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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Taylor Johnson takes advantage of starter spot on women’s team, 7

Central Michigan University

| Friday, Feb. 24, 2012

Pair finds common ground through Big Brothers Big Sisters match, 3

[cm-life.com]

‘throw it here’

college of medicine

Most FA faculty members hired will remain in union Some new hires were removed By Theresa Clift Staff Reporter

The College of Medicine’s first full-time faculty member, Dr. W. Robert Fleischmann, was a due-paying member of the Faculty Association for four months before his exclusion from the union in January. He has not asked for a refund of the dues, taken from his $150,000 salary, and does not intend to. “I no longer pay, since I received notice from the FA that I was no longer an FA member,” he said in an email. Fleischmann is married to Linda Perkowski, associate dean of medical education. He began work on July 1, and paid FA dues from about September through December, he said. He declined to comment on his motivations or feelings. A final agreement was

photos by mike mulholland/photo editor

cheerleader. CMU went on to defeat Northern Illinois 73-50. The Ross’ are known for attending nearly every women’s basketball home game, and Elizabeth is listed as a “Champions Level” supporter of the team on cmuchippewas.com.

At Wednesday night’s women’s basketball game, Central Michigan University President George Ross enthusiastically attempted to win a T-shirt for the fans behind he and his wife, Elizabeth Ross, by attracting the attention of a CMU

Dale-Elizabeth Pehrsson named new EHS dean Provost Shapiro says she stood out throughout search process By Alayna Smith Staff Reporter

The search for the new dean of the College of Education and Human Services has come to an end, and Dale-Elizabeth Pehrsson will be taking over the position beginning July 1. Pehrsson is currently serving as the associate dean of the College of Education at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, and has another decade of administrative and professorial experience as well. When she starts the job, she will earn a salary of $154,500.

Pehrsson said she was a finalist for seven other positions at different universities around the nation, but chose to go with CMU because of its great programs and faculty. She expressed great excitement over taking the position and looks forward to living close enough to campus to be able to walk or ride her bike to her job. “I chose CMU because I loved the programs I saw there, the variety and the faculty,” she said. “They were very interested in student engagement and reducing class sizes to have more personal relationships with students. That really stood out for me and was so important. I love to teach, and this university was a good fit.” Provost Gary Shapiro announced the appointment of Pehrsson Thursday, and said

she was the best match for the position. “Dr. Pehrsson stood out as a top candidate throughout every step of the search process,” Shapiro said in a news release Thursday. “Her experience clearly positions her as a leading teacher, scholar and administrator whose leadership and vision will continue to move the College of Education and Human Services forward.” Pehrsson will lead five departments as the new EHS dean, as well as 13 educational centers and 185 faculty and staff. Kathy Koch has been serving as interim dean since 2009, following the unexpected death of former dean Karen Adams, and will return to the position of associate EHS dean. Shapiro thanked Koch for her service to the university.

In a forum to review Pehrsson as a candidate, held Feb. 7 in the EHS Building, Pehrsson discussed the future of education, and how the field has been evolving in recent years. She emphasized the implications of a globalized world, where students must learn to communicate and adapt to be successful. “Education is going to a point where students will need to be very globally and culturally aware,” she said at the forum. “International training and education is not only critical, but necessary.” Pehrsson also emphasized the importance of communication within the college and with faculty, saying she was not interested in working in a divisive environment. A dean | 2

By Justin Hicks Staff Reporter

Vice President of Development and External Relations Kathy Wilbur reemphasized Thursday that Michael Rao was president when Central Michigan University decided to allocate $10 million to the Events Center. “The project was all done, all initiated and launched when President Rao was president,” Wilbur said when reached by phone. Rao, however, is not talking. Several requests have been made to Rao’s office at Virginia Commonwealth University, where he became president in 2009. He said Wednesday he “would rather questions about CMU’s projects, programs and initiatives be directed to current president George Ross,” Ann Buckley, Director of Communications and Public Relations at VCU, said in an email.

Mitt Romney

Rick Santorum

Locations in Mount Pleasant include City Hall, 320 W. Broadway St., Pullen School gymnasium, 251 S. Brown St., Ganiard School gymnasium, 101 S. Adams St., room 112 of the Mount Pleasant High School,

Rao chose not to make himself available personally to Central Michigan Life by phone or Michael Rao email, and Steve Smith, director of public relations at CMU, said he didn’t know why Rao wouldn’t comment and that it was his choice to do so. “I would think you’d have to ask him why he wouldn’t respond,” Smith said. “It’s not my position to respond to something like that in the first place. It’s his choice.” University President George Ross told members of the media Feb. 16, following the CMU Board of Trustees meeting, that he was not at CMU when the allocation of $10 million was made to the Events Center.

A wilbur | 2

[ I N S I D E]

Voting locations set for Tuesday Polling locations around the state are gearing up for what should be a very close race for the Michigan Republican primary on Tuesday. Those looking to vote in the primary need to already be registered to vote, with the registration deadline having already passed. Voters registered in Mount Pleasant can vote in seven locations matching up to which precinct they are registered in.

A cmed | 6

Wilbur: Rao here when Events Center allocation made

michigan primary

By John Irwin Staff Reporter

ratified Jan. 12 following a six-month contract impasse between the FA and the administration. The FA conceded to exclude fulltime CMED faculty from the union in exchange for the benefit of keeping MESSA health care for members. David Jesuit, FA bargaining team member and associate professor of political science, said the bargaining team fought hard to keep CMED faculty in the union to avoid cases like Fleischmann’s, and for stronger solidarity. Jesuit’s impressions and opinions are not necessarily shared by everyone on the FA or its bargaining team. He said the exclusion of CMED faculty from the FA was the No. 1 reason FA members voted not to ratify the contract, in his opinion. “It was a huge concession,” Jesuit said. “It was a very bitter pill for a lot of members to swallow.”

w Michigan Senate passes legislation against graduate student unions Wednesday, 3

1155 S. Elizabeth St., Kinney School gymnasium, 720 N. Kinney St., Vowles School gymnasium, 1560 S. Watson Road and Fancher School gymnasium, 801 S. Kinney St. For those registered to vote in Union Township, there are three precincts. Those locations and the other 17 voting locations in Isabella County can be found on the Isabella County Clerk’s Office website at isabellacounty.org/clerk/pollinglocations.html.

file photo by andrew kuhn

A vote | 2

Voters in precinct 6, show up to the Vowles Elementary School Gymnasium, 1560 Watson Road, to cast their votes on Nov. 2, 2010.

w SAPA’s fifth annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes event raises about, 3 w SGA presidential debate to be held Tuesday, 3 w Students begin season of Lent at St. Mary’s services, 5 w Annual juried student art exhibit opens today, 6

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

Experienced Provider Specializes in Adult Medical Care Adult Nurse Practitioner Helene Vossos, R.N., M.S.N., A.N.P.-B.C., is now welcoming college students and adults of all ages to her practice at 211 S. Crapo Street, Suite J, in Mt. Pleasant. Helene received her associate nursing degree (RN) from MidMichigan Community College and completed

bachelor of science and master of science degrees in nursing at the University of Michigan – Flint. She is dual board certified as a nurse practitioner in adult medicine and psychiatric mental health. Appointments may be made by calling her office at (989) 773-6218.


2 || Friday, Feb. 24, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

wilbur |

EVENTS CALENDAR

PHOTO OF THE DAY

continued from 1

TODAY

w The Broadway Players Present Sin, Sex and the CIA, which will be held from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Broadway Theatre. Tickets are $8 and can be purchased in advance at Ace of Diamond’s, Ric’s Food Center and at friendsofthebroadway.org.

saturday

w American Sign Language Society Workshop will be held from noon to 4:30 p.m. in Anspach Hall, Room 161. Tickets are $5 at the door. w CMU Up All Night will be held from 11 p.m. to 3 a.m. at the Large Sports Forum in the Student Activity Center. There will be free food, laser tag, video games and free bowling. w Presidential candidate Ron Paul will speak at 6 p.m. Saturday in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium. Doors will open at 5 p.m. for those with vouchers and 5:30 p.m. for general admission.

sunday

w CMU Concert Choir/ Chamber Singers will perform "Music of the Americas" from 5 to 6 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. Š Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 64

dean | continued from 1

“As a dean, the biggest and most important thing is to keep the faculty informed,� Pehrsson said. Pehrsson confirmed this idea of open communication, saying her first priority after coming to Michigan will be to get to know the faculty and students. “I will only make changes after learning the input of the faculty and students,� she said. At the forum, Pehrsson also discussed how to tackle problems facing educational institutions despite a lack of resources. She proposed a plan of action having the faculty collaborate and bring ideas to the leadership, and then deciding on the best plan together so everyone can move forward. “Money and staff are not forthcoming anymore, so we need to find creative ways around this,� Pehrsson said. Though Pehrsson has been in similar positions before, she said she was eager to take on new challenges and projects at CMU. “If you’re looking for someone with a desire to learn, that would be me,� Pehrsson said. university@cm-life.com

“I wasn’t (at CMU), I was in Mississippi,� Ross said in a recent CM Life article, referring to his time as president of Alcorn State University. “I can’t talk about what someone said when I wasn’t here. In the records it was submitted as joint fundraising. I’d be speculating if I said anything beyond that.� The $10 million was allocated by the university to help fund the Events Centers, a project which was intended to be funded by private donations only. The Events Center was expected to cost $21.5 million and the university was committed to raising the funds privately, CMU Athletics Director Dave Heeke said in 2008. The Events Center website said the facility would not be funded by the university because of “declining state appropriations.� Several parts of the website, including where it was called a “privately funded� project, were changed after Ross told Aca-

demic Senators about the $10 million allocation. CMU allocated the $10 million from university reserves after fundraising goals for the project fell short, Ross said. “The state of Michigan knew exactly what we were doing,� Ross said, pointing to a July 2009 board of trustees meeting in which the board approved a motion that said: “Total project cost not to exceed $21,000,000; funding to be from donations, reserve for future construction, reserve for remodeling and university recreation facility expansion reserve.� Following the board of trustees meeting, board Chairman Sam Kottamasu said the fundraising remains ongoing for the Events Center. “The center only opened 15 months ago,� he said. “The average time for fundraising is five-plus years.�

victoria zegler/Staff photographer

Nathaniel Cromar, 4, of Mount Pleasant, stands next to his LEGO model in which he won first place during the Fourth Annual Chippewa River District Library Lego Contest Thursday evening at the Veterans Memorial Library, 301 S. University Avenue. “I built a birthday cake,� Cromar said. Out of 96 entries each based on participating grade levels from pre-schoolers to high school students, the winners walked away with award ribbons, gift cards and an assortment of LEGO books.

university@cm-life.com

        

vote |

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continued from 1

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Students and others who are registered and have received an absentee ballot for the primary must make sure it is received by this Saturday, or the votes will not count. Some students neglected to register to vote in time for the primaries, with a focus more on the general election in the fall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t registered to vote yet, but I kind of regret it right now thinking about how close this election season has been,â&#x20AC;? said Lake Orion sophomore Nick Taylor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to November though, when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to vote for the first time.â&#x20AC;? Holland senior Jaime Coon is registered to vote and will vote in the general election, but not in the upcoming primary. She said she has voted through an absentee ballot in the past and will continue to do so. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind either way, I just love voting,â&#x20AC;? Coon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m registered to vote back home ... because I pay much more attention to the local politics there, and I feel like my vote makes a bigger difference.â&#x20AC;? The Michigan primary is open, meaning Democrats and independents may vote in the Republican primary on Tuesday. To find out if one is reg-

istered to vote and where they are registered to vote, they can visit the Michigan Secretary of State website at https://webapps.sos.state. mi.us/mivote/votersearch. aspx. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I registered to vote the day I turned 18,â&#x20AC;? said Cass City sophomore Chelsea Green. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really looking forward to voting for the first time in November.â&#x20AC;? The Republican presidential primary season has been full of ups and downs for all of the candidates so far. The Michigan primary, with 30 delegates, distributed proportionally, at stake, all four of the major GOP candidates are looking to nab as many delegates as they can. Recent polls show former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum in a dead heat in the Wolverine State. The most recent NBC News/Marist poll and the most recent Mitchell/ Rosetta Stone poll both show Romney leading Santorum by just 2 percent in his home state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think voting in a polling booth might be fun, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never done it, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know,â&#x20AC;? Coon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be voting via absentee ballot for a while.â&#x20AC;? metro@cm-life.com

Eat Fresh . . . Eat Healthy!

Any Regular 6â&#x20AC;? Meal

5

$

for only

00

With purchase of drink. Expires 3/4/12 Not valid with any other offer. One per customer.

GREAT TASTING!

Adjacent to Campus CAMPUS COURT PLAZA

MADE YOUR WAY! OPEN LATE! NExT TO BTAN

Hey CM Life Fans WE HAVE A FUN SPRING BREAK ASSIGNMENT FOR YOU: Grab a CM Life before you leave and pack it in your suitcase. Then sometime during your vacation (sooner than later), take a picture of you with CM Life from your Spring break location. Post the photo to the CM Life facebook page as soon as you can. This enters you into a contest for Buffalo Wild Wings gift certificates when you return.

The entry with the most â&#x20AC;&#x153;likesâ&#x20AC;? wins

$100 IN GIFT CERTIFICATES!

SECOND PLACE wins $75 and THIRD wins $50 in certificates.

Voting closes 5PM on Friday, March 16. Limit one entry per person.

facebook.com/cmlife

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

Have a Great Break!

      

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3

INSIDE LIFE Friday, Feb. 24, 2012

| cm-life.com

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

Bill denying grad student unionization passes Michigan Senate By David Oltean Senior Reporter

The Republican-dominated Michigan Senate voted to pass legislation during a Wednesday hearing that would prevent graduate student research assistants from unionizing. The legislation, Senate Bill 0971, was passed by a 26-12

vote and will now advance to the Republican-led House of Representatives. The proposed legislation would continue to deny entitlement to representation and collective bargaining rights for Michigan’s graduate student research assistants, which total more than 2,000. The bill was introduced on Feb. 15 by Senate Major-

ity Leader Randy Richardville, R-Monroe, after GSRAs at the University of Michigan motioned to unionize. A previous ruling by the Michigan Employment Relations Committee in 1981 deemed GSRAs as students, while graduate student teaching assistants were declared as employees and given the right to unionize. Republicans

say the bill just reinforces the original ruling, while Democrats say the proposal is an attempt to undermine collective bargaining rights. “An individual serving as a graduate student research assistant or in an equivalent position and any individual whose position does not have sufficient indicia of an employer-employee relation-

ship using the 20-factor test announced by the Internal Revenue Service of the United States Department of Treasury in Revenue ruling 87-41, 19871 C.B. 296 is not a public employee entitled to representation or collective bargaining rights under this act,” the bill stated. Lawmakers have long viewed GSRAs as students

because of their pursuit for knowledge, said Richardville’s press secretary Amber McCann. “Research assistants are there simply because they’re working on their own academic pursuit in conjunction with the university,” McCann said.

A Union| 5

Deaf student claims denial of interpreter for student teaching By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Victoria Zegler/Staff Photographer

Mount Pleasant senior Rachel Sherwood, left, and “little brother” Parker Anzalone, 7, of Mount Pleasant, look at entries of LEGO models Thursday evening at the Veterans Memorial Library, 301 S. University Ave., during the Fourth Annual Chippewa River District Library Lego Contest as part of United Way of Isabella County’s program Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mount Pleasant.

Two of a kind

Pair finds common ground through Big Brothers Big Sisters match By Hailee Sattavara | Senior Reporter

Parker Anzalone looks forward to hanging out with his big sister Rachel Sherwood every week. Both from Mount Pleasant, Sherwood’s and Anzoalone’s favorite thing to do together is play the online game, “Poptropica.” The two were matched through Big Brothers Big Sisters in the Heart of Michigan in June 2011. “I’d rather do it (hang out) everyday,” Anzalone, 7, said while playing “fruit ninja” on Sherwood’s phone. The two met up Thursday for their weekly hangout, this time choosing the Veteran’s Memorial Library, 301 S. University Ave., as the location. Sherwood, a senior at Central Michigan University, said Anzalone is always the first out of school on Thursdays, running down the sidewalk to greet her when she picks him up. Sherwood said cross-gender matches in BBBS are not common, but the pair was matched because of a lack of male volunteers in the area. Anzalone was on the waiting list for a big brother for two to three years, Sherwood said, before the decision was made to match the pair. Common interests Jenny Oswald, caseworker at BBBS, said matches are made through common interests

with a commitment of one year. “My mom was his first grade teacher,” Sherwood said. Sherwood’s mother now lives a few blocks away from Anzalone and his mother. “Part of Big Brothers Big Sisters is you’re supposed to get together three times a month, but we get together once a week,” Sherwood said. “Most of the time I let Parker decide what we do,” Sherwood said. Often the two hang out, eat a snack and play video games, but sometimes Sherwood brings Anzalone to places like the bank or car wash. “Sometimes we do little things, like letting him help me

After completing almost all of the requirements to graduate from the College of Education, one student’s degree is at risk because of something she cannot control. Kelly Laatsch, a senior from Freeland, has been deaf since birth. She is in her final year of the education program and is completing her student teaching requirement in a class of hard of hearing students in Saginaw. Laatsch requested an interpreter to complete this requirement and was told by Karen Edwards, director of student teaching, that if she were to utilize an interpreter, she wouldn’t pass her student teaching requirements. Laatsch said she brought a section of the Michigan Department of Education Teaching Technical Standards that states (students) should “understand and speak in English” to Edwards’ attention. The document also states that students may complete this

requirement “with or without reasonable accommodations.” Despite Laatsch’s efforts, Edwards and Susie Rood, director of Student Disability Services, told her she would need to complete a portion of her student teaching without the aid of an interpreter. Rood and Edwards created an “Action Plan” designed to wean Laatsch off of an interpreter so she could “become independent.” “The action plan allowed me to use an interpreter full time for the first two weeks. The following two weeks I could only use an interpreter half time, then for the rest of the semester I needed to show that I can teach without an interpreter,” Laatsch said. “Being severely-profoundly deaf since birth, I knew this wasn’t going to work out. I tried convincing them that even with my cochlear implants and being able to hear and speak well, I still cannot hear as well as a hearing person can.”

A Deaf | 5

Student government

Presidential debate Tuesday in Anspach Victoria Zegler/Staff Photographer

Mount Pleasant senior Rachel Sherwood, left, and “little brother“ Parker Anzalone, 7, of Mount Pleasant play Poptropica, Thursday evening at the Veterans Memorial Library, 301 S. University Ave., as part of United Way of Isabella County’s program Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mount Pleasant.

fill out my deposit slip,” Sherwood said. Anzalone’s curiosity often leads him to ask Sherwood the meaning of words she uses. Thursday Sherwood explained what it meant to be “geeky,” cross referencing what it means to be “nerdy.” “There are so many opportunities to learn,” Sherwood said. “Everything you do is an opportunity to be a positive role model.” Sherwood, a nontraditional student, has earned a fine arts degree in painting, is pursuing an integrated sciences degree in education and has been involved with BBBS for two years.

Local goals “We focus on mentoring one-to-one relationships,” Oswald said. The BBBS organizations in Midland and Isabella counties joined forces in 2007. Approximately 50 CMU students are involves with BBBS in the community and schools, and more than 200 are involved in the BBBS registered student organization, Oswald said. “We don’t get enough male volunteers,” Oswald said. “We encourage those good male role models to sign up.” Those interested can contact Jenny Oswald at 772-5232. metro@cm-life.com

By Ryan Fitzmaurice Staff Reporter

On Tuesday Student Government Association presidential candidates will have a chance to show students their goal for the organization during a debate. The debate will feature all five presidential candidates, Warren senior Connor Gallagher, Macomb junior Justin Gawronski, Sparta junior Spencer McKellar, Hesperia senior Killian Richeson and Romeo senior Kevin Richmond. The event will be held at 6 p.m. in Anspach Hall 161. The debate will be moderated by Assistant Professor of Finance and Law Kenneth Sanney, and will be open to the public. Questions can be submitted anytime prior to the event through Twitter, using the hashtag #CMUSGA. SGA Elections Director

Christopher Armelagos said using Twitter will give students the opportunity to become involved within the debate. “The SGA works for and is accountable to the students,” the Milford graduate student said. “This will give students the opportunity to become even more active in choosing a candidate.” The debate will cover a wide variety of topics related to Central Michigan University, from the debate over a proposed unicameral system within SGA to the Faculty Association contract conflict. SGA Press Secretary and Clinton Township senior Michelle Shamaly said the debate is important because it allows students to become invested in the election. A SGA | 5

200 CMU men Walk a Mile in Her Shoes, raise about $1,300 for SAPA By Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

It’s not every day crowds of college men can be seen strutting in red high heels, but Wednesday night brought hundreds together for a cause. About 200 guys limped, shuffled and strutted their way through nine laps around Finch Fieldhouse’s gymnasium during the Sexual Aggression Peer Advocates’ fifth annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes event. The participants took on the challenge of walking in heels to support women who have been victimized by sexual assault and raised about $1,300. “For a guy to walk a mile in a pair of a women’s shoes is

only the beginning of knowing the struggles that women go through,” said Wayne sophomore Jered Smart. Heels are just another pair of shoes, he said of his women’s size 11. “I can totally own this; it’s easy for me,” Smart said. “I’m a marching band member, so marching backward we’re on our toes, so I feel like that gave me a little bit of an ability to do it.” SAPA member Andrew Slater said the heels were purchased off a specialty website for loaning out to the men because they had to buy such large sizes. “We also have pink frilly flip flops in case we run out of the heels,” the Lansing graduate student said.

Perfecting a walk in heels provided more of a challenge for freshman Derek Susalla. “Walking in the heels is extremely difficult. I didn’t think it was going to be this hard,” the Bad Axe freshman said. “But it’s a good time for a good cause and two of our (Beta Theta Pi) brothers are in SAPA, so we’re coming to support them and everybody involved.” Sexual education and peer advocacy organizations outlined the course of walk with tables giving out information and free products. The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan shared information about domestic violence safety planning. “We take care of residents who need to come in for

shelter, counseling and provide services for them,” said Support Tech Carol Corbiere. “We’re trying to profile that there is help out there for people in distress who are needing to get back on their good way and move on from these kind of instances happening because it really can be devastating.” The nine laps left sophomore Dan Milligan in pain and with future plans. “My feet are killing me, and even though I did wear socks, I still have blisters,” the Riverview native said. “My toes are crushed; I don’t know how girls do this. But, I actually think I’m going to wear these out to Wayside Friday night to get the full experience.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Charlotte Bodak/Staff Photographer

Illinois freshman Dan Botterman, Clarkston freshman Aaron Wright, Ohio junior Brock Thatcher and Grosse Ile sophomore Zack Kowalski dance to the Cupid Shuffle while participating in SAPA’s Walk A Mile In Her Shoes event Wednesday evening at Finch Fieldhouse.


4

VOICES Friday Feb. 24, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | More than administration to blame for Events Center $10 million bungle

The buck stops where?

Three parties are involved in the $10 million Events Center issue: the administration, University Communications and the athletics department. While the administration can claim transitions of power were to blame for any mixed messages during the building of the Events Center, neither University Communications or athletics can claim that of themselves; the leadership for those two groups has remained the same throughout the period in question. University Communications never released numbers about how much CMU was paying. The numbers which reflected the actual economic situation were released only to the state and nothing more was said. “We’re committed to raise all $21.5 million privately,” Athletics Director Dave Heeke said in April 2008.

T

he lack of public disclosure of the Events Center allotment has resulted in finger-pointing between present and former leaders of Central Michigan University in the past week.

While we now know when the $10 million was disclosed to the state in 2009, a satisfactory explanation as to why no public announcement followed, or why the facility continued until this month to be labeled as “fully privately funded,” has yet to be made. Former University President Michael Rao, now president of Virginia Commonwealth University, would have overseen much of the planning of the Events Center. He will not publicly comment on the issue. He said Wednesday he “would rath-

er questions about CMU’s projects, programs and initiatives be directed to current president George Ross,” Ann Buckley, Director of Communications and Public Relations at VCU, said in an email. But University President George Ross said questions about Events Center plans should be directed to Rao, a sentiment echoed by former-interim president Kathy Wilbur, currently the vice president of Development and External Relations. This points to a bigger problem.

“We’re going to go out and ask alumni, friends and others to contribute to the project.” Whoever was in charge of the Events Center website apparently did not know the difference between privately donated funds and tuition dollars. The documents sent to the state were never put on cmich.edu; no forums or press conferences were held to answer questions about the $10 million expenditure. This ongoing series of communicative shenanigans bleakly outlines CMU’s chronic lack of transparency. What right do students have to know where their money is going? This Editorial Board waits patiently for the renaming of the CMU Events Center to more accurately reflect its greatest benefactors: students and taxpayers.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

Social overload Social networking is currently ruining my academic life, but rocking my social one. The other night, my women’s history book, that was once propped up on my desk, slid further and further down to the floor as the means of social media pushed its way to being my numberone priority. I found myself texting, Facebook chatting and Skyping all in one continuous motion. Then I tweeted about it. With so many outlets for communication, it’s hard to stick to only one source. Especially when your friends on each site have the power to all text, Facebook, Skype and tweet you at the same time. Four sources of communication and throwing a women’s history exam in there can make for one major headache. Not to mention having enough tabs open to give my laptop a headache, too. But my need to put down every form of technology is an option I cannot face. Without the constant communication with friends, I might not have to cram for an exam. What would I do from midnight to 8 a.m. the night before the test? Scary thoughts. When I got my first cell phone in ninth grade, it was a flip phone with physical keys I had to push. I had a limit of 50 text messages per month and that counted the ones I received as well. Now, I override that 50 text limit in 50 minutes. Since upgrading to 200 messages and then finally unlimited, I’ve become glued to my phone. Things got even worse when I caved for an iPhone. Walking from class to class should be a time to take in the fresh air and break from my technology-filled day. Those glorious 10 minutes of walking from Powers Hall to Moore Hall leaves me just enough time to get through two songs, respond to texts and listen to voice mails. Although it’s great to have friends that talk to me, it might be time to put them on pause and pick back up on my history lesson. But then again, when the future is practically already established on Facebook and Twitter as it happens, who really has time to care about history anyway?

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805 Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (email excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

[LEtter to the Editor]

The SGA Senate dilemma Monday night was not a good evening for senators, or for their legislation. After exiting a general board meeting that lasted just over an hour, senators rushed to their meeting room and readied themselves for the tense debate that was about to come for a controversial piece of legislation that had been postponed from the previous meeting: the “Recognition of the Take Back The Tap” bill. Since I started my role as senator last fall semester, I knew how hard it was for controversial bills like these to pass in the senate. I knew how critical they could be about any bill that is presented to them. Despite this, I encouraged the two new ambitious senators, Mariah and Alysha, to present this bill to the senate. But as the bill was finally brought back on the table, a senator made a motion to amend the bill and cut out the last paragraph, which would removed the “potential and gradual campus-wide end to the sale of bottled water” statement. I sighed and realized we were all in for a long and tedious debate. The senate then began a some-

what heated debate. Senators who objected to the bill made themselves heard, openly questioning the bill’s intentions. Although some of their statements seemed odd. One senator said the signed petitions that TBTT had collected, which was more than 2,000 signatures, was not a good representation of the CMU campus students. Ironically, senators only need 200 signatures for the upcoming election to represent a student body much larger than those who signed their election petitions. After a long debate, the senate came to the conclusion that this bill would only be passed if the final paragraph was amended from the legislation. As I saw the final vote to amend the bill was in favor of the opposing senators, I couldn’t help but feel a great sense of sorrow. Not only the senators who proposed the bill, but for the future well being of CMU sustainability in general. The bill represents the efforts of the TBTT group to promote sustainability and to eventually remove the sale of bottled water for campus,

but it goes beyond that. It represents a small but important step for CMU and its students to become a more environmentally friendly campus, to show how students can come together and change unsustainable practices, even become the forefront of a sustainable movement by removal bottled water sales from CMU. But in the end, the SGA senate rejected this step. Although they showed support for the bill’s tone of sustainability, they condemned the bill for its “extreme” view on bottle water removal on campus and threatened to “table the bill indefinitely” unless it was amended. The SGA has often spoken about how it wishes to promote sustainability, and is currently working on creating a sustainability committee. But if their own senate edits a bill that tries to do just that, then who can students believe? Let us hope the SGA senate can reconsider this issue in the near future. Daniel Breitenbach, White Cloud senior

[Comments] Comments in response to “‘American Pie’ actor brings musical talent to campus” Peter, Wednesday You guys need to advertise better... if people would of known, maybe more than 65 people would of attended! ChipsAlum, Wednesday What happened to all the big Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

events? 65 people? second rate B list performers? Shows at lunch, what is this a nursing home!!! Please bring back big acts like Dave Matthews, Maya Angelo or even some medium ones! As a young alum, it’s sad to see the lack of big shows for kids today! Selected comments in response to “Budget cuts blamed for one department offering fewer classes during summer” Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Ryan Fizmaurice Staff Reporter

Why I Love Ron Paul Ron Paul is not a politician. Well, maybe he technically is. He holds fundraisers constantly, gives convoluted speeches and has an obnoxiously patriotic website. But when compared to the shadowy shapeshifting creatures that generally run our government nowadays, the man seems to be made out of a different kind of fabric. While most politicians don one of a variety of masks, depending on the political audience they stumble across, Ron Paul has only presented himself as Ron Paul. If Romney, Gingrich or, God forbid, Santorum wins the Republican nomination, they’ll turn moderate so fast Usain Bolt would be jealous. It’ll be just like the five month GOP circus never happened. And can you blame them? It’s how politicians win votes. But Ron Paul, if by some miracle the Republican Party accidentally nominates him, will still be spouting the same crazy 19th century libertarian economics that he always has, votes be damned. I’ll admit I’m not sold on Ron Paul’s platform. Yes, the government undoubtedly has grown too large, powerful and bloated, and Paul is the only true small-government candidate we have. His views on bureaucracy stand in contrast to those of the rest of the Republican Party, who only offer a different kind of big government than the Democrats, one focused on the wealthy, rather than the middle class. Yet, Ron Paul’s views often go to extremes. His position on disbanding the Federal Reserve and moving back to the gold standard would completely reshape an already unstable fiscal landscape. His view of the American government is one where governmenteconomic interaction barely exists, and implementing those changes would demolish the complicated relationship the government and the economy has carefully nurtured for the last century. Republicans have often mentioned “Obamacare” as an experiment we can not afford to continue, but the ultimate experiment stands right next to them in the form of Ron Paul. Either his presidency will be the reset button our government desperately needs or the end of American government. There’s a chance Paul as president would be a disaster, as former Special Advisor for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Elizabeth Warren so wonderfully said on Jan. 24’s “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart”: “We’ll have no future.” But it’s not like Elizabeth Warren matters to Ron Paul. After all, even the right wing media has turned their guns against him, and Ron Paul still hasn’t changed his tune. He lost previous Republican nominations because he wouldn’t change his views, and he’ll most likely lose this nomination as well for the same reasons. Make no doubt, when speaking Saturday night to Central Michigan University, Ron Paul will say whatever he damn well pleases. He will speak without reservations because he’s Ron Paul — and there is something oddly beautiful about that.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator

Chuck, Tuesday This have anything to do with that department offering their vote of no confidence in Ross???

Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers

CMU-Person, Wednesday No. All colleges and departments were asked to cut their budget by the provost. Each department decided how they wuld that. In CHSBS, many departments cut summer classes.

Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Friday, Feb. 24, 2012 || 5

[News]

Students begin Lenten Season at St. Mary’s services Wednesday

CMU receiving $55,000 in grants to fund three new business plans James Hageman, interim vice provost for research, works for the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. ORSP holds the responsibilities of finding, obtaining, supporting and advising appropriate funding opportunities to interested faculty and staff. “Grant money is always coming from the efforts of faculty and staff,” Hageman said. “Both contribute in important ways. Our office deals with anything that is a grant or a contract that has obligations to do certain things with the allotted portion of money.” Hageman said ORSP deals with many grants that are revocable, meaning if grant money is not used in a certain way, penalties may be initialized and funding could be taken away. “If you don’t do what you say you are going to do with the money, there may be penalties,” Hageman said. “When federal agencies give grants, those grants can be recovered if you fail to do what you say you are going to do, but, happily, we generally follow through.” Since 2009, ORSP has received contracts and grants from 68 organizations. According to the ORSP Grant and Contract Activity Fiscal

By Kelsey De Haan Staff Reporter By Sarah Donetti Staff Reporter

Worshippers came together at St. Mary’s University Parish to mark Ash Wednesday. About 1,000 students attended one of the four services held throughout the day Wednesday at St. Mary’s, 1405 S. Washington St. The noon, 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. services were traditional Roman Catholic mass, along with a 7 p.m. scripture service. In the western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent, a 40-day period before Easter in which Christians prepare to reflect on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. “Lent is a time to renew our spiritual lives so that our souls blossom anew at Easter,” said Deacon James Damitio, who presided over the scripture service and is also a professor of accounting at Central Michigan University. One of the most well-known Ash Wednesday practices is the placing of ashes on the forehead, usually in the shape of a cross. The practice is a symbol of mourning over sin and repentance toward God. Though it was Hillman freshman Esther Hardies’ first

Deaf | continued from 3

Laatsch said in an email that although she is allowed an interpreter part time, she was told the continued use of the interpreter may impact whether she passes student teaching because it hinders her independence as a teacher. After trying the “Action Plan” for a few weeks, Laatsch again requested full-time interpreters. Rood hired an interpreting agency in Saginaw to accompany Laatsch daily. “There are days where I will have one or two interpreters. Other days, I’ll have different interpreters throughout one day. Some days, I will go without any interpreter from between 30 minutes to a few hours,” she said. “This is confusing for me and for the students. The class has a lot of students who are at-risk and they very much need consistency.” At a meeting Laatsch had with Rood and Edwards last

SGA | continued from 3

“The debate will allow interested students to learn about the candidates and their positions,” she said. “We feel that this is a crucial step to any election.”

union | continued from 3

McCann said the bill came about earlier this week from conversations Richardville had with research assistants at U-M

Charlotte Bodak/Staff Photographer

Macomb sophomore Steve Zajac has ashes placed on his forehead during the 7 p.m. scripture service on Ash Wednesday a St. Mary’s Catholic Parish, 1405 S. Washington St.

time receiving ashes, she said the experience did not make her uncomfortable. “My friends asked me to come and I was interested,” Hardies said. “The service was very welcoming.” Others said they have celebrated Ash Wednesday their whole lives, often out of their own faith and family traditions. “All my life I’ve grown up in the church,” said Clinton Township junior Amanda Jaczkowski. “A lot of my friends think it’s weird for me to keep coming when my parents aren’t around, but I think it would just be weird if I didn’t come.” Jaczkowski said the most

significant words stated when ashes were applied are, “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return,” from the Bible’s book of Genesis. “It reminds me that it’s not the condition of your physical body that matters, but your heart,” Jaczkowski said. As students left Ash Wednesday services, resources to help them participate in Lent, such as daily meditation booklets and baby bottles for alms-giving, benefiting Central Michigan Pregnancy Services, were provided.

week, she was given two options. “They gave me two options to think about: I could not pass student teaching and just get a bachelors of science (nonteaching), or sign a waiver stating that I will never seek teaching certification in the state of Michigan,” Laatsch said. “I was baffled with both suggestions, especially the latter one. Even though I plan on teaching deaf and hard-of-hearing students, I still want to get my bachelor of science in elementary education.” Edwards was contacted and acknowleged the incident but declined comment. Rood did not return several calls for comment. Laatsch filed her case regarding her reasonable accommodations with the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights in October, and the case was expected to take as long as 180 days to be reviewed. This isn’t the first time Laatsch has had difficulty with the education program.

In 2010, she attempted to transfer to Michigan State University to take advantage of the certified deaf education program. When she learned MSU would be phasing out the program by 2013, she chose to remain at Central Michigan University and attempt to create a program. “I’m sure it’s going to be a long process, but I think it would be really beneficial for students,” Laatsch said in a 2010 Central Michigan Life article. The program never took off at CMU. “Currently, I’m just taking it day by day with a lot of unnecessary stress,” Laatsch said about her current issue. “I am loving my student teaching experience in the classroom and look forward to the rest of the semester. But, I believe I should be able to pursue anything I want to do and utilize my reasonable accommodation. It’s my right.”

Sanney said he accepted the offer to moderate the debate because of the important role SGA holds on campus. “As faculty, I believe the students should have a voice in how the university is run. Students should be part of that process,” he said. “Obviously, the person who repre-

sents the students in this regard is incredibly important, which is why the SGA election is fundamentally important for the student body.” The general elections will be held from March 12 to 16. Voting will be held online at vote.cmich.edu.

who did not wish to unionize. The U-M Board of Regents spoke out Tuesday against the legislation, voting in a strict 6-2 partyline vote against the bill, though Central Michigan University officials have not yet expressed an opin-

ion on the bill. Several calls to CMU Board of Trustees Chairman Sam Kottamasu seeking comment over the last two days have gone unreturned.

studentlife@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan University has received $55,000 in grants from the Michigan Initiative for Innovation and Entrepreneurship to fund three upcoming projects on campus. The grant funds, allocated to several universities by the President’s Council of State Universities of Michigan, could create 200 new start-up businesses around Michigan. About $25,000 was awarded to develop a New Venture competition between CMU and Michigan Technological University, $22,000 for the commercialization of new mercuryabsorbent technology for coal-fired power plants and $8,000 for a market assessment for the commercialization of tap water filters. “The main purpose of these grants are to push for new economy jobs,” said Kathy Backus, assistant director of public relations. “They foster job start up in our community, which is beneficial for those receiving the grants.” In the past seven months, CMU has been awarded 108 grants and contracts equaling about $13 million.

Year Comparison, the “dollars requested” by CMU from July 2011 to January 2012 are nearly 34 percent greater that the “dollars awarded.” “The money comes to a particular active group that is seeking it,” Hageman said. “If you don’t ask, if you don’t write a grant, if you don’t write a good proposal ... even if you do write a good proposal, it’s often that you won’t get it funded. Then you have to keep trying.” Because of the steps necessary to receive grant money, Hageman said grant distribution is not equal, but individualized. Backus said the university finds great purpose from the grants it receives. Like many other grants awarded to CMU, the MIIE broke down the funding to support three entrepreneurial projects on campus. “There are lots and lots of things,” Hageman said in regard to the numerous grants offered to support on-campus projects. “You just have to find an adviser and a project that is interesting to you, and it doesn’t matter what the discipline is. There are ways to fund it.” university@cm-life.com

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6 || Friday, Feb. 24, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

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[News]

SGA looks to add new sustainability committee Schumacher questions charter schools’ quality By Ryan Fitzmaurice Staff Reporter

Student Government Association President Vince Cavataio introduced legislation Monday night to create a new committee focused on sustainability. If the legislation is passed by the House of Representatives, the new committee would pursue establishing sustainable practices on campus, as well as work toward solutions to other environmental problems. It would push for the addition of solar panels on campus, pursuing a new energy-saving ventilation system and work toward the addition of energy efficient lightbulbs in campus buildings. The committee would be required to lead educational initiatives to encourage sustainable choices, meet with Facilities Management monthly to establish goals toward sustainability, work actively with environmentfocused organizations on campus and plan one event every semester to promote sustainability. Cavataio, a Shelby Township senior, wrote the proposal, and said the committee is a crucial addition to the student government. “We need to promote sustainability on campus,” Cavataio said. “We have yet to be proficient in this regard.” Cavataio said he believes the new committee will give SGA the focus needed to tackle sustainability issues.

F i n ali s t c a n didate for u m

“We have failed in the past because we have not given this the attention it needs,” Cavataio said. “With a committee solely focused on sustainability, we will be able to have a group dedicated to the problem, and make the changes needed on campus.” If the legislation passes, the committee would be established during the next administration. Cavataio said if student interest is high enough, he would be open to starting the committee as soon as next week. Saline junior and Student Environmental Alliance President Chloe Gleichman, who initially proposed the idea to form the committee to SGA, said the committee will have a crucial function on campus. “I think that there are two things which the committee will be directing that are extraordinarily important,” Gleichman said. “First, they will make campus buildings more proficient and sustainable, and second, on a more personal level, the committee will be able to educate students about fossil fuels, global warming and other environmental issues, so the students can themselves make changes.” Gleichman said of the many issues SGA works on, this is the most important. “Sustainability is the most important issue of our time,” she said. “If we don’t focus on the environment today, we could irreversibly damage it for the future.” studentlife@cm-life.com

By Alayna Smith Staff Reporter

The Center for Charter Schools’ search for someone to fill the exective director position has culminated with finalist Cindy Schumacher. The position opened up when former Executive Director Jim Goenner left last year to become the president and CEO of the National Charter Schools Institute. Mary Kay Shields has been serving as interim executive director. About 25 people attended an open forum with Schumacher on Thursday in the EHS Building to discuss the position, the future of the center and the future of charter schools in general. Fifty initial applicants were considered after a national outreach for the position before a committee narrowed the number to just three finalists, Goenner said. One finalist has accepted a position elsewhere and another was deemed unqualified for the executive director position, leaving Schumacher as the prime candidate. “There’s going to have to be some changes, and this is a great opportunity to make these changes,” Schumacher said. Schumacher indicated the quality of the charter

schools was of the greatest concerns that needed to be addressed. “There is a quality issue with schools,” she said. “On a whole, we’re not where we need to be. ... (There is) a lot of discussion about teacher quality.” The Center for Charter Schools has operated successfully since 1994, and was one of eight model authorizers recognized nationally last year. The Michigan Deptartment of Education is also pleased with the work the center has been doing. “We have a collaborative relationship (with the Michigan Department of Education),” Schumacher said. “They have a role and we have a role, but we work together. (The department of education) looked at 17 different areas of the center, and were very pleased with the system they saw, and didn’t have any recommendations.” There are 56 charter schools in Michigan currently overseen by the CMU Center for Charter Schools, with four more in Wayne County to be added soon. Overall, there are more than 200 charter schools in the state. Charter schools, though public government entities, are often contracted to work with companies. These partnerships are

Kaitlin Thoresen/Assistant Photo Editor

Deputy Director of The Center for Charter Schools Cindy Schumacher answers questions during a public forum Thursday morning at EHS 315. Schumacher is a finalist for the position of executive director for The Center for Charter Schools.

carefully considered to maintain the standards of the schools, Schumacher said. “(It’s important to) ensure all our schools are meeting their performance standards with the systems we have to support them,” she said. Gary Naeyaert, senior advisor for policy and communications for the Center of Charter Schools, said more than two-thirds of kids served are poor or minorities and are underserved by traditional schools. “(The new director) needs to be a passionate advocate for charter schools and helping kids ... and Cindy represents that,”

Naeyaert said. “We’re looking for somebody with vision, commitment (and) passion who would help take university programs to the next level,” he said. Naeyaert said he was happy with the selection of Schumacher as a finalist for the position. “She’s superbly qualified; she’s been in the center for over a decade,” Naeyaert said. “She’s very well-equipped to take the helm. If Cindy were to become our director, it would be a smooth transition — it would not be a drastic change.” university@cm-life.com

Annual juried student art exhibit opens today, runs through March 24 By Chad Mitchell Staff Reporter

Anne Gochenour said the juried student art exhibit gives young artists a chance to experience exhibiting. The Central Michigan University Art Gallery director said this exhibit has been very popular in the past. “There’s a lot of student interest in the show,” she said. “It gives them experience exhibiting.” The exhibit opens today and is free to the public. Awards will be announced at the artists’ reception between 2 and 4 p.m. on Saturday. All works chosen will be displayed in the main gallery until March 24. Two Michigan professionals from outside CMU, a fine art artist and a graphic design artist will act as jurors for the exhibit. The jurors will decide which pieces get into the exhibit and which artists de-

CMED | continued from 1

The final agreement also states CMED faculty who have an equal or greater appointment to CMU’s other colleges may remain in the union. So far, there are six CMED faculty members hired who were previously hired at CMU. Five of them were previously in the FA, and will remain members. Psychology Professor Gary Dunbar is one of them. He currently has a 50 percent appointment to CMED, and he will remain primarily a faculty member of the psychology department. He said the final contract “makes sense.” “Although I am hoping there will be a rich exchange of ideas and collaborations between CMED faculty and my fellow FA members, there are fundamental differences in how CMED will structure the educational experiences for their students,” he wrote in an email. “In addition, the expectations for CMED faculty varies considerably from what is expected of most of their non-CMED counterparts. As such, I think the flexibility that the negotiated contract provides is in the best interest of CMED.” Besides Dunbar, the other CMED FA members include chemistry professor Ajit Sharma, biology professor Steve Gorsich, physical therapy professor Peter Loubert and health professions professor William Saltarelli. Leslie Wallace, the sixth previously employed mem-

serve prizes. Gochenour said experiences like this are crucial for developing artists, because it’s important to share art and communicate. Mount Pleasant senior Meghan Borland won the people’s choice award in last year’s exhibit. “It’s a good experience to enter your work,” she said. “It’s also good to have people see what you’ve been working on.” There are other incentives for students to participate. The top five students will be awarded cash prizes, and the first place grand award will come with $200. Two $100 juror awards and two $50 merit awards will be given to second, third, fourth and fifth place winners. Last year’s grand prize winner, Lauren Hild, is entering three pieces this year. Last year was Hild’s first experience exhibiting her work.

“I didn’t think I would place at all,” the Bad Axe senior said. “I was completely floored when they called my name.” Hild said the atmosphere of the exhibit was friendly and enthusiastic rather than competitive, and it’s worth it for students to enter everything they can. “Whether you place or not, you’ll still get good exposure for your work,” Hild said. “And maybe some feedback you wouldn’t normally get.” Borland agreed with Hild and said the worst that can happen is not getting accepted, which is part of the process. The prize money from awards can be used for anything, but Borland and Hild used at least part of their winnings for art supplies. “It’s quite cyclical I guess,” Borland said, causing him to laugh.

ber, is a health sciences adjunct and Union of Teaching Faculty member hired as part-time CMED foundation sciences faculty. CMED Dean Ernest Yoder said he is unsure if she will remain in the UTF. Yoder said there is a possibility for CMED to include more FA members, such as those from CMU’s other six colleges, and those co-recruited with other colleges. During state fact-finding, CMU’s bargaining team said there are only two medical schools in the country with unionized faculty: Temple University in Philadelphia and Wayne State University, one of CMU’s comparable universities.

when classes begin fall 2013. However, to be honest, I am not sure,” Saltarelli said in an email. The hiring of three listed faculty members is still in the process. However, when asked how many CMED faculty members will remain working when classes start, Yoder said “I believe most everyone on the list.” In total, less than 58 percent of CMED’s starting faculty are now fully hired.

Hiring progress uncertain Before CMED classes start in summer 2013, Yoder anticipates having 30 foundation science faculty and 80 clinicians hired. Clinicians will be adjuncts, not included in the UTF. So far, there are about 18 foundation science faculty and 46 clinicians hired, according to a list provided by the university. However, some of them have already finished working with CMED. “I was a consultant of sorts with CMED for about a year, but I don’t have an appointment with them,” Health Professions Professor James Lile said in an email. He remains on the list of foundation science faculty. Others are unsure if their work in CMED will continue. “There is a good chance I will continue with my 50 percent CMED appointment

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SPORTS Central Michigan Life

Gymnastics begins stretch of road games at Northern Illinois on Sunday, 9

| Friday, Feb. 24, 2012

Men’s basketball team takes on MAC-worst NIU on Sunday, 8

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Former baseball coach Waldo Sauter dies at age 90 By Matt Thompson Sports Editor

Former Central Michigan University baseball coach, professor, assistant football and basketball coach Waldo Sauter died Wednesday morning at the age of 90. Sauter was assistant coach of those three sports from 1957-62 before becoming the head baseball coach for eight years until 1970. “Not only was he an outstanding coach, which made them fun to watch, he was real, he was dedicated to being a professor,” said former CMU Athletics Director Herb Deromedi, who was an assistant football coach while Sauter coached baseball. In his last year of coaching in 1970

he was named NCAA regional Coach of the Year. He still stayed at CMU teaching physical education until 1986. Sauter was the first CMU coach in any sport to win 200 games, posting an overall record of 210-91. “He was a gentleman,” Bill Theunissen said, the CMU baseball coach before Sauter from 1953-62. “He was a very conscious person and disciplined. He was liked by players and everyone. “He will be sadly missed.” Even after Sauter retired he never stopped going to CMU baseball games. “He was one of the first ones to greet me when I came back to CMU, and the first one to greet me when I was hired as head coach,” said current baseball head coach Steve Jaksa. “He goes to the banquet every year, and is always

at the ‘Meet the Chippewas.’” Jaksa has known Sauter for 35 years. While Jaksa was a baseball player here in the 1970’s Sauter didn’t coach, but was around the program Waldo Sauter and was Jaksa’s physical education instructor. “He always had a dry humor,” Jaksa said. “He epitomized Chippewa baseball.” Jaksa said in recent years Sauter would sit in the press box for cold games, but when it was nice out he loved being outside around everyone. “He always had encouragement and dry humor,” Jaksa said. “He knew it was

very important, but said do the best you can. It was fun to talk to him about baseball in general. He had a keen mind and didn’t lose it. He always remembered games from previous years.” Theunissen said he had no doubts when Sauter took over the program in his place. “He was very successful,” Theunissen said. “He expected the very best you could do. He was straight-forward with you, ‘Do the best you can.’ And he was respected for that.” Deromedi said it was admirable the way Sauter always came back to baseball games and was around the program. “I always admired him as a gentleman and true professional,” Deromedi said. “He was admired by his colleagues too.”

Waldo Sauter w Born: April 7, 1921 w College: Ball State w Assistant Coach: 1957-1962 w Head coach: 1963-1970 w Career record: 210-91 w Physical Education professor: 1957-1986 w Died: Wednesday at 90 years old Sauter was inducted into the CMU Hall of Fame in 1994. “We’re going to miss him,” Jaksa said. “I feel really bad for his wife Judy. You know at some point it’d happen, you just hoped it didn’t.” sports@cm-life.com

Track and field stays relaxed for MAC By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

LIBBY MARCH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore forward Taylor Johnson leaps up for a shot against Northern Illinois Wednesday night at McGuirk Arena. CMU defeated the Huskies 73-50. Johnson had 10 rebounds, 2 assists and scored a total of 20 points. CMU won the game 73-50.

Becoming a star Taylor Johnson taking advantage of starting spot By Kristopher Lodes | Staff Reporter

Last season sophomore forward Taylor Johnson was named Mid-American Conference Sixth Person of the Year but it appears she won’t repeat. Why? Because she has become the most consistent player for the Central Michigan women’s basketball team, earning her a spot in the starting five. “I have a lot players on this team that can start and Taylor was coming off the bench and if anything she has been consistent,” head coach Sue Guevara said. “We were getting a lot of point production off our bench and we were starting a little slow, now we’re a little bit faster.”

Sophomore forward Taylor Johnson dribbles around Northern Illinois defender Kim Davis during the second half of Wednesday night’s game at McGuirk Arena. LIBBY MARCH/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A JOHNSON | 9

The Central Michigan track and field team is at the point of the season it has prepared for all year: the Mid-American Conference championship. It begins at 11 p.m. today in Akron, Ohio and will finish Saturday. “This means to us, as a staff, the opportunity to put our athletes out on the field and let them do what they’ve prepared for,” Willie Randolph said, director of track and field. Randolph said although he’s excited for what he calls the most exciting time of the year, it’s also stressful. “I don’t ever feel nervous the week of (conference championships),” Randolph said. “Just calm, slash, passive-aggressive.” Randolph said his athletes feel rested about the dialed-down intensity of practices this week to stay rested and loose for competition. “They look fine,” he said. “They look ready to go and they’re loving it – they don’t have to work hard this week. They’re fresh and excited.” Randolph said he thinks the Chippewas will arrive very confident since they already competed at the Stile Field House in the Akron Invitational two weeks ago. “Most of (the team) never competed in an environment that size,” Randolph said. “It really helps us.” Randolph said at different points of the season he knows Kent State will be the Chippewas biggest obstacle for the MAC championship. Kent State men’s and women’s runners have produced top-five results in most events all season. The strategy to prepare during the week, Randolph said, is all mental. The coaches have been speaking genially with athletes to keep their minds from wandering into nervousness. “You do it more now because we’re in the psychological piece of it,” Randolph said. Senior thrower Mychael King said he felt bittersweet going into the MAC championship. “It’s my last one,” he said. “After that, it’s over. It makes you want to go out and do even better.” sports@cm-life.com

BASKETBALL

Despite career game from Trey Zeigler, men lose at Toledo By Ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

Sophomore Trey Zeigler’s career-high 33 points was not enough to propel the Central Michigan men’s basketball team during a 72-67 loss Wednesday night at Toledo. “It was a tough loss for us,” Trey said. “We really came together after our last loss and we are trying to finish strong here in the MAC Conference, so it was a tough one to bite.” Despite shooting nearly 52 percent from the field, the Chippewas defense could not contain Toledo guard Julius Brown. He

had a team-high 29 points on 1011 shooting. Toledo guard Dennis Curtis added 18 points in the victory. “Defensively, we couldn’t get stops when we needed to,” head coach Ernie Zeigler said. “It was a game where both teams shot the ball really well and we just came up on the short end of the stick.” The game remained close throughout with neither team holding a lead larger than 9 points. CMU (8-19, 3-10 Mid-American Conference) trailed 33-27 with 4:10 left to go in the first half before going on a 9-0 run to take the lead. Sophomore Derek Jack-

son hit a 3-pointer and freshman Austin McBroom converted a layup off a steal to cap the run. “It was a valiant effort,” Ernie said. “I think our kids really responded. We played confident offensively and had some great contributions across the board.” The Rockets added four more points before the half to take the 37-36 lead. Tied at 49 with 9:18 into the second half, Toledo gradually increased its lead to 64-53 with 5:32 remaining. CMU made it a 3-point game with 22 seconds left but could not complete the comeback attempt. Ernie said his team was a vic-

tim to a few unfortunate calls. “We had some plays we made that ended up being discounted,” he said. “Some calls we got no baskets for when we actually made baskets. That along with our inability to get stops on defense at key junctures really hurt.” But he was pleased with his team’s ability to create points off turnovers. “We forced 17 turnovers and we knew we could pressure in different situations and focus on turning that in to offense,” he said. Wednesday’s game was the second time Trey scored thirty points or more in a game in his

career. He also had a team-high eight rebounds. “I’m just trying to make a real effort to be really aggressive this last part of the season and it paid off tonight,” Trey said. “I think it’s going to be key for us to make a run going into the MAC Tournament.” The loss snaps a six-game winning streak for CMU against Toledo. The Chippewas will host Northern Illinois (3-23, 2-11) at 2 p.m. Sunday at McGuirk Arena in a battle of the two teams with the worst records in the MAC. sports@cm-life.com


8 || Friday, Feb. 24, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Women’s Basketball CMU 73, NIU 50 CMU (73) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Bracey 29 2-5 0-0 2-2 5 4 6 Johnson 23 7-15 6-8 0-0 10 3 20 Welch 14 0-2 0-1 0-0 0 0 0 DiGuilio 23 5-13 2-7 0-0 3 1 12 Baker 24 1-2 1-1 1-2 6 1 4 Miller 13 0-0 0-0 0-1 5 3 0 Green 25 3-10 0-1 2-2 2 1 8 Olive 12 2-6 1-3 2-2 0 0 7 Tamm 4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Bellamy 3 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Bradford 22 6-11 0-3 1-2 7 2 13 Laduke 5 1-3 1-1 0-0 1 1 3 Huff 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Totals 200 27-68 11-25 8-11 45 17 73 Assists (13): Welch 4, Bradford 4, Johnson 2 Steals (10): Green 3, Olive 2, Johnson 2, Bradford 2, Bracey 1 Northern Illinois (50) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Thorp 20 1-4 0-0 0-1 1 2 2 Davis 35 2-4 0-0 3-7 5 1 7 Shelton 34 3-7 2-3 4-4 3 1 12 Corral 24 3-11 2-6 0-0 5 4 8 Johnson 30 4-8 1-2 0-0 4 3 9 Callahan 5 0-2 0-1 0-0 0 0 0 Taylor 24 4-10 0-3 0-0 3 0 8 Augusta 10 1-2 0-0 0-0 2 1 2 Haywood 14 0-2 0-0 2-5 3 0 2 Jackson 4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 18-51 5-15 9-17 35 12 50 Assists (11): Shelton 4, Davis 2, Taylor 2 Steals (4): Davis 2, Shelton 1, Corral 1

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports] Men’s Basketball CMU 67, Toledo 72 CMU (67) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Barnes 25 2-3 1-1 0-0 2 2 5 Coimbra 34 2-4 0-1 2-4 4 2 6 Zeigler 38 15-25 1-4 2-7 8 2 33 McBroom 30 3-7 1-4 2-3 1 4 9 Jackson 34 4-10 2-6 2-2 2 3 12 Craddock 14 0-0 0-0 0-0 3 4 0 Keel 9 0-2 0-2 0-0 0 0 0 Morris 10 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 Harden 3 1-1 0-0 0-0 2 1 2 Saylor 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 0 Totals 200 27-52 5-18 8-16 24 21 67 Assists (12): McBroom 5, Zeigler 3, four tied with 1 Steals (10): Jackson 3, McBroom 3, Zeigler 2, Barnes 1, Coimbra 1 Blocks (0): None Toledo (72) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Smith 24 2-4 0-1 1-2 4 4 5 Wonnell 21 0-0 0-0 1-2 5 0 1 Buckley 27 1-3 0-1 0-0 3 2 2 Pearson 33 5-12 0-0 1-2 7 4 11 Brown 33 10-11 1-1 8-10 3 2 29 Mathew 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Dear 6 0-0 0-0 1-2 1 1 1 Holliday 21 1-3 0-2 3-3 1 2 5 Dennis 32 6-10 3-5 3-3 2 3 18 Totals 200 25-43 4-10 18-24 27 19 72 Assists (11): Buckley 5, Pearson 3, three tied with 1 Steals (5): Buckley 2, Dennis 2, Wonnell 1 Blocks (1): Wonnell 1

men’s basketball

Huskies up next at McGuirk Arena By Ryan Zuke Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan men’s basketball team knows time is running out to improve its seeding for the Mid-American Conference Tournament. Its next challenge will be taking on the last place team in the MAC, Northern Illinois at 2 p.m. Sunday at McGuirk Arena. The Chippewas (8-19, 3-10 MAC) will take on an NIU team (3-21, 2-11 MAC) that has lost four in a row and 10 out of its last 11. But CMU has endured a similar stretch dropping 11 of its last 12. “We’ve had a chance to win these recent games,” sophomore guard Trey Zeigler said. “Some calls haven’t been going our way, but we’ve got to come back

home and beat Northern (Illinois) and get rolling going into the tournament.” The Huskies have two players that average more than six points a game. Senior Tim Toler is averaging 10.8 points and freshman Abdel Nader is averaging 10. NIU is 11th in the MAC in scoring offense and scoring defense. CMU head coach Ernie Zeigler is confident heading into Sunday’s game. Although his team was not on the winning end last game at Toledo, he said he saw signs of improvement from his squad. “We got better,” he said. “I feel good about the fact that our kids got better and hopefully we can come home and be ready for Northern (Illinois) on Sunday. If we can play with that type of effort and execution

on offense, then it’s going to help us heading into the (MAC) Tournament.” CMU shot above 50 percent from the field Wednesday night for only the fifth time all season, and also created 17 turnovers. “I think our kids have a sense of purpose about us,” Ernie said. “We probably had our best road effort in about a month. We are playing better basketball and more confident basketball.” NIU won the first meeting this season 74-66. CMU had four players in doubledigit scoring, but Nader’s 22 points was too much for the Chippewas. The Huskies shot 55 percent from the field compared to 37 percent that CMU shot. The Chippewas are 45-50 all-time against the Huskies. sports@cm-life.com

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Freshman guard Crystal Bradford looks for an opening Wednesday night at McGuirk Arena. She scored 13 points and had 7 rebounds.

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Crystal Bradford scores 13 off the bench to help beat Northern Illinois By Kris Lodes Staff Reporter

Freshman Crystal Bradford scored 13 points after sitting out the previous game because of a team violation. She also had 7 rebounds as the Central Michigan women’s basketball team defeated Northern Illinois 73-50 Wednesday night at McGuirk Arena. Sophomore forward Taylor Johnson had 20 points and 10 rebounds for her third double-double of the season for the Chippewas (1414, 6-8 MAC). CMU needed it against a Huskies (12-14, 6-8 MAC) team that was tied with them for third place in the Mid-American Conference West division. “In the beginning I tried to force a little bit, but my coaches told me to get out there and do my job,” Johnson said. “I wouldn’t have had anything if it wasn’t for my teammates.” Johnson definitely didn’t do it all herself as she needed

her teammates to step up when she found herself with two fouls in the first half. Freshman guard Crystal Bradford contributed 13 points, seven rebounds, four assists, two steals and a block while coming off the bench. Bradford didn’t make the trip to Muncie, Ind. Sunday when her team lost to Ball State. “It was certainly good to have her (Bradford) on the floor tonight,” said head coach Sue Guevara. “I told Crystal that I thought she played a very controlled game today.” MAC seeding on the line The win puts CMU at the No. 5 seed if the season ends today in the upcoming MAC Tournament. That would mean the Chippewas would have the opportunity to host the first round of the conference tournament in McGuirk Arena against No. 12 seeded Buffalo. To be able to host, it CMU must win one of its final two games.

The Chippewas have to travel to rival Western Michigan (7-20, 4-10 MAC) Saturday at 2 p.m., and then host rival Eastern Michigan (20-7, 12-2 MAC) in the regularseason finale 7 p.m. on Feb. 28. “We have two games left and this is just a good game for momentum and that’s what we need going into the tournament,” Guevara said. “It’s about carrying over and being consistent, and our transition defense is going to be key.” Another key would be the availability of Bradford when the team plays the Broncos. Bradford has not traveled with the team in its last two trips and it has missed her. “I fully expect that you’ll see Bradford make every trip with us,” Guevara said. Guevara then turned to Bradford and asked if that is true to which Bradford simply replied ‘Yes’ with a smile. sports@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, Feb. 24, 2012 || 9

[SPORTS]

Gymnastics goes to Northern Illinois to begin road stretch By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan gymnastics team will be traveling for the next three weeks and its first stop is 2 p.m. Sunday at Northern Illinois. The team will be sleeping in a hotel for the first time this season, something head coach Jerry Reighard said normally comes earlier in the season.

“We always struggle when we go to Kent State because of the rivalry,” Reighard said. “But I think Northern Illinois is a concern for us because it is such a long trip, it just adds to the fatigue of our team. This is very late in the season for us to be having our first overnight trip.” Freshman Halle Moraw will continue to help the Chippewas by competing as an all-arounder against the Huskies. Moraw scored

JOHNSON | CONTINUED FROM 7

Last season Johnson brought that physical play and energy off what was a shallow bench. She averaged 19 minutes, 10.7 points and 6.4 rebounds in that season. Johnson continued to come off the bench in the first 20 games of the season, but has started in the last eight games. That was highlighted Wednesday night with a 20-point, 10-rebound performance against Northern Illinois.

Since becoming a starter she has averaged 13.1 points, 7.4 rebounds per game where her season average is at just 7.9 points a game and 5.2 rebounds. “The only difference now is that I have a big flashy entrance,” Johnson said. “As soon as that jump ball goes up, it’s just a game.” When the Huskies first played the Chippewas this year it was a similar outcome, the Chippewas won big (86-67). But Johnson

an 8.75 on the floor in her last event. The high score propelled the Chippewas to score over a 49 on the event, a season high. “Halle was looked at, at the beginning of the year as a very competitive athlete on all four events,” Reighard said. “She came down with mono and that set her back early in the season, but we think she has done a great job for us and is really competitive as a Division I ath-

lete.” With so many injuries to the team this season, it has forced new faces into roles. Up to this point in the season, Reighard has pegged freshman Taylor Noonan as the most improved gymnast on the team. “Noonan has showed us she has a great competitive spirit,” Reighard said. “We looked at Taylor as a balance beam expert, which she is. She is leading the confer-

only played six minutes with two points and one rebound in that game. NIU found out firsthand Wednesday night what Johnson can do with 23 minutes instead of six. She shot 47 percent from the field, including six 3-pointers at 75 percent behind the arch. When she got the ball she attracted the defenders, which opened her up to create a couple assists to her teammates as well. Johnson crashed the boards with 10 rebounds on the night, two on the offensive end. After every shot, offense or

defense, Johnson was showcasing her physical play by going up for the rebounds. If she didn’t get the ball at first she would get her hands on the ball and create a tie up and a jump-ball situation. She forced turnovers by taking charges or getting a couple steals. “Taylor comes out strong and aggressive and she shows the rest of us when she rebounds that we have to get in the rebounds and help her out because she is bringing great energy,” said freshman guard Crystal Bradford.

ence on balance beam. She has done a great job on bars, and floor, she really filled a slot that we needed to be filled.” If the Chippewas want to continue their dominance of the Mid-American Conference they will need senior Kristin Teubner to continue her MAC gymnast of the year performances. Reighard believes Teubner can continue to perform at her high level now that her

MIKE MULHOLLAND/PHOTO EDITOR

sports@cm-life.com

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Sophomore forward Taylor Johnson drives past Northern Illinois Jenna Thorp in the first half of Wednesday night’s game at McGuirk Arena. Johnson had a game-high 20 points.

ibit Freeman/DeCaussin Art Exh Room

Friday, February 24 Art Exhibit Freeman/DeCaussinBab er Room

schedule is less cluttered. “She had some troubles early in the year with some grad school application trips,” Reighard said. “She had a ton of interviews that she had to do, which had a bigger toll than anyone expected. She was actually flying around the country to grad schools and coming back in the morning to compete later in a meet.”

Large Meal

Sunday, February 26 CMU Men’s Basketball 25 ry Central Februa day,Life tur SaCMU, , Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan • www.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, •CIA 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, •rthwww.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Illinois ernLife vs. No Sin, Sex and the 2:07pm @ HOME r r 7pm, Broadway Theate

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vertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media Bold, italic centered Bold, italic and 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 per issue e standards of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with the standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will$7.75 be responsible for typetypographical are the available along type are the available e extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to the used extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to the used extent of cancelling charge along for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features with other special features ch an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per y credit due canthe befipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due canthe befipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: per issue y responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

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ed Policy Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

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discrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 CM word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad Phone: 989-774-3493 gin, ect By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of the withStudent the standards Media which Board, of CM is$7.75 in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Lifeissue will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of and CM$7.75 is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will with the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling ypographical the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and charge for the are space used and type are type centered type are centered type are om By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along available along available along with available along with by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first date for such of with publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of with publication. Any Issues: $7.25 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features In Person: Moore Hall other special other special features special features ays picked of termination up at the CM of436 Life the credit ad. offi ce Ifdue you within can find 30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the credit ad. office Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the7-12 CM of Life the ad. offifeatures ce If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issue Issues: $7.00 per issuefor thelike Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like attractors. attractors. like adIssues: attractors. like ad attractors. onsible ified Dept. forp.m. the immediately. first day’s report insertion. We are it toonly the Classifi responsible ed Dept. forp.m. the immediately. fi13+ rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. We are only responsible fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall NOTICES WANTED NOTICES TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

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JAMESTOWN APTS - 2 PER 2 BED, UNION SQUARE APTS - 2 PER 2 3, 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to ment close to campus. Water garbage BED, Beside Target, Warmwhich Shuttle to CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising refl ects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Campus, (989)775-5522 paid 805 1/2 douglas. Call John Campus. (989)772-2222 sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising www.LiveWithUnited.com 989-560-1701. www.LiveWithUnited.com in the to opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping the standards CM People Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 2 BED, 2 bath. Mobile home. WeidMAIN with STREET LIVING!of3-5 BASIC 2 BEDROOM 1which bath.isClose CM Life Classifi edsonly • 989-774-3493 man area. $500 + no smoking or pets. be responsible for typographical errors to the extent of cancelling charge for the space used and Walk to the class and downtown! campus $280 p/p includes heat. No By Website: www.cm-life.com 989-824-0362 rendered valueless by such anwww.cm-life.com error. Credit for such an error is 989-773-2333 limited to onlywww.olivieri-homes.com the first date of publication. Any pets. Non-smoker. 989-560-7157. In Person: 436 Moore Hall credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

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1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for 10 || Friday, Feb. 24, 2012 || Central Michigan Life type are available along Central Michigan Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • per www/cm-life.com typographical errors only to theLife extent•of436 cancelling the charge for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 issue with other special ed Ad and rendered Classifi ed AdOPEN Policy Classifi features ed Ad Rates ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS valueless byOPEN such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office ed Ad within 30CM Classifi ed Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates Lifeofwill not knowingly accept which refl ects discrimination because of race, color, religion, days termination of the ad. If you fiadvertising nd an error, report it to the Classifi ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising CM Life notopinion knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of color, which is will in the of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards ofrace, CM Life. CMreligion, Life will sexresponsible or nationalfor origin, and CM Life reserves to of reject or discontinue, without notice, be typographical errors only tothe theright extent cancelling the charge for the spaceadvertising used and which is invalueless the opinion of thean Student Mediafor Board, not in keeping the standards of CM Life. CM LifeAny will rendered by such error. Credit suchisan error is limitedwith to only the first date of publication. be responsible for picked typographical errors onlyoffi toce the extent cancelling the charge the space and credit due can be up at the CM Life within 30of days of termination of thefor ad. If you findused an error, rendered byed such animmediately. error. Credit for error is limited for to only first date of publication. Any report it tovalueless the Classifi Dept. Wesuch are an only responsible the fithe rst day’s insertion. credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

PUBLISHING om

om a.m.-5 p.m.

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32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS , Mt. Pleasant, MIPlacing 48859 • www/cm-life.com a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Policy Classified Ad Rates By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com By Fax: 989-774-7805 discrimination because of race, color, religion, Board, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified adis not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for

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ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ed Ad32,000 Policy Classified Ad Rates HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED SALES GARAGE SALESAMGhousing.com FOR RENT MIGHTY MINISGARAGE SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION ALWAYS OPEN AT PETS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE Isabella County PERSONALS PERSONALS Classifieds: Your system for connections. Transportation AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES Commission LOST & FOUND WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPYTO ADS WANTED TO RENT WANTED NOTICES FOR SALELIFE WANTED TO RENT RENT NOTICES FOR SALE Central Michigan 436 Moore Hall • CMU Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHIWANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS www.cm-life.com • 774-3493 CLES we buy them we haul them. HELP Central WANTED 989•772•9441 GARAGE SALES FOR Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES 989-772-5428. LOST & RENT FOUND LOST & FOUND WANTED TOa RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALEed Ad Policy Placing Classified AdNOTICES Classifi Classified Ad Rates SPECIAL SECTION WANTED TO RENT HELP HELPPETS WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad ADORABLE BREED: SHI SALE CHI PUPBy Phone: 989-774-3493 AUTOS SERVICES SERVICES sex or national and CM989-365-3914. Life FOR reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising LOST & FOUND PIES. $300 JUST RELEASED FOR rental 5 bedOAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master origin, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 Bold, italic and ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will By 989-774-7805 room 3Fax: storyPETS condo. Washer/dryer. Bedrooms Each With Personal Bath 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT responsible centered type are $1200/ month. Available May - 2012. Full Size Washer & be Dryer Includesfor typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and Bedrooms By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue HELP GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES Walk to campus. 248-496-8861 Internet FOR & cable RENT 989-773-2333 available along with rendered valueless by such an error.WANTED Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue In Person: 436 Moore Hall www.olivieri-homes.com rjrassoc@ameritech.net Security Deother special features credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, REAL ESTATE PERSONALS RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES DANCERS WANTED. NO EXPERIposit required. 13+ Issues:STARTING $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. NECESSARY. SUPPLEMENT SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS AT $255/MO. WANTED TO RENT ENCE YOUR INCOME PART TIME. APPLY MICELI!S CORNER. 989-539-3401 REACH THAN 32,000 READERS PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADSEACH AT REAL MORE ESTATE PERSONALS REAL ESTATE PERSONALS AFTE R 6 PM. • FREE Laundry facebook.com/micelis.corner.showROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES girls. • FREE High Speed Internet WANTED TOMembership BUY WANTED TO BUY SUMMER HAPPY ADS CAMP POSITIONS: HAPPY ADS Make FREE Gym to Endurance a difference in the life of a child! SumREAL ESTATE PERSONALS • FREE Expanded Cable mer therapy camp for children with physical disabilities. Located on 2-5 Person • FREE Shuttle Service shores of Lake Superior in Big Bay, NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE Positions available for Counselors, 2-5 Bedroom WANTED TO BUY MI. HAPPY ADS to Campus Waterfront, Instructors for Nature/ Arts NO DEPOSIT ON 5 BEDROOMS & Crafts/ Recreation Nurses, Thera• Basketball CourtAUTOS FOR SALE Food Service, and Auxiliary. FOR& Cable SALE pists, Warm Shuttle to Campus AUTOS • FREE Internet SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND Must be enthusiastic, responsible, and • Sand Volleyball Court love children. June 10 through August Pet Friendly 5. $1,800 plus room & board, and the 775-5522 LiveWithUnited.com HELP WANTED HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES experience of a lifetime provided. FOR RENT FOR RENT

typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used ect By or discontinue, notice, advertising Website:without www.cm-life.com and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only eping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue In Person: 436 Moore Hall the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office cancelling the charge for the space used and centered typeofare within 30 days termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue discrimination because of race, color, religion, wingly accept advertising which refl ects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad Rates: 15immediately. word classifi available alongminimum with limited to only the first date of publication. Any Dept. We are onlyper responsible fored the fiad rst day’s insertion. 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue ect or discontinue, without notice, advertising gin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising other special features ays of termination of the ad. If you find an error, eping with the of CM is Life. Life will with the standards on of the Student notCM in keeping of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic and 13+Issues: Issues: $7.00 per issue like attractors. Bold, italic and 1-2 per 1-2adIssues: $7.75 per issue onsible for thestandards firstMedia day’sBoard, insertion. cancelling the errors charge for to thethe space used and centered type are ypographical only extent of cancelling the charge for the space centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 used per and issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with limited the first date of publication. Any to only the first date of publication. Any available along with by suchto anonly error. Credit for such an error is limited 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue Rates: 7-12 $7.25 per per issue owingly accept which ects discrimination because of race, religion, other special features other ays of termination of Life the ad. If you firefl nd30 an error, 15Issues: word minimum classifi edspecial ad features picked up at theadvertising CM office within days of termination of the ad. If youcolor, find an error, gin, Life reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising Issues: $7.00 per issue like adIssues: attractors. 13+ $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. onsible forCM the first reserves day’s insertion. ifiedand Dept. immediately. Wethe areright onlyto responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. on of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and APARTMENTS ANDIssues: HOUSES closeper issue 1-2 $7.75 ypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space usedto and centered type are downtown and campus. View list atper issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 available along with by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first not date of publication.810 Any South University or call “I’m used 7-125pm. Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features 989-621-7538. 9ampicked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of terminationto of the ad. If you find an error, this much 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the firstattention.” day’s insertion. SHUTTLE SERVICE WESTPOINT VILLAGE - 2 BED 2 MASTER BATH LIKE NEW, Warm Public Get noticed with Shuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 Transportation the Classifieds. www.LiveWithUnited.com Services of the

Classifiereds ! n w o D t i s o p e D o

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partment Homes

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CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

presented BY:

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Across 1 Woolly grazers 5 It follows John 9 Defunct Olympic sport 13 Dieter’s snack? 16 On __ with 17 Crop production toast? 18 5’7” Spud who won an NBA Slam Dunk contest 19 Words before coming or out 20 Telegraph sound 21 Lover of Psyche 22 Artist’s pad 25 Ability to detect a certain orientation 27 Not like at all 30 PLO part 32 Boxing statistic 33 Actress Thurman 34 Saint in red 36 Raised entrance area 38 Ave. paralleling Park 39 Useless footwear 41 Switz. neighbor 42 Soul 44 Waist-length jackets 45 Gray gp.

3300 EAST DEERFIELD ROAD • (989) 773-3300 46 Stray chasers 48 Not own outright, with “on” 49 Pique 50 Debate choices 52 Piano sonatas, usually 54 It covers all the bases 55 Tuna of the Pacific 57 Golden __ 61 Rice from New Orleans 62 Buckaroo at sea? 65 It has banks in Germany and Poland 66 Dance and theater in Texas? 67 Red areas, once: Abbr. 68 Case workers, briefly 69 The greater part

7 Knotted 8 Mistletoe piece 9 Played with, in a way 10 One giving pep talks between acts of “Carmen”? 11 Maternity ward? 12 Balls 14 __-1: “Ghostbusters” auto 15 Relatively cool red giant 23 Fail in business 24 With 35-Down, fairs, and a hint to making sense of this puzzle’s pairs of adjacent 10-letter answers 26 Acknowledgments 27 Pacific dance 28 Pews, at times? 29 Intersection where Down cabs hang out? 1 Do some glass cutting, 31 Joie de vivre perhaps 34 Tropical ring-tailed 2 “Take it easy!” critter 3 Goes astray 35 See 24-Down 4 Declining from old age 37 H.S. sophs may 5 Bavarian carp? take it 6 Friend of Fidel 40 Basie’s “__’Clock

Jump” 43 Auto club employees 47 Hot tea hazard 49 Ojibwa home 51 Young pig 53 Thailand neighbor 54 New Mexico ski resort 56 Buried treasure site, often 58 Iberian river 59 Disintegrates 60 Part of MS-DOS: Abbr. 63 Dr. Mom’s forte 64 __ in Charlie

Feb. 24, 2012  

Central Michigan

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