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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Students compete at Eggtastic Target Toss, raise $1,000 for Big Brothers, Big Sisters, 3A

Central Michigan University

David Blackburn’s departure leaves void at tight end position, 1B

| Monday, April 2, 2012

[cm-life.com]

CMU pays no extra cost for delay of website

‘BYOB’ campaign stresses green campus

By Lonnie Allen Staff Reporter

By Alayna smith Staff Reporter

The delay in the Central Michigan University website redesign will not cost the university more than its contracted $550,000, Vice President for Information Technology Roger Rehm said last week. In a meeting with Central Michigan Life, Rehm said the CMU web team is actively involved in its preparation ahead of the upcoming April 9 relaunch. Blue Chip Consulting Group, an IT company based in Ohio, was tasked with redesigning the entire web presence. Initially tabbed for an August launch, the project was delayed after the number of pages needed to be migrated bloomed above 50,000. “We are making sure all the technical pieces are working appropriately,” Rehm said. “We are making sure all the final pieces of content are put in place, and we are making sure that everyone is taking the time to update the content in their sites.” One of the key aspects of relaunch will be Central Link, a new and improved version of the CMU Portal, where students will be able to access grades, Blackboard and email, among other options. Cmich. edu, while also on the same platform, will serve as the marketing arm for the university for potential students and the outside world. Rehm said the two sites will be distinctly different. “Central Link will only be accessed by the CMU community,” he said. “We define (community) as someone who has a CMU global ID. Cmich.edu is the external site.” A series of six videos produced by the team, released last week and this week, will help explain functionality of Central Link and cmich.edu. Monica Mull, CMU’s associate director of Integrated Marketing, said a video set to be released this week will better illustrate the new search aspect. “We have set up key words for certain user offices,” Mull said. “Similar to Google, you will have preferred search results that show up at the top to help indicate what we think is the best match for you. There (are) also going to be filters on the Central Link side, so you can filter your search once you get your initial results.” If a user is looking for a web page or PDF, they will be able to search by type, she said.

a deal,” McEnhill said. McEnhill said her team met on three separate days to organize its routine, while Mays said the men’s team worked for six hours creating its dance. The wrestling and women’s basketball teams finished third and fourth place, respectively. “Jock Rock is a good cause and really unifies people within the program,” said sophomore wrestler Scott Mattingly. “All the teams were great and those guys used a lot of guys and deserved to win.” Other teams that competed in the Jock Rock include gymnastics, soccer, football, volleyball, field hockey and men’s basketball.

Stickers have been popping up around campus with one simple message: B.Y.O.B. But the new campaign has nothing to do with partying; the message is one stressing environmental awareness and sustainability through small, easy steps. The “Small Steps, No Footprint” campaign, promoted through a partnership between the Student Environmental Alliance and the Great Lakes Institute for Sustainable Systems, is placing stickers on waste receptacles and drinking fountains around campus to remind students of their environmental impact. “The stickers on drinking fountains are there to remind people to B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Bottle) so we can eliminate unnecessary plastic water bottle waste,” said SEA President Chloe Gleichman, a Saline junior. “By placing a reminder by trash cans, we hope to get people to think twice about what they are throwing away. Many things can be recycled of which people are unaware.” Although the campaign is focused primarily on the stickers for now, GLISS Director Tom Rohrer said it could easily be expanded to encompass other parts of campus and student life, including the promotion of sustainable practices within residence halls. Facilities Management, helping to cover the cost of the roughly 700 stickers distributed around campus, has funded the campaign. Facilities Management Director Jay Kahn said initiatives such as this one were important for students. “(The) campus population turns over with each graduating class, (and) incoming students want to know how to support recycling programs and eliminate bottled water,” he said. “Outreach efforts like the sticker campaign help create awareness.” On top of being wasteful, Gleichman said plastic water bottles are nothing more than a marketing scheme designed to trick us into buying something that should already be free and available.

A JOCK | 2A

A BYOB | 2A

A CMICH | 2A

good sports

PhotoS BY aNDReW kUHN/StAff PhotogrAPher

ABOVE: Inkster freshman Crystal Bradford dances with the rest of the women’s basketball team Sunday evening during the annual Jock Rock competition at Plachta Auditorium on campus. The competition was held as a fundraiser for Big Brothers Big Sisters. LEFT: New York freshman Mary Alice Moore performs with members of the field hockey team during the annual Jock Rock competition. RIGHT: Lansing freshman Auston Barnes performs with members of the men’s basketball team during the annual Jock Rock competition.

Athletes raise money for Big Brothers, Big Sisters By Justin Hicks | Staff Reporter

The men’s track and field and cross country teams claimed first place in the 2012 Jock Rock for the first time Sunday at Central Michigan University. Senior thrower Kevin Mays said the victory was a long time coming for a team in its fifth year of competition. “It’s great to come out and see each other and we raise money for a good cause,” the Flint native said. “There was great competition this year and I was really impressed with it.” The team’s routine consisted of music from a multitude of artists, including The Temptations, Vanilla Ice, Rebecca Black and The Jackson 5. Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium held the 18th annual Jock Rock, which raised money for Big Brothers, Big Sisters. The total amount raised wasn’t available by time of print, although the event raised $1,400 in 2011.

“The event means a lot to us and there’s always a lot of money raised,” said sophomore distance runner Jackie McEnhill. “It gets everybody together for a good cause and we get to form a better connection with people on the other teams.” CMU women’s track and field and cross-country teams finished second Sunday, ending its five-year winning streak. “We’re not going to be sore losers and we’ll congratulate them,” McEnhill said. “We didn’t even lend them our clothing; they came up with all of that on their own. At least it was a track team who won.” The women’s team experienced a technical difficulty during the opening of its routine, but recovered with a backup CD, performing to artists including Eminem, Black Eyed Peas and B.O.B. “We had plenty of backup and we always win, so we thought it wouldn’t be too big

w Check out our gallery on the web for more photos.

neW venture

Competition showcases future of Michigan business

By Alayna smith Staff Reporter

The New Venture Competition brought 30 teams of Central Michigan University and Michigan Technological University students together to compete with the entrepreneurial business plans for a prize of $30,000. Michigan State Rep. Kevin Cotter, R-Mount Pleasant, said he was impressed by the presentations and the progress of the competition, which started last year and was held Friday in the Education and Human Services Building and McGuirk Arena. “This competition goes right along with things going on at the state level to make Michigan

more entrepreneur-friendly and provide jobs for others,” Cotter said. Charles Crespy, dean of the College of Business Administration, said he saw many viable business plans outlined in presentations throughout the day, and win or lose, the competition provided good experience and all still had great potential to succeed in the marketplace. “We like to think some of the things we do are transformative experiences,” Crespy said. “You stand in front of 200 people and lay out all your hopes and dreams; it’s not something every student can do.” The competition serves the purpose of filling the most common need when it comes to

w Check out our gallery on the web for more photos. business start-ups, Cotter said. “CMU has a great entrepreneurship program and students have great ideas; the third leg that is too often missing is the funding,” he said. A prize of $60,000 was given to teams for achievement in various categories. Baisikeli Ugunduzi, a social business that provides bicycles to people in Africa, took home $10,000 for the Best Social Venture Award, as well as the $30,000 grand prize. A VENTURE | 2A

[INSIDE] w Leaders in local anti-discrimination movement still push for law, despite lawmaker’s proposal, 3A w Increased incidents of vandalism renew calls for downtown cameras, 3A w Union Township bike path project to begin in coming months, 6A

VICTORIa ZeGLeR/StAff PhotogrAPher

Westland senior Daniel Leinbach waits among other teams after receiving cash prizes totaling more than $46,000 for start-up capital Friday night during the Central Michigan University New Venture Competition in the Events Center of McGuirk Arena.

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

w Car smash event part of Sigma Tau Gamma week-long Special Olympics Michigan fundraiser, 7A


2A || Monday, April 2, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

byob |

EVENTS CALENDAR

continued from 1a

TODAY

w Educause Learning Initiative Webinar, Just as Good is No Longer Acceptable: The Promise of Ed will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Charles V. Park Library room 413. w The spring 2012 Griffin Policy Forum: Predictions for the November Elections, will be held in the Powers Hall Ballroom from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Panelists include a range of political insiders and experts.

Tuesday

w The CMU vs. WMU Blood Challenge will be held in Kulhavi 142 from noon to 5:45 p.m. The event will be hosted by the American Red Cross. Walk-ins are welcome. w A showing of the documentary "Vincent Who" with filmmaker Curtis Chin will be held at 5:30 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Auditorium.

“The plastic in water bottles has been known to leach chemicals into the water,” she said. “Tap water is tested multiple times daily for safety, whereas the entire bottled water industry is monitored by one person in the FDA who has other responsibilities as well. As such, the bottled water industry remains highly unregulated. From an economic standpoint, bottled water makes no sense. Here, we have access to clean, safe and free tap water. Bottled water costs the equivalent of $10 per gallon. And to think we complain about gas prices.” Aside from just recycling and using a reusable water bottle, Gleichman said there are many simple, everyday choices that can be made to create a sustainable living,

jock | continued from 1a

Four competition judges decided the winning team based on attention to detail, lip syncing, originality, crowd enthusiasm and time management. The judges panel consisted of Katie Christensen, studentathlete services intern; Dan Heck, coordinator of marketing and community relations;

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 75

cmich | continued from 1a

Kole Taylor, technical writer for the Office of Information and Technology, said upcoming training sessions will be held for those who modify content and do the behind-the-scenes work of department web pages. “It is similar (to) training that’s offered right now for people who manage their

venture | continued from 1a

Two other finalists, Movement Film Studios and Picket Books, received $10,000 and $5,000 respectively for their achievement in the competition. Baisikeli Ugunduzi, a team from Michigan Technological University made up of Ben Mitchell and Wade AitkenPalmer, used their business venture to address a need for dependable transportation in Africa. Fifty million Africans use bikes to commute to work, school, markets and health centers, but many are using as much as 10 percent of their income on replacing deflated tires. Baisikeli Ugunduzi provides tires with solid inner tubes that will not deflate and can take much wear and tear. While visiting Kenya for market testing last summer, Mitchell

cm-life.com/category/news

[News] such as turning off lights, eliminating waste and being conscious of what can be reduced and reused. Although these small steps toward change can make a huge impact, Gleichman said these initiatives were only the tip of the iceberg in terms of what still needs to be accomplished. “While these personal lifestyle choices are essential to realizing a sustainable future, I want to stress that personal change is not equivalent to systemic change,” she said. “The systems that have permeated our governments do not place priority on the future of the planet, which is inextricably linked to the future of the human race ... personal lifestyle changes are necessary and good, but what is ultimately needed is true systemic change and infrastructure overhaul.”

PHOTO OF THE DAY

university@cm-life.com

Jamie Brown, towers academic advisor and Brad Griffin, a member of Big Brothers, Big Sisters program. “The event shows that athletes are really diverse and do a lot of extra curriculars,” McEnhill said. “We’re not just athletes, and when we get together like this, we show we can work well to make some good dances. It’s fun ... it’s hilarious.”

jake may/Staff Photographer

Brighton senior Rachel Money, left, laughs as she enjoys sitting atop a picnic bench with her best friend Laura Summers, a Brighton freshman, after the two finished up smoking a cigarette Sunday afternoon outside of Barnes Residence Hall. Money is wearing a cow plush animal hat with mittens, which she gave to Summers as a Christmas present, but took to wearing because she wanted to play dress-up. “The cow is my favorite animal,” Summers said. “They’re so adorable. Sometimes I just drive around to the farms to see them in the pastures.”

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university@cm-life.com

website at CMU,” Taylor said. A video released Wednesday explained the differences between cmich.edu and Central Link. They will continue this week. “All of these things are meant to introduce the main features of the site,” said Renee Walker, vice president of University Communications. “After we get feedback from the CMU community, we will be able to better address future content in regard of training and that sort

of thing.” Rehm said the new site is more efficient compared to the old web environment, where users would have to log in separately for Blackboard and email access. “The huge difference is you log in once,” he said. “Once logged in, you get access to all the appropriate things you should have access to within that community.”

said the popularity for the product was instant and it soon became an issue they didn’t have a supply available to sell right then and there. “As a social business, Baisikeli Ugunduzi is driven by social impact rather than profitability,” Aitken-Palmer said. Even for those who did not win the competition, the day was still a useful step toward a productive future. MTU freshman and competitor Joel Florek, who has competed in several other similar competitions around the state, said the New Venture Competition is unique and more fairly structured than others. “The biggest thing about the competition is that it forces you to go through the process of thinking about your business,” Florek said. “You look at advice from judges, who provide open feedback at the New Venture Competition. Many other competitions don’t provide any feed-

back at all.” Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, the keynote speaker for the final ceremony, said entrepreneurship in Michigan began long ago with the auto industry, which started as just an idea in the heads of some businessmen. Events like the New Venture Competition were important in regaining that entrepreneurial edge, he said. University President George Ross agreed, and said it was great to be providing students with a more applied and practical learning not always found in the classroom. “As a university, it is our responsibility to shepherd growth of the community,” Ross said. “The New Venture Competition allows us to invest in new businesses and ideas, encourage students as they move forward and create success and help the economy.”

university@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

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3A

INSIDE LIFE Monday, April 2, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Increased downtown vandalism renews call for installing cameras By John Irwin Senior Reporter

Photos by Brooke Mayle/Staff photographer

Farmington Hills sophomore Noelle LaLonde tosses an egg during the final round of the Eggtastic Target Toss in Finch Fieldhouse Sunday. All proceeds from the event went to the Big Brothers, Big Sisters Foundation.

eggin’ on them Students compete at Eggtastic Target Toss, raise $1,000 for Big Brothers, Big Sisters By Ryan Fitzmaurice | Staff Reporter

The egg toss was redefined on Sunday as about 60 students competitively tossed plastic Easter eggs to win prizes and raise money for Big Brothers, Big Sisters. The event, called the Eggtastic Target Toss, which ran from 2 to 4 p.m. in Finch Fieldhouse, involved several rounds of competition and raised about $1,000. At the sound of “go,” students began hailing eggs toward the center of the room, hoping to land their plastic Easter egg as close to the center as possible. The closest egg would win up to several prizes, ranging from tickets to Greenfield Village to free Detroit Pistons tickets, or a signed Detroit Red Wings jersey. Students could buy one egg at a time for $2 or three eggs for $5. The event is part of a class project for RPL 430: Planning Recreation Programs and Events. The group behind the program was Sterling Heights senior Alexandria Schauer, Gaylord junior James Wagner, Grand Haven junior Allison Krupp, Shelby Township

Increased incidents of vandalism have revived talks in the city commission of installing cameras in downtown Mount Pleasant. City Commissioner Jim Holton said he has been an advocate for installing cameras downtown for more than five years, but talks right now are just in the early stages. “We’re still in the real beginning stages of asking what do we want in the system, who would monitor it, what will the costs be, where would we put it, those types of things,” Holton said. Referencing the breakin at Emma’s Basement Boutique, 111 S. University Ave., last week, Holton said downtown is ready for changes like this. “Downtown has the infrastructure in place to make this happen,” Holton said. “We have a lot of businesses downtown. When we see an incident like we saw last week, it makes sense to have cameras in place. It may not solve a case, but it gives a timeframe and aids in the investigation process.” Holton owns Mount Pleasant Brewing Compa-

ny, 614 W. Pickard St., and Mountain Town Station, 506 W. Broadway St., and said he has cameras set up at both businesses. “I use them if there’s an incident,” Holton said. “It’s not a case of me sitting in front of the camera displays all day.” Downtown business owners expressed openness to Holton’s idea. Helen Chase, owner of Trillium, 123 E. Broadway St., said the sense of security gained through the camera system outweighs any negative impacts. “The two things you would look at are what you are gaining and what you are losing through this,” Chase said. “You gain security, and I can’t see anything major that we’d lose.” Chase said she wasn’t concerned that installing cameras downtown would infringe on residents’ right to privacy or deter customers from coming downtown. “I can’t see that putting cameras downtown would deter people,” Chase said. “I don’t see downtown as a high-risk area. It’s a very nice place, and this can only help.”

AVANDALISM | 5A

Unemployment rate below 9 percent for first time since 2008 By John Irwin Senior Reporter

Holland Senior Aj Westendorp, right, celebrates with Rochester Hills juniors, Kevin Kohner, center, and Cody Wilson, left, after winning the Eggtastic Target Toss Sunday in Finch Fieldhouse. Westendorp, who donated $5 toward the Big Brothers, Big Sisters foundation, received three eggs but won his purse prize after just one toss.

junior Caitlin Bailey and Rochester junior Jennifer Hayes. They were given the assignment to pick a charity of their choice, develop an event to raise money for that charity and gain support for the event. Holland senior A.J.Westendorp, who said he heard about the event from Wagner, came away with the prize of an expensive purse and various perfumes. “The enthusiasm comes from instant success and unexpected success,” Westendorp, a quarterback for the football team, said.

“I’m never going to use the purse, but my girlfriend might, or perhaps my friends’ girlfriends might, as they would be more into purses.” Colama junior Jory Brown, who won a getaway package, including a massage and a weekend stay at a hotel, said she was surprised by her success. “I never win anything,” Brown said. “I have no luck ever, so this is awesome.” Wagner said he thought the turnout was successful. “It was a lot of fun and really cool,” he said. “If I could do it again, I would.”

Jackson Martin, a junior from Saline, won the grand prize, a signed Henrik Zetterburg Detroit Red Wings Jersey. Martin said winning was all because of his technique. “First I was going beer pong style, but that didn’t really work,” Martin said. “Then I tried rolling it, which got me closer, but still wasn’t effective. Finally, on this last round, I had my girlfriend kiss it, and then threw it low. That was the secret.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Michigan’s unemployment rate dropped to 8.8 percent in February, falling below the 9 percent marker for the first time since August 2008. The state’s unemployment rate has dropped each of the past seven months, according to seasonally-adjusted data released by the Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget. It was at 9 percent in January and at 10.4 percent one year earlier. The numbers reveal total employment rose by 22,000 in February, and the number of unemployed dropped by 8,000. The 8.8 percent figure is still 0.5 percent higher than the national unemployment rate. The dip in the unemployment rate is a small step for a state that led the nation in unemployment during the heart of the recession. Led in part by the recovery of the state’s manufacturing sector, Michigan is enjoying one of the most robust and rapid recoveries in the country, which is also beginning to see more rapid drops in the unemployment rate.

Economics Professor Lawrence Brunner said the recovery has been typical, though. “What’s responsible (for the recent dip in the unemployment rate) is people leaving the labor force,” Brunner said. “If (discouraged workers) don’t look for work, they’re not unemployed. It is blindingly obvious that this is not a typical recovery.” Measures of unemployment that include discouraged workers and part-time workers who are looking for full-time work show the unemployment rate around 17 percent in the state. Brunner blamed what he sees as a weak recovery on President Barack Obama’s administration and federal regulations. “The stimulus plan is a total failure,” Brunner said. “There is no such thing as a shovel-ready project anymore, given the extreme amount of regulations that we now have. We have an administration in Washington that is totally unconcerned about job creation.”

A UNEMPLOYMENT | 5A

Students hold vigil Friday to show support for Trayvon Martin By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

Central Michigan University students and faculty who attended the Trayvon Martin vigil Friday night were part of a national show of support. The vigil, held outside the Charles V. Park Library, was planned by Saginaw sophomores Chasney Gilbert and Taylor Wilson. The two are best friends and came up with the idea at the same time in separate rooms. That was enough, they both said, to put the idea into action. The cold weather also may have factored many in attendance to dress in what has become a national symbol of support for Martin— a black hooded sweatshirt. Martin, 17, was walking in the gated community of his Florida home on Feb. 26 when George Zim-

“The voice of Trayvon Martin is us, because he can’t speak for himself.” Taylor Wilson, Saginaw sopohmore merman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, spotted him. Suspicious of the boy, Zimmerman followed Martin against the advice of local police. A confrontation ensued and ended in the shooting death of Martin. Various reports said it was against Zimmerman’s Neighborhood Watch rules for its volunteers to carry firearms. It was not unlawful for Zimmerman to carry a handgun, because he owns a concealed weapons permit. “A lot of people just think it’s about race,” Wilson said. “The injustice lies in kill-

ing an unarmed person and claiming self-defense.” Zimmerman is believed to have since gone into hiding with his family. About 30 students and faculty stood on the walkway near the library with small candles and were invited to comment about the murder of Martin. Yae Sock Roh, a market and hospitality services professor, encouraged others to follow a broad line of advice. “I strongly encourage you all to build up your human capital,” he said about conjuring mindfulness toward other people.

Wilson said she and Gilbert advertised the vigil with a Facebook event page, word-of-mouth and small sticky tabs for doors in the residence halls. Wilson said the number of people who attended far exceeded the number she had in mind. “I didn’t even expect that many people to come here, honestly,” Wilson said. “( The ones who didn’t come) showed their support by spreading the word.” Gilbert said she thought it was odd that a registered student organization had not planned any sort of memorial service for Martin. “It’s just awkward, because we’re just a couple of regular students,” Gilbert said of herself and Wilson. “You’d think it would be an RSO that would put it on.” Gilbert and Wilson said the experience of planning

Adam Niemi/Staff Photographer

Marketing and Hospitality Services professor Yae Sock Roh speaks with students during the Trayvon Martin vigil near Charles V. Park Library on Friday. “I strongly encourage you to build up your human capital,” he said.

the event showed them what kind of potential influence students have. Vigils have been held across the country as a one-month memorial to Martin’s death.

“The voice of Trayvon Martin is us, because he can’t speak for himself,” Wilson said. studentlife@cm-life.com


4A

VOICES Monday, April 2, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | Why add new website onto end of semester stressors?

Bad timing

approach and certain tools and information are needed, and you have a recipe for disaster. Why not wait until the end of the semester so people can slowly adjust throughout the summer and return in the fall having mastered it? And why not establish a public beta, allowing those who are curious to opt-in to the new system, rather than shoving it in front of many who just want to finish out the semester? Graduating seniors, for example, will have to waste time learning how to operate a new system that they are unlikely to be comfortable with by the time graduation rolls around. Easing users into the program for as positive of an initial experience as possible should be on the

T

he redesigned cmich.edu had problems meeting its numerous launch windows, so it is encouraging to see a firm date set for its release.

But just because the site is finally ready to go live for thousands of users does not mean it should. Need we remind the Web team and University Communications that their much ballyhooed release date falls just about three weeks before final exams? Getting acquainted with a significantly altered website is going to present a large stumbling block to many students and even more to

some non-digital-native professors. Despite how well-documented the new user experience is, or how user-friendly its design may be, the significant restructuring of pages and utilities will make performing previously routine tasks on the site an exercise in frustration until people grow accustomed to it. Take into account the fact that many students and faculty may not even use the website until exams

forefront of the Web development team’s minds. Beyond usability concerns, what happens if there are problems on the launch day? Even the most casual observer of the tech world can tell you big launches of new products and services seldom run smoothly. While we can only assume some type of contingency plan is in place, there is no reason to risk users getting lost in the shuffle. If CMU waited one more month, it would still have a new website and people will figure out how to use it. It seems that in a rush to make up for previously missed deadlines, CMU has decided to launch the new site because it can, without regard on whether it should.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Confessions of a reality TV junkie, Part II I’m back. Yes, I’m still addicted to reality TV. Yes, I understand that it’s a stupid thing to be addicted to. And yes, I caught the latest episode of “Dance Moms”, don’t worry. Today I’d like to discuss something I’m sure irks all avid reality TV watchers; spin-off shows. We went from “Jersey Shore” (Seasons one through five were all fabulous) to the “Pauly D Project,” from “Dance Moms” to “Dance Moms: Miami,” from “Real Housewives of Orange County” to “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills,” “Real Housewives of Atlanta,” “Real Housewives of Miami” and “Real Housewives of everywhere else known to man,” and, here’s the kicker; from “America’s Next Top Model” to “Australia’s Next Top Model.” Let’s take the time as a collective unit of reality TV watchers to say enough is enough. Not only are most of the spin-off series not nearly as entertaining, but when they ARE good, it just adds another show to my already-hectic television schedule. Most of the spin-off versions of shows end up being canceled after a few seasons, and people act like they’re surprised. I really don’t know why. When you watch reality TV the way I do, it becomes an emotional investment. You begin to become attached to the characters. You feel for the girls on “Dance Moms” when Abby Lee Miller once again loses her mind and adds another routine to their set. You want to fight with Tyra when she eliminates your favorite model, and you are basically forced to choose sides when fights break out on “Real Housewives.” When a spin-off show is introduced, I obviously tune in, but I go into the show with the mindset that I will hate it. After all, just watching it makes me feel like I’m cheating on the original show, and heaven forbid I actually enjoy the spin off. When I see characters that I’m not accustomed to living the lives of the characters on my favorite originals, it’s annoying. What’s even more annoying is when shows that clearly require an entire cast to be successful (like “Jersey Shore”) take one or two characters and try to make a series. Pauly is nothing without Vinny, Snooki and Deena can’t be meatballs without one another and Sammy would be forgotten without Ronnie. I wish Pauly luck with his show, I really do, but I don’t foresee it working out. When a show is getting millions of views nightly, let it be. Don’t abandon our favorite characters, move to a strange location and try to recreate the series we’re obsessed with. After all, if it’s not broken, don’t fix it.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

[Letter to the Editor]

Computer science professor not in the wrong Professor Thomas Ahlswede is by no means the most interesting professor on the planet. However, this does not detract from the fact that he’s one of the few professors that are super nice and willing to help where they can. The fact that Central Michigan Life would run this article and attack this man so that some senior “journalist” could get their degree disgusts me. There are thousands of art classes in schools all across the nation that actually have nude models come into the classrooms and pose. If an art teacher would have had his art in a sketchbook or even drawn/painted in a frame behind the desk in his office, no one would have said a word about it. For example, Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights, which depicts hundreds of nude people in

provocative positions as well as one right near the front bent over with flowers sticking out of his/ her ass. In fact, this piece is well known to be studied in art history classes. Let’s not forget that Ahlswede also TEACHES computer graphics courses and this just goes to show that he’s really good at what he teaches. Even if he was creating “porn,” as someone who worked on a lot of broken student computers while attending Central Michigan University, I can guarantee this isn’t the first time most of those “innocent 17-18 year olds” have seen a naked body. Some of the stuff I stumbled across on many student machines, while ridding their PCs of malware, was borderline illegal and definitely disgusting. As an alumnus of CMU, I am appalled to see this is what this

paper has come to in my absence. What people do in their free time is their own business anyway. He admits himself he didn’t try to hide it and he shouldn’t have to. No one made this kid Google Ahlswede’s name and then look at almost everyone of these pictures and Ahlswede never showed them in any of my classes. If he felt really uncomfortable, he had the ability to hit that little close button in the top corner of his machine. Instead, he sits there, looks at all of them trying to formulate a way to take a good mans means of expression and run his name through the mud. Which it seems CM Life was happy to oblige by featuring this article better suited for a tabloid magazine on the front page. Dan Riehl CMU alumnus

[Letter to the Editor] Comment in response to “LETTER: Helping your fellow human” Marvi1kn Wow I am completely proud to see this letter! After my roommate, who works for CMlife, found this she sent me the link. On wednesday I sent her text saying how ashamed I was to be the only person who cared after a girl had fallen so hard on such a crowded street. I didn’t expect acknowledgement for helping a CMU student up who had just tripped, but I truly appreciate seeing this and thank you for the kind words. I’m happy to know someone else out there would’ve helped a stranger in a time of need. Comments in response to “Michigan’s unemployment rate below 9 percent for first time since 2008”

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

Brad O’Donnell An econ prof that doesn’t believe in macroeconomics. How does he have a job? michmediaperson Thank you Governor Snyder and the Republicans in Lansing! We tried telling socialist Granholm to quit raising taxes and unemployment would fall. But, she would never listen. Funny what happens when you cut business taxes, businesses have the $$ to hire people. The results and this story prove michmediaperson and the conservative Republicans are correct. Today, the USA has the highest corporate taxes because Barack Hussein Obama doesn’t want to lower them. Imagine, how much more unemployment would fall if the Demo-

crats would do what Ronald Reagan and Rick Snyder have done. That’s why we need to fire Obama and Debbie Stabenow this fall! Thanks Governor Snyder for putting people first! Selected comments in response to “Football schedule announced; seven home games, only two weeknight” Vince88 Now that’s a schedule! It’s about time, of course my daughter is graduating... Heeke, thanks for finally listening to the fans. Fire Up Chips Florenceschneider Kudos to Dave Heeke for assembling an outstanding schedule this fall for football.

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

I sleep when I can So much to do, so little time

As a college student, sleep is hard to come by. What used to be a routine activity in my daily life has now become a luxury. Having endless assignments, papers, deadlines and events on my calendar, it becomes hard to pencil in a little R and R. After drinking a pot of coffee to push through my final homework assignments, I usually crawl into bed around 3 a.m., just in time to enjoy the latest infomercial scams as my eyes glaze over. Going to bed this late and waking up after a brief moment of slumber is starting to make me feel a lot older than someone who is approaching her 20s. Growing up, I always thought how weird it was that my dad could fall asleep seconds after laying down in his La-Z-Boy chair after work. But now I mimic that exact routine whenever I lay down on anything, especially a LaZ-Boy. Since I hardly have time to sleep when it’s considered normal to, I try to find time randomly throughout my day to catch a few z’s. I always hated those kids who slept in class. Now I am sometimes one of them. Turning off the lights in class to show a film is like a cue for my body to pass out. As I woke up to the Lion King playing in my three-hour night class a few weeks ago, my dream turned into me walking to reach the light at the end of the tunnel. Although it really was just the lights being turned on by my teacher in the auditorium. But don’t think I am a slacking student. Of course I always make sure to flip on my audio recorder, used primarily for Central Michigan Life interviews, to capture my professors’ lectures. Sticking to my exercise routine has also become a struggle. What was going to be an abs session last week turned into me passed out on my bedroom floor for 15 minutes before I came up for a crunch. My dentist appointment on spring break didn’t go much better. Apparently the reclined dentist chair resembled that of a recliner to my sleepy head. I guess it’s good that I fell asleep before the doctor came in and not while he was actually cleaning my teeth. Either way, it wasn’t the best place to wake up. While many people are counting down the days to summer tans and vacations, z’s are the only things I am looking forward to counting this summer.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 2, 2012 || 5A

[News]

CMU professor teams up with MSU colleague to write book on racism, history By Tony Wittkowski Staff Reporter

Chuck Miller/Staff Photographer

Anthropology Professor Catherine Willermet gives a PowerPoint lecture Saturday afternoon at French Auditorium, along with ChemistryProfessor Anja Mueller. The purpose of the presentation was to encourage undergraduates to tackle global issues such as water and social justice. It was part of Universities Allied for Essential Medicines’ Second Global Health Conference.

17 speakers highlight weekend’s Second Global Health Conference By Anna McNeill Staff Reporter

About 50 participants listened to Clint Smith open the second Global Health Conference with a slam poem titled “I am sick, I am tired, I am dying.” The performance on Saturday by Smith, a Washington, D.C. resident, was just one of many events that took place at the conference hosted by the Universities Allied for Essential Medicines chapter at Central Michigan University on Saturday and Sunday. Speakers from many different areas of expertise talked about the necessity for equal

access to health care around the world in the Education and Human Services Building’s French Auditorium and Pearce Hall 128. After participants signed in, had a chance to get some breakfast and check out the poster section and UAEM merchandise in front of the auditorium, seats were found and Smith took the floor. His performance was emotional and set a tempo for the other speakers who followed. President of the UAEM Justin Mendoza, an Ostego junior, said the purpose of this event was, “based on the principal that no one should die of a curable disease due to lack of access.”

Each speaker, 17 in total, spoke of how their works have been affected by, or are changing global health care. Dr. David Yanga, founder of HealthScepter.com, spoke about the U.S. public’s lack of health care knowledge and how it limits access to American citizens, even those with insurance. Yanga said Americans have more knowledge about the cost of gas prices than we do about how much health care costs. “Hope is not a very good strategy in health care right now,” he said. university@cm-life.com

NPR’s ‘Planet Money’ coming April 10 By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

How does the failing Greece economy affect the U.S.? What is a N.I.N.A. loan? Those topics or similar economic stories be discussed at a presentation by the hosts of National Public Radio’s “Planet Money” at 7:30 p.m. April 10 in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium. “Planet Money” is a radio talk show that discusses the global economy and its effect on people. Featuring a two-man team of Adam Davidson and Alex Blumberg, the show has two fundamental rules; one, that everything has to be interesting, and two, everything should be economically smart and accurate. The radio show produces twice-weekly podcasts and creates stories for other NPR programs including “Morning Edition,” “All things Considered” and “This American Life.”

“I’m absolutely thrilled,” said John Sheffler, director of CMU Public Radio, which is hosting the event. “I’ve been a fan of the ‘Planet Money’ team since I first began hearing them on NPR. They put things in terms that even a guy like me could understand.” Sheffler said the event will be a presentation followed by a question-and-answer period. He said “Planet Money” is coming at a perfect time. “It’s good that their appearance is so close to tax day,” he said. “Also, some very interesting things are happening in the world right now economically, so I think their timing together here is just perfect.” Law and Economics major Mike Manoogian said “Planet Money” is really good for explaining things, such as the mortgage crisis in 2008, in a way any regular person can understand. “I just think it’s a cool con-

UNEMPLOYMENT | continued from 1a

Brunner said Obama should be doing more to approve oil regulation on federal land, which he said would create plenty of new jobs. Last week, Obama announced he would approve the southern portion of the controversial Keystone XL

pipeline as part of his “allof-the-above” energy policy, which emphasizes increasing domestic oil and gas production while investing in new, green energy sources. Obama said his energy policies have helped reduce American dependence on

cept and really insightful,” the Sterling Heights senior said. “It would be better if a lot more people listened to it.” Tickets are $6 for students and $16 for the general public and can be purchased through CMU Ticket Central or by calling 1-888-268-0111. “Everybody is impacted by the economy,” Sheffler said. “You can’t help it; and when something happens in Greece, for example, it has an impact on people here in the United States, and if you have any curiosity at all about why and how you’re impacted by things like that, that are taking place in Europe, this is a great chance to come and (have) these guys explain things to you.” This presentation of “Planet Money” is also sponsored by Finance Professor Charles Walmsley, who is a financial adviser with HS&C Wealth Management. studentlife@cm-life.com

foreign oil while creating new jobs. According to the most recent figures, Isabella County continues to have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the state. In January of this year, Isabella County’s unemployment rate stood at 6.8 percent, well below the state and national rates. metro@cm-life.com

A Central Michigan University history professor has teamed up with a Michigan State University professor to publish a book on race and history. After two and a half years of work, Stephen Jones and Eric Freedman, an associate professor of journalism at MSU, finished their book, “Presidents and Black America: A Documentary History,” about racial misconceptions. The book includes a chapter on each president and their interactions with black America, Jones said. “The actions and the attitudes of the presidents are not always during the period in office,” Jones said. “Sometimes it comes before or after their term in office.” The duo tries to provide the same amount of information on each professor, but others were more difficult than others, Jones said. “William Henry Harrison was more of a scramble to find than most,” he said. The relationships between presidents and black Americans in the book covers the colonial days through the current Obama administration, Freedman said. The two former journalists knew each through reputation and a few phone calls at first.

“I knew his byline and we had a number of conversations during the newspaper strikes,” Jones said. “Eric was looking for someone to work with on this project, and the rest, as they say, is history.” The first collaborative book came out in 2008 about black Americans in Congress. Shortly after its completion came the proposal for the second book, which would focus on the presidents and black America. “We saw logic to continuing the line of research on the Congress book,” Freedman said. “There are a lot of misconceptions Americans have about race and presidents.” Both books had a common theme about race, whether it was dealing with Congress or presidencies. “We had some conversations during the first book where we came across some stories where we crossed the boundaries between the presidents and the Congress,” Jones said. The two were then able to use some of the remaining notes in the next book, which, admittedly, included a few eye-openers. For instance, while most remember Abraham Lincoln for his work during the Civil War, he still had many racist tendencies. “Lincoln made comments about how he didn’t believe in equality among races,” Freedman said.

Vandalism | continued from 1a

Alan Godley, owner of Norm’s Flower Petal, 201 E. Broadway St., agreed. “The only people cameras would deter are people who make trouble and want

to cause harm,” Godley said. Godley said his business has been vandalized recently. “I had some guys draw

“He didn’t pull for political rights among African Americans.” They both said one of the most interesting things found was something that did not make it into the book. While researching in the Herbert Hoover Library in Iowa, Jones came across a letter between President Hoover and Walter White, former president of the National Association for the Advancement for Colored People. By 1932, the Great Depression had hit and people were struggling for food and shelter and an unidentified congressional source suggested that all unemployed black men should be shipped back to the South. “I found this document that was a letter from Walter White to Hoover,” Jones said. “I had never heard of such a thing. White’s letter was breathtaking.” In the letter, White expressed how much he disapproved of the idea. It took the two professors thousands of hours of reading archives, looking at microfilms and old newspapers to complete the book. As for future projects, both professors said they intend to take some time off. “We haven’t talked about it yet,” Freedman said. “I’m still recuperating from the last project.” unive rs ity@cm-life.com

some graffiti on the back wall of the building,” Godley said. “Cameras might’ve kept them out. Isn’t this kind of where all cities are headed? Cities all around have cameras set up. New York City has them, why can’t we?” metro@cm-life.com

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cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

Black and White Charity Ball | About 80 attend event

Union Township bike path, sidewalk project to begin in coming months By Brittany wright Staff Reporter

PhotoS BY BeTHANY WALTeR/StAff PhotogrAPher

Students dance on during the Black and White Charity Ball Friday night in the University Center Rotunda.

About 80 students attended the Black and White Charity Ball on Friday night in the University Center Rotunda room. Students ranging from freshman to seniors attended the ball paying seven dollars for tickets at the door. Capac freshman Vreanna Strickland deejayed at the ball. “A friend volunteered me,” Strickland said. “She knew I liked music, therefore I ended up deejaying.” She played several songs throughout the night including a few slow dances for the several couples that went to the event. North campus residence halls put on the event including Barnes, Larzelere, and Calkins. The goal for the night was to raise $1,000 through ticket sales and one dollar photographs of people and their dates or friends who accompanied them to the event. One of the couples that attended the ball was Woodhaven Brownstown junior Kara Heagle and her boyfriend Suttons Bay junior Sean Riley. “My girlfriend Kara really wanted to come, so I thought I’d make her happy,” Riley said. All proceeds from the event went to Kids Against Hunger, Smile Train and Relay for Life.

Fowlerville junior Kevin Kline and Saginaw sophomore Melissa Davis slow dance on at the Black and White Charity Ball Friday night in the University Center Rotunda room. “It’s a date.” Davis said. “It’s the homecoming we never had in high school, because we didn’t know each other.”

Milford freshman Ali Nasser and Southfield freshman Daniel Moore dance together at the Black and White Charity Ball Friday night in the University Center Rotunda. “I like dances so I thought it would be fun to come,“ Nasser said.

IN THE NEWS SOON WILL BE CLEAR IF IRAN IS ‘SERIOUS’ ABOUT NUCLEAR TALKS, SECRETARY OF STATE CLINTON SAYS By Ronald D. Orol MarketWatch

WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Saturday that it will soon be clear whether Iran’s leaders are prepared to have a “serious” discussion about the Islamic Republic’s nuclear initiatives,

according to reports. Speaking in Saudi Arabia’s capital, Riyadh, Clinton said that negotiations among the five permanent members of the United Nation’s Security Council, Germany and Iran are scheduled to be held April 13-14 in Istanbul, according to reports.

The discussions come as the U.S. and other countries impose a growing variety of sanctions on Iran. The U.S. argues that Iran must dispel worries that it is seeking to develop nuclear weapons. Iran insists its program is peaceful and involves improving medical research.

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Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 2, 2012 || 6A

Union Township officials are hoping to start the construction of bike paths and sidewalks in May as part of the Greater Mount Pleasant Non-Motorized Plan. “This is a high priority,” said Union Township Zoning Administrator Woody Woodruff. “There are people who don’t have motorized cars, who depend on trails.” The township’s Pathway Prioritization Committee approved the plan and made recommendations for work on Blue Grass Road on Feb. 2. There are six different tasks in which the committee is trying to complete, which are bike lanes, neighborhood connectors, sidewalk gaps, road crossing improvements, intersection improvements and regional connections. At the Feb. 22 meeting, Woodruff presented the Pathway Prioritization Committee’s recommendations for Blue Grass Road to the board. “The money for the project is coming from a variety of sources,” Woodruff said. “We have just applied for a huge grant from the Department of Transportation. We also have a grant from the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe in which they will match any existing grant.” Another thing contributing to the funding of the extensive road project is pre-existing projects. “The credit union on Encore has installed sidewalks on their property,” Woodruff said. “There will be an Aldi’s around that area and they will also be installing 8-foot sidewalks as well.” The recommendation is for 8-foot sidewalks on both sides of East Blue

“Bike lanes may help the congestion along east Blue grass road.” Woody Woodruff, Union township Zoning Administrator Grass Road from Mission Street to Isabella Road, where there are no existing sidewalks. Sidewalks are also recommended for the west side of Isabella Road south from Blue Grass to Spring Lane and north to Jeffery Lane. A crossing improvement for the plan at Encore Boulevard is also recommended. “Bike lanes may help the congestion along East Blue Grass Road,” Woodruff said at the Union Township Meeting. “Also, we would like to add a lot of neighborhood connector routes.” The committee also wants to add 5.5 miles worth of

bike lanes to East Blue Grass Road between Encore Boulevard and South Isabella Road. “The next step is going to be contracting with engineers,” Woodruff said. “Through contracting with the engineers, a more indepth plan will be created and also an effective timeline will be established.” Union Township Manager Brian Smith said the project is a combination of Union Township and the zoning department, but Union Township is implementing it. metro@cm-life.com

ING N E P O JOB

Central eview R 2012-13 EDITOR IN CHIEF

Editor in Chief is responsible for the overall content, design and publication of The Central Review, the official student literary magazine of Central Michigan University. The magazine is published once each during the fall and spring semesters. Responsibilities include organizing content and writing contests, publicizing categories for submission, supervising contributing staff writers, layout and design, securing bids for printing and distribution of magazine to campus locations. Apply at 436 Moore Hall, CMU

April 2 • 5 p.m. Deadline: Monday, The Student Media Board of Directors will select the editor-in-chief for this publication.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 2, 2012 || 7A

[News]

Car smash event part of Sigma Tau Gamma week-long fundraiser

Students help launch, design Flint-based hospitality house

By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

By Kelsey De Haan Staff Reporter

Commerce Township senior Chris Barnes stood next to his car between Pearce and Anspach halls and watched people smash its body with a bright orange hammer. Students paid $1 per swing or $5 for six swings as the hammer came with a sharp retort from echoes around the courtyard between the buildings. Committed to a week-long fundraising effort for Special Olympics Michigan, the Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity offered students amid the cold and snow a chance to hit a car with a hammer. Greg Pierce, a Grand Rapids sophomore, was one of the organizers for the event. He said about 100 people participated in the event held Friday and Saturday. “I feel like it was a success, for the weather,” Pierce said. “It wasn’t the best of weather. If we had it Monday when it was in the ‘80s, we would have had a better turnout.” The fraternity’s original plan was to hold the event only on Friday. Pierce said he thought the bad weather on Friday was why Central Michigan University extended its permission for the fraternity to use the courtyard for the event on Saturday also.

Central Michigan University hospitality students have had a hand in both designing and managing the newlyopened McLaren Hospitality House in Flint. The house is set up to help treat and accommodate individuals suffering from prostate cancer by using proton therapy treatments. These treatments affect the cells around the cancer, leaving patients with very few effects from treatment. Because the procedures take a series of weeks to complete, the Hospitality House not only helps cure patients, but provides a comfortable home to them as they undergo treatment. “In developing our Proton Therapy Center, we found from other centers that 30 to 50 percent of their patients came from greater than two hours away,” said McLaren Vice President Roxanne Caine. “The course of treatment lasts anywhere from five to nine weeks, with the patient receiving a fraction of the treatment five days a week. Because of the special needs patients and their caregivers, the Hospitality House concept was developed to help meet those special needs and provide a home-away-from-home.”

Adam Niemi/Staff Photographer

Grand Rapids sophomore Greg Pierce takes a swing at a 1996 Pontiac Bonneville during the Sigma Tau Gamma car smash event Friday in the courtyard between Anspach and Pearce halls. Pierce, who is part of the fraternity, took a swing as they waited for students to participate.

Half of the proceeds from the fraternity’s fundraising efforts will benefit SOMI. The other half will go to the winning sorority after a weeklong fundraising events competition for sororities. The winner will have to decide on a philanthropy to donate that money. The sororities were scored throughout the week for different point assignments from all the different fundraising events. Pierce said the results of the competition and the total amount of money raised was not yet determined. Barnes donated his car to the event after it broke down

one day returning home from work. “I’m driving my cousin’s car while he’s at Air Force boot camp in Texas,” Barnes said. “It’s quite an upgrade from this one.” The car Barnes donated is a 1996 Pontiac Bonneville; his cousin’s car is a Pontiac Grand Prix. Barnes said he has a lot of memories of the car with about 160,000 miles built up. “It got me out to Pennsylvania,” he said, smiling at the car. “I hit a deer on Deerfield Road. Isn’t that ironic?” studentlife@cm-life.com

“Out of my 15 years of teaching hospitality, this is my proudest moment.” Gary Gagnon, Assistant Professor of marketing and hospitality services Students and other members of the establishment of the Hospitality House have been busy raising $8 million for the house and $24 million for the proton treatment machine through fundraising projects and donations made to the McLaren Foundation. “Out of my 15 years of teaching hospitality, this is my proudest moment,” said Gary Gagnon, assistant professor of marketing and hospitality services. “Patients will be able to stay in this house for as little as $30 per night. If these patients are unable to pay that amount, there will always be someone willing to pay for them.” Gagnon said his students are looking to other ways of fundraising off campus and approaching major companies like Whirlpool and Serta to donate goods or sponsor rooms. What is arguably more exciting than the establishment of the Hospitality Housing is the amount of student commitment to this off-campus project, he said. Students are working for no money or college credit, but simply because of the real-world train-

ing this experience provides them. “My role in the process of the Hospitality House is to help connect the two completely different fields, referring to the medical field and the hospitality field,” said Traverse City senior Morgan Johnson. “This is something that is fairly new and very exciting. I hope to be able to work on the medical side of the Hospitality House by bringing in the type of personality that is needed to connect the inspiration that is needed to roll over on to the clinical side of things as well.” To all of the members taking part in the development of the Hospitality House, this is a subject that hits close to home and is a task all members take seriously. “This is an amazing project,” Johnson said. “It is something that will impact lives for years to come — not just curing the patients, but also all the CMU hospitality students that are involved in this real, hands-on experience.” university@cm-life.com

Michigan Senate approves bill that could raise more than $100 million for road repairs By John Irwin Senior Reporter

The Michigan Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill that would allocate more money for road repairs on Tuesday, depending on the price of gasoline. The bill, if approved, would change how the revenue raised from the state’s 6 percent sales tax on fuel is allocated. Two-thirds of the revenue

raised from the tax currently goes toward the budget’s general fund. More of that money would go toward road repairs, potentially more than $100 million, depending on the price of gas and sales. The remaining portion that funds the school aid fund would be unaffected by the proposal. As the bill heads to the House of Representatives, Rep. Kevin Cotter, R-Mount Pleasant, said he will review the legislation as

a vote approaches. “Having just been transmitted to the House, as always, I will monitor any changes made during the committee process and welcome feedback from local residents on how to fund improvements to Michigan’s roadways and bridges,” Cotter said. He said the maintenance of roads in the 99th District and throughout the state is an important priority.

“Infrastructure and roads are just as much of a priority in our community as they are in any community, and there is no doubt that we must find ways to maintain a sturdy and safe transportation system in our state,” Cotter said. The bill is designed to create new revenue without raising taxes on drivers. Revenue raised from the 19cent per gallon flat gas tax and vehicle registration fees for

the Michigan Transportation Fund has fallen recently, leading state lawmakers to look for other sources of revenue. As gas prices continue to rise, Isabella County Road Commission Manager Tony Casali said he worries revenue will continue to decline. “(Part of the commission’s funding) comes from the Michigan Transportation Fund through the gas tax,” Casali said. “We are concerned about

that because, since gas prices could start reaching $4.50 and possibly $5, we’re funded by the gallons of gas that are sold. So if people slow down on their usage and travel less because of gas prices, we may see our revenue decrease as that goes on.” Casali said future road projects could be in jeopardy if new sources of revenue are not found. metro@cm-life.com

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SPORTS Central Michigan Life

[I N S I D E] w Reid Rooney gets his first collegiate extra-base hit, 3B w Track and field has another strong showing at Toledo Collegiate Challenge, 4B w Softball goes 1-2 during opening MAC weekend, 4B

Section B

| Monday, April 2, 2012

| cm-life.com

w Team using Area 51 as inspiration while preparing for NCAA regionals, 3B

MAC gives high honors to Tom Borrelli, Ben Bennett By Jeff papworth Staff Reporter

Central Michigan wrestling coach Tom Borrelli and junior Ben Bennett earned Mid-American Conference honors Friday. Borrelli received his 12th MAC Coach of the Year award. “It just means I’ve coached a lot of really, really good wrestlers,” Borrelli said. “They’re the ones that have to win the matches for me to get those awards.” Bennett was named MAC Wrestler of the Year. He is the fifth CMU wrestler to win the award. “I think that’s well-deserved for him,” Borrelli said. “I felt like he had a very good season. He wrestled a really tough schedule and performed well all year long. I know at nationals he would have liked to have a little better outcome, but I feel

like in the entirety of his whole season he was very consistent.” While Bennett grappled successfully with the experience of two finishes in the top eight of the NCAA Championships in previous seasons, Borrelli was dealt a hand of young wrestlers. He brought seven underclassmen to Athens, Ohio to compete in the MAC championships and six finished in the top three, aiding in keeping the Chippewas MAC Tournament Championship streak alive at 11 straight. “I just felt like they had a good attitude all year,” Borrelli said. “They didn’t get down on themselves and they kept improving.” A MAC | 3B

Matt Thompson Sports Editor

Attendance worries won’t exist this fall

Mike MuLhoLLand/photo eDitoR

Attendance won’t be an issue next fall. Last season, attendance for Central Michigan football was below the NCAA benchmark for Division I programs that has to be hit once every two years. When the CMU schedule was released Thursday it became clear the Chippewas should have no worries about not reaching that threshold for two seasons in a row. With Michigan State, Navy, Western Michigan and another big crowd for homecoming that’s four out of the seven home games next year that should have huge crowds. Another thing that crippled the attendance numbers last year was the three midweek games. This fall six of the seven home games will be on Saturday. The only Thursday home game will be the season opener. That’s beneficial for CMU because it will still be warm out, unlike the night games in November last year, and students and fans typically have a better attendance for the home opener. It won’t hurt that it’s Labor Day weekend, allowing people to still take off the long weekend. Attendance numbers obviously usually come from the success of the team. Coming off two 3-9 seasons, CMU needs improvement to consistently raise the attendance, but with next year’s slate, those numbers look safe. The MSU matchup should be sold out and will most likely break any Kelly/Shorts Stadium attendance record. Navy will get veterans here and people interested in it, and obviously the WMU game packs the stadium every other year. Something else to look at is the fourstraight home Saturday games. That continuity wasn’t there last year when twice CMU had three consecutive road games. And when the Chippewas were home it was likely on a weeknight. Saturday home games should give the alumni and students a chance to get back into a tailgating routine. When you become used to something and are around it more, you become more interested and have more fun.

Junior tight end Connor Odykirk tries to break through tight ends coach Butch Barry’s blocking during Thursday morning’s practice inside CMU’s Indoor Athletic Complex.

A FALL | 3B

file photo by andrew kuhn

Sophomore tight end Caleb Southworth runs upfield after catching a pass from junior quarterback Ryan Radcliff Nov. 4, 2011, against Kent State at Dix Stadium in Kent, Ohio. Southworth and junior Connor Odykirk are battling for the starting tight end spot during spring football practice.

big footsteps to fill David Blackburn’s departure leaves void at tight end position By Brandon Champion | Staff Reporter Last season, senior tight end David Blackburn caught 34 passes for 479 yards and five touchdowns on his way to Mid-American Conference second-team honors. In 2012, the Central Michigan football team will need to find someone to replace him. One option is junior Connor Odykirk, who caught nine passes for a total of 106 yards without a touchdown last season. The 6-foot-4-inch, 237-pound native of Mount Pleasant played in all 12 games last season and started the season finale against Toledo. Odykirk is battling others for the top spot on the depth chart during spring practices. “My game time is very valuable,” said Odykirk. “Practice is good, but it’s nothing like the speed of games. It was good to get that experience last year.” Also in the mix for playing time is sophomore Caleb Southworth, who also played in 12 games last season and is the leading returning tight end in terms of statistics, but barely. He caught 10 passes for 109 yards and no touchdowns. A TIGHT END | 3B

Kansas prepares for title against Kentucky By Bob Lutz MCT

Mark CorneLison/leXiNGtoN heRAlD-leADeR(MCt)

Kentucky’s Anthony Davis, 23, of the Kentucky Wildcats dunks in the second half against Louisville in the NCAA Tournament semifinals at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, La., on Saturday. The Wildcats will face the Kansas Jayhawks tonight for the national championship.

NEW ORLEANS - Kansas and Kentucky have never met in a Final Four and tonight should be quite an introduction. Two of the most storied and historic college basketball programs in the country, with names like Rupp and Allen in their coaching trees, will play for a national championship, a dream game that has been decades in the making. And if you think Kentucky’s young stars are too much for KU - even though that’s a logical thought to have - you better give Kansas credit for finding ways to win even when the odds are not in the Jayhawks’ favor, or even when they spend parts of games playing the role of their own

worst enemy. Kansas looked lost and defeated early during Saturday night’s national semifinal game against Ohio State. KU coach Bill Self struggled to find an answer as the Jayhawks trailed by as many 13 points. In a city that never sleeps, the Jayhawks were snoozing through the biggest game of their lives. But Kansas never forgets to set the alarm. And when it was time to get serious, that’s exactly what KU did. The Jayhawks took control in the second half and weaved their way through some tight turns to beat Ohio State, 64-62. They will play in their second national championship game in five years against a Kentucky team that has been cast as the overwhelming favorite to win it all, but one that had its own scary moments

before beating in-state rival Louisville, setting off riots amongst crazed Wildcats fans in Lexington. Nobody in Lawrence is rioting because Kansas fans realize the best could be yet to come. Kansas was in nobody’s Final Four before the season. The Jayhawks did what they always do by winning another Big 12 regular-season championship, its eighth in a row, and spending a significant amount of the season planted in the nation’s Top 10. So many questions needed answers and Bill Self and his team were able to give them. The Jayhawks found their spark after a demoralizing December loss to Davidson at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, a loss that kept Self mumbling for weeks.

A TITLE | 3B


2B || Monday, April 2, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Softball results

Baseball results Friday

Friday

CMU 4, BGSU 0 W: Cooper (2-2) L: Apthorpe (0-4)

CMU 2, Kent St. 5 W: Johnson (8-8) L: Dornbos (6-6) S: none

CMU 2, Kent St. 3 W: Johnson (9-8) L: Sundberg (4-5) S: none

HR: Cory DeLamielleure RBI: DeLamielleure 2

HR: Molly Coldren RBI: Coldren 2 Run scored: Coldren, Macy Merchant

Saturday CMU 8, BGSU 12 W: Singer (2-2) L: Dodridge (1-4)

CMU 4, BGSU 5 W: Malewitz (2-2) L: Enns (1-1)

CMU 7, Buffalo 0 W: Dornbos (7-6) L: Speckman (5-6)

3 tied at 5

Batting average Barstad .436 WMU Merchant .423 CMU Tofft .420 NIU Blanton .412 KSU

Runs batted in Taylor Rager 25 BSU

Stolen bases Mountain 19 AKR

Shelby Miller 7 NIU Katie Yoho 7 BGSU

Katie Yoho 23 BGSU Andrea Arney 22 BGSU Shelby Miller 21 BGSU 5 tied at 20

Home runs

Dan Scahill 6 UB Tom Murphy 4 UB Pollock 5 UB

Runs batted in Tom Murphy 28 UB Painter 26 Ohio

Richards 16 EMU

File photos by leah sefton

Softball schedule

West Division

WMU EMU Toledo Ball State CMU Northern Illinois

2-0 2-1 2-2 1-1 1-2 1-3

13-10 13-18 9-21 20-10 14-13 13-19

Kent State Bowling Green Ohio Miami (OH) Buffalo Akron

MAC

March 27 at Detroit W, 11-1 Senior Zach Cooper shut down Bowling Green hitters in his appearance this week. He threw a complete game shutout on Friday in the CMU 4-0 win. Cooper pitched nine innings allowing four hits and walking two batters while striking out eight Falcons. He has a 3.72 earned run average this season and has only allowed one run in his last 17 innings on the mound. “I just wanted to pound the strike zone and get early outs to go deeper into the game and hopefully give my team the best chance to win,” Cooper said.

March 30 at Kent State L, 2-3 March 31 at Buffalo W, 7-0 April 1 Buffalo canceled

16-15 18-11 14-15 19-12 7-15 11-18

Next five games Wednesday Michigan State 4 p.m. Friday Western Michigan 1 p.m.

Other top performers

Friday Western Michigan 3 p.m.

Softball, Cory DeLamielleure: The freshman catcher hit two home runs over the weekend leading the CMU offense.

Baseball schedule

Baseball MAC Standings

Past five games

Team

March 25 Buffalo W, 14-13

March 30 at Kent State L, 2-5

Overall

3-0 3-1 3-1 2-2 0-3 0-4

CM Life Athlete of the week: Zach Cooper

Past five games

East Division Team

Summers 14 KSU Ahart 12 MIA Newton 12 Ohio Corfman 9 UT

Crummy 22 Miami (OH)

Softball MAC Standings

Overall

Stolen bases

Jamison Wells 15 NIU

Bower 23 Miami (OH)

Van Wagen 15 Ohio Helfrich 14 AKR

MAC

Batting average Hamilton .533 KSU Scarcello .410 UB Thomas .408 UB Madsen .402 Ohio

Jensen Painter 10 Ohio

Zach Cooper

Team

Hr: Walker RBI: Arnold 2, Adams 2

MAC Leaders

MAC Leaders Taylor Rager 7 BSU

RBI: Arnold 2, Theunissen, Russell, Rooney, Adams, Henika, Houlihan

Sunday

Saturday

Home runs

RBI: Theunissen 1, Russell 1 Runs scored: Hall, Theunissen, Henris

Saturday Northern Illinois 2 p.m. Sunday Northern Illinois 1 p.m.

March 28 at Michigan State L, 5-6 March 30 at Bowling Green W, 4-0

West Division

WMU Toledo CMU EMU Northern Illinois Ball State

March 31 at Bowling Green L, 8-12 April 1 at Bowling Green L, 4-5 Next five games Wednesday at Michigan 4:05 p.m. Friday Toledo 3:05 p.m.

MAC

Overall

5-0 3-2 3-3 3-3 2-4 1-4

13-10 12-13 12-16 10-17 8-20 4-18

East Division Team

MAC

Kent State Ohio Akron Miami (OH) Bowling Green Buffalo

5-0 3-3 3-3 2-3 2-4 1-4

Other top performers

Saturday Toledo at 2:05 p.m.

Baseball, William Arnold: The senior catcher knocked in two runs in both games on Saturday and Sunday.

Sunday Toledo 1:05 p.m. April 11 at Oakland 3 p.m.

n of Central io it d e l ia c e p as published in ptember 2012. e b l il w s lt u Res e in Se Michigan Lif

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Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 2, 2012 || 3B

[Sports]

Reid Rooney gets his first Team loses series to Bowling collegiate extra-base hit baseball

Green after 15-inning loss By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan baseball team needed extra innings to decide the series after splitting games one and two in its series with Bowling Green Sunday. The Chippewas (12-16, 3-3 MAC) couldn’t outlast the Falcons (10-17, 2-4 MAC) after a 15-inning marathon ended 5-4 in favor of Bowling Green. “Whenever you lose a game that long you’re not going to have a great feeling about the result,” head coach Steve Jaksa said. “It was (a) hard-fought game on both sides, but the feeling on the bus is a little low for sure.” BGSU jumped out to an early 4-0 lead in the third inning after three CMU errors and a home run given up by starter senior Ryan Longstreth led to the end of his day. In came junior Patrick Kaminska who pitched 5 1/3 scoreless innings, striking out four and allowing three hits. While Kaminska was holding off the Falcons, the Chippewas offense got it going with three runs in the sixth inning and the tying run in the seventh after junior Jordan Dean had a tworun RBI single and senior William Arnold had a pair of RBI singles. “PK (Kaminska) has been great for us this season and were really happy with him,”

The magic number for junior infielder Reid Rooney was 32. The right-centerfield grass at McLane Field in Lansing might be Rooney’s new favorite spot. That’s where his 32nd career hit for the Central Michigan baseball team landed, but it wasn’t just any ordinary hit. Rooney hit a double and achieved his first extra-base hit as a collegiate athlete in the 6-5 loss against Michigan State

mac | continued from 1b File photo by andrew kuhn

CMU closer, junior Dietrich Enns, pitched the final 6 2/3 innings of the 15 inning game. He allowed the Bowling Green winning run in the 15th inning.

Jaksa said. CMU closer Dietrich Enns went 6 2/3 innings and gave up the game-winning hit with two outs in the bottom of the 15th inning. “Enns was our closer, unfortunately we didn’t score any runs and he couldn’t close the game out,” Jaksa said. “His pitch count was getting high like a starters’, so we were ready to take him out. He just wanted the ball.” As Enns was doing his job on the mound, but the Chippewas offense couldn’t score that fifth run, despite opportunities to take the lead late in the game. In game two Saturday CMU fell into another early hole, this one a bit bigger

going down 9-0 early, and it would battle back dropping game two 12-8. In game one senior pitcher Zach Cooper threw a complete game shutout while striking out eight batters. The Chippewas will end their five-game road trip at 4:05 p.m. Wednesday in Ann Arbor facing Michigan and return to Theunissen Stadium with Mid-American Conference play against Toledo Friday. “I told the team the first two series is pretty much a wash,” Jaksa said. “We’ve been in this position and worse before and I have no doubt that this team will battle back.” sports@cm-life.com

ncaa regionals

Gymnastics using Area 51 as inspiration while preparing By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

Area 51 in Nevada is home to a government military base where there are rumors to be alien experiments and foreign spaceships. Area 51 in Mount Pleasant is home to the Central Michigan gymnastics team. It’s where the team trains during the season. Head coach Jerry Reighard said Area 51 has a special meaning to the team. “We have a big Area 51 sign in our gym,” Reighard said. “That’s taken from the place in Nevada. For us Area 51 means five individual championships and one team championship. That’s exactly what we worked very hard for. That’s been the goal since day one — to win every event — and we came very close.” CMU nearly claimed all six titles. Kristin Teubner, Taylor Noonan, Brittany Petzold and Meaghan McWhorter all claimed titles at the Mid-American Conference tournament. The titles kept coming as Reighard won MAC Coach of the Year. “That’s a result of what my team has done,” Reighard said. “Without their effort and hard work, we wouldn’t have done what we did. It’s very gratifying because the other coaches vote on that. They recognized what our team effort was.” March 26 the team sat down together to watch the NCAA selection show that announces the gymnastics NCAA regionals. CMU was the last team announced. “We were all around the selection show,” Reighard said. “The whole team was there, it was very exciting. We knew we were in, when they kept announcing regions and we weren’t called we just looked around and wondered where we would go. It was just trying to figure out where they were sending us.” CMU was selected in the Washington region as a six seed, and with defending national champions Alabama in the region. The regionals begin April 7. “It’s funny; every regional that we have qualified for, Alabama has been in it,” Reighard said. “We have a great relationship with their coaching staff.” The field also includes LSU, Arizona, Washington and Iowa. Reighard has already been able to watch Alabama and LSU in action this year. “The SEC has a lot of television coverage,” Reighard said. “A lot of the coaches including myself (have) seen the

By John Manzo Staff Reporter

Borrelli also tallied his 300th win in duals along the way. His record is 306-134-8 in his 26 seasons as a head coach. He added 14 wins and suffered 9 losses this season to bring his record with the Chippewas to 260-109-7 in 21 seasons. He has had 36 All-Ameri-

tight end | continued from 1b

Sophomore Jarrett Fleming also played in all 12 games and caught four passes for 45 yards. “It’s been a dog fight for the tight ends,” said senior quarterback Ryan Radcliff “They’re all trying to get the number one and two spots because we run some twotight end formations. They have been working hard,

Wednesday afternoon. “I’m very aware,” Rooney said. “I haven’t heard the end of it for four years. I can say it probably would have felt a lot better in a win, but it felt pretty good and I got some crap from the dugout during it, so it was a good experience, hopefully many more to come.” During his senior year of high school Rooney hit five home runs, so he knows how to trot the bases. In the five games since the March 13 game against Madonna, he has raised his average .073 points.

Tallying a hit in at least every game, his average is up to .273 coming into Sunday’s game against Bowling Green. Rooney, also a relief pitcher, has been a hitter in 58 career games as a member of the baseball team, but failed to record an extra-base hit in 116 atbats until Wednesday. “I know they played on it, I wish he would have hit a home run,” head coach Steve Jaksa said. “I think he’s been having good at-bats.”

cans go through his system at CMU, eighth most among active coaches in the country. Bennett had 26 wins in his freshman season and has increased the number by four each of the following years to make his record 34-8 this season. His career winning percentage is .804, which would be the fifth-best in CMU wrestling history. This year he was a MAC Champion and an All-American for the third straight

season. There are nine other Chippewas who have won three MAC titles, and there are two who have been named All-American three times. Three awards were handed out by the MAC. They were selected by the six head coaches of the conference. The freshman of the year was given to Kent State’s Ian Miller.

we have a lot of young guys and they’re doing a good job coming out here and working hard.” According to Odykirk, the presence of Blackburn is still felt despite his absence. “David was a big asset to our team last season,” he said. “He passed a lot of knowledge to all the guys who are on this team now. He taught us a lot about every aspect of the tight end position, whether it was blocking, running routes or

how to break off of defenders.” With Blackburn’s departure, Odykirk is now the veteran tight end on the team, something he said he’s looking forward to. “I think it’s on my shoulders now to help out the young guys and kind of take over David’s role,” he said. “We got a lot of young guys so it’s my job to help them out.”

sports@cm-life.com

sports@cm-life.com

sports@cm-life.com

fall | continued from 1b

It’s no secret that if CMU comes out and lays an egg the first month and a half after those premier games attendance will drop off, but it won’t drop to under 10,000 like it did last year. And those big-time games will make the 15,000 NCAA benchmark a worry of the past.

a

d v

e

r t

i

s e

m

e

n

t

title | continued from 1b

file photo by jeff smith

Head coach Jerry Reighard congratulates all-around senior Kristin Teubner Feb. 19 after she performed a floor exercise against George Washington University at McGuirk Arena.

SEC compete twice, and so we know what they can do. When it comes down to it, those teams are at the most a half of tenth better per routine, which isn’t a lot. We have to be at our best, but that’s what we expect to do.” Kent State was selected as a five seed, even though CMU won the Mid-American Conference regular season and tournament titles. Reighard said he wasn’t upset or surprised at that selection. “It’s not surprising,” Reighard said. “Once you get past the top 18 spots, it really doesn’t make a difference. We’ve always known Kent State produces high scores

at home, that’s what gave them the bump in RQS that we didn’t have. Head to head we’ve handled them twice though.” This week the Chippewas are perfecting their routines as they have another week left before regionals. “We are preparing exactly how we prepared for the MAC tournament,” Reighard said. “We are really honing in on the first part of our routines, and making it perfect. We will be putting the full routine together soon, and looking to improve a half a tenth better each routine.” sports@cm-life.com

But he used that loss as a consistent reminder of where the Jayhawks could go again without a consistent focus. Kansas started improving almost immediately, heeding Self’s message that the Jayhawks were a team without much room for error. Now Kansas is one of the last two teams standing. For the next couple of days, you’ll be hearing a lot of people saying KU has no chance against this talented group of Kentucky players, many of whom will be drawing big checks in the not-too-distant future. KU has only one sure-fire NBA player in Thomas Robinson, who was typically out of this world against during the win over Ohio State. On paper, it’s Kentucky’s game to lose.

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Viewing Parties for NCAA Championships in McGuirk Arena CmU’s University recreation, events and Conferences is holding viewing parties for the men’s and Women’s nCaa championship games on april 2nd and 3rd (respectively) for the students of Central michigan University. not only will the events feature the championship games on the 30 x 10 feet Led video board, but live entertainment will also be provided. CmU’s Hip-Hop Club and Club Pom-Pon will perform on april 2nd. ricky “Bird” Clarkson will perform at halftime of both events. There will also be promotional events and competitive games for guests to participate in during time outs. a huge benefit of attending the event is free food. Guests will be provided with snacks such as popcorn and hot dogs. There will be prizes raffled at the event. some of the prizes include a Gordie Howe signed plaque, gift cards to Playmakers, a pair of tickets to a 2012 detroit tigers home game and many more! This is the second year that UreC, in partnership with the Pes 650 sport marketing class has hosted this event. many in attendance are students in the residence halls, the halls have made this event a part of their monthly program. andrew Haubenstricker, one of the resident assistants in Larzelere stated, “This viewing party concept is a great idea for underclassmen to connect. Upon hearing of this, i instantly made it a part of Larzelere’s april program.” University recreation, events and Conferences hopes to make this event a new tradition on campus. The men’s championship game is scheduled for monday april 2nd at 8:00Pm. The events Center doors will open at 7:30Pm. The Women’s championship game is scheduled for tuesday april 3rd at 6:30Pm. doors will open at 6:00Pm for this event. Please contact alison Wright, Pes 650 event Coordinator at wrigh3am@cmich. edu or 248-904-7493 with questions or concerns.

CHOOSE FROM MEAT OR ZEASTY MARINARA SAUCE OVER SPAGHETTI NOODLES. SERVED WITH A GRILLED GARLIC ROLL AND CHOICE OF SIDE OR CEASAR SALAD. Offer only available at the following location: 1623 S. MISSION, MT. PLEASANT PHONE: (989) 772-2476

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urec.cmich.edu 989-774-3686


4B || Monday, April 2, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[SPORTS]

Softball goes 1-2 during opening MAC weekend

TRACK AND FIELD

By Ryan Zuke Senior Reporter

FILE PHOTO BY ANDREW KUHN

Director of track and field/cross country Willie Randolph talks to men and women from Central’s track and field Feb. 21 about their performance after the Jack Skoog Open.

Team has another strong showing at Toledo Collegiate Challenge By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

Central Michigan distance runner Krista Parks did not feel any pressure in the Toledo Collegiate Challenge. “My coach wanted me to be very relaxed,” she said. “When I’m relaxed, I run better. This wasn’t a huge meet.” The approach resulted in a first-place finish in the 5,000 meter with a time of 17:15.17, a half second better than her career best. “I was running a good pace, so I knew I had to be close to it,” Parks said. “In indooroutdoor, I’ve been getting in better shape and more prepared to run longer races.” The CMU track and field team’s success last week and in the Toledo Collegiate Challenge last season continued into Saturday. The men’s team placed first once again

in the event, while the women placed third, an improvement of one spot over last year. Director of track and field Willie Randolph said he hopes Parks’ success can continue into the MAC Championships. “It’s pretty exciting and pretty promising for her future this year,” he said. “It’s just translating from indoors to outdoors, so hopefully there is more to come at the end of the season.” The sophomore is in her third season of track and field. She bypassed her first chance at competing in the sport in indoors last season by redshirting. “There is always a transition from going to high school to college,” Randolph said. “Just letting her body adapt a little bit more to the level of competition.”

Randolph was satisfied with the team’s performance. He said he left some athletes in Mount Pleasant. Ryan McCullough returned from his record-setting day last weekend to throw 199-06 feet. It was far away from his record, but good enough for first. Freshman sprinter Diamond Hamilton tallied her first win of her collegiate career in the 200m with a time of 25.33. Buffalo, Eastern Michigan, Findlay, Hillsdale, Siena Heights, Spring Arbor, Concordia, Oakland, Toledo, Bowling Green and Detroit Mercy all took part in the event. The CMU track and field team will travel about 70 miles south to play in the Spartan Invite this Saturday. sports@cm-life.com

IN THE NEWS

DESPITE HIS SIZE, TIGERS’ FIELDER LIKES TO RUN By John Lowe Detroit Free Press (MCT)

Prince Fielder doesn’t just want to hit. He wants to run. All the way home. “Baserunning is a big part of the game, and that’s another part of my job,” Fielder said. “I think I should drive in runs, but if I have the opportunity to score, I like to, because you want everybody to score for you when you’re hitting.” That’s how a hitter gets an RBI. “So I think it’s only fair to try to do the best I can to score for the guys behind me because I want the same in return,” Fielder said. “I always try to fail on the side of my teammate. If I’m thrown out, then I was trying to score for my teammate and trying to help us win.” It has become clear in spring training games that

Fielder is an alert, aggressive baserunner. The first time he swung the bat in a Tigers uniform - three weeks ago against Florida Southern - he thrilled manager Jim Leyland with how he churned for a double on a ball he hit down the rightfield line. Days later, Leyland raved about how Fielder moved up from second to third when a pitch got only a little bit away from the catcher. In a recent game, Fielder did something he has done only nine times in the regular season in his sevenyear career. He tripled. Leyland said Fielder might get some triples this season when he hit the ball to the distant part of right-center in Comerica Park. “I don’t see why not,” Fielder said. “Not that I’m a burner by any means, but I’m quick at times.” When Fielder triples, he will be 90 feet from his goal - home plate and an-

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other RBI for a teammate. Fielder will be able to test out the Comerica Park outfield gaps during the Tigers Opening Day on Thursday against the Boston Red Sox. CABRERA RETURNS After taking a nasty onehop grounder in his eye Tigers third baseman Miguel Cabrera blood spilled everywhere as he cut his eye and needed stitches. After missing a week of spring training Cabrera has returned and appeared as sharp as ever. In his first game back he ripped two doubles going 2-for-3 with a flyout too. Tigers manager Jim Leyland said after the game he expects Cabrera to play third the rest of the spring and start Opening Day. “We kind of broke him in slow,” Leyland said. “I just played it by feel. I felt that after three at-bats for the first time back out that was enough.”

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The Central Michigan softball team rebounded from two Mid-American Conference losses to Kent State Friday with a 7-0 win Saturday against Buffalo in Buffalo, N.Y. The series with Buffalo was cut short Sunday because of rain. Saturday the Chippewas (14-13, 1-2 MAC) scored in every inning besides the first and sixth, and junior Kara Dornbos held the Bulls to just three hits while pitching a complete game shutout. She improved her record to 7-6 on the season. “She did a really good job in the circle,” head coach Margo Jonker said. “You have to give credit to Kara and (catcher) Cory (DeLamielleure) for doing a really good job keeping Buffalo’s hitters off-balance.” The CMU offense pounded out 11 hits, four of them for extra-bases. “They were disciplined at the plate today and displayed some power throughout the lineup,” Jonker said. “Different people came through with RBIs so it was nice to see that you can have different people produce offensively.” Freshman CarolAnn Sexauer led the CMU offense with three hits including two doubles and a home run. She drove in three runs. “Overall, she had a really good day both offensively and defensively,” Jonker said. DeLamielleure also homered for CMU.

FILE PHOTO BY ANDREW KUHN

CMU junior pitcher Kara Dornbos pitched twice this weekend going 1-1 between Friday’s and Saturday’s games. She is 7-6 on the season.

three unearned runs. CMU (13-13, 0-2 MAC) pushed across two runs in the top of the seventh on a DeLamielleure home run, but that was it for the Chippewas offense. Senior Molly Coldren gave CMU a 2-0 lead in the first inning of game two with her sixth home run of the season, but three Golden Flashes pitchers shut the door from there on out. “We had numerous people in scoring position, we just didn’t take advantage of our opportunities,” Jonker said. The Chippewas surren-

! u o Y s t Wan Editor In Chief is responsible for directing the overall news and editorial operation of the paper. The Editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The Editor has final student authority in decisions and is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Friday, April 13, 2012 to select the Editor in Chief for CM Life for Summer and Fall 2012. The selected CM Life Editor in Chief will later interview and select all other staff editors prior to the end of the spring 2012 semester. In order to facilitate electronic transmission of application materials to board members, PLEASE EMAIL a copy of your resume in a PDF format, email a Microsoft Word document answering the application questions and have your letters of recommendation emailed to: hopp1nc@ cmich.edu.

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FRIDAY The softball team opened MAC play Friday with a pair of losses to Kent State in Kent, Ohio. CMU lost 5-2 in the first game before being edged 3-2 in the second. The losses snapped a six-game winning streak for the Chippewas. “It was a tough day for Central softball,” Jonker said. “We were not the aggressors in the game and therefore, did not win.” The Golden Flashes used a five-run fourth inning to take a commanding lead in game one. After a Summer Knoop error, KSU hit two home runs in the inning, accounting for

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dered the lead in the bottom of the fifth when freshman Dani Ramos hit an RBI single down the left field line. CMU threatened in the top of the seventh with two runners on, but DeLamielleure struck out to end the game. “We need to learn from today and make sure we take charge tomorrow,” Jonker said. “The MAC conference season is a long season, so we cannot let the first day dictate the rest of the year.”

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Applications for Summer and Fall 2012 semester now available at the CM Life front desk. You must be enrolled as at least a half-time student in good academic standing to be eligible for these positions.

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Central Michigan Life || Monday, April 2, 2012 || 5B

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MONDAY

MODERATOR: Rick Pluta

April 2, 2012

Managing Editor & State Capitol Bureau Chief, Michigan Public Radio Network

Powers Hall Ballroom, CMU 7 to 8:30 p.m. (2nd floor)

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Griffin Policy Forum

Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government. The Robert and Marjorie Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government at Central Michigan University was established to elevate political awareness and activity among students, faculty and citizens and to help prepare pricipled political leaders to serve Michigan in the future.

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Admission to forum is free and open to the public For more information, call 989-774-3341 or email CHSBS@cmich.edu CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity within its community (see cmich.edu/aaeo).

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type are available along typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. In Person: 436ALWAYS Moore Hall the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS within 30 daysRENT of termination ofWANTED the ad. IfFOR you find anSALE error, report it to the Classifi ed NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES WANTED NOTICES TO RENT OPEN WANTED NOTICES TO RENT WANTED NOTICES TO TO RENT WANTED TO RENT TO RENT FOR SALE FOR FOR SALE FOR SALE 13+SALE Issues: $7.00 per WANTED issue FOR Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. SALE Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES NOTICES FOR RENT NOTICES CHRISTIAN COUNSELING/ LIFE Relationships, stress, Coaching. SPECIAL PETS WANTED TO LOST & SECTION FOUND abuses, addictions, more.RENT Call Larry Hoard, BA 989-842-3982. (christianLOST & FOUND lifecoaching.net) ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES FOR RENT FOR RENT $220 AND UP. 1,TO 2, 3RENT bedroom WANTED REAL ESTATE PERSONALS houses/ apartments. Close to campus. WANTED TO RENT Pets ok. 989-644-5749. 1 & ROOMMATES 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS available summer TO and 2012/2013 WANTED BUY HAPPY ADS ROOMMATES

ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS AUTOS SALE OPEN AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

Classifieds

HELP HELP HELP HELP HELP GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES WANTED TO RENT SALE FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT TO RENT FOR 1WANTED AND 2 bedroom apartments. Close DEERFIELD VILLAGE - 2 PER 2 BED, WE ARESALE PLEDGED to the NEW, NEW, NEW 1 block from camLARGE ONE BEDROOM on Chipcampus. Available May and August. to 4SPECIAL PER 4 BED, 5 PER 5 BED. Warm pSPECIAL us 5 b e d SECTION room duplex pewa River. PETS One SECTION block from downletter and spirit of U.S. policy SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SECTION SPECIAL AUTOS FOR SALE PETS PETS PETS PETS SERVICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT Year lease. 989-444-1944. Shuttle to Campus. (989)773-9999 Olivieri-homes.com 989-773-2333. town. $475. Call 400-8358. for the achievement of equal AUTOS FOR SALE www.LiveWithUnited.com 1 AND 3SERVICES bedroom apartments close to housing opportunity throughout RECYCLE YOUR ITEMS campus and downtown. MAIN STREET LIVING! 3-5 People GREAT HOUSE. QUIET, clean, no theMOTORCYCLES Nation. We WANTED encourage support an HELP ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES GARAGE SALES 989-621-7538. Walk to class and downtown! that you no longer need pets, studious women roommates. affirmative advertising and marketing 989-773-2333 www.olivieri-homes.com 15 BEDROOM homes available for HELP WANTED $185/ month plus utilities. Summer GARAGE SALES and gain $$ and space! program in which there are no barriers Fall 2012! Close to capus and out of and school year. 773-9191. to obtaining housing because of race, CM Life Classifieds SPECIAL SECTION town!REAL StartingPETS atESTATE $250/ mo. Partlo NEARREAL DOWNTOWN, ONE bedroom, REAL ESTATE ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS color, religion, sex, handicap, familial H E R IREAL TAGE SESTATE QUARE TOWN 774-3493 Property Management upstairs, duplex, back yard, nice SPECIAL SECTION www.partloproperty.com HOUSES Only 1- 6 bedroom left! Free status, or national origin. PETS 436 Moore Hall neighborhood. Year lease, $550 utiliCable & Internet + Full Size W/D 989-779-9886. ties included. 989-802-1931. www.cm-life.com CHERRY STREET TOWN HOUSES 3 TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES CALL NOW TO START SAVING! orWANTED 4 People 1 1/2 Bath FreeBUY Cable & TO WANTED TO BUY WANTED BUY• www/cm-life.com WANTED BUY WANTED BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPYTO ADS HAPPYTO ADS Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU,989-773-2333. Mt. Pleasant, TO MI 48859 MOTORCYCLES school year NO PETS! Very Clean. Internet + TRAVEL Washer & Dryer Walk to Broadway & Brown Apartments. Campus and Downtown Starting at JAMESTOWN APTS - 2 PER 2 BED, 989-772-3887 $280 per person 989-773-2333. 3, 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to REAL ESTATE PERSONALS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates Campus, (989)775-5522 REAL ESTATE PERSONALS www.LiveWithUnited.com CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, JUST TWO 4 br apts left for May advertising or WANTED TO BUY AVAILABLE JUNE 7TH . 2 BEDROOM HAPPY ADS e eissue August. Prices for 3- 4 people. FREE F rper which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 HOUSE. WASHER/ dryer. 1411 c a b l e i n t e r n e t WANTED TO BUY be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and • Water centered • Gas type are HAPPY ADS IN Website: HOUSE LEASING PARTY - MON., APRIL 4 - 9-5 By www.cm-life.com Granger. 2 blocks west of Freddie!s 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue bomackprop@gmail.com<mailto:boma

DEERFIELD VILLAGE

rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any Tavern. $600 Plus deposit/ utilities.

ckprop@gmail.com> 773-0785 In Person: 436 Moore Hall credit due can be picked up at CM Lifeduplex office 628 within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, FREE Gym Membership to Endurance Pets OK. 1- the 2 person 1/2 ( S E E O F F I C E8 Fa.m.-5 OR DET AILS) Hours: Monday-Friday p.m.

LIFE report it to the Classifi ed Dept. We areutilities only responsible CM for the firstCLASSIFIEDS day’s insertion. South oak immediately. $375 plus deposit/ (989) 774-3493 • www.cm-life.com no pets 772-5668.

FREE Shuttle to Campus • FREE Internet & Cable SAVE TIME! APPLY ONLINE TODAY!

773-9999 NOTICES

LiveWithUnited.com

FOR SALE

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IN HOUSE LEASING PARTY - MON., APRIL - 9-5 AUTOS FOR 4SALE LOST & FOUND

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HELP WANTED

(SEE OFFICE FOR DETAILS)

FOR RENT

1-2 Person 2TO Bedroom WANTED RENT SPECIAL SECTION ROOMMATES REAL ESTATE

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available along with

7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue • Heat other & AC special • Electricity features 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors.

Plus • Dishwasher ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

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lassifi eds Classifi eds lassifieds

6B || Monday, April 2, 2012 || Central Michigan Life DAY! cm-life.com/news 32,000 EACH ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Life • 436READERS Moore Hall, CMU, PUBLISHING Mt. MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Central Michigan LifePleasant, • 436Central Moore Michigan Hall, CMU, Life Mt. •Pleasant, 436 Moore Central MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. LifePleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Classifi ed Ad Rates fied Ad Placing a Classifi Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

Classified Ad Rates

Classifi

wingly accept advertising ects discrimination of Life race, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad CM which Life willrefl not knowingly acceptbecause advertising CM which willcolor, not reflects knowingly discrimination accept because advertising CM of which Life race, will color, refl not ects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed 15 adword minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu gin,By andPhone: CM Life reserves right to reject discontinue, without notice, 989-774-3493 By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex the or national origin,or and CM Life reserves sex or the national rightadvertising toorigin, reject and or discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex the ornotice, national right to advertising reject origin,orand discontinue, CM Life reserves without the notice, rightadvertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising on By of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per which is in the opinion of Student Media which Board, is inisthe notopinion in keeping of the with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is$7.75 is in Life. not theCM in opinion keeping Lifeissue will of with the Student the standards Media of Board, CM$7.75 Life. is not CM in Life keeping will with the standards of and CM Life. CM Life will Fax: 989-774-7805 BytheFax: 989-774-7805 Bold,Issues: italic Bold, italic and$7.75 p 1-2 Issues: per issue 1-2 $7.75 per issue 1-2 Issues: ypographical errors only the extent for of cancelling the charge forresponsible the space used and type are beto responsible typographical errors only be to the extent foroftypographical cancelling theerrors charge only be forto responsible the the space extentper used for of cancelling typographical and thecentered charge errors only for the to the space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the are space used and centered type centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 issue om By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along with by such an error. Creditrendered for such an error is limited only theCredit first rendered date of publication. Any available along available along with valueless by suchtoan error. for such valueless an error isby limited such an to only error. the Credit firstIssues: rendered date for such of publication. an valueless errorper is limited by Any suchtoan only error. theCredit first date for such of publication. an error is Any limited to only the first date of with publication. Any 7-12 $7.25 issue other7-12 special features Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 picked up at the CM Lifecredit offi cedue within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you fi nd an error, In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall other special features other special features can be picked up at the CM Life credit office due within can 30 bedays picked of termination up at the CM ofLife the credit offi ad.ce Ifdue you within can find 30be an days picked error, of termination up at the CM of the Lifead. office If you within find30 andays error,of termination of the ad. If you find an error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad Issues: attractors. sifi ed Dept. immediately. We are forp.m. the firstMonday-Friday day’s insertion. 13+ $7.00 per issuefor thelike 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 attractors. like ad attractors. report it toonly the responsible Classifi ed Dept. immediately. report We itare to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. immediately. the first day’s report We insertion. are it toonly the responsible Classified Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible firstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: 8 a.m.-5

WANTED TO RENT

FOR SALE

NOTICES

WANTED TO RENT

FOR SALE

FOR SALE FOR SALE• www.cm-life.com n AUTOS Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com SERVICES SERVICES LOST FOUND Central Michigan Life • 436& Moore Hall, CMU,AUTOS Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 32,000 REACH READERS MORE THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF Classifi ed Ada Policy Rates Placing Classifi edMI Ad Classified AdGARAGE Policy & Rates Life • 436 WANTED Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, 48859 • www/cm-life.com Classified Ad HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES SALES

owingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, gin,By andPhone: CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising 989-774-3493 on By of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Fax: 989-774-7805 wingly accept errors advertising which reflects of race, color,used religion, ypographical only to the extent ofdiscrimination cancelling thebecause charge for the space and gin, andWebsite: CM Life reserves right to reject or discontinue, advertising www.cm-life.com by By such an error. Credit forthe such an error is limited to only the fiwithout rst datenotice, of publication. Any on of Media is notHall in the standards of CM Life.fiCM Lifeerror, will picked upStudent at the CM LifeBoard, offi ce within 30keeping days of with termination of the ad. If you nd an InthePerson: 436 Moore ypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. Hours: a.m.-5 p.m. by such an error.Monday-Friday Credit for such an error8is limited to only the first date of publication. Any picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

Classified Ad Policy

SPECIAL SECTION

TRAVEL WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE

PETS

FOR RENT

Rates: 15will word minimum per classifi ed refl adects discrimination because CM Life not knowingly accept advertising which

Classified Ad Rates

of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is Bold, in the opinion of the Student Media italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75with per issue Board, not in keeping theper standards of CM CM Life will be responsible for Rates: 15isword minimum classifi edLife. ad centered type are 3-6 Issues:errors $7.50 typographical only per to theissue extent of cancelling the charge for the space used available and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for suchalong an errorwith is limited to only 7-12 Issues:$7.75 $7.25 per issue canBold, italicup and 1-2 Issues: per issue features the first date of publication. Any credit dueother bespecial picked at the CM Life office centered type are 13+Issues: Issues: $7.00per per issue within 30 days of $7.50 termination ofissue the ad. If you filike nd an report it to the Classified aderror, attractors. 3-6 Dept. immediately. We are only responsibleavailable for the first day’s insertion. along with

WANTED TO RENT

MOTORCYCLES NOTICES WANTED NOTICES TO RENT FOR SALE

ROOMMATES FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE

SPECIAL SECTION

TRAVEL WANTED TO WANTED TO RENT RENT NOTICES FOR SALE

7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

PETS 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue

Bold, italic and centered type are available along

3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. MOTORCYCLES 13+SALE Issues: $7.00 per WANTED issue FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT TO RENT NOTICES FOR

other special features

Issues: $7.00 per issuePERSONALS like ad attractors. PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT 13+ WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE PERSONALS AUTOS SALE REACH THAN 32,000 READERS EACHOPEN PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE OPEN AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &MORE FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

GARAGE SALES HELP HAPPY ADS FORWANTED RENT MIGHTY MINIS

PETS SPECIAL SECTION WANTED TO RENT LEAGUE WANTED TOOFRENT WOMEN VOTERS MOTORCYCLES ROOMMATES TRAVEL WANTED TO RENT SERVICES Encourages informed and active participation in government: REAL ESTATE PERSONALS SERVICES http://mtpleasantarea.mi.lwvnet.org/ GARAGE SALES ®

Like us on facebook!

www.facebook.com/LWVMPA WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS GARAGE SALES PETS

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FOR RENT HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master Bedrooms Each With Personal Bath Full Size Washer & Dryer Includes Internet & cable 989-773-2333 www.olivieri-homes.com

HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHI-

GARAGE SALES HELP HAPPY ADS GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT

BLOOMFIELD HILLS RENTAL Com-

COLLEGE PRO IS now hiring painters

we buy them we haul them. in Oakland County Michigan all across the state to work outdoors SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT RENT CLES WANTED TO RENT pany WANTED TO WANTED TO$3k-5k. RENT 989-772-5428. needs summer help! UpRENT to $12.00 w/other students. Earn Adan hour. Outdoor work, good drivvancement opportunities + internships. WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE CM LIFE CLASSIFIEDS ing record, and lifting required. Call 1-888-277-9787 or ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES 436 Moore Hall, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 Wayne at 248-332-4700. www.collegepro.com ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES UNION SQUARE APTS - 2 PER 2 (989) 774-3493 •SALE www.cm-life.com TO RENT NOTICES FORFOR CM LIFE CLASSIFIEDS CM LIFE CLASSIFIEDS BED, Beside Target, Warm Shuttle to AUTOS SALE WANTED SERVICES LOST & FOUND Campus. (989)772-2222 (989) 774-3493 • www.cm-life.com (989) 774-3493 • www.cm-life.com www.LiveWithUnited.com REAL PERSONALS REAL&ESTATE ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES LOST FOUND WESTPOINT VILLAGE 2 BED 2 HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT MASTER BATH LIKE NEW, Warm SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS Shuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS CAMP COUNSELORS WANTED TO BUY WANTED! WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY• www/cm-life.com WANTED BUY www.LiveWithUnited.com HAPPY ADS ADS HAPPY ADS HAPPY TO ADS HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT Central Michigan Life •HAPPY 436for Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED private Michigan WANTED TO RENT WOODSIDE APTS- 2 bedroom, in-

Classifi ed Ad Policy PETS SPECIAL SECTION TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

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1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

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Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

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boys/girls overnight camps. Teach swimming, canoeing, water skiing, sailing, sports, computers, tennis, archery, 989-779-1539. horseback riding, climbing, which windsurfing CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, & more. Office maintenance jobs By Phone: 989-774-3493 sex or national origin, and CM Lifeand reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising too. Salary is $1900 and up plus which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 room/board. Find out more about our responsible for typographical only to the extent camps anderrors apply online at of cancelling the charge for the space used and GIRL AND GUY be ROOMMATES By Website: www.cm-life.com valueless by w wsuch w . l wan c gerror. w c . cCredit o m , for such o r anc error a l l is limited to only the first date of publication. Any NEEDED FOR 2012-rendered 12013 school In Person: 436 Moore Hall y e a r . up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, 888-459-2492. w w w . b ecredit s t r o due l l c . ccan o mbe picked report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Email sam@lwcgwc.com 586-321-1112. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Trust the Midas Touch MT. PLEASANT 1303 E. Pickard St. (989) 772-2814

Across 1 Jon of “Mad Men” 5 Knight fights 11 Roll of dough 14 Slangy prefix meaning “super” 15 Oust from office 16 Ornamental climbing plant 17 Roller coaster feature 18 Batter’s position 19 Anonymous John 20 One completely lacking morals 23 Small batteries 24 Sound preceding “Oof!” 25 2009 Will Ferrell dinosaur movie 32 Vaudeville show 33 Landlord’s contract 34 Paid athlete 36 “__ it now”: “Understood” 37 Writer H.H. or Alice 38 Security breach 39 Place for pickups 40 They may be

7 Defense gp. with pilots 8 Mailed 9 Gadget measuring rpm 10 Church high point 11 Hairline’s midpoint, perhaps 12 Swear 13 Change the color of, as hair 21 “Smooth Operator” singer 22 Lav in Leeds 25 Word before pad or tender 26 Common man with a six-pack? 27 Plump (up) 28 Basic principle 29 Severe 30 That, in Tijuana Down 31 Swap 1 Boat’s bottom 32 You might brush 2 “Peek-__!” barbecue sauce on 3 Siamese sound 4 Longtime logo with a one top hat and monocle 35 Approves 37 “Little Red Book” 5 Exactly right writer 6 Suspicious of cracked using stethoscopes 41 Abacus pieces 42 Woman with varying roles in Arthurian legend 45 __ guzzler 46 Indian bread 47 What exacting judges follow 55 __ Mahal 56 Political fugitive 57 Delude 58 Big fuss 59 Singer Bette 60 Team on a farm 61 Alphabet ender 62 Animals for 5-Across 63 Call to a queue

38 Used for support 40 Gamblers’ methods 41 Dull 43 “Who __?”: New Orleans Saints’ fans chant 44 Keys in 47 Stow below 48 Give off 49 Disney World’s Space Mountain, e.g. 50 Leer at 51 Wilma Flintstone’s guy 52 Opulence 53 Highest point 54 “What __ wrong?” 55 Looney Tunes devil, scasually

April 2, 2012  

Central Michigan Life

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