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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Advertising professional, journalism Professor Doug Berry leaving CMU in 2013, 3A

Central Michigan University

Graduation commencement: To walk or not? 1B

| Wedmesday, April 25, 2012

[cm-life.com]

Football’s Deon Butler arrested, ‘indefinitely suspended’ White’s attorney calls charges against running back ‘unfounded’ By Aaron McMann University Editor

Sophomore receiver Deon Butler remains indefinitely suspended from the Central Michigan football program after his arrest Monday.

In a statement issued the same day, the CMU athletics department acknowledged Butler’s arrest but said his status on the team had not changed. “The Department of Athletics, while continuing to cooperate fully with local authorities, is in the process of gathering all factual information regarding the situation,” the release stated. “Butler remains suspended indefinitely from the football program.”

Butler, of Detroit, was arrested by CMU Police Monday and charged with one count of receiving and concealing stolen property, estimated to be worth between $200 and $1000. He was jailed at the Isabella County Trial Court, arraigned and released on a $2,000 personal recognizance bond. Butler’s arrest comes on the heels of a police investigation into a stolen cell phone on campus last month. Freshman receiver

Danel Harris, one of three CMU football players arrested Tuesday, has been charged with one count of felony larceny from a vehicle. Police were then led to a terrace-level dorm room in the Celani Residence Hall, where is it alleged sophomores Joe Sawicki and Austin White were growing and selling psilocybin, a form of hallucinogenic mushrooms. Sawicki, a tight end from Illinois, was arrested Tues-

day and charged with three counts: manufacturing and delivering narcotics, possession of narcotics and maintaining a drug house. White, a running back from Livonia, turned himself into police Wednesday and was charged with the same three-county felony. Both men, along with Harris, were released from the football program last week. Mary Chartier, a Lansingbased attorney representing White, said White will not

enter into a plea agreement and plans to fight the charges she calls “unfounded and untrue.” “Whether they’re ultimately dismissed by the prosecutor or whether we go to trial and a jury acquits Austin, I have no reason to believe we will be entering into a plea based on the information that we have and discovery that we have seen,” Chartier said. A DEON | 2A

Basketball guard Craddock arrested on OWI charge By Aaron McMann University Editor

Central Michigan senior basketball guard Finis Craddock was arrested early Saturday morning, charged with drunken driving, a team spokesman confirmed Tuesday. Craddock, 21 from Garland, Texas, was arrested at 3:08 a.m. Saturday at the corner of Preston Street and E. Campus Drive, according to documents from the Mount Pleasant Police Department. He was lodged in jail and charged with operating while intoxicated-first offense. Jason Kaufman, director of athletic communications, confirmed the arrest Tuesday and said Craddock has been “indefinitely suspended” by CMU head coach Keno Davis. Jeff Browne, public information officer for MPPD, could not confirm or deny Craddock’s arrest when contacted

PHOTOS BY JEFF SMITH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Midland resident and Central Michigan University alumnus Brad “Finn” Erla fights during a battle at Dagorhir at CMU Sunday afternoon on a field behind Finch Fieldhouse.

Fight Knights

Dagorhir games at CMU puts the fighter in fantasy “Every weekend I get to be a warrior,” said Brad “Finn Tehviking” Erla, a CMU alumnus and long-time member of the registered student organization. “It’s awesome.” The combatants were members of Dagorhir Battle Games, a national association which organizes full-contact battle games inspired by fantasy literature and medieval history — its name is taken from the “Lord of the Rings” Elvish language term for “battle lords.” It may sound familiar to people acquainted with dice-based role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons, but according to the website, the similarities end with their mutual love for fantasy fiction. “Dagorhir is a sport, not a tabletop game,” the site states. “Dagorhir is athletically challenging.” The organization, which was founded in 1977 according to the official website dagorhir. com, uses a single set of rules for all of its subunits while prioritizing “safety, playability and realism.” The rules specify how to make safe weaponry that can be swung at full force without in-

Midland resident Nick “Pillarus” Burkett wears chain-link armor before a battle at Dagorhir at CMU Sunday afternoon on a field behind Finch Fieldhouse.

By Connor sheridan | Online Coordinator

Twenty five warriors stood at opposing ends of the battlefield, adjusting their grips on swords, shields, spears and bows. A roar of “Lay on!” stirred the legions and they charged into the fray. Sword met shield. Spear met belly. Might met might. And the bewildered Central Michigan University students who observed the clash Sunday at Alumni Field met Dagorhir at CMU.

The “most hated family in America” returned to Central Michigan University Monday. Associate Professor of Journalism Tim Boudreau invited Westboro Baptist Church of Topeka, Kan., to speak to three journalism classes to illustrate the “outer limits” of the First Amendment. Westboro is infamous for their protests at the funerals of soldiers and spread of hateful rhetoric, particularly toward the LGBTQ community. The group has also recently started campaigns with signs flashing messages such as “Thank God for 9/11” and “Thank God for cancer.”

“(WBC was invited) to get students to think about the limits of free expression, how much speech is and should be protected,” Boudreau said. “These folks force them to think about these issues and ask these questions.” The members of the church, who have been traveling with their message for 21 years across all 50 states and have even made trips to Canada and Iraq, said it is their duty to preach and spread the gospel. In 2011, the group won a U.S. Supreme Court case, which ruled their hate speech was protected by the First Amendment. Shirley Phelps-Roper, a member of the church, first appeared on campus, along with daughters Megan and Rebekah, in November 2010. This time, her brother

juring opponents, how to determine the winners and losers of a spar and when period or fantasy-inspired garb is required. While assuming the identity of a fantastic or historical warrior is encouraged, the degree to which participants emphasize straight-up combat games versus role-playing varies. “This game, to me, is about the fighting first and foremost,” Erla said. That inclination was typical to many members of the group, who said they considered Dagorhir at CMU more of a big group of friends to get together and beat (safely) more than an indepth theatrical pursuit. Ashley “Brinje” Bonem, an alumna and founder of Dagorhir at CMU, said the basic nature of their sport lends it some levity. “It’s really hard to take yourself seriously when you carry a pillow on a stick and wear a costume,” Bonem said.

By shelby Miller Staff Reporter

Central Michigan University’s Sexual Aggression Peer Advocates organization is making a difference worldwide. After presenting at the Pentagon and the White House over the summer, SAPA Sexual Aggression Services Director Stephen Thompson was asked to present “No Zebras, No Excuses” at navel bases. Last October, “No Zebras, No Excuses” put on performances for a naval base in Florida. With the success, they were asked to travel to other naval bases around the world this summer to perform. “The Department of the Navy asked SAPA to present the theatrical presentation of Zebras,” Thompson said. “They brought the

A DAGORHIR | 2A

w Check out the web for a full video re-cap of WBC’s speech. and Pastor Fred Phelps Jr., daughter-in-law Jennifer Phelps-Roper and church member Taylor Drain, junior at Washburn University, came along. “No one has ever suffered so much as a hangnail (from the protests),” Fred said. “It’s called freedom of speech, freedom of religion.” Shirley said their hatred was supported by the word of God, and society should be ashamed for allowing sinful behaviors — namely homosexuality — to continue. A CHURCH | 2A

university@cm-life.com

SAPA takes ‘No Zebras’ worldwide

w Check out the online gallery for more photos from this event.

Westboro speakers engage students in lively debate By Theresa Clift Alayna smith and Kelsey De Haan Staff Reporters

Tuesday. Someone arrested over the weekend would not be arraigned in Isabella County Trial Court for 2 to 3 weeks, Browne said. According to Michigan state law, operating while intoxicated can include alcohol or drugs in the body that “substantially affect(s) your ability to operate a motor vehicle safely” and/or a bodily alcohol content (BAC) level at or above 0.08. An OWIfirst offense charge carries a fine up to $500 and 93 days in jail or 360 hours of community service. Craddock, a 6-foot-1, 179-pound guard, was recruited by former CMU head coach Ernie Zeigler in 2009 from Garland High School. He played in 31 games last season, averaging 2.8 points and 2.5 rebounds per game.

cast to the Pensacola Naval Air Station to present two programs in order to see the reaction of the people in attendance. It was overwhelming.” St. Clair Shores junior Megan Stowell said people are afraid to talk about sexual and domestic violence issues, which causes a lack of awareness and knowledge. “SAPA wants to go on this trip, because we are all about raising awareness,” Stowell said. “The opportunity to travel with ‘No Zebras’ gives us the ability to spread knowledge about the issue and raise awareness.” Rochester Hills senior and SAPA Program Coordinator Paul Carbini said a lot can be gained from the upcoming experience. A SAPA | 2A

[I N S I D E ] w Isabella County Board of Commissioners votes on personal property tax legislation, 3 w CMU Debate & Forensic team competes at National Competition, 3 w Students in Free Enterprise work on green energy, clean drinking water projects, 3

ANDREW KUHN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Westboro Baptist Church member Shirley Phelps-Roper speaks with students in one of Associate Professor Timothy Boudreau’s journalism classes Monday afternoon in the Charles V. Park Library Auditorium. For a photo gallery of the event, visit cm-life.com.

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

w Son of athletic director joins baseball family, 6


2A || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY

w Quilts to the Rescue Information Session will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at Island Park. w CMU’s school of music presents University Band and Campus Band at 8 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall.

Thursday

w American Red Cross Benefit Concert will be held from 7 to 11 p.m. at the corner of Main and Broadway streets. The concert featuring up-coming live musical acts is free.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 85

deon | continued from 1a

Chartier, knowing CMU police had searched White’s residence hall room, said she tried to make contact several times with the detective three days prior to White turning himself in. She said she was made aware of the arrest warrant the morning of April 18, the day White surrendered to police. “It is unusual, at least in my experience, that the police wouldn’t take the opportunity to speak with someone they suspected of committing a crime,” Chartier said. “That’s where I think they rushed to judgment based on allegations that are not true. If they actually talked to him, I think we would have a different result. “But that’s certainly their choice, they don’t have to speak to someone beforehand and obviously they chose not to do it. But I don’t think that speaks to a thorough investigation.” Butler, a graduate of Inkster High School, was a part of head coach Dan Enos’ 2010 recruiting class. He redshirted his freshman season and played 12 games in the 2011 season, recording six receptions for 49 yards. Butler, Sawicki and White are listed in the CMU directory as living in the same dorm room. All four players, and sophomore defensive back Kevin King, were indefinitely suspended following CMU’s April 14 spring game. King has not been charged with a crime by police and remains suspended by the program. university@cm-life.com

dagorhir | continued from 1a

She does, however, take her commitment to “Dag” and the group of friends she has formed around it very seriously. She started the student group in spring of 2008, after graduating from high school in Midland and enrolling at CMU. She found herself deprived of the combat and camaraderie she grew to love with her friends back home and began to post flyers calling for a new group. Since then, the club with eight members has grown to regularly host 25 to 35 people at its events, said group president Chris “Corvus” Roy, a Livonia senior. “The cool thing is, the game is willing to accept any level of commitment,” Roy said. However, CMU’s Dagorhir activities are not limited to wearing costumes and bashing one another with foam weapons. Someone has to sew those costumes and craft those weapons. Crystal “Trea Greyjoy” Sanders, a “noncombatant,” enjoys the atmosphere of the events and the creativity Dagorhir’s do-it-yourself attitude encourages. “I like to be artistic: sewing, making shield-covers, tunics, dresses,” the Mount Pleasant resident said. “I like being challenged.” She said she first began crafting for the group when her husband came home one day and said he needed garb for battle. She has been sewing, embroidering and otherwise patching together the equipment, which makes Dagorhir at CMU more than a bunch of roughly collegeage people beating each other with sticks ever since. Sanders particularly enjoys the group’s creative exchanges, and said several participants have crafted a few costume pieces of their own as well as wearing her and other people’s contributions. Battle buddies Sanders’ favorite aspect, however, is the community. “It’s very accepting of everybody,” she said. “You don’t see

church | continued from 1a

“I have so much sorrow, because these children are supremely ignorant of what God says and desires,” she said. The members argued with students, proclaiming God hates Catholics, the U.S. military and the LGBTQ community. “Every dime you give (to a Catholic Church) pays a pedophile priest,” Shirley said. Hopkins freshman Elizabeth Roberts told the group her plans to start basic training at the Air Force by the end of the summer. “…You will be fighting for same-sex marriage and for a nation that has made God its number-one enemy,” Shirley said. Roberts said the dead soldiers give them the right to do what they do. “Then shut up while we exercise them,” Shirley replied. A group of protestors gathered outside the library during all three sessions, handing out popsicles

cm-life.com/category/news

[News] that very often.” Midland resident Jordan “Erlend” Walmsley agreed. “It’s not so much about the fighting as it is the people,” Walmsley said. Ragnarok, Dagorhir’s largest social event, is a week-long festival held every June in Cooper’s Lake Campground in Slippery Rock, Penn., which regularly brings 1,600 together to battle and socialize, according to its section of the website. Much of its appeal comes from the potential to rub elbows and trade blows with people from all over the country — sometimes without ever knowing their real names, Walmsley said. The friendships he has forged by the campfire as well as on battlegrounds are unlike any he has with “normal friends,” he said. Walmsley is a construction worker, though only three of his coworkers are aware of his regular participation in Dagorhir. He said the fantasy atmosphere and potential to be almost anything players want to be make for a perfect escape from the daily grind. “You don’t have to hide who you are here,” Walmsley said. Erla also said he enjoys Dagorhir as a pressure release from his real-world occupation as an accountant (bean-counter, as he put it) for Dow Chemical Company in Midland. “When I started my big-boy job, I realized I’ve got to stay in Dag or I’ll lose my mind,” he said. “Life can be so very mundane sometimes.” Though the game can become a lifelong commitment as part of a far-reaching community, Roy said it all comes back to living out legends for most participants. “The crush of a shield wall, storming a castle … You can be a warrior, you can run into battle and die a hundred times,” he said. Walmsley was eager to express his all-consuming love of Dagorhir. “This has been, and always will be, the most fun I have ever had,” he said. “It’s just a game, but it’s one hell of a good game.” studentlife@cm-life.com

to those passing by and holding signs that read “Hell is hot!” Bethany Zinger, a Leslie sophomore and member of CMU’s Dogma Free Society, was one of the avid protesters against what the WBC stands for. “The Westboro Church uses religion to spread hate,” Zinger said. “Our group is fine with you wanting to believe whatever you want to believe, but don’t use your beliefs to put down other people.” After the 5 p.m. session, about a dozen protesters followed the group to their vehicles carrying signs and chanting phrases such as “God loves all his children,” “All people are good people,” and “Jesus was a hippie.” The protesters were not allowed inside the auditorium for the speech. Chicago freshman Erica Brown said she was dissatisfied with the group’s refusal to discuss some issues, or to seemingly change their stances when convenient. “They think they love everyone equally and unconditionally, but they have so much hate,” Brown said. “Today was largely about

sapa | continued from 1a

“It will hopefully create a lot more awareness with our own students,” he said. “Everything we do is survivorbased and it’d be wonderful if the publicity off of our work with the Navy would create more knowledge with CMU students about who we are and what we do.” SAPA uses “No Zebras, No Excuses” to address the importance of intervention on situations involving sexual aggression. “SAPA does a lot on campus,” Stowell said. “The most important and main thing we do is run a 24/7 crisis line where survivors and secondary survivors can call to talk or to get resources.” In addition, SAPA holds educational programs in classrooms and activities for awareness during domestic violence, stalking and sexual assault awareness months. “People will learn to not

be bystanders and to stick up for each other when they see something arise,” Stowell said. Thompson said the reaction to “No Zebras, No Excuses” is positive. “It can trigger survivors, which is not a bad thing,” he said. “It very much has an effect on bystander mentality.” Stowell said performing is an amazing experience because of the crowd’s reaction. “People react differently to ‘No Zebras.’ Some people have an emotional reaction and some people look at it as a call for change,” she said.

“It is always a very humbling and heartwarming experience to see that people are grateful that we are there.” Carbini said “No Zebras, No Excuses” educates the audience on the truth behind sexual aggression by showing them why they should care and to watch out for their friends, themselves and those around them. “It’s a very emotional and impactful program that opens the audience’s eyes to a subject rarely talked about,” he said. university@cm-life.com

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3A

INSIDE LIFE Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Michigan Street to undergo $649,840 reconstruction during summer Funding methods for change orders debated by city By Jackie Smith Staff Reporter

Another section of Michigan Street will undergo a full reconstruction this summer thanks to city commissioners’ approval of a $649,840 contract with a local company for the project.

Discussion over what would be the second phase of work on Michigan first came up last fall, when commissioners agreed to combine downtown streetscape design with the street rebuild, budgeting more than $762,000. On Monday, Malley Construction, Inc., was given the green light to do the work. But commissioners dove into the project’s financial logistics, spurring debate over whether they should authorize City Manager Kathie Grinzinger

funding that we’re doing.” Three options were put before commissioners, Grinzinger said, that somehow deal with unforeseen problems that may require additional money during construction. With the first, commissioners would have only approved Malley Construction, capping funds at the contracted amount. The second left the “additional latitude” to Grinzinger to OK change orders up to 10 percent, or the $70,000, of the contracted budget.

to approve any additional costs up to $70,000 in the case “something unusual was uncovered” amid the project. “You know there’s going to be problems. There always is with this kind of project,” said Commissioner Jon Joslin. “And it’s a very tight, constrained timeline on the project. We’re doing it in segments; we’re trying to keep the effects minimized.” “All of that being said,” he added, “the biggest thing I have an issue with is the process of

The third option, which multiple commissioners favored, gave city staff leeway to move money between the Economic Development and Major Street funds. Moving forward with option three, as the “preferred” method, was approved by the commission in a 5-1 vote, with one absent and Mayor Bruce Kilmer dissenting. But if the chosen method somehow is “not going to cut the mustard,” as Commissioner Nancy English put it, and jeopardizes the idea of revital-

izing Michigan’s streetscape, commissioners additionally left the second option as a fallback. “I like three because it seems to me that what you’re trying to describe is if we have a little bit of flexibility, we might be able to make some changes ... and still get basically the project we want (and) be able to move funds to keep us from going over,” said Vice Mayor Kathy Ling. “But we’re not sure that

A RECONSTRUCTION| 5a

C M U D E B AT E & F O R E N S I C S

Team finishes high at national competition Junior Owen Valley places second in nation By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

The Lincoln-Douglas debates were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas as they fought to win control of the Illinois legislature in 1858. Now, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, known as LD debates, are a type of debate competed at National Forensic Association competitions. The NFA states that an LD is “a one-person, persuasive, policy debate on traditional stock issues.” After leaving Mount Pleasant Wednesday, the Central Michigan University Debate and Forensics team returned at 3 a.m. Tuesday from the NFA National Tournament at Ohio University in Athens, where they competed against 79 other universities from around the country including Cornell University, Purdue University, Ohio State University and San Francisco State University. Four students represented CMU at the competition: Farmington junior Mike Begovic,

Cadillac junior Owen Valley, Jackson senior Amy Hinchey and Mount Pleasant sophomore Sean Kolhoff. There are many different types of events at the NFA including After Dinner speech — a humorous speech about social and cultural issues and interpretive events. Valley won second place in the nation for LD debates. “This year, the topic was if the United States federal government should change its trade policies and/or practices with the Peoples’ Republic of China,” Valley said. “It feels pretty amazing. I feel pretty blessed just to be able to be in the position that I’m in. It’s just been an honor being here and being able to engage in the academic activities here at CMU; a student employee and part of the debate team.” Valley said he spent three years on the debate team in high school and also competed on the Michigan State University team while he was there for two years. The accounting major said the skills he learned from doing debates are very beneficial. Though he was beat by a student from Drury University, Valley said he’s still in shock from winning second place in the nation.

The work of one Central Michigan University professor on an advocacy website for the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota has earned him a distinct honor. Known to those in the industry as the “Oscars of the Internet,” the Webby Award is an international award honoring excellence on the Internet including websites, interactive advertising and online film and video. The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences selects the nominees and includes members such as Twitter co-founder Biz Stone, Virgin Group Chairman Richard Branson and David Bowie. Clark Most, associate professor of graphic design at CMU,

one of a kind

Advertising professional, journalism Professor Doug Berry a favorite among students, leaving CMU in 2013 By Paulina Lee | Staff Reporter

A DEBATE| 5a

Professor Clark Most earns Webby Award nomination for website By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

photos by Tanya Moutzalias/staff photographer

CMU advertising professor Douglas Berry speaks with a group of students during “Kabosh,” an activity in which students participate in the buying and selling aspect of media.

found out two weeks ago that the website he has been working on for three years, pineridgesioux.com, was nominated for a Webby Award. Most’s site is in the Charitable Organizations and Non-Profits category. “The site educates viewers in a concise pictorial format about the historical, social, health and economic challenges of the third-poorest county per capita in the United States, and directs them accordingly,” Most said. The selection committee reviews more than 10,000 submissions from more than 40 countries worldwide and selects five nominees for more than 60 categories. Other nominees in Most’s category include Amnesty USA, the Girl Scouts, Messages for Japan A MOST | 5a

Doug Berry worked for more than 25 years at some of the nation’s top advertising agencies before coming to teach at Central Michigan University. Berry, a journalism professor and resident of Dearborn, graduated from Wayne State University as a public relations major. He was also a professional actor and did some television work. “After I graduated, I found out PR people usually work for newspapers,” he said. “But I didn’t want to work at newspapers, so I went into the ‘Advertising Red Books’ and sent my cover letter and resume out to 30 agencies in Detroit.” After three rounds of interviews at Meldrum & Fewsmith Advertising for an account executive position, the agency decided to hire the other candidate for the job. But the executive secretary accidentally sent the acceptance letter, signed with a salary, to Berry. “So the Friday before the Monday start date, I got a call, ‘Oh, Mr. Berry we’ve made a terrible mistake, but hey, we have positions open in the creative department,’” Berry said. “So I ended (up) in the creative department and became a

staff producer and writer there.” Later, one of the receptionists from that agency got a job at a bigger agency, now known as Leo Burnett. “She called me and said, ‘They’re looking for a writer, get your ass over here,’” he said. After a long career in advertising, Berry decided for another change of pace. After guest teaching one time at CMU, he became an adjunct professor while still working full-time at Young & Rubicam in Dearborn. Berry stopped working in

Berry speaks with Warren junior Cody Shintoski during “Kabosh.”

advertising and became a full-time professor the next semester in the fall of 2008. Overall, Berry said he has had an interesting career. “I lucked my way into my first, schmoozed my way into my second, worked my way into my third, then had a full-time career thrown into my lap at Central Michigan University,” Berry said. Berry is the adviser to the CMU Ad Club and was also the driving force behind the recently passed advertising major. He was also listed on this year’s Central Michigan Life bucket list as item

#47: “Take a class with Doug Berry.” Berry will be leaving CMU after next May, and though he has no set plans, he said he has some books he would like to finish writing. “My basic approach to students tends to be different than other people,” he said. “I view them as me when I was their age and I was a good person and some ways I was very mature and some ways I had growing to do.” A BERRy | 5a

Students in Free Enterprise work on green energy, clean drinking water projects By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

Jeff Smith/Staff Photographer

West Bloomfield sophomore Adam Chuchla talks with others during a Students in Free Enterprise meeting Friday afternoon in Grawn 117.

Students in Free Enterprise competed at the SIFE regional conference the weekend of April 16 in Chicago, bringing with them ideas for clean energy and safe drinking water. One of the registered student organization’s projects, named, “Get Fit to Get Lit,” aims to convert energy created on aerobic exercise machines into generators of sustainable, clean electricity. SIFE members hope to implement the technology at the Central Michigan University Student Activity Center.

“We were looking for ways to bring the green effect into the university, and through research, we found this company — ReRev,” said Kyle Carver, the SIFE member who presented the project in Chicago. “Their attachments take the kinetic energy we create and converts it to DC current, which goes right back into the facility. This company has previously implemented this at 18 other universities including University of Oregon, Ohio University, University of Florida and University of Kentucky.” The Bessemer senior said assessments were done at the

SAC and 10 elliptical machines were chosen. He said one machine produces one kilowatt hour in two days, which is equivalent to powering a vacuum for 6 hours. “A typical 30-minute workout produces 50 watt-hours of clean carbon-free electricity, and that’s equivalent to powering a CFL light for 2.5 hours, it can charge a cell phone 6 times, it can power a laptop for an hour or a desktop for half an hour,” Carver said. He said they have had many tedious meetings with SAC officials and the director of sustainability.

“The project totals at $12,250,” Carver said. “We want to raise some money to incentivize the SAC, to push them faster. It’s stalled out since we have nothing to incentivize them to take action.” They have been offered outside financial help for their project. “After we presented in Chicago, a Sam’s Club executive came up and was really into the project and said if we needed funding, he’d at least give a grand,” Carver said. “We’re actively seeking grants too.”

A GREEN | 5a


VOICES

4A

Wednesday April 25, 2012

| cm-life.com

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | Student debt requires drastic solution, greater oversight

T

Digging a hole

he greatest threat facing the U.S. economy isn’t peak oil, the Eurozone crisis or competition with China; outstanding student debt is already beginning to cripple spending and has the potential to create multiple lost generations.

With outstanding debt rising with each class of graduates entering a brutal job market, tuition rates continuing to rise and the interest rate of many federal loans set to double in July, the situation seems likely to get much worse, quickly. U.S. Representative Hansen Clarke, a Democrat representing Michigan’s 13th District, has proposed legislation to give students and graduates some hope of paying off their education-related debt. His bill, The Student Loan Forgiveness Act of 2012, both acknowledges the precarious state of student debt in America and proposes a tempting and dangerous solution. Clarke’s proposed legislation comes with an important grounding in fact, and it’s encouraging to see that some in government are beginning to take note of a clearly impending crisis. As the bill notes, “Total outstanding student loan debt officially surpassed total credit card debt in the U.S. in 2010, and is on track to exceed $1,000,000,000,000 during 2012.” Hopefully that row of 12 zeroes is enough to get the attention of the many older Americans who dismiss student debt as a petty problem for spoiled

suburban kids. A large part of Clarke’s proposed solution is the “10/10 Loan Repayment Plan,” whereby 10 percent of debtors’ income would be automatically withdrawn to go toward repayment of federal loans for 10 years, at which point the remaining balance would be forgiven. Loan forgiveness is tempting. American students now graduate with an average of more than $25,000 in debt, with that figure rising yearly. This Editorial Board alone, consisting of hardworking students, many benefiting from scholarships and grants, who attend a moderately priced state university, owes more than $120,000 between its six members and would certainly benefit from the more secure future offered by the 10/10 Plan. But simply forgiving loans would have no effect on the universities who continue to raise tuition. Clarke’s bill would do nothing about the sad reality that any money taken in by Central Michigan University has been spent, not always for the benefit of students or faculty. The problem lies in the fact that many public universities view themselves more as businesses than as institutes of

learning. And universities as a business want to make a campus that is flashy, which will make more students want to come and spend their money. This should be clear: Any type of education should never, ever be viewed as a business. Because when it is, the focus changes from producing productive leaders of society to acquiring money. The worst part of this mess is that even if the government was to reinvest in education and double the funding to state universities, it would be hard to imagine that those in charge would be fiscally responsible and begin to take that burden off students. The operating budget for CMU for the 2000-01 academic year was $244 million. The operating budget for CMU for the 2010-11 academic year was $417 million. Tuition for CMU during 2000-01 was $108.15 per credit hour. For the 2010-11 year, credit hours cost $346. If those numbers don’t put in perspective the problems this nation will face in the future with student debt, then nothing will. We’ve relied on administrators and lawmakers to make changes, and instead, they’ve footed the bill to the next generation — it’s a bill that may leave future generations broke, even if they’re prohibited from filing bankruptcy.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Andrew Dooley Staff Reporter

Ruthless bankers make bad neighbors? It turns out the wealthiest Americans haven’t just shattered our economy, corrupted our democracy and saddled future generations with crippling debt — science has proved they’re sh*tty people too. In her excellent article, “How Wealth Reduces Compassion,” published by Scientific American on April 10, Daisy Grewal compiles recent evidence that makes a strong case for wealth having a troublingly powerful effect on a person’s degree of compassion for their fellow humans. Grewal’s piece comes on the back of research into class, empathy and selfishness by University of California, Berkeley psychologists Paul Piff and Dacher Keltner. In one study, Grewal reports, researchers asked subjects to take time comparing themselves either to people better off or worse off than themselves financially. Afterward, those participants were shown a jar of candy and told that they could take home as much as they wanted. They were then told the leftover candy would be given to children in a nearby lab. Those participants who had spent time thinking about how much better off they were compared to others ended

John Irwin Senior Reporter

[LETTER TO THE EDITOR]

Chippewa Pride As I have reflected on my recent Fulbright award, there is one thing I wish every student at CMU felt about their education — pride. Over the last four years, I’ve been quick to diminish the goodness of a Central Michigan education. Mistakenly, I assumed Chippewas weren’t competitive for top graduate programs or national scholarship programs. Here I am, now a recipient of a prestigious fellowship and heading to a graduate program ranked second in the country for my field. As a freshman, I would have said you were crazy if you told me it’d be me on the front page of CMU’s website.

Students here have the potential to achieve greatness. We are competitive against students from University of Michigan and Michigan State University, even against Ivy League students. Personally, the Fulrbight means a lot. Poland has always been a large part of my life and I hope to continue incorporating it into my career. I have worked incredibly hard in my classes, research, internships and extracurriculars to achieve this. However, I think this award serves a bigger purpose. I want it to be an inspiration to any student who doesn’t think they are competitive. I hope it convinces you that your

degree can mean as much from CMU as it does from anywhere else. Central Michigan is not a second-class university. It is a place where learning can and does thrive. Education is a personal journey. So I can’t give you a magic formula for success, but find your passion. Pursue it. Do research. Find internships. Work hard. Get involved. Find confidence in your abilities. Own your education and your success. Seek out advice from professors. Above all, be proud to be a Chippewa. Stephanie Jaczkowski Clinton Township senior

[comments] Comments in response to “Students react harshly to rhetoric of Westboro Baptist Church” Mccla2al College people are for the most part intelligent. We don’t all drink and the fact that you generalize a whole group makes you look ignorant. There are many Christians including myself on campus who read the bible regularly. Obvious-

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

ly you don’t or else you wouldn’t praise a group that spreads such hate acting as if it’s the word of god. “For God so LOVED the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.” John 3:16. Obviously bible study is too much for YOU.

Florenceschneider Phoenix Lee - If you think the Bible and Christian Faith back what the WBC espouse, then you are Biblically illiterate and spiritually void. WBC = H.A.T.E If you think there is anything but a warm place in Hell for these Christians In Name Only (CINOs) then you are sadly mistaken.

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Just how stupid are the Saints? The New Orleans Saints must have the worst luck and maybe the lowest ethical standards of any professional sports team in the world. Just weeks after suspensions and fines were handed out for the now-infamous bounty scandal, in which Saints coaches rewarded defensive players injuring opposing offensive players with cash rewards, a new scandal has just broken out. This time the Saints might be in trouble with the law. According to an ESPN “Outside the Lines” report, the Saints allegedly set up the booth of General Manager Mickey Loomis so that he could listen in on opposing coaches during home games from 2002 through 2004, only to be disabled in 2005 as the Superdome was transformed into a shelter while Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans. The Saints went a mediocre 1212 at home during that stretch, but did noticeably better after halftime than they did at the start of the game. The Saints have called the allegations “1,000 percent false.” But if these claims are proven to be true, this will put the 2004 New England Patriots Spygate scandal to shame. Not only is this against NFL rules and regulations, this is in potential violation of federal and state law. The FBI and Louisiana state police are both looking into the allegations. I’m not going to pretend I’m an expert on federal law or Louisiana state law, so I’ll leave the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

up taking significantly more candy for themselves — leaving less behind for the children. It gets worse from there. From rude driving to muted reactions to tear-jerking videos of children struggling with cancer, substantial evidence was found that suggests wealth makes people less aware of the importance of other people’s problems. Despite what logic might suggest, the studies found that those of moderate or meager means are actually more empathetic the poorer they are. Those who struggle the most still remember the importance of a helping hand. This is not some claim that capitalism should be immediately and permanently replaced by something distributive and equally dystopic. Instead, it’s a evidence-based explanation of the disconnect between our legislators, both state and local, and the people they claim to represent. It’s yet another reason why the election of politicians purely on the basis of social issues like gay marriage, prayer in schools, Islamophobia and abortion has left us with a group of largely wealthy white men who don’t seem to understand the issues of their constituents. Mortgage reform? Health care reform? Student loan reform? In a country where the rich own multiple homes, have generous insurance and don’t worry about the cost of education, it should be no surprise that the pain of everyone else, of the 99 percent, to borrow a phrase, is not only ignored but easily dismissed. Empathy comes from shared experience, or at the very least, interaction. With the rise of gated communities and other forms of hypersegregation based on class, there’s no need to acknowledge privilege. There’s no need for you or your kids to be worried about the hungry children on the other side of the fence. Reminds me of a classic joke: What’s the different between a porcupine and a BMW? Porcupines have pricks on the outside.

legal analysis of this scandal to legal scholars and writers who wish they were legal scholars. There’s one question that I’d like to ask Loomis and other higher-ups in the Saints, though: Just how stupid are you? Arrogance and stupidity are nothing new in sports. Players that are raised under the spotlight their entire lives because of their talents have a different mindset than most growing up. If they do something obviously wrong and it leaks out, then no one is usually too surprised. But seeing this kind of idiocy coming from a front office not run by Matt Millen is truly amazing. How could Loomis or others in the Saints front office not foresee knowledge their top secret wiretapping technology leaking out to the public, especially in today’s never-ending news cycle? This kind of story is irresistible to journalists and shocking to the public. That means it was bound to leak out. And guess what? It did, and at the worst possible moment for this embattled franchise. Loomis needs to be fired, not only because of any legal ramifications that may come out of this, but also because of his pure stupidity.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

GREEN | continued from 3A

SIFE’s other project stems from something many take for granted every day — clean drinking water. Their Honduras Sustainability Project won first runner-up at the conference. “The idea was Honduras was a very poor country and it has record number of people suffering from various illnesses that can be easily cured with clean water,” said Shiva Ganganithi, SIFE marketing chairman and project presenter. “The main illnesses they were suffering from were diarrhea, cholera, sore throat, upset stomach — all those are directly correlated with bad water.”

MOST | continued from 3A

and Sesame Street. “When I found out, I was surprised and humbled at being a nominee,” Most said. “The other nominees in my category include Amnesty International, Sesame Street and the Girl Scouts, so I am definitely the David in a lineup of Goliaths — websites that have been done (by) much larger teams for wellknown organizations.” There are two awards given for each category. One is given by the academy judges and the other is given by popular vote during the Webby People’s Voice voting. People’s Voice voting can be done on the Webby Awards site and ends April 26.

DEBATE | continued from 3A

“It was amazing,” Valley said. “It was a great experience.” The CMU Debate and Forensic team has 18 active members, which have competed in 18 competitions this year around the country from San Diego to Boston. Because of school funding, students travel with all expenses paid. “To produce a debate case is

BERRY | continued from 3A

Many students have said Berry is one of their favorite professors. “I think that in his classes, you felt you were learning stuff you would need in a real-life setting,” said Kendall Boyle, a West Bloomfield Township senior. “Even his

[News] Ganganithi, a Troy senior, said the water source, a river, was only a foot and a half wide. “Upstream, people were actually going and ‘doing their business,’” he said. “So all that infested water was coming down and people were drinking that infested water.” The SIFE team partnered with Omar Keith Helferich, professor of marketing and hospitality services administration, to find a solution. “We figured that would be an issue we could deal with and we wanted to work on an international issue,” Ganganithi said. To fund the project, SIFE held a benefit concert at Rubble’s Bar, 112 W. Michigan St., and then purchased five filters, $80

each. SIFE President Sean Cale, a Clarkston junior, traveled to Tegucigalpa in March to install them. Their ultimate goal is to convince the Honduran government to purchase 40,000 units. The team will continue to collect data from the area bi-annually to demonstrate the filters’ benefits. “I found the idea of helping out people in another country very alluring,” Ganganithi said. “There’s not many opportunities where you can go in and have a venue where you can do that.” For students interested in joining the organization next fall, contact central.michigan. sife@gmail.com.

Most said he is confident his site can compete in terms of the academy vote, but encourages students to vote for his site while voting is still open. “For the Academy vote, I think we have a reasonable chance in our category, although I am very happy just to have been nominated,” he said. “The People’s Voice award is more about social marketing than anything else. These larger agencies and organizations simply have much larger social networks than I have. However, if the campus community reading this article votes by Thursday, I may have a chance.” Most designed the site, completed the research, interviews and photography and acted as his own copywriter. Additionally, he designed the animated elements on the site while work-

ing with former CMU student Ryan Lee on the site development. “Most of the work done on site took place over a three-year period, although I have been visiting the reservation periodically for about 15 years,” Most said. “Much of the research was done during my sabbatical leave two years ago and a CMU grant helped with some of the expenses.” Winners will be announced on May 1. “The main advantage of the publicity (that comes with winning) would be that the traffic to the site may increase support for meaningful programs on Pine Ridge,” Most said. “If I win, I’m heading to New York City for the awards event. Perhaps I’ll get to eat dinner with David Bowie.”

equivalent to the work it takes to do a Master’s thesis,” said Philip Tschirhart, assistant coach and master’s candidate. “Though it’s a lot of work, being on the debate team is great. It is a really great academic support system because of the diversity of majors and the intelligence.” Hinchey, a health administration major and president of the team, said anyone can join. “Public speaking is definitely something that’s important, but it’s also something that is acquired while on the team

through various debates,” she said. By joining the debate team, students can also satisfy their oral competency requirement by competing at two events. Those interested in joining can attend the final CMU Debate and Forensic team meeting at 4:30 p.m. Friday in Moore 209 or email Director Ed Hinck at hinck1e@cmich.edu or Hinchey at hinch1ae@cmich. edu.

lectures are interesting. I just thoroughly enjoyed all of his classes that I took.” “He’s my favorite professor, and I think without him, the advertising department wouldn’t exist,” said Canton junior Jackie Denomme. “He has the best experience. He’s just realistic with you and very respectable. He teaches you without talking down.” Bay City senior Kyah Dubay said Berry’s career experience

is an asset in the classroom. “I love that his teaching experience came from his professional experience and everything he has to say is directly applicable not only to class, but real life,” she said. “I’ve never met a professor so enthusiastic and passionate about having his students succeed. I worship the ground he walks on.”

studentlife@cm-life.com

studentlife@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

RECONSTRUCTION | continued from 3A

would be enough.” Joslin argued any unforeseen, but necessary changes in street construction plans ought to come from a street fund, because transferring funds from the Economic Development Fund would be like taking money from “the wrong bucket.” Kilmer agreed, expressing his preference to go with the city’s original recommendation. “The best thing to do is to give the city manager the flexibility if a contingency arises to approve it,” he said. “If this would have come to us last

time and the estimate had been $70,000 more, we would have approved it.” According to city documents, the total cost of the Michigan Street project is estimated to be $756,855 when Malley Construction’s bid is combined with project management fees and engineering and design costs. The total amount only leaves a $4,100 contingency, or money available to handle change orders. The city has a history with Malley Construction, which Public Works Director Roger Rousse said doesn’t include significant, last-minute changes

mid-project. Grinzinger said funding includes a $375,000 grant from the Michigan Department of Transportation, which processed the project’s bids. Last fall, she said commissioners decided the project would include landscaping and sidewalk and brick work to be visually equivalent to the rest of the downtown area. The first phase of street work was completed in 2010. Construction is pegged on Michigan between Washington and Fancher streets and is set to be carried out over two four-week periods.

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || 5A


6A || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[SPORTS]

S TA F F V I E W P O I N T

Baseball fans: Don’t panic yet

Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter Don’t sound the alarms, don’t shoot off the warning flares and don’t panic just yet. The Central Michigan baseball team may be 7-8 in the Mid-American Conference and sitting in fourth place at the halfway point of a division it was picked to win, but there are three reasons why I think the team will be just fine. No. 1: The Chippewas don’t play a single team ranked better than third in the MAC from here on out, whereas Toledo and Eastern Michigan still have to play each other. Although CMU is 7-8, the team is two games behind

both the Rockets and Eagles, who are tied for first in the MAC West. The Chippewas have Akron, Ball State, Northern Illinois and Western Michigan remaining on schedule. Who better to play after dropping back-to-back series then the Zips, who (although are 9-6 in MAC play and third in the East) have not beat the Chippewas in a series since 2002 and are 1-11 against the Chippewas since 2006 (with the last win coming in 2007). Then they play a struggling Cardinals team on the road and the Huskies at home before finishing the season with the Broncos at home. No. 2: The MAC overall has been pretty weak. Yes, CMU has an overall record of 18-24, but in comparison to the rest of the conference, that isn’t terribly bad. The MAC overall is 220-264, with Kent State and Ohio be-

ing the only two teams with winning records. If the Chippewas can take care of business and sweep a series or two, they’ll find themselves fighting for the top spot in the division. No. 3: This is the most important. CMU has won backto-back MAC West Championships and won the division in 2010, despite conference losses. The Chippewas are loaded with seniors who have been here before and I’m willing to bet they aren’t worried either. Seniors William Arnold, Sam Russell, Nate Theunissen, Tyler Hall and Zach Cooper, not to mention head coach Steve Jaksa who has four MAC West Championships, to name a few that have won two straight MAC West Championships. CMU needs to qualify for the MAC Tournament and once it’s there, anyone can win it.

ANDREW KUHN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Tyler Hall is one of many seniors on the baseball team who have won back-to-back MAC West titles.

Key remaining Mid-American Conference games This weekend CMU vs. Akron Akron comes in for a threegames series. The Zips have not won a series with CMU since 2002.

May 4-6 CMU at Northern Illinois The Chippewas go to NIU and face the worst team in the MAC West. The Huskies 5-10 record in the MAC is second worst.

May 11-13 CMU vs. Ball State After NIU, BSU has the next worst record in the MAC West. The Cardinals will play three games at Theunissen Stadium.

GOLF

Mount Pleasant golf courses see business boom with warm weather By Ryan Zuke Senior Reporter

This mild spring has done more than just increase the number of dog walkers and rollerbladers around town. Local golf courses in Mount Pleasant have also seen an increase in business because of warmer temperatures in March and April. Jeremy Lawless, director of operations at Riverwood Resort, 1313 E. Broomfield Road, said it is more business than typically budgeted for. “The nice weather has

been beautiful for us in a business sense, because more people want to be outside,” Lawless said. “There’s nothing better than being able to be out on the golf course in early April. It’s basically a bonus month of golf.” The weather also allowed Riverwood to save on labor costs. Lawless said the company did not have to spend as many hours cleaning the course after winter. “This has to be the best course conditions we have had in April in a long time,” Lawless said. “Without the

heavy snow melt we have normally had in the past, we opened up early and haven’t had all the overflow from the winter.” Jon Conklin, head golf professional at Bucks Run Golf Club, 1559 S. Chippewa Road, said the relatively dry spring has been vital in maintaining course conditions as well. “What we are seeing right now is actually the course is in better shape because

it is not as wet and we can get carts out on the course faster,” he said. But because of the lower rates in April, Jason Clark, general manager at Pohlcat Golf Course, 6595 E. Airport Road, said they do not generate as much revenue as they do in the summer, despite the increase in business. “From an overall standpoint, we still don’t make a heck of a lot of money because our prices are lower,”

“It’s basically a bonus month of golf.” Jeremy Lawless, director of operations at Riverwood Resort

BASEBALL

Ryan Heeke, son of athletics director, joins CMU baseball family By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

If you look through the Central Michigan baseball roster you will see some familiar names. You will see senior Nate Theunissen and think of the Theunissen Stadium (named after his grandfather Bill Theunissen). You see freshman Marc Jaksa, son of head coach Steve Jaksa. Another name that jumps out is redshirt freshman Ryan Heeke, son of the CMU Athletics Director Dave Heeke. “It’s a little different (being the son of an AD) when you’re in college than in high school,” Ryan said. “When you’re in high school it’s fun because you get to take your friends on the sidelines, but in college those are your friends playing on the sidelines.” One would imagine recruiting Ryan to CMU wasn’t

a very tough job for Steve. Despite being a highly-decorated player out of Mount Pleasant High School, not many schools Ryan Heeke were taking in interest in Ryan because of a knee injury that ended his senior season. “I was recruited a little bit from other schools, but after my injury not many schools (were interested), so I just wanted to come here,” Ryan said. After his senior season, which he batted .424 with 11 doubles, three triples, 30 RBIs and 29 stolen bases, Ryan was named to the 2011 Division II All-State Team, the Morning Sun Dream Team, Saginaw News Dream Team and Detroit News Dream Team. He was also a part of the Michigan High School Base-

ball Coaches Association All-Star Game at Comerica Park. “He’s a left-handed hitter, we like left-handed hitters and he can run a bit, play some outfield as well as second base for us,” Jaksa said. “We just got him back in January, but we like his swing, his work ethic and he’s a smart guy.” Jaksa said next season Ryan will get a look at second base and time in the outfield. With the name Heeke your last name is synonymous with all things Chippewas – the good and bad. “I might hear it behind my back, not in front of me too much,” Ryan said. “The good stuff they’ll say to my face; the bad, probably not.” His father has the luxury of having his son stay home and not only join him at CMU, but be a part of one of the most successful programs his school has to offer.

Although Ryan is being redshirted this season, you can imagine that his father is watching over the team, not just as an AD, but as a parent watching his son’s team play. sports@cm-life.com

Clark said. “But traffic is good and it’s revenue we didn’t have last year.” Those lower spring rates are appealing to college students. All three courses said they see the most Central Michigan students in the early spring, before school is out and before prices rise. “The spring time is definitely when we see the most CMU students,” Lawless said. “They all have that itch to play. And being so close to campus, they are coming out here in bunches and having a great time.” Clark said most of their

business is driven by wordof-mouth. Pohlcat has hosted several fraternity and sorority events and relies on good feedback from customers. Both the CMU club golf team and the Mount Pleasant High School team use the facility, which creates more business for the course. This is the first year Pohlcat is in the CMU employee discount card program and Clark said he is expecting to see more faculty and administration on the course as well. sports@cm-life.com

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VIBE

Central Michigan Life

[ I N S I D E] w Read your weekly horoscope, 2B w MOVIE REVIEW: “Chimpanzee” hampered slightly by Tim Allen going bananas on narration, 4B w ADVICE COLUMN: Summer struggles, other thoughts in last column, 4B w ALBUM REVIEW: Jason Mraz’s “Love is a Four Letter Word” succeeds with new blues sound, 6B

Section B

| Wednesday, April 25, 2012

w Check out this week’s podcast about graduation, animals and bachelorette parties

| cm-life.com

THE LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL Graduation commencement: To walk or not? Story by Jessica Fecteau | Senior Reporter Photo illustration by Jeff Smith | Staff Photographer

In high school, it’s odd for a student to skip their graduation commencement. In college, the ceremony is optional. The big graduation days begin on May 4 for Central Michigan University students in the Events Center. But is accepting this diploma in front of a big crowd such a big deal? Some say yes. Ann Arbor senior Kara Jacobitz’s decision to walk to get her diploma included her parents.

“I mostly am walking for my parents’ sake, because it is a meaningful moment for them to see their baby girl graduate from college,” Jacobitz said. “Plus, I figure if I ever have kids, I imagine I would want to see them walk, so I can throw it in their faces that I walked.” She said it’s mostly about giving in to a social norm and following a proper sequence in which walking is the final step to completing college and closing that chapter of her life. West Bloomfield Township senior Kyle Minch said he’s not planning on attending commencement because of his bitterness toward his experience at CMU. “I am not going because I feel no personal connection with the university whatsoever,” said Minch. “After five years of being here, living here, involved in the CMU experience and coming out at the end feeling nothing, I

choose not to walk because I am not proud of going here. I am not impressed with the education I received here and feel no reason to celebrate my current success with the university.” For senior Laura Baker, this will technically be her second time graduating, but she said she is deciding not to walk, because she doesn’t think it’s a big deal. “I was supposed to graduate last year, but I ended up not having all the requirements, so I didn’t officially graduate, but I walked,” the Flint native said. “I officially graduate now in May, but I’m not going to walk, because my sister is graduating too and I don’t want to steal her shine.” Baker said she is looking forward to being with her family after the ceremony. Alumnus Dan Crowley said he wishes he could have gone to his graduation commencement in December. “I ended up going to my cousin’s

wedding instead and they threw a graduation party, but I would’ve liked to go,” he said. “I spent four and a half years and worked really, really hard on this degree and I was proud of it, and it would’ve been nice to be recognized.” Driving from her new home of Chicago back to Michigan for graduation is not a decision CMU alumna Anna Siroonian says she regrets. “It was definitely worth it,” Siroonian said. “You work so hard for four years; everyone should be able to make that graduation final by walking.” To make it through what some people say is a long and boring ceremony, Siroonian said to take advantage of the seating. “Sit next to your friends for sure,” she said. “And I really wish people would have thrown their graduation caps at the end like they do in every single movie.” studentlife@cm-life.com

AN ECONOMIC CRISIS

High unemployment, student loan debt greet class of 2012 By John Irwin | Senior Reporter

A perfect storm of unemployment, lack of opportunity and debt is creating the newest economic crisis ready to greet the class of 2012 as it graduates, and there are no easy fixes. According to a study conducted for The Associated Press, 53.6 percent of young adults age 25 or younger with bachelor’s degrees find themselves without a job or underemployed, working lowwage jobs that only require a high school degree or less and do not take advantage of their skills. Jobs graduates would normally take are no longer there as older, more experienced workers take those jobs because of the recession. On top of that, most studies show as much as 95 percent of job growth coming from the top and bottom of the wage scale, with middle-income jobs normally reserved for those with bachelor’s degrees disappearing because new technological breakthroughs. This compounds the problem of high student loan debt. Graduates out of work or struggling to get by find themselves increasingly unable to pay back their loans to the government or private institutions.

Student loan debt has grown rapidly over time. Total debt now has reached $870 billion, exceeding credit card debt and auto loans, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

According to a 2011 report by the Project on Student Debt, students in the class of 2010 owe an average of $25,250 in student loan debt. Central Michigan University graduates from that same year owe an average of $28,142, with 74 percent of students graduating with debt, well above the state averages. Most student loan debt, according to a 2011 report by the College Board, is owed to the federal government. As federal aid has expanded, nonfederal loans (which usually have less favorable interest rates) comprised only 7 percent of education-related borrowing in 2010-11, down from roughly 25 percent just a few years earlier. “The private student loan market has consolidated in recent years, with a number of smaller lenders leaving the business and some larger lenders selling their loans to others,” the College Board said in its report. This presents an urgent issue for federal lawmakers on Capitol Hill to address. On July 1, interest rates on federallysubsidized loans are set to jump from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent unless action is taken. A DEBT | 2B

Student Loan Borrowers by Age in 2011: Q3 Total Number of Borrowers: 37 million Under 30 30 to 39

26.9% 39.6%

40 to 49 50 to 59 60 and over Age not known

14.3%

11.8% 5.3% Source: The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax

Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342

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2B || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

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Leaders in both parties are looking to keep interest rates from going up. President Barack Obama and presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney have both called on Congress to keep rates where they are. “We cannot let America become a country where a

shrinking number of people do really well, while a growing number of people struggle to get by,” Obama said on Saturday in his weekly address, speaking on student loan debt. Other lawmakers are looking to go a step further. Rep. Hansen Clarke, DMich., introduced the Student Loan Forgiveness Act of 2012 in March. The bill would forgive outstanding student loan debt for students who have made pay-

ments equal to 10 percent of their income for 10 years. “This bill provides student loan borrowers with a second chance, those who have been struggling financially,” Clarke said in a news release. “By cutting this debt, this frees up their money to invest on their own. That will create new jobs throughout this country.” The bill has yet to come up for a vote. studentlife@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || 3B

[VIBE] S TA F F V I E W P O I N T S

An address to freshmen: Bring a coat but you will quickly find that plans and class schedules are much more amorphous now that the only person you are beholden to is yourself. Don’t let this get you down, but don’t let it excite you too much, either. Solitude is a gift best returned. Take part in all the student groups you can, but don’t let them become your life. Your parents, your part-time job or most likely your future credit rating are not paying thousands of dollars a year so you can pull your hair out resolving drama in the herpetological society or pacifying snakes in the grass in the theatre club. If you’re doing something so you can put it on your resume, stop. Ride a bike whenever possible — it’s decent exercise and more fun than walking,

Connor Sheridan Online Coordinator You incoming freshmen are headed into what has been repeatedly described as the best years of your life, so I will try to keep my remarks short and not give them a bad start. Forgive me if I ramble, it’s my way of coping with the looming end to four years of more learning and growing than I ever expected. I also went to class. Bring a coat. You probably think you will head home and refresh your wardrobe in a few weeks after the fall semester starts,

always, always burn you back. You don’t need to be your roommate’s friend, but you should be friendly with your roommates. Experience freely. Commit selectively, especially to things you don’t think you’re committing to. Don’t go to the same bar every night. Don’t hang out with the same people every night. Don’t drink just to drink, but don’t not drink just to not drink. You can have fun if you know your limits. Know your limits. You are not here to study, and you are not here to party. You are here to grow, in the hopes that you will be a better person to have around by the time you leave. Take courses outside your degree. Argue with a philosophy professor at least once, especially if you are a philosophy major.

but don’t expect distracted students to get out of your way. You’ll both be disappointed. At the start of the semester it will be very warm and you will think you have months before any article of clothing will have to descend below your knee caps. You will be wrong. You still live in Michigan, even if you no longer have a driveway to shovel. Bring a coat. You should not be desperate for love, but neither should you fear it. There will never be a better or worse time to begin a relationship. That will always be true. If it does not work out, always part on the best terms you can. Burning bridges is bad for the environment and will

Sit in the student section at a sports game if you ever feel your school pride dipping too low, and sit in the public seats at a board of trustees meeting if you ever feel too content with your university. And please, if by some act of God or Goldschlager you come to disregard the contents of this address, do

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Andrew Dooley Student Life Editor As hip-hop pioneer Aristotle once wrote in a poem later turned into a lyric by intrepid philosopher Kanye West: “We outta here baby.” And by “we,” I mean “me.” Or is it “I?” In writing this I realized me never really nailed that bit of knowledge down either. I did learn how to do all kinds of things during my half-decade sentence in college, not all of them practical, some of them decidedly unprofessional. Still, I am leaving this sandbox of a campus some kind of halfmature semi-adult, which is a remarkable achievement considering the swampish emo child who was tricked into coming here five long years ago. Seriously, take a look at my Campus I.D. photo taken in the muggy summer of 2007: (pause for laughter)

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babies or something else awful. Nutritional supplement turned songstress Vitamin C reminds us that soon this beautiful stressparty will be over. Don’t worry friends, let her soothing words resonate in your heart: “As we go on, we remember All the times we had together And as our lives change, from whatever We will still be, friends forever.” Word. But really, I probably won’t ever see you guys again.

If you know in your gut that you’re headed for something miserable, even if it’s safe, change now. Nothing is going to go as planned anyway, you’re at the CMU that can’t even get cmu.edu as its website, so why don’t you at least go through the insanity of life doing something you want? As Beatle and ruiner of round glasses John Lennon once said, “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.” (pause for vomit) Do I know exactly where I’ll be in six months? Sure don’t. But remember that most people who are positive are full of it anyway. Or, they’re going to still be in school in the wealthiest country in history, which is the best possible place on Earth to be right now. The economy could be well and truly destroyed thanks to some important politician’s off-the-cuff insult of someone’s ant farm or something (moment of honesty: I took a class in economics and six credits of political science classes, and that’s the best I could do) and you will still be in college. A safe place. Want to give your hair the Skrillex treatment? Of course you do, you edgy little dishmop. And you know what? No one will bat an eye. You can’t be fired from college. I know this, because if students could be, I would have been canned years ago. Instead, I’m walking out of here, intact and something of a better person. At least a less naive person. Remember to enjoy yourself. Soon enough you’ll have reasonable adult haircuts, student loan payments (haha, oh are we doomed or what?) and probably

Editor’s note: You might also consider wearing sunscreen.

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Goodbye, happy flat mountain That was a person who honestly believed the world of college graduates consisted entirely of intelligent, wellmeaning, open-minded adults. He also thought people would speak to him even with that haircut and wearing a Bathing Ape hoodie. That person was an idiot. As someone who has now dipped a toe in the professional world and will be receiving a diploma shortly, I can assure you life will continue to be a series of slightly better dressed high schools forever. So, I can’t offer any kind of perfect plan of action, because the things that have gone best in my life have come from blind luck or happy accidents. Still, taking a risk every now and then is probably a good idea. I am fairly certain the person who decided they want to be an accountant/nursing assistant/ technical writer at 17, probably for career and security reasons, then wakes up at 30 as a miserable accountant/sperm bank guard/sperm bank accountant will be pretty upset with their grown-ass selves for listening to the pathetic person they were at 17.

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4B || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Movie Review

cm-life.com/category/vibe

[VIBE] Advice column

Summer struggles, other thoughts her and enjoy talking to her, but I am concerned those things will be a problem later on down the road.”

By Jordan Spence Staff Reporter

Photo Courtesy of Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund

“I’ve been talking to a girl for about a month now and she stays the night about once or twice a week. She just got out of a long relationship in December and is going home for the summer. I’ll be here in Mount Pleasant while she is at home, more than two hours away. I don’t know what to do or if we should just stay single and see what happens in the fall. The other thing is, I don’t know if she can make me happy. I am a very picky guy and there are things about her that seem to bother me sometimes. I really do like

If you’ve been seeing this girl a few times a week for a month, I think that’s enough time to figure out what you want to do about the relationship. It sounds like you have a lot of reservations about moving it further though, so I wouldn’t. With all that you’ve said, you just don’t sound that into her. I think when people both mutually really like each other, they will do whatever they can to be together, including long distance. I would just stay single until you do find a girl that you would do anything for, including driving two hours to see her. If you decide to be single, realize there’s a difference between picky and impossible. Hopefully you’re picky and not expecting girls to be perfect,

because they aren’t and neither are you. Be selective in the right way. So what if a girl doesn’t have the same musical tastes, dresses differently and her idea of cooking is Rice-A-Roni? Does she have a good heart? Is she not selfish? Does your face light up when she enters the room? That’s what you you need to look for. If you are happy in a relationship, you won’t question it, you’ll just know. Readers, this is my last relationship column for Central Michigan Life, so I won’t need you to send me any more questions. This has been a fun and interesting experience, and because of it, I’ve discovered a whole other type of writing I enjoy. Hopefully I helped some of you, but if I didn’t, at least I tried.

‘Chimpanzee’ hampered slightly by Tim Allen going bananas on narration Graduating seniors share advice, feelings about taking the next step HHHHH By Jordan LaPorte Staff Reporter

It is not surprising that a documentary called “Chimpanzee” focuses on the lives of chimpanzees living deep within the jungle. What is surprising about “Chimpanzee” is the stunningly human story that transpires throughout the film. The movie follows a group of chimpanzees over four years, with the main focus being put on Oscar, one of the youngest members in the group. Much of the early footage depicts Oscar learning how to carry out basic tasks like climbing trees or cracking nuts, with the guidance of his mother Isha. These scenes are not only incredibly cute, but also quite funny. In the nut cracking scene, for example, Oscar is using a tree branch to try to crack open a nut. He hasn’t yet grasped the proper technique, so while the nut remains intact, Oscar’s branch keeps breaking into smaller pieces.

It’s one of the many scenes in the film that couldn’t be any better even if it was scripted. The film also shows the darker side of life in the jungle. A rival group of chimpanzees want to take over the land occupied by Oscar’s group. There are a couple times throughout the film when the two groups get into dramatic conflicts. One of these conflicts leaves Oscar alone in the jungle, and the story that follows will no doubt grip audiences’ emotions and have them eagerly waiting to see what happens next. The film is not only emotionally engaging, but it’s absolutely breathtaking to look at as well. Everything from the canopy to the small insect life is shot with incredible detail. The fantastic visuals do more than just look pretty, they help immerse the audience into the environment and make them feel even closer to the drama unfolding. Oddly enough, the one human present in “Chimpanzee” is the worst thing about it. Tim Allen narrates the events on screen, and while everything

studentlife@cm-life.com

‘Chimpanzee’

By Melissa Beauchamp Senior Reporter

w Genre: Documentary w Rating: G starts off alright, it gets annoying quickly. It’s not that his narration is all that bad; he just seems to never stop talking. The body language and facial expressions of the chimpanzees speak volumes about their emotional condition at any given time, so it seems unnecessary when Allen explicitly states how each chimpanzee is feeling whenever they’re on screen. If anything, it detracts from the subtle beauty of seeing how amazingly human the chimpanzees act. Overall, “Chimpanzee” is a beautifully engaging drama that will be appealing to just about any age group — just try to ignore the mediocre narration. studentlife@cm-life.com

Amanda Lesch said coming to campus was a whole new step for her. “I didn’t know anyone at CMU,” the Benton Harbor senior said. “It was the best decision I’ve ever made.” Lesch said students should get involved right away if they know what they want to pursue. She is graduating in May with a degree in child development and plans to go to graduate school at Central Michigan University. “It’s kind of what you have to do,” she said. “I have years to (go), but it’s a whole different step.” Rockford senior Elizabeth Roelse said after four years attending CMU, her best advice to students is to embrace the experience and don’t rush through it. “Don’t make it take four

years,” she said. “Make it take longer. You don’t have to cram it in.” She said many people establish friendships outside of class when they should be looking inside classes, where people have so much in common. Roelse said although she’s grown into her own person, she isn’t ready for the next step. “You go through good and bad, but you become more of just you,” she said. In September, Roelse will continue her education in CMU’s dietetics internship program. “I keep trying to get out of here, but I keep getting pulled back,” she said. “I guess I have work to do.” Davison senior Emily Edmonds will move to Chicago on May 18 to attend Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. She said she’s worked so

hard and now it’s here. “Going into health care, people’s lives are in my hands,” she said. She said she doesn’t feel ready, but it’s as ready as she will ever be. “I can’t believe four years have come and gone so fast,” she said. “It’s nice to know I don’t need to go into the real world just yet, but it’s scary to think I have two more years of school.” She said she can’t wait to get out of Mount Pleasant, but she will miss her family and friends. “I’m going to start crying,” she said. Edmonds said she regrets not getting involved on campus until junior year. The football games, going out and meeting new people made the experience worthwhile for her. “Just take in everything Central has to offer,” she said. studentlife@cm-life.com


5B || Wednesday, April 25, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

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Stay in touch with CMU and Mt. Pleasant news all summer long! Photo Courtesy of sweetlyrics.com

Album Review

Jason Mraz’s ‘Love is a Four Letter Word’ succeeds with blues sound

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Pleasant, MI 48859 • braphone and nice touches of Things.” guitar. ed The albumed isClassifi a Ad cross section aofClassifi Placing ed Ad ajazz Classifi Policy &Classifi Rates Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad Placing ed Ad a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed He doesn’t leave his main- “5/6”) and even some of his Mraz’s style, from some of stream fans hanging, though. hisadvertising hip blues and jazz compospop tunes come stiff some-accept ept which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life refloff ects will not discrimination knowingly because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu Phone: 989-774-3493 Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 ational origin, andpop-rock of CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or andof CM Life color, reserves religion, theclasright sexto orreject national or and“Michael of CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to “Everything israce, Sound” is times, a bit Bublé.” ingByto the that has vertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Stude By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 Byhe’s Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and centered Bold, italic centered Bold, italic centered Bold, italic and hip-but-sunny Mraz, If looking sound hip him so famous. 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 p emade standards of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with thesic standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Life inwill keeping bepepresponsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isto not Life in will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will$7.75 be respo typetypographical are the available along typetypographical are the available along typetypographical are the available along type are the available e extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge errors for risks the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge along for the spa pered with smart production and loose, taking more Those bluesy ideas, though, om By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p with and other special features with and other special features with and other special features with other special features ch an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited choices (baritone sax, electric and outside the lines really are remarkable; “5/6” is 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall Incoloring Person: 436 Moore Hall ny credit due canthe befipicked rst date up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due canthe befipicked rst Issues: date up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: date up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. picked up at the CM L organ), andfind from standard wouldn’t his sound. toanthe experimenfMraz’s the ad. If trip you find within error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi the ed ad. If you within an error, 30 days report of termination it topop the Classifi the ed ad. If you hurt find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to theAClassifi the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the C 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: p Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 p.m. ya.m.-5 responsible the Dept. fiof rstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. tracks like “93 Million Miles” couple of contours through tal, jazzy for side his work, and it comes off cool and smooth. to “The World As I See It,” we the horn parts, a few more 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE ALWAYS DAY! EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF ALWAYS hear aAT lotREADERS ofMORE the ALWAYS Mraz we’re OPEN well-played fills, or aTHAN more OPEN It’s nice toREADERS seeMORE a pop artist play OPEN energetic drummer wouldn’t with mixed meters like this, used to. His current single, “I Won’t have hurt. too — the piece is alternating That being said, “Love is a bars of five and six, hence the Give Up,” comes in two vername — but what makes it sions; the radio edit and an Four Letter Word” won’t dispop out of the album’s lineup acoustic demo track with a appoint fans. It has the feel of Mraz’s classic sound in the is the mood. Cool, dark, re- more personal feel. Of course, the album has most important places, and served and soulful, it’s begging its drawbacks. Mraz’s stomp- even manages to stay fresh for a tenor sax cover. It’s nice to see Mraz moving ing grounds have always been and ahead of the curve — toward bluesy ideas like these, light pop-rock, so his forays to- something that will keep old turf so often reserved for art- ward jazz and blues influenc- fans entertained and maybe ists outside mainstream mu- es sometimes sound forced. win him some new ones. Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU • cm-life.com sic, because it means we don’t Some of his jazziest songs have to listen to him paint (“The Freedom Song” and studentlife@cm-life.com By Sam Easter Staff Reporter

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, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • w

ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi eded Ad Rates Classifi eded Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

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discrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, r Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 CM word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu Phone: 989-774-3493 Phone: 989-774-3493 Phone: 989-774-3493 gin, ect By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, adv eping on of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of with Student the standards Media which Board, of and CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of and CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of and CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: p cancelling ypographical the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and charge for the are space us centered type are type are type are type om By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along available along available along available along by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of with publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of with publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of with publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publicat Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 In Person: Moore Hall In Person: Moore Hall In Person: Moore Hall other special features other special other special other special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the credit ad. offifeatures ce Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. offifeatures ce If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find a Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issuefor thelike Issues: $7.00 p like ad attractors. like attractors. like attractors. attractors. sifi onsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. We are only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF ALWAYS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 WANTED NOTICES TOMoore RENTHall WANTED NOTICES TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

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AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY!

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HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

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DUPLEX 214 N. Arnold St. Mt. Pleasant MI. 2 bedroom 1 bath/big backyard. Aug 10, 2012 to July 31 2013 $520 plus utilities. Pets allowed. 517-403-4587.

HERITAGE SQUARE TOWN HOUSES Only 1- 6 bedroom left! Free Cable & Internet + Full Size W/D CALL NOW TO START SAVING! 989-773-2333.

CHERRY STREET TOWN HOUSES 3 or 4 People 1 1/2 Bath Free Cable & Internet + Washer & Dryer Walk to Campus and Downtown Starting at $280 per person 989-773-2333.

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letter PETS and spirit U.S. policy SPECIAL SECTION WANTED TOof RENT for the achievement of equal

housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

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1 AND 3 bedroom apartments close to campus and downtown. 989-621-7538. 1- 5 BEDROOM homes available jAugust 2012! Starting at $350/ mo. Partlo Property Management 989-779-9886 www.partloproperty.com

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

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2 BEDROOM APARTMENT downtown within walking distance to bars, restaurants, parks, campus. $350/pp/ month One year lease available June 1st No pets. 989-289-2848..

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

AIR CONDITIONED TOWNHOUSE for June or August. Two bedrooms quiet yet close to campus. Includes heat, Wi Fi, Internet, cable, water, dishwasher. $405/ pp. 989-772-1061. nptdev@gmail.com.

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SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

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GREAT HOUSE. QUIET, clean, no $220 AND UP. 1, 2, 3 bedroom apartpets, studious women roommates. ments. Close to campus. Pets ok. Ed $185/ month plus utilities. Summer 989-644-5749. and school year. 773-9191. 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS DEERFIELD VILLAGE - 2 PER 2 BED, available summer and 2012/2013 4 PER 4 BED, 5 PER 5 BED. Warm school year NO PETS! Very Clean. Shuttle to Campus. (989)773-9999 Broadway & Brown Apartments. www.LiveWithUnited.com CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, 989-772-3887 By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national andSTREET CM Life LIVING! reserves 3-5 the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising MAIN People 1 AND 2 bedroom apartments. Close 4 BEDROOM APARTMENT. Close to origin, which is inW/ theD. opinion of thetoStudent is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Walk classMedia and Board, downtown! to campus. Available May and August. campus includes water, trash, be responsible for typographical only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and 989-773-2333 errors www.olivieri-homes.com Year 989-444-1944. $275 per person. 989-621-0052. Bylease. Website: www.cm-life.com rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any In Person: 436 Moore Hall credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

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A T P A R K P L AClassifi C E ed A PAd A RRates TMENTS

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Color Your REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! Ads Remarkable! NOTICES

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A Great place to plant your roots! a lease & receive FREE Netflix for a TO year! RENT WANTED FOR• Sign SALE (Must present ad at lease signing)

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436 Moore Hall • 989-774-3493 www.cm-life.com

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PETS 1240 E BROOMFIELD ST. • (989) 779-7900 M-Th: 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 12-4

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Central Michigan Life’s final publication for Spring semester is Friday, April 27, 2012. REAL ESTATE Ad deadline REAL ESTATE April 25, PERSONALS PERSONALS for the final publication is Wednesday, 2012 at Noon

April 25, 2012  

Central Michigan Life

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