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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

‘American Pie’ actor brings musical talent to CMU, 3A

Central Michigan University

| Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012

Phi Sigma Sigma adviser one of 100 Pillsbury Bake-Off finalists, 1B

[cm-life.com]

Presidential candidate Ron Paul to speak in Plachta Saturday By Ben Harris Senior Reporter

With the Michigan primaries fast approaching, Central Michigan University will see one of the contenders for the Republican nomination speaking on its campus. Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul will speak at 6 p.m. Saturday in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium. Doors will open to those

who sign up for vouchers beforehand at ronpaulatcmich. eventbrite.com/ at 5 p.m., and remaining general admission will begin at 5:30 p.m. Paul was invited to speak by CMU Campus Conservatives. Campus Conservatives President and Mount Pleasant senior Taylor Jackson said the registered student organization is honored to bring Paul to speak at CMU. “This is an opportunity to

engage the community in a critical discussion on solutions to the challenges facing our country. Campus Con- Ron Paul servatives has always been about bringing together the extended conservative family for thoughtful discussions,” Jackson said

in an email. “This promises to be a great opportunity for students and the broader community to hear from a major voice at such a critical time in our country’s history.” Jackson said the event is designed to engage the community, including students, in discussions about possible solutions to problems facing America but that the event does not constitute an en-

dorsement by himself or the RSO. “(Campus Conservatives) do not endorse any single candidate,” Jackson said. “I’m an advocate of promoting that critical discussion and would host any candidate who wanted to come.” In January, Paul won CMU College Republicans’ primary straw poll. Keith Voeks, assistant director in University Events, said

University Events offered a number of different venue choices to Paul’s campaign managers, who decided on Plachta Auditorium. He said a sound system with technicians was ordered, along with custodians to clean the building, costing $933. Jackson said the cost will eventually be borne by the Campus Conservatives.

A paul | 2a

A c a d e m i c P r i o r i t i z at i o n

Science, Technology, HP colleges slated to receive most funds By David Oltean Senior Reporter

The Science and Technology and Health Professions colleges will receive the most in academic prioritization funding tabbed for Central Michigan University’s six colleges and Prof Ed program. According to funding documents provided by Provost Gary Shapiro, the Science and Technology College is tabbed to receive $880,296, while Health Professions will get $857,000. Combined, the two colleges will get more than 47 percent (24 and 23 percent, respectively) of the more than $3.6 million University President George Ross authorized to Central Michigan University’s six colleges and Prof Ed program. Criteria for ranking programs included room for enhancement, enrollment rates, employment oppor-

photos by jeff smith/staff photographer

Highland senior Alex Chouinard asks the audience to discuss three “road blocks” Monday evening during “New Year, New Life” in Pearce 128. The program, created by Chouinard, is designed to help students reach true fulfillment in their lives.

New

tunities and expected future enrollment demand. Out of the 401 programs, there were 34 Priority 1 programs and 88 Priority 2 programs. The prioritization, based off recommendations from deans and their advisory councils, along with Shapiro, ranked academic programs from Priority 1 through 5. All Priority 1 and some Priority 2 programs received portions of the funding. The College of Business Administration will receive $780,000, about 21 percent of the available amount. After that, the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences, Communication and Fine Arts and Education and Human Services have been allocated less than 20 percent combined. Prof Ed will receive $116,000, or about three percent of the A FUNDING | 2A

Proposed legislation may prevent grad. students unions

life

Motivational event draws 250 students

By David Oltean Senior Reporter

A recently proposed bill that may prevent graduate student research assistants from unionizing was discussed in a Michigan Senate Government Operations committee Tuesday. The proposed bill, Senate Bill 0971, would remove the collective bargaining rights and entitlement to representation of the more than 2,000 GSRAs in Michigan. State Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville, R-Monroe, proposed the bill Feb. 15 and chaired Tuesday’s committee meeting. The proposed bill comes on the heels of a group of graduate students’ efforts to overturn a Michigan Employment

By Ryan Fitzmaurice | Staff Reporter Two hundred and fifty students absorbed personal revelations Monday at the motivational program New Year, New Life. The event’s creator and host, Milford junior Alexander Chouinard, said he has been working on the program extensively since his freshman year. The event, held from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in Pearce Hall 128, featured an introduction from Leadership Institute Director Dan Gaken. The program, according to its mission statement, aimed to be the most “successful and influential motivational program in the history of Central Michigan (University).” Chouinard said he doesn’t know if the program lived up to that goal, but he is confident it had a powerful effect on its participants.

Midland juniors Lauren Butler laughs with her fiance Ben Puckett as the two discuss “road blocks” in their life Monday evening during “New Year, New Life” in Pearce 128. “New Year, New Life” is a program created by Highland senior Alex Chouinard to help students reach true fulfillment in their lives.

“I haven’t been here for the history of Central Michigan; I haven’t seen every single motivational program that has happened on campus,” Chouinard said. “What I do know is that when you can get a group of students dedicated to making others lives better to bring in a group of over 200 people, you have a very successful program.” Chouinard said the most

powerful part of the evening came halfway through when he had students take part in what he called “the pointing exercise.” In it, he directed students to try and point crosswise against their body as far as they could. Then he had students close their eyes, and imagine pointing even farther. A NEW YEAR | 2a

black history month

Dick Gregory talks comedy, civil rights in keynote By Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

kaitlin thoresen/assistant photo editor

Comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory speaks in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium Tuesday night to a full audience as part of Black History Month.

You don’t go to school to learn how to make a living; you go to school to learn how to live, civil rights activist and comedian Dick Gregory told a crowd of about 800 people at his Black History Month keynote speech. “The No. 1 cause of death in America today is sleep deprivation, and I learned that when I went to college,” Gregory said Tuesday night in Warriner Hall’s Plachta Auditorium. “Take care of yourself. If you don’t have no money tonight, you’re not going to die. If you didn’t eat today, you’re not going to die. If I hold your nose

and mouth for 30 seconds, you’re dead; why? The most important thing on this planet is oxygen — and it’s free.” Multicultural Academic Student Services hosted the event as part of their celebration of Black History Month. University President George Ross introduced Gregory, calling attention to the comedian’s legacy as a civil rights activist. Gregory focused his speech around thanking Martin Luther King Jr. for his accomplishments. In 12 years, one person organized a movement based on a universal God and changed the entire planet, Gregory said. Instead of attending their usual Tuesday night meetings,

the Organization for Black Unity met in the auditorium for Gregory’s speech. “It’s important for us to come to as many black history events that we can,” said OBU President and Ypsilanti senior Jenee Graham. “It’s the month we can celebrate our heritage.” Although Gregory’s speech focused on serious topics, humor was prominent throughout his speech as well. “I was there when we used to call it Negro History Week,” he said. “And now it’s a month. We didn’t know any better that you guys give us a month — and it’s February with all those damn days missing.” studentlife@cm-life.com

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

Relations Committee ruling in 1981, which declared GSRAs as students. “An individual serving as a graduate student research assistant or in an equivalent position and any individual whose position does not have sufficient indicia of an employment relationship is not a public employee entitled to representation or collective bargaining rights under this act,” the proposed bill stated. Amber McCann, Richardville’s press secretary, said the proposed bill stemmed from conversations Richardville had with research assistants from the University of Michigan who did not wish to be unionized. A grad | 2a

[ I N S I D E] w Romney, Santorum in dead heat heading into Mich. primary, 3A w CMU looks to step up recycling in nationwide competition, 3A

[CM-LIFE.COM] w Join your co-hosts for this week’s VIBEcast, also on iTunes


2A || Wednesday, feb. 22, 2012 || Central michigan life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY

w Self Defense Class will be held from 9 to 10 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Terrace. A third degree black belt in karate will be teaching the class for $5 in advance or $6 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at Larzelere Hall 005. Proceeds benefit the Detroit Children’s Hospital.

THURSDAY

w Program Registration Night will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. in Finch Fieldhouse. Mount Pleasant Parks and Recreation hosts a registration night for community organizations to promote their programs and register participants. w Bowl for Kid’s Sake will be held at 9:30 p.m. at Chippewa Lanes. The event is hosted by Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 63

PAUl | CONTINUED FROM 1A

“The campaign decided Plachta was the best place for them,” he said. “We only have 500 to 600 seats downstairs, but if it turns out great, we can open up the balcony and have 1225.” Bryant English, the College Democrats vice president of community relations, said many of the members of the organization are excited for Paul’s visit, and there are at least six that will be attending the speech. “I really respect his conservative viewpoints, to be honest with you,” the Jackson senior said. “I hold him in high re-

FUndinG | CONTINUED FROM 1A

available funding. Shapiro said none of the $3.7 million will go to the College of Medicine. “We didn’t take any of this $3.7 million that we’re investing in high-priority programs,” Shapiro said. “(CMED’s review) was a different kind of review. We didn’t have enrollment patterns but had projected enrollment. We didn’t have quality measures in terms of faculty publications because we were hiring faculty, so it was included to be reviewed, but it was somewhat outside the process.” Kathryn Koch, College of Education and Human Services dean, said she was not surprised by the amount of funds given to her college. “This whole prioritization

GrAd | CONTINUED FROM 1A

On Thursday, the U-M Board of Regents called an emergency meeting to vote to oppose the bill. The Detroit Free Press reported that the board voted in a straight-party line, six Democrats voting against it and two Republicans voting for it. “The bill is pretty concise,” McCann said. “Really, this is born out of discussions that the majority leader had specifically with research assistants at U-M that felt that they would be faced with the imminent possibility of being unionized.” Ruthanne Okun, director of Michigan’s Bureau of Employment Relations, said MERC has a case pending on whether GSRAs are classified as students or employees. Okun said a 1981 ruling by MERC against GSRAs from unionizing, graduate student teaching assistants were still allowed to organize. “The question that the judge from the Michigan administrative is determining is whether the facts have changed since the 1981 ruling,” Okun said. McCann said Richardville is not concerned about differentiating between teaching assistants and GSRAs, and graduate gard, and I look forward to (his visit). Some of his economic policies I don’t agree with, but as far as his social views, I can follow the line with some of those. I won’t vote for him, but I respect him.” Paul makes it clear that there is a definite choice to make in the upcoming election, English said. “(It is about) whether we believe the government is there to support and invest in its people or whether the government is there to pull out the rug from under our feet, and I believe that’s the choice in 2012. That will pretty much be the name of the game, as far as I’m concerned. Do we invest in our people, invest in education, invest in clean and renewable resources? Or and funding process have been jointly developed with input from all sides,” Koch said. “I understand why it is that we received the funding that we did and next year, when we’re asked for more recommendations, we’ll hopefully be able to prove we made good use of this year’s funding.” Koch said if Priority 4 and 5 programs are eliminated or combined in her college, it may strengthen it for the future. “With the Priority 4s and 5s, I think in the long term that it’s going to strengthen the college and departments to change certain programming,” Koch said. In addition to the Academic Prioritization funding, $2,163,000 will be reallocated from college resources to help high-priority programs. The academic programs’ priority rankings can be seen in the re-

www.cm-life.com

[NEWS] student teachers will still be viewed as public employees. “Research assistants are there simply because they’re working on their own academic pursuit in conjunction with the university,” McCann said. Cedar Springs graduate student Michelle Campbell, vice president of Central Michigan University’s Graduate Student Union, said she was concerned about the wording of the proposed bill and questioned what the equivalent position mentioned in the legislation might include. “The big problem I have with the proposed wording of the bill that was introduced is that it says ‘graduate research assistants or an equivalent position,’ but they don’t define exactly what that equivalent position is,” Campbell said. Midland graduate student Jim Kowalski, the union’s treasurer, said some of CMU’s graduate assistants work in both research and teaching roles, making their employment title difficult to define. “We have a number of people whose appointment is partially research and partially teaching,” Kowalski said. “So we’re wondering what type of interpretation would be applied to those people.” university@cm-life.com

do we have not (have those things)?” he said. Libby Aldrich, President of the RSO VOX, Voices for Planned Parenthood, said she is glad Paul is coming to campus but has a problem with Paul’s seeing abortion as a legal issue rather than a privacy issue — something she said is between a woman and her doctor. “It’s great to get people involved in our government,” the St. Johns senior said. “However, I disagree with his idea of limited government everywhere (except) in women’s privacy and reproductive health rights, especially since he’s a gynecologist and should know better.” studentlife@cm-life.com

FUNDING AMOUNTS Funding amounts: w College of Science and Technology: $880,296 w College of Health Professions: $857,000 w College of Business Administration: $780,000 w College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences: $398,000 w College of Communication and Fine Arts: $330,000 w College of Education and Human Services: $306,000

PHOTO OF THE DAY

jeff smith/staff photographer

Mount Pleasant resident and Robaire Bakery & Doughnut Shop employee Lorrie Dunlap serves paczkis to a customer Tuesday afternoon, 1903 S. Mission St. “It’s a very fast-paced day,” Dunlap said. The bakery prepared nearly 700-dozen paczkis for the “Fat Tuesday” rush.

neW yeAr | CONTINUED FROM 1A

“It was incredible, because almost every single person was able to point farther then they initially could. Everyone suddenly realized at once that if they truly believed in their heart that they could do something, then they could do it. That was truly a remarkable moment, and everyone in the room knew it,” he said. Gull Lake sophomore Benjamin Hoeksema, who helped organize the program, said he felt the night was a success. “There was a lot of excitement in the room, a lot of students got a lot out of it,” Hoeksema said. “What stood out was how everyone knew who Chouinard was and was invested in what he had to say.” Hoeksema said despite the program’s success, there are no concrete plans for another event. “Me and Alex talked about this after the conference,” Hoeksema said. “We have no plans at the moment, but we were both ecstatic at how everything

went, and we will both be thinking and praying on it.” Chouinard said if a similar program were to happen again, he would try to go through a university department or organization. “I’m sure it’s going to happen in the future,” Chouinard said. “(And) if it does, I want to try and reach an even larger audience and an

even larger amount of students. Being sponsored by an organization would give us that reach.” Chouinard said he wants to be careful not to take too much credit. “I want to be modest,” he said. “The focus shouldn’t be on me; it should be on the students who went to the program and made a difference in their own lives, who discovered something about themselves.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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3A

INSIDE LIFE Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Graduate fights for equal treatment of disabled students By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

photos by ashley miller/staff photographer

Musician and actor Thomas Ian Nicholas talks about his career on his Gibson tour bus Monday morning shortly before performing with the Thomas Nicholas Band in the Bovee University Center’s Rotunda. The band, on the American Pie Reunion Tour, came to CMU to promote the release of the final chapter of the American Pie series.

rookies’ second act ‘American Pie’ actor Nicholas brings musical talent to campus By Jessica Fecteau | Senior Reporter

The Bovee University Center served up a lunchhour jam session Monday. About 65 people rotated in and out of the UC’s Rotunda to watch actor and musician Thomas Ian Nicholas’ band perform. Nicholas is best known for his role as Kevin in the “American Pie” series and for starring as Henry Rowengartner in “Rookie of the Year.” Program Board hosted the performance, one of 20 college stops on his tour for promoting the final chapter of the “American Pie” series, “American Reunion.” “It’s the first time I had a song in one of the ‘American Pie’ films,” Nicholas said. “When we did the first film so many years ago they did a lot of promotion on college campuses.” Although the first “American Pie” film has always been his favorite, Nicholas said “Ameri-

can Reunion” is the best sequel. “I had a lot of fun writing ideas or inspiring Seann (William Scott) to be funnier with Stifler,” Nicholas said. “Kevin doesn’t get to do any of those things, so we came up with some good bits together. But of course, he’ll take all the credit.”

Budget cuts have forced the department of sociology, anthropology and social work to offer fewer classes during the summer. Chairwoman Brigitte Bechtold said because of budget cuts, the department will be cutting two researchmethod classes that would normally be offered in the summer. “We have two professors who are retiring after the semester,” Bechtold said. “This doesn’t impact the summer schedule at all, however, because we’re able to hire people to teach the courses on

a fixed-term contract. We’ve been told by the dean that due to budget cuts, only the most important courses can be offered this summer.” The search for permanent faculty member replacements will begin full-force in fall 2012. The names of the retiring faculty have not been released. As opposed to the eight courses typically offered by the department, only five will be available this summer. “We’re only offering a total of five classes,” she said. “We’ll have options for the programs that require internships and the courses that relate to that. Also, we’ll have two field-school courses in

university@cm-life.com

Romney, Santorum in dead heat heading into Michigan primary By John Irwin Staff Reporter

Musician and actor Thomas Ian Nicholas plays an original acoustic song Monday morning before performing with the Thomas Nicholas Band during the American Pie Reunion Tour in the Bovee University Center’s Rotunda.

CM-LIFE.COM w Visit the website for videos, tour of Nicholas’ tour bus Commerce Township junior Jan Howell was surprised Nicholas was on campus. “We were just looking for

time to kill, and we cut through Bovee and heard the music, so we stopped to watch it,” he said. His friend, Zack Greening, said he thought it was Central Michigan University students playing in the band. A actor | 5a

Sociology offering fewer classes this summer By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

A 1998 Central Michigan University graduate is fighting to ensure what he claims should be equal treatment of all students at the university. Andrew Helmboldt, in a recent letter to Central Michigan Life, said teacher education student Kelly Laatsch is on track to receive her diploma in May. Laatsch, a Freeland senior, is working on completing her student teaching requirements but has a disability that entitles her to an interpreter that translates English using American Sign Language. Helmboldt said Laatsch requested an interpreter and was told by Karen Edwards, director of student teaching and Susie Rood, director of Student Disability Services, that if she were to implement use of her mandated reasonable accommodation, she would not successfully pass her student teaching requirements. When contacted, Helmboldt said Edwards and Rood said a section of the Michigan Department of Education Teaching Technical Standards indicates (students) should “understand and speak in English.”

Laatsch can do so, he said, but needs the assistance of an interpreter. According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Civil Rights website, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 protects disabled students from instances like this. “Section 504 forbids organizations and employers from excluding or denying individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to receive program benefits and services. It defines the rights of individuals with disabilities to participate in, and have access to, program benefits and services,” the website states. Edwards acknowledged the incident when contacted but declined comment. Rood did not return messages. Helmboldt said numerous alumni are concerned about this instance. “Kelly’s situation was brought to my attention by a friend of mine who works as an interpreter. He asked that I write a letter to bring attention to the issue, and I believe numerous people have written to CMU about it,” he said. “Hopefully we can get this resolved.”

anthropology.” Courses in research methods will not be available this summer. Of the five courses being offered, three of them are faculty-led study-abroad courses. “One study abroad course is a social and criminal justice course taking place in Brazil; there’s an anthropology course in Belize and another opportunity for students to do field work in Bolivia,” Bechtold said. Dianne DeSalvo, Study Abroad program director, said study-abroad courses are gaining popularity, particularly those in the field of anthropology and social work.

Students going to Belize will be there for 10 days. The Brazil program is 14 days, while the Bolivia program selects two or three students to stay the entire summer, supervised by Sergio Chavez, professor of sociology, anthropology and social work. “Applications are still coming in. The goal is to have 10 to 12 students per class,” she said. “There was enough interest in the Belize anthropology program that a second class was started. Therefore, some students will be going in May, and some are going in July.” university@cm-life.com

The latest poll shows Rick Santorum’s lead over Mitt Romney has vanished as the Michigan Republican primary slated for next Tuesday gets closer. On Tuesday, the Michigan Information and Research Service released a poll showing Romney, former governor of Massachusetts, leading former Pennsylvania Senator Santorum 32 percent to 30 percent among likely primary voters, a statistical tie. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.7 points. A week ago, a poll done for MIRS by Mitchell/Rosetta Stone showed Santorum with a nine-point lead. Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich comes in third at nine percent in the most recent poll, and Rep. Ron Paul of Texas finished fourth with seven percent. Twentytwo percent of voters say they are undecided. The poll underscores just how volatile and unpredictable the race for the Republican presidential nomination has been. Clinton Township senior Stephanie Jaczkowski, a member of College Republicans, said the messy process will help the GOP come general election time. “I think the ups and downs of the primary season will be beneficial to the eventual nominee,” Jaczkowski said. She said the controversies

that surround all the candidates will be “old news” come November. Jaczkowski said the volatility may be because of Republican voters’ high standards. “(Republicans) are looking for someone who is wellversed enough to debate President Obama, and somebody who is willing to make tough decisions to balance the budget and shrink the debt,” Jaczkowski said. Romney has struggled to connect in his home state, once considered a lock for his campaign. His 2009 New York Times column against the bailouts of General Motors and Chrysler, titled “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt,” may be part of the reason for his struggles. Meanwhile, Santorum has won over Republican voters recently with his conservative social stances. Trying to win back support, Romney made trips to Grand Rapids and Bloomfield Hills last week. In addition, the proRomney super PAC Restore Our Future has spent more than $1.5 million on commercials in Michigan. The Romney campaign, to combat sluggish poll numbers nationwide, has spent enough money over the past two months that the campaign would be out of money within 20 days, according to Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight blog for the New York Times. metro@cm-life.com

CMU looks to step up recycling in nationwide competition this year By Shelby Miller Staff Reporter

RecycleMania has hit Central Michigan University. The annual, 10-week nationwide recycling contest began on Jan. 22 and is currently in its fourth week of competition following two weeks of practice. This year, 552 colleges and universities throughout the U.S. and Canada are competing by tracking the amount of recycling and trash collected weekly at each school. Alpena graduate assistant Sarah Reisner is co-chairing the event for the second time. “This year will mark CMU’s fourth year of participation in RecycleMania,” Reisner said. “We hope to make major improvements in our recycling efforts from years past.”

In 2011, CMU placed 176 out of 288 participating schools. Residence halls have since stepped up the push, posting signs in each hall and encouraging students to recycle their paper products, cans and bottles, cardboard, trash, food service organics and e-waste. “We have room to improve,” Reisner said. “Every year, CMU’s mission is to beat our previous year’s results, as well as to perform well against schools of similar size, such as Western.” Over the past few years, Western Michigan University has placed ahead of CMU, and to improve, the university is aiming to do more outreach to students through presentations, competitions and prizes. “We bought RecycleMania stainless steel water bottles, travel coffee mugs and other prizes

to give away at the Down Under Food Court at our trivia table,” she said. The recycling and green cleaning program also has an outreach team who will be holding events around campus, such as presentations and recycling floor wars in the Towers Residence Halls. Livonia sophomore Laura Gonzalez works with CMU recycling to do pick-ups in the Towers and outreach with students. She said she would like CMU staff and students to realize how great of an impact recycling has been, not only on the community and school, but on themselves as well. “Eighty percent of our garbage is recyclable,” she said. “There is a huge global problem with waste.” Gonzalez said it is important tstudents and staff know what

to recycle and the advantages of recycling. “RecycleMania is really beneficial to everyone,” she said. “Whether you live off campus or on campus, RecycleMania helps everyone become involved and become aware of what is going on.” Students and staff can easily become involved in RecycleMania by simply recycling on campus, Reisner said. “Staff are also promoted to do their office cleanouts this time of year as a way to decrease their clutter and to get their recycling of papers and books done while we are in the competition,” she said. Currently, CMU is ranked 47 with a 35.01 percent recycling rate. studentlife@cm-life.com

charlotte bodak/staff photographer

China graduate student Rui Zhang sorts through papers he collected for this year’s Recyclemania contest Monday morning at the Michigan Recycling Facility, 4208 E. River Road. “It’s important to educate people about recycling,” Zhang said. “During the past weekend, I’ve had to sort through 620 pounds of recycling, which makes me really happy to see how many people are recycling.”


4A

VOICES Wednesday Feb. 22, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | University of Michigan regents’ involvement far cry from CMU trustees’

A study in contrasts

ric ward, might sound unusual to a typical Central Michigan University student. The board’s vigilance in matters important to the school and their clear willingness to question and critique internal decisions is a far cry from the attitude and actions of the CMU Board of Trustees. While the transition to an elected board might not be what CMU needs, the U-M board’s vigilance demonstrates the ways in which oversight can be used to monitor the actions of monolithic public institutions. Our current rubber stamping committee hearkens back to a time when CMU was a relatively small school, not one of the top 100 largest universities in the country or the fourth largest in the state.

T

he University of Michigan Board of Regents should be lauded for its continued involvement in matters important to the school.

Most recently, the board held an emergency session to vote on whether to oppose proposed Michigan legislation that would prohibit some graduate students at state universities from unionizing. Under Senate Bill 971, proposed by State Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville, R-Monroe, graduate student research assistants at Michigan public universities would not be considered public employees and, as a result,

prohibited from unionizing. The regents decided six to two to oppose the measure, but whether they voted for or against the legislation is beside the point. Their involvement in issues which concern the university from without, in the case of the aforementioned legislation, and within, in the case of calling for external investigations of an alleged sexual predator being allowed to continue work in a U-M hospital pediat-

The U-M regents met in an unprecedented emergency session to deal with a bill that would affect graduate students statewide, not only at their school. Instead, the issue, one with serious implications for students, faculty and people on all parts of the political spectrum, has been met with deafening silence. Other serious issues raised by students, faculty and this Editorial Board have been met with the same silence, or muddled non-statements at best. There have been no emergency meetings, no badly needed investigations or even acknowledgement of issues of great importance to this university. It’s quiet enough on campus to hear a pin drop. When will we hear the other shoe?

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Nathan Inks Columnist

Santorum’s education plan lacking The topic of education is always a key issue in Presidential elections, and 2012 will be no different. On Sunday, Rick Santorum went on CBS, saying he wants parents to take a stronger role in shaping education. Santorum has been a longtime supporter of homeschooling, and some in the media unfairly twisted what he said to make it sound like he wants to end public education. Nothing could be further from the truth. What he said was, “Local communities and parents should be the ones who are in control of public education.” When pressed for his overall plan, he said, “First I’d get the federal government out … To the extent possible, with respect to mandates and designing curriculum and the like, I would get the state government out,” saying he wants parents to be “in charge, working with the local school district to try to design an educational environment for each child that optimizes their potential.” In terms of the federal government, the Department of Education has turned into a monstrosity of mandating test standards and failed policies like No Child Left Behind. The constitutionality of the Department of Education is shaky, at best, with supporters of the department saying Congress has the right to regulate education under the Commerce Clause. The existence of the department violates the 10th Amendment, and the right to regulate education should rightfully be left to the states. If Americans want a Department of Education, the Constitution should be amended to truly enable Congress to regulate education; however, such an amendment is unlikely to pass, because it would require lawmakers to admit the department has been running unconstitutionally for the past 32 years. In lieu of abolishing the department, the department’s role should be shrunk to only stepping in as a last resort. As for Santorum’s plan to decrease state involvement, this also violates the 10th Amendment. The federal government has no right to tell a state they cannot implement mandates or design curriculum. The people who know what students need most are often found at the local level. Teachers in Detroit know what Detroit students need a lot more than a bureaucrat in Lansing. The role of states in education should be setting broad standards and ensuring these standards are upheld. Struggling districts like Detroit may be unwilling to admit there is a problem until it is too late, and it should be the state’s job to keep school districts in check, but when it comes time to fix those problems, it should be fixed at the local level when feasible. Broad solutions that give nearcomplete power to local communities will be just as harmful to students as placing too much power in the hands of the federal government. Nathan Inks is the president of College Republicans. The column does not reflect views of the organization. Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

[LEtter to the Editor]

Catholic Church contraception issues are a Constitutional issue The past month has pushed major social issues such as abortion and contraceptives to the forefront of political debate. Two weeks ago, President Barack Obama presented a “compromise” to the Catholic Church in regard to the HHS mandate for all insurance plans to pay for contraceptives. The compromise is laughable; merely an accounting gimmick. Under the “new” plan, Catholic schools, hospitals and charities will still be forced to purchase insurance plans that cover contraceptives. HHS’s mandate covers all FDA-

approved contraceptives, including morning-after pills and sterilization. All of these directly violate the Church’s teaching on the dignity of human life and beauty of human sexuality. The issue is not whether you agree with the Church’s stance on contraception. The issue at hand is whether Americans still value the Constitution, religious freedom and the “Free exercise thereof.” Opponents to the Catholic Church’s teachings have propped up various straw man arguments as to why violating

the Church’s conscience is constitutional, such as Catholic use of contraceptives. Morality in the church has never been dictated by the masses. Perhaps, that is one way it has remained the largest provider of relief in the world. Today, Americans should not be debating whether or not contraception is a good or bad thing. We cannot risk being distracted from the true problem religious freedom. Stephanie Jaczkowski Clinton Township senior

[Comments] Selected comments in response to “EDITORIAL: State intervention needed to put CMU back on right path” Michmediaperson, Monday Excellent, exactly what I’ve been saying for months. I’m glad you’re reading michmediaperson’s comments. Only Lansing can get CMU back on track ... Now, you’ve got to contact these

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

folks and let them know we need their help! We need a blend of Emergency Managers, Snyder’s financial acumen and some Tea Party members who will come and clean house. And, the students need to mount a statewide media campaign. You need to talk like Limbaugh and Hannity and get on the Detroit talk stations, Grand Rapids, the Tri-Cities and start talking about the wasteful spending.

I know we’ve got talented students who can do this. Great editorial. Lansing is the last hope to get CMU turned around. Driver, Monday I think the problem here is partly the lack of accountability of the Trustees. We need elected trustees like U of M and MSU. The current board has no reason to bow to public pressure, as they are unelected appointees.

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Sienna Monczunski Staff Reporter

Stop sleeping in class I have never fallen asleep in a class before, and I honestly don’t know how people do it. There are more than a few classes out there students consider boring — like watchinga-blade-of-grass-grow boring. Whether the professor has a monotone voice or the material is presented in a way that lacks depth or passion, every one of us has had a class where glances at the clock are constant. But no matter how boring the class is, I find it impossible to doze in a deep, snore-filled slumber. Maybe it’s my paranoid instinct. I feel like if I were to fall asleep in class, I would be placing myself in a vulnerable position. I have this fear that someone will mess with me while I’m sleeping. I know it’s highly unlikely, but for some reason, I would not want to risk someone playing a cruel joke on me. I can just picture someone ripping off a piece of paper and tickling me on the ear in some huge lecture hall. I also know when I sleep, I sleep very deeply. A fire alarm probably couldn’t wake me up. What if I fall asleep in class and someone does not wake me up? How embarrassing! Not to mention, when I sleep in my bed, I wake up with white crust on my pillow from drooling; apparently I sleep with my mouth wide open. According to many sources, I have a loud, distinctive snore I don’t want to punish anyone in my class with that. But most of all, I would feel extremely guilty. Maybe I’m too nice, but it feels a bit rude falling asleep on a professor. Some seem like they would be offended, even angry, if someone fell asleep in their class. My guilty conscious won’t let me do it. But believe me, there have been times where I have literally forced my eyes to stay open. Every one knows how it feels to nod off; when your head starts to fall, then you jerk it upward and strain your eyes to remain open. Nodding off sucks, because it happens in cycles, too. I hate nodding off and would rather just lay my head on the desk and rest my eyes for a bit, but I just can’t bring myself to do it. I’ve had so many friends tell me they sleep in class regularly, and I see people do it all the time when I’m in class, so I feel like I’m left out of some amazing ability to escape a boring lecture. I know it’s wise to get abundant rest the night before so sleeping won’t happen in class, but sometimes I have to stay up so I can get things done. We are in college, and a lot of the time there’s a choice between getting all of your work done, having a social life or sleeping, and it seems like I’m forced to pick two out of the three.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 || 5A

[News]

CMU-RC creates 85 new jobs, hires new communications manager By Alayna Smith Staff Reporter

chuck miller/staff photographer

Lapeer junior Lauren Penn covers one of her eyes Monday night in Kulhavi Hall while wearing a pair of goggles. She was in attendance for the David Garcia Project, a talk about the physical disabilities.

Garcia project offers opportunity for students to learn about disabilities By Brittany Wright Staff Reporter

Seemingly simple tasks for most people still pose challenges for others, and that is exactly what the David Garcia Project aims to demonstrate. On Monday night in Kulhavi Hall, the program demonstrated for eight people just how difficult daily tasks can be for people with disabilities. The David Garcia Project is designed to educate people about the different types of disabilities people may have. The presentation is a simulation to show what it would be like if you have certain impediments. The four disabilities touched on were auditory, learning, visual and physical. The program asks students to do simple, everyday tasks such as taking a message, writing their name and taking a walk, all while experiencing barriers they normally

actor | continued from 3a

“It’s all hitting me now,” the Alma junior said after realizing who the lead singer really was. “I think it was the beard that threw me off.” The noon lunch-hour program was a hit with Administrative Clerk Jeanette Smith. “I think he’s awesome,” she said. “I love live music, and I appreciate people who can do live music.” As a fan of the “American

wouldn’t deal with. Students would take a message while they had ear plugs in their ears. While writing their name, they could only write it while looking in the mirror, and they had to take a walk with goggles that simulated a certain degree or type of blindness. Belleville junior Nicole Infante has been involved with the David Garcia Project for about two years. “It was really interesting to me, so I got involved,” Infante said. “My friend is now the coordinator, and this is my second year as a facilitator.” David Garcia was a 9/11 victim who suffered from an incurable and degenerate eye disease in which his vision worsened as he aged. Garcia was still active however, in his college life, social life and now in his after life as his memory lives on. The program was named after him to pass on his legacy and educate those about disabilities.

Birch Run senior Rhane Martin has also been involved with the project for about two years. He said he is involved, because it will help in his career. “I am going into physical therapy, and I wanted to be able to know how to deal with people with physical disabilities,” Martin said. Detroit freshman Chelsea Moss participated in the event and said she came along with a friend to support her, because she attended for a class. “This was a good experience to have; it gives you a different understanding on what some peoples’ lives are like and why they may have certain animosity,” Moss said. “My favorite part of the project would have to be drawing using the mirrors; it’s truly amazing to see how difficult it was to draw while looking in the mirror.”

Pie” movies, Mount Pleasant senior Vinnie Schiavi came to see Nicholas’ musical talent front and center. “I heard them when I was walking by, and it turned out to be really good, so I decided to stay for the rest of it,” Schiavi said. “He seemed really down to earth and really appreciative of us being here.” Being a musician and an actor gives Nicholas the opportunity to use two different sides of creativity at the same time, he said. “I think music is more of a representation of me,

because I’m pulling all the strings and I’m writing all the music and doing what I want to do, whereas acting is taking direction,” he said. Nicholas ended the show leaving the audience with: “You can tell people later on you were here when no one else was,” he said. “Because I’m going to keep touring and I’m going to keep playing, and one day you can say you were there. So tell your friends about us, unless you think we suck, then just don’t say anything.”

The Central Michigan University Research Corp. has been successful in creating new jobs in an economy where many seem to be struggling. Through its business incubator and business accelerator programs, CMURC created 85 new jobs in its 12th year of operation. Each program works with a company for a number of years to help promote and develop the business. CMU-RC possesses 17,000 square feet of wetlab space, leased from the university and shared between faculty, researchers and companies. CMU-RC President and CEO Erica Strang said Thursday during the Board of Trustees meeting that

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million of that. This work is done by a team staff of five, including a new communications manger who started on Monday. Sheril Tarrant, the new manager and former program director for the Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance, is responsible for taking a strategic look at the brand, image and communications of the CMU-RC, Strang said. CMU-RC hired a CMU alumnus as its new business development manager in December, in an attempt to aid and encourage new clients in and around the Mount Pleasant area. The business incubator group also received a $100,000 award to help start up companies in mid-Michigan.

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COMMUNITY Central Michigan Life

Section B

| Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012

| cm-life.com

[ I N S I D E]

w Proposed anti-discrimination law to be subject of a presentation to City Commission, 3B w Students use Etsy website to sell art, clothing, 4B w Importance of prevention stressed in youth services decision, 5B w Star player hooping at the SAC mid-season, 5B

Mount Pleasant officials consider income tax study Commissioners cite need to boost local revenue By Jackie Smith Staff Reporter

Mount Pleasant officials will look into the feasibility of an income tax, citing future needs to boost revenue and maintain the current level of services. Last week, city commission-

ers were given a rundown of Mount Pleasant’s recent financial history before giving city staff the green light to search for a firm capable of completing a study of what potential an income tax could have. City Manager Kathie Grinzinger pointed to two major areas that could continue to weaken Mount Pleasant finances — an $8.6-million loss in state-shared revenue over 11 years and proposed legislation in Lansing that could eliminate

Norma Bailey works as professor, community activist 3B

the local collection of personal property taxes. “I don’t want to raise anyone’s blood pressure with them thinking, ‘Oh, they’re going to do this income tax,’” Commissioner Sharon Tilmann said at the Feb. 13 meeting. “No, we’re trying to study what would be the best alternative for the city so we can continue to provide service.” The city has already invested several thousand dollars into exploring an income tax twice

in little more than two decades, according to city documents. First in 1990, Mount Pleasant employed the Ann Arbor-based firm, Stauder, Barch & Associates, to finish an analysis for $7,500. It later paid the Michigan Municipal League $18,000 for another in 2000. The first estimated possible revenue based on census data, while the later depended on employer data.

Michigan cities’ individual income taxes City

Residents

Non-residents

Detroit

2.5%

1.25%

Grand Rapids

1.3%

0.65%

Highland Park

2%

1%

Saginaw

1.5%

0.75%

Eighteen cities level Income taxes at 1% for residents and .05% for nonresidents in 2011. source: michigan.gov

A TAX | 2B

Mount Pleasant

‘Super drunk’ law now enforceable locally By John Irwin Staff Reporter

Photos by TANYA MOUTZALIAS/Staff Photographer

Becky Pifer, CMU Manager of SAP HR Information Systems, dons her Pillsbury Bake-Off apron in her office in Foust Hall. Pifer’s recipe for peanut butter crunch layer bars is one of the top 100 finalists in Pillsbury’s 45th Bake-Off contest. In March, Pifer will go to Orlando to compete for a $1 million prize. The Phi Sigma Sigma adviser said if she wins, she will travel to Germany to visit the foreign exchange student who lived with her family for a year.

the million dollar bar Phi Sigma Sigma adviser is one of 100 Pillsbury Bake-Off finalists

By Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter Blanchard resident Becky Pifer’s baking has won over the stomachs of many friends and family members, and she might now win $1 million because of it. The SAP HR Information Systems Manager and Phi Sigma Sigma adviser is one of 100 finalists in the 45th annual Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest. She said her recipe for Peanut Butter Crunch Layer Bars is a simple creation she just threw together for submitting. “There are people who submit hundreds of recipes every time this contest comes up,” Pifer said. “I literally submitted two.” All of the ingredients used in Pifer’s recipe had to come from a list of ingredients supplied by Pillsbury. Pifer has so far claimed a microwave, $125 cash prize and a trip to Florida for the finals on March 26. She said all of the finalists will compete using mini kitchen set-ups in a hotel ballroom and will be given four hours to make their creations for the judges. “We make it one time for the judges, one time for the display table for photos and if we want, we can make it a third time to give out samples to people who will be there as well,” Pifer said. The winner of the contest will be announced on the Martha Stewart Show, who is also the host of the bake-

Though the “super drunk” drivers law went into effect in 2010, it’s now fully enforceable after Gov. Rick Snyder signed a bipartisan package of bills last week. The “super drunk” law gives harsher penalties to drivers who have a blood-alcohol level of more than 0.17 percent, just over double the legal limit of 0.08 percent. The driver faces up to 180 days in prison and $200 to $700 in fines if convicted, as opposed to up to 93 days in prison and a fine between $100 and $500 for someone who is not “super drunk.” Since the maximum prison term was increased, law enforcement officers were unable to write tickets for violators of the “super drunk” law. Prior to the new law, municipalities such as Mount Pleasant, could only enforce 93-day misdemeanors under local ordinances. Now, they have the flexibility to prosecute cases under local ordinance instead of state law. “We must all work together to combat drunken driving and keep our roads safe,” Snyder said in a press release. “This legislation gives communities the tools to be effective partners in protecting Michigan families.” Mount Pleasant Public Information Officer Jeff Browne said ordinances conflicting with the new law was the issue

the Mount Pleasant Police Department had with enforcing the law. “The problem we ran into was that we could not enforce it through city law,” Browne said. “We had to go through state law in order to enforce the “super drunk” law, which isn’t harder. It’s just that there’s more paperwork.” Browne said roughly 40 percent of drunken driving cases the police department dealt with last year involved “super drunk” drivers. “(For) regular drunk drivers, through the city attorney’s office, 87 were processed,” Browne said. “Super drunks’ that we tracked through the prosecuting attorney’s office was 60.” Milan sophomore Meagan Sanders said the super drunk law is fair, and she is glad to hear the law is now easier to enforce. “I know a guy who was caught drunk driving at a level of .2, and he had his license restricted for 60 days,” Sanders said. “(He) had to pay a few fines, and that was it, and it wasn’t his first time.” Sanders said she was upset when she learned about his minor punishment, because it’s so dangerous and “all he got was a slap on the wrist.” “I’m glad to see that the punishment is more severe now, because I think this will deter people more from doing it,” she said. metro@cm-life.com

More than 700 attend Soaring Eagle Water Park and Hotel job fair Tuesday By Melissa Beauchamp Senior Reporter

Becky Pifer’s peanut butter crunch layer bars which is one of the 100 recipes in the finals of Pillsbury’s 45th Bake-Off.

off, on March 27. The idea for Pifer’s recipe was inspired by a treat she loved when she was a student at CMU in the ‘80s.

ity member Kristen Squiers. “And we get to test them out, so I’m not complaining.” The sorority members’

“She just kind of does it so people can feel like they’re having a good day.” Kara Pifer, Blanchard senior

“My husband and I both loved these treats at a little deli called scotcharoos,” she said. “I tried to make a cookie of that theme.” Although Pifer comes from a family of baking and cooking, it’s her sorority family that enjoys the treats on a regular basis. “She has so many different recipes, and she tries new things all the time,” said Phi Sigma Sigma soror-

favorite right now is the recipe she made for the competition, the Okemos senior said. “She usually bakes for all of our events,” Squiers said. “Her baking is just so original.” Pifer’s daughter, Kara, agreed her mother is always up to something in the kitchen. “You can tell everything is from scratch,” the

Blanchard senior said. “There’s almost always something on hand in the house to eat.” Kara said her mother bakes to make other people happy. “She just kind of does it so people can feel like they’re having a good day,” she said. Practice makes perfect for Pifer, who is now creating her recipe a couple times a month to get the timing down before the big day. The winner will take home $1 million and $10,000 in GE appliances. Kara expects her mother to win the grand prize. “She’s tried making some of the other finalist’s recipes, and none of them seem winning-worthy,” she said. “Hers just seems easy to make and (is) just wonderful.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Soaring Eagle Water Park and Hotel has 194 positions to fill for its grand opening in mid-April, but the number of applicants on Tuesday far exceeded that. More than 700 people were lined up at 9 a.m. at the job fair held at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort Entertainment room. Booths were set up for potential employees to turn in applications and talk to a representative about each position available. The job fair lasted until 5 p.m., and the final number of applicants will not be determined until next week when applications are sorted, said Soaring Eagle Water Park and Hotel Manager Bonnie Spraque. “It’s awesome to see all the individuals interested in working,” Spraque said. When Spraque presented the business plan to the Tribal Council, they immediately

saw the resort as a source to boost the economy, she said. “It’s definitely a strength,” she said. A previous job fair was held Feb. 15 for tribal members, first-line descendants and Native Americans. Saginaw Chippewa Indian Public Relations Director Frank Cloutier said there were 500 interviews from the job fair, although there were only 300 applicants. Many people were applying for more than one job, he said. The resort will need employees to fit many different areas including housekeeping, facilities, lifeguards, retail clerks, guest services and food and beverage. The biggest area to fill is the food and beverage department with the restaurant wait staff, host/ hostess, utility/dishwasher, line cooks, preparation, cashiers and supervisors. “We are looking at everybody,” Cloutier said.

A HOTEL | 2B

Jeff Smith/Staff Photographer

The exterior of the Soaring Eagle Water Park and Hotel is nearly complete, 5665 E. Pickard St. The water park is set to open in late May.


2B || Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

IN THE NEWS

U.S. colleges: What bad economy? Gifts rise 8.2 percent to $30.3 billion By Michael Muskal Los Angeles Times

(MCT) LOS ANGELES — Donations to U.S. colleges and universities rose 8.2 percent last year as institutions of higher education improved their financial condition after some tough economic years, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Council for Aid to Education. The survey showed that charitable contributions reached $30.3 billion in 2011, the second time the total had crossed the $30-billion mark— but it was still down from the

hotel | continued from 1b

For Mount Pleasant resident Danielle Wisneski, it was her first job fair she attended on Tuesday. “I’m into the office-type of thing, so I’m hoping there’s something like that,” she said. Wisneski said she called the Water Park in search of a job, and they directed her to the job fair. Beaverton resident Tresa Haus was also attending her first job fair. Haus said she wasn’t intimidated with all the people there.

tax | continued from 1b

Because of the unlikelihood of state-shared funds being restored to a previous level, which was 50 percent of the city’s revenue about a decade ago, Grinzinger said officials have been in “constant review” of the city’s level of services, what they cost and how to increase efficiency. Over that same period of time, she said the city has reduced its number of positions by 12 percent and increased some fees, among other adjustments made, to preserve funds.

$31.6 billion record in 2008. Adjusted for inflation, last year’s increase is 4.8 percent over 2010, according to the Voluntary Support of Education survey. The good fundraising news doesn’t automatically mean that parents and students won’t face tuition increases. According to the council, 13.6 percent of the giving went to capital purposes such as endowments and buildings, while 4.7 percent went to operations. Because not all dollars can be used to defray current-year expenses, last year’s giving accounts for 3.8 percent of expenditures, one

of the major drivers in tuition. As is common in such giving, rich universities will continue to get richer while the less well-endowed will have to enjoy college spirit, rather than money. Of the $30.3 billion collected, $8.2 billion was raised by the top 20 institutions, about 2 percent of the 1,009 respondents in the annual survey. Fundraising in the top tier grew by 15.3 percent over the year before. The top quarter of those responding to the survey accounted for 86.3 percent of all giving, while the bottom quarter received just 1 percent.

“So far, so good,” she said. “Everyone has been very helpful, although I’m a little confused with where to go.” With 16 years in the food service industry, Haus said she hopes she is qualified for a position in that area. Weidman resident Amber Carman said the job fair was a perfect opportunity because of the ability to apply for several positions. “I need a job really bad,” she said. “I know the casino is a good place to work, so I figured I would try it out.” Weidman said she was hoping to land a position in the

food and beverage position. “We want as many candidates as we can so we can pick the best of the best,” Cloutier said. Cloutier said a job fair is the best way for the hiring process to be successful. People spend money locally, which will stimulate money in Mount Pleasant, he said. Cloutier said he hopes the Water Park and Hotel will give people an income who don’t currently have one. “The more people that can work, the more we can spur the economy,” he said.

The concern now for many officials, however, is that with the suggested elimination of personal property taxes, they may not be able to balance the 2013 and other future budgets without a “drastic” reduction in services or a substantial increase in “real” property taxes generated.

“(We) have only increased the millage rate once and never dipped into the rainy day fund,” Grinzinger said. “I believe, however, we’ve taken just about as many cuts as we can before we begin changing the face of who we are and what we want Mount Pleasant to grow up to be.” An income tax would collect money from residents, as well as those who work in the city. As it is only one of the multiple mentioned options to increase revenue, Grinzinger said city staff will not know more about which is the preferable choice until an independent study is conducted.

‘Real’ vs. ‘Personal’ property wReal: Property that includes land and buildings; taxes are calculated on either residential, commercial or industrial property wPersonal: Property that is considered ‘real’; taxes are calculated for property on which a business is conducted

cm-life.com/community

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[community]

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 || 3B

Norma Bailey leads push for anti-discrimination ordinance

JEFF SMITH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Education Professor Norma Bailey Tuesday afternoon in the Education and Human Services building. Bailey has been one of many fighting for a non-discrimination ordinance to be passed in Mount Pleasant.

tion to the Mount Pleasant City Commission Monday. Bailey said like many gays and lesbians, she hid who she was for many years. She said she didn’t come out until she was 34 years old. “It was a long process,” Bailey said. “After admitting to myself I was a lesbian, I ended my marriage and decided to do my part to help the community.”

By Jordan Spence Staff Reporter

A Central Michigan University education professor has shifted her social activism to a political one by fighting for a non-discrimination ordinance. Professor Norma Bailey and others hope the ordinance will pass after the final presenta-

She began speaking to schools and giving fellow teachers tools to better serve the younger community. “When you aren’t out to the community, there’s a sense of being cautious,” Bailey said. “You always have to stop and think, ‘Do we hold hands or to what degree do you wish to be out?’ You aren’t able to do things straight couples do without thinking in terms of how to function publicly.” Bailey said she’s not afraid of losing her job, but she knows of others who are. She said she remembers how internally isolated she felt before coming out. She said she now feels much more free and wants others to feel the same. Charles Farnum has been working closely on the ordinance with Bailey and said if it passes, long-term couples can be seen together without fear of losing a job, he said. Males will be able to hold hands across a table without being asked to leave a restaurant. Two post-college women will be able to rent an apartment together without inquiries into whether they’re “just

sharing or living together,” he said. “People that are against the ordinance for different reasons, including religious ones, can believe anything they wish,” Bailey said. “But they don’t have the right to discriminate against other people.” She said if someone can perform their job or are good renters, why does it matter what their sexuality is? Bailey said religious organizations will not be forced to hire people of the LGBT community. The ordinance simply states people can’t be fired, turned away from a place of business and kicked out of a housing situation because of sexual orientation or gender identity. Farnum said everyone should have the right to work, eat in public and rent a place to stay, regardless of who they fall in love with. That’s not the case right now in Mount Pleasant, but he said he hopes it will soon be. “This is so people know they can’t be turned away,” Bailey said. “No one should have to pretend; they should be able to

city commission

Anti-discrimination law to be subject of presentation City Manager Kathie Grinzinger has said it’s all a part of the normal process of enacting all ordinances — that after a municipality’s approval, residents reserve the right to file a referendum to bring the decision to voters. According to Mount Pleasant’s charter, an ordinance goes into effect after 30 days, unless such a referendum is filed. Though this was the case in places such as Kalamazoo, the ordinance from which served as a model for Mount Pleasant’s draft, no party has said if this city will meet the same fate. Jay Kaplan, staff attorney for the ACLU of Michigan’s LGBT Project, said for the most part communities in Michigan have embraced anti-discrimination ordinances. Much of that is embedded in the history of civil rights starting at the local level, he said. “This is no reinventing the wheel. It’s just a matter of treating people with dignity,” he said. “Most people don’t realize in the state of Michigan it’s legal to discriminate against gay people. That’s why it’s so important for communities to have the local human rights ordinances.”

By Jackie Smith Staff Reporter

Mount Pleasant may be one step closer to adopting an antidiscrimination law on Monday, but the effort could still face roadblocks outside of City Hall. At Monday’s City Commission meeting, Norma Bailey, a city resident and spokeswoman for the movement, will be helping present the proposed ordinance. She said those involved have been preparing to answer potential questions from officials over the proposed ordinance following a brief address. It’s only one of the several stages expected for the ordinance, which was drafted and proposed last year to protect people of more than a dozen demographics, including sexual orientation and gender identity. If the city were to eventually adopt the law, it would be the nineteenth municipality and the last that’s home to a large public university in the state to do so. “Right now, the goal is to have the city council pass it,” Bailey said. “Speaking from experiences of other cities, what has happened is outside forces, specifically the American Family Association, have raised issues and said, ‘Wait a minute, the people haven’t decided, just a commission did. You need to go to a ballot and prove that the people want it.’” The latest anti-discrimination ordinance adopted in the state, according to published reports, was last year in Traverse City, where city officials green-lighted the law before it was approved by voters. In 2009, Kalamazoo residents voted to adopt such an ordinance, after the city’s approval was received with some local controversy.

Potential opposition Agreeing with Bailey, Kaplan said the opposing agenda could come largely from representatives of American Family Association of Michigan. Contact with the American Family Association of Michigan were not returned as of Tuesday morning. The draft ordinance was first handed to city commissioners in a November meeting and was later referred to the city attorney for analysis. Last week, that analysis, along with research of similar ordinances

in other college towns, was the subject of a commission work session. The draft would ban discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodation, as well as policies or actions that have discriminatory effects. Regulation at the city level would supplement state and federal regulations by specifying the city as the agency responsible for enforcing it. Bailey has attested to the “broadness of support” human rights regulations in Mount Pleasant have received, after tripling the number of businesses pledging support in the past several weeks and seeing hundreds of residents sign an online petition at www. mpwelcome.org. However, much of the opposition could come from Lansing as the ordinance moves forward. A bill was introduced to the state House in October aiming to amend Michigan’s Elliott-Larson Civil Rights Act to prohibit policies from any city village, township, county or school district authority that supersede a law at the state-level. House Bill 5039, as it’s written, would affect local human rights ordinances, though so far it has not left committee. “Clearly, if that piece of legislation came along, it’s unconstitutional,” Kaplan said, citing a 1996 U.S. Supreme Court case that overturned a Colorado constitutional amendment, because it would have prevented local governments from lawfully protecting LGBT citizens. “Should this bill (see approval), we have every intention of fighting it in federal court,” he added. If the matter comes up during the presentation to the City Commission Monday, Bailey said that moving forward to

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pass an ordinance is “the right thing to do, regardless if that bill passes.” The presentation is scheduled at the start of Monday’s regular twice-monthly commission meeting, which will begin at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 302 W. Broadway St., pending any change in details later this week. metro@cm-life.com

be who they are.” It’s this fear that’s created when someone can’t be out, she said; without this protection it, limits people’s lives. Bailey and her group will have ten minutes to present to the commission to include the LGBTQ community in the antidiscrimination ordinance. “I sat down next to Norma; I did not know her at the time and saw an opportunity to use my past experience with community organizing to help a cause I believed in,” Farnum said. “Norma is a bundle of energy and has a wonderfully positive outlook on people. She works with determination on her goals, while being aware of her limitations and open to different ideas — a rare combination, in my experience. It’s been great.” If the ordinance passes, Bai-

ley said she hopes it’s part of the tremendous advancement of rights for the LGBTQ community she has seen come about over the years. After she retires from her first love of teaching in a couple years, Bailey said will continue to involve herself in social justice. “I grew up in the ‘50s and ‘60s. I didn’t do much, and looking back, I could’ve done more,” she said. “You have to ask yourself what is the difference I myself am making. It’s so invigorating to know I’m doing something proactive about an issue. “I never thought in my lifetime I would see gay people be married,” Bailey said. “The problem is some hate is still there.” metro@cm-life.com

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cm-life.com/category/community

[community]

Students use Etsy website to Importance of crime prevention sell art, clothing creations stressed in youth services decision CITY COMMISSION

In 2012 city spends $240,000 for programs

By Anna Palm Staff Reporter

Kaitlin Slack was about 10 years old when her aunt started teaching her proper techniques of jewelry making. Now, the Howell sophomore sells jewelry in Native American style on the online marketplace etsy.com. On Etsy, every user may sell handmade goods, supplies and tools to their own items. She said for a few years she stopped making jewelry to focus on other activities, such as tennis. When she started high school, she became involved in art again. She founded her shop OxygentoBreathe on Dec. 23, 2010. “It’s only been over the past few years that I’ve perfected my jewelry-making skills with a focus on polymer clay techniques,” Slack said. Her style is inspired by Native American art, said Slack, who has gone to many Native American art exhibits in the past. While growing up, her parents would take her to Indian Hills Gallery in Petoskey, Michigan. She uses metal, yarn, feathers and textiles in her art. Slack said she believes Etsy is a lot cheaper for businesses that are just starting out and don’t have the time, energy and money to create items on a regular basis. “I started selling my jewelry online, because it seemed like the biggest available market for me as a high school student with little resources,” Slack said. Over winter break, she made mittens out of recycled sweaters and made more than $400. Slack is not the only Central Michigan University student selling creations on the online website. Brynn Good, a Plymouth senior, opened a shop called Bib&Tucker on Etsy a few weeks ago. “My shop sells vintage clothing in the categories of outerwear, dresses, blazers, denim, blouses and jewelry,” Good said in an email. “I hope to soon expand to handbags and shoes.” She said her work started as

By Jackie Smith Staff Reporter

libby march/staff photographer

Howell sophomore Kaitlin Slack works on a dress she is making, one of four pieces for the upcoming Threads show in her dorm room. Her collection is American Indian inspired. Slack also sells Native American influenced jewelry on the website etsy.com.

a hobby in high school, buying and modifying vintage clothing by altering them in some way, such as shortening a hem or adding embellishment. “My shop began as the love child of my obsession with period pieces and all things vintage and my entrepreneurial spirit,” Good said. She said she likes using polyester, wool, leather and silk — also in vintage format — which she finds through scavenging garage sales and small fabric stores. The oldest piece she ever found was a dress from the ‘40s. Good said she loves the fact that the items she sells can live past their owners’ use and be given life again instead of being thrown away. “I modify it (the clothing item) so that it can be used toward the next generation,” she said. Her dream is to become a business owner one day, and Etsy has enabled her to do so on a college-student budget, she said. While some other online marketplaces require members to pay a monthly fee, Etsy users only have to pay for each item they put up for sale. Good said it takes a lot of capital to start a regular business. She said she tries to price

items reasonably enough for college students to afford. A long wool coat will be more expensive than a polyester top, but if she finds a great deal on an item, she said she will transfer that savings to her customers. CMU alumna Jesi Parker has made her Etsy shop JustFollowYourArt into a success by painting canvases with inspiring messages and quotes. “I started painting as a way to de-stress from my classes and many student organizations that I was involved with (during my sophomore year),” Parker said. “My passion for painting grew when I noticed the happiness that my work brought to others.” Selling canvases has helped Parker raise money for LiveStrong and avoid taking out student loans while in graduate school at Grand Valley State University. So far, she has raised about $300 for the organization. After graduation, Good said she plans to buy an actual store in an urban area, someplace where she expects to find customers. “I’m passionate about what I do,” Good said. “If I could be doing this for the rest of my life, I would be the happiest person in the world.” metro@cm-life.com

Heart Cry International starting Widow’s Hope in Uganda By Hailee Sattavara Senior Reporter

Designs from mid-Michigan will travel across the globe in April. The Widow’s Hope project, through nonprofit Heart Cry International, will host a fashion show supporting the group’s efforts to help impoverished women from Uganda sew clothes for profit. “Widow’s Hope was started to keep children with their mothers,” said Heart Cry International Founder Carla Ives. Those who qualify as a widow have lost their husband through death or abandonment, Ives said. “Right now they only make handcrafted jewelry, so right now Heart Cry International is working with a ministry to

provide sewing machines to the women,” said Sam Hegeman, Heart Cry International intern and South Rockwood senior. At present, the women have an eBay business established by Heart Cry International so they can take steps to become independent and self-sufficient. “These women have no way to earn a living,” Ives said. Pattern submissions for the fashion show are open to anyone in the form of a paper pattern and sketch along with a $2 donation to the cause. Entries should be sent to the Heart Cry International office, 221 Bellows St. The deadline is March 2, and on March 12, voting on each submission will begin. The winning patterns will

be sent and sewn in Uganda after appearing in the Widow’s Hope fashion show. Heart Cry International is also working on another project in Uganda and one in Nigeria, Ives said. Submissions should fit one of four categories: shirt, skirt, shorts or dress. Those who wish to get involved with the nonprofit can meet up at World Changes at 9 p.m. the first and third Monday of each month. “I like to have people streamline with one project,” Ives said. Ives said Heart Cry International is always looking for volunteers. Internships overseas are available. “I would love to have as many students as possible,” Ives said. metro@cm-life.com

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A community public safety program aimed at dissuading crime among local youth will push forward two more years, despite what had been an approaching March depletion date for current funding. The city’s 2012 operating budget accounted for an assumed $240,000 in outside funding for the Youth Services Unit, a cohort of the Mount Pleasant Police Department’s Community Services/Crime Prevention Unit. City Manager Kathie Grinzinger said now two of the unit’s four designated officers are funded with grant money that is due to run out next month. But last week’s 5-1 approval of a budget amendment, allotting $400,000 to cover the shortfall, has left city commissioners hoping other agencies will step up financially down the road. Commissioner Nancy English recalled to her colleagues looking into what parts of the program could be cut, sustained or re-prioritized but said she ultimately supported its value. “I think a clear warning is going out throughout the community, and I think the scare that this very likely could be cut,” she said. “We need to work as a community.” Commissioner Jim Holton stressed the need to look forward and search for financial partners for the program. “The city should not be the sole survivor in this deal providing the funds

for it,” he said. Much of the YSU funding in the past has come from 2-percent allocations from the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, which has recently declined more than city officials expected. City staff’s recommendation to amend the ongoing budget in response, Grinzinger said, also included the goal to make the issue a part of a more wide-ranging conversation in the future about what services and programs are important and affordable. The only commissioner not to support the budget amendment last week was Jon Joslin, who said he was uncomfortable with how the decision’s balance could eventually impact other city services.

“We’ve been trying to get people to understand that this program’s at risk, but nobody stepped up. It just always seems like it always falls back on the city,” he said. “Public safety is obviously very important to our community, but ... unfortunately, there (are) other things in the community that we need.” Grinzinger quoted Mount Pleasant Police Capt. Thomas Forsberg when she told commissioners of a final reason city staff made the recommendation to approve the budget amendment: “We have 23 officers dedicated to reacting to crime. It seems reasonable to devote at least four to preventing it.” metro@cm-life.com

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cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012 || 5B

[SPORTS]

BASEBALL Tyler Hall, third baseman for the Chippewas, is week-to-week with an undisclosed injury. Last season, he broke a CMU record for most triples in one season with 11. FILE PHOTO BY ANDREW KUHN

Last season’s MVP Hall out with injury

Star player hooping at the SAC mid-season I’m not a basketball player, never have been. But, like many other students at Central Michigan University, I like to go to the SAC and participate in the endless games of pick-up basketball that seem to occur around the clock, seven days a week. I’ve seen no evidence they ever stop. Most of the time I meet my friends there, other times I’ll just join a team that needed one guy, but when I went to shoot a few hoops on Monday night, I played on a team with someone I never expected. So let’s play a game of guess who, shall we? I’ll give you some hints. First, it’s a girl, so that will eliminate the majority of the people playing basketball at the SAC. Second, she was about 6-feet tall, so that eliminates the majority of girls on campus. You got it yet? I understand if you don’t, so I’ll give you one more hint. This 6-footer is a Division I basketball player. If you guessed Crystal Bradford, you win. That’s right; my teammate at the SAC was none other than the sensational, but tumultuous, freshman guard for the CMU women’s basketball team. Bradford is the team’s leading-

Brandon Champion Staff Reporter scorer, averaging 14.1 points per game. That mark makes her the fifth-leading scorer in the MidAmerican Conference. Playing with her was fun, dressed in her CMU practice jersey. She was by far the most vocal person playing on the court and at the SAC; you know that’s saying something. It was none other than “CB23” who was organizing the chaos that ensues after a game is completed and people flood the court trying to figure out who is “next.” Once the game started, Bradford was the vocal leader of every team she played on. Whether it was pumping up the team, encouraging strong defense or yelling out the score, she was in control. Impressive, considering she was the only female on or around the court. We lost the game 12-10, Bradford probably had six of those points, and as the women’s basketball beat reporter,

it was cool to get to play with someone I have been watching all season. I just wish she would have passed me the ball more often. That being said, it wasn’t until after the game that I realized something and the journalist in me kicked in. I thought to myself, why is the leading-scorer of a Division I basketball team, which happens to be in the stretch run of its season, playing basketball at the SAC with a bunch of dudes? It’s especially concerning because “Air Inkster” has been suspended for a total of four games this season, including the team’s 84-76 loss at Ball State on Sunday. She didn’t even travel with the team due to violation of team rules. So why is she playing at the SAC? Is it because she’s not playing in games? Is it because she’s trying to make a point? Or is she just exercising her right to use the facilities offered to all CMU students? I don’t know the answer to that question, and I don’t know what she did to earn the suspension, but I do know what I think. Risking injury at the SAC in the middle of her season isn’t going to help her situation. I understand she probably wants to play, and right now

lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi edsedseds ing five runs. “Tommy Lally did exactly what we wanted our number two hitter to do,” Jaksa said of Lally’s weekend performances. “He bunted a little bit, he hitand-ran a little bit and he swung the bat a couple of times pretty good.”

By John Manzo Staff Reporter

she isn’t being allowed to do that for the Chippewas. It’s really unfortunate, because the team really needs her. Bradford has a skill set that no other player on the team does; I found out first hand on Monday. “CB23” has a chance to take the Mid-American Conference by storm, and judging by how vocal she was while playing pick-up games at the SAC, she obviously has it in her to be a leader. She’s the best player on a team with tons of potential, but if CMU is going to go anywhere in March, it’s going to be Bradford that will lead them. Your best player has to be your leader, and risking injury playing pick-up games is not being a leader. I’m not at the SAC all the time, but I’ve never heard of or seen a Division 1 player there playing pick-up ball in the middle of their season. I don’t know when her suspension will be over, or if she will play in tonight’s game against Northern Illinois. But I do know she needs to be playing in front of hundreds of people at McGuirk Arena, not a handful of dudes at the SAC. As a fan, it was awesome to play on a team with her. As a sports journalist, I see why it could be troublesome.

Tyler Hall, All-Mid-American Conference Tournament selection and baseball team Most Valuable Player winner from a year ago will be week-to-week Save Money with an undisclosed injury. Save Money Head coach Steve Jaksa was unable to comment on the ARNOLD IS RECONGIZED Senior William Arnold respecifics of the injury because of HIPAA laws. HIPAA laws are ceived many accolades after going week with four federal protections for n,private Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt.6-for-12 Pleasant, • 436last Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 00 home runs and 8 RBI. personal health information. He was named the National The third baseman, whoed had Ad a Classifi edClassifi Ad Placing a Classifi Policy ed &Classifi Rates Ad ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Rates a school record 11 triples last Hitter of the Week by the Naept advertising which CM Life reflects will discrimination knowingly because advertising which CM Life reflBaseball ects will not discrimination knowingly because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which reflects discrimination because tional Collegiate Writ-accept year, led the team in not with a .367accept Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 ational andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto national origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM race, Lifecolor, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or ersorAssociation and was the Colbatting average, starting allStudent 58orreject vertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, advertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic centered Bold, italic and Bold,1-2 italic and centered 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 $7.75 per 1-2 per issue Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Baseball News National from aLife. year ago. He also egames standards of CM Board, CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with thelegiate standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Board, Life.Issues: CM isand not Lifein will keeping be responsible with theissue standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Lifecentered will$7.75 be responsible for typetypographical are the available along type are the available type are available along type are available along eled extent cancelling typographical thewww.cm-life.com charge errors forathe only space to theused extent of the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling charge along for the space used om By Website: Player ofcancelling thetypographical Week. theof team with 84 hits, .559 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features with other special features with other special features with other special features ch an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit and for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad attractors. On due topcanof named slugging aof .470 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. In Person: 436 Moore Hall ny credit due percentage, canthe befipicked rst date up at publication. the onCM Life Any officredit ce the bethat, fipicked rst Issues: datehe up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad the beattractors. fipicked rst Issues: dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce fbase the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report ofruns. termination it to the Classifi ofMid-American the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the Classifi ed Conference percentage and 46 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. ya.m.-5 responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. are only responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. West Player of the Week. We are only responsible for the Tom Lally has replacedWeHall in the lineup. He is 4-for-12 in 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS three games this season, scor- OPEN sports@cm-life.com

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lassifi ifiClassifi edsClassifi edsedseds Classifieds Tyler Hall career stats

Year 2011 2010* 2009* Total

AB 229 137 154 520

Hits 2B 3B HR 84 13 11 3 66 9 6 4 74 11 8 5 224 33 25 12

SB 16 34 25 75

RBI 34 42 54 130

Runs 46 48 N/A N/A

Average .367 .482 .481 .459

*Played for Grand Rapids Community College in 2009, 2010 w Hall broke a CMU record in 2011 with 11 triples in one season. That also puts him at third all time in program history.

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, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE ALWAYS DAY! THAN EACH OPEN 32,000 PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall NOTICES WANTED NOTICES TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

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We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for 13+ $7.00 13+ $7.00 p like ad attractors. report it in to Classifi ed immediately. report We are it to the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We areLife. only responsible fi1-2 rst day’s insertion. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m.typographical Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. which is is in the the opinion opinion of Dept. the Student Student Media Board, isonly not in in keeping with standards of CM CM Life. CM Life will will for the ByHours: Fax: 989-774-7805 989-774-7805 Bold, italic italic and and type are available along per Issues: $7.75 per issue issue which of the Media Board, is not keeping of CM Life By Fax: Bold, errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used with the standards 1-2 Issues: $7.75 com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are and rendered valueless by an error. Credit for such is limited only be responsible forsuch typographical errors onlyan to error the extent of to cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are By Website: Website: www.cm-life.com www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 $7.50 per per issue issue By 3-6 Issues: likeWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ad attractors. 7-12 Issues: $7.25 OPEN per issueAT available along with with rendered valuelessAny by such an an error. error. Credit for such an error error is limited limited toAT onlyWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS the rst date date of publication. publication. Any the first rendered date of publication. credit due can be picked up at the CM Life offi ce to 32,000 REACH READERS MORE THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! OPEN ALWAYS OPEN AT available along valueless by such Credit for such an is only the fifirst of Any REACH THAN 32,000 REACH READERS MORE THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS DAY! EACH PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue In Person: Person:MORE 436 Placing Moore Halla within 30credit days of termination of the ad. If you fi nd an error, report it to the Classifi ed 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue In 436 Moore Hall other special special features features due can can be be picked picked up up at at the the CM CM Life Life offi office ce within within 30 30 days days of of termination termination ofClassifi the ad. IfIf you you find nd an an error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue other ClassifiDept. edimmediately. Ad due ed Ad Policy & Rates credit of the ad. fi error, a.m.-5 p.m. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. 13+ Issues: Issues: $7.00 $7.00 per per issue issue like ad ad attractors. attractors. report itit to to the the Classifi Classified ed Dept. Dept. immediately. immediately. We We are are only only responsible responsible for for the the fifirst rst day’s day’s insertion. insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday Monday-Friday 88 a.m.-5 a.m.-5 p.m. p.m. 13+ like report Hours:

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or OPEN national origin, andWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS CM Life reserves the right to reject or 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and centered CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue

Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for

type are available along typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. In Person: 436 Moore Hall the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT RENT NOTICES NOTICES FOR SALE FOR SALE SALE FOR SALE within 30 days of termination ofWANTED the ad. IfFOR you find an error, report it to the Classifi ed NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT TO RENT TO NOTICES NOTICES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR 13+SALE Issues: $7.00 per WANTED issue FOR SALE Hours:Classifi Monday-Friday a.m.-5 p.m. Dept. immediately. We are ed only responsible for the first day’s insertion. ed Ad8 Policy Classifi Ad Rates

AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SALE OPEN AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES REACH& MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS AUTOS SALE FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST & FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE FOR SALE HELP HELP WANTED HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT FORWANTED RENT HELP HELP WANTED HELP HELP GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT MIGHTY MINIS AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES BUCKS RUN GOLF CLUB now acDANCERS WANTED. NO EXPERILOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND cepting applications for experienced ENCE NECESSARY. SUPPLEMENT SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS PETS PETS WANTED TO TO RENT RENT SPECIAL WANTED TO RENT WANTED WANTED TO RENT RENT YOUR SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION bartenders, wait staff, banquet servPETS PETS PETS INCOME PART TIME. APPLY WANTED WANTED TO RENT TO WANTED TO RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED ers, beverage cart, room set up. Apply AT MICELI!S CORNER. 989-539-3401 GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FOR RENT in person Monday - Friday 10-3. No AFTER 6 PM. PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS phone calls please. 1559 South Chipfacebook.com/micelis.corner.showROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL ROOMMATES ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES pewa Road, Mt. Pleasant. Printable girls. SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS applications now available on our webWANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT CAMP COUNSELORS fied Ad Classified Ad Policy ClassifiedSUMMER Ad Rates site at www.bucksrun.com. Services of the WANTED! CAMP COUNSELORS JAMESTOWN APTS - 2 PER 2 BED, REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE Isabella County PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS Classifieds: Your advertising system for connections. WORKPERSONALS ON MACKINAC Island This for ESTATE Michigan CM Life will not knowingly accept which reflects discrimination because of race, color, Transportation 3, MOTORCYCLES 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to religion,ROOMMATES Rates: 15 word minimumWANTED per classifi edprivate ad ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES SummerMake lifelong friends. The boys/girls overnight camps. Teach Commission (989)775-5522 Campus, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge Central Michigan LIFE GRADUATE STUDENT LOOKING for swimming, canoeing, water skiing, sailwww.LiveWithUnited.com which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 issue Shops are looking for help in all areas: roommate beginning January for twopering, sports, computers, tennis, archery, 436 Moore Hall ADS • CMU WANTED TO BUY for typographical WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY HAPPYTO ADS HAPPY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS be responsible errors TO only toBUY the extent of cancelling the charge for the space usedbedroom and WANTED TO BUY WANTED WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY centered type are HAPPY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS ADS Front HAPPY Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, WANTED RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE apartment in quiet setting. horseback riding, climbing, windsurfing www.cm-life.com •ADS 774-3493 om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue H E R I T A G E S Q U A R E T O W N Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com 989•772•9441 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication..$297 Any per month. 989-772-1061. Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. Hous& more. HOUSES Only 1- 6 bedroom left! Free 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue Office and maintenance jobs

wingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad gin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising on of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue ypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 issue otherAND BASIC 2 BEDROOM 1 bath. Close to per APARTMENTS HOUSES close special features picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, campus $280 13+ p/p includes Nopertoissue downtown like and ad campus. View list at Issues:heat. $7.00 attractors. sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. pets. Non-smoker. 989-560-7157. “I’m not 810 South University or call 989-621-7538. 9am- 5pm. used to 2012 SCHOOL YEAR 2 person apartthis much WESTPOINT VILLAGE - 2 BED 2 ment close to campus. Water garbage SHUTTLE SERVICE attention.” MASTER BATH LIKE NEW, Warm paid 805 1/2 douglas. Call John Public Shuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 989-560-1701. Get noticed with Transportation www.LiveWithUnited.com the Classifieds.

EXPLORE

special features too. Salaryother is $1900 and up plus

credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, nptdev@gmail.com Cable & Internet + Full Size W/D

a Classifi ed Adimmediately. We are only responsible ed Ad report it to the Classifi ed Dept. for the TO fiClassifi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5Placing p.m. CALL NOW START SAVING! AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES

ing, bonus, and discounted meals.

13+ Issues: $7.00 perroom/board. issue ( 9Ad 0 6 ) Rates 8 4 7 - 7 1 9 6 . like ad Policy Classifi Find out attractors. more about our ed SERVICES

LOST & FOUND www.theislandhouse.com and applyADS online at 989-773-2333. WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY camps HAPPY ADS HAPPY CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, w w w . l w Rates: c g w c . c o15 m ,word o r minimum call per classified ad Now Leasing for Fall 2012 CM Life Classifieds • 989-774-3493 By Phone: 989-774-3493 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHINGsexDAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 888-459-2492. MAIN 3-5 People or national origin, andSTREET CM Life LIVING! reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHIHELP WANTED www.cm-life.com GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES Email sam@lwcgwc.com Walk to class and downtown! FOR RENT CLES with we the buystandards them weofhaul them. which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 Moore Hall WANTED PETS Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

989-773-2333 errors www.olivieri-homes.com 989-772-5428. be responsible for typographical only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit such5an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any JUST RELEASED FORfor rental bedcredit due can be picked upstory at thecondo. CM LifeWasher/dryer. office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, room 3 report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. are- only for theBREED: first day’sSHI insertion. $1200/ month. AvailableWe May 2012.responsible ADORABLE CHI PUPWalk to campus. 248-496-8861 PIES. $300 989-365-3914. rjrassoc@ameritech.net Security Deposit required.

TO RENT

SPECIAL SECTION

PETS

r

pt

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WANTED BUY HELP WANTED GARAGETO SALES NOTICES FOR SALE SPECIAL SECTION PETS AUTOS FOR SALE LOST & FOUND 4 TRAVEL Person 4 MOTORCYCLES Bedroom HELP WANTED 5FOR Person 5 Bedroom RENT NO DEPOSIT – 4-5 BEDROOM PERSONALS Warm Shuttle Campus • SPECIAL FREE Internet & Cable SECTION WANTED TOtoRENT FREE Gym Membership to Endurance (see office for details) HAPPY ADS ROOMMATES TRAVEL

jects, Leica MS camera, entire household! Central Estate Sale Service.

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HAPPY ADS HELP WANTED FOR RENT NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION SERVICES LOST & FOUND ROOMMATES TRAVEL 2 Person 2 Bedroom GARAGE SALES FOR RENT 2 Master Bathrooms REAL ESTATE PERSONALS Warm Shuttle WANTED to Campus PETS TO RENT BRAND NEW FREE INTERNET & CABLE! WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES

DEERFIELD VILLAGE WESTPOINT VILLAGE

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REAL ESTATE

779-9999

month’s rent when you sign a lease! (per person)

GARAGE SALES FOR SALE PETS AUTOS FOR SALE MOTORCYCLES HELP WANTED • INDOOR HEATED POOL • PETS ALLOWED • ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! • FREE ELECTRIC, GAS, HEAT, A/C, WATER, SEWER & TRASH • 24 HOUR MAINTENANCE • ON-SITE LAUNDRY

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g n i s a e L w No

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SPRING BREAK MOTORCYCLES ALWAYS OPEN AT forget WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Don’t to FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT sign a lease! PROFESSOR!S ESTATE SALE Feb 23, 24 Thursday 9- 6, Friday 9- 3 1105 Receive $100 off your first AUTOS FOR SALE E. Illinois St.: 1000!s of books all subSERVICES

ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES REACH READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! NOTICES WANTED TO RENT FORMORE SALETHAN 32,000 OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master 1825 L D . A . 104 RBORETUM Bedrooms Each With Personal Bath FREE MT. PLEASANT REAL ESTATE PERSONALS HomesSALE Off Broomfield, on Lincoln Rd. FullLOST Size Washer Dryer Includes AUTOSpartment FOR SERVICES HEAT! & &FOUND (989)775-3200 Internet & cable 989-773-2333 iberty

3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue Issues: $7.25 per issue Before7-12 you leave for 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

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SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

presented BY:

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Across 1 ‘50s-’60s Bronx Bombers nickname, with “The” 5 South Seas tuber 9 Oceans 14 Like the team before @, on schedules 15 Not much 16 Hotel courts 17 Best Original Song Oscar winner from ... Disney’s “Pocahontas” 20 Little one 21 __-tzu 22 On the calmer side 23 ... Disney’s “Aladdin” 28 Headache 29 WSJ headline 30 __ rock: music genre 31 Faux pas 33 Bars with hidden prices? 35 Evensong? 39 ... Disney’s “Song of the South” 43 Wed. vis-à-vis Thu. 44 Reed of The Velvet Underground

45 Expel, as lava 47 Western treaty gp. 50 Periods prec. soccer shootouts 52 Before, poetically 53 ... Disney’s “Mary Poppins” 58 French city mostly destroyed in 1944 59 Golf’s Woosnam 60 Tyler of “Jersey Girl” 61 ... Disney’s “Monsters, Inc.” 67 Athena’s shield 68 “__ chic!” 69 File’s partner 70 Actor Milo 71 Holiday tubers 72 __-Ball Down 1 Brolly user’s garment 2 __ Jima 3 ‘20s White House nickname 4 1997 ecological protocol city 5 Gustatory sensor

6 Blood typing abbr. 7 Sight site 8 Bilingual Canadian city 9 John who explored the Canadian Arctic 10 Openly hostile 11 Showy extra 12 Like tridents 13 Marquis de __ 18 Three-sixty in a canoe 19 Coyote call 23 Grain beard 24 Suffering from vertigo 25 Legendary skater Sonja 26 “Ixnay!” 27 Sgt. Snorkel’s dog 32 Covert __: spy stuff 34 Disney frame 36 Some mag spreads 37 Flat hand, in a game 38 __ Khan: “The Jungle Book” tiger 40 Elemental bit 41 Judgment Day 42 Blow away in competition

46 Pint-size 48 Low-pH substance 49 Crudely built home 51 Switchblade 53 Tables-on-the-street restaurants 54 “__-Ho”: Dwarfs’ song 55 Non-mainstream film 56 Prefix with mural 57 Civil rights activist Medgar 58 “Farewell, cara mia” 62 Metaphor words 63 Skirt line 64 Asian plow puller 65 Vague pronoun 66 Hawaiian strings

Feb. 22, 2012  

Central Michigan Life

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