in how women are treated since entering the highereducation workforce, though some work remains for women to get equal footing with men. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I came through a period of time where there were few women in terms of professors and administrators,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always had the education, credentials and fortitude for the work (but) we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always given the opportunities.â&#x20AC;? Gates is known for her role in helping out CMU faculty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her track record of mentoring and teaching others definitely stands out,â&#x20AC;? said Amy McGinnis, co-chairwoman of the committee that chose Gates for the

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6A || Monday, April 4, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

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[News]

22nd annual Pow wow brings tribes together for tradition, celebration Visitors observe culture through drumming, singing, dancing By Kurt Nagl Staff Reporter

victoria zegler/staff photographer

Sutton Bay resident James “Bud” Day, 30, performs the men’s Grass Dance with members of his group on Saturday night at the 22nd annual CMU Pow wow in the CMU Events Center. “It’s not everyday you get to sing and dance,” he said.

Drumbeats and singing sounded through the Events Center on Saturday as hundreds gathered to celebrate American Indian culture. The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe and several others participated in dances and drummed all Saturday and Sunday at the 22nd annual CMU Pow wow. The event gave American Indians the opportunity to celebrate tradition, visit with family and friends, make

new acquaintances, and trade arts and crafts. It also offered visitors a chance to learn and participate in the traditions. Dressed in cultural regalia, some in beads, feathers and headdresses, tribe members stepped and swayed to the spiritual music during the Grand Entry of the tribes. More than just dancing took place on the stage. For people like Rob Wanageshik, powwows are a way to show respect for elders and pave the way for youth. “I dance for the people who have went before me, the ones who can’t dance and the ones who will come forward still,” said the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa tribe member. “I also want others to learn about

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this tradition instead of having stereotypes.” Wayland resident Cathy Moore, a member of the Gun Lake Tribe, has attended powwows across the U.S. and Canada for several years. This was her fifth year coming to CMU. “I enjoy not only the dancing, but the tradition and companionship,” she said. “I follow the drum. The drum is the heartbeat.” Head Veteran George Martin led the tribes holding the Eagle Staff, which represents American Indian nations in contemporary times, during the reverent flag song. Stands selling American Indian arts, crafts and accessories lined the walls outside of the stadium. Incense, jewelry, moccasins

and paintings were among the most popular items sold. Planning committee member Sara Shawano said the CMU Pow wow has always seen a good turnout, but this year might have been the largest yet. “There seem to be more visitors and dancers this year,” the Petoskey junior said. “I think it’s because there’s been more advertising for it.” She said the Pow wow has been a tradition for years, bringing together the entire Central Michigan area. “It gives people a chance to socialize in a different way,” Shawano said. “It’s a way to keep in contact with the culture.” university@cm-life.com


B

CM-LIFe.com | Check the website for the latest SportsLine

spring football Rash of injuries to the offensive line provides opportunities for younger players, 2B

sports

Monday, April 4, 2011

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CMU takes series against Ohio Jake Sabol pitches shutout Sunday By Anthony Fenech Senior Reporter

In the week’s time since Central Michigan starting pitcher Jake Sabol was chased in the third inning of last Saturday’s start against Miami, the senior right-hander decided to go back to the drawing board. “I watched a lot of film trying to rebound from my last outing,” he said. “I wasn’t really getting on top of the ball

Zeigler: Winning season goal for ‘11-’12

or throwing a good Game 1: W, 9-3 two-seam fastball Game 2: L, 6-5 and I was trying to blow people away.” Game 3: W, 9-0 And the tale of the tape was evident on Sunday, in the rubber game of a weekend series against Ohio, as Sabol pitched the Chippewas to a series victory in a 9-0 blanking of the Bobcats at Bob Wren Stadium in Athens, Ohio. CMU jumped on top of Ohio early, scoring runs in each of its first six innings, while Sabol threw an effective two-seam fastball — limiting the Bobcats to only six hits — and didn’t try to overpower

the Ohio lineup, striking out four with a walk. “I thought the work really paid off,” he said. “I stayed focus, threw a lot of twoseam fastballs and made them put the ball in play a lot.” The complete game shutout was the first of his collegiate career. “I’m proud of him,” said Chippewas head coach Steve Jaksa. “He executed the game plan we set up for him and did a great job.” Offensively, CMU (12-17, 2-4 MidAmerican Conference) scored in every

JOEL HAWKSLEY/ohio athletics

A series | 2b

Tyler Hall celebrates following CMU’s win against Ohio Sunday. The Chippewas won two of three games against the Bobcats over the weekend to win their first conference series.

s p r i n g p r a c t ic e

Learning the ropes Freshman QB Alex Niznak makes transition from high school to DI football

By John Manzo | Staff Reporter

Freshman quarterback Alex Niznak didn’t head to the locker room with the majority of his teammates following Saturday’s spring practice. Instead, the 6-foot, 220-pound freshman stretched, talked with former Central Michigan quarterback Brian Brunner and then grabbed a football and continued to throw. He was one of the last Chippewas to vacate the Indoor Athletic Complex’s TurfBay. “I like the type of worker he is — he pays attention to deal,” said firstyear quarterbacks coach and passing game coordinator Morris Watts. “He’s always trying to learn, and things will happen for guys that are hard workers and trying to learn the right way. It’s just a matter of when he gets his chance.”

Sports Editor Aaron McMann and Senior Reporter Andrew Stover sat down with Central Michigan men’s basketball head coach Ernie Zeigler last week to talk about last season, the status of the program, what needs to be happen next season and much more. Here is Part 2 of the interview: Andrew Stover: Dave Heeke obviously has confidence in you. He gave you a big extension last year. How has your conversation with them been proactive toward righting the ship and continuing strong recruiting classes in the future? EZ: We speak weekly, we’re neighbors. I’m very fortunate I have the relationship I have, with him being my boss first and foremost and us being friends as well. He has expectations that I have to get this done. That’s the top and bottom line. I don’t run from that. He understands, at the same time, what we had in the challenges ahead. It’s been a process. We’re quickly approaching the point now where it’s time to have some sucErnie Zeigler cess. We started five years ago with probably one of the worst facilities in our conference. We opened year five and now we’re in the top tier in terms of basketball facilities. That’s no longer a crutch or excuse. With us being able to have the ability to go out and do some things from a recruiting standpoint for our assistants and student-athletes, the expectation now is to win. I love the fact that we have people that are passionate about men’s basketball that are upset we lost 21 games this year. Trust me, there’s no one more upset than I. I live it and breathe it every day in every one of those 21 losses and, more importantly, every one of the 90 losses that I have accumulated here as the head coach over the last five years. I think it would be worse if no one cared. That’s what fuels me, in terms of what Dave Heeke and Dr. Ross expect of me. We’re looking forward to getting this thing going in the right direction. We have the foundation set.

andrew kuhn/staff photographer

Niznak graduated in December — a full six months before the rest of his class — from Ithaca High School to have an opportunity to enroll at CMU for the spring semester and join the football team for spring practice. In his attempt to adapt to the college level, he realizes that this isn’t Ithaca and that he’s enrolled at a Division 1 university. “It’s been interesting,” Niznak said about the transition. “It’s definitely different coming from Division 6 high school football to Division 1 college football. There’s definitely going to be some wrinkles in the learning curve and it’ll take time just getting used to everybody.” And getting used to everybody is eventually going to come along. In fact, junior quarterback Ryan Radcliff, sophomore quarterback A.J. Westendorp and Watts have already made a huge impact in the development of the young quarterback. The three of them have taught Niznak that the mistakes will come, a natural process for any true freshman. “Once we got out here and began practicing it’s been a flow, because it’s easier to be taught, look at it in your room and then come out and actually practice it,” Niznak said. They also taught him to be patient. He’s realizing that the speed of the game is quite the change

A ERNIE | 4B

Freshman quarterback Alex Niznak throws practice prior to the CMU football team’s first spring scrimmage on Saturday at the Indoor Athletic Complex. Niznak, who graduated early from Ithaca High School, is fighting for a spot on the team’s quarterback depth chart.

A NIZNAK | 2B

g y m n a s t ic s

Mistakes doom Chippewas at Ala. regional CM Life Staff Reports

Small mistakes cost the No. 25 ranked Central Michigan gymnastics team on Saturday as it finished sixth in the Tuscaloosa, Ala., region, failing to qualify for the NCAA nationals. Ending the meet with a 195.075, the Chippewas, the fifth seed in the meet, finished in last behind No. 1 Alabama (197.275), No. 14 Illinois (195.925), No. 11 Penn State (195.850), No. 22 Auburn(195.600) and unranked Kentucky (195.600). Needing to finish in the top two spots in order to qualify for the

next round, CMU missed the No. 2 spot by .850 points. The Chippewas began the meet with a bye, but competed in the bars in the first rotation and scored a 48.575. Senior Andrea de La Garza led the team with a 9.800, finishing 10th in the event. Freshman Alyssa Wilson also posted a 9.725 in the event. The balance beam was the second rotation for CMU, where junior Kristin Teubner (9.800), de La Garza (9.775) and freshman Emily Heinz (9.775) led the squad to a total of 48.825 points. The third rotation pitted the

Chippewas on the floor exercise. A strong event for the team as of late, averaging scores of 48.800 this season, the team finished below average Saturday with a 48.775. De La Garza again led the squad with a 9.800, which was good enough again for the No. 10 spot. The final rotation saw CMU finish on the vault, where sophomore Brittney Taylor claimed the No. 7 spot with her team-leading 9.825. Three Chippewas (Meaghan McWhorter, Teubner and de La Garza) posted matching 9.775 scores. De La Garza and Taylor were the

top finishers in the all-around category for CMU, with de la Garza leading the team with a 39.150, good enough for No. 8 overall. Taylor posted a season-high 39.025 which placed her at No. 12 overall. The Chippewas ended their 2011 campaign with a 23-6 overall record and perfect 12-0 mark in the Mid-American Conference. Winning the regular season title and conference tournament, the team also qualified for their third consecutive NCAA regional tournament. sports@cm-life.com

file photo by paige calamari

Brittany Petzold performs on the vault during the MAC Championships.

PROJECT 989 INTERVIEWS JAROD TRICE I CM-LIFE.COM

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Aaron McMann, Sports Editor | sports@cm-life.com | 989.774.3169

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2B || Monday, April 4, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Injuries on the offensive line allow Fantuzzi, others to step up he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know what Weaver, Olson and Keyton are going to do, but they also need reps to get better. But these other guys have been forced into action and are getting more work against our first defense.â&#x20AC;? Fantuzzi is one of those guys who has had the opportunity and he plans to make the most out of it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every rep I get, I have to take advantage of,â&#x20AC;? Fantuzzi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every rep I learn something new, especially since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve moved so many positions and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m now playing center. I just have to get every rep in that I can because with these reps Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting the experience that I need.â&#x20AC;? The junior offensive lineman from Macomb Dakota High School has been a part of winning tradition. During his time at Dakota, Fantuzzi won backto-back Division 1 state championships. However, winning in high school is different. He thought he knew it all coming into his first spring in 2009, but quickly realized that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a major dif-

continued from 1B

sports@cm-life.com

Griffin Policy Forum

.POEBZ "QSJM rQNrPowers Hall Ballroom

Panelists: File Photo by Joe Tobianski

Freshman Alex Niznak rushes past Monroe St. Mary Catholic Central senior defensive back Edmond Shinevarre in during the MSHAA Division 6 State Championship game on Nov. 26 at Ford Field. Niznak led Ithaca to a 45-35 win, during which he set a MHSAA state record with five rushing touchdowns.

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Kelly Keenan, Owner, Keenan Consulting The Robert and Majorie Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government.

CMU is an AA/EO institution (see cmich.edu/aaeo). For more information or request accomodations, contact 989-774-3341.

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a 9-3 victory. The senior infielder laid off a first-pitch breaking ball in the dirt before lacing a letter-high fastball over the center field fence for his second home run of the year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a huge at-bat in a big situation,â&#x20AC;? Jaksa said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was looking for one pitch, got it and kept it going with a big hit.â&#x20AC;? Junior left-hander Trent Howard pitched seven innings for the win. Faiman recorded a pair of hits in each game of the series victory, going 6-for-15 with four runs scored and five driven in. The Chippewas have won three out of four game and host Michigan on Wednesday at Theunissen Stadium. First pitch is scheduled for 3:05 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting in a good place,â&#x20AC;? Sabol said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing well and have to continue to play well so we get back in the hunt.â&#x20AC;?

Moderator John Lindstrom

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Rest of the series CMU dropped Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sandwich game, 6-5, committing four errors behind starting pitcher Zach Cooper. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The guys didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play great defensively,â&#x20AC;? Jaksa said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you Steve Jaksa as much.â&#x20AC;? Cooper struck out six in five-plus innings and Faiman had two hits. In Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opener, Tom Howard broke an eighth-inning tie with a three-run, pinch-hit home run, propelling the Chippewas to

sports@cm-life.com

Honorable William C. Whitbeck

Executive Director, Michigan Campaign Finance Network

Justice, Michigan Supreme Court

E . CA MPUS D R

In the series, Russell hit .500 (6-for-12) with five doubles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pretty happy with where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at,â&#x20AC;? Jaksa said of Russell, who has emerged as the Chippewas utmost power threat, leading the team in home runs (3), RBI (21) and slugging percentage (.483).

be redshirted this season â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but one year it could be his team. And when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that time, expect Niznak to take what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learned, but ultimately still be himself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One day, eventually when I get a chance, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be about Alex Niznak,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not trying to be like Ryan or Dan LeFevour or anything. I just have to go out and do what I do.â&#x20AC;?

Rich Robinson

WASHINGTON

productive career at CMU. For now, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to continue to learn from the other quarterbacks and the staff. He wants to execute his fundamentals and focus on the simple things. Eventually, he hopes, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be the one teaching. The 2011 season may or may not be his opportunity to see a large amount of playing time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; head coach Dan Enos said it is still up in the air whether he will

Honorable Marilyn Kelly

R. SD

inning except the seventh, recorded 16 hits and hit two solo home runs. After the Chippewas scored a run each in the first two innings, senior outfielder Matt Faiman homered to right field in the fourth, his second of the season, and junior outfielder Scott Phillion homered to left field in the fifth. The five-run cushion halfway home was more than enough for Sabol, who needed 104 pitches to complete his first game since Feb. 28 of last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just a real good baseball game for us today,â&#x20AC;? Jaksa said. Sophomore second baseman Jordan Dean had four hits and two stolen bases, and junior outfielder Sam Russell continued his hot hitting, smacking two doubles.

said about last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spring practices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This spring we know them and just have to go out and run them. We tweak them all, but we still know them all now.â&#x20AC;?

Should Michigan Change the Way We Select Judges?

R. US D W. C AMP

continued from 1B

how rough and tough it is.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now in the midst of his third spring, and said that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting used to it, especially now that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a full year under Enos and his staff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every practice they were putting in a different play,â&#x20AC;? Fantuzzi

Northwinds Apts.

series |

ference from high school to college. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I came here in my first spring, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know anything,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought I knew everything, coming from Dakota, but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know anything. I found out how fast the game is and

And Justice For All?

Niznak from high school to a Division 1 university. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In high school I was a huge competitor and I could do all these things, but at CMU I may be going a million miles an hour, but that just might not be fast enough.â&#x20AC;? Niznak has been a part of a lot of success in his football career. He helped lead the Yellowjackets to a perfect 14-0 season and Division 6 state championship season at Ford Field in Detroit, in which he set a state championship record with five rushing touchdowns. We know this much â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he knows what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to be a winner. Coming out of high school, he is arguably CMUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most highly-regarded newcomer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You never know how far a guy is going to go based on potential, until theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re put in that spot,â&#x20AC;? Watts said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see a lot of potential in him, but potential is one thing. Taking that potential and running with it is another. I think he has the attitude to do that.â&#x20AC;? Niznak is in the beginning process of what could be a very

Andrew Kuhn/Staff photographer

Redshirt freshman offensive lineman Andrew Nowak practices with the team during spring practice Saturday at the Indoor Athletic Complex.

Timber Creek Apts.

Injuries can hinder any athletic program in the country, but more times than not there is a silver lining that comes out of it. For the Central Michigan football team, injuries have plagued the offensive line. Junior Jake Olson and sophomore Aaron McCord are coming back from surgery, while junior center Darren Keyton just had surgery and Mike Repovz is coming off an injury that occurred during winter conditioning. Senior offensive linemen Rocky Weaver is also coming off surgery. These linemen are injured and still need reps to continue their improvement, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had time to establish themselves. These recent injuries shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t totally affect CMU in the fall. Most of the players injured now should be fully recovered come August, but the opportunity for others gives CMU its own opportunity: a chance to add much-needed depth to its

roster. Guys like redshirt freshman Kevin Henry and junior Eric Fisher continue to get better. Sophomore Jeff Fantuzzi has been getting a lot of reps and is adapting to different positions along the line. Injuries sustained by Keyton, the projected starting center and junior Nick Reynolds have given Fantuzzi the opportunity to step up and receive reps at center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a unique player,â&#x20AC;? said CMU head coach Dan Enos. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have so much respect for him because of his toughness and the way he comes to work everyday, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting better.â&#x20AC;? A shortage of offensive linemen due to injuries has allowed sophomore Cody Pettit to make the switch from defensive line to offensive. Ironically enough, he got injured Thursday, but Enos said that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been having a great spring up to that point. Enos also said there can be a bit of a silver lining with these injuries because others are getting their opportunity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These reps are very valuable,â&#x20AC;?

CRAWFORD

By John Manzo Staff Reporter

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cm-life.com/category/sports

Track & Field

Men place first in Toledo Randolph confident moving forward after solid showing By Brandon Champion Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s track and field team continues to roll. After posting 17 Top-5 finishes and winning four events last weekend, the Chippewas put together one of their best meets of the year, finishing first out of nine teams over the weekend at the Toledo Collegiate Challenge in Toledo, Ohio. CMU won the meet with 250 points, 85 points more than second-place Buffalo. The men had posted a dominant performance, securing 23 Top-3 finishers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This weekend gave us a lot of confidence moving forward â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we had a lot of solid marks," said director of track and field Willie Randolph. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the same

time, we know we have bigger challenges ahead." J u n i o r jumper Kevin Bacon led the way with two f i r s t - p l a c e Willie Randolph finishes in the long jump and the triple jump. CMU went one and two in both the Javelin throw and the 100 meter dash. Nick Rainy and Tim Reynolds were the Chippewa winners in the javelin, while Ross Parsons and Greg Knaus continued their outdoor season success in the 100-meter. Other first place finishes for the Chippewas included junior Ryan McCullough in the hammer throw, sophomore Alex Rose in the discus and freshman Keith Zech in the 800-meter run. The 4x400m relay team of David Ashcraft, Clay Norman, Christopher Thomas and Par-

sons also finished first. The Chippewas finished two through five in the shot put, led by senior George Flanner, and finished second and third in the pole vault with Adam Lohner taking second and Joseph Jankowski taking third. Other runner up finishes for the Chippewas included Jacob McDonald in the high jump, Ashcraft in the 400m, Clay Noeker in the 110 meter hurdles and Parker Scott in the 400 meter hurdles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think doing well against some of our conference rivals will give us a mental edge,â&#x20AC;? Randolph said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just about placing, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about getting some personal bests, which we had a lot of this weekend.â&#x20AC;? The majority of the team will have next weekend off while a select group of Chippewas will travel to Sacramento, Calif., for the Mid-Major Challenge beginning Thursday. sports@cm-life.com

Imbrock, Heffner lead women CMU places fourth behind EMU, UB, BGSU

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We accomplished what we wanted to do, and that was to focus on taking care of business.â&#x20AC;? Willie Randolph, CMU track and field director

By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan track and field teams had to deal with every kind of weather imaginable at the Toledo Collegiate Challenge. From sun to snow, the women's team finished in a close fourth behind fellow MidAmerican Conference teams Eastern Michigan, Buffalo and Bowling Green. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did fairly well considering we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any distance runners at all,â&#x20AC;? said track and field director Willie Randolph. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were pretty pleased with how the meet turned out. We accomplished what we wanted to do, and that was to focus on taking care of business, so we were very productive.â&#x20AC;? The women had 28 Top-10 finishes at the meet, 17 topfive finishes and two winners. Senior Mykal Imbrock was one of those 17 with a second place finish in the hammer throw, tossing 55.12 meters. Fellow senior Katie Christensen came in 10th with a toss of 44.44 meters. Christensen finished fifth in the discus with a throw of 41.76 meters, while Imbrock came in seventh in the shot put with a throw of 12.56 meters.

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 4, 2011 || 3B

[Sports]

The team of freshmen Samantha Stein and Megan Heffner both placed second in the high jump with leaps of 1.60 meters. Heffner also had success in the 400-meter hurdle, coming in second with a time of 1:03.96. Senior Allie Sissions finished right behind her with a time of 1:04.15. Sissions was also a part of the 4x400-meter relay that finished second with juniors Christina Farrow, Stephanie Hurley and freshmen Shawntoreah Turk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right before the 400-meter hurdles it started raining," Heffner said. "The hardest part was running and trying to keep your eyes open with the raining hitting your eyes." Turk also finished fifth in the 400-meter run two places behind fellow freshmen Kelsey Ritter who came in third at 57.94 seconds. The women dominated the 100-meter hurdles event having four ladies finishing in the top eight. Senior Jordan Dunn placed second while junior Dierra Riley finished third, senior Brittnee Shreve came in fifth and freshmen Kirlene Roberts finished seventh. Shreve, Roberts, Dunn and

Riley teamed up to take first place in the 4x100-meter relay with a time of 46.09. Sophomore Tamica Harbour was the other athlete to finish first, recording a time of 15.34 and edging out teammate Emily Deinhart, who finished second with 15.36. In the 800-meter, junior Charnele Lyons finished fifth with a time of 2:17.16, and senior Kylee Kubacki ran for the first time since cross-country season and finished third in the 1500-meter run with a time of 4:37.87. There were a lot of athletes who stood out this weekend and a couple that came to mind for Randolph. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mykal Imbrock had a really good throw, Jordan Dunn ran a good lap in the 4x100meter relay (and) Tamica Harbour running into hard winds and winning,â&#x20AC;? Randolph said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another good point was Kylee Kubacki, who hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run in four months and ran a personal best in the 1500-meter relay.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team did pretty good and a lot people had really good performances,â&#x20AC;? Heffner added. sports@cm-life.com

Central Michigan Life

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APPLICATIONS DEADLINE: TUESDAY, APRIL 5 â&#x20AC;˘ 5 PM !PPLICATIONSFOR3UMMER&ALLARENOWAVAILABLEATTHE#-,IFEFRONTDESK9OUMUSTBE ENROLLEDASATLEASTAHALF TIMESTUDENTINGOODACADEMICSTANDINGTOBEELIGIBLEFORTHESEPOSITIONS Editor In Chief is responsible for directing the overall news

and editorial operation of the paper. The Editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The Editor has final student authority in decisions and is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Thursday, April 14, 2011 to select the Editor in Chief for CM Life for summer and fall 2011 and the Editor of The Central Review for the 2011-12 academic year. Editor in Chief applications: Fill out the application form online at www.cm-life.com/applications using Adobe Acrobat Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s typeable.PDF version and save. Email this PDF along with a copy of your resume in .PDF format, a Microsoft word document answering the application questions and your letters of recomendation to: hopp1nc@ cmich.edu.

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com, the posting of all news and advertising content, news updates, and the posting and monitoring of feedback. The manager also will work with the staff and publications management in further development of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s features and content, to include pod casting and video content. Understanding of Java Script and journalism needed.

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Softball

Clutch hitting non-existent for CMU in weekend games C

MU softball went 1-3 in its opening weekend against Western Michigan and Northern Illinois, much to do with not capitalizing on opportunities to score. The Chippewasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lone win came Friday against Northern Illinois behind sophomore Kara Dornbosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; complete game, one-run outing to win 5-1. In that game, CMU head coach Margo Jonker talked about how â&#x20AC;&#x153;key hitsâ&#x20AC;? helped the offense. That was the only game where the Chippewas took advantage of their opportunities. Hits all weekend put runners on base, but the timely hitting wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a rough day (Saturday) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; left a lot of runners on base and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the key hit,â&#x20AC;? Jonker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their hitters really hit our pitchers. We played good defense but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have pitching or hitting.â&#x20AC;? The first game was a 8-7 loss because of two WMU swings bringing in six runs. The two-run shot and grand slam hurt CMUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opportunities. The Chippewas left eight runners on that game, including leaving the bases loaded to end the game. As good as this pitching staff is, there are going to be games when umpires shrink the strike zone or a pitcher has an off-day and the offense will need to win. The offense almost did that in the 8-7 loss, but was still one hit short of pulling it off. Junior leftfielder Ashley Gilson struck out swinging to end the game. Gilson, who had recorded a double, left six runners on base during the WMU doubleheader. Last year, Gilson led the team with a .326 average, but this year she has started 0 for her first 18 at bats until she hit the double. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been struggling on offense so it was key for her

Matt Thompson Staff Reporter to get a hit and make a great defensive play,â&#x20AC;? Jonker said of her play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She went over the fence and made a catch.â&#x20AC;? The Chippewas need another player to step up, and if she can get back to her play from last year that featured five homers and 30 hits with 19 runs batted in, it will go a long way for CMU. CMU didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a key hit at all Saturday in the 2-1 and 8-0 losses. In the first game against NIU, the Chippewas left nine runners on base in the one-run loss. That included leaving the bases loaded twice and another time stranding a runner on third with one out. We out-hit them but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the key hit,â&#x20AC;? Jonker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their

slugging percentage was really good.â&#x20AC;? In the non-conference slate, the Chippewas proved their pitching staff can be dominate, but to contend for the MAC theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to bring along the offense. Getting hits wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a problem this weekend, but the offense scoring and getting clutch hits was. In all four games, CMU got at least seven hits in three games and five in the other. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need the clutch hitting we had earlier in the season,â&#x20AC;? Jonker said. The offense is making improvements, though. They just need to make the next step and drive in runners when they get those bases load two out at bats. CMU (14-12, 1-3) will play its first home game at 2 p.m. Wednesday against Detroit. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to see firsthand if the Chippewas will be able to put together all three facets of the game to live up to the high potential for a MAC run. sports@cm-life.com


4B || Monday, April 4, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

ERNIE |

f a n t a s y b a s e b a ll

The dangers of addiction M

file photo by sean proctor

Junior forward Andre Coimbra will be one of three seniors on the roster next season. In his first year at CMU, Coimbra averaged five points and 4.5 rebounds per game.

of that — $15,000-$20,000 — to start a home and home. We’re going to have to be strategic that way to put ourselves in a position, because the league is mandating it. If you don’t do it then there’s going to be a fine, which hasn’t been determined yet. It’s going to make you find resources. In our state, as budget strapped as we are, there isn’t a lot of money coming in to men’s basketball from a university standpoint, and rightfully so. AM:With Marko Spica deciding to leave his final year of eligibility on the table, the team really struggled to develop a post-presence this year. Going forward, with Andre having one year left and Colin only having one year of experience and Nate sitting out the year, is there any concern in the frontcourt? EZ: It’s a concern, but I’m excited and very hopeful that someone’s going to emerge. I think Nate VanArendonk – he’s 6-foot-10 now and has grown during his redshirt year – can evolve into that post-presence that we’re looking for. Andre can evolve into being more of a threat to get a paint catch. He’s probably the most talented of our returning frontcourt players. A guy who has totally forgotten is Zach Saylor. He’s going to have an opportunity to be a fourth-year player with sophomore eligibility, who’s been around in the program. And you’ve got Colin and Javon. Javon is a kid, who at the end of the day, is going to have an opportunity to emerge and be better than any of them. Someone’s got to emerge in that group, and we’ll probably add a guy or two that has some versatility to play at the 3 and 4. Going into Year 6, you got to develop some guys. When you look at that young group of guys, somebody’s got to emerge. We look at it from a recruiting standpoint and we don’t want to bring in somebody just to bring in a body. We don’t want to bring in somebody that’s not better than what we already have. AM: After a few years of sustained growth and a pair of MAC West titles, is there any pressure to achieve a certain threshold next season? EZ: The pressure is to win. Year 1, we went 13-18 and in my mind we should have went 18-13. In Year 2, we went 14-17

and we should have won 20 games. The pressure is to win is the pressure to win. I’m going to continue to put that pressure on myself, continue to push our guys and the guys we bring in here, and our goal is to have a winning season next season. If we don’t, then I’m going to have to be able to deal with what comes with that. It’s the nature of this business. I do feel good about the fact that the support that I have from our AD and our administration in understand, and I think this is the hard part for people to realize. While football is winning, wrestling is winning … our men’s basketball program has zero level of sustained success other than the Dick Parfitt era, who was the best coach to ever coach here. We have a championship culture, I am very much aware of that, and the expectations for men’s basketball is to add to that culture. That’s what my responsibility is and we’re going to continue to do it, but understanding what we’re up against and trying to make steps forward. I do know for a fact that the people I have to answer to understand that. Now it’s my job to keep pushing the torch forward and putting us in a position to rise above and do something that was started by Dick Parfitt and have that same type of sustainability.” AM: Going into next season, what are the keys to having a winning season? EZ: We have to improve offensively, and we have to improve defensively. I’m a defensive coach, but were anemic offensively this year — to the point that it put so much pressure on our defensive schemes and how we prepare defensively — that the margin of error for us was slim and none. We have to put ourselves in a position where we have more of a balance and more guys capable of knocking down open shots. When you shoot 38 percent from the field as a team and 32 percent from 3 and 62 percent from the foul line and average 59 points per game … we got to get more guys that can score at their position that are playing major minutes for us. That’s what we’re on the recruiting trail trying to do now, and at the same time working and developing some of the guys returning. sports@cm-life.com

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y name is Andrew, and I am an addict. Nothing gets in the way of addiction. The majority seems to downplay its hold on you. “You can quit if you really put your heart in to it,” they say. “If you get your priorities straight, you’d be off the stuff,” they cry. But no rehab can correct this chemical imbalance. No religion can steer you clear. Cocaine is a very powerful drug. But I’m not talking about cocaine — or heroin, meth or anything else. Rather, this drug is more powerful, more addicting. It takes over lives. It’s true — fantasy baseball is my drug. An addict never chooses his drug of choice. I didn’t plan to watch 10 hours of baseball on Saturday. And thanks to Comcast’s free week of MLB Extra Innings, I watched parts of every single game. I’d wait for my players to step up to the plate or get on the mound, and I’d tune in. Hour after hour. Beer after beer. No showers necessary. No, there’s no time. Just one weekend into the baseball season, and my addiction has altered my behavior. I’ve developed pet names for my players — my soldiers. Outfielder Nelson Cruz has become “Cruz Control.” Pitcher David Price: “The Price is Right.” Soon-to-be third baseman Kevin Youkilis: “God of Walks.” Shortstop Jimmy Rollins: “J-Roll.” And any time catcher Carlos Santana comes to the plate, I cue “Maria, Maria” by Carlos Santana. “The sounds of the guitar, played by Carlos Santana.” I’ve upped the ante this year, and joined a high-stakes keeper-contracts league. But with higher stakes, comes a greater addiction. When “Cruz Control” hits his third home run in as many days, it is the perfect high. But when close Carlos Marmol blows a save against the Pirates, my high turns on me. I mutter profanity for hours — some in English, some Spanish. “Why are you messing with me, Carlos?!” “Who

Andrew Stover Senior Reporter the hell do you think you are, Carlos?!” “Screw you, Carlos!” What a trip. What a bad, bad trip. That’s what happens when the drug turns on you. Hot sweats. Cold sweats. Hallucinations. Muttering incoherent sentence fragments. Outbursts. The shakes. Do you know what it’s

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like? Have you felt its wrath? Have you seen its beauty? It’s a lose-lose situation. Lose, and I’m miserable. Win, and I feed my addiction. Maybe disappointment turns to rage, and somebody gets hurt. Maybe I’ll never get married. Maybe I’ll push everyone away who is close to me. Maybe I won’t be able to get enough. And maybe nobody understands. Ah, the life of an addict. It’s what I am. More importantly, it’s who I am. My name is Andrew, and I am an addict. sports@cm-life.com

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Upcoming Events: Percussion Ensemble Tuesday, April 5 @ 8 p.m. Staples Family Concert Hall

Trombone Choir Sunday, April 10 @ 2 p.m. Staples Family Concert Hall

Brass Band Thursday, April 14 @ 8 p.m. Staples Family Concert Hall

Horn Choir Saturday, April 16 @ 2 p.m. Staples Family Concert Hall

Jazz Central Sunday, April 17 @ 3 p.m. Staples Family Concert Hall

Jazz Lab 1 Sunday, April 17 @ 8 p.m. Staples Family Concert Hall

CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

Aaron McMann: You played seven of your first eight games away from Mount Pleasant, in main part due to the new arena. At one point you were 2-9. Do you feel like it took a toll on your team? EZ: It definitely took a toll. We were so fragile emotionally from the standpoint that guys were trying to buy in, but we just couldn’t make that play. The Montana State started it off for us, and that game started to show the Achilles heel we had in being able to guard point guards. The kid that played the point for them was a non-scorer and he had a career game. He was the first of numerous guards all year long that had career highs on us. We just couldn’t rebound from it. I do think in light of our new conference mandate that every team has to play a minimum of six non-conference games at home. What we’re trying to do as a conference is put ourselves in a position where hopefully everyone has a .500 or better non-conference record going into conference play, which will raise our conference RPI and allow for good RPI wins in conference. They might be 200 RPI wins instead of 300. The difficult part of it is programs like ours is how you get those non-conference games, because some people in our conference have the ability to buy games. There’s teams in the upper-echelon of our conference paying $80,000 for a team to come. Or paying $150,000 or $200,000 to host an exempt tournament and have three games at home to start the season. When you look at Kent, Akron and Ohio, that’s something that they’ve done, and each of those teams have gone into conference play with 10 or more wins every year since I’ve been here. All of a sudden you’re in a much better place.It’s common knowledge that most team win a majority of their home games, so that’s going to be a challenge for us. We can’t buy $75,000 or $80,000, so we’re going to do some things. We’re coming up with ideas now. We’re going to have to play a Texas or Kansas and get $100,000, and use some

With baseball season underway, nothing else matters

School of Music

continued from 1B

I look at the whole thing – five years ago it was like a 2,000piece jigsaw puzzle that was all over the place. Two years later, you’ll see the foundation, but there are still pieces missing. That’s where we are, but I do feel good about the fact that we’re not the laughing stock of our conference. When I took this job five years ago, there were two or three coaches in the conference that specifically told my boss that it was the worst job in the conference, “why would he want to go there? There’s only one or two Division 1 guys on that roster.” We have gained the respect of having a level of competiveness, which definitely was part of winning those back-to-back division titles. Are we where we need to be? No, without question. But I think we’ve put ourselves in the middle of the pack, and now it’s time to compete at the top. Is that going to mean winning a championship (necessary)? I don’t think that’s the case, but I think that’s what we’re competing for. We all know how hard it is to do that. We got to win, and no one understands that better than I.

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Program information at: www.music.cmich.edu/events or call (989) 774-3738 CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity within its community (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo).


cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 4, 2011 || 5B

[Sports]

ncaa tournament

Butler gets another chance in title game By Greg Logan MCT

HOUSTON — Matt Howard didn’t see the ball leave Gordon Hayward’s hand from just inside the midcourt line on the right side of the floor last April 5 at Lucas Oil Stadium. He knew Butler was desperate, trailing Duke by two points as the final seconds of a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity to win the NCAA championship ticked away. But hope keeps us all going, and when Howard turned and caught sight of the ball in midflight, it looked surprisingly good, as if it had a chance. “Maybe that’s what made it a little more hard to deal with is that it was so close,” Howard said Sunday. “I just remember that difference of high and low right there where you think it’s going in and then it doesn’t.” The red light around the back-

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board blinked, but the scoreboard didn’t. Duke 61, Butler 59. Hope was crushed. “I didn’t watch ESPN for a month after that,” Butler center Andrew Smith said, “because I couldn’t take seeing Duke there with the trophy at center court. I don’t think the pain will ever subside completely because we were so close.” But 364 days later, it turns out that wasn’t Butler’s last shot at all. It was Hayward’s final shot before going to the NBA, but somewhere deep in the well of disappointment, his Bulldogs teammates decided they weren’t done with history, hadn’t run out of belief. They’ve lived with that unhappy ending for the past year. As Shelvin Mack said: “I’ve seen the shot on almost every March Madness commercial now. So it’s kind of disappointing, but it’s over with. We have a different chance (Monday night) to write

our own story.” The Bulldogs returned to practice in October aiming for a twice-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Their prospects looked bleak at midseason, but they remained committed, their resolve growing with each last-second win in the NCAA Tournament until they reached their second straight title game against Connecticut on Monday night at Reliant Stadium. “We’ve been fortunate to squeak by and be here,” said Brad Stevens. “Certainly, there are a lot of reasons to say you can’t, but it’s a lot more fun to say you can. And it’s a lot more fun to believe.” Rationally, the notion of little Butler returning to the NCAA final is preposterous. The Bulldogs pulled out miracle wins in their first two tournament games against Old Dominion and Pitt. But

they’re here. “When I’m thinking of this happening again,” guard Chase Stigall said, “I’m shocked. I’m speechless.” Freshman forward Khyle Marshall, who had committed to Butler last year, was upset as he watched the Bulldogs’ run to the Final Four a year ago. “It just made me want to be born a year earlier,” he said. Now Marshall has that chance and has made his share of big plays. “We’ve got 10 guys who have been through this before, and they’ve set a great example,” Marshall said. “Their attitude and their poise have made it easy to mimic.” Connecticut is every bit as formidable an opponent as Duke, but it’s as though Butler got the offensive rebound on Hayward’s shot with time still on the clock. If it comes down to another desperation shot, the Bulldogs are prepared.

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1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS available immediately Broadway and Brown Apartments exceptionally clean/ NO pets 989-772-3887

A 3 STORY 5 bedroom condo for summer/ fall washer/ dryer, water,cable, HS internet. $1200/ month plus gas/ electric/ security. 248-496-8861.

1, 2 AND 3 bedrooms available for 2011-2012!! Partlo Property Management! 989-779-9886 www.partloproperty.com

AIR CONDITIONED TOWNHOUSE for May. Two bedrooms quiet yet close to campus. Includes heat, Wi Fi, Internet, cable, water, dishwasher. $395/ pp. 989-772-1061. nptdev@gmail.com.

1- 5 BEDROOM houses and apartments. Close to campus and downtown. Call 989-621-7538.

!

2 BEDROOM HOUSE half block from campus. Washer/ dryer dishwasher. Available May 20th $575 per month plus utilities. Year lease 989-444-1944. 2-2 BEDROOM HOUSES available on attractively landscaped property. Utilities and horseboarding not included. extra.ideas@hotmail.com 248-918-8096. 4 BEDROOM APARTMENT. Close to campus includes water, trash, W/ D. $275 per person. 989-621-0052.

Sunny Giveaways are springing up!

Sign a new lease at and receive a

FREE ITUNES CARD! (exp. 4/4/11)

Enter to win the use of a

42” flatscreen TV!

No $$$ Due at Signing!

@FOR RENT

www.tallgrassapts.com 779-7900 • 1240 E Broomfield St. M-Th: 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 11-3

APARTMENTS & TOWNHOUSES FOR 2- 4 people. Walk to CMU. Free cable/ bomackprop@gmail.com internet 773-0785.

CHIP VILLAGE CONDO available 2011-2012! Close to campus and Cabin Bar.!Starting at $240/mo! Partlo Property Management! 989-779-9886! www.partloproperty.com CLEAN CONVENIENT QUIET. (Private Courtyard) Two Blocks CMU. 1, 2 & 3 BR apartments or houses. $385 to $750 plus utilities + Deposit. Non-smoking, no pets. References 775-8709 /330-1484. EXTRA LARGE 1 bedroom 1 person only $425 includes utilities. May-May Call 989-400-8358.

DEERFIELD UNION VILLAGE SQUARE 4 Person 4 Bed 5 Person 5 Bed

1or 2 Person 2 Bed 3 Person 3 Bed

FREE Cable FREE Cable FREE Shuttle FREE Shuttle FREE Internet FREE Internet EVERYDAY IS FREE FRIDAY

No Deposit 4 or 5 Person

Visit myucard.net

773-9999

LiveWithUnited.com

@ SUDOKU

@FOR RENT

EVERYDAY IS FREE FRIDAY

LEXINGTON RIDGE

2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 Bedrooms Sign a lease ANY day of the week and recieve: • A spin on the Wheel of Prizes (gifts valued at $25 or more) • No Application Fee ($50 Savings) • $0 Security Deposit Down

773-3890

AMGhousing.com

Pet Friendly Visit myucard.net

772-2222

LiveWithUnited.com

SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

PRESENTED BY:

0/0 ..*$()*+

:Xcc]fikf[XpËj jg\Z`Xcj fifi[\i fec`e\Xk1 gXgXaf_ej%Zfd

We accept the following credit cards: Ask our Classified Sales Representatives about our special services

[ ACCEPTANCE & CANCELLATION ]

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY!

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS


@marketplace

6B || Monday, April 4, 2011 || Central Michigan Life

Online 24/7!

www.cm-life.com

classified

www.cm-life.com /classifieds

436 MOORE HALL, CMU

PHONE: 989•774•3493 FAX: 989•774•7805

where people connect.

FREE SHUTTLE

(989) 779-2818 • 5652 E. PIckard

989•772•9441

@FOR RENT

@FOR RENT

DON!T MISS OUt on this summer special $690/pp total May, June, July and August. Water, cable, H.S. internet, free washer/ dryer. Bring your friends 5 bedroom unit. 248-496-8861.

LOOKING FOR A subleasor summer 2011 3 bedrooms- 2 bath. University Meadows. $350/ per month. Call/ email 989-560-1215. wrigh2sa@cmich.edu LARGE 2 BR Loft apartment downtown. Water and trash included. 775-8919.

LARGE 2BR TOWNHOUSE Furnished or Unfurnished, FREE Cable, Internet and Laundry. 773-3890. MAIN STREET TO BROOMFIELDOLIVIERI-HOMES.COM 2 to 6 Person Houses, Apartments & Town Houses & Much More. CALL NOW FOR THE BEST LOCATIONS! 989-773-2333.

SHORT TERM SUMMER leases, 4 bedroom townhouses. Mid May until end of July $250/ person/ month. Free cable, internet/ W/D, Dishwasher 989-772-9577.

CM Life Classifieds • www.cm-life.com STUDIO APARTMENT CLOSE to campus available now.. $375 per month. Includes all utilities. 989-444-1944. SUBLEASOR NEEDED UNTIL May 2011- $560. No Security Deposit. Churchill Court Apartments. Call 616-644-2538 or email to mills1cm@cmich.edu for further info. VARIETY OF 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Next school year. 989-560-7157. NO PETS, REFERENCES. WESTERN ISLAND APTS- 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath. Walk to class. Free internet and cable. Next to La Senoritas. Call 772-2222 for more information.

@WANTED TO RENT FAMILY LOOKING FOR 3 to 4 bedroom house with option to buy near Mt. Pleasant and Rosebush. Would like at least a one car garage and a fenced in yard for our dogs. Please call Conni at 989-828-6132.

CM Life Classifieds • www.cm-life.com SIGN A NEW Lease at Lexington Ridge and get March Mania specials. 773-3890 or AMGhousing.com for details.

WESTPOINT VILLAGE

Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHICLES we buy them we haul them. 989-772-5428.

@HELP WANTED ISABELLA COUNTY IS currently accepting applications for the following position: Part time Substitute Site Manager - Commission on Aging Beginning Salary: $11.57/hr Application Deadline: April 15, 2011. The Application form and job description can be found at www.isabellacounty.org or are available in Administration. Applications may be mailed, faxed, hand delivered or emailed to Administration. Work on Mackinac Island- Make lifelong friends. The Island House Hotel and Ryba!s Fudge Shops are looking for seasonal help in all areas this summer: Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. Housing, bonus, and discounted meals. (906)847-7196. www.theislandhouse.com RECYCLE! Your hardware, your sofa, your bicycle in the Classifieds! CM Life Classifieds • 774-3493 436 Moore Hall www.cm-life.com

Every Day is

CM Life Classifieds • www.cm-life.com

JAMESTOWN

FREE FRIDAY!

2 Person 2 Bed 3 Person 3 Bed 4 Person 5 Bed 5 Person 5 Bed

Sign a NEW Lease ANY DAY of the week and receive

FREE Application Fee FREE Large Pizza FREE Firehouse Carwash FREE Internet FREE Expanded Cable FREE $25 Meijer Gift Card NO DEPOSIT 4 or 5 Person

FREE Cable FREE Shuttle FREE Internet EVERYDAY IS FREE FRIDAY

NO DEPOSIT 4 OR 5 PERSON

Pet Friendly Visit myucard.net

• Deerfield Village • SouthPoint Village • Western Islands • Jamestown

• Union Square

• WestPoint Village

772-2222

775-5522

LiveWithUnited.com

LiveWithUnited.com

Lexington Ridge & Casa Loma

CASA LOMA

4 Bedrooms: 2, 3, & 4 Person Rent starting at $235/mo.

EVERYDAY IS FREE FRIDAY

(gifts valued at $25 or more)

• No Application Fee ($50 Savings)

• $0 Security Deposit Down

Visit myucard.net

779-9999

LiveWithUnited.com

773-3890

OF

ST MO F FIR F O $25 TH OF RENT MON $25 GIFT TARGET CAR $2 D GI 5 S FT PE CA ED RD WA Y

FOR 2!

FREE Cable FREE Shuttle FREE Internet

• A spin on the Wheel of Prizes

CRUISE

BRAND NEW

Sign a lease ANY day of the week and receive:

1 MONT FREE H REN T

2 Person 2 Bed 2 Master Bath

H NT

Sign a lease ANY day of the week and receive:

T

N RE

•No application fee ($50 savings) •$0 security deposit down •Win a gift valued at $25 or more

Lexington Ridge & Casa Loma Where everyone is a winner!

in!

*your choice of bread or garden salad

@WANTED TO BUY

@FOR RENT

UNITED APTS

o t Spin

W

Every Monday and Tuesday Through AprIL

COLLEGE PRO IS now hiring painters all across the state to work outdoors with other students. 3k- 5k with advancement opportunities. 1-888-277-9787 or www.collegepro.com.

1 MO FRE NTH E RE $5 NT 0O FF FIR ST

6.99

@FOR RENT

!

SPAGHETTI!

Public Transportation Services of the Isabella County Transportation Commission

LOOKING FOR 1 or 2 female subleasors from early May to July 2011. The sublease can be extended from July to the end of the semester if wanted. For more information call 248-227-5288. Campus Habitat apartment behind the Cabin.

@HELP WANTED

FOR 2

ALL YOU CAN EAT $

SERVICE

@ROOMMATES

E CRUIS

@ MIGHTY MINIS

989-773-3890 www.AMGhousing.com

AMGhousing.com

You SCORE with our

UNBEATABLE PRICES! Apartments as low as

$275 A MONTH!

1, 2, or 3 Bedroom Apartments Available

• INDOOR HEATED POOL • PETS ALLOWED • ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! • FREE ELECTRIC, GAS, HEAT, A/C, WATER & SEWER AND TRASH

3300 EAST DEERFIELD ROAD

773-3300

We accept the following credit cards: Ask our Classified Sales Representatives about our special services

[ ACCEPTANCE & CANCELLATION ]

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY!

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS


April 4, 2011