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Bell tower changing tune, scheduled in time for graduation, 3A

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Central Michigan University

| Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Mount Pleasant: Rock City? 1B

[cm-life.com]

“It is not organized well at all, you have to search to find the portal and it is the weirdest set up. It just looks strange.”

By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Next year’s undergraduate tuition rates and a name change for Central Michigan University’s off-campus and online programs are among topics to be discussed at Thursday’s board of trustees meeting. Traditionally set during a July board meeting, tuition rates are being discussed earlier in order to allow students adequate time to plan financially. CMU increased undergraduate tuition for the 201112 academic year by 3.47 percent, $12 per credit hour, last July, the lowest increase among the 15 Michigan public universities. Gov. Rick Snyder has proposed a budget that includes a 3-percent increase in state funding for universities that keep tuition increases to 4 percent or less. Many students are hoping tuition rates don’t face a major increase. “I obviously want tuition

Cory Brzak,

Midland sophomore

“I find this way of easing us into the new website by email and videos a week before extremely annoying,” he said. “I don’t have time to watch videos.” Charles Hastings,

SITE UNSEEN

By David Oltean Senior Reporter

A recently-introduced Michigan Senate bill may reduce retiree benefits for public employees enrolled in the Michigan Public School Employees Retirement System, including some at Central Michigan University. The legislation, Senate Bill 1040, would require select teachers and administrators enrolled in MPSERS to pay about 10 percent more for health premiums, increase salary contributions toward benefit pensions and reduce a portion of the cost for school districts. Testimonies will be presented for the bill during the Senate Appropriations Retirement Subcommittee’s April 11 hearing. Sen. Roger Kahn, R-Saginaw, was the primary sponsor of the legislation and released a written statement regarding the proposed bill, highlighting the $45 billion liability caused by MPSERS. “In 2013-2014 the Office of Retirement Services estimates that school districts will pay a total of about 31 percent of MPSERS employee payroll into the retirement system to cover the costs of school retirement,” he said in a released statement. “This is roughly equivalent to 20 cents of every education dollar set

Website launch comes up short with campus community By Lonnie Allen | Staff Reporter

University Communications and the Web Task Force have said the April launch date was determined based on the effect it would have on the university community and its operations. CMU, based on user feedback, sent out an email Monday saying iCentral would remain accessible through the end of the semester. Links to both Central Link and iCentral were provided in the message. The public website, cmich.edu, was unavailable for much of Tuesday as IT officials worked to correct an internal error.

In a previous story, Vice President for Information Technology Roger Rehm said iCentral was to be replaced by Central Link when the new website was launched. Because of the launch date, the Web team discussed leaving iCentral available throughout the project, but the final decision to leave it up was made over the weekend. The primary driver for the decision was feedback from students regarding the timing of the launch. Charles Hastings, assistant professor of anthropology, said he has not tried

called launching the new system Monday, with finals approaching, irresponsible and rushed. “I don’t like that they switched it this close to finals,” he said. “I think they should have waited until summer. It is bad timing, there is a lot of stress already because of finals (and) we don’t need any more. It took me about 15 minutes to find the (portal) connection link.” the new website and called preparations for the launch, a string of video announcements sent via email, “a waste of time.” “I find this way of easing us into the new website by email and videos a week before extremely annoying,” he said. “I don’t have time to watch videos.” Hastings said Sarah Buckley, coordinator of marketing and events for the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences, sent an email Monday alerting CHSBS faculty and staff about external pages, which do not match

rates to go down, but if they were to remain the same, that’d be OK,” said Detroit sophomore Jourdan Bender. “I really can’t afford anything higher, and the quality of education we get for the amount we spend is, in my opinion, worth it.” Vice President of Development and External Relations Kathy Wilbur declined comment through University Communications while Vice President of Finance and Administrative Services David Burdette could not be reached for comment Monday and Tuesday. According to a release sent by the board of twrustees, room and board rates for students living in residence halls will also be discussed at Thursday’s meeting. Macomb sophomore Andrew Venditti said although he doesn’t live on campus, for the sake of incoming freshmen, rates should be decreased. ABOARD| 2A

Proposed legislation may increase MPSERS health payments

assistant professor of anthropology

A week of emails and instructional videos preparing the Central Michigan University community for the new cmich.edu launch was considered unsuccessful by many. The new design of cmich.edu is being blamed by students and faculty for adding frustration to an already stressful time of the year. Muskegon junior A.J. Balkema said he is not a fan of the website and

Trustees to set tuition rates, room and board Thursday

the internal pages and there were some missing links on the college home page. Her email also informed CHSBS that they were working with OIT to fix the problems. Midland sophomore Cory Brzak said he was confused by the organization of the home page. He said he didn’t see the purpose to launch on Monday and called navigation on the site “ horrible.” “It is not organized well at all,” he said. “You have to search to find the portal and it is the weirdest set up. It just looks strange.” AWEBSITE| 2A

aside to pay retiree pension and health care costs. Skyrocketing retirement system costs in conjunction with the $45 billion unfunded liability will ultimately incapacitate our school districts. It is imperative that the system undergo significant and necessary reforms that will ensure stability for the future of retired school employees.” Along with increasing the cost of health premiums and benefit pensions, the bill would require current teachers to work until age 60 to qualify for retirement health care. Current retirees’ pensions would remain unaffected by the legislation, though contributions to the existing retiree health plan would increase by 10 percent. Employees hired after July 1, 2012 will remain to be required to make a 2 percent contribution to a 401K health plan, which will be matched by employers. Sen. Mark Jansen, RGrand Rapids, sponsored the Senate bill along with many other recent reform bills. Deborah Drick, Chief of Staff for Jansen, said the MPSERS reform is necessary as the retirement plan continues to be a liability for Michigan. ABILL| 2A

‘Planet Money’ team brings economics, humor to Warriner Hall By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

Chuck Miller/staff photographer

Adam Davidson, co-host of NPR’s “Planet Money” podcast, stands on stage Tuesday evening in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium giving a presentation on pop economics. Davidson was joined by his co-host Alex Blumberg. “One of the secrets of the ‘Planet Money’ team is that no has an economic background,” Davidson joked.

When thinking about the future of the U.S. and the current state of the economy, one has reason to ask, “How screwed are we?” That was the question “Planet Money’s” Alex Blumberg and Adam Davidson posed to the audience of about 300 attendees Tuesday night in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium. The live talked based on their popular NPR segment was presented by Central Michigan University’s Public Radio. The show aims to explain the economy in terms

that anyone can understand. Blumberg and Davidson walked out to a standing ovation, and were greeted by a row of high school boys lifting up their shirts to display “Planet Money” written out across their chests in brightpink duct tape. The festive fans were part of a group from Petoskey High School. Davidson said America in a way has two economies. “A good economy exists side by side with a really bad economy, that will exist in both the short and long run,” he said. Then they provided background. Blumberg said since the 1970s, for about 80 mil-

lion Americans, there has been virtually no economic growth, with some who are worse off than their parents. He said this phenomenon masked as earning was replaced by borrowing. “In the old system — auto plants, mill, steel plants — you would start as a high school drop out or an immigrant, maybe with limited English, but there were jobs you could start with your body,” Davidson said. “There was little technical school. You learned on the job. Now low-skill jobs are disappearing rapidly.”

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

APLANET MONEY| 2A

[INSIDE] w CMU funding model similar to those at WMU, EMU, 3A w City Commissioners study wording of anti-discrimination ordinance draft, 3A w Dinner Dialogue talks politics, stereotypes about women in Yemen, 5A


2A || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

PLANET MONEY |

EVENTS CALENDAR

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

PHOTO OF THE DAY

continued from 1a

TODAY w Annual Journalism Awards Luncheon will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Rotunda. Tickets are $10 for students and $15 for the public. Contact the journalism department for ticket information. . w Drag Show featuring Sabin will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium.

ThURSDAY w Cooking with Kids: Lunches with Pizzazz will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at McLaren Central Michigan Community Hospital. A registered dietician and executive chef will explore cooking techniques for preparing healthy and nutritious lunches. Children ages 7 and older can participate for $5. Register for the program by calling (989) 779- 5606. w Graphic Design 2012 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the University Art Gallery. It will feature work by candidates for the BFA in Graphic Design. The event is free.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 79

WEBSITE| continued from 1A

In a statement from the Web Task Force team via University Communications, “the launch of the web environment went very well and performance of the environment more than met (our) expectations.” CMU’s help desk received 375 calls Monday, 118 of which were directly related to the web environment. Comparatively, the help desk received 311 calls the previous Monday, April 2, and 282 the Monday before that, March 26. Mount Pleasant junior Krandall Williams logged in Monday to check out the new site for the first time and said she liked what was done. “I like the layout,” she said. “(There are) general things I noticed that weren’t working, but I like the site.” She said there are going to be some issues with the new website, but it isn’t a reason to scrap the launch. “I think people know by now how to get to Blackboard

The duo said research has shown that in today’s economy, it is the soft skills that matter — skills acquired as early as preschool. They referenced the Perry Preschool Project, which took place in the 1960s in Ypsilanti. The project conducted a study in which one group of children attended preschool while the other group stayed at home. Later in life, those who went to preschool avoided crime, earned a larger salary and enjoyed greater employment — all which researcher and Nobel-Prize winning economist James Heckman attributed to their early education. “It was awesome,” said Paul Winegard, a junior from Peto-

skey High School. “It was kind of cool how they explained everything, especially right now as I’m getting ready to go into college.” Charles Walmsley, Financial Advisor with HS&C Wealth Management, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial, said he thought the presentation was very entertaining and felt it was important for students to be educated. “The economy is deeply entwined in everyone’s future,” he said. “It’s important that students understand about the economy; it helps them make decisions about everything they want to do in the future.”

board |

line, a proposal to change the name of Off-Campus and Online Programs to Central Michigan University’s Global Campus will be discussed by trustees,” the release said. “Also known internally as ProfEd, the new name will reinforce the department’s cohesiveness with the main campus and better reflect CMU’s goal for increased internationalization.” Also on the agenda for Thursday’s meeting is setting graduate/doctoral tuition rates, the establishment of a bachelor’s degree in engineering science, discussion of the renovation of Anspach Hall and an update on the strategic planning process from co-chairs Barrie Wilkes and Claudia Douglass.

continued from 1a

“Part of the reason I don’t live on campus is because it was so expensive,” he said. “A lot of students just can’t afford the cost, and although CMU is reasonably priced compared to other schools, an increase in cost would be devastating to some students.” CMU offers a number of off-campus and online programs, referred to as ProfEd. On Thursday, board of trustees members will discuss a name change for the program. “To better reflect the scope of CMU, which delivers its academic programs on campus and at more than 50 locations and on-

and email,” she said. “Today’s launch shouldn’t hinder too many.” Hamburg junior Stephan Rose said he hasn’t noticed anything wrong when accessing the portal, but said he doesn’t go to the cmich.edu landing page. “I skip going to the homepage,” Rose said. “I access cmich.edu/portal and find everything fine. I had no issues with the site (Monday).” Port Huron junior Shawn Garska said the new website has a good layout, but now it’s about becoming familiar with it and learning to access everything. “I am having some trouble,” Garska said. “I am finding that the locations of links are missing. ... (They) probably should have waited before launching the website.” Auburn sophomore Kristy Brandt was on the website Sunday during its soft launch and was unable to access email and other class material, but said she was able to get to everything on Monday. “I am on it right now and I have been finding everything

studentlife@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

I need,” she said. “What really bugs me is that the old URLs that I have in (my) emails and such do not work anymore; they just send me to the cmich. edu homepage.” Some CMU faculty are also avoiding the new site, asking the same question some students are about the launch on Monday: Why now? Christopher Tycner, associate professor of physics, said he is busy preparing his classes for exams and hasn’t been on the website. “I don’t know why they did this now and didn’t wait until summer,” Tycner said. “What’s the rush; why now? I think it would have been nice to know why they wanted to do the launch now.” The launch has been very successful for a project the size of this scope, according to the email from the Web Task Force and University Communications. Individuals still having trouble navigating the site are asked to use the search function and invest some time in configuring the favorites tab. university@cm-life.com

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Jeff Smith/staff photographer

Livonia sophomore Adam Kovsky, right, attempts to give a high-five to Livonia sophomore Zach Parker as the two slackline April 4 in Warriner Mall. “I saw a YouTube video of some french dudes slacklining between two mountains,” Kovsky said about why he began the hobby.

BILL | continued from A1

“MPSERS has been a system that has been going along, and because the economy kind of took a tank and because of other contributing factors, the MPSERS plan in itself is unsustainable,” Drick said. “There’s a lot more liability than there is revenue.” Drick said the biggest change would be for those enrolled in MPSERS who plan on retiring in the near future, as some school employees will have to adjust plans and work until age 60 before retirement. “The short answer is that we

can see the growing trend of people retiring more and more and less and less is being put in the system,” Drick said. “If we just ignore this, within 10 years, there’s not going to be any left.” Administrative Clerk Caral Turner, a member of UAW Local 6888 and recipient of MSPERS, said she opposed the bill after contributing to her current pension plan for more than 30 years. Turner said the legislation could make finances very difficult for recent retirees or teachers and administrators planning on retiring within the next few years. “What they’re indicating is that the health care is getting too costly, but they not only want us to pay more in to cover health care costs, but we’ll also have to

pay more out of pocket for that health care to the tune of like $100 a month more,” Turner said. “It’s like I’m paying in to help support this, but it’s still going to cost me more out of pocket when I do retire.” School of Engineering and Technology executive secretary Karen Bellingar, president of UAW Local 6888, said she expects the legislation to significantly impact certain retirees if passed. “I don’t know how they think retirees can take a 10 percent hit on premiums and a hit on health care, especially one that’s unexpected,” Bellingar said. metro@cm-life.com


3A

INSIDE LIFE Wednesday, April 11, 2012

| cm-life.com

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

CMU funding model similar to those at WMU, EMU

office of Enrollment and Student Services

Changes on target for end of year By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

The distribution of tuition money and state appropriations for the general fund at Central Michigan University is similar to several other universities in Michigan. State appropriations, student tuition dollars and revenue from other sources combine to form a general fund that covers all expenses on Central Michigan University’s campus. According to a document provided by David Burdette, vice president of Finance and Administrative Services, 75 percent of the general fund is comprised of student tuition dollars, 20 percent from state appropriations and the rest from other revenues. The general fund is used to cover areas including faculty and staff salaries, benefits, supplies and transfers, utilities and scholarships. “The biggest expenditure by far is salaries, wages and benefits,” Burdette said. “These benefits include health insurance, retirement, social security and those kinds of things. After that, areas like academic supplies, utilities and scholarships are covered.” In 2011, the two most expensive areas covered by the general fund were instructional purposes and public service. Approximately $150 million was spent on instructional purposes and public service cost approximately $70 million. Western Michigan University, a public university in Kalamazoo with more than 25,000 students, also makes use of a general fund to cover all university expenses. “Tuition dollars go toward our general operation budget, which is combined with our state appropriation,” Cheryl Roland, executive director of University Relations at WMU, wrote in an email. “Essentially, tuition dollars aren’t treated any differently than state appropriations. We do a general fund statement and divvy money up for various projects from there.” A Tuition | 5

Photos by jeff smith/Staff photographer

Imlay senior Ricardo Rinconeno gets a tour of the bell tower April 4 on the fourth floor of Warriner Hall. The bell tower is controlled by a digital box with recordings of real bells, which can also be played on a keyboard.

a change of tune Bell tower may play fight song in time for May graduation By Octavia Carson | Staff Reporter

As 2012 graduates welcome an end to their time at Central Michigan University, the campus may be welcoming a new tradition. For 27 years, chimes have rung out from Warriner Hall’s bell tower all across CMU’s campus, but by May graduation, a new, yet familiar tune may be heard. “Our hope at this point is to have the school fight song play for graduation on May 5,” said Ricardo Rinconeno, Student Government Association Spirits and Traditions Committee member and North Branch senior. In the future, this may be a reason for people to unplug their headphones for a few seconds while walking through campus. “Future plans entail having seasonal music play before specific breaks in the school year,” Rinconeno said. The tower in Warriner Hall does not have actual bells, but a new system was added more than two years ago. “Mr. Vokes showed me the room, which used to actually house the original bell chimes, which have since been removed,” Rinconeno said. “Now the only thing in the room is a keyboard and the synthesized chime system.” The system added in place of the chimes has the potential to hold more than 40 songs he said. “We feel that allowing the tower to play additional sounds on special occasions

“Future plans entail having seasonal music play before specific breaks in the school year.” Ricardo Rinconeno, North Branch senior

would be something that increased school spirit whether it was at graduation or even before winter break,” Spirits and Traditions Committee Member and Chesterfield Township Freshmen Charles Mahone II said. The spirits and traditions committee has made it their mission to start a long lasting CMU tradition, Mahone said. “The idea is to create something that will spark new life and pride into the campus,” Rinconeno said. “We just hope that it gets people excited.” Other schools have made similar traditions on their campus. “I had heard about anoth-

City Commissioners study wording of anti-discrimination ordinance draft By Jackie Smith Staff Reporter

A couple of “quick questions” yielded a near 90-minute debate Monday when the City Commission dissected the language of an antidiscrimination ordinance drafted by Mount Pleasant’s contracted attorney. A template for the law was proposed to commissioners by a local group last November with hope to implement protection against discrimination for people in multiple categories, particularly sexual orientation and gender identity — neither of which is covered by the state’s Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act. On Monday, in the third work session for the developing law, commissioners voiced concern over the wording of areas describing types of agencies and circumstances that would be exempt from penalty in cases of discrimination complaints. Commissioner Nancy English questioned the phrasing of an exemption that would allow religious

organizations to restrict use of its facilities and services, regardless if the occupant was of the same denomination or moral tenet. The discussion that ensued over what the exemption implied took up most of the work session. “Some of the (other exemptions), I thought, were so broad that anybody could claim anything was a religious belief, and there were some that were so narrow,” said City Attorney Scott Smith. “What we tried to do is something fairly down the middle. Obviously, the language isn’t hitting the mark yet, because everybody’s interpreting it differently.” The Discussed Area “A religious organization or institution may restrict the occupancy of any of its housing facilities or accommodations operated as a part of its religious activities to persons of its denomination or those who conform to the moral tenet of that religious organization or institution.”—Exemption classification in

The old bell tower system lies on a table April 4 on the fourth floor of Moore Hall.

170.07B of the draft. Among the most iterated points was whether a religious institution should be able to limit access to its facilities, such as a church’s banquet hall or gymnasium, if it largely services it out to the public. Some commissioners questioned if a religious facility, despite use, should be considered a public facility at all. But by the end of the session, most commissioners advocated to — for the time being — leave the wording as is. Mayor Bruce Kilmer said doing so would help avoid referendum of the ordinance once it’s adopted by the city and not limit the community outreach of religious agencies. “It’s a community asset,” said Vice Mayor Kathy Ling. “So you have a basketball facility, and there are churches that still believe that blacks aren’t equal. Would you feel comfortable saying, ‘OK’?” Kilmer agreed, but still voiced some concerns. A Ordinance |5A

er university that had a professor play Lady Gaga from the campus clock tower and I thought that that would be something fun and engaging to add to (CMU’s) campus,” Rinconeno said. After seeing a previous article in Central Michigan Life about the tower, Rinconeno said he found that the school had just changed to a system capable of playing different sounds. “We decided that keeping the music as a novelty and playing them every once in a while during special campus events like games, graduations and before holiday breaks would be the best course to take,” he said. As of now the spirits and

traditions committee believes this change will only have a positive impact on CMU. “When it comes to negatives I currently can’t see any, but if any concerns do become apparent then they will be taken care of,” Mahone said. Rinconeno said when he first brought the idea to attention Keith Voeks assistant director of University Events and many others have shown much interest. “The spirits and traditions committee as well as SGA also had overwhelming support for the project,” Rinconeno said. Spirits and traditions committee member and Waterford junior Jacqueline Maggioncalda said she hopes the new sounds will add a new character to campus. studentlife@cm-life.com

The ongoing realignment process in the Enrollment and Student Services Office is on target to be complete by the end of the calendar year. The most recent step taken in the project involved changing the title of the Dean of Students. Now called Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, responsibilities of the position remain the exact same. “It’s the exact same job,” said Tony Voisin, director of student life and interim assistant vice president for student affairs. “Nothing has changed. There are the same responsibilities. Because of the new division, the position is not in the academic division any longer, therefore the Dean of Students title no longer made sense.” Steven Johnson, vice president of Enrollment and Student Affairs, said the search has started for a permanent candidate for the position. “By the fall, at the latest, (the) position will be filled,” Johnson said. “We’re conducting an internal search first, and if a candidate is not identified, the search will turn national.” Johnson said he is looking for someone with experience in dealing with students on both an academic and personal level. “We’re searching for somebody who has the range and scope of experience in working with students, because it’s a key position in managing student affairs,” he said. “The candidate should serve as an interpreter between students, faculty and staff. Somebody who is strong enough to provide leadership such as counseling, sexual aggression services and things like that, so students can come to someone to handle personal challenges is important. Also, being responsive to emergency situations that may happen on campus is key.” Once the position is filled, Voisin will return to his position as director of student life. AREFORM| 9A

Human Resources interviews finalist Lori Hella for associate vice president job Second candidate to hold open forum Friday By Alayna Smith Staff Reporter

The search for a new associate vice president for human resources has been narrowed from a national search down to two finalists. The first open forum discussion with finalist Lori Hella was held Tuesday in the Bovee University Center Lake Michigan Room, where about 10 people gathered to interview her for the position. The associate vice president position was formerly occupied by Maxine Kent, who retired in 2010. Hella has been serving as the interim AVP for the past two years. Being the internal university candidate, Hella said she knew why certain decisions have been made at the university and this knowledge would help her in the position. This information would not be restrictive in her decision-making though, she said.

“I’m a firm believer in continuing to look at our policies, and looking at what needs to be changed,” Hella said. Hella said it is imperative for the university to be considering multiple avenues when addressing the younger generation, as competition rises for students taking online courses versus coming to live on campus, leading to a declining number of high school students looking to attend universities. “Courses are on a more ondemand basis so it meets (the students’) schedules and it is not on our schedule,” Hella said. Hella said one of the university’s best kept secrets is the robust health care packages offered to employees for such a low cost. “When we look at other state universities in particular, our costs are 93 percent of the average,” she said. These low costs are the result of successful collaborative purchasing efforts and progressive contracting with vendors, which Hella said she aims to continue. “We need to educate employees about how to keep

the cost low for benefits and how to use the benefits, which will help to keep the cost low for the university,” she said. Hella also discussed her experience working with unions and how to help synchronize the efforts of the faculty and the administration. “You need to be cognitive of the issues you’re working on and how they could be impacted or could impact a collective bargaining situation,” she said. Hella has a variety of experiences in collective bargaining and contracting efforts, and said she is willing to offer advice in conflictual situations between employees and supervisors. “A fundamental key is communication and that you’re providing information to allow individuals to do their jobs,” she said. Cali Clark, director of employment in human resources, said there are many qualities that are important for the AVP position, and Hella meets much of the criteria. A HELLA |5A


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VOICES Wednesday April 11, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | University Communications should bear the blame for botched cmich.edu redesign

Nathan Inks Columnist

Language of law at fault in Oakland redistricting Last week, the Michigan Supreme Court made a 4-3 decision that the law changing the way Oakland County redistricts its county commission seats is legal, while acknowledging there were political motivations behind its passage. In dispute was Public Act 280 of 2011, which changed Oakland’s reapportionment control from the Democratically-controlled executive branch to the Republican-controlled County Commission and removed four seats from the commission. Republicans, unhappy with the lines the Democrats drew, claimed it was a cost-saving measure, but emails that were released proved otherwise. One such email, from Representative Eileen Kowall, R-White Lake, read, “I guess it would also help to have (a) legitimate explanation as to why we waited until now, after redistricting plans have been submitted, to take these bills up. I’m thinking that we claim we were having trouble agreeing on how many seats the BOC would ultimately have.” Democrats claimed because the law only affected Oakland County, it was a local act, which requires a two-thirds majority to pass the House, which Republicans did not have. Republicans contend it is not a local act, and the court agreed. The court used the precedent from Dearborn v. Board of Supervisors, which lays out what defines a local act: “the limiting criteria … must be reasonably related to the overall purpose of the statute” and it has to leave open the possibility for other locations to eventually fall under the provisions of the law, regardless of the likeliness of that ever happening. The law never specified Oakland County, but rather any county with a population more than 1 million and a certain type of county government. Because the law will apply not only to this year’s redistricting, but also redistricting in the future, other counties could fall under the provision. The Democrats on the court used the precedent of State v. Wayne County Clerk, which found that the legislature could not direct cities of at least 750,000 (i.e. Detroit) to place a ballot proposal on the ballot in the primary election. Using that precedent was incorrect, because no other city could have been determined to have a population of at least 750,000 before the primary. That law set a specific date for the ballot proposal, and it would only happen one time. The redistricting law, on the other hand, could potentially affect other counties in future years. The majority correctly stated “the validity of legislation can never be made to depend on the motives which have secured its adoption, whether these be public or personal, honest or corrupt.” What the Republican legislature did was slimy and disgraceful, but the justices’ job is to rule on the law as it is written. This will be a hot issue in this year’s election, but anger should not be directed at the Republicans on the court — they made a ruling that adhered to the rule of law. Those unhappy with the results should change what defines a local act, so that conflicts like this do not happen. E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805 Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

Excommunicated

W

here do I ...? How do we ...? Now the entire site is down? Seriously?”

Students and faculty are frustrated with the relaunch of cmich.edu, and it doesn’t help matters that it’s just a few weeks before finals, a time of peak use for the site as students register for fall classes, prepare for exams, and in many cases, prepare to graduate. When Central Michigan University announced plans to unveil its revamped, easier-to-use information hub, it was supposed to be the end of an ongoing issue of clutter and confusion. But while all that has allegedly been fixed, the changes have brought on another bout of confusion; learning how to navigate a site during a time of the year where most students are looking for outlets to the stress and anxiety brought on by final exams. In addition to cramming to memorize one last mnemonic device, it’s going to take an extra 10 minutes just to remember how to find our way to Blackboard. Students might be in trouble, but millenials tend to understand information technology intuitively; say a small prayer for the professors attempting to find their gradebooks on a system they’ve never seen before, a system complex enough to require tutorial videos. In short, certainly in

terms of timing, the relaunch has been a fiasco. But this type of decision-making isn’t surprising. The way the website was released showed both arrogance and incompetence, parts of an overall brash attitude demonstrated by CMU administration this academic year. If one were to point a finger in the direction such questionable decision making has originated from most often, a good place to start would be West Hall, home of University Communications. This year, when University Communications meddled in anything, it seemed bad things happened for CMU. Take a look at the website. University Communications has been partnering with several different entities, including the Office of Information Technology and the hired, Ohiobased Blue Chip Consulting Group. The result: Disastrous. With a seemingly amateur design, CMU could easily be the online laughingstock of universities for years to come, with the $550,000 price tag providing a generous helping of salt for both members of the CMU family and outsiders to rub in. An informal poll concerning user happiness with the new site posted on Central Michigan Life’s Facebook wall yielded immediate, irritated results. Of the 130 votes recorded in the first five hours by Facebook users, 120 chose “it’s awful!,” while six selected “I

feel about the same as I did before,” and four decided “It’s great!” best summed up their feelings. Of course the polling methodology is childishly simplistic and the results far from scientific, but the outcome is hardly encouraging; it’s an embarrassment. But the list of questionable decision-making keeps coming. When CMU hid a $10 million allocation to the Events Center from the public, Renee Walker, associate vice president of University Communications, went as far to say that the information had in fact been released to the public because documents detailing funding were given to the state legislature. Other public gaffes include University President George Ross’ speech during the Faculty Association strike, where several students were kept out of the library for an event in which Ross went on to refer to the FA dispute as a matter for “grown-ups,” thus giving a big slap in the face to the students who pay his salary. What’s worse is University Communications still seems to think perfect silence will somehow instill a belief in students, faculty, alumni and community members that things are indeed perfect at CMU, and have been very reluctant to admit anything about any dissent, going as far as to dismiss the nearly 20 votes of no confidence against the current administration. The website is yet another indication that when there is a job that needs to be done wrong, University Communications is the right office to call.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

[LETTERS TO THE EDITOR]

Think before you drink too much You may have seen or read the article about me, “Student overcomes coma, near deadly fall,” which was published in Central Michigan Life on Wednesday. Yes, it is spectacular the progress I have made, but I have one particular message I want to get across to all college students. The subject is about drinking. I know lots of college students do it, and a lot do it illegally. Now, I don’t know the exact percentage of students who do or don’t drink, but I am smart enough to guess that at least 80 percent of students do. Although my recovery has been very inspiring, there may be some who think I am a typical college student, who on my anniversary, went out to have a drink. I learned my lesson; I will never get drunk again. Try to imagine one day you’re

hanging out with friends and the next thing you remember is not being able to walk, talk and you have to eat out a feeding tube. It wasn’t a fun reality! I thought I was dreaming. But this all happened because I decided to drink uncontrollably. Now, I’m not against drinking; I just think students should think about how much they are going to drink. I get it; we’re young, in a college town, on our own, no parents, drinking, parties, reminisceing from the night before. But we only get one life. Is it really worth risking it? You may think what happened to me will never happen to you. I thought the same thing. Because of my choices, I couldn’t go out and celebrate my 21st birthday. Instead, I had to participate in countless hours of therapy. I

couldn’t even drink for a year. You might think, “Wow, he’s 21 and he can’t drink for a whole year, that sucks.” It did, but that’s what I get for my actions. And no, when I got to school, I still didn’t drink. You might say, “Well I was at a party with a balcony.” Do you think I thought about that before I went there? No. A brain injury can happen to anyone. It’s most common among males between the ages of 18 and 25. I saw someone almost get hit by a car because his drunken friend decided to push him, in the rolling chair he was on, into the street. Just think about how much life is worth to you before taking that first sip. Matt Herrod Livonia junior

Take care of those around you Many of you have seen, read or heard about Matt’s story. I’d like to add a bit more. First of all, I’d like to thank those individuals who stayed and helped him after the fall. We were led to believe no one was with him; that everyone ran to avoid the police. That was heartbreaking to me. We have since learned otherwise. Thank you to the young adults, police, first responders and to the medical personnel at Mount Pleasant Community Hospital. You all got him stabilized within the very critical first hour. That made a HUGE Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

difference to the outcome we see today. Yes, he drank too much that night. Yes, we had talked to him repeatedly. Yes, our own family and friends are responsible drinkers. No one is to blame but him. As someone said to us “What you do matters.” It matters whether you help or not, encourage or discourage your friends to drink, run or stay when trouble happens. It mattered when his friends visited constantly and encouraged his recovery both in and out of the hospital, rehab. facility and at home. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

It mattered once he got home who came over to just watch a game or show on TV. It mattered when his friends took him out to eat or just get ice cream. It mattered who texted me or him to get updates about his recovery. It mattered who sent cards and said prayers. It all mattered. He is where he is today because many, many people cared enough to do something that mattered. Take care of your friends. They are what matters. Laura Herrod Matt Herrod’s mother Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Brynn McDonnell Columnist

Promotion of hate?

There is a dangerous, potentially deadly, communicable disease among the youth in society. This disease can cause one to go blind to one’s surroundings, deaf to voices speaking and in the worst scenarios, death to the human heart. Apathy has the potential to be more potent than heart disease and carelessness; deadlier than cancer. Apathy is more dangerous than the indecent actions by the bigoted themselves. So when I am told to not protest the presence of the Westboro Baptist Church, I take the opposing comments into consideration. However, silence is as deadly as any method fringe hate groups have. I am not saying to meet the Westboro Baptist Church with pitchforks and anger, for anger is what they feed on. Their whole agenda is based on the premise of hate, and it would make no sense to meet them with it. At the same time, they have to be met nonetheless. It may bring attention to them and they do feed on this attention, but it is not ethical to simply act as though they aren’t here. Their presence cannot be ignored. Civil rights leaders met their opponents head-on and nonviolently repeatedly, and I see no difference in this case. In all honesty, I do not disapprove of their visit, and to completely remain isolated and apathetic of their visit as a strategy to protest them, I don’t see as being productive. The whole premise of their visit is to pursue a dialogue on the limits of free speech. What better way to exercise our free speech; speech that has an agenda of love and tolerance in retaliation against their agenda of bigotry? Any group invited to speak at Central Michigan University should be allowed to speak freely. The amazing thing about the First Amendment is that any group, regardless of others’ personal beliefs, can speak their mind. Fred Phelps and his family have an inalienable right to preach their bigoted hatred, and I do not deny that. I see no legal qualms in their expression, but we still must continue to meet them and use our rights to free speech to remind them they are not welcome here with their hateful ideologies. Meeting them in protest might not be a shocker or a surprise to the Phelps family, but if they are using their rights to spread hatred, why not use ours to spread love? I find this a much more efficient tool than apathy.

Brynn McDonnell is member of College Democrats. This column does not reflect the views of that organization.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || 5A

[News]

Ordinance| continued from 3A

“I don’t think it’s right, and I don’t think it’s right not to treat sexual orientation equally,” Kilmer replied. “But I don’t know that we can tell a church what we think is right. I think we’ve stepped over into their first amendment rights.” Some clarity as called for in other areas of the drafted law, such as the an exemption that addressed professional counseling services in the case counseling reasonably conflicts with “sincerely held religious beliefs.” Charlie Farnum, a local

United Methodist pastor who has been part of the group supporting the ordinance, sat in on Monday’s work session. He applauded the commission’s perseverance in discussion and decision to leave wording because, as he said, it would allow religious institutions to delegate use of its accommodations and facilities based on its mission. “It’s so that (churches) can say ‘We allow wedding receptions for male-female couples, but not male-male couples,’” Farnum said, ref-

erencing the length of time such a position been around. “It’s not like someone just (pulled) that out of a hat.” Commissioners opted to take time to reach out to members of the religious community for feedback and to continue to contemplate the draft, while minor changes to wording are considered. City Manager Kathie Grinzinger said an additional work session could be scheduled in the coming weeks, or a special work session, in order to keep development on a reasonable timeline. metro@cm-life.com

Zack Wittman/staff photographer

Asma Dammag, an immigrant from Yemen, speaks on Yemenese women’s rights at the Dinner Dialogue of Women in Yemen Monday evening on Calkins Hall’s terrace floor.

Dinner Dialogue Monday talks politics, stereotypes about women in Yemen By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

Fulbright Scholar and Yemen native Asma Dammag talked politics, education, culture, religion and stereotypes at a dinner dialogue Monday night. Starting at 6 p.m. Calkins Residence Hall hosted the dinner that discussed Women in Yemen and the Middle East. The free event featured a presentation by Dammag, who is finishing up a master’s degree in Teaching English as a Second Language this spring. After a majority of attendees had finished eating the traditional Middle Eastern meal that was served, Dammag opened up the dialogue. “What do you know about Yemen?” she asked the audience of 13. When few replied, she said Yemen is a country located in Southwest Asia with about 25 million people, whose main language is Arabic. “Yemen has been mentioned in all three celestial religions: Christianity, Judaism, Islam,” Dammag said. “It is in the Bible, Torah, Quran; mainly because of the story of the queen of Sheba who went to visit King Solomon.” She said contrary to what many believe, not all of the Arab world is wealthy. “We are not all rich. Majority of Arabs are poor or middle class.

HELLA| continued from 3A

“We are looking for somebody with strong leadership skills and experience in all areas of human resources,” Clark said. “This includes benefit administration, employee relations and employment and compensation. Somebody who has the ability to build positive re-

Tuition| continued from 3A

According to a budget breakdown sent via email by Roland, WMU spends 60 cents of each dollar in the general fund on academic activities, including instruction, academic advising and support and faculty research support. Approximately 21 cents of each dollar goes toward student activities, about

We are 22 countries — you cannot say we are all rich,” she said. “Currently, Yemen is considered a developing country. It is a poor country. We depend on oil a lot, but we don’t have that much oil, like Saudi Arabia.” Several audience members asked questions regarding women’s clothing, specifically scarves and veils. “One hundred years ago, even women here were wearing very long dresses,” Dammag said. “Kind of like the Amish or some religious Christian groups, it’s part of our religion that says ‘Don’t show off, be modest.’ Some are more conservative, other are more liberal.” She said she had some stereotypes of the U.S. before arriving, but soon realized they were not wholly true. “I cannot say everyone is George Bush,” Dammag said. “Everyone is different.” Dammag also discussed the current political situation in Yemen. “You grow up feeling like you have no future, no hope for a good education, no hope for jobs,” she said. “But these people are growing richer and richer and they are controlling everything. That was one of the main reasons that people started rebelling against them.” Dammag said it is frustrating that not all stories make it to the media.

“It’s very clear, because it’s not in the American’s benefit,” she said. “Like a poor country, what is the benefit? But for Saddam, they made him a Satan because there was benefit there; there was oil.” Dinner Dialogues are held about three times each semester on various topics, said Cathy Warner, Calkins Residence Hall director. “It’s a discussion and we can ask the questions that are uncomfortable, so we can break down those stereotypes and talk about the real issues,” she said. Jason Sarkozi said Dammag’s presentation was “very informative, eye-opening and had great food.” Sitting with his friends, Terri Eamsuk from Thailand and Elizabeth Hernandez from El Salvador, all three of whom are Central Michigan University graduate students, said they were friends with Dammag and asked many questions so everyone else could hear her answer. Calkins Hall will host its final Dinner Dialogue of the year at 6 p.m. April 18 in the Calkins Terrace Lounge. It will feature Sarkozi and his story about how he, a Michigan native, ended up in central China teaching Spanish. The event is free and food is provided.

lationships with employees and supervisors, somebody who has strong management skills, someone with experience in a higher education setting and someone with union experience.” University Stores Manager Mike Viers agreed and said although he had not met the other potential candidate, Hella seemed to be a perfect fit for the position. “Her experience here gives her a unique qualifi-

cation; no one else that’s going to step in from outside CMU has the firsthand experience that she has,” he said. “Her experience gives her a unique and invaluable perspective.” The next open forum, with finalist Mark Ankenbauer, will be held at 10 a.m. Friday in the Bovee University Center Lake Michigan Room.

14 cents per dollar goes toward administrative services and the rest is spent on university utilities and insurance. According to a document on Eastern Michigan University’s website, in the 2011 fiscal year, the public university of approximately 23,000 students in Ypsilanti spent more than $80 million on faculty salaries, more than $5 million on utilities and about $250,000 on scholarships. Michigan State University’s

budget breakdown was not received in time for publication. Burdette said the way CMU spends student tuition dollars is efficient and comparable to any university. “I’ll put our statistics up against anybody on how we spend our money in terms of efficiency,” Burdette said. “We spend more toward instruction and less on administration than a lot of other campuses.”

REFORM| continued from 3A

“I’ve served as interim since last July. I’m happy to continue in this role as long as ( Johnson) will have me, and when someone is chosen, that person will assume the duties I have now and I’ll go back to my old position,” Voisin said. In terms of the realignment of the rest of the office, the process is not complete. Johnson is working with both University President George Ross and Provost Gary Shapiro to develop strategic goals for each department in the office. “Strategic planning goals include updating videos, deciding how we can promote Central Michigan University in new venues that we haven’t taken advantage of, exploring responsive financial aid packages that suit the changing economy and student body and enhancing the advising experience,” Johnson said. “Additionally, we hope to provide more one-on-one experiences between students and advisers.” Once strategic goals are decided, Johnson said the Enrollment and Student Services Office will re-evaluate the process after a year or two.

“You can’t do everything in one cycle,” Johnson said. “You have to go through a year and then evaluate what’s working, what you need to tweak and make changes after that. Ultimately, we hope these changes will make things more seam-

less between the two divisions. We will be closer knit than ever has existed at the university, and students will see a beneficial outcome in the campus environment and experience.” university@cm-life.com

studentlife@cm-life.com

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6A || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[SPORTS] FOOTBALL

SOFTBALL

Players getting ready for spring game Saturday Scrimmage gives team chance to show off talent By Ryan Zuke Senior Reporter

The Central Michigan football team is entering its fifth week of practice this week and anticipation of the spring game has started to accumulate. There is one practice remaining before the spring game at 2 p.m. Saturday at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. “You always get excited for the spring game,” junior defensive end Kenny McClendon said. “People come out and you can show off what everyone’s been working on, give everyone a sneak preview of what’s coming next season.” Head coach Dan Enos said the spring game is more exciting for the players and fans than the coaching staff. “I think the spring game is fun for the players and fans, but the coaches don’t get as much of a thrill out of it,” Enos said. “We’re trying to get through it and make sure nobody gets hurt moving into the offseason. But it’s great for the players because they can

MIKE MULHOLLAND/PHOTO EDITOR

Sophomore Chelsea Sundberg earned the win in the second game of the double header against Oakland Tuesday at Margo Jonker Stadium. For more photos go to cm-life.com for a complete gallery.

Sweeping out Oakland Offense comes alive in mid-week double header

Scoreboard GAME ONE CMU 9 (18-16, 3-5 MAC) Oakland 1 (3-30)

By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

GAME TWO CMU 7 Oakland 6

The cold weather factored into a small attendance at the Central Michigan softball games Tuesday. Low temperatures did not, however, stop CMU from winning two games against Oakland University at Margo Jonker Stadium. CMU (18-16, 3-5 MidAmerican Conference) won the first game in a mercyshortened six-inning game 9-1. CMU won 7-6 in the second game.

Temperatures were recorded in the mid-40s and dropped to 41 by the end of the second game. Wind chill made temperatures “feel like” 35 degrees, according to The Weather Channel. Winds gusted up to 20 mph. Jonker said the cold weather and the possibility of players’ hands being numb was no excuse for CMU committing six errors. “That’s a good point to bring up, but I will have none of that,” Jonker said. “I’m sure they would like that excuse, but, no. They train to play in all types of weather.” Sophomore pitcher Chelsea Sundberg started the second game and pitched four innings. She gave up three runs on five hits and struck out four. She gave up no walks and earned the win. Abbie Richardson took the loss for Oakland.

GAME TWO Oakland (3-30) could not sustain a rally in the last inning of the second game that would have given them a much-needed win. The game was 7-3 going into the top of the seventh inning. CMU head coach Margo Jonker said it’s important to win games against softer opponents. “You always want to win both games,” Jonker said. “We needed to win those games. Oakland has had a tough year.”

GAME ONE Neither the cold nor the wind stopped senior pitcher Kara Dornbos from winning her ninth game of the season in the first game of the double header. She threw four shutout innings with four strikeouts and one walk en route to a 9-1 win. NCAA softball rules state the mercy rule in softball takes effect with at least an eight-run lead after the fifth inning. Sophomore pitcher Morgan Yuncker relieved Dornbos at the top of the fifth. She gave up OU’s only run and had one strikeout. Junior utility Summer Knoop led CMU with two RBIs. Senior infielder Molly Coldren, junior catcher Brogan Darwin and sophomore leftfielder Brittney Horan each had one RBI. Brittany Doyle took the loss for OU. She gave up three earned runs, three unearned on three hits. She walked four and struck out three. Katie Moy relieved Doyle in the third inning to finish the game. She gave up three runs, two unearned. CMU plays a double header beginning at 1 p.m. Friday at Toledo (10-24, 3-5 MAC).

“I think we’re going to have a quadruple threat.” Anthony Garyland, sophomore running back

said of the backfield get out in front of people and play.” The team previously scrimmaged for nearly the entire practice and ran about 100 plays. “We got a lot of situations in,” Enos said. “There were some mistakes, but for the most part, I thought it was very spirited. I thought defensively we played extremely well and were dominant in the early part Dan Enos of the scrimmage. Then the offense ended up turning the tides and got some big plays later in the game to win the scrimmage.” McClendon said he is pleased with how practice has gone so far and can see the team is focused on improving every day. “I think spring practice is going pretty good,” he said. “The offense is doing some good things; the defense is doing some good things, so we’re

working together as a team to work toward our goal, which is to win a MAC Championship.” Running back Anthony Garland said at this point, the offense is focusing on consistency. “We’re trying to accomplish rhythm,” he said. “We have most of our sets in, all our plays in, now we’re just trying to find that offensive rhythm where we just stay on beat and have everything come together.” Garland saw limited action this spring while rehabbing an ankle injury he sustained at the end of last season. He said he has been impressed with how the other running backs have performed thus far. “I think we’re going to have a quadruple threat,” Garland said. “We have four lethal weapons in the backfield and have a great blend of power, speed and elusiveness.” Garland, along with sophomore Austin White and juniors Zurlon Tipton and Tim Phillips, are all expected to see time at running back next season. sports@cm-life.com

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VIBE

Central Michigan Life

[ I N S I D E] w Read your weekly horoscope, 2B w Starting in Calkins Hall, Moses rocks Mount Pleasant, 3B w Mount Pleasant’s Bracken family bonded by music, 4B w Local band Wavvy Hands defies genre, moves forward, 5B w MOVIE REVIEW: ‘American Reunion’ too similar to old films, 5B

Section B

| Wednesday, April 11, 2012 w Student Government Association president Justin Gawronski joins in this week’s podcast for discussion of “American Reunion” and more

| cm-life.com

MOUNT PLEASANT: ROCK CITY?

“There’s a lot of Mount Pleasant bands. I can say, five years ago, that there weren’t as many bands as there are now.” Andrew Neal, Ugly Broads guitarist

and Mount Pleasant senior

MOSES

Plenty of talent, but not enough venues to maintain established scene Story by Sean Bradley | Staff Reporter Photos by Victoria Zegler | Staff Photographer Few bands make their way to Mount Pleasant, while local groups struggle to bring out crowds. While not completely unknown to the music world, the Mount Pleasant scene has seen better days. There are Internet rumors, seemingly confirmed by Henry Rollins’ writing, of legendary hardcore punk band Black Flag having played here at an unknown venue a couple of times in the mid-’80s. Grand Rapids ska band Mustard Plug does shows at Rubble’s Bar, 112 W. Michigan St., two or three times a year. Pop-rock group Cheap Trick played Soaring Eagle back in 2000, with the casino being a regular stop for groups past their prime. THE CURRENT CROP There is a growing scene of young bands emerging and becoming a part of Mount Pleasant’s musical landscape, though it remains to be seen whether they will stick around upon receiving recognition or, as others have in the past, leave for greener pastures. Bands like Anathallo, Stepdad and Frontier Ruckus have Mount Pleasant roots, but none ever seriously established themselves in the city. Beyond Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers, which features singer and acoustic guitarist Joe Hertler, a Lake Orion senior, which have become the most well-known Mount Pleasant band, exists a new and exciting group of bands. “There’s a lot of Mount Pleasant bands,” said local band Ugly Broads guitarist and Mount Pleasant senior Andrew Neal. “I can say, five years ago, that there weren’t as many bands as there are now.” Neal said bands have their work cut out for them when it comes to finding others to form a band with. “Here you have slim pickings of people (to) meet to find a band,” he said. “If you find the right people, and obviously the bands around here have, and they’re all motivating each other to do more, quicker.” Bands like Moses, consisting of students who live on campus, and Newday Dreamers, made up of former Mount Pleasant High School students, are examples of bands here with enough likeminded people who wanted to form a band. Ugly Broads have been a band for less than a year, while Newday Dreamers formed more than three years, each forging their own path. “We (Ugly Broads) want to play the cool places in Michigan and be known as a Michi-

U G LY BROADS

STEPDAD

W AV V Y HANDS

“You want to be a little bit bigger than what this town can sustain.”

gan band, not a Mount Pleasant band,” Neal said. “You want to be a little bit bigger than what this town can sustain.” So far, it seems the band is able to sustain is a small, yet inspired group of musicians. Corey Densmore, founder of Mount Pleasant music promotions company Diamonds in the Rough who books shows at Rubble’s, said the scene is growing and doing unique things. “There’s a lot of Mount Pleasant bands,” Densmore said. “They’re doing something different.” ONE PLACE TO PLAY Years before Rubble’s became the only venue in Mount Pleasant, there were several places to play shows, including The Wesley Center on the campus and a house venue called The Garage. “Every Friday night, there would be a bunch of kids there (at Wesley),” he said. “They would pack the place.” At Rubble’s, no one under 21 is admitted, even during shows. This rule has wide-ranging implications for bands as well as potential attendees. Jon Andrews, a Rubble’s employee from Saginaw, has worked at the bar for almost seven years. He said the decision to be exclusively 21 and older was tough, but necessary. “It was a decision we came to as a whole bar,” Andrews said. “‘Let’s make it 21 and over and just make it work.’” Several musicians offered their opinions on the 21 and up rule and how it affects their musical livelihoods. “At least half the people in the college town are under 21,” Hertler said. “For a smaller band that needs a good venue to play at, they won’t be able to get the 18-plus (stipulation).” Some bands from out-oftown who play here often, like Lansing’s Elliot Street Lunatic, have the ability to bring out a

crowd in Mount Pleasant. “For the most part when we go to Rubble’s to play, we’re on a show that’s going to have a good draw,” said Laingsburg native and Elliot Street Lunatic guitarist and singer Jason Marr. Marr also said Elliot Street Lunatic hasn’t played a show to a crowd in Mount Pleasant where the majority of the attendees were over 25 years old. “I would say that is the most important thing you can do about having a show in Mount Pleasant is to get the CMU students to come to the show and telling all their friends about (it),” he said. Cale Sauter, a Lansing resident and owner of record label Bermuda Mohawk Productions, co-promoted a few shows at Rubble’s with Densmore’s DITR several years ago. He thinks having fewer places to play will make people put more effort into playing and finding shows at home and in other towns. “Whenever they make music illegal for people who are 21 and under, it usually generates a lot of creativity,” Sauter said. “It generates a lot of people growing accustomed to working harder for it.” Traverse City sophomore Russell Tandy, a 20-year-old, said he would attend shows at Rubble’s if he could. “It makes me angry, because I want to enjoy good music and I can’t,” Tandy said. “At many bars, they just put X’s on your hands if you’re under 21 and it’s really frustrating when I can’t see any good shows because I’m not 21 yet.” Tandy said he usually attends shows in Grand Rapids or Detroit. “I feel that artists that I enjoy never come here,” he said. Novi junior Mark Ruhl, who is over 21, said he has been to a show at Rubble’s in the past, but doesn’t know of other venues in the area. He said all-ages shows work better for the crowds and the bands. “I have gone to a lot of shows that were all ages, and it was not different than the shows I’ve been to that are 21 and up,” Ruhl said. “Plus, the bands love it because it always brings in a larger crowd.” CONCERT ALTERNATIVES? The idea of having a new, allages venue in Mount Pleasant has been a much discussed, but often a leaderless topic. A CITY | 2B

MOUNT PLEASANT ARTIST COLLECTIVE

Andrew Neal, Ugly Broads guitarist

Formed with the goal of collaboration among musicians and artists in town. The group has held acoustic shows in Rubble’s Bar. It is currently inactive.

and Mount Pleasant senior

NEWDAY DREAMERS Formed in Mount Pleasant. The band has been playing gigs in town since their inception. Micah Bracken, the singer and rhythm guitarist, is the brother of Anathallo member Danny Bracken.

THE WESLEY CENTER The center ran hardcore and punk shows put on by Dead Weight Records label.

2000

‘01

ANATHALLO Formed in Mount Pleasant. Relocated to Chicago in the same year.

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UGLY BROADS Formed in Mount Pleasant. The band has played shows at Rubble’s and is currently working on a new album.

JOE HERTLER Begins playing in Mount Pleasant.

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DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH

JUSTICE RECORDS

The promotions company started in 2006 by Corey Densmore began to book shows in Mount Pleasant and other cities in Northern Michigan.

The store opens in January on 617 N. Mission St. and held live shows.

‘10

w Justice Records closes within two years of opening its doors.

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2012

w The Wesley Center hasn’t scheduled any shows to date. w Rubble’s Bar enforces 21+ admittance for shows.


2B || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

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By Andrew Dooley | Student Life Editor

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Indie rock fans: stop acting like I dropkicked a kitten every time I haven’t heard of some Swedish industrial-folk band that released two singles before committing mass suicide in a burning go-kart. Don’t worry, even if I had “all” their stuff, you would make the exact same shotin-the-lung hissy exhalation because of how mind-shattering the B-sides are. But even then they will ask if you’ve heard their early stuff. Hint: you have never heard their early stuff. Sometimes these people make me wish LMFAO was the only band on Earth.

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I love the guts CMU has to charge graduating seniors $55 for a cap and gown. One last dip into my wallet before I escape. Maybe I can return every textbook I purchased over the course of 10 semesters in exchange for a 30 percent discount on a glorified disposable poncho.

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Friday night in downtown Detroit city I attempted karaoke for the first time. I realized two very important lessons: 1) Karaoke is the only possible reason country music is so popular (anyone can sing “aand I loove my flaaagg and my dooogsss and stuffff” and make it sound okay) and 2) “Monster Mash” is probably not a tune for early April; the crowd did receive that graveyard smash happily.

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I spent part of Easter weekend watching “Die Hard with a Vengeance” with my family. This largely meant trying to watch the movie while my Dad got really excited and told us to watch the movie. “Woah! Did you see that? Look at that? Watch this part, see what’s in his hand?” Dad it’s a movie! What do you think I was doing? Sorry, for that part I totally had my eyes closed! I forgot how to watch movies for a second! What did it say on the weird sandwich board they made him wear? Really? Wow!

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It’s time for people giving directions from the passenger seat to completely abandon the word “right” when they mean “correct.” Do I take a left here? Right. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN. A list of words to use instead: affirmative, yes, indeed, absolutely, please, oh how wise of you to know to take a right here. I refuse to let this carpool situation turn into an Abbott and Costello routine. How selfish of you. Get out of my car.

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The Binturong is a South-East Asian species of “not bears” that sort’ve resemble furry, black versions of my nightmares. According to Wikipedia, “The scent of binturong musk is often compared to that of warm buttered popcorn[3].” I don’t have a punchline for that.

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Facebook acquired Instagram for a cool $1 billion this week. The billion dollars wasn’t cool, it was actually warmish and a little obnoxious, until Mark Zuckerberg took a tinted picture of it that made the warehouse full of green look even greener and posted it on his Facebook with the caption “lunch lol.” Ma r2 Is this the collective noun for a group 1 s e of people named Ari? I love collective nouns. Some of my favorites are a business of ferrets, a murder of crows or a failure of CMU Public Relations administrators.

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I had to use a mechanical pencil sharpener in class the other day, because somehow a purple colored pencil was the only writing implement left in my backpack. As I was whirring away, obnoxiously interrupting class, I realized that crappy wall-mounted crank pencil sharpeners are outdated, unattractive and barely functional, which means they are light years ahead of the redesigned cmich.edu.

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The Internet tells me researchers are only two years away from a reasonably affordable staircase attachment that will act as a lift for overweight dogs, which I thought was an interesting way of announcing to the world that a cure for cancer has been developed. Wait ... what? Jul 23 I don’t think it’s safe for human consumption, but I went out of town for a few days and the cole slaw in my fridge decided to make me even more cole slaw! Free food! It’s in the dumpster behind Douglas Street if you want some.

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People who like creamy peanut butter are idiots. Don’t date them, don’t talk to them and absolutely refuse to construct ants on a log with them. It will taste horrible. Like salty caulk. Oh, you like creamy because the texture is better? Eat yoghurt, clown. Stop wasting our time.

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In addition to his duties as Student Life Editor, Andrew Dooley has received all of your hate mail. If you consulted the classic 1987 manual “McKninzies Guide to Stars and other Wondrous Spheres,” you would realize the incredible relevance of these projections to both the Standarde Charte of Staeres (4th Revision) and your own miserable life.

studentlife@cm-life.com

A group called The Mount Pleasant Artists Collective, which includes Densmore and Hertler, has discussed the possibility of a new venue in the area. “Let’s have a venue that can also double as a practice space, so there’s always something going on there,” Densmore said. Jon Miller, a senior from Bloomfield Hills and promotions director for 91.5 WMHWFM, said colleges and house shows go together. “College towns need to have house shows all the time somewhere,” Miller said. “You need to have a house close to campus and downtown.” Miller also books shows as part of 91.5 FM’s Modern Rock and Bowl monthly concert series at the Riverwood Resort, 1313 E. Bloomfield Road. Bands like Howell’s Good Weather for Airstrikes, Lansing’s Frank and Earnest and Mount Pleasant’s Ugly Broads have played the event. “I just booked a show for the Rock and Bowl and we had an ad in the paper, and it still wasn’t the turnout I wanted,” he said. “It’s harder to get people to come off campus.” Central Michigan University Program Board Concert Chairman Jordan Benghiat, a Southfield junior, said he would love to see more local acts involved with the university’s entertainment. “I don’t think necessarily we wouldn’t ever consider it,” Benghiet said. “If anything, I think we should promote them.” Adam Marth, a Brighton senior who plays guitar in Newday Dreamers and drums in The Deep End, said house shows could potentially do better than a night at Rubble’s. “House shows bring more people than a night at Rubble’s,” Marth said. “I think that those have more of an impact.” Neal said he thinks bands should go on campus and play stripped-down versions of their songs. “Just go on campus with your acoustics and a hand drum and a stack of CDs and a

stack of fliers,” he said. Moses percussionist and singer Eddy Pendegrast, a sophomore from Royal Oak, said the band would play for friends or play a set outside their residence hall. “We’ve played a few sets outside our hall and people have told us afterward we sound great,” Pendegrast said.

Future oF mount Pleasant musiC? With an exclusively 21-plus venue in Rubble’s Bar, a lack of real places to play shows, a few bands making waves and a disconnected but potentially huge student fan-base, where is the music scene in Mount Pleasant headed? Some say the school graduating classes every four years has a massive effect on the local music scene. Brighton senior Andrew Price, who has played open mic shows at Kaya Coffee & Tea Co., 1029 S. University Ave., said once bands graduate from college, new bands have to come in. “It’s very cyclical,” Price said. “I think people will recognize when a lot of bands leave and try and fill that void, hopefully.” Hertler said because the scene is a cycle, it’s important for the bands to support each other. “It’s a small town, so everyone kind of really needs to work together,” he said. “They need to support each other.” He also advocates for newer bands to play as much as possible at events run by registered student organizations and open mic nights. “You’re not going to get paid, but it’s a great way to get your name out there,” he said. “You’re going to get better for playing those.” Mount Pleasant resident and former Those Transatlantics member Kathleen Bracken said the desire to create and play music is what drove her, bands like Black Flag, promoters like Densmore and is what motivates the current crop of musicians. “If there are any students that are playing music, even if they don’t think it’s good, they should be playing it,” she said. “Until they get asked to stop.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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Tufts university duo

Timeflies to make debut April 22

By Paulina Lee Staff Reporter

Victoria zegler/staff photographer

Flint sophomore Tyler Morley, left, shakes hands with St. Clair Shores sophomore Nate Zinzi after band practice March 19 in the Music Building.

Starting small in Calkins Hall, Moses rocks Mount Pleasant By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

Dorm rooms are not ideal places for a rock band to form, write and practice. But in the beginning, Moses, a Central Michigan Universitybased folk rock band, didn’t have much say in the matter. “All we had were our acoustic guitars,” said acoustic guitarist John Schaeffer. Schaeffer, along with friend and band co-founder Nathan Zinzi, are sophomores from St. Claire Shores and live together with Royal Oak sophomore and percussionist Eddy Pendegrast in Calkins Residence Hall. Schaeffer and Zinzi started the band when they came to CMU last fall. They had been in a band together called Category in high school, and have now lived and played together in Calkins Hall for two years. Because they could only write music on acoustic guitars, the music they composed reflected their constraints. “We wrote more relaxed music,” Schaeffer said.

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || 3B

The band came together in the fall of 2010 and played their first show in April 2011 at a concert hosted by Moore Media Records. Zinzi, the band’s lead singer and acoustic guitarist, said Moses has since played about 10 shows around Michigan. The band also features four other members, all CMU students, who add layers and the ability for people in the band to switch instruments. “We love layers,” Zinzi said. “We want to incorporate a lot of different sounds.” Pendegrast said the ability to switch instruments between band members adds to the group’s creativity. “That definitely helps us with creating new ideas and songs and opens a lot of options for us, which works out pretty well,” he said. Pendegrast said he played clarinet in middle school and has been playing the drums since 2007. Schaeffer, who also plays the drums, said playing different instruments helps him write interesting parts for the band.

“I’m a drummer and I take that and write songs on guitar that are really percussive,” he said. “It brings different styles together.” The band practices about five times a week, sometimes in the Music Building, and rarely still in their dorm. “We’re all very committed,” Pendegrast said. “Even with school and work, we find time for everybody to come practice.” Pendegrast said the band wants to keep playing shows wherever they can, even playing acoustic sets outside their hall. Playing with many different bands like Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers and Wavvy Hands has helped Moses gain contacts and confidence as a band. “Without them (other bands), I don’t think we could get out there,” Pendegrast said. “A lot of bands today depend on successful bands to be successful. “I want to get Moses to be known by word of mouth,” he said. “I want to get to that next step.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Once described as “two babyfaced former frat boys” by the New York Post, a duo of Tufts University alumni make up the electronic music group Timeflies. Timeflies, composed of Caleb Shapiro and Robert Resnick, will be performing for the first time in Michigan at 9 p.m. April 22 at Wayside Central, 2000 S. Mission St. Chase Fitzpatrick said once he heard Timeflies was coming to Central Michigan University, he knew he wanted to see them. “I found them on the Internet one day when I was surfing YouTube,” the Lexington sophomore said. “They’re really good the way they remix songs, bring their own styles and all the instruments they use.” Shapiro, known by most as Cal, is from New York and Resnick, known as Rez, is from New Jersey. They both attended college in Boston and agreed college had a big impact on them. “We were both music majors, so obviously we were both exposed to classical music, a decent amount of jazz, an abundance of theory and a bunch of different performance classes,” Rez said. “Drums, piano for me, Cal for singing, I think it definitely helped.” “I think being in college in general is great,” Cal said. “You sort of have a mentality that is associated with the kind of music we’re making — we’re just partying and listening to music, while getting f***** up. ‘Cause we are making music for people who like to get f***** up. It was great.” The two both said they still listen to classical music. “If we’re in a weird city and can’t find a station we like, very often we’ll find a classical station and end up spending some time there,” Rez said. The pair met at party in college while Cal was freestyling. Cal said Rez asked him to come sing for his funk band. After, Timeflies was born. “We were pretty much big pieces of s*** and never could

really get our act together and people would call us Timeflies because we were never on time and really had no concept of time,” Cal said. Vanity Fair described the two as “musical masterminds of electro-pop-hip-hop-rap.” They describe their music as “electro hip-pop, dub-something.” “The idea was that we don’t fit into any typical genre, so we just wanted to try to throw other genre names into one — it was a hodge-podge of words,” Cal said. “We’ll put on an acoustic track, then a dubstep track; there was just nothing we could put our finger on. So we just threw words together.” Some may recognize their music, which was played during FOX’s presentation of the Cotton Bowl. Most know the band for “Timeflies Tuesday,” where the group releases a new song to their YouTube channel every Tuesday. The idea came from a brain-

storming session after their first couple of songs had come out. “One of the guys was saying, ‘You guys should make a video of what you guys do in the studio, since you guys just sit there and f*** around and people would love to watch that,’” Rez said. Timeflies agreed they are working on a mixtape that will hopefully come out next month, featuring sample-based music, a lot like their “Timeflies Tuesday” songs, and a new album should be out at the end of the year. The two said they are very excited to have added Michigan to their Midwest tour and gave a message to their fans. “We just want to thank everyone for their continued support and we can’t wait to get out there,” Cal said. “We’re definitely thrilled that this is happening.” General admission tickets can be purchased for $15 at timefliescentral.eventbrite.com. metro@cm-life.com

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4B || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

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[VIBE]

Mount Pleasant’s Bracken family bonded by music By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

More than anything else, music ties Mount Pleasant’s Bracken family together. Even though they’ve grown apart physically over the years, with some children moving to different parts of the country, the family members are bonded by their affinity for a charming chord or great vocal harmony. “It was always there,” said Kathleen Bracken, the secondoldest of four siblings. Kathleen has played in nationally touring bands Those Transatlantics and Cameron McGill & What Army. Their father, Daniel Bracken, Sr., was always playing guitar around the house, which was filled with other instruments too, making live music around the house a constant. “My dad had a banjo, a hammered dulcimer, baby grand piano,” Kathleen said. “That just seemed like it was something we were going to do. It was just kind of our lifestyle.” Even though the music the family was exposed to was more on the folk and roots

“I feel really fortunate for the family that I have; the musical influence that we have,” Danny Bracken side early on, they all have very different musical styles. The youngest, Micah, currently plays in Mount Pleasant rock band Newday Dreamers. He also took piano lessons as a child for five years and is mostly self-taught on the guitar. “My dad was always playing music around the house; was always playing the guitar,” Micah said. “My sister taught me the first basic songs on piano.” The Newday Dreamers have played many shows in the Mount Pleasant area at places like Rubble’s Bar, 112 W. Michigan St., and Kaya Coffee & Tea Co., 1029 S. University Ave., but Micah and the rest of the band have plans to play other places as well. “I’m not planning on staying in Mount Pleasant,” he said. “It’ll definitely depend on how well the band is doing.” He said he’s almost expect-

ed to tour nationally because of the amount of touring his siblings have done in the past. “I’d love to tour nationally at some point,” he said. Micah and Kathleen’s brother Danny played in Mount Pleasant band Anathallo from 2004 until the band’s dissolution in 2010. Anathallo toured across the country many times, and performed in Europe and Japan. “I feel really fortunate for the family that I have; the musical influence that we have,” said Danny, the second youngest. The oldest sibling, Ben, currently lives in California, where he composes and performs accoustic and electronic music and creates soundbased installation art. The holiday season is when the family sees each other the most; the time when ideas of a musical collaboration are of-

Brooke Mayle/staff photographer

Kathleen Bracken, left, laughs with her younger brother Micah, both of Mount Pleasant, between songs during their performance March 12 at Art Reach, 111 E. Broadway St.

ten swapped. “There’s pretty much music non-stop around the holidays when we’re together,” Kathleen said.

Micah said music is a strong part of the Bracken family’s identity. “There’s always been a great tradition of music in my

Archana started in Midland, taking on Midwest

Victoria Zegler/Staff Photographer

Midland junior Jacqui Hoyle, lead singer of Archana, performs live alongside her younger brothers Michigan State University sophomore Zack, 19, and Midland sophomore Randall, 20, during the Rockshow at The Wayside March 30, 2011. By Sam Easter Staff Reporter

Up-and-coming hard rock outfit Archana isn’t the standard metal group. The band’s work is a hardhitting journey through crunchy guitar, rapid-fire drum licks and the occasional soaring guitar solo, topped with mostly clean vocals and the occasional trumpet. Although for the moment they’re scattered across the Midwest, Archana’s current members have been playing together for several years. Midland junior Randall Hoyle plays trumpet and guitar, while his sister Jacqui Hoyle covers vocals and his brother Zack Hoyle plays guitar. Drummer Nathan Brandt and bassist Sean Stout complete the lineup. One of the band’s talking points is how much its members bring something unique to the table. Although Jacqui finds herself singing for a hard-rock band, she’s had classical vocal training. Randall brings trumpet into an arena unused to horns; Zack adds a guitar style more typical of metal bands. In terms of their approach to the music, Archana keeps things in perspective. “We’re not really one of those bands that are like ‘Oh, we’re

going to make it big,’” Jacqui said. “We’re more into self-expression.” Their live shows are an extension of that attitude. “We do everything we can to make it fun,” Randall said. He said Cincinatti alternative-rock group Foxy Shazam is their biggest influence for their stage presence, with some of the best live shows he’s ever seen. “People come out of their way to see us and we do everything we can to make it worth their while,” Randall said. Brandt agreed. “It’s almost like acting,” he said. “Who we are onstage is not who we are offstage. It’s more like superhero versions of ourselves, if that makes any sense.” History At first, Archana was only put together for fun, and then later stayed together for small events like a high school battle of the bands, but things slowly became more serious. In 2009, their work won a battle of the bands contest in Coleman and clinched some free recording time at Elm Street Recording in Lansing. From there, it’s taken them toward a more professional style of playing. “That experience was good,”

Randall said of the band’s first time in the studio. It was the first time he’d ever heard the band on a playback, and he said it gave him a new perspective on the group’s work. But, he added, “that album wasn’t where we wanted to be. We were restricted by money and we couldn’t put the money into it to make a really, really great (album).” And so the group went back to work, sometimes writing three or four songs in a day. About a year later, Archana recorded the double album “Roundabout”, released in 2011. Roundabout Albums Randall describes “Roundabout 1” as a by-the-book rock album more inspired by his simpler writing style, while “Roundabout 2” is closer in line with guitarist Zack’s fast-paced and frenetic style of playing. “That’s where we put all the weird stuff,” Randall said. The second of the “Roundabout” albums starts off with an arabesque lick on “The Monster with 21 Faces” before jumping into “Light,” a split-personality piece that heads from a quick-paced, off-rhythm drum opener into snappy verses and a sudden shift to a more soaring idea in the middle. And for those who aren’t into the hard-rock scene, the band also released “Roundabout: The Instrumentals.” It’s essentially the same songs minus the vocal tracks, and has a more musical feel. Their latest single, “Brobot” (February 2012), offers up an uncharacteristically techno-flavored track. What’s next Their next show is May 28 at the Main Street Pub in Saginaw. In the meantime, the band has its docket full. In terms of writing new music, Brandt said the band has a lot of potential for future creative development, from making more acoustic music to reaching out

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to hip-hop artists. “I want to do everything,” he said. “I want Archana to be a one-stop-shop for any kind of music and mood you’re looking for.” Randall agreed the band’s creative muse likes to explore. “We just want to be different every time,” he said. “I don’t know if we’re moving toward anything, we’re just moving to however we go.” Through the process, the band remains enthusiastic about their work. “There’s no feeling, experience or drug that can make you feel as good as playing music and expressing yourself with your four best friends,” Brandt said.

house,” he said. “In general, the appreciation for music is always there.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, April 11, 2012 || 5B

[VIBE]

Local band Wavvy Hands defies genre of fold music

Movie review

By Sean Bradley Staff Reporter

By Jordan LaPorte Staff Reporter

‘American Reunion’ too similar to old films

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Music has a way of bringing “American Reunion” does exactly what the title impeople with their ideas, histoplies; it brings together all of ries and goals together to form the characters from the core something bigger than the sum “American Pie” movies for of the parts. more vulgar and outrageous Mount Pleasant’s Wavvy shenanigans. Hands, currently comprised of The result MI is 48859 a comedy local promoter Corey Densmore, Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, • www.cm-life.com that’s enjoyable enough, but originally from Jackson, and one that is Classifi also too predictMount Pleasant native Andrew a Classified Ad Placing ed Ad Policy & Rates able, corny and similar to the Kauervane, came about in just CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflanything ects discrimination because past films for to feel such a way. Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad By Phone: and 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or fresh. Victoria Zegler/Staff Photographer Densmore Kauervane discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media By both Fax:on 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Theof film stars Jason Biggs, for Kauervane songs were a bill last August Mount Pleasant residents Corey Densmore, left, and Andrew Board, is notperform in keeping with the standards CM Life. CM Life will be responsible type are available along errors debut only to the extent of cancelling charge theawkspace used Website: www.cm-life.com reprising histhe role as for the forBy solo acts at Rubble’s Bar, 112 from their band Wavvy Hands new EP “Our Classy Lifestyle”typographical during the bands 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only ward Jimbe picked Levenstein, who W.In Michigan St.,436 but Moore for reasons two-piece folk Any credit 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. Person: Hall show Aug. 25, 2011 at Rubbles Bar, 112 W. Michigan Street. Thethe first dateelectronic of publication. due can up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the once ad. If you find an finds error, report it to the Classifi ed again himself in they Hours: couldn’t control, Kauervane band from Mount Pleasant formed in August 2011. 13+ Issues: $7.00 perPhoto issueCourtesy of Rotten Tomatoes Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. plenty of troublesome situcouldn’t play the show by himations. He is joined by Sean hanging out together just self, so the two decided to play something that not everyone travel by your music supporting REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING OPEN ATseem WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ‘American ,together. Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt.does Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI progress 48859 Hall, CMU, •awww.cm-life.com Mt.traveling.” Pleasant, MIDAY! 48859 • www.cm-life.com doesn’t to be very beWilliam Scott ALWAYS as Stifler, Edelse helps that your die Kaye Thomas as Finch, lievable all around. It feels WMHW - 91.5FM Promotions “It was only supposed to be a little bit further.” Reunion’ aone-off Classifi Ad ed Ad Densmore Policy said &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Nicholas Rates as Kev- more like watching a group Thomas Ian being dynamDirector Jon Miller, a senior from showed soClassifi we both could of guys read lines from a in and Chris Klein as Oz. stay obligated to that show,” ic helps the band from a writing Bloomfield Hills, filled in on keyept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will discrimination knowingly accept because advertising reflects discrimination Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum classifi ad other, as opscript to ed each The funniest scenes from per standpoint as well asnot areligion, booking boards for which two tours lastminimum fall forbecause Densmore said. tional origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or standpoint. the band. helped re- Mediathe movie involve either Jim posed to a bunch of high Afterwhich theisdiscontinue, show, both Densvertising in the opinion without of the notice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media whichMiller is in the also opinion of the Student italic and Bold,1-2 italic and centered Bold, italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue emore standards CM Board, Life. CM is not Life inwill keeping be with responsible with the standards for of CM Board, Life.in CM isanot Life inwill keeping be fine; responsible with thecord standards for the Bold, of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will foror Stifler. schooltypefriends getting it’s Jim “We can play bar just band’s debut EP$7.75 ,beasresponsible anper issue andofKauervane (along w Genre: Comedy type are the available type areWhether available along are available along toe extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge along for the space used om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue withfor other special features withcaught other special features other specialapart features after being for a naked in the getherwith playand a rendered theater, weis limited can advanced au- to onlygetting keyboard player Nadia Leatz, w Rating: R ch an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to we only an can error. Credit for such an error valueless by such to assignment only an error. Credit foran such an error is limited like ad like ad attractors. 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per 7-12 Issues:or$7.25 per issue y credit has due can the befipicked rstleft dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any offi credit ce coffee due can the befipicked rst Issues: date up of at publication. the CM Life Any offi credit ce production duelike canad beattractors. picked up at the CM Life offiissue cekitchen long time. yetattractors. again Stifler play shops, house shows,” dio course. who since the band) f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 issue Issues: 13+ per issue Oz may be the worst of evdefecating inIssues: a cooler$7.00 owned Densmore said. “It helps us beper Miller said13+ there were manyper issue began playing shows in Mount p.m. ya.m.-5 responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. by high school kids, Jim and eryone, not because he isn’t Suvari as Heather. Pleasant and around the state, more diverse in that aspect. We highlights on the two separate Central Michigan Life •aAT 436 Moore Hall, and CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Stifler able to make those funny, but because he is so have lot WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS more options tours he with the band, all the while formulating bigger OPEN “American Reunion” isn’t 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS ALWAYS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN ATplayed WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN ATareWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS scenes funny regardless of corny and bogus during the really concerned with the places to play.” especially playing in Milwaukee goals. a Classifi edwe Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates how similar the humor may dramatic scenes that it is al- female characters though. Having independently re- at Art Bar. “I think that both really Michigan Life • an 436EPMoore Hall, CMU, Mt. 48859 • www.cm-life.com most unbearable at times. seem to the past films. last year called “It Pleasant, was a reallyMI good show,” They’re really just there to wanted to doCentral out-of-state shows leased CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15MI word minimum classified adReunion” has move the plot along whenevFinch, Kevin and Oz are a per “American the religion, band hasor national he “It was the bestHall, show we pretty bad, and it was like a really “A Million Eyes,” Central Michigan Lifesaid. • 436 Moore CMU, Mt. 48859 • www/cm-life.com of race, color, sex origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or Pleasant, aeasy Classifi ed Adthe type of toured extensively, Classifi ed Ad Policy & Rates plenty of problems in general er it’s convenient for the film. playing playedwhich of those shows inofathe row.” discontinue, without notice, advertising is in the opinion Student Mediadifferent story. None of them way to get across Bold, italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible forgive incredibly when it comes to Classifi its dramatic bad perforshows as far typographical as North Carolina. Wavvy Hands will release their music Placing we wanted to,abyClassifi working ed Michelle has a pretty Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy ed Even Ad Rates type are available along CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which refl ects discrimination because errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other specialoff features of race, color,you religion, or such national origin, and Life reserves theisright to reject ormances; instead they’re just portions coming as in- sparse role, and she’s mar“It definitely makes feelsex renewest EP onCM April 12 Rubble’s together,” Kauervane said. and rendered valueless by an error. Credit for such anat error limited to only like ad attractors. discontinue, notice, advertising which is advertising in opinion of the Student CM without Life will not knowingly accept which discrimination because ofof race, color,are religion, 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue firstscope date of of publication. AnyBar, credit due can bethe picked up at therefl CMects LifeMedia officebland. All Rates: 15 and word minimum ad character. credibly cheesy, but Oz takes per them your things with Farwell band Delightriedclassifi to theed main Playing a brand of folk music ally small in the Bold, italic centered 1-2three Issues: $7.75advertising per issue By Phone: 989-774-3493 Board,30 issex not in keeping with the standards of CM CM Life will right be for within days termination of the ad. IfCM you findLife. an error, report it toresponsible the orof national origin, and Life reserves the to Classifi rejected or discontinue, without notice, type available along 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue things to aare completely differinvolved in some amusing and your place in the world,” fuls and Lansing hip-hop artists In the end, “American Rewhich incorporates electronic a.m.-5 p.m. typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue whichvalueless is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 with other special features Bold, italic and leave 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue and rendered by such an error. Credit for such an error limited to onlymoments of cheese. during the film, ent level James “Philthy” Gardin andisextent Joshelements and keyboards, Kauer- Kauervane said. union” will probably attractors. be responsible forAny typographical errors only to of cancelling the charge for the space 7-12 Issues: $7.25used perand issue like ad centered type are the first date of publication. credit due can be picked up the at the CM Life office By said Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues:from $7.50the per issue The love interests but those moments are easily Densmore said getting to tour ua “J.Young the General” Smith. audiences with a smile vane the band is striving for within 30rendered days of termination the ad. Ifan you find Credit an error, to the Classifi ed 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN available along with on valuelessofby such error. forreport suchitan error is limited toAT onlyWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS the date of publication. 13+firstIssues: $7.00 per Any issue a.m.-5 p.m. Issues: $7.25 issuefaces, In Person: 436 Moore Hall had its perksDept. past films7-12 return as well. Aly-per their funimmediately. arebe only responsible the firstLife day’s though. Tickets $5 and the show is 21 thatfeatures smile will a new sound. otherbut special credit dueWe can picked upare atfor the CM offiinsertion. ce within 30 days ofovershadowed termination of theby ad.much If you find an error, 13+ Issues: per issue is back $7.00 as Jim’s nier thatinsertion. happen in- son Hannigan “It’s fun to play for newit people years oldimmediately. an up. “We strive Monday-Friday to make it be that 8 a.m.-5 likely wear quickly. likeoff adrather attractors. report to the Classifi ed Dept. We are only responsible for things the first day’s Hours: p.m. 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS OPEN AT different WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS wife Michelle, along with volving characters. introduce moreDAY! people to kind of undefinable genre,” Kau- and Tara AT ReidWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS as Vicky and Mena studentlife@cm-life.com Seeing the group of guys your music,” he said. “YouEACH get to studentlife@cm-life.com ervane said. “IMORE think trying to do 32,000 REACH THAN READERS PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN

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Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

ed Policy Ad Classified Ad Policy Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classified Ad Rates Classified Ad Rates ,discrimination Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com wingly acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad

gin, ect or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per cancelling ypographical the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the are space used and centered type om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue ept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: word per classifi ed available along by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto an only error. the Credit fi15 rst date for such of minimum publication. an error is limited Any to only the fiad rst date of with publication. Any ational origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features ays picked of termination up at the of Life the credit ad. office Ifof due you within find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, vertising which is inCM the opinion thecan Student Media Bold, italic and centered Issues: $7.00 perissue issuefor the Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per onsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. firstLife. day’s report insertion. Wewill are it to the Classifi responsible ed for the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s insertion. We are only responsible fi13+ rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 eifistandards of CM CM Life beonly responsible for Dept.

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CentralHall, Michigan LifePleasant, • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Central Michigan Life • AT 436WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Moore CMU, Mt. MIALWAYS 48859 • www/cm-life.com like WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ad attractors. 7-12 Issues: per issue AT 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY!$7.25 OPEN OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 13+ $7.00 per issue Placing a Classifi edIssues: Ad ed Classifi eded AdAd Policy & Rates HELP Classifi WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FOR RENT ed Ad Ad Policy Classifi Rates Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad CM Life will not knowingly advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, ALWAYS OPENaccept AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM15 Life word reservesminimum the right to reject or classified ad Rates: per discontinue, notice, advertising which is in theTO opinion of the Student Media SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves theed right Ad to reject or discontinue, withoutwithout notice, advertising PETS PETS ed Ad Classifi Policy Classifi ed Ad Rates WANTED TO RENT WANTED RENT By Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for

e extent of cancelling the charge for the space used ch an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only ny credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified y responsible for the first day’s insertion.

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1-2 Issues: per issue type are available along typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge$7.75 for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6ad Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features CMresponsible Life will not for knowingly accepterrors advertising reflects of the race, color, religion, be typographical only towhich the extent of discrimination cancelling the because charge for space used and centered type are Rates: word minimum per ed and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for15 such an error is limited only classifi om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 pertoissue sexMoore or national origin, and an CM Life Credit reserves to reject or discontinue, notice, advertising available along with rendered valueless by such error. for the suchright an error is limited to only the rst date dateofof publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per MOTORCYCLES issue like ad attractors. ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL In Person: 436 Hall the fi fiwithout rst publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office MOTORCYCLES 7-12 Issues: per issue NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT SPACE SPACE SPACE FOR SALE SALE FOR SALE within 30 days termination of theOFFICE ad. IfFOR you find an error, report it$7.25 to theper Classifi edOFFICE other special features which is in the of the Student Media Board, is not 30 in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CMan Life will credit due canopinion be picked upFOR at the CM Life offi ce within days ofOFFICE termination ofSALE the ad. Ifofyou find error, Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Dept. immediately. We are onlyand responsible for 13+ the firstIssues: day’s insertion. $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. be responsible for typographical errors onlyWe to the of cancelling forinsertion. the space used report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. are extent only responsible for the ficharge rst day’s a.m.-5 p.m. centered type are om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will

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You S

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES COREWANTED TO RENT FOR SALE SPECIAL SECTION PETS AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES HELPApartments WANTED as lowGARAGE SALES as PERSONALS SPECIAL SECTION PETS A MONTH! HAPPY ADS TRAVEL1, 2, or 3 MOTORCYCLES Bedroom

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SPECIAL SECTION TRAVEL

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3300 EAST DEERFIELD ROAD

773-3300

772-4032

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Park Place

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|| Wednesday, Apr. 2012•||www.cm-life.com Central Michigan Life cm-life.com/news U,6B Mt. MI 11, 48859 n Life •Pleasant, 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

Classifi Policy & Rates fied Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi eded AdAd ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

Classified Ad Rates

Classifi

ept advertising which reflects because Rates: 15 CM word minimum per classifi ed ad owingly accept advertising CMdiscrimination Life which willrefl notects knowingly discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 CM word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu ational origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or gin, and CM Life reserves sex or the national right to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising dvertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Bold, italic and centered 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue onstandards of the Student Media which Board, is in is the not opinion in keeping of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of and CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will he of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p type are available along he extent of cancelling charge forextent the space used ypographical errorsthe only be to responsible the for of typographical cancelling the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and charge for the are space used and type are type centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p ch an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only available along available along available along with by such an error. Creditrendered for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit firstIssues: rendered date for such of publication. an valueless errorper is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of with publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publication. Any like ad attractors. 7-12 $7.25 issue ny credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office

By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: 989-774-7805 omBy Website: www.cm-life.comBy Website: www.cm-life.com Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue In up Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: Moore Hall other special other special features picked at the Life credit offi ce due within can be days picked of termination up at the CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the credit ad. office Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. offifeatures ce If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, of the ad. If you findCM an error, report it to the30 Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. like ad attractors. sifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 ya.m.-5 responsible for the first day’s insertion.

7-12 Issues: $7.25 other special features 13+ $7.00 like adIssues: attractors.

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com ALWAYS OPEN ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates

ifieds Classifieds By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall WANTED NOTICES TO RENT 8 a.m.-5 WANTED NOTICES TO RENT FOR SALE FOR Hours: Monday-Friday p.m. SALE

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE

WANTED OFFICE TO SPACE RENT NOTICES FOR SALE

REACH THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &MORE FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered type are available along 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. OFFICE SPACE OFFICE SPACE NOTICES FOR FOR SALE 13+SALE Issues: $7.00 per issue

ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS AUTOS SALE OPEN AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND

HELP HELP GARAGE SALES SALES FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT MIGHTY MINISGARAGE

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION PETS

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

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REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

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PERSONALS

COORD/ STUDENT CONDUCT & BEGRAPHIC DESIGNER UNIVERSITY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/ MID-MICHISUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS HAVIORAL INTERVENTION. Student COMMUNICATIONS. P&A-3. ReGAN REGIONAL AREA HEALTH WANTED! CAMP COUNSELORS Life. P&A-3. Required: Bachelor's dequired: Bachelor's degree or equivaEDUCATION CENTER College of WANTED for private Michigan gree, 3 years experience. Applicants lent, 1 year experience. Applicants Medicine. Required: Bachelor's deboys/girls overnight camps. Teach LEAGUE OF must apply online at must apply online at gree, preferably in business adminiswimming, canoeing, water skiing, sailWOMEN VOTERS® www.jobs.cmich.edu. Screening bewww.jobs.cmich.edu. Screening bestration, healthcare administration, ing, sports, computers, tennis, archery, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimumeducation per classifi ed ad gins immediately and continues until gins immediately and continues until administration, or other horseback riding, climbing, windsurfing ect or discontinue, without notice, advertising filled. CMU, an AA/EO institution, filled. CMU, an AA/EO institution, health-related field with interest in edu& more. Office and maintenance jobs and active eping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life willEncourages informed Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue strongly & actively strives to increase strongly & actively strives to increase cation studies; 5 years exp. in the detoo. Salary is $1900 and up plus participation in government: cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are diversity within its community (see diversity within its community (see delivery and evaluation of room/board. Find out more about our 3-6 Issues: $7.50 pervelopment, issue http://mtpleasantarea.mi.lwvnet.org/ available along with www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). s limited to only the first date of publication. Any www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). health care/professions related educacamps and apply online at 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue ! other ays of termination of the ad. If you find an error, ! tional p r ospecial g r a m s features ; see www.lwcgwc.com, or call COLLEGE PRO IS now hiring painters Like us on facebook! 13+ Issues: $7.00 perwww.jobs.cmich.edu issue like ad for attractors. complete list WORK ON MACKINAC Island This 888-459-2492. Email onsible for the first day’s insertion. www.facebook.com/LWVMPA all across the state to work outdoors of requirements. Screening begins imSummer- Make lifelong friends. The sam@lwcgwc.com w/other students. Earn $3k-5k. Admediately. Applicants must apply Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge vancement opportunities + internships. on-line at www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, Shops are looking for help in all areas: MANAGER/CRM ENROLLMENT & “I’m not 1-888-277-9787 or an AA/EO institution, strongly & acFront Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, STUDENT SERVICES. Enrollment & www.collegepro.com used to tively strives to increase diversity Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. HousStudent Services. P&A-4. Required: this much w i t h i naccept i t s advertising c o m m u n iwhich ty (refl s eects e discrimination because of race, color, religion, ing, bonus, and 15 discounted meals. CM Life will not knowingly Bachelor's degree, Rates: word minimum per classifi ed ad5 years experiDIRECTOR/ ADMISSIONS COLLEGE SHUTTLE SERVICE By Phone: 989-774-3493 attention.” www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). ( 9 0 6 ) 8 4 7 - 7 1 9 6 . ence. Applicants must apply online at sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject discontinue, without advertising OF or MEDICINE. PA-5.! Req: notice, Bachelor's Screening Public Fax: 989-774-7805 of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Lifewww.theislandhouse.com will By degree preferably in education, busiBold, italic and beGet noticedwhich withis in the opinion 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per www.jobs.cmich.edu. issue !COORDINATOR/ LIBRARY WEB Transportation gins immediately and continues be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and ness, public administration or related centered type are until the Classifieds. By Website: www.cm-life.com Services of the 3-6FAMILY Issues: $7.50isper filled. issue CMU, an AA/EO institution, SERVICES Libraries.! PA-4.! Req: WEST MIDLAND CENTER field; 5 to yrs expthe related to enrollment available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited only fi rst date of publication. Any Isabella County Bachelor's degree in web technology, connections. now accepting7-12 applications sum- per strongly actively strives to increase Issues:for$7.25 issue & other In Person: 436 Moore Hall Classifieds: Your system for management, recruitment Transportation special features credit due can be picked up attechnology the CM Lifeoroffi ce within 30 days of termination of the ad. Ifmanageyou find an error, information related field; mer program staff. See www.wmfc.org diversity within its community (see Commission ment, or admissions management in a 13+ Issues: $7.00 perwww.cmich.edu/aaeo/). issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classifi edyears Dept.website immediately. We are only Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. five management expe-responsible for the first day’s insertion. for details and application. Central Michigan LIFE higher education setting; see rience; see www.jobs.cmich.edu for 436 Moore Hall • CMU www.jobs.cmich.edu for complete list complete list of requirements.! Appliwww.cm-life.com • 774-3493 of requirements. Screening begins imcants must apply on-line at mediately. Applicants must apply m www.jobs.cmich.edu .! CMU, an Bedroo on-line at www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, AA/EO institution, strongly and actively eases an AA/EO institution, strongly & acL strives to increase diversity within its le! tively strives to increase diversity Availab community (see cmich.edu/aaeo). within its community (see ! DISPATCHER POLICE. ST-5.! "#$ www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). %&'(#)*!+,-!.!/#0(!#12#('#34#5!!6227'40389 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR/ TRANSFER :&98! 0227/! ;37'3#! 08 STUDENT SERVICES Admissions. UMPIRES WANTED. MT. Pleasant LitSign a new <<<5=;>954:'4?5#)&5! ,4(##3'3@! >#@'39 PA-3.! Req: Bachelor's degree; Minitle League is looking for experienced, lease at '::#)'08#7/! 03)! 4;38'3&#9! &38'7! A'77#)5 mum of 1 yr exp in a related field; see reliable umpires. Season runs late BCD-!03!66EFG!'398'8&8';3-!98(;3@7/!H!04$ www.jobs.cmich.edu for complete list April through June. Games start at 8'I#7/! 98('I#9! 8;! '34(#09#! )'I#(9'8/! <'8?'3 of requirements. Screening begins imand receive 6:15, Monday- Thursday. For more in'89! 4;::&3'8/! J9## mediately. Applicants must apply formation, call Brian Mitchell, <<<54:'4?5#)&E00#;EK5 on-line at www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, It’s been 989-621-9629. (Must Present Ad) ! an AA/EO institution, strongly & acproven many times that tively strives to increase diversity ADMIN CLERK DEVELOPMENT. Enter to win the use of a people are recycle YOUR items that you no lonwithin its community (see OP-6. Required High School, 4 years more likely to ger need and gain $$ and space! Clean Add Yellow to www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). exp.; see www.jobs.cmich.edu for respond to ads out that closet that is overstuffed, your in color. Try it Any Classified complete list of requirements.! Screenwww.tallgrassapts.com kitchen that is out of control and your today and BLOOMFIELD HILLS RENTAL Coming begins immediately. Applicants Liner Ad For Only watch profits burgeoning bookcase. Sell it all and you Ask pany in Oakland County Michigan 779-7900 • 1240 E Broomfield St. No $$$ m u s t a p p l y o n l i n e a t bloom! $2.00 Per Day! will reap the rewards! about the needs summer help! Up to $12.00 Due at www.jobs.cmich.edu. CMU, an AA/EO M-Th: 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 12-4 CM Life Classifieds Tallgrass an hour. Outdoor work, good drivSigning! institution, strongly & actively strives to Central Michigan Life 774-3493 • 436 Moore Hall Promise! ing record, and lifting required. Call increase diversity within its community 436 Moore Hall • 989-774-3493 www.cm-life.com Wayne at 248-332-4700. (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). www.cm-life.com

, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Policy

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WANTED TO BUY Life WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY• www/cm-life.com WANTED BUY HAPPY ADS ADS HAPPYMI ADS HAPPYTO ADS Central Michigan •HAPPY 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, 48859

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy

NOTICES

FOR SALE

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! ! OFFICE SPACE

AUTOS FOR SALE REACH THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! 989•772•9441 SERVICES LOST &MORE FOUND

FOR RENT Color Your Ads TO RENT WANTED

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ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Sunny Giveaways are springing up!

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Across 1 Great, in slang 4 Take as one’s own 9 Scenic view 14 Fifth in NYC, e.g. 15 Indian prince 16 Indian, e.g. 17 [Quoted verbatim] 18 Porterhouse relatives 20 Trading center 22 Without __: pro bono 23 Chop 24 Hannibal Smith underling 28 Dined 29 Polish place 30 MetLife, for one 32 Org. concerned with the word spelled by the starts of 18-, 24-, 36-, 54- and 59-Across 33 Muslim leader 35 Popular dolls 36 Any of five Wolverine films 40 Jeer 43 Geraint’s lady 44 Cookbook abbr.

47 Elite athlete 51 Urban skyline standout 53 Actress Peeples 54 Some online shoppers 56 Receive 57 Talker on a perch 58 Aid companion 59 Pot holder, perhaps 64 Reason for gaping 65 Immunity agent 66 Porter’s “__ the Top” 67 Dastard 68 Halos 69 Board game with an exclamation point in its name 70 Mil. spud duties Down 1 Long-grained Asian rice 2 One skilled in plane talk 3 Fiats 4 Legal hangings? 5 Little bit 6 Pancho’s peeper

7 Jet age 2011-’12 TV drama 8 Hoover led it for 37 yrs. 9 Political pollsters’ targets 10 Winter glaze 11 Mollusk named for its pair of long earlike appendages 12 Rest 13 Responds 19 Espied 21 Catch some rays 25 Injure severely 26 Marceau, notably 27 Verve 31 Don Ho’s instrument 34 Sra.’s French counterpart 36 Crosses (out) 37 A student’s GPA blemish 38 Caesar’s “I saw” 39 “__ it my way” 40 Kind of rap 41 Former Romanian president 42 Utter nonsense

44 Secure behind one’s head, as long hair 45 Make a mess of 46 Really bugs 48 Synagogue 49 “Rock-__ Baby” 50 Actor Quaid and pitcher Johnson 52 Pharm. watchdog 55 Internet giant with an exclamation point in its name 60 According to 61 “__ Song”: #1 country hit for Taylor Swift 62 Hockey great 63 Opener on a ring


April 11, 2012