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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Relay for Life brings out 1,200; raises $61,000, 3A

Central Michigan University

| Monday, April 23, 2012

Nate Theunissen follows family’s footsteps to CMU, 1B

[cm-life.com]

U-M, CMU defend tuition policy for illegal residents

Must attend one of two events to reserve tickets for Sept. 8 By Matt Thompson Sports Editor

By Emily Pfund Staff Reporter

Students at the University of Michigan are fighting for what they have dubbed “tuition equality.” David Morales, a freshman from Detroit, has lived in Michigan his entire life, but he was born in Mexico and is not a legal resident of the United States. Because of this, he is charged out-ofstate tuition at U-M. Morales co-founded the Coalition for Tuition Equality, a student group pushing to get in-state tuition for students who live in the state but do not have U.S. citizenship or a green card. They want U-M to charge in-state tuition for anyone who can prove they completed at least two years of high school and earned a diploma from a high school in Michigan or a certificate recognizing the completion of a GED testing service. “We just want tuition equality,” Morales recently told the Detroit Free Press. Betty Wagner, director of admissions, said Central Michigan University has the same policies as U-M for students like Morales. “That student would be considered out-of-state for tuition purposes (at CMU),” Wagner said. “We would do nothing special for that student.” The Coalition for Tuition Equality has caught the attention of the U-M Board of Regents, which asked Provost Phil Hanlon to report to the board on the possibility of offering in-state tuition to these students, the Detroit Free Press reported. A report was not issued at the regents’ Thursday meeting. While most schools in Michigan charge undocumented students the outof-state rate, the Free Press reported, Western Michigan University charges in-state rates for anyone who can prove they live in Michigan. Wayne State University does not ask students to provide documentation, and the president of Saginaw Valley State University can approve waivers to allow the children of migrant workers to receive in-state tuition. A Tuition | 2A

MSU game gets 2,000 more seats for students

Photos by Charlotte Bodak/staff photographer

Dancers perform a piece titled “Gene and Frank” during the University Theatre Dance Company Concert on stage in the Bush Theatre Saturday evening.

spring in their step University Theatre Dance Company showcases a variety of productions in annual spring show By Jessica Fecteau | Senior Reporter

Thirty-five University Theatre Dance Company students put on their dancing shoes for the spring concert performance Thursday through Sunday in the Bush Theatre. Dance works included ballet, contemporary, classic jazz, tap, modern, hip-hop and theatrical story dance. Dance faculty Ricky Clarkson was jumping out of his seat while watching his students take the floor. “I’m amazed,” Clarkson said. “A, three h’s, ahhhmazed.” Clarkson choreographed a trio called “Right as Rain” and a hip-hop version of “The Wiz” called “Hip Wiz.” The student dancers incorporated dialogue in “Hip Wiz” that had the audience laugh-

ing during Friday night’s performance. “‘The Wiz’ was an experiment that I have been trying to do for a few years,” Clarkson said. “I am trying to get my kids to connect to a character and a dance.” Alma College sophomore Taylor Myers came to Friday’s

performance to support her long-time friend Kalie Dickman. “I’ve seen her dance for a long time, so it’s just fun to watch what she can do,” Myers said. Dickman, a Shepherd sophomore, said this was her second year in the spring show. “I love being on stage,” she said. “I just thrive on being on stage with just the energy and the audience and all of that.” Director Heather TrommerBeardslee choreographed a piece called “Popular.” “‘Popular’ captures the idea of being popular at the end of your life when everyone you’ve dealt with and have had interactions with come to say goodbye,” said TrommerBeardslee, a member of the

dance faculty. One student began the performance sitting in a wheelchair and continued to dance around it while more and more dancers came out and stood in the background watching him dance. To really capture the emotion of the dance, students had to learn how to feel empathetic toward the situation and make the movement authentic. “Whenever I create a dance, I create story dances,” Trommer-Beardslee said. She said this was another successful year for the dance company. “Each year is unique; each year has its own special dancers; each year has its own special circumstances,” she said. studentlife@cm-life.com

Two thousand more seats are being allotted to the student section to accommodate the high demand of people wanting to attend the Central Michigan football game against Michigan State Sept. 8. Students will still be able to get in free of charge as usual, but have to go to one of two events at the end of August to load the ticket on a valid CMU ID. Students will have to go to either Main Stage on Aug. 26 or the first football game Aug. 30 against Southeast Missouri State. The ticket-loading system will only be in effect for the MSU game. For all other games, students will just need to bring a student ID at the gates. “We saw a growing demand and we are thrilled that we can accommodate our student body’s interest with the additional seats,” said Athletics Director Dave Heeke. “They are such an important part of our atmosphere. Based on the feedback we’ve heard, we expect the tickets to go extremely fast.” The 2,000 additional seats will bump the student section size to 10,000 students. It will make one-third of the total capacity at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. A committee of campus student leaders came together to finalize how ticketing procedures would go for the game. “We wanted to come up with a fair system for all CMU students who will be enrolled next semester, and we worked consciously as a group of students to do the right thing,” said Detroit junior and committee member Darryl Maxwell. “It has all come together and I am very happy with everything.” sports@cm-life.com

[I N S I D E ] w Isabella County Board of Commissioners votes on personal property tax legislation, 3

[ C M - L I F E .C O M ] w Visit the website for a livestream video of Westboro Baptist Church’s appearance in JRN 101: Mass Communication in Contemporary Society at 2 p.m.

Students Lazzaro, Lorentzen leaving CMU to start new company By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

If you went to LMFAO, Dayglow or Na Palm, there are two Central Michigan University students to thank; Anthony Lazzaro and Thomas Lorentzen. The two Delta Chi, snowboarding- and wakeboardingloving fraternity members are known to many on campus for the various events they put together and promote. Now, they are taking their skills to the next level with the creation of their new company Kruüe (pronounced “crew”), which they are leaving CMU to establish after this school year. “I came up with the idea nine months ago, and then I told Thomas right away,” said Lazzaro, a Hope junior. “Thomas thought it was a

great idea. Then, together we built on it, and then when we thought the idea was ready enough, we presented the idea to Zach (Sampson, owner of Hottest College Parties) who is now the Kruüe CEO and owner. He had the right people and right connections to launch the company.” Lazzaro is also the Red Bull student brand manager, event manager at Wayside Central and manger of Ron Sulewski, known as “DJ Pigpen.” He said the idea for Kruüe came from the fact that he wanted college students to have experiences similar to his. “Out of all the events and experiences, I’ve learned a lot,” he said. “I wanted to be able to do something that helped college students get jobs after college and helped increase busi-

ness for local businesses. I got some ideas from Groupon and LinkedIn. I want to help college students get jobs in something they actually want to do.” Lazzaro said the new company will help plan, execute and promote various events through networking with local businesses and on college campuses. Recently, the duo has been traveling all over the Midwest to interview candidates to establish Kruüe at various schools. Many of these are students who were promoters for Dayglow at their respective schools and therefore are connected to Sampson, who runs 40 percent of Dayglow parties worldwide. Lazzaro and Lorentzen met at Lazzaro’s first event at Wayside Central, a New Year’s Eve

party in 2010. Lazzaro said he was impressed at how fast the Clio junior was able to sell tickets for a party when so few students were in town. “I was like, ‘Who is this kid?’” Lazzaro said. “Most of the kids I knew were Greek and all these people were non-Greek, so I talked to him and I was like, ‘Hey, you ever think about doing promotions?’” Thomas said, ‘Who, me?’ And I was like, ‘Yeah dude, you just sold 60-something tickets in like three hours.’” Soon after meeting, they both decided to switch their majors to marketing. Lazzaro was originally majored in personal financial planning and Lorentzen in bio-medical, prephysical therapy. A Kruüe | 2A

Victoria Zegler/staff photographer

Clio junior Thomas Lorentzen, left, and Hope junior Anthony Lazzaro, right, nine months ago began a marketing, advertising and promotional company, Kruüe hiring students to gain experience in their chosen field of study. Both Lorentzen and Lazzaro have brought a variety of entertainment and concerts to campus such as American electro-pop duo LMFAO and Dayglow, the world’s largest paint party.

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice


2A || Monday, April 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR

Juxtaclay exhibit showcases contrasting styles By Ryan Fitzmaurice Staff Reporter

TODAY

w Flick’s Family Film Festival will be showing "Puss in Boots" at Celebration Cinema, 4935 E. Pickard St. The event is free for children 12 and under and $3.50 for adults.

Tuesday

w Symphonic Wind Ensemble will be performing at 8 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall. w Strategic Community Engagement to Address Mental Health Disparities in Diverse Youth and Families will be held at noon in the Bovee University Center Rotunda. w Mid Michigan Stamp Club will meet at 7 p.m. at the Isabella County Commission on Aging, 2200 S. Lincoln Road, in the craft room. The club meets every fourth Tuesday.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 84

Tuition | continued from 1A

CMU students voiced several different opinions on the issue. “I don’t know why they shouldn’t have in-state (tuition) if they have lived in Michigan their whole lives,” said Saline freshman Hannah Hagood. “Isn’t that the point of instate tuition?” Jiebing Wang, a graduate student from China, agreed with Hagood. “They should get the benefits (of in-state tuition), because they live in the state and pay the taxes,” Wang said. “It’s different than international students. We don’t pay as many taxes here.” Farmington Hills junior Violet Serra disagreed. “They are here illegally. They should have to pay the higher rate,” Serra said. “They get the benefits of living here without being here in a legal manner.” The issue was not as simple to Grand Rapids sophomore Shane Gilligan. “I don’t think illegal immigrants should receive all the rights of citizens, but this is different than rights,” he said. “I don’t know where I stand.” university@cm-life.com

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

The University Art Gallery is hosting the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Spring 2012 Exhibition featuring the work of two students with vastly different approaches to ceramics. The exhibit, Juxtaclay, features the works of Mount Pleasant senior Meghan Borland and Utica senior Stephanie Galli. The gallery will be open until May 5, on weekdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Saturdays between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. The exhibit is closed on Sundays and Mondays. At the reception and artist talk Saturday, Galli said the title is a play on the words “juxtaposition” and “clay” and speaks to the differences between her and Borland’s works. Galli said by putting her and Borland’s contrasting styles side by side, the audience can better appreciate both of the artists. “I think that is exactly what juxtaposition does,” Galli said. “It makes the features of both works more prominent.” Galli’s work is heavily focused on aesthetic pleasure and centers around modern adaptations of traditional forms of ceramics. Galli said the goal of her work is to be desirable to look at. “I realized that they (her art) were very similar to the female form, and upon pondering it, I realized that I’ve always had this interest in high fashion and artforms that were very beautiful,” she said. “And I wanted to make something similar.” Galli’s works are intricate but also rely on simplicity. She said her favorite piece she made is a slipcast porcelain mold, which features a single gold line contrasted by a white background. She said simplicity is essential in her work.

Kruüe | continued from 1A

“He balances me out, because I try to make everyone happy,” Lazzaro said. “I’ll promise people things, and Thomas will be like ‘You’re an idiot, you can’t do that.’ He brings me back down to reality and makes sure we follow through with everything.” Lorentzen agreed that the two make an effective team. In order to dedicate all of their time to the launch of Kruüe, the two have decided not to return to CMU and are potentially moving to Chicago in January. “I still can’t believe it’s all happening,” Lorentzen said. Both agreed that Jon Hunter, owner of Wayside Central, O’Kellys, The Cabin and Hunter’s Ale House, has had a big influence on them as a mentor. “We wouldn’t be anywhere without him,” Lorentzen said. “He’s taught us so much.” Lazzaro said Hunter taught him everything. “He’s really given me so much advice,” he said. “I am

“It’s simple, but its design needs to be simple, or it gets loud and busy,” Galli said. “Something that is pleasurable to look at can’t get loud and busy.” Borland’s work is completely different from Galli’s work in both its form and its purpose. Borland’s ceramic pieces defy tradition and are conceptual in their form. Her works are closely connected with the natural world, and she said she wanted to reconnect her audience to the natural world with her works. “Our connection and understanding of the pure form of nature is lost,” Borland said. Borland said a common reaction to her work is surprise, because while she uses materials common for ceramics, she uses them in surprising and original ways. One of her works, titled “The Schematics of Nature,” was composed of several pieces of clay from the Chippewa River covered in moss. Borland spent months growing the moss herself, which she said took a large amount of effort. “For the moss to grow on it, I needed distilled water, because the chemicals of substances in the Chippewa River make it impossible to grow,” Borland said. “I have to mimic the environment completely just for a simple organism to grow, which is something we never think about.” Another one of Borland’s pieces was composed of a small room with plaster molds of leaves covering the floor. The audience is allowed and encourage to walk on and crack the molds. “We step on leaves all the time in the fall, but we never have a reaction to it,” Borland said. “That is what I hoped to bring.” Ryan Heisler, a Mount Pleasant resident and a former student at CMU, said he was impressed by the exhibit and the definitely really lucky to have known him.” Hunter said he is excited for the duo and their new venture. “Meeting Thomas and Anthony was great,” Hunter said. “I think they’re going to go and never look back. They’re the type of people who are always looking for the next challenge, and they’ve always done a great job. They’ll be missed, but I’m sure they’ll come back and visit.” He said the two are applying their Wayside experiences to Kruüe. “I think Kruüe will be successful,” Hunter said. “A lot of the philosophies they’re going to use are what we’ve used during our most successful events here.” Both said the support of their friends and family was something they couldn’t live without. “I just want to say this is such a great opportunity, and everything that has happened and all the good that has happened comes from the community,” Lorentzen said. “We have so many friends here and everyone is supportive. This isn’t something we did on our own.” Lazzaro said he hopes to keep

amount of dedication the artists displayed. “It’s very evident the amount of hard work they put into this exhibit,” Hesler said. “You can see the passion involved.” Mount Pleasant freshman Connor Berglund, who is studying 2D art, said he was amazed by the ceramics in the exhibit. “These are all beautifully crafted, formally solid, and they’re treated well,” Berglund said. He said the exhibit will cause him to branch out into threedimensional art forms. “I have been really inspired by the 3D art,” Berglund said. “It’s different than a painting where it’s just on a canvas. I like how you can make something real.” studentlife@cm-life.com

close ties with his good friends. “My favorite thing to do when I have free time is going and catching up with all my friends,” he said. “I’m just really lucky to meet the people I’ve met at CMU.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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3A

INSIDE LIFE Monday, April 23, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Isabella County first to oppose elimination of local property tax Other units will soon vote on resolution By Theresa Clift Staff Reporter

The Isabella County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday to oppose legislation that would eliminate the state’s personal property tax. The package of eight bills, introduced in the Michigan

Senate on Tuesday, would phase out the personal property tax for industrial properties. It would also provide an exemption for small commercial properties. The county’s resolution, which passed unanimously, stated the bills would reduce revenues to the county by $384,888 beginning in 2013. “Such a revenue loss would have a devastating impact on the ability of local units of government to provide critical community services,” Com-

missioner David Ling read from the resolution. State Sen. Judy Emmons, RSheridan, said she has not yet decided how she will vote on the issue but will take into account the county’s opposition. “I’m a little concerned for the locals,” she said. “I’m also concerned for the businesses impacted by paying taxes on something over and over.” She said she hopes, through bill amendments, they can include a replacement for the revenue lost.

“It’s just one of those things that I think isn’t ready to be voted on yet,” she said. Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration supports the bills. “The proposal is designed to encourage economic growth in Michigan by reducing the personal property tax burden on many Michigan businesses,” said Terry Stanton, a spokesman for Snyder. Lost revenue will be replaced by the elimination of tax credits, like the Michigan Business tax, Lt. Gov. Brian

Calley told local government leaders in April. However, Ling said that will not fully reimburse the county. The resolution urges state legislators to “actively and vigorously oppose any attempts to eliminate the personal property tax without full and guaranteed replacement.” Commissioner James Moreno said the state legislators have been trying to reduce the county’s funding for the past 10 years for services like public safety. “It’s hard to explain that to

constituents,” he said. The joint resolution is shared with the city of Mount Pleasant, Union Township and the Village of Shepherd. According to the resolution, the bills would reduce revenues in the city by $230,000, the township by $45,000 and the Village of Shepherd by $17,420. The other units will vote on the resolution at their next regular meetings. metro@cm-life.com

County ranks high in healthy cities survey Local residents attribute gym opportunities By Stephanie Titsworth Staff Reporter

Mount Pleasant residents appear to be staying healthy with Isabella County ranked in the 75th percentile of healthiest cities in Michigan. According to the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps, Isabella County is ranked number 20 out of 82 on the scale of Michigan counties that are in good physical shape. Grand Rapids senior Micholus Stevens wasn’t surprised by the results. “Every time I go to the gym, there’s a ton of people there,” Stevens said. “A lot of college students worry about their physical appearance, and they should. This is the time in our life when it’s important to be healthy.” With more than 2,000 people visiting the Student Activity Center daily and numerous other gyms in town, the residents of Mount Pleasant have non-stop opportunities to stay active and in shape. “There should be no reason that people in Mount Pleasant are unhealthy and stay out of shape, when as CMU students,

we get to use the SAC for free,” said Coleman freshman Katie Murphy. “Every college student goes out and drinks too much and has a few unhealthy habits, but if you do have bad habits, fix them with good ones. Go to the gym after a big night of drinking.” Seung ni Fitness, 2217 S. Mission St., is one of the options for residents looking to be fit. Coowner Brandon Thomas said he is not shocked by the high ranking Isabella County received. Having more than 450 members ranging from college students to people in their 70s, Thomas said people from every age and fitness level are interested in their physical health. “College students run into problems, because the last thing they care about is nutrition; but, at the same time, they want to look good,” Thomas said. Many students are getting memberships at the gym in order to learn about being healthy, and others are just interested in good eating tips, he said. “Thirty percent of our memberships are college students who are looking to mix up their workout,” Thomas said. “They like coming here, because we’re interested in our members. If they want help grocery shopping and want to learn what foods are good to eat, then I’ll go to the store with them and show them.” metro@cm-life.com

sport management

Class teams up with Great Lakes Loons for Social Media Night By Brandon Champion Staff Reporter

The Great Lakes Loons minor league baseball team is teaming up with sport management students at Central Michigan University to host their first-ever “Social Media Night” Thursday at Dow Diamond in Midland. Students in professor Steve Adler’s PES 190: Introduction to Sport Management classes have helped in every aspect of the event. Each of Adler’s three classes were broken up into five groups: Communications, brand marketing, grassroots marketing, promotions and research. “Our main job has been to promote around campus,” said Farmington Hills junior Courtney Field, who is serving as the communications leader. “We’re trying to get as many people as

we can to come to the event and have a good time.” Grandville junior Matt DeVries, leader of the brand marketing group, said his group was in charge of the advertising leading up to the game. They developed an advertisement that will run in Central Michigan Life and a radio spot that has been airing the past few weeks on 100.9 WLUN-FM, mid-Michigan’s ESPN Radio affiliate. “This has helped us see the behind-the-scenes stuff that has to happen to put on an event like this,” he said. “It’s a longer process than people actually see on the field.” First pitch between the Loons and the Clinton (Iowa) LumberKings is scheduled for 6:05 p.m., but fan interaction will begin long before then. A class | 5a

photos by charlotte bodak/staff photographer

Holland junior Angela Miedema talks to a member of Tale Waggers, Clare resident Lori Lickly, who is raising money for cancer research by letting people walk her golden retriever Breeze around the Indoor Athletic Complex during Relay For Life Saturday afternoon.

PASSING IT ON

Relay for Life brings out 1,200; raises $61,000 for cancer research By Alayna Smith | Staff Reporter

Cancer is a disease that plagues families across the nation. Cures are limited, but research is working toward bettering the lives of the millions of people worldwide suffering from the illness. Students, faculty and community members gathered in the Indoor Athletic Center for a 24-hour-long event over the weekend to help raise money to support cancer research and a cure. The fundraising goal of $50,000 was met easily, having raised $48,886 before the event even began on Saturday morning. By the end of the event, through continued sales and fundraising done by the teams in attendance, $61,000 had been raised. Merrill Hall Council made the largest donation of $1,700, followed by Larzelere Hall. Seventy-three registered teams with 840 participants were expected and more than 1,200 people ended up filtering in throughout the 24 hours. Dearborn freshman Mary Menter said she Relays for three people in her life who have all suffered from various medical conditions, and it feels good to be part of such a positive event. “It’s a way for a lot of people, in a mental or psy-

chological way, to know that they’re not alone and that there is always support. It brings the community together for a great cause,” Menter said. Bad Axe junior Nick Varner said he has had family members affected by the disease and that finding a

Fowlerville junior Kevin Kline tries to break the Hula Hooping record for 20 minutes in order to raise money for Relay For Life in the Indoor Athletic Complex Saturday afternoon.

cure is important. “I love going to Relay, because everyone is so pumped up,” Varner said. “Everyone likes to see that the money is going to a good cause, and people keep going even if they’ve been up for 24 hours.” The event kicked off at 11 a.m. on Saturday with University President George Ross leading the first lap, followed by a survivor ceremony to honor the survivors of cancer for a lap. Later in the night, there was a luminaria ceremony to honor the many lives lost to the disease. Various activities kept participants awake and ex-

cited, including musical performances from On the Rox and Fish n’ Chips. There was also a punt, pass and kick contest, Fear Factor and a drag talent contest called Mrs. Relay. Varner, who dressed up and played harmonica for the Mrs. Relay contest, said these activities were a fun way to break things up throughout the night. “It’s very serious subject matter, so it’s good to have a bit of humor in there to lighten the mood,” he said. Rockford freshman Bethany Hicks said she was pleasantly surprised by the huge turnout.

A relay | 5a

Jeff Percha crowned victor of Slim-to-Win weight loss competition By Hailee Sattavara Senior Reporter

Jeff Percha said he doesn’t advise anyone to lose as much weight in 14 weeks as he recently did. Losing 34.24 percent of his body weight since Jan.11 was not the most difficult part, the Mount Pleasant resident said. “The hardest part was showing up the first day and accepting where I was,” he said. More than 50 people gathered Sunday to see Percha awarded $10,000 and crowned the winner of the Slim-to-Win contest at Morey Courts, 5175 E. Remus

Road. Percha was one of the four finalist in the competition. “The best part is that this is over,” he said. After losing a significant amount of body weight, there are things Percha can do that he wasn’t able to a few months ago, he said. He takes the stairs more and no longer has to worry what chair he sits in. Percha weighed in at 324.8 pounds on Jan. 11 with 882 other people. Lon Morey of the Morey Foundation said the first weigh-in amounted to 97 tons of people. “I was hoping to get 50 to 75

people, but I was blown away,” Morey said. The Slim-to-Win contest had a two-to-one female-to-male ratio. However, the contest is not over for those who weighed-in Jan. 11, Morey said. Anyone that weighed in in January can weigh in Aug. 12. The individual who has lost the biggest percentage of body fat since January will be awarded $3,000. In addition to a large check, Percha was awarded a 12-month fitness pass to Morey Courts. Percha’s trainer Erin Lenhart said Percha had a full fitness center behind him. “I hope all of them can main-

tain it,” Lenhart said. “Hopefully now they can look in the mirror and see the changed man.” Doug Carey came in at a close second, losing 32.4 percent of his starting body weight, 300 pounds. Carey was down to 197.4 pounds and was awarded a prize of $2,500. Carey, a Mount Pleasant resident, said he plans on relaxing a bit but has 15 to 20 ideas slated to maintain his weight loss. “I’ve said all the way along that the hardest part is maintaining weight loss,” Carey said. Along with pounds shed, Carey said he has also gained new-

found knowledge pertaining to eating healthier. “It’s all about veggies and lean meats,” Carey said. Carey said his wife Sherrie was his biggest encouragement, as well as his personal trainer, Landon. “About a month ago, I came up with the slogan that ‘It takes a community to make a fat guy slimmer,’” Carey said. Carey was also awarded a sixmonth Morey Courts Fitness pass. Brian Maxon and Tim Daugherty also weighed in Sunday. Maxon lost 30.31 percent of his body fat and Daughtery shed

33.21 percent. Those involved with Morey Courts and the Morey Foundation acknowledged the many accomplishments of those who participated in the contest. Several lowered their cholesterol and reduced the amount of high blood pressure medication used. Some even went off their medication entirely. Percha said he still plans to lose a few pounds to hit his target weight of 190, he said. “I wanna make sure that guy in the picture never comes back,” Percha said. metro@cm-life.com


4A

VOICES Monday, April 23, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

Anna Palm Staff Reporter

A spider web of expectations, hope As a ‘90s kid who grew up on numerous Marvel characters, I have my own version of Spider-Man, and Tobey McGuire wasn’t it. With “The Amazing Spider-Man” hitting theaters on July 3, I hope to find less flaws than I did in the previous SpiderMan trilogy. In the televised “Spider-Man: The Animated Series,” which ran from 1994 to 1998, Peter Parker is portrayed as a hardluck, yet good-humored young man. McGuire managed to turn the superhero into a whiny, love-sick guy with identity issues, while also neglecting to address the character’s alter ego. We saw some of that briefly in the third movie, but apparently Parker had to turn to the dark side in order to be funny and cunning. To me, it seems to say that good guys can’t be mocking, and in my opinion, McGuire wasn’t the “friendly neighborhood spider-man.” He was depressing and made me want to yell for my money back. I hope the new Spider-Man portrayed by Andrew Garfield realizes this is a great opportunity to make us laugh as he fights a villain, like when the cartoon superhero taunted his enemies. Based on the trailers, I can tell they are staying a little closer to the comic books, as Parker will be using mechanical webshooters in the movie. In the McGuire-starred movies, his body created the web, and he could shoot it from his wrist, which really happens in only a few comic versions. Adding the mechanical web-shooters indicates they’re planning to make Parker possess a genius level of intelligence, as he applies science in constructing helpful devices like in most comics. Another good thing about the film is the appearance of Dr. Curt Connor, played by Rhys Ifans. In the second and third movie, they show Connor as a professor with witty comments instead of his comic version: Spider-Man’s confidant and personal doctor. In this movie, it appears Connor will be both Peter Parker’s friend and SpiderMan’s enemy, which should add an interesting twist to the plot. When it comes to the romance department, I’m glad to be rid of Mary Jane. All she seemed to accomplish was messing with our superhero’s head. Besides, her constant need to be saved in every single movie was irritating. I’m not sure what to expect from high school crush Gwen Stacy played by Emma Stone other than her setting up a storyline for her police officer father, George Stacy, who is played by Denis Leary. Stacy will replace The Daily Bugle’s editor-in-chief J. Jonah Jameson as the one with the campaign against Spiderman. It seems rather strange, since George Stacy is a Spider-Man supporter in the comic books, but I guess it adds drama if the father of the love interest goes against the superhero. Maybe I’m being too harsh on McGuire, but getting the story straight and showing us defiance instead of desperation isn’t much to ask for by a geeky fan.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

EDITORIAL | Michigan cannot thrive on lower taxes alone

What’s left to cut? M

ichigan will not recover from its economic travails without strong action on the part of politicians and citizens. So, it is encouraging to see Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration back legislation as strong as the proposed set of bills which would eliminate personal property tax for industrial properties, and provide an exemption for small commercial properties. Unfortunately, the legislation in its current form would be counterproductive, to the point of amputating a leg to cure a heavy limp. Striking down these taxes in the hopes of creating a more business-friendly economic environment would reduce Isabella County’s revenue by $384,888 beginning in 2013. Its total revenue for 2012 is set to be $17,199,417. Gov. Snyder might forget that

people and businesses do not flourish on low tax rates alone. Mount Pleasant’s local government can barely afford to salt and plow its roads in the winter. While a barren wasteland would place very little burden on taxpayers to maintain, Isabella County will not look very attractive unless businesspeople want to snowshoe across the region to conduct their affairs. This Editorial Board agrees with Snyder that bloated government and high taxes are detrimental for the business climate in Michigan, but, at least in Isabella County, it’s difficult to see how much more services could be reduced. The legislation might be ap-

propriate for some larger counties, where it could indeed spur investment, but without a revenue-sharing scheme, smaller counties with less industry seem certain to face a net loss. Snyder’s administration seems to fail to appreciate that infastructure, safety and education are also key factors in determining relocation, for both families and businesses. There’s no sign of Google, or any other major corporation, setting up shop in Isabella County anytime soon. In order for Michigan to be attractive to investment from outside the state, it must continue to provide basic services, not just to the wealthy areas of the state. Citizens might look at this tax cut as more money in their pocket, but how are they going to feel when trash pickup is affected or the local police and fire departments are staffed by fewer employees?

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

[your voice] Comments in respose to “Student section grows by 2,000 for football game against MSU; students must attend one of two events to reserve ticket” White2ej This is no different than a school having its students camp out for tickets to games (i.e. Michigan State, Duke, etc.).. The student leaders who helped make this decision clearly thought it was a good idea and did a tremendous job IMO of protecting us as students. Ben Ford So it comes to this, we have to bribe people to attend CMU events. CMUMOM1 Thank God my daughter is on the danceteam. And as an athletic booster, I am allowed to purchase two tickets for the game. Of course I sold them as I get in free w/ dance! No overinflating this game’s attendance and with almost (all) Saturday games attendance should be up!! FIRE UP CHIPS!!! Almost all goes to the first game, but mainstage is usually freshmen. Asdf Talk about artificially inflating attendance numbers... Selected comments in response to “Police bust illegal marijuana operation in Union

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

Township Tuesday afternoon” I M Doobius This was NOT an illegal grow ­— it was a medical service operation with more than adequate paperwork and a serious attempt to conform to parameters of the 2008 initiative for which more than three million Michiganders expressed their desires to allow legal cannabis use — you haven’t spoken with anyone involved other than the police who erred in (the) entering house in first place and you’re not doing your job as a so-called ‘reporter’ to accept and print characterization of operation as “illegal.” No wonder newspapers are dying. Itisonlyaplant I feel safer now. Imagine if we had laws against alcohol prohibiting the sale and regulation.. (Oh) wait... Comments in response to “Joint investigation leads to the arrest of Nigerian graduate student” Prince Ezeli That’s PRINCE Ezeli to you! If you wire me $100,000 bail, I promise to return $5,000,000 of my fortune when I’m back in my kingdom of Nigeria. Sarah Palin 2014 I’ve already given Ezekiel over

$9,000. This arrest better not interfere with the return on my investment. Selected comments in response to “Greek Week brings together the community to raise money for Logan MacGregor” CMUFaculty So please explain to me why this little event has to disrupt students attending their classes? FireUpChips Students are still required to attend class. They turn in class schedules to the Greek Week chairpersons. When attendance is taken at an event, the individuals who are scheduled to be in class are excused from missing the event, and there will not be any penalties toward points. Also, I’m sure one of your students within the Greek community would love to share what an amazing week this is for all involved. The amount of awareness, dedication and charitable contributions that the Greek organizations are giving this week is amazing. Quoting what you had said, “...this little event...,” shows me you might want to inquire as to how LARGE of an impact the Greek community is making on our community at CMU, in Mount Pleasant and beyond and especially to Logan MacGregor and his family. Fire Up Chips!

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Ryan Fitzmaurice Staff Reporter

Why I love the Westboro Baptist Church Our worst defends our First I feel like I need to clarify the title of this column immediately before Central Michigan Life disowns me for hate speech. I personally am disgusted by the message the Westboro Baptist Church preaches. More than that, I am offended by the fact that a group like this exists in our society. They are an ugly, exaggerated reflection of the discrimination our society continues to impose on the LGBTQ community. I don’t believe any individual deserves the eternal torture Westboro condemns everybody to — if I did, they would be on the top of my list. I believe the majority of people in this country, at least in part, feel the same way. So much so, if the United States government enacted legislation making such hate speech illegal and threw the Westboro participants in jail as soon as they step on this campus on Monday, I believe most would stand and applaud. And we would be utter fools. America is a conversation but not a polite dinner conversation. Our nation’s conversation is passionate, convoluted, confused, messy, explosive, eccentric, sometimes angry, increasingly odd, and most of the time, wildly off topic. It’s a conversation open to everyone, of all opinions, of all religions, of all societal backgrounds. And, with very few exceptions, you too can jump in and say whatever you want. The First Amendment is what sets our country apart, and it is a major component of the liberty we value. No group embodies that conversation for me more than the Westboro Baptist Church. The very fact that we as a nation honor and protect their right to express their opinion, an opinion that even the KKK has separated themselves from, means my right to speak will also be honored and respected. Furthermore, if we value the first amendment as we should value it, we need to recognize that we need to boldly defend Westboro’s right to speak. If our government were to start limiting our First Amendment rights, it would not start with speech that we value — it would start with speech that we are offended by, that we as a nation don’t want to hear. Once that precedent is made, the government will then have a process to increasingly limit our First Amendment rights, and we would no longer have the freedom we so fully enjoy today. The first line of defense for our right to speak freely is groups like Westboro. Of all the rights I have been blessed with, free speech is the most important to me. I love the fact that I am able to openly disagree with my society and my government. I love the fact that I can fearlessly publish an article with such an abrasive title. I love the fact that in this country I am open to fully express myself and fully embrace myself. This is a reality we all partake in. But I think we all need to recognize that for that reality to happen, the Westboro Baptist Church has to be allowed the same right.

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

Forensic Anthropology

Students spend final exam time learning from a crime scene By Tony Wittkowski Staff Reporter

Students from ANT 342: Forensic Anthropology gathered together on a cold Friday afternoon to take part in a mock crime scene for their final exam. Catherine Willermet, assistant professor of anthropology, did this before when she taught at the University of Louisiana for two years, but has never implemented the project as a final exam until now. “All semester long they’ve been learning different aspects of forensic anthropology,” Willermet said. “This is the largest student lab I’ve done.” The whole point of forensic anthropology is when the police have to call in an expert when they find bodies outside that have decayed and are unidentifiable, Willermet said. “You can’t prosecute anyone if you can’t identify the body,” she said. Newaygo sophomore Kelsey Vandenbosch was in one of nine groups of five students given a specific job. The lab involved finding the bones, mapping them out and analyzing the evidence. While learning about decomposition rates and trauma wounds, Vandenbosch said she was exited to learn about the hands-on final exam. “I think it’s a lot better than a written exam,” Vandenbosch said. “It gives us a hands-on experience instead of learning it in a classroom. It makes you realize how much work goes into it.” Laura Kettle, a Bridgman senior, said she looks to use the experience in becoming a real forensic anthropologist. “I took a class on it when I was a sophomore,” Kettle said. “I was pretty good at skull reconstruction.” Each group has two mappers, a photographer, a recorder and one excavator, Kettle said. Each

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 23, 2012 || 5A

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“A lot of times you walk around campus and wonder how many people actually care or think about these things,” Hicks said. “You find out it’s a lot. There’s a really great community here to be a part of.” Vice Event Chairwoman Brianna Reuter, an Orion senior, said she was impressed

About 100 were in attendance for the English Department’s first-ever Literary Hullabaloo, which featured literary works from both students and faculty, along with scholarship and award announcements. The Literary Hullabaloo, held in the Powers Hall ballroom Friday evening, was complete with readings from more than 15 contributors from the spring 2012 edition of The Central Review, along with the special spring edition of the graduate student literary journal “Temenos,” titled “Offsprings of an African River.” Along with the readings, more than 15 awards and scholarships for students and faculty were acknowledged. A silent auction was conducted and the proceeds went to The Divine Mercy of God Hospital in the area of Nnarambia Ahiazu, Mbaise, in Imo State, Nigeria. Funds raised from the “Temenos” publication also went to the hospital. Department faculty member Robert Fanning, a creative writing professor, said an event such as the hullabaloo has been long overdue, and he expects the event to continue annually.

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ence for all the different RSOs around campus to see what they’re all about and why they come out.” With such a great turnout, many are already looking forward to attending next year’s event and continuing the efforts. “It’s a great time and a great cause, and it’s really a shame if you missed out,” Varner said. university@cm-life.com s e

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then instructed to do a writeup about the results. There is specific paperwork for each job, Willermet said. Each group was also required to map out a one-by-one meter grid across the portion of the crime scene they staked out, Willermet said. Whenever there were visitors at each crime scene, whether it was a reporter or another anthropologist, they had to sign in and write down the time. “They’re doing really well so far,” Willermet said. “They are asking very few questions.”

The event will encourage fans to interact with the Loons via Twitter and Facebook. Leading up to the game, fans will have a chance to help select which uniforms the players will wear, which promotions to feature and what music to play. Fans can also enter a drawing to win an iPad by “Liking” the Loons’ Facebook page or following them on Twitter. The winner will be announced during the game. “Professor Adler is really enthusiastic about this project,” Field said. “He said it would be fun for us to do and would look good on a resume. It’s cool, because the Loons are actually using lots of our promotional ideas at the game.” There will be a section devoted to students for the game, along with discounted food and beverages. “This (is) a great opportunity to gain some real world experience,” DeVries said. “We’re all trying to break into the industry, and this is the kind of thing that organizations do every day.” Fans tweeting at the game are encouraged to use the hashtag #LoonsSMN to interact with other fans at the game.

university@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

photos by jeff smith/staff photographer

TOP: Niles freshman Pandhra Phegley, left, and Hastings freshman Jessie Ulrich map out a mock crime scene for ANT 342: Forensic Anthropology Friday afternoon outside of Anspach Hall. BOTTOM: A police line surrounds a mock crime scene.

group would flag everything and anything that looked like evidence. This included cigarette butts, pencils, candy wrappers and any trash that was around. “I know it’s going to be difficult,” Kettle said. “But Professor Willermet is a great teacher.” Livonia junior Heather Marshall was in a group with a skeleton that was missing its upper half. “We are assuming it’s male, because of the narrower sub pubic angle on the pelvic bone,” she said. After all the students finished their work outside, they were

‘Hullabaloo’ event features readings, awards By David Oltean Senior Reporter

with how much was raised over just the course of the 24-hour event and that it was great to see such a large and diverse group in attendance. “(Relay is great because) people can be better involved with things happening around campus and learn a lot about different people,” the Clarkston senior said. “Hearing the stories of everyone is great and really helps you grow closer to other people. It’s also a learning experi-

“So many organizations came together to see the launch of both of our journals, which were amazing,” Fanning said. “It’s something that’s long overdue and will now be an annual event to celebrate all the things that the English department does to bring and cultivate creativity on campus.” Fanning said the department has previously held separate events for awards and readings, though the hullabaloo gave students and instructors the opportunity to see the creativity of others. Fanning said he was particularly awed by the readings of faculty member Maureen Eke, whom he has never heard read her original poetry before. “We’re sitting beside students we don’t always get to hear from, students are sitting beside others that they’ve never been in class with and professors get to see another facet of each other’s creativity,” Fanning said. “And that’s what this is about.” Graduate student Regan Schaeffer, managing editor of “Temenos,” said she thought many of the essays read at the event were wonderful and said it was great to bring the different English groups together on campus for an audience. “I know so many different

people in English groups on campus, but I’ve never seen them all in the same room for an event like this,” Schaeffer said. “This has really been a great ending for the academic year.” Schaeffer said the staff of “Temenos” consists of only graduate students, though anyone can contribute to the publication. She said she is excited to see more inspiring contributions to the literary journal next year, when she will be editor-inchief. “Next year, I’ll be the editorin-chief of ‘Temenos,’ so I’m certainly excited about continuing some of this amazing momentum we’ve had this year with the publication,” Schaeffer said. “I look forward to participating in both ‘Temenos,’ which has been a wonderful experience to see literature contributions from all over the world, and to participate in this event again as well.” Mount Pleasant senior Leigh Jajuga, assistant editor of The Central Review, said she thought the event was a great way to bring different groups involved with the English department together and provided a great audience for contributors to the publication. “I thought it was a great way to bring the English Department together and have a great

celebration to remember the semester and the entire year,” Jajuga said. “I’m really looking forward to the next hullabaloo.” Jajuga, the future editor-inchief of The Central Review, said the combined events were a great success. “We had a great turnout for the Central Review this year,” Jajuga said. “It’s always a wellattended event, but it was nice to have people from the English department and members from ‘Temenos’ as well.”

Annual Smitty Softball Tournament The smitty softball tournament was started in spring 2009 as a fundraiser to establish The Lamott smith award, a scholarship given annually to a CmU Pes or rPL student. Lamott was a CmU student and University recreation employee who passed away suddenly in 2008. This softball tournament is open to current students, staff, alumni, and is open to the public. in the past, competitors have travelled from all across the state to play in this CmU tradition. One tournament division will be for Corec teams and another for men’s teams. The tournament will first take place this Friday, april 27 at noon with pool play and will continue again on saturday, april 28 at 9:00 am. all of the estimated 24 total teams will be playing on both days for this year’s prize, the coveted 2012 intramural Championship t-shirt. Winner of last year’s tournament, Jacquie Wiest, shared “i love participating in the smitty softball tournament!” and explained, “everyone is just out there to have fun and play softball.” each year, volunteers who help umpire, supervise, run concessions, and prepare fields make this tournament possible. The tournament will be selling ‘smitty’s all stars’ t-shirts this year as a fundraiser; they will be $7.00 for participants and $10.00 for spectators. The last day for registration in this year’s tournament will be Wednesday, april 25. to participate or volunteer in this year’s tournament, contact scott George by e-mail at georg2sw@cmich.edu or by phone at (989) 774-3689. if you can’t make it to the tournament, but would like to support the fundraising, please mail a check made payable to ‘Central michigan University’ and memo ‘Lamott smith award’ to scott George at 200 saC, mount Pleasant, mi 48859.

989-774-3686

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SPORTS Central Michigan Life

w Baseball drops weekend series with Kent State, 4B

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w Track and field travels over the weekend, setting career bests, 3B w Staying in the game; CMU student Matt Sandles coaches travel team, 4B w Mount Pleasant Discovery Museum has raised more than $2 million toward new structure, 5B

Wrestler Jarod Trice’s Olympic dreams end By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

File photo by Andrew Kuhn

Jarod Trice took a year off of wrestling at Central Michigan to pursue his dreams of playing in the Olympics. Those dreams ended Sunday two matches before qualifying for the Olympics.

Comeback falls short for softball against Ball State

Jarod Trice took a year away from Central Michigan wrestling to pursue his dreams of showcasing his talents in the Summer Olympics in London this year. In a matter of minutes Sunday in Iowa City, his goal was wrestled away from him by Tervel Dlagnev, a NCAA Division II champion at NebraskaKearney in 2007 and 2008. He was two wins shy from representing the red, white and blue at 125 kilos, or 275.6 pounds.

“I had the confidence going into the tournament,” Trice said. “I was disappointed in the outcome of course, but I wrestled really well. I did some of my best wrestling in this tournament.” The scoring system used was a best of three, contrasted from the college game. The wrestler with the highest point total in each period was awarded one point. Dlagnev clinched a win in two periods with push-outs. “I was battling and staying in good position,” Trice said. “I rushed it a little too fast, and when I rushed it, I

stepped out of bounds and I lost the (second) period.” Trice defeated a familiar opponent in Dom Bradley in his first match Sunday. A five-point throw was the highlight of the match. “I ended the period on one fivepoint throw right off his back. It might be on ESPN’s Top-10 plays; it was that good of a throw,” Trice said. “The last time I wrestled Dom Bradley, I let him get away from me, and he stole the match from me, and I’m not putting up with that anymore.” A Trice| 2B

THEUNISSEN

By Ryan Zuke Senior Reporter

It all came down to the last pitch. The Central Michigan softball team trailed 9-6, and freshman CarolAnn Sexauer was up to bat in the top of the seventh inning with two outs, the bases loaded and a full-count. But Ball State pitcher Audrey Workman was able to get Sexauer to pop up, completing a two-game sweep of the Chippewas. “I thought we were in the perfect situation for the comeback, but it didn’t happen,” said head coach Margo Jonker. CMU jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the first on a two-run home run by senior Molly Coldren, but BSU countered with three runs in the bottom of the frame. The Chippewas (21-22, 6-9 MidAmerican Conference) added four more runs in the second, but once again, the Cardinals responded with two more, cutting the lead to one. “The first couple innings, we took advantage of the missed pitches and really drove the ball,” Jonker said. “But the pitcher adjusted to the umpire’s strike zone after that, and we struggled a bit on offense.” BSU (32-12, 10-2 MAC) took the lead in the fifth when sophomore Chelsea Sundberg threw a wild pitch with the bases loaded, allowing a run to score. Saturday, a first inning grand slam by BSU sophomore Audrey Bickel proved to be the game-winner in the 4-0 win. Two walks and an error loaded the bases for BSU before Bickel delivered the key hit. The Chippewas had seven hits but could not push any runs across. They left nine runners on base. Friday, CMU and Miami each earned a shutout win in a double header. The Redhawks took game one 4-0 before the Chippewas responded with a 2-0 victory. Sundberg went the distance for CMU in game two, allowing two hits and walking none. “Sundberg was amazing,” Jonker said. “She had good movement on her pitches and good location. She and (catcher) Rachael Hensel worked together extremely well and did a good job setting up Miami’s hitters.” A softball | 2B

jeff Smith/staff photographer

Senior first baseman Nate Theunissen reaches for a wild throw during a game against Kent State Saturday afternoon at Theunissen Stadium. CMU lost 3-6.

As his career winds down, Nate Theunissen follows family’s footsteps to CMU, breaking program records By Kristopher Lodes | Staff Reporter

In the rich history of Central Michigan baseball, one last name has been at the forefront. That name is Theunissen. “It means a lot (to be a Theunissen at CMU); we’ve got a lot of family history here at Central going back to my grandpa, my dad, my uncle and down to me,” said senior Nate Theunissen. “It means a lot to me, and it’s really special.” Nate’s grandfather, Bill Theunissen, was a former CMU head coach (namesake for Theunissen Stadium) from 195362. Nate’s father Mike and his uncle Chris Theunissen played in the 70s, ending with him, who is currently chasing a few records to finish out his career. “My freshman year (having my name on the stadium) impacted me more,” Theunissen said. “I got a rough time from my teammates, but it’s neat to see. I just give myself a little nod and a smile.”

Inside w Baseball drops weekend series with Kent State, 3B This season, Nate has had 164 at-bats, 48 hits, and 12 extrabase hits giving him 68 total bases and team-leading 37 RBIs. In all of those statistics, he is ranked in the top five of the CMU record books. “When we have fourth or fifth year players, I always look at them like, ‘Keep getting better keep getting better,’ and at the

Andrew Kuhn/staff photographer

Senior first baseman Nate Theunissen watches after making contact during Friday’s game against Kent State at Theunissen Stadium in Mount Pleasant. The Chippewas won 3-0.

end of the day, you overlook the fact that he’s had a pretty good career,” said head coach Steve Jaksa. “You take a deep breath and look up and, ‘You know what, you put up some good numbers’.” Theunissen is ranked second in doubles with 48, fourth in total bases (360) and RBIs (171) and fifth in extra-base hits (75), hits (233) and in at-bats with (727). He is one home run shy of tying

for No. 10 all-time in school history with 26. “The doubles record (stands out). You know I’ve got a shot at that right now.” Theunissen said. Theunissen ended his high school career with the 2007 MHSAA State Championship for Mount Pleasant High School, and after being redshirted his first season as a Chippewa, he was ready to live up to his name. A Theunissen | 2B

MOWING THEM DOWN

Zach Cooper becoming one of program’s top strikeout kings Career strikeouts CMU record book ANdrew Kuhn/ Staff Photographer

Senior pitcher Zach Cooper delivers a pitch to home plate Friday against Kent State at Theunissen Stadium in Mount Pleasant. Cooper pitched nine innings and recorded 13 strikeouts during the 3-0 win over the Golden Flashes.

1. Josh Collmenter 2. Ty Dunham 3. Dan Rambo 4. Zach Cooper

288 274 268 244

YEARLY STRIKEOUTS Senior year Junior year Sophomore year Freshman year

72 88 44 40

By John Manzo Staff Reporter

It’s always a good sign when one of your teammates gets a post-game shaving cream face wash. Zach Cooper was the beneficiary after he had a career day in the opening game of a threegame weekend series against Kent State. The senior starting pitcher set a career-high with 13 strikeouts, enough for a complete-game four-hitter as the Chippewas beat the Golden Flashes 3-0 Friday at Theunissen Stadium. “I think it’s the consistency you need from your Friday guy,”

Matt Thompson, Sports Editor | sports@cm-life.com | 989.774.3169

head coach Steve Jaksa said. “If Coop can be that good for us on Friday and then we don’t make any errors behind him, we’re going to be pretty tough to beat on Friday.” A rain-soaked field with a light drizzle throughout the afternoon moved the original 3:05 p.m. start time to 3:38 p.m. for the first pitch, but the conditions didn’t affect Cooper. He opened the game striking out five of the first six batters until the offense took over in the bottom of the second inning. Cooper is 44 strikeouts away from first all time with likely four more Friday starts and at least one MAC tournament appearance.


2B || Monday, April 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Trice | continued from 1b

CMU coach Tom Borrelli said the losses were nothing to be ashamed of. “He doesn’t have anything to be hanging his head about,” Borrelli said. “Both of those guys have been on world teams in the past and have been on tours and have really concentrated on that style (of wrestling).” Trice said he enjoyed the

experience and looks forward to going at it again in four years. “I took this whole year off of school for this. The experience that I’ve had this year has been great,” Trice said. “I’m going to keep competing; I’m going to go for the next three world championships. I’m also going to go for the Olympic Championships in the next four years. “I’m going for it all,” he said. “I’m going for the gold.”

Wynn Michalak, who wrestled for CMU from 2004 through 2008, also grappled for a spot on Team USA at 96 kilos (211.6 pounds). He lost in the first round to Craig Brester. He grabbed the first point to start off 7-0. He lost the next two, 2-1 and 4-3. “He was very, very good,” Borrelli said. “You can’t say enough good things about his career at Central (Michigan).”

Wynn Michalak

sports@cm-life.com

West ChamTHEUnISSEN | MAC pionship since 2006 continued from 1B

andrew kuhn/staff photographer

Theunissen led the team in his first season of play in home runs with nine and RBIs with 47. “It was really interesting; I was getting my feet wet and nobody really heard of me. I was thrown into the DH role,” Theunissen said. “I just did my part and played my role.” He led the team to its first

during that 2010 season with seven home runs and 54 RBIs. He helped lead the team to its secondstraight MAC West Championship in 2011. So what is next for Theunissen after this season and his career is over? “We’ll look at the draft when that comes around. If not, I have to go out and find a job,” he said.

With his career as a Chippewa coming to an end, Theunissen said he wants to get his team in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 1995, as well as be on the top of the record books. “He’s not done yet, and I think he can still do some work for us,” Jaksa said. “He can have some quality atbats and put us in position to win a few more games.” sports@cm-life.com

Zach Cooper

CM Life Athlete of the week: Zach Cooper Senior Zach Cooper shut down defending MidAmerican Conference Champions Kent State Friday. He threw a complete game with 13 strikeouts in the Chippewas lone win against the back-to-back conference champions. Cooper is 44 strikeouts shy of the all-time CMU career record.

SOFTBALL | continued from 1b

Coldren put CMU on the board in the top of the second inning by hitting a solo home run to centerfield. The Chippewas added another run in the third on an RBI single by senior Ashley Gilson. In game one, Miami senior Jessica Simpson showed why she is one of the best pitchers in

Softball MAC Standings

Baseball MAC Standings

West Division

West Division

Team

MAC

Ball State WMU CMU Northern Illinois Toledo EMU

9-2 7-5 6-8 6-9 5-8 5-10

EMU Toledo WMU CMU Northern Illinois Ball State

Team

MAC

Team

East Division

Bowling Green Kent State Miami Ohio Buffalo Akron

10-3 8-4 7-5 7-5 4-7 2-11

the Mid-American Conference this season. “She was on today,” Jonker said. “She basically shut us down. We didn’t make the adjustment quick enough. It was one of the better games I’ve seen her pitch in her four-year career.” Simpson entered the game with a 1.39 earned run average and lowered that number by pitching a complete game, allowing three hits and striking

Team

MAC

9-5 9-6 7-6 7-8 5-10 5-10

East Division

Kent State Ohio Akron Miami (OH) Bowling Green Buffalo

MAC

12-3 11-4 8-6 5-9 5-9 3-11

out 12 Chippewas. CMU returns home Wednesday for a double-header against IPFW with the first game starting at 2 p.m. “We need to fight strong the rest the year,” Jonker said. “We need to get ourselves in the best position possible for the (MAC) tournament and get stronger pitch-by-pitch, game-bygame.” sports@cm-life.com

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cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 23, 2012 || 3B

[Sports]

Baseball drops below .500, losing series to Kent State By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan baseball team fell below .500 in Mid-American Conference play after losing 6-4 Sunday to Kent State at Theunissen Stadium. The Chippewas (17-24, 7-8 MAC) fell to back-to-back Mid-American Conference Champion Golden Flashes (23-16, 12-3 MAC) this weekend in a tough series. Junior Rick Dodridge is still searching for his first win since Feb. 19 against Troy. He threw four 1/3 innings and gave up seven hits, allowing five runs and striking out three. “I thought Rick was pretty good, but unfortunately, they hit a two-run homer in the fourth; the wind carried and went forever,” said head coach Steve Jaksa. “It wasn’t well hit, but he got it in the right place.”

Senior Jon Weaver came in for relief of Dodridge and gave up a double that scored a run, then struck out the next two hitters to end the inning. Weaver was solid from then on, throwing 2 and 2/3 innings, allowing two hits and striking out two. Junior Dietrich Enns came in to finish the final two innings, giving up just one hit and striking out one. “Our whole bullpen in relief has been pretty good,” Jaksa said. “I thought both Jon and Dietrich did a really good job. I just wish one of Rick’s balls would of been at somebody.” It looked as if things were going to go the way of CMU after the first inning. Dodridge got a double play to end the top half. The Chippewas scored two runs off an RBI single for senior first baseman William Arnold, and senior centerfielder Tyler Hall scored on single and error.

The Chippewas didn’t score again until the sixth inning when Jordan Dean hit an RBI single up the middle that scored right fielder Eric Wrozek, who hit a double. Nick Regnier left the game after he ran into the right field wall trying to catch the home run ball in the fourth. “He’s going to the doctor tomorrow,” Jaksa said. “We took him out of the game. He had some discomfort — we’ll know more after he sees the doctor.” KSU won games two and three after senior Zach Cooper pitched his second complete game this season while throwing a 3-0 shutout with a career high of 13 strikeouts Friday. Saturday, the Chippewas struck out 13 batters as well, but it was divided between two different pitchers. Junior Patrick Kaminska started and went four innings throwing five strikeouts, but

also giving up nine hits and allowing four runs. Redshirt freshman Dylan Rheault came in on relief and was very effective by striking out seven in five innings, only giving up two hits. He also walked five batters. The batting wasn’t all bad for CMU, as senior outfielder Sam Russell batted .500, and Dean hit .385 with an RBI and two multi-hit games. “It’s just a matter of getting into good counts with good pitches,” Dean said. “I just tried to stay calm and see the ball.” CMU will hit the road this week at Notre Dame at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday and a MAC weekend series at Akron. “We’re coming together pretty good,” Dean said. “It’s just a matter of playing good defense, and our sticks are going to come around in just a matter of time.” chuck miller/staff photographer

sports@cm-life.com

Junior pitcher Rick Dodridge allowed seven hits and five runs Sunday at Theunissen Stadium. He’s still looking for his first win since Feb. 19.

t r a c k a n d fiel d

CollEGE STUDENT

Athletes set career highs over weekend By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan track and field team had a busy weekend competing in five meets around the country. The Chippewas traveled throughout Michigan, Indiana and California in a four-day stretch that resulted in many career bests. At the Polytan Invitational, held in Indiana, the CMU distance team for the men saw a career day for many athletes. Sophomore Tecumseh Adams ran a career best 3:46 to finish fourth in the 1,500-meter run. Adam’s time was two seconds off from tying the school record set in 1983 by Bob Duerksen. Adams wasn’t the only runner who had a career day. Ben Wynsma, Kyle Stacks, Jason Drudge and Ethan Lievense all finished with career bests. On the women’s side, Holly Anderson, Raeanne Lohner, Veronica Garcia and Krista Parks finished with career bests.

“I think the long-distance team is going in a solid direction, along with the other groups,” said Willie Randolph, director of track and field. “Tec (Adams) has always been someone who is very talented, but he is starting to come into his maturation with proper coaching. It’s exciting to see that group come together as a whole.” Sprinters, hurdlers and the field team competed at Grand Valley State University Saturday and had a strong performance. Sophomore hurdler Cory Noeker won first place in the 110-meter hurdles with a career-best time of 14.46. The relay teams helped CMU dominate by winning both the men’s and women’s 4x400 meter relays. “Very good meet; very good solid performances,” Randolph said. “But again, we want to make sure those performances are duplicated at the conference championship in three weeks.” The trip to California was suc-

cessful for the CMU throwers at California State University in the Los Angeles Twilight Open. Junior Alex Rose won the men’s discus, while on the women’s side, freshman Milica Kulidzan won the women’s javelin. Rose threw a season best 17900 and won the competition by more than 11 feet. CMU also competed at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids Saturday. Senior Josh Kettlewell won the men’s pole vault, while sophomore Tim Reynolds won men’s long jump. On the women’s side, Emily Dienhart won the 100-meter hurdles with a career best of 14.55. Randolph said he is pleased with how those in the program are performing. “It goes from great recruiting to communication and focus and making sure you’re finding the right athletes for your program,” Randolph said. “It’s developing the athlete.” sports@cm-life.com

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cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Andrew Woodrich named Junior Matt Sandles coaches travel, recruits players new women’s basketball assistant coach By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

Head coach Sue Guevara has announced the hiring of new women’s basketball assistant coach Andrew Woodrich. The Central Michigan women’s basketball program was in need of a new assistant coach after former assistant Kathy McGee retired March 26. Woodrich’s job for the team will be player development (mainly perimeter players), community relations and scouting. “I’ve known Woody for the last five years. I watched his Indiana Elite AAU teams play, and I loved how they played,” Guevara said. “I loved how fast they got up and down the floor, how fundamental they were, and they play hard.” Woodrich is experienced with a player development role with his years of AAU coaching and managing. He spent six seasons as a vice president, director and coach at the Midwest Basketball Academy in Indiana. He won a state championship with Elite Basketball in 2008, along with runner-ups in 2007 and 2009, while coaching many NCAA Division I players. “I interviewed him two years ago when Bill (Ferrara) left, and I just didn’t think he had enough recruiting experience,” Guevara said. “He just didn’t have what I needed at that time.” Woodrich is also familiar with the Mid-American Conference. He spent the last two seasons on the Western Michigan bench as an assistant to Tasha McDowell after being the director of basketball operations for the Broncos.

Andrew Woodrich, women’s basketball assistant coach

After an 8-22 season, WMU fired coach McDowell and Woodrich has quickly found himself a new home in Mount Pleasant. He’ll be joining a program that has won back-to-back 20 win seasons as well as back-toback postseason appearances and a 2011-12 MAC runner-up. “He had a lot of influence at Western with what they did, and I thought with this second go around, I’m not going to let him go,” Guevara said. “He has some good recruiting ties for us, especially in Indiana and in Chicago.” And with a focus on perimeter players, he’ll have a load of young talent to coach for years to come. “He’s not just perimeter with our offense — he could work with the post — he’s very, very familiar with our offense,” Guevara said. “You’ll see something a little different defensively. With his AAU teams, he ran a really nice press. Thursday was his first day and the last day we can work with players, and he put in the bones of that press.” sports@cm-life.com

Matt Sandles is shy. He is not somebody anyone would expect to manage a bunch of 17 through 19-yearold baseball players, but that is exactly what the Central Michigan student has done for two of the last three years. People who work around Sandles have said his greatest asset is his statistics gathering and most of all — recruiting. He had to build teams from scratch every season, because most members are one-anddone players, who just finished their senior year in high school or their freshman year in college. They must be 18 years old or younger when May 1 arrives to participate. “He is an excellent recruiter,” said Sandles’ former assistant coach Jim Rousseau. “He can tell you (who) almost any of the top high school kids in Michigan are.” Sandles, 21, led his U-18 summer travel team, the Michigan Jets, to a 32-13-1 record in the 2011 season. “He really knows his stuff,” said former player Joe Williams. “He picked a really good group of guys, because they (were) all good players and they signed with good teams in college.” He finds players by scouring websites and contacts them by text message or email. The affordability is one thing that attracts players. Sandles does not make a profit. “We’re not trying to make money,” he said. “We’re just trying to have fun.”

Helping players go Division I Rousseau’s son Jeffrey was left off recruiting boards of Division I schools because many thought hockey was his future. Jeffrey, playing on Sandles’ squad in addition to attending camps at schools, resulted in a scholarship offer from Eastern Michigan. “It still comes back to Matt. If Matt wouldn’t have called, and he wouldn’t have pursued, we may not be at Eastern Michigan,” Rousseau said. “EMU knew of him probably prior too, but they hadn’t seen him,

because he moved out of state. Sandles said it brings joy to him when a player on one of his teams is succeeding in college. Only one player from last year’s team is not on a college roster. “Last night, I was watching a kid that was on our team in 2008. He was on the Big Ten Network pitching for Michigan State,” he said. “That was back when I was playing, but it was pretty cool. I was really happy for him.”

Age creates problems coaching Sandles created an 18-andunder traveling team in the summer of 2008, entering his senior year in high school. His role was to be a player and recruiter, but he took over the reigns as manager in 2009. Rousseau said it can be a struggle for Matt, because he is not much older than his players. Sandles said he expected players to practice on their own, and he was “walked all over.” “Last year, what was he, 20 (years old)?” Rousseau said. “Well, the kids on our team were 18 and 19. He is not an athletic guy, and I think sometimes athletes look at someone who is not athletic, and this may not be right, and it is what it is. “When I started, I was a dad. I was 25 years old coaching nine year olds” he said. So if you’re 20 coaching 19 year olds, you know, it’s harder. It’s much harder.” His team’s greatest win in

2011 was in the Triple Crown Sports Great Lakes Spectacular Championship game. The Jets won via walk-off single 10-9, after facing a 6-0 deficit in the first inning. The day the Jets won, July 17, was a year after his grandmother died. He did not manage in 2010 as a result of her deteriorating health. He realized it was the same day after looking at the championship plaque. “One year after I had the worst feeling in the world, I had the best feeling in the world,” Sandles said. “I truly feel she was looking down on me that day.” His team was two-for-two against the Central Michigan Stars, coached by Central Michigan University’s volunteer baseball coach Derek Simmons. Sandles is looking forward

to his second full season at the helm this summer. “I’m really excited. I think we got a better team than last year,” he said. “We just got to see if they can play as a team or if their egos get in the way, because they are all very talented.” Rich Crentz is one of the longest-running traveling team coaches in Michigan, entering his tenth year. He said he hopes Sandles will continue managing. “If his team disappears like a lot of other teams disappear, then you got these kids coming back from college (and high school) that have no place to play,” he said. “Then they’re at a disadvantage when they go back to college.” sports@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 23, 2012 || 5B

[NEWS]

Senior Taylor McManus awarded Star of Industry, to begin work in Kentucky

Mount Pleasant Discovery Museum

More than $2 million raised, structure making progress

she could continue working during the school year. “I worked throughout the year on the weekends,” McManus said. “The following summer, I was promoted to housekeeping supervisor, and I started working again only on the weekends when school started. They let me stay on and grow with them. They knew how much I wanted to learn every aspect of my major.” It is this dedication that got McManus the top honor in her field as a student. She was nominated by her employer and then won the Star of the Industry Student of the Year Award from The Michigan Lodging & Tourism Association. McManus was presented with the award on March 26 at the Pure Michigan Governor’s Conference on Tourism at the Amway Grand Plaza in Grand Rapids. “After I hired Taylor here, from the beginning to winning this award ... she has been impressive,” Fluette said. Market and Hospitality Services Administration Professor Gary Gagnon, who is McManus’

By Lonnie Allen Staff Reporter

By Hailee Sattavara Senior Reporter

The drive from Central Michigan University to the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa in Traverse City every weekend is coming to an end for Dewitt senior Taylor McManus. McManus, a hospitality major and professional sales minor, is graduating in May. She has been driving to the resort and giving up her weekends for the past two years after she was chosen for an internship. Krystal Fluette, a CMU alumna, hired McManus as an intern and has watched her advance during her two years with the resort. Following her graduation in May, she will start her career with White Lodging at the Marriott Louisville-Downtown in Kentucky. “Taylor is one of those people you don’t want to let go,” Fluette said. “But you’ve got to let her spread her wings, so to speak. I will miss her greatly.” As an intern, McManus started as a front desk agent. When summer ended, she was asked if

adviser, tried to talk her out of it when she first came to him about the program. “It is my goal to make sure the students know what they are getting into,” Gagnon said. “This industry isn’t for everyone; we work long hours and we work when other people play, and you really have to like people to go into this business.” Gagnon said it was this passion to succeed that brought her the top honor of the biggest event in the Michigan Lodging and Tourism field, with every major hotel in the state represented. “This is the first time in my 11-year career at CMU that a student has been honored,” he said. McManus will start her new job on May 21 as banquet manager. “It was my goal to graduate CMU with a job,” she said. “I didn’t want to graduate and then go through the job-finding process. I am glad that is taken care (of) and that part of my life is figured out.”

The Mount Pleasant Discovery Museum is beginning to take shape. More than $2 million has been raised for MPDM toward filling the museum with exhibits and covering operating expenses. “The building is well underway,” said Jennifer Fields, co-founder of MPDM and member of the board of directors. “We’re still in the second phase of the campaign.” Zack Wittman/Staff Photographer The second phase of the Construction of the 10,000-square-foot Mount Pleasant Discovery Museum, 5093 ReMPDM campaign, called “let’s build a museum,” mus Road, continues through the rain on Friday. The children’s museum will engage involves raising money to various ages through exhibits covering subjects ranging from math and sciences, build exhibits, first-year world cultures, literacy, regional history and the arts. operating expenses and an endowment. As previously reported by Central Michigan Life, the goal of the capital campaign was to raise $1.8 milJennifer Fields, co-founder of MPDM university@cm-life.com lion and $250,000 to cover the first- year operating budget. Riverways, Rocket Climber, math and language literacy. Central Michigan Life •Journey 436 Moore Hall, Little GarThe to Japan ex-CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Several commitments for The Greenhouse, F I N A L S I S S U E exhibit sponsorship have deners, A Farmer’s Market hibit will include a JapaPlacing Classifi Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates Journeyed to Japan. nese house, a Zen garden, been made, said MPDM aand A Farmer’s Market, mod- sushi spot, CM kimono, haiku Office Manager Heather Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad and ansex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or Frisch. By Phone: 989-774-3493 eled after Mount Pleasant’s wall, calligraphy of race, color, religion, discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media “We’re working to- weekend summer market, origami station. By Fax:still 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for ward the second half of will include a honey stand, type are available along typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features To read and therendered full valueless story by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the capital campaign,” She veggie stand, smoothie ,said. Life Mt. • 436 Central Moore MIMoore 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www.cm-life.com Mt. • www.cm-life.com 7-12 Issues: $7.25 issue like ad attractors. In Pleasant, Person: 436 Hall first MI date 48859 ofHall, publication. Any credit due can be picked at the CM offiMt. ce Central Michigan LifePleasant, •each 436theCentral Moore Michigan Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MIup48859 Hall, CMU, •Lifewww.cm-life.com Pleasant, MI 48859 • per www.cm-life.com stand and a program cart. about exhibit, visitCMU, within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. This environment will cm-life.com Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Frisch said a firm date is anot Classifi edClassifi Ad ed Ad Policy & Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Placing Classifi ed Ad Placing Rates ed Ad Policy & Rates provide role-playing, prob- a Classified Ad set for the opening of a lem solving and emerging MPDM, but they are hoping metro@cm-life.com ept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly because advertising which CM Life refl ects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which refl ects discrimination because REACH MORE THANaccept 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed 15 minimum per classifi Rates: ed 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad CMad Life word will not knowingly accept advertising which CMad Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu tional origin, and of CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national orBy origin, andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right or origin, andof forBy some time this summer. Phone: 989-774-3493 Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sextoorreject national CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or vertising which is discontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinionwithout of the Student Media discontinue, notice, advertising which is discontinue, in the opinion without of the notice, Student advertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media The Morey Bold, italic and Bold,1-2 italic and centered Bold, italic and centered 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per issue Issues: $7.75 per issue e standards of CM Board, Life. CM isFoundation not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with the standards forBy Fax: of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will be responsible for By Fax: 989-774-7805 989-774-7805 Bold,1-2 italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Issues: $7.75 p is not in keeping with the standards of CM Board, Life.available CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with the standards for of CM Life.available CM Life will be responsible for type Board, are the available along type are along type are along e extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for and the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling chargeerrors for the space used donated $1 million type are available along om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue typographical only to the extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to the used extent of cancelling the charge for the space used with other special features with other special features with other special features By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p ch an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error.like Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error.like Credit such an error is limited to only promised to match up to LifeAny ad attractors. adfor attractors. Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues:publication. $7.25 per 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue y credit due canthe be fipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM officredit ceIn due can7-12 the befipicked rst dateMoore up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. picked the CM Life offiissue ce like ad attractors. Issues: $7.25 per 7-12 Issues: $7.25 In Person: 436 Moore Hall Person: 436 Hall the first dateupofat Any credit due canthe befipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due can7-12 be picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce $500,000 in donations in f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the per Classifi of issue the ed ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classifi ed ad. If you fi13+ 13+ Issues: $7.00 13+ Issues: perofissue within 30 days of $7.00 termination the nd within an Issues: error, 30 days report of $7.00 termination it to theper Classifi ofissue the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed p.m. 13+ Issues: per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 ya.m.-5 responsible forof the Dept. immediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsiblep.m. for the firstimmediately. day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 the form afirstgrant. DonaDept. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. tions exceeded the match32,000 PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN ing grant.READERS REACH MORE THAN 32,000 REACH MORE THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF Central Michigan Life •AT 436WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com “People are starting to become more interested,” Placing a Classifi ed Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates Woodland Hospice Group: __________________________ Fields said. “We are still p accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimu CMeLifea will not knowingly April 25, 2012 Date: __________________________ dee looking for corporate doTak By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or nors and smaller donaMount Pleasant, MI __________________________ eath...without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media brdiscontinue, ByLocation: Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for tions.” s! only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used cuerrors typographical fo d n By Website: www.cm-life.com a 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p Fields said MPDM has and rendered valueless such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • bywww/cm-life.com been talking with individu7-12 Issues: $7.25 In Person: 436 Moore Hall the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified als about future donations. INDEX 13+ Issues: $7.00 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Placingexhibit a Classifi Classified Ad Policy Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Classifi ed Ad Rates Preliminary de- ed Ad P I CperKclassifi I T adU P signs were released in a CM Life THAN will not knowingly acceptREADERS advertising which reflects discrimination because ofDAY! race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum REACH MORE 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS OPEN AT ed WWW.CM-LIF By Phone: 989-774-3493 news packet detailing eight sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising exhibits, which include: which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and The Creation Station, centered type are ByHive, Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any Life Mt. • 436 Central Moore MIMoore 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. MI 48859 •30www/cm-life.com 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features In Pleasant, Person: 436 Hall Central LifePleasant, • at436 Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MIad.48859 Hall, • an www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com creditMichigan due can be picked up theCentral CM Life office within daysLife of termination of the If you fiCMU, nd error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Classifieds lS FINaeds lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi edsClassifi eds eds e v e i l e R k WEE Your ! s s e r t S Classifieds Classifieds lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi edsClassifi edsedseds Classifi edseds Classifi “We are still looking for corporate donors and smaller donations.”

Monday, April 30,

2012

NT

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........................ Baby Graduates

2

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Brain teaser .................. 3-4 games ..................

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hikes during Students stress professionals final exam week, .................... 4 share ways to cope

Survival tips for 11 ....................... final exam week

.......... 7

ule ......... Final exam sched

s ......... 7-12, More brain teaser

14

.................13-15

Classifieds .........

Friday, April 27

Policy ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy AdAd Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classified Ad Rates Classifi Placing a Classifi ed Ad Placing a Classifi ed Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS discrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising CM of race, Life which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, refl ects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad CM Lifeminimum will not knowingly accept advertising CM Life which will refl notects knowingly discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu

ect gin, or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national rightadvertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without notice, right advertising to reject discontinue, without notice, By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex the or national origin,orand CM Life reserves sex or the national rightadvertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of the with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is in Life. is the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of the with Student the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. not CM in keeping Lifeissue willof the withStudent the standards of CM Life. CM willof the Bold, italic and italic italicofand 1-2 Issues: per 1-2Media Issues: per issue 1-2Media Issues: $7.75 per issue which is$7.75 in the opinion which Board, is$7.75 in is the not opinion in Life keeping withStudent the Bold, standards Board, ofand CM is Life. notCM in keeping Life will with the Bold, standards CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: per cancelling ypographical the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only for the the space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the space used and centered type are centered type are centered type beto responsible for typographical errorsIssues: only be to responsible the extent for of typographical cancelling the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for theare space used and om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: with $7.50 per issue available along available along available by limited suchto anonly error. theCredit first date rendered for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Anysuchtoan only theCredit first date of with publication. Any rendered valueless by error. rendered for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit firstIssues: date for such ofwith publication. an error is limited Any the first along date of publication. Any Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issueto only other special features other special features other7-12 special features Issues: $7.25 per issue picked ys of up at the CM of436 the Life credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of up at the7-12 CM of436 Life the ad. offi ce If due you within find 30an days error, of termination of the ad. If due you find30 an error, Intermination Person: Moore Hall Intermination Person: Moore Hall credit can be picked up at the CM Life credit office within can bedays picked of termination up at the CM of Life the ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 responsible per issue for thelike Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue attractors. like adIssues: attractors. like ad Issues: attractors. onsible ified Dept. forp.m. the immediately. firstMonday-Friday day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for p.m. the immediately. fi13+ rstMonday-Friday day’s insertion. We are fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 $7.00 per issue report it toonly the Classifi ed Dept.p.m. immediately. report We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. Hours: 8 a.m.-5 Hours: 8 a.m.-5

Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along with 7-12 Issues: $7.25 other special features 13+ $7.00 like adIssues: attractors.

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT OFFICE SPACE FOR SALE FOR SALE 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT READERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN REACH MORE THAN 32,000 REACH MORE THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF Central Michigan Life •AT 436WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MIALWAYS 48859 • www/cm-life.com Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates Placing Classified Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Classifi AUTOS FORaSALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES & FOUND LOST & FOUND CM Life will not knowingly accept LOST advertising which refl ects discrimination because

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or CMwithout Life willnotice, not knowingly advertising reflectsMedia discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimu discontinue, advertising accept which is in the opinionwhich of the Student By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues:notice, $7.75advertising per issue Bold, italic and centered orkeeping national and CM LifeLife. reserves right to rejectforHELP or discontinue, without Board, is sex not in withorigin, the standards of CM CM Lifethe will be responsible HELP WANTED WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES type are available along FOR RENT FOR RENT typographical onlyopinion to the extent of Student cancelling the charge foristhe used with the standards whicherrors is in the of the Media Board, notspace in keeping of CM Life. CM Lifeissue will By Website: www.cm-life.comBy Fax: 989-774-7805 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per 1-2 special Issues: $7.75 p with other features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and attractors. 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED OFFICE SPACE OFFICE SPACE OFFICE SPACE FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE valuelessofby such error. Credit such error is limited toFOR only the fiSALE rst date of publication. AnyOFFICE NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES TO WANTED TO RENT SPACE FOR SALE FOR FOR SALE withinSALE 30 rendered daysRENT of termination the ad. Ifan you find an error,for report it an to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue SPECIAL SPECIAL SECTION 7-12 Issues: $7.25 PETS PETS In Person: 436 Moore Hall Hours: Monday-Friday p.m. SECTION WANTED TO RENT 8 a.m.-5 WANTED TO RENT credit dueWe can picked up atfor the offiinsertion. ce within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Dept. immediately. arebe only responsible theCM firstLife day’s 13+ Issues: $7.00 report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SALE OPEN SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES HORSE BOARDING FOR RENT FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT HELP HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT FOR RENT FOR RENT REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS HORSE BOARDING. BOX stalls inASST COORD/ FINANCIAL AID FiJAMESTOWN APTS 2 PER 2 BED, COLLEGE PRO IS now hiring painters H E R I T A G E S Q U A R E T O W N WE ARE PLEDGED to the door arena 989-433-2925. nancial Aid. PH-2. Req: Associates deall across the state to work outdoors 3, 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to HOUSES Only 1- 6 SECTION bedroom left! Free letter PETS and spirit of RENT U.S. policy SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS PETS PETS WANTED TO WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION gree or equivalent, 2 yrs exp. or PETS PETS PETS (989)775-5522 Campus, w/other students. Earn $3k-5k. Ad& Internet + Full Size W/D WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT Cable WANTED TO RENT equivalent; WANTED TO RENT for the achievement of equal see www.jobs.cmich.edu www.LiveWithUnited.com vancement opportunities + internships. CALL NOW TO START SAVING! WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS housing opportunity throughout for complete list of requirements.! 1-888-277-9787 or 989-773-2333. Dice!s AutoTRAVEL Scrap. UNWANTED VEHIthe Nation. We encourage support an ROOMMATES NEEDED NEXT YEAR: Screening begins immediately. Appliwww.collegepro.com ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master CLES we buy them we haul them. NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE ONE MALE AT ALAMO. 2 FEMALES cants must apply on-line at affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

REAL PERSONALS REAL ESTATE ESTATE

WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS WANTED TO BUY

Classifieds NO FEES

AT GROTTO www.bestrollc.com

586-321-1112.

REAL PERSONALS REAL ESTATE PERSONALS LOST &ESTATE FOUND

SMALL EFFICIENCY APARTMENT/ STUDIO close to downtown. $275 plus utilities. No pets. Call 989-430-1563.

Bedrooms Each With Personal Bath Full Size Washer & Dryer Includes Internet & cable 989-773-2333 www.olivieri-homes.com

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS AUTOS FOR SALE PERSONALS

MAIN STREET LIVING! 3-5 People

989-772-5428.

PERSONALS SERVICES REAL ESTATE

FOX HOME BUILDER!S. All Types of home improvements from roofing to remodeling. Experienced and local 989-773-4665.

www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly & actively strives to increase diversity within its community (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). !

REAL PERSONALS LOST &ESTATE FOUND

to class and downtown! HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FOR RENT WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPY TO ADS WANTED TO BUY Walk WANTED BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS 989-773-2333 UNION SQUARE APTS -Michigan 2 PER 2 Central Life • 436www.olivieri-homes.com Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

BED, Beside Target, Warm Shuttle to

Campus. (989)772-2222 WANTED TO RENT Placing a Classified Ad www.LiveWithUnited.com

SPECIAL SECTION Classifi ed Ad Policy PETS

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for summer and fall at University Cup Coffee Co., Apply at U-Cup, 1027 S. Franklin St.

AUTOS FOR SALE PERSONALS HELP WANTED HAPPY ADS

WANTED TOClassifi RENT edSPECIAL Ad RatesSECTION

WESTPOINT VILLAGE 2 will BED CM -Life not2knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad MASTER BATH LIKE Warm origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising sexNEW, or national Shuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue www.LiveWithUnited.com be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue WOODSIDE APTS- 2rendered bedroom, inavailable along with valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features In Person: 436 Moore Hall cluding washer and dryer $620.00 perbe picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, credit due can month. HOMETOWNE REALTY 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 989-779-1539. AIR CONDITIONED TOWNHOUSE for 1 AND 3 bedroom apartments close to June or August. Two bedrooms quiet campus and downtown. yet close to campus. Includes heat, Wi (must present ad at lease signing) 989-621-7538. Fi, Internet, cable, water, dishwasher. Ask $405/ pp. 989-772-1061. 1- 5 BEDROOM homes available About nptdev@gmail.com. jAugust 2012! Starting at $350/ mo. the Tallgrass Partlo Property Management 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS Promise! 989-779-9886 available summer and 2012/2013 www.partloproperty.com school year NO PETS! Very Clean. Upon Signing (when you sign a lease) Broadway & Brown Apartments. GREAT HOUSE. QUIET, clean, no $175 Utility Fee due within 14 days of signing No Application Fee of signing 989-772-3887 pets, studious women roommates. $175 Utility Fee due within 14 days No Security Deposit $185/ month plus utilities. Summer No Application Fee DEERFIELD VILLAGE - 2 PER 2 BED, 1240 E. Broomfi eld St. Tallgrassapts.com and school year. 773-9191. $50 Meijer Gift Card No (when Security Deposit you sign a lease) 4 PER 4 BED, 5 PER 5 BED. Warm Mon. - Thurs. 9-6, Fri. 9-5, Sat 12-4 Shuttle to Campus. (989)773-9999 $50 Meijer Gift Card (when you sign a lease) www.LiveWithUnited.com 4 BEDROOM APARTMENT. Close to By Phone: 989-774-3493 campus includes water, trash, W/ D. ByperFax: 989-774-7805 $275 person. 989-621-0052.

ROOMMATES

TRAVEL

REAL ESTATE

PERSONALS

MOTORCYCLES

SPECIALS:

ROOMMATES

TRAVEL

REAL ESTATE

PERSONALS

Upon Signing

No $$$ due at Signing! WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! OPEN WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Sign a lease and receive FREE Netflix for aALWAYS year! $175ATUtility Fee due within 14 days of signing Win the use of a 42” flatscreen TV! No Application Fee Bedroom leases available! No Security Deposit Full court basketball and sand volleyball $50 Meijer Gift Card

779-7900 NOTICES

NOTICES

FOR SALE

WANTED TO RENT

LOST & FOUND

AUTOS FOR SALE

SERVICES

FOR RENT

RECYCLE YOUR ITEMS HELP WANTED that you no longer need and gain $$ and space! SPECIAL SECTION CM Life Classifieds 774-3493 TRAVEL 436 Moore Hall www.cm-life.com

$220 AND UP. 1, 2, 3 bedroom apartments. Close to campus. Pets ok. Ed 989-644-5749.

WANTED TO RENT

1 AND 2 bedroom apartments. Close to campus. Available May and August. Year lease. 989-444-1944.

ROOMMATES

CHERRY STREET TOWN HOUSES 3 or 4 People 1 1/2 Bath Free Cable & Internet + Washer & Dryer Walk to Campus and Downtown Starting at $280 per person 989-773-2333.

REAL ESTATE

PERSONALS

LOST & FOUND

GARAGE SALES FOR RENT CM Life’s last publication for Spring semester is: TO RENT PETS WANTED Friday, April 27, 2012. ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES Ad deadline for that issue is: Wednesday, April 25 at Noon. REAL ESTATE

NO FEES FEES NO

Upon Signing OFFICE SPACE FOR SALE

Monday April 23, 2012 Monday April 23, 2012

AUTOS FOR SALE

SERVICES

Pick your Power Power Hour HELP WANTED Pick your Hour GARAGE SALES

Monday April 23, 2012 10 - 11 am or 3 - 4 pm

10 - 11 am or or 33--4PETS 4pm pm SPECIAL 10 -SECTION 114175 am E. Bluegrass,(989) 772-2222 Deerfield Village Village •• Jamestown Deerfield Jamestown••Union UnionSquare Square• Westpoint • WestpointVillage Village TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES Pick your Power Hour

Deerfield Village • Jamestown • Union Square • Westpoint Village

4175 E. Bluegrass,(989) 772-2222

4175 E. Bluegrass,(989) 772-2222 PERSONALS


ds

Classifieds

|| Monday, Apr. 23, 2012 || Central Michigan Life n,6B Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

fied Policy Ad Classified Ad Policy

Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

Classified Ad Rates

cm-life.com/news

Classified Ad Rates

owingly discrimination acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad gin, ect or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling ypographical the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the are space used and centered type centered type are centered type are om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along available along with available along with s by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publication. Any Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features other special features special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of Life the credit ad. office Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issuefor thelike Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue attractors. like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. sifi onsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s insertion. We are only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ww.cm-life.com Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates

Ad Policy & Rates

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

By Phone: 989-774-3493 cause By Fax: 989-774-7805 Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad ect or Media By Website: www.cm-life.com 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered ble for type are available along In Person: 436 Moore Hall used 3-6SALE Issues: $7.50 per issue with other specialRENT features WANTED NOTICES TO RENT WANTED NOTICES TO FOR FOR SALE o only Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. office

ssified

OFFICE NOTICES SPACE FOR SALE

13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

REACH THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &MORE FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue OFFICE SPACE 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT MIGHTY MINIS

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HURRY! SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS

PETS

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

MOTORCYCLES

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

GARAGE SALES

MANAGER/ COMMUNICATIONS ADNOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS HIRING EXPERIENCED LINE Cooks MISSIONS. PA-4.! Req: Bachelor's defor summer painting for student housApply on-line at gree in marketing, journalism, commuing and Apts. Availability M-F 8-5 is rewww.mountaintown.com nications, English, public relations or quired. Apply at Lexington Ridge ofEmail info@mountaintown.com related field; Minimum of three yrs exp fice, 3700 E. Deerfield Rd. F-1. Sign a new lease & get a see www.jobs.cmich.edu for complete $50 MEIJER GIFT CARD. list of requirements. Screening begins immediately. Applicants must apply Don’t wait until it’s too late! on-line at www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly & actively strives to increase diversity within its community (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). www.smwrentals.com ! GREETERS: DUE TO an expanding ! store we are looking to fill part and full time positions for Greeters. Benefits available. Apply within at 4580 E Pickard, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 Email 5x10 Warehouse Spaces CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, llambertson@hankgraff.com By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising ADMINISTRATOR gion, PERSON BEDROOM which is in the opinion of2the Student2Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Rates: 15 word minimumPROGRAM per classifi ed ad DEARBORN. PA-3. Req: Bachelor's PET FRIENDLY • NEXT TO to TARGET tising be responsible for typographical errors only the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and By Website: www.cm-life.com degree or equivalent; 3 yrs exp (eduFor the Entire Summer! e will Bold, italic and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any 1-2 Issues: $7.75 percation issue or office environment); see In Person: 436 Moore Available Now!Hall issue d and centered type arecan credit due for complete listbe picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, 3-6 Issues: $7.50 perwww.jobs.cmich.edu available along n. Any Hours: McGuirk7-12 MiniIssues: Storage $7.25 per report it with to apply the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. of issue requirements. Applicants must special featuresby error, (989) 772-1309 on-line at other www.jobs.cmich.edu 2 PER 2 BED 2 Master Bath 13+ Issues: $7.00 per4/27/2012. issue like ad attractors. www.mcguirkministorage.com Applicants must apply on-line at www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly & actively strives to increase diversity (see office for details) within its community (see 2 PER 2 BED • 4 PER 4 BED www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). 5 PER 5 BED • PET FRIENDLY SHUTTLE SERVICE ! WORK ON MACKINAC Island This Public Summer- Make lifelong friends. The Submit your Transportation Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge Services of the application online Shops are looking for help in all areas: Isabella County Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, Transportation 1, 2, 3 PER • 2 & 3 BEDROOM Commission Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. Housing, bonus, and discounted meals. ( 9 0 6 ) 8 4 7 - 7 1 9 6 . www.theislandhouse.com 2 PER 2 BED • 4 PER 4 BED • 5 PER 5 BED

Only 4 units left!

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Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

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NOTICES FOR SALE LOST & FOUND 989•772•9441 AUTOS FOR SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED WANTED TO RENT BLOOMFIELD HILLS RENTAL Company in Oakland County Michigan SPECIAL SECTION needs summer help! Up to $12.00 ROOMMATES an hour. Outdoor work, good driving record, and lifting required. Call Wayne at 248-332-4700. TRAVEL REAL ESTATE PERSONALS WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS

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ALWAYS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS AUTOS FOR SALE OPEN AT SERVICES SERVICES

Classifieds

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Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

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Across 1 Get really high 5 Overhaul 9 Archipelago unit 13 Six-sided shape 14 Captain’s “Hold it!” 16 Corrosive liquid 17 Gillette razor brand 18 Do a two-step, say 19 Broadway award 20 Providence native, for one 23 Spectacular failure 24 Nutritional fig. 25 Writer LeShan 28 Part of PST: Abbr. 29 Saintly glow 32 Marries in secret 34 Skipped the saddle 36 Cathedral niche 39 Hot brew 40 Wedding vows 41 Steered the skiff beachward 46 Tentacle 47 Petrol station name 48 Juan Carlos, to his subjects

51 RR terminus 52 Prime rib au __ 54 “From the halls of Montezuma” soldier 56 Crosby/Hope film 60 Visibly wowed 62 “Vacation” band, with “The” 63 Baseball stitching 64 Kate, to Petruchio, eventually 65 China’s Zhou __ 66 “__ la Douce” 67 Well-protected 68 Desires 69 Armchair quarte back’s channel Down 1 Eats, with “up” or “down” 2 Bat for a higher average than 3 Overseas 4 Curls up with a book 5 Commercial on AM or FM 6 Actresses Gabor and

Longoria 7 Frontiersman Boone, familiarly 8 Hollywood award 9 “Musta been som thing __” 10 Scrabble sheet 11 Surprise 2012 New York Knick standout Jeremy __ 12 Joseph of ice cream fame 15 Painfully sensitive 21 Off-the-wall effect 22 Chip’s partner 26 Geometric art style 27 Raises a question 30 “Panic Room” actor Jared 31 More than chubby 33 Off-Broadway award 34 Fishing line holder 35 Sighs of relief 36 Barking sounds 37 One writing verse 38 Quit cold turkey 42 __ vu: familiar feeling

43 Plod 44 Diffusion of fluids, as through a membrane 45 Thunderous noise 48 Potato presses 49 Pitch a tent 50 Naval petty officer 53 Full of rocks 55 Riveter painted by Rockwell 57 Architectural S-curve 58 Eye lasciviously 59 Sound of suffering 60 “How cute!” sounds 61 Italian actress Scala


April 23, 2012