Page 1

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

CMU wins 11 in a row over MSU, 7

Central Michigan University

| Friday, Feb. 17, 2012

Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney visits Grand Rapids, 3

[cm-life.com]

Employee groups to receive lump sums

Council of Chairs endorses vote of no confidence

By David Oltean Senior Reporter

Central Michigan University employees that received a zero-percent wage adjustment for the 2010-11 academic year will soon be receiving a lump sum payment amounting to 2.25 percent of their base salary. The payments, which will be given to professional and administrative employees, office professionals, public broadcasting employees, supervisorytechnical workers, nonunion fixedterm faculty members and senior officer groups, will amount to $1.3 million and will be distributed from university funds. More than 1,100 employees will receive compensation in the form of a lump sum. One employee group, the Supervisory-Technical Association, will receive only 1.75 percent of annual salaries in the lump sum after receiving a 1/2 percent increase in base wages in the last academic year. At Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting, University President George Ross commended the employee groups for accepting the zero-percent increase in wages for the past academic year. “I again would like to (thank these) groups for accepting a zero-percent adjustment in 2010-11,” Ross said. “In recognition of your commitment and service to our students and university, I have authorized a one-time lump sum payment in the amount of 2.25 percent of the annual base wage to those employees who received zero for a year and are now in their second year.” Ross also acknowledged he would not be one of the employees receiving a lump sum. Ed Grant, CMU Public Broadcasting general manager, will be one of CMU’s employees to receive a lump sum at the end of this month, along with many of his employees in the public broadcasting building. Grant said the lump sums will most likely be appreciated after many employees’ salaries were frozen during the last academic year. “I think it’s probably unexpected on the part of most employees, but they also recognize the different economic times the university and state have gone through,” Grant said. “I’m sure it will be welcomed, and they’ll appreciate the ability of the university to distribute those funds.” Kevin Smart, director of human relations, was involved with the collective bargaining agreements and said lump sums such as these could not be distributed in years past because of the state and federal economy. Smart said two groups, the Police Officers Association of Michigan and service maintenance members, will not receive lump sums this academic year, because the collective bargaining agreements were on a different cycle. “Our state support was cut again, and that’s always tough because that often gets translated right to the operating budget,” Smart said. university@cm-life.com

Events Center contribution, shared governance cited as some of reasons By David Oltean Senior Reporter

cost almost nothing for CMU. “In the current economic condition, it was vital that we help build revenue,” Heeke said. “This partnership will maximize exposure and solidify corporate sponsorship position at virtually no cost to CMU. This is a revenue-share plan that will provide staffing as well as sales expertise.” Current employees are not in danger of losing their jobs, he said. Athletics currently employs three full-time marketing employees, and IMG typically brings in a manager and account executive to head up its operation.

The Academic Senate’s vote of no confidence against President George Ross and Provost Gary Shapiro continues to gain support as the Council of Chairs endorsed the resolution during their meeting on Wednesday afternoon. The council, which consists of 22 department chairpersons and other constituents, approved the endorsement because of a number of issues, including the $10 million contribution to the CMU Events Center from university funds that was recently exposed. Brigitte Bechtold, chairwoman of the Council of Chairs, said the endorsement was overwhelmingly passed by the group’s members. “The Council of Chairs endorses the Senate’s resolution of no confidence in the administration of President Ross and Provost Shapiro, and we call upon the Board of Trustees to address the concerns raised therein,” the endorsement stated. Bechtold said members had additional concerns along with the issues of the administration’s shared governance policy, transparency and the decision-making process that many departments have expressed objections toward. Bechtold said the university’s $10 million contribution to the CMU Events Center as well as the recent appointment of Matt Serra as executive director of Faculty Personnel Services influenced the vote as well. “We have several additional issues to be concerned about,” Bechtold said. “Members are concerned about the $10 million we have heard about in the paper, issues related to a memo from the provost regarding the faculty personnel director that was appointed following a national search and several other issues.” Bechtold said the council had discussed endorsing the resolution during their meeting last month, and the Board of Trustees formal meeting Thursday did not factor in to the vote. “It was not planned to specifically have this vote before this Board of Trustees meeting, but the fact that the Board of Trustees will meet tomorrow may help our concerns be addressed,” Bechtold said. “The reason why the council took this up today was because it had already been considered at last month’s meeting.” A-Senate chair Jim McDonald said the endorsement, along with those previously made by academic departments, contradicts the former chair

A ATHLETICS | 6

A VOTE | 2

ADAM NIEMI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Central Michigan University President George Ross speaks to the board of trustees during their meeting Thursday in the Bovee University Center’s President’s Conference Room.

The $10 million question Ross says he wasn’t at CMU when allocation was made to Events Center By Catey Traylor | Senior Reporter

University President George Ross said Wednesday that he did not previously know $10 million was allocated from university funds to the Events Center. “It’s my understanding that the project was to be privately funded,” he said. “When it comes to fundraising, there will always be estimates.” At Tuesday’s Academic Senate meeting, Ross said $10 million from the university reserves was allocated to the Events Center after fundraising goals weren’t met. The expected cost of the Events Center was estimated at $21.5 million in 2007. In 2008, Director of Athletics Dave Heeke told Central Michigan Life that the university was committed to raising all of the money privately. “We’re going to go out and ask alumni, friends and others to contribute to this project,” he said in 2008.

Ross told members of the media Thursday following the Board of Trustees he was not at Central Michigan University when the $10 million allocation was made to the Events Center. “I wasn’t (at CMU); I was in Mississippi,” Ross said, referring to his time as president of Alcorn State University. “I can’t talk about what someone said when I wasn’t here. In the records, it was submitted as joint fundraising. I’d be speculating if I said anything beyond that.” Until Tuesday evening, the Events Center website said the project would be privately funded. Kathy Wilbur, vice president of development and A george ross | 6

board of trustees

Athletics enters contract with IMG By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

The Central Michigan University Athletics Department will now have access to the same marketing techniques currently used by 70 of 75 Bowl Championship Series schools in America. Marketing, broadcasting and brand development for the athletics department will now be handled by IMG College, a division within the International Marketing Group. A brand utilized by universities across the nation, IMG provides training, billing and customer service support for all clients.

At Wednesday’s Finance and Facilities Committee meeting in the President’s Conference Room, Director of Athletics Dave Heeke said the service will build revenue for the athletics department. The revenue will be split, with 45 percent going directly to CMU athletics and 55 percent going to IMG. “In the first year, we expect revenue to decrease. By year two, we’re showing a $30,000 to $40,000 increase,” Heeke said. “In the span of the life of the agreement, a little over $10 million in revenue will be made by athletics.” Heeke said the partnership, a 10-year contract expected to be signed in the next few days, will

Students protest ‘fracking’ seminar Thursday By Melissa Beauchamp Senior Reporter

Chants of “Hell no, hydro-fracking has got to go,” were heard near the Mount Pleasant Comfort Inn and Conference Center on Thursday. Members of the Student Environmental Alliance and Taking Back the Tap were protesting from 2 to 6 p.m. outside the Inn, 2424 S. Mission St., where the Michigan Oil and Gas Association was holding a seminar. A Facebook event was created by Saline sophomore Chloe Gleichman, president of SEA, to raise awareness by protesting. About 70 people attended the event, coming and going over the four-hour time period. Gleichman said if water is poisoned, there is no turning back. “Water is a basic necessity for life,” she said. “If there’s no water, there’s no life.”

Walled Lake sophomore Mariah Urueta, SEA member, held a sign that read, “You can’t drink money and oil.” “We are here in opposition and protest of hydraulic fracturing,” Urueta said. “Fracking is absolutely outrageous and horrible.” A fact sheet on the Michigan Oil and Gas Association’s website said fracking is, “a safe, proven and essential process for recovering natural gas and oil from reserves found deep below the earth and often in tight rock.” Ureta said fracturing, “fracking,” is extracting natural gas from marcellus shale, and the process includes pumping gas that includes more than 600 chemicals into the ground that goes to the water table. According to msetc.org, marcellus shale is “a geological formation that was formed by the accumulation of

CHARLOTTE BODAK/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A PROTEST | 2

Midland freshman Alexis Loebig, Waterford senior Alysha McClain and West Bloomfield sophomore Caitlin Richards chant “Once you frack you can’t go back” in front of the Comfort Inn Thursday afternoon.

[ I N S I D E] w A-Senate proposes shared governance committee, 3 w Concessions lost $43,000 last year at football games, 3 w GOP hopeful Fred Karger visits CMU; first openly gay man to seek presidency, 5

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

w Gymnastics takes on winless George Washington Sunday, 8


2 || Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

faculty, additional graduate assistant positions and supplies and equipment. (The) announcement reflects the continued and ongoing commitment to providing an exceptional education and learning environment for our students.� Ross said $3.6 million will come from the general fund, while the remaining $2.2 million will be reallocated by various academic colleges The colleges in the report expecting funding include the colleges of business administration, communication and

By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

w Windigo Tale will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Bovee University Center Auditorium. The film is inspired by Ojibway spirituality and is based on the history of the residential school system.

w The Bernard Woma Ensemble will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Music Building’s Staples Family Concert Hall. The concert will feature virtuoso musicians of xylophone and drumming music of Ghana, West Africa.

continued from 1

Ross allocates $5.8 million to Category 1, 2

TODAY

saturday

PROTEST |

ACADEMIC PRIORITIZATION

EVENTS CALENDAR

w CMU Sports Management Association Professional Development Conference will be held at 3 p.m. in French Auditorium. The conference will be headlined by Detroit News Sports Columnist Terry Foster and 13-time Emmy Award Winner Dick Enberg. Registration for the event is $20, and forms can be picked up and dropped off in 2301 Health Professions.

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

University President George Ross informed the Central Michigan University Board of Trustees Thursday that $5.8 million would be allocated for academic programs that were categorized first and second priorities in the revised Academic Prioritization report. “We must and will continue our strategic investment in CMU’s academic enterprise,� Ross said. “This investment will be used for tenure-track faculty positions, fixed-term

VOTE | continued from 1

of the Board of Trustees Sarah Opperman’s statement about those angry with CMU’s administration affairs. Opperman

said in a Dec. 8 interview that said “it’s a small part of (the) university, from what I see, that is feeling very uncomfortable.� “I think it reaffirms the Academic Senate resolution, and it follows in line with what 16 other departments have done at this point. It shows a wider

w Sin, Sex and the CIA will be held from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the Broadway Theatre, 216 E. Broadway St. Tickets are $8 and can be purchased at Ace of Diamonds, Ric’s Food Center and the Broadway Box Office.

spread of support for it,� McDonald said. “It really counters the statement of the chair of the Board of Trustees in December that said it was a small part of the university community that felt that way.�

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287 &$55<287 3/867$; 3/867$;

Attention Students

LARGE LARGEÂŽ PEPPERONI PEPPERONI PIZZA, PIZZA, ÂŽ CRAZY ,, CRAZY CRAZY BREAD BREADÂŽ,, 88 PIECE PIECE ORDER ORDER CRAZY SAUCE SAUCEÂŽ 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287 &$55<287 ALL DAY! 3/867$; ALL DAY, DAY, EVERY EVERY DAY! 3/867$;



25,*,1$/5281'

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287 &$55<287 3/867$; 3/867$;



LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA, LARGEÂŽPEPPERONI PEPPERONI PIZZA, LARGE PIZZA, LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA, 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ ÂŽ, 8 PIECE ORDER ÂŽ ÂŽ &$55<287 CRAZY BREAD ,, CRAZY SAUCE ÂŽ, 8 ÂŽ &$55<287 CRAZYBREAD BREAD PIECE ORDER CRAZY SAUCE CRAZY ORDER ,, CRAZY SAUCE 3/867$; CRAZY BREAD , 8, 8PIECE PIECE ORDER CRAZY SAUCE 3/867$;

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Week Sale!

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY! ALL ALLDAY, DAY,EVERY EVERYDAY! DAY!

99¢ TANS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY! LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA, LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA, ÂŽ ÂŽ CRAZY CRAZY BREAD BREADÂŽ,, 8 8 PIECE PIECE ORDER ORDER,, CRAZY CRAZY SAUCE SAUCEÂŽ ALL ALL DAY, DAY, EVERY EVERY DAY! DAY!

     



25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287 &$55<287 3/867$; 3/867$;

 

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287 &$55<287 3/867$; 3/867$;

3/867$; LARGE PIZZA, LARGEPEPPERONI PEPPERONI PIZZA, LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA, ÂŽ , 8 PIECE ALL DAY, EVERY DAY! CRAZY BREAD ORDER ÂŽ, 8 ALL BREAD DAY, EVERY DAY! CRAZY PIECE ORDER ,, ,, CRAZY BREAD 8 PIECE ORDER CRAZY BREAD ,&8, PEPSI PIECE ORDER LARGE PEPPERONI ÂŽ ÂŽPIZZA, CRAZY SAUCE 2-LITER LARGE PEPPERONI ÂŽ && ÂŽPIZZA, CRAZY SAUCE PEPSI 2-LITER CRAZY SAUCE 2-LITER ÂŽ CRAZY SAUCE & PEPSI PEPSI 2-LITER ÂŽ, 8 PIECE CRAZY BREAD ORDER,, CRAZY BREAD , 8 PIECE ORDER ALL DAY, EVERY DAY! ALLDAY, DAY,EVERY EVERYDAY! DAY! ÂŽ ÂŽ ALL ÂŽ ÂŽ ÂŽ ÂŽ

ÂŽ ÂŽ

ÂŽ ÂŽ

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY! CRAZY SAUCE & 2-LITER CRAZY SAUCE & PEPSI PEPSI 2-LITER

ALL ALL DAY, DAY, EVERY EVERY DAY! DAY!

Italian Cheese Bread

3

Sale ends Sunday,

$ 99

Corrections

   



  

Mt. Pleasant 324 s. Mission





(989) 773-1121

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$; &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$;

3(33(521,

´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG ´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG E\6DQGHOPDQ $VVRFLDWHV3(36,DQGWKH3HSVL*OREHGHVLJQDUHUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNVRI3HSVL&R,QF E\6DQGHOPDQ $VVRFLDWHV3(36,DQGWKH3HSVL*OREHGHVLJQDUHUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNVRI3HSVL&R,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$; &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$;

´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG ´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG ´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG ´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG ´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\Âľ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Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B

&$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$;

3(33(521,







February 19 th

   

   25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287 &$55<287 3/867$; 3/867$;

Tell Your Friends!

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281'

ÂŽ &$55<287 ÂŽ PIZZA, LARGE &$55<287 LARGE 3 3 MEAT MEAT ÂŽTREAT TREAT 3/867$; PIZZA, 3/867$; 25,*,1$/5281' CRAZY ,, &$55<287 8 CRAZY BREAD BREADÂŽ25,*,1$/5281' 8 PIECE PIECE ORDER ORDER,, &$55<287 ÂŽ 3/867$; ÂŽ ÂŽ 3/867$; ÂŽ PIZZA, SAUCE LARGE MEAT &3 CRAZY SAUCE LARGE& 3CRAZY MEAT TREAT TREAT PIZZA,



ÂŽ ÂŽ PIZZA, CRAZY BREAD PIECE ORDER LARGE 3 MEAT MEAT TREAT HOT-N-READY 4-8 OR ANY CRAZY BREAD ,, 88ORDER PIECE ORDER LARGE 3 PIZZA, HOT-N-READY 4-8PM PMTREAT OR ORDER ANY,, TIME! TIME! ÂŽ ÂŽ 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ, 8SAUCE ÂŽ 25,*,1$/5281' CRAZY PIECE ORDER CRAZY &$55<287 CRAZY& BREAD , 8SAUCE PIECE ORDER,, &BREAD CRAZY &$55<287 ÂŽ 3/867$; ÂŽ 3/867$; & SAUCE & CRAZY CRAZY SAUCE HOT-N-READY 4-8 PM OR ORDER ANY HOT-N-READY 4-8PM OR ORDER ANY TIME! TIME! ÂŽ LARGE MEAT HOT-N-READY PM ORDER ANY LARGE 3 34-8 MEAT TREAT PIZZA, HOT-N-READY 4-8 PM OR ORÂŽTREAT ORDERÂŽ PIZZA, ANY TIME! TIME! CRAZY CRAZY BREAD BREADÂŽ,, 88 PIECE PIECE ORDER ORDER,, ÂŽ & & CRAZY CRAZY SAUCE SAUCEÂŽ ÂŽ ÂŽ

ÂŽ ÂŽ

ÂŽ ÂŽ

ÂŽ ÂŽ

HOT-N-READY HOT-N-READY 4-8 4-8PM PM OR OR ORDER ORDER ANY ANY TIME! TIME! ÂŽ ÂŽ

Accepted

25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' 25,*,1$/5281' &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$; &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$; &$55<287Â&#x2021;3/867$;

3(33(521, 3(33(521,

*

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right, all College Students can tan for just 99 cents at Image Sun!

LARGE PIZZA, LARGE PEPPERONI PEPPERONI PIZZA, 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ, 8&$55<287 CRAZY PIECE 3/867$; CRAZY BREAD BREAD , 8&$55<287 PIECE ORDER ORDER,, 3/867$; 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ ÂŽ 25,*,1$/5281' ÂŽ 2-LITER CRAZY SAUCE &$55<287 CRAZY SAUCEÂŽ & & PEPSI PEPSI 2-LITER &$55<287 LARGE PEPPERONI3/867$; PIZZA,

w Vocal Chamber Music of the British Isles will be held from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in the Music Buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Staples Family Concert Hall. The concert is free and open to the public.

metro@cm-life.com

university@cm-life.com

       

sunday

Š Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 61

university@cm-life.com



w CMU University Theatre presents: Independence will be performed at 2 p.m. in CMUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bush Theater. Tickets can be purchased at the Central Box Office.

Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com.

fine arts, health professions, humanities and social and behavioral sciences, education and human services, science and technology and medicine. Ross did not specify in the meeting how the money will be awarded and reallocated. Provost Gary Shapiro, who prepared the Academic Prioritization report, could not be reached for comment before his office closed at 5 p.m. Thursday. Check back at cm-life.com for further coverage.

sediment into a sea. This formation was eventually buried over many thousands of years and compressed to produce an organic-rich black shale.â&#x20AC;? Urueta said fracking is not in Mount Pleasant yet, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prevalent in areas north like Pennsylvania with marcellus shale. The problem with fracking, Urueta said, is it contaminates clean water sources. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It affects peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health and farming,â&#x20AC;? she said. Hazel Park senior Carlos Coronado held a sign that said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poisoning our water.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to be here all day,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very unique opportunity on a local level to raise awareness.â&#x20AC;? Coronado said many people are unaware of what fracking is,

and this is a way to get the word out. People are recognizing what we are doing and honking to support us, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Previously, the list for fracking-fluid was a disclosed list,â&#x20AC;? he said. Saline resident Kurt Gleichman came to support his daughter and spread awareness by holding up a sign that read, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fracking jobs are grave digging our children.â&#x20AC;? He said the fracking process harms the environment and the water supply. There have been accidents that have contaminated the water supply, specifically in Pennsylvania, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of it flows back out, and they take those toxins and eject them into wells in the ground,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are trying to nip it in the bud before it comes to Michigan.â&#x20AC;?

4445 Bluegrass Road, Suite 1B

(989) 773-TANS

Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B

´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG ´+LJKHVW5DWHG&KDLQ9DOXH)RU7KH0RQH\ÂľEDVHGRQDQDWLRQZLGHVXUYH\RITXLFNVHUYLFHUHVWDXUDQWFRQVXPHUVFRQGXFWHG E\6DQGHOPDQ $VVRFLDWHV3(36,DQGWKH3HSVL*OREHGHVLJQDUHUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNVRI3HSVL&R,QF E\6DQGHOPDQ $VVRFLDWHV3(36,DQGWKH3HSVL*OREHGHVLJQDUHUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNVRI3HSVL&R,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF /,77/(&$(6$56Â&#x160;WKH/LWWOH&DHVDUVORJRVDQGGHVLJQVDQGUHODWHGPDUNVDUHRZQHGE\7UDGHPDUNV,QF $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP $YDLODEOHIRUDOLPLWHGWLPHDWSDUWLFLSDWLQJORFDWLRQV3ULFHVPD\YDU\9LVLWRXUZHEVLWHDW/LWWOH&DHVDUVFRP Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B Â&#x2039;/&(,QFB35B

MakingA

Difference:

an evening with Dr. Jane Goodall

Photo Courtesy of Michael Neugebauer

Wednesday

March 28, 2012

8:00 PM at McGuirk Arena EVENT FREE, TICKET NEEDED

Ticket Central Phone: 989-774-3000 Email: ticketcentral@cmich.edu Website: centralboxoffi ce.cmich.edu

T

he legendary primatologist and conservationist will share her insight from more than ďŹ ve decades of work with Gombe Dr. Goodall will: â&#x20AC;˘ provide insight into the person behind the research. â&#x20AC;˘ discuss The Jane Goodall Institute and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission.

chimpanzees, current threats facing the planet, and reasons for hope in these complex times. â&#x20AC;˘ provide a book signing following speech For more information about Dr. Goodall, please visit www.janegoodall.org

Sponsored by: Speaker Series University Events, Program Board, Biology Department, College of Science and Technology, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, and OfďŹ ce of Research and Sponsored Programs.


3

INSIDE LIFE Friday Feb. 16, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Academic Senate proposes shared governance committee By David Oltean Senior Reporter

Some of the Central Michigan University community’s concerns about shared government principles and transparency may be answered with a new Academic Senate committee. The committee, proposed to consist of 13 members, would be composed of students, faculty, administrative staff and a board of trustees member. The committee will examine the shared

governance matrix, university communication and transparency issue on campus and then will submit a semester report and make recommendations to university administration. At Thursday’s board of trustees meeting held in Bovee University Center’s President’s Conference Room, University President George Ross announced the committee formation had been proposed. Ross said similar committees dedicated to university governance were established in

previous years. “The essence of the charge is for this committee to take a look at shared governance on campus ... to take a look at communication channels on campus, the transparency issues, how we are communicating and how we can be more effective at communicating,” Ross said. Ross said he expects the committee to have a report by the end of the semester on the current state of shared governance and transparency throughout

the university and will take recommendations from the committee. “We want to make sure that the matrix as we now understand it, if it needs to be modified, I can look to that committee to make recommendations,” Ross said. A-Senate’s executive council met with board of trustees members in a private meeting Wednesday afternoon, though board Chairman Sam Kottamasu said the meeting did not influence the development of the committee.

“The purpose of the meeting was to listen to the Academic Senate executive board’s comments and concerns and work with them to improve the student success on the campus,” Kottamasu said. “This was not a decision-making meeting.” A-Senate Executive Board member Michelle Campbell, a Grand Rapids graduate student, said the committee will be able to provide a solution to some of the communication and governance issues at the university.

Campbell said of the 13 members, two student representatives will be selected. “I think that the shared governance committee, which is an ad hoc committee, is a positive step in bridging all members of the campus community in trying to do some problem solving about the issues that have been going on on campus,” Campbell said. “I’m very pleased with the way members will be selected.” university@cm-life.com

Concessions lost $43,900 last year at football games By Matt Thompson Sports Editor

photos by jake may/staff photographer

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney laughs as he holds onto a less-than-thrilled 18-month-old Jonah Brieve of Grand Rapids as he greets a few of the more than 300 people in attendance at a campaign rally Wednesday at office systems company Compatico in Kentwood.

Central Michigan football attendance numbers last year were the worst in years, and concession sales felt the pain. After coming off a year where CMU concessions turned a profit, things turned downhill fast. Nikki Smith, marketing manager for campus dining, released a loss of $43,900 last season. “Concessions fluctuate for a variety of reasons,” Smith said in an email. “Including strength of schedule, date of games, weather, day of week, win/loss record, number of games, etc.” The past two years the football team has been 3-9 each season. Last season, CMU had three midweek games, which contributed to the low attendance that trickles into lower concessions.

“I don’t know or have attendance numbers, but it’s no secret if attendance is lower I’d expect concessions to drop, too,” CMU athletics director Dave Heeke said a few weeks ago. In 2009, when CMU won the Mid-American Conference, attendance dropped to 15,328, more than 5,000 below the year before. The concessions numbers reflected the attendance drop. CMU lost $31,000 on concessions in 2009, while in 2008 it made $12,900. Smith stated how in 2009 CMU had “three Saturday games as well, but they were against teams that didn’t draw the same crowd as the three Saturday games in 2008.” She went on to say how the final game of the season was played the Friday

ACONCESSIONS | 6A

fa c i l i t i e s m a n a g e m e n t

Replacement of water lines in campus buildings continues By Tony Wittkowski Staff Reporter Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney addresses more than 300 people at a campaign rally Wednesday at office systems company Compatico in Kentwood.

Jim Wilson of Buckingham, Va., finishes a phone call with a West Michigan auto mechanic to replace his drive shaft, which broke 12 miles from Compatico in Kentwood, Mich, where Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney rallied.

BACK TO THE ‘MITT’EN Mitt Romney returns to Michigan, receives Synder endorsement By John Irwin | Staff Reporter GRAND RAPIDS — A day after returning to Michigan, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is already reaping the benefits. Governor Rick Snyder on Thursday endorsed the former Massachusetts governor, calling Romney “the man for the job.” “Our next president must understand how markets work and know how to get our nation back on track,” Snyder wrote in an op-ed in the Detroit News.

On Wednesday night, in a 20-minute speech before hundreds of supports on the west side of the state, Romney took on the president and organized labor, calling their relationship “crony capitalism.” Romney said Obama has given huge financial favors to green energy industries and unions that contributed to his 2008 presidential campaign. “(Obama) got hundreds of

millions from labor bosses for his campaign, and so he’s paying them back in every way he knows how,” Romney said. “One way, of course, was giving General Motors and Chrysler to the UAW.” “I’ve taken on union bosses before, and I’m happy to take them on again,” Romney said. “I sure won’t give in to (the) UAW.” AROMNEY | 6A

Work continues on renewing old water lines in various buildings on campus. Since 1999, domestic water lines have been renewed in 17 residential halls and several academic buildings. New water pipelines have been installed in the Bovee University Center, Brooks Hall, Anspach Hall, Pearce Hall, Moore Hall and the Dow Science Building. Ronan and Foust halls are almost done, while Bush Theatre is being worked on now. Grawn Hall is the next building to have work done, with work beginning over winter break and expected to be done by the end of the summer, said Steve Lawrence, vice president of Facilities Management.

Many of the older buildings contained galvanized piping that allows for carbonate buildup, limiting water pressure and the amount that is able to come through. The only residential halls not done are Celani, Campbell, Fabiano, Kesseler and Kulhavi because they contain copper piping, Lawrence said. Installation began in 1999 when Herrig, Barnes and Thorpe halls were worked on. The university has completed 28 buildings at a cost of $9,332,000, funding that came from the deferred maintenance fund, Lawrence said. “The cost varies a lot,” he said. “It also depends on how the hall was built, how many feet of pipe there is and how many

APIPES | 6A

Nine students make next round in model casting call for fashion line By Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

Sophomore Cathryn Blake took a deep breath and strutted across the room toward the judges’ table. “I think it takes a lot of selfconfidence to be a model,” said the Gobles native about trying out for Central Michigan University alumna Kala Wilburn’s accessory line, Fannie Lucille. About 15 students gathered Wednesday night in the Bovee University Center’s Chippewa Room in hopes of becoming the face of the line. “I originally wasn’t going to come out, but my sorority sister wanted me to come with her,” Blake said. “I’m nervous just to

see what they think of me, but really, I’m just here for fun.” Wilburn said she was really excited about the casting’s turnout. “I’m glad people are stepping out of their box,” the designer said. “I’m really happy to be helping people go through the modeling process and seeing them experience something different.” The Fashion Association of Merchandising and Design club hosted the event to look for models of all shapes and sizes. FAMD President Alex Mauro said the model selected for Wilburn’s line will receive a contract with Jer Decor Fashion/Modeling Company and a spread in “Liv Lux Magazine,” in addition

to being the face of the collection. “I’m really impressed with the professionalism from Kala and the crew,” the Troy junior said. “It’s great that they took the time to come here and give everyone this opportunity.” Jeremy Cornelius, Jer Décor runway and model coach and fashion show coordinator, prepared the students before they walked for the judges. “My name starts with a J, but I’m not Miss J,” he said, referring to Project Runway’s walking coach. “But I can teach you how to walk.” His tips for the aspiring models were to relax, keep their chin parallel to the floor and walk heel to toe.

“The reason for this is for you to get experience,” Cornelius told the students. “A lot of people want to get into modeling but don’t know how to do it. We’re here to give you those things you need to bring to the fashion industry.” Blake was one of nine students chosen to move on to the next round of the competition, to be held March 2 at the Greater Flint Art Council. “The people I chose possessed a good attitude, determination, and they had fun,” Wilburn said. “I loved the fact they took the time to look at the handbags and expressed how the designs made them feel.” studentlife@cm-life.com

CHarlotte bodak/Staff photographer

Charlevoix freshman Kathryn Sell listens while Portage junior Megan Repyak is interviewed during auditions as the new model for Fanni Lucille accessories Wednesday evening in the Bovee University Center’s Chippewa Room. “This experience has helped me grow in so many ways,” Sell said. “I’m excited to see where this takes me.”


4

VOICES Friday Feb. 17, 2012

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

| cm-life.com

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | Timing of lump sum payments tips university’s hand

F

$ilence

take a pay freeze in 2010. After striking an agreement with the Faculty Association over a new contract last month, we feel the timing of this one-time payday is questionable at best. A quiet, appeased campus is much less likely to ask the hard questions. Ross said he has excluded himself from the offer, but it does not diminish the apparent attempt by him and the board of trustees to gain favor from those who have been working without a pay increase for the last year and eight months. On Wednesday, the Council of Chairs, made up of 22 department chairpersons, made an unprecedented vote to endorse the Academic Senate’s vote of no confidence against Ross and Provost Gary Shapiro. Instead of individual faculty members voicing frustration this time, it is now department leaders casting a large shadow of doubt over the president’s ability to lead. Then on Thursday, in a closed-door meeting with members of the media, Ross reiterated a point he first made

or several years, financial decisions at Central Michigan University have been justified by the premise that times are tough. Constant tuition and room and board increases, fewer hours in the computer labs, even limits on the amount of student printing all came to meet economic hardship. Yet Thursday at the board of trustees meeting, University President George Ross authorized a 2.25 percent onetime lump-sum payment to employees who took a zero-percent wage increase in 2010. Those include professional and administrative groups, office professionals, public broadcasting, supervisory-technical, nonunion fixed-term faculty and senior officer groups. While it is nice to see these individuals get a few extra dollars in their pockets, the outlay would appear to be frivolous if budgets truly are strained

at CMU — especially the same week it was revealed the university has quietly deemed that at least $10 million of funding for a superfluous Events Center always billed as “privately funded,” is a permanent allocation. Ross went on to admit similar funding would be provided for even more expensive future endeavors such as the bioscience and College of Medicine buildings. Many of the individuals set to receive this infusion of cash simply do not need it for the betterment of the university, as evidenced by their willingness to

Wednesday night at the trustees-faculty liaison meeting. When asked about the $10 million allocated by the university to the Events Center project, Ross took the easy way out, responding with a simple, “I wasn’t here then.” And while he makes a valid point — then-President Michael Rao got the ball rolling on the facility renovation — is that the type of leadership CMU needs during tumultuous times? A real leader stands up and takes responsibility for mistakes made, even if there was little he or she could do about it. A real leader does not play the blame game by insinuating others dropped the ball, and a real leader knows ignorance is no excuse. Ross must acknowledge that mistakes were made and begin taking action to correct them. Such steps would go a long way toward increasing confidence in his administration, much more than Thursday’s surprise bonus. Hush money is no substitute for honest action, especially when it comes to the issue of silently transferred funds.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORK BIRD]

Anamaria Dickerson Senior Reporter

Why yellow is more than just a color Gone too soon are words that play in my mind when I think of someone who was like another older sister to me and committed suicide. I was 10 years old when one of my sister’s best friends, Patty, took her own life. They had met through working together as orthodontists and Patty became someone I came to not only respect, but look up to. She was a role model for me. I share this story because after attending the new registered student organization, Yellow Ribbon’s first meeting Monday, it made me realize just how many people have attempted or know someone who has attempted or committed suicide. I realized I am not alone in dealing with this kind of experience. Being that young when Patty died was something I couldn’t, and still cannot to this day, wrap my mind around. As I was talking with other members of Yellow Ribbon, we discussed the stigma with suicide and the mental illnesses related to it. Even though I don’t think I’ll ever fully understand why Patty did what she did, I know there must have been something deeper going on than what she told people up front, something she didn’t think she could get help for. But I wish she had. I hear people say, “Why can’t someone just get over it?” It isn’t that simple. I know from having friends and family with mental illnesses that it isn’t always easy to reach out for help and overcome, especially when it’s expected of them to just brush it off. I think some people are afraid to reach out for help in fear of the person they reached out to not taking them seriously. I have had other people in my life, aside from Patty, who have expressed feelings of depression or shared thoughts of suicide. Some have actually attempted it, and I wish there was more I could personally do. I know all I can do is offer love and support. I am not a professional, so I can’t tell people how to overcome their obstacles, but I can guide them in the right direction to get the professional help they need. I still wish Patty could have seen in herself what I saw in her — a beautiful, caring and smart woman who was appreciated and loved by many. I wish that at even 10 years old, there was something I could have said or done to make her change her mind. If she was here today, I would tell her just how much I admired her. After the meeting, I was already looking forward to what is next. I can’t wait to see the work Yellow Ribbon does in spreading the message to have more open communication about suicide and its prevention. After all, yellow is more than just a color. Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

[Letter to the editor]

Affordable Care Act offers college students health insurance option Recently, Michigan State University announced that if students do not have health insurance coverage on their own, they will be required to enroll in a MSU plan at a cost of nearly $1,500 for the year. The university was acting in response to the fact that a high number of students at MSU have historically not had coverage, and they want to protect students who might get sick and have to choose between paying medical bills or college. But what was missing in the news coverage is that college students, as well as all young adults between 18 to 26, have another option thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Under this new federal law, young adults can now stay on their parents’ health insurance plan until their 27th birthday. The young adult son or

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

daughter can be married or file their taxes as an independent and still qualify. They don’t have to live with their parents or even live in the same state as their parents and still qualify.

work as when they are healthy.

There are currently about 207,000 uninsured young adults between 19 and 26 in Michigan. Since this new provision took effect in 2010, approximately 32,800 young adults have signed back on their parents’ family policy, and nationwide, more than 2.5 million more young adults now have coverage through their parents’ plan ,thanks to the Affordable Care Act.

MSU is right that students need health insurance. But students, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, can avoid the MSU plan and save $1,500 by simply signing up on their parents’ policy. And for those parents that may not currently have insurance, beginning January 2014, they will be able to buy affordable quality health care from the health insurance exchange that will be up and running. Then students can join their parents’ policy. For more information, visit www.healthcare. gov.

We know that many students who do not have insurance do not seek medical treatment when they are sick. We also know that when a person is sick, they do not perform as well in school or at

John Freeman, a former State Representative, is the State Director of Know Your Care, an organization dedicated to educating the public about the benefits available under the Affordable Care Act.

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received. Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Nathan Inks Columnist

Obama has changed tone “Last week, the Supreme Court reversed a century of law to open the floodgates for special interests — including foreign companies — to spend without limit in our elections. Well, I don’t think American elections should be bankrolled by America’s most powerful interests, and worse, by foreign entities.” Those were President Barack Obama’s words during his 2010 State of the Union address regarding the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission Supreme Court case, which allowed unlimited spending by corporations and organizations for political purposes. The ruling allowed for what have become popularly known as “Super PACs” (political action committees), something President Obama described as “not just a threat to Democrats, (but) a threat to our democracy.” Last week, the tone from the president changed. Obama began encouraging donors to support outside groups, and his campaign manager, Jim Messina, told reporters, “We’re not going to fight this fight with one hand tied behind our back. With so much at stake, we can’t allow for two sets of rules. Democrats can’t be unilaterally disarmed.” Whether you agree with the president on Super PACs or not, the sheer hypocrisy coming from him here is obvious. All of a sudden, it becomes OK to do something that threatens our democracy as long as you are doing it to get reelected? If Obama truly disagrees with the Citizens United ruling and finds Super PACs to be such terrible things, he should never resort to using them against his principles for electoral gain. In response to Obama’s reversal, former Senator Russ Feingold, D-Wisc., said, “I … think it guts the president’s message and the Democratic Party’s message. We are doing very well right now. The president is doing brilliantly. This is no time to blunt that message by starting to play this game. I think people will see it as phony that Democrats start playing by Republican rules. People will see us as weak and not being a true alternative and just being the same as the other guy. And as I have said before, to me this is dancing with the devil.” Feingold, one of the most principled senators this country has ever seen, hit the nail squarely on the head here. For those who believe the Citizens United ruling and Super PAC are positives for free speech, by all means continue funding and helping Super PACs spread their message. On the flip side of this coin, shame on Obama and any other Democrat who criticized Super PACs, but now plans on using them because it has become a political necessity. The point that politicians sacrifice their principles to get reelected is the time when the people need to step in and stop reelecting them. Not only is Obama’s stance a selfdescribed threat to democracy; it is also hypocritical. In this reversal, Obama showed us a dark secret of “Hope and Change;” they only matter when they are politically expedient to his reelection. Nathan Inks is the president of College Republicans. The column does not reflect views of the organization.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

GOP hopeful Fred Karger visits CMU; first openly gay man to seek presidency

Michigan House Democrats propose to strengthen financial transparency By John Irwin Staff Reporter

photos by chuck miller/staff photographer

Candidate for the Republican presidential nomination Fred Karger speaks with students Tuesday night in Anspach 169. Karger, a California native, has worked on presidential campaigns for Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. By Ben Harris Senior Reporter

Fred Karger was not followed into Anspach Hall on Tuesday evening by a swarm of assistants and photographers. Neither would one suspect, just by looking at him, that he is the first openly gay man to seek the nomination for president of the United States from either of the two major political parties. “I do everything the big campaigns do but on a more limited basis,” Karger said. “Everything’s done differently — you don’t see the big entourage you don’t see the national press with me.” Karger spoke at 9 p.m. Tuesday in Anspach 169 to members of the College Republicans and Spectrum. Karger, a California native, said when he first decided he wanted to run for president, he kept it to himself. Though he has worked on many presidential campaigns, including those of Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, he has never held a political office, according to his website. He said he always wanted to run for a political position but was never able to before. “I knew I could never run … because I was gay, just like I would go to dozens and dozens of weddings for friends and relatives and I just knew as I would sit there, or be standing up or something that I would never get married,” he said. Karger said things have changed since he started his career in the early ’70s. After he retired from his long career as a political consultant in 2004, he spent time as a gay rights activist in California, opposing Proposition 8, which banned same-sex couples from marrying in the state. Being a vocal opponent for Proposition 8 meant Karger had to publicly come out, he said. “(Publicly coming out) normally wouldn’t affect someone who was gay — I mean, my family knew, my coworkers knew, close friends and everything, but it wasn’t public. And because I’d had a fairly high-profile life in politics, it became a little more interesting. So I did that, but it was very difficult for me,” he said. He said he had the idea to run for president after he had come out and received widespread attention because of his work against Proposition

Central Michigan Life || Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 || 5

[News]

Fred Karger speaks to students Tuesday night in Anspach 169. Karger is the first openly gay presidential candidate from either major party and is one of six Republicans who will be on the ballot in Michigan.

8, which included launching a boycott against a hotel mogul who donated to the pro-Proposition 8 campaign. Karger visited Washington, D.C. and New York City and decided not to run for president. But then, he said, he visited the University of New Hampshire. “The first night there, I met up with these 35 or 40 students from the (University’s) Gay Straight Alliance, and they were in a room about half the size (of Anspach 150) or less on the floor,” he said. At the start of his speech, he said, the students were a little apprehensive because they did not know who he was. “But I told my story, and I guess they were kind of in awe that a gay man could run for president of the United States. I got all these Facebook messages and emails, and I did a reversal and decided I would run,” he said. Karger said his campaign found out last week that he would be placed on the ballot in California — the five others being Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul and Buddy Roemer, who is a former Louisiana governor and Congressman. Karger has recently been placed on the ballot for Michigan as well, which he said opened the door to be placed on the ballot in North Carolina, Maryland and Puerto Rico. At the speech he gave on Tuesday, he marketed himself as a moderate Republican. He said his moderate views and willingness to compromise set him apart from the other candidates. He said compromising is a skill he learned from his mentor, Ronald Reagan, who told Karger that if he got 80 percent of what he wanted, he was happy.

“I think it’s a new paradigm for the Republican Party. I’d like to see more moderate Republicans on social issues but still preaching this fiscally conservative platform. I think that’s where the Republicans are going in the future, and Fred Karger is ahead of his time,” said Macomb junior Justin Gawronski, president of Spectrum. Karger has been visiting colleges around Michigan trying to garner support. He said he has visited Adrian, Michigan State University and the University of Michigan and has more colleges to visit in the coming weeks. He said he will be going after Democrats to vote in the Republican primaries since Michigan does not have closed primaries like many other states. He said Democrats should vote for him because he has a lot of the same social values and understands the need to be inclusive and compromise to resolve Congressional deadlock. “I thought he (showed) a lot of courage. I mean, I’ve been involved in Republican politics, and it’s a very unfriendly place for the gay/lesbian/ transgender community,” said Clinton Township senior Stephanie Jaczkowski. “And so I think him just going out there and going straight for the presidential ticket shows a lot of courage and that he really believes his economic message. That was the best part of the whole thing. We haven’t heard anybody come out on this and say ‘the economy is what’s wrong.’ That’s Mitt Romney’s platform, but it’s not like Fred, who just comes out and just goes right at it and wants to cut out whatever needs to be cut out.” metro@cm-life.com

House Democrats in the state legislature unveiled a package of bills Thursday designed to increase transparency and accountability relating to money in politics. The bills would require lawmakers and appointed officials to disclose their finances and would establish periods when former lawmakers and officials could become lobbyists. House Democrats also proposed an amendment to Michigan’s constitution requiring corporations to increase disclosure of lobbying and political activities and banning the state government from awarding contracts worth more than $100,000 to contractors and vendors who make political donations. Central Michigan University Philosophy Professor Robert Stecker said these proposals are a step in the right direction to creating an ethical and transparent government. “Complete public financing of elections would help,” Stecker said. “Short of that, strong disclosure rules and restriction on going from public office to lobbying would be helpful.” Philosophy Professor Andrew Blom agreed. “The biggest ethical problem in contemporary American politics, as I see it, is that we have effectively made corruption institutional by allowing monied interests to have so much influence in campaigning and, as a result, access in lobbying,” Blom said in an email. “This is not

a matter of individual ethics but of our very system of democracy.” Democrats hope their proposals will gain bipartisan support in Lansing. In his State of the State address in January, Republican Gov. Rick Snyder made transparency in government a priority for 2012. “We should have more frequent and better disclosure of campaign contributions, and we should have stronger rules governing employment of people who negotiate state contracts while in government service,” Snyder said. Snyder is under pressure from many outside groups to pass legislation to slow the “revolving door” in state politics. This refers to when

politicians leave government to work for private companies that may have benefitted from policies they passed or advocated. One watchdog group, Common Cause Michigan, recently unveiled a new website featuring a clock counting the days, hours, minutes and seconds since the governor called for ethics reform. “We, the people of the State of Michigan, declare that we have a right to know when corporations spend money to influence elections or government officials so that we can make informed decisions and hold our leaders accountable,” the group said on its website. metro@cm-life.com

312 W. Broomfield

(next to Dragon Express)

MT. PLEASANT

(989) 317-3385 100 Tanning Minutes for

15

$

Expires 4/1/2012

Any Hair Cut

Cannot be combined with any other offer

12

$

Expires 4/1/2012

Like

Us On Facebook!

773-7370

Movie FREE Movie Day! Sale! Any Movie Rental Free!

2

$

701 N. Mission

AUDIO/VIDEO •Car Stereo •Used DVDs •Home Stereo •Used Games

1,000s to choose from

Friday, February 17th

FRIDAY, FEB. 17th


6 || Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Q & A w i t h SGA C a n d i d a t e s

Connor Gallagher By Octavia Carson | Staff Reporter Student Government Association Presidential candidate and Warren senior Connor Gallagher talked with Staff Reporter Octavia Carson about his campaign. Central Michigan Life will do question and answer interviews with all SGA presidential candidates. Vice Presidential candidate and Carleton junior Andrew Clark did not respond to a request for an interview in time of publication. The general elections will be held from March 1216; students can vote online. Photo by Bethany Walter/Staff photographer

Octavia Carson: What do you want to accomplish? Connor Gallagher: Our main goals are as follows: Have a computer lab on north campus and south campus open 24-hours per day; address the rising tuition costs and attempt to keep as much money in students’ pockets as possible; address the lack of parking on campus, especially for north campus, where seniors drive to class daily; create an easier medium for the spread of ideas so all students can be easily and equally heard on issues that are affecting their every day lives; create an undergraduate counseling/mentoring program to guide freshmen and help them understand how to get a job after their four-year education; work with police and administration to safely and effectively through compromise and school spirit bring our tailgate pride back. OC: How would you handle a situation such as the FA crisis? CG: My interests are always pro-students; the Fac-

SGA Presidential candidate Connor Gallagher and Vice Presidential candidate Andrew Clark respond to questions at the Charles V. Park Memorial Library Feb. 16.

ulty Association has their own representation. It would be inappropriate of me to comment on the way past situations were handled. My job as student body president would be to share interests with every student on campus and make sure no student is deprived the right to attend classes that they paid for. OC: Since the unicameral Proposal 1 was taken off the ballot, what do you want the bicameral system to look like? CG: I just want more students on campus to be excited to get their opinions expressed to the SGA. The SGA is a valuable product that we can sell to students here on campus, and if we market and push it to students who want to get involved, we can have more (ideas) and thoughts infused into our policy making. It is our job as officers of SGA to make sure every student knows what the SGA can do

george ROSS | continued from 1

external relations, said at the A-Senate meeting that information on the website was wrong and she wasn’t sure why. The website was edited shortly after, deleting a link to the Frequently Asked Question’s page, which explained why public funds were not being used to finance the project. Wilbur said documentation of the intent for CMU to fund $10 million of the project can be found in the uses and finance document provided to the state. The document, provided to Central Michigan Life by CMU, dated Aug. 19, 2009, says, “Funding for the project is coming from private donations and university capital construction reserves. It is the intent of the university that over time, private donations will reimburse the university capital construction reserves.” Additionally, the document states that $10 million would come from university capital construction reserves (state of Michigan funds) and referred to the

PIPES| continued from 3

toilets, showers, sinks and drinking fountains a building has.” When the university redid the Towers’ domestic water lines, it cost $1.7 million to replace the water in those because they were so big and tall, Lawrence said. New toilets, alterations to faucets A change in water faucets and toilets has Central Michigan University saving money and water every year. Tom Rohrer, director of the Great Lakes Institute for Sustainable Systems, said faucets were putting out five gallons per minute and

additional $11 million as private funds, noting that “funds raised over and above this amount will be used to offset university funding.” “The state of Michigan knew exactly what we were doing,” Ross said, pointing to a July 2009 Board of Trustees meeting in which the board approved a motion that said: “Total project cost not to exceed $21,000,000; funding to be from donations, reserve for future construction, reserve for remodeling and university recreation facility expansion reserve.” During a Feb. 8 interview, Wilbur referred to the $10 million from CMU as a “donation,” and when asked if the money would be paid back she said, “Who would pay that money back? Where would the money be paid?” Board of Trustees Chairman Sam Kottamasu stressed Thursday that the fundraising for the Events Center is not complete. About $8 million has been raised, with another $3 milcosting the university more than it should have. Aerators were put on faucets and water use dropped to three-quarters a gallon per minute, marking an 80-percent reduction. “The university had reduced it so much, the city of Mount Pleasant called to see what was going on,” Rohrer said. Building by building, 2,200 aerators have been installed by student employees since 2008. The established annual savings for the faucets came to $58,000 a year, with the cost and installation of the aerators coming to $9,000, Lawrence said. They are now on most campus faucets. “I now found one or two sinks I haven’t seen (the aerators) on,” Lawrence said. “But it’s very few.”

ATHLETICS | continued from 1

“We are able to reorganize internally,” Heeke said. “We’re not downsizing in any way. The current marketing team will just be reassigned.” IMG will assume annual expenses for web maintenance and hosting fees,

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

currently priced at $10,000, plus printing of programs for both men’s and women’s basketball, which cost $20,000 and $10,000, respectively. After three years, if IMG doesn’t meet a 15-percent

CM-LIfE.COM w Visit the website to read the full question-and-answer interview with Richeson and McGoff w Watch for a live stream interview with Blank Candidate and Blank Candidate Monday at 9:30 p.m. for them, and that the SGA is one of the most beneficial organizations on campus for students. OC: Connor, how would your experience with Greek life help you as president? CG: My experience with Greek life has helped me immensely. I have learned how to run an RSO here on campus from the president and vice president positions. Greek Life to me is a microcosm of our university, and I already have valuable experience running and leading an organization.

ROmNEY| continued from 3a

Romney, who spoke at an office furniture maker warehouse in Grand Rapids, has come under fire in Michigan for his opposition to the auto bailouts of 2009. Romney addressed his critics in his speech. “I care very deeply about the auto industry,” Romney said. “I want to make sure we have good jobs. Not just for a few weeks but for many, many years. I want the industry to come back in a big way.” Romney pledged to stand up for workers by fighting for right-to-work laws, which would give employees the option of whether or not to join a union instead of being required to join one. “I’ll fight for right-to-work laws, and I’m going to make sure we don’t force unions on people,” Romney said. He took shots at Obama’s record on energy, claiming he has favored companies that

supported him and his fellow Democrats in 2008 over others. He also criticized the president’s recent decision to strike down the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada through the United States and pledged to approve it the day he takes office, should he win. Romney, the son of former Michigan Governor George Romney, recalled a visit to Mount Pleasant for an Independence Day event with his family. His father stepped to the microphone and told the crowd how happy he was to be in Mount Clemens. “My mother tried to help and say, ‘George, it’s Pleasant, it’s Pleasant.’ He said, ‘Sure it’s pleasant here in Mount Clemens,’” Romney said, drawing laughter from the crowd. Byron Center native John Carlson attended the rally and said the biggest issues for him heading into 2012 are the debt and unseating Obama. “He’s the best liar I’ve ever seen,” Carlson said. “And all politicians are liars.” James Broskey, an unem-

Concessions| continued from 1a

after Thanksgiving. So even though the MAC title hopes were on the line, concessions suffered because of poor attendance. Smith did say that mid-

week games don’t always result in poor concession nights. “The last game of the year (in 2008) was on a Wednesday night, which typically results in lower sales,” Smith said.

ployed Grand Rapids resident who supported Obama in 2008, said unemployment and the economy are the issues on his mind this election season. He attended the rally to try to gain a better understanding of all the candidates and come to a decision afterward. “I’m starting off with a clean slate this election season,” Broskey said. For Romney, the speech was designed to draw a contrast between himself and Obama and to give him a boost in the polls. Recent polls have him falling behind the president in a hypothetical matchup in November and against former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum in the Michigan Republican primary. A recent Mitchell/Rosetta Stone poll showed Santorum ahead of Romney in Michigan by nine points. Likewise, Romney has gone from a two-point lead over Obama at the beginning of the year to a six-point deficit, according to a recent CBS/New York Times poll. metro@cm-life.com

“But we still had good sales because of the teams winning records.” Smith said concessions also go down when the Saturday games aren’t played at noon or 1 p.m. Both Saturday home games this season began after 3 p.m. sports@cm-life.com

studentlife@cm-life.com

lion to go. “The center only opened 15 months ago,” he said at Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting. “The average time for fundraising is fiveplus years. The fundraising is still ongoing.” A message left with former University President Michael Rao, now president at Virginia Commonwealth University, was not returned in time of publication. Rao left CMU on June 30, 2009. In a 2008 annual donations report, signatures from Rao and then-Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations Michael Leto appear on a letter that states, in part: “As we prepare to celebrate the opening of a new Education Building next year — made possible by more than $5 million in donor support — we also are taking bold strides toward raising $20 million to open the premier athletics, cultural and entertainment Events Center in central and northern Michigan.” Staff Reporters Adam Niemi and Alayna Smith contributed to this report. university@cm-life.com

The university has also installed 220 low-flow flush valves on urinals and 650 dual-flow toilets since 2009, Lawrence said. Toilets are dual flow, meaning it has the option for a low or regular flow. “On the dual-flow toilets, you pull up for liquid waste and push down for solid waste,” Rohrer said. The university wanted to cut back on its water and sewage bill and succeeded by installing these water savers. Last year’s fiscal budget for water was $934,750, which was a decrease from $1,012,300 in 2009-10, Lawrence said. “Sustainability here at CMU is a point of pride,” Rohrer said. “We were putting out a lot of water flow.” university@cm-life.com

growth margin, CMU has an opportunity to get out of the contract. CMU will check in with IMG every three years and can opt out of the contract at any time. “This brings CMU marketing to a new level,” said University President George Ross at Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting. university@cm-life.com

Creative Writers: the Central Review Attention

is

your literary publication.

Get your name in

print.

Grad schools love

that. Your parents love that.

Impress people. You write.

Own it.

Submit your work by 15 March for a chance to get published.

thecentralreview.com In addition to being published, two writers will receive our $100 prizes for poetry and prose.


SPORTS Central Michigan Life

w Gymnastics takes on winless George Washington Sunday, 8

| Friday, Feb. 17, 2012

cm-life.com

[ I N S I D E] w Coach Dan Enos answers football questions, Austin White returns as running back, 8 w Men’s basketball looks to build on Eastern Michigan win, 8

baseball

Zach Cooper starting off the season on the mound today

By John Manzo Senior Reporter

Head coach Steve Jaksa and his staff are giving the baseball to senior Zach Cooper for the opening game of the season and four-game series against Troy this weekend. “Words can’t really explain,” Cooper said about the anticipation for the beginning of the season. “I’m really excited and ready to get down for some warm weather and play some

baseball outside because inside it kind of gets boring, so I’m excited about it.” The four-game series begins at 7 p.m. today in Troy, Ala. Saturday, the team plays a double-header at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. Jon Weaver and Ryan Longstreth are the expected starters, with Rick Dodridge concluding the weekend with his start at 1 p.m. Sunday. The Chippewas were projected to win their third-straight Mid-Ameri-

can Conference West title, according to the conference coaches, but Jaksa isn’t too concerned with it, especially because the team plays 21 games before MAC play begins against Buffalo March 20. “Each team has its own identity, so we’re going to go out and figure ours out,” Jaksa said. “We don’t play in the MAC for a while. Right now, we’re trying to just play, because ‘hey’ we need to play well. We think we’re one of the best teams in the Midwest, too.”

Cooper leads the team into the season as the starting pitcher, but the rotation looks a lot different than a year ago. CMU lost starting pitchers Trent Howard and Jake Sabol from the Major League Baseball draft. “It’s definitely some big footsteps to fill with Trent and Jake both leaving,” Cooper said. “Not only myself, but we had a lot of guys that worked hard over the fall and through the summer to get ready for this, so we’re all look-

ing forward to it.” Jaksa said he hopes his team can continue the mentality that ‘the game in hand is the most important game.’ “Don’t think too much in the past, and don’t think too much in the future. Just play the game you’re supposed to play,” he said. Troy finished 43-19 last season and won the Sun Belt Conference championship. sports@cm-life.com

Track, field uses Skoog meet to prep for MAC run

wrestling

By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

jake may/staff photographer

Junior 184-pounder Ben Bennett, ranked No. 4 nationally, scores two points on a takedown against Michigan State’s Ian Hinton as he wraps him up for riding time during the third period Thursday at McGuirk Arena. Bennett finished his match with a 15-1 win, including one point for riding time. CMU beat MSU with a team score of 21-12.

State dominance

CMU wins 11 in a row over MSU By Ryan Zuke | Staff Reporter

Ben Bennett filled in admirably in sophomore Joe Roth’s position as the sparkplug for the Central Michigan wrestling team against Michigan State. Bennett gave the Chippewas a 4-0 lead after earning a major decision over MSU senior Ian Hinton. The spark proved to be enough as CMU rolled over Michigan State 21-12 Thursday night at McGuirk Arena. It was the Chippewas eleventhstraight victory over the Spartans. “Every match is real important to us,” head coach Tom Borrelli said. “But to me, this dual meet was more important, because it was our next match, and we are trying to build some momentum going into the MAC tournament.” Dual meets typically start at 125 pounds, but MSU’s coach forced a draw. The meet started at 184 pounds. “We haven’t done that all year,” Borrelli said. “Normally Ben, Chad (Friend) and Peter (Sturgeon) watch a bunch of matches before they have to wrestle. I wouldn’t say it threw us off; it was just different.” A cmu | 9

Brad lowe/staff photographer

Freshman 165-pounder Mike Ottinger attempts to gain control of Michigan State’s David Cheza during their bout Thursday at McGuirk Arena. Ottinger went on to defeat Cheza 9-7.

Central Michigan assistant track and field coach, John Ridgway, caught Ryan McCullough’s attention after a practice weight throw. McCullough looked back at him through the thick netting and listened. “You’re doing this,” Ridgway said, leaning back. “You need to be here.” McCullough, a senior, nodded. It’s been that kind of year for him so far. “He’s been battling with this event all year,” Ridgway said, referring to McCullough’s mental approach. After what McCullough said was his best practice all year Monday, he and the rest of the Chippewas will have a chance to maintain their confidence and technique before the Mid-American Conference championship next week. CMU hosts the Jack Skoog meet at 4 p.m. today. Saginaw Valley State, Alma, Northwood and Lake Superior State will all be competing in the event. It is also Senior Recognition Day for upperclassmen performing in their last indoor meet for CMU. McCullough said the challenge he’s faced this season has been to develop a rhythm and stay consistent with it. McCullough’s goal of honing his technique in the week leading to the MAC championship underscores what director of track and field Willie Randolph said is a final opportunity for athletes to gain confidence before they travel to Akron. “It always gives you more confidence,” Randolph said about home meets. “It’s a good thing to be relaxed and comfortable at home.” Randolph said his top runners, including sprinters, hurdlers and longdistance runners will not compete. He said they will stick to practicing technique and keeping their muscles loose for next week. Shot-put and weight throwers like McCullough will use today’s meet to gain repetitions. “We’ve tailored ourselves for next week,” Randolph said. “Unless something spectacular happens Friday, we already know what we’re doing next week.” Randolph said senior distance runner Raeanne Lohner will run her first indoor meet of the season. Her window of indoor eligibility has elapsed, but she will run unattached for CMU. sports@cm-life.com

Rockets blow away women’s basketball Wednesday, 80-62 By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

It was a rough night for the Central Michigan women’s basketball team as it was blown away by Toledo 80-62 at McGuirk Arena Wednesday. The 725 people in attendance saw the Rockets (17-7, 10-2 Mid-American Conference) shot lights out, 53 percent from the field and 56 percent from three-point range, and the Chippewas (13-13, 5-7 MAC) had no answer. “I was extremely, extremely disappointed in our effort,” head coach Sue Guevara said. “I think that was as poor of a performance as we’ve had all year.” The CMU defense struggled to contain Toledo senior guard Haylie Linn, whose only miss of the night was a desperation three-pointer as the shot clock ran out. Besides that miss she was perfect, ending the night shooting nine-for-10 from the field, including six-for-seven from behind the arc.

“Our defense sucked,” Guevara said. “It’s not like we didn’t know Linn could shoot the ball; it was like a mental block.” There were a couple bright spots on what was a dark night for the Chippewas. Junior guard Brandie Baker scored 13 points with five rebounds and four assists, while sophomore forward Taylor Johnson continued to thrive since becoming a starter, scoring 12 points and snatching five rebounds. The CMU bench continued to produce as it outscored the Rockets bench 27-13. The Chippewas were led by freshman guard Crystal Bradford, who had nine points, six rebounds and three steals after sitting out against Buffalo. Rockets head coach Tricia Cullop, despite winning big, saw the potential the Chippewas have to be a threat come time for the MAC tournament. “As this team continues to gel, I think Central (Michigan) is going to be

very dangerous in the tournament,” Cullop said. “We feel fortunate to get this win tonight.” Coming into the game, CMU had the five seed in the MAC tournament, making them a host for a first round matchup. After the loss, it dropped to the seven seed, which still gives it a home game to start the tournament. “We have four games left, and there’s nothing locked up whatsoever,” Guevara said. “If we have the same effort against Ball State that we did tonight, the same result will happen.” The Chippewas are on the road against the Cardinals Sunday, where they have a history of struggles and the schedule doesn’t get easier. They host Northern Illinois but then have to travel to rival Western Michigan and return to McGuirk Arena to finish the regular season against MAC West leader Eastern Michigan on Feb. 28. sports@cm-life.com

andrew kuhn/staff photographer

Central Michigan head coach Sue Guevara hangs her head in reaction to a missed free throw by freshman guard Jessica Green during the second half of Wednesday night’s game against Toledo at McGuirk Arena in Mount Pleasant. The Chippewas made 31 percent of their total field goals during the 80-62 loss to the Rockets.


8 || Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

Men’s Basketball CMU 55, EMU 52

Jake May/Staff photographer

Central Michigan gymnastics head coach Jerry Reighard fires his team up on Jan. 8. CMU will host George Washington Sunday.

Gymnastics

Winless George Washington comes to McGuirk Sunday By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan gymnastics team (9-3, 4-0) will host George Washington in a non-conference meet 1 p.m. Sunday at McGuirk Arena. The Colonials are from the Atlantic 10 conference and have yet to finish a meet in first place this year. After beating Kent State, CMU head coach Jerry Reighard said he doesn’t believe the team will have a let down. “I’m not worried about a let down,” Reighard said. “That victory against Kent State really inspired us, and I think we believe in ourselves more now than we have all season.” The performance against Kent State earned senior Kristin Teubner her secondstraight Mid-American Conference gymnast of the week

honors, while sophomore Meaghan McWhorter was MAC specialist of the week. Reighard said he doesn’t believe the meet against the Colonials will be a trap. “I don’t think my team is aware that they haven’t won,” Reighard said. “We are aiming to compete for a team score more than against an opponent. That’s the way we have been approaching practice all week. We’ve been working on the little things, hopefully that transfers into a better team score.” Teubner and sophomore Brittany Petzold have been carrying the Chippewas throughout this season. Reighard said they are key to the meet against George Washington as well. “Kristin Teubner has really been leading the charge,” Reighard said. “When she is on, and Brittany Petzold is on, I think that puts a lot of

confidence into the team. Three weeks ago, freshman Rebecca Druien fell during bars. Druien couldn’t continue during the meet due to an elbow injury. She has been working her way back to become an allarounder once again. Druien still isn’t ready for that role, so fellow freshman Halle Moraw will be the third all-arounder for the Chippewas against the Colonials. “Halle will go all-around again,” Reighard said. “We are really trying to get Rebecca Druien back on bars. She is still wearing an elbow brace. We are a little bit leery that if we use her in something that she might fall, and that’s what cost us the meet against Texas Woman’s University. There is a chance she will be back, but we are being very careful.” sports@cm-life.com

Football

Ryan Radcliff to start again, injured players getting better By Matt Thompson Sports Editor

It looks like even with the addition of a few quarterbacks to the roster football head coach Dan Enos is planning on sticking with Ryan Radcliff. The two-year starter is entering his senior year and would be a candidate to become a captain for next year’s team. “It will be very tough for anyone to beat Ryan Radcliff,” Enos said during a Detroit Free Press live chat when asked about the quarterback competition. “Through the eight MAC games we felt that Ryan was one of the best quarterbacks in the league and gave us a chance to win games.” Enos said he was excited about having Cody Kater join the program and already having Alex Niznak and A.J. Westendorp. When asked about the

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

attendance problem that plagued CMU last season during the live chat, Enos said “We are excited about our seven home games this season and expect to have an exciting atmosphere at Kelly/ Shorts Stadium for each of those home games.” Michigan transfer running back Austin White appears to be back on the team after being thrown off during last season. He had to sit out last year due NCAA transfer rules. “He has outstanding ability,” Enos said. “He hasn’t played in a game in two years, so spring practice and fall camp will be important for him to get the rust off.” The reasoning for White’s absence was never released. “We anticipate that if he continues to improve in all aspects of his life, he will be a key part of our team in the fall,” Enos said. Last year’s team was plagued with injuries, and al-

though not all of them are 100 percent according to Enos, he expects them to be healthy by early summer. Two of those injuries were to freshmen Anthony Garland (running back) and Courtney Williams (wide receiver). “They are both on track to make full recoveries and have some participation in spring practice,” Enos said. When asked what’s better for recruiting, being on ESPNU for midweek games with small crowds or large crowds on Saturday games, Enos answered carefully. “Anywhere we go in the country, people know who Central Michigan and the Mid-American Conference are, and that’s because of our television exposure,” Enos said. “But, there is something special about having a full stadium on Saturday afternoon.” sports@cm-life.com

Women’s Basketball CMU 62, Toledo 80

CMU (55) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP 23 3-6 1-3 0-0 5 5 7 Coimbra 1-1 0-0 0-0 3 3 2 Mbaigoto 15 35 5-9 1-2 0-4 9 1 11 Zeigler 5-12 1-4 3-4 2 2 14 McBroom 30 30 2-7 2-5 0-0 2 1 6 Jackson 13 2-3 0-0 0-0 1 1 4 Barnes 1-2 0-1 0-0 3 0 2 Craddock 16 11 1-4 1-3 0-0 3 1 3 Keel 10 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 0 Morris 4 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 1 0 Harden 13 3-5 0-0 0-2 2 1 6 Saylor 200 23-49 6-18 3-10 36 16 55 Totals Assists (11): McBroom 3, Jackson 2, Morris 2, Zeigler 2 Steals (4): Harden 1, Jackson 1, Zeigler 1, Coimbra 1

CMU (62) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF Bracey 21 2-4 0-0 1-2 4 2 Johnson 20 4-9 2-4 2-2 5 1 Welch 24 1-4 0-3 0-0 2 0 DiGulio 14 1-5 1-3 0-0 0 1 Baker 33 2-11 0-3 9-12 5 1 Miller 17 2-3 0-0 2-4 5 1 Green 24 4-11 0-0 0-2 5 3 Olive 8 0-1 0-1 1-2 0 0 Tamm 12 1-4 1-3 0-0 1 0 Bradford 19 4-14 1-3 0-2 6 3 LaDuke 8 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 0 Totals 200 21-66 5-20 15-26 37 12 Assists (6): Baker 4, Welch 1, DiGuilio 1 Steals (7): Baker 3, Bradford 3, Johnson 1

Eastern Michigan (52) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Harris 34 4-7 0-0 2-4 7 2 10 Riley 16 1-3 0-0 0-0 2 2 2 Green 15 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Dailey 21 0-2 0-0 2-2 2 1 2 Lampley 21 1-4 0-2 4-6 1 1 6 Sims 11 0-3 0-1 0-0 0 3 0 Harper 21 2-3 0-0 2-4 0 3 6 Thompson 25 6-9 4-5 2-2 2 0 18 Strickland 16 1-2 0-0 1-2 3 1 3 Balkema 19 1-3 0-0 3-5 3 1 5 Janton 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 16-39 4-8 16-25 23 15 52 Assists (5): Lampley 2, Harper 2, Strickland 1 Steals (6): Harris 2, Riley 1, Sims, Harper, Balkema 1

Toledo (80) MIN FG 3PT FT Rb PF TP Smith 21 5-7 0-0 3-5 10 1 13 Richardson 15 4-6 0-0 0-0 11 4 8 Ingersoll 37 2-7 2-5 0-0 2 1 6 Dortch 34 7-14 1-1 1-2 2 3 16 Linn 29 9-10 6-7 0-0 6 2 24 Reed-Lewis 14 0-4 0-1 2-2 0 0 2 McCormick 2 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 2 Recker 3 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 2 Zanoguera 22 1-3 0-1 0-0 3 3 2 Baumgartner 10 1-3 0-1 1-2 3 0 3 Jones 13 1-4 0-0 0-0 3 1 2 Totals 200 32-60 9-16 7-11 45 16 80 Assists (16): Richardson 5, Smith 4, two tied with 3 Steals (1): Smith 1

TP 5 12 2 3 13 6 8 1 3 9 0 62

Men’s basketball looks for win streak By John Manzo Senior Reporter

Building off a win is something head coach Ernie Zeigler and his staff haven’t faced since Jan. 11 when they beat Eastern Michigan. Central Michigan men’s basketball team faces the important task of continuing that success, following the 55-52 win Wednesday when it faces Texas A & M-Corpus Christi from the Southland Conference at 7 p.m. Saturday at McGuirk Arena. “I think it’s really important for us to see if we can put together back-to-back wins,” Zeigler said. “This will be our fifth opportunity to win backto-back games, and we’ve done it two other times. Hopefully we can use this victory as a springboard to continue to play well together as a team.” Zeigler said the Islanders are a scrappy team that can score in bunches. He expects them to come out aggressive.

Texas A & M-Corpus Christi is in a similar boat the Chippewas were just in three days ago. The Islanders have lost the past six games and have a 4-21 record. “I think they can really score in transition, and just looking at some of the scores of their games, they’re playing really tough on the road,” Zeigler said. “They’ve had two road victories here in conference that they’ve won both by one point. They’re accustomed to battling and playing until the end.” The Islanders are last in the Southland conference in points per game, averaging 58 points, but they do have Terrence Jones. Jones, a guard, is the team’s leading scorer, averaging 14.4 points per game. It’s good enough to make him the conference’s sixth-leading scorer. The Chippewas had eight scorers last game, but junior forward Olivier Mbaigoto was a non-factor offensively. He

has been inconsistent with his scoring, notching a career-high 23 in a win against UC-Irvine on Nov. 25, 2011. He went 1-for1 with two points in the win against EMU. “One thing I told our guys, when you have multiple guys that can score at a high rate, some nights it’s not going to be your night,” Ernie said. “I thought OV last night just came victim to the zone. We were able to get (Auston) Barnes some really good minutes defensively, and I thought OV did a good job defensively as well.” Point guard Jorddan Myrick is day-to-day for CMU with a lingering hip injury. His status for the game is uncertain. sports@cm-life.com


cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 || 9

[Sports]

cmu | continued from 7

After MSU cut the lead to 4-3, CMU rallied off four-straight victories to take the 18-3 lead. CMU senior Sturgeon defeated sophomore Mike McClure 5-4 in his last match of his career at

McGuirk Arena. “I haven’t been here long, but it was nice they were all cheering for me that loud,” Sturgeon said. Redshirt freshman Tyler Keselring followed Joe Roth’s decision with a 13-4 major decision, and CMU sophomore Scott Mattingly scored four takedowns en route to a 10-2 major decision of his own.

–With this coupon–

FREE REFILL

“I thought he wrestled well in spots,” Borrelli said of Mattingly. “We expected him to score bonus points for us, and he figured out how to do that. But I think he can certainly concentrate more through a seven-minute match.” The Spartans responded with two-straight decisions to pull within nine. But freshman Mike Ottinger

halted any chance of a comeback attempt. His 8-7 decision sealed the win for CMU. MSU’s last victory over the Chippewas was Nov. 28, 2001. CMU leads the all-time series 14-13. CMU travels to Purdue Sunday to face the Boilmakers at 2 p.m. sports@cm-life.com

Eat Fresh . . . Eat Healthy!

*

Any Regular 6” Meal

Buy 1 Inkjet Cartridge and Get 1 Of Equal Or Lesser Value Free! Mt. Pleasant Location Only. Requires Empty Cartridges.

Saturday, Feb. 18th 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

5

$

ONLY

for only

00

With purchase of drink. Expires 2/26/12 Not valid with any other offer. One per customer. brad lowe/staff photographer

Senior Peter Sturgeon defeats Michigan State’s Mike McClure, with a score of 5-4 on Thursday night at McGuirk Arena.

2018 S. Mission • In Stadium Mall

989-772-0020

GREAT TASTING!

Adjacent to Campus CAMPUS COURT PLAZA

MADE YOUR WAY! OPEN LATE! NExT TO BTAN

*One Coupon Per Event

GET READY FOR SPRING BREAK IN MCGUIRK WITH CMU ATHLETICS AND CM-LIFE!

lassifi ifiedseds

Beach Ball giveaway courtesy of CM-Life, Papa John’s, Little Ceasar’s, and United Apts!

MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. TEXAS A&M CORPUS-CHRISTI: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 7:00 P.M. - MCGUIRK ARENA

, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com

Classified Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy & Rates

ept advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which 15 reflects discrimination because Rates: word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad tional origin, andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or vertising which is discontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media Bold,1-2 italic and centered 1-2 per issue Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered e standards of CM Board, Life. CM is not Lifeinwill keeping be responsible with the standards for of CM Life.Issues: CM Life will$7.75 be responsible for type are available along type are available along e extent of cancelling typographical the charge errors for the only space to theused extent of cancelling the charge $7.50 for the space used 3-6 Issues: per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features with other special features ch an error. Creditand for rendered such an error valueless is limited by such to only an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad attractors. Issues: $7.25 per 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. y credit due canthe be fipicked rst dateup of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce due can7-12 be picked up at the CM Life offiissue ce f the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of termination it to the Classifi of the ed ad. If you find an error, report $7.00 it to the per Classifi ed 13+ Issues: issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue y responsible for the Dept. firstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

Spring Break is two weeks away: Wear your favorite spring break gear and get warmed up in McGuirk!

PUBLISHINGALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

lassifi ifiedseds Classifieds Halftime at Saturday’s game:

Come help us honor a CMU legend, Dick Enberg, who will be in attendance at Saturday’s game.... “Oh my!” Facebook.com/CMUMensBBall

Twitter.com/CMUMensBBall

Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

Policy

Classified Ad Policy

Classified Ad Rates

Classified Ad Rates

discrimination wingly acceptbecause advertising of race, whichcolor, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classified ad ect gin, or and discontinue, CM Life reserves withoutthe notice, rightadvertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping on of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM Life. is notCM in keeping Life will with the standards of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling ypographical the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and the charge for the space used and centered type are centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with available along with by limited suchto anonly error. theCredit first date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features special features picked ys of termination up at the CM of the Life ad. office If you within find30an days error, of termination of the ad. If you find an error, Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ $7.00 per issue like ad Issues: attractors. like ad attractors. onsible ified Dept. for the immediately. first day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion.

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com PUBLISHINGALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates By Phone: 989-774-3493 By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Website: www.cm-life.com In Person: 436 NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TOMoore RENTHall FOR SALE Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE

AUTOS SALE AUTOS FORDAY! SALE SERVICES SERVICES LOST &MORE FOUND LOSTREADERS &FOR FOUND REACH THAN 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING HELP FORWANTED RENT

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

2 BEDROOM APARTMENT downtown within walking distance to bars, restaurants, parks, campus. $350/pp/ month One year lease available June 1st No pets. 989-289-2848..

WANTED TO BUY

WANTED BUY HAPPYTO ADS

ROOMMATES MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE

1 AND 2 bedroom apartments. Close to campus. Available May and August. Year lease. 989-444-1944.

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

SPECIAL WANTED SECTION TO RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL

2012 SCHOOL YEAR 2 person apartment close to campus. Water garbage paid 805 1/2 douglas. Call John 989-560-1701.

REAL ESTATE PERSONALS

2012 SCHOOL YEAR 7 person house close to campus. Own room 2 bath, garbage paid. 805 Douglas. Call John 989-560-1701.

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

SERVICES ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Classifieds

GARAGE SALES FOR RENT PETS WANTED TO RENT

WANTED TO RENT

Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

GARAGE SALES JAMESTOWN

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES

Now Leasing for Fall 2012

APPLY ONLINE & RECEIVE $10 MEIJER GIFT CARD

SPECIAL SECTION PETS

PETS

2 Person 2 Bedroom 3TRAVEL Person 3 Bedroom MOTORCYCLES 5 Person 5 MOTORCYCLES Bedroom NO DEPOSIT ON 5 BEDROOMS

Warm Shuttle to Campus PERSONALS FREE Gym Membership to Endurance (see office for details) FREE Internet & Cable

HAPPY ADS

Pet Friendly

RBORETUM

partment Homes

1825 Liberty Dr. Apt. 104 MT. PLEASANT Off Broomfield, on Lincoln Rd. (989)775-3200

www.arboretumapartmenthomes.com LiveWithUnited.com Central Michigan Life •775-5522 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

FREE HEAT!


lassifi eds Classifi eds lassifi eds ifieds lassifieds lassifiClassifi eds eds A SI N G E L

CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad ALWAYS OPEN ATLife WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS of race, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right toed rejectAd or 10 || Friday, Feb. 17,color, 2012 || Central Michigan Policy Classifi Rates without notice, advertising which is in the MI opinion of the Student Media Life • 436 discontinue, Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, 48859 • www/cm-life.com 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for

www.cm-life.com

type are available along discrimination because of race, color, religion, per classified typographical errors only to the extent ofRates: cancelling15 theword chargeminimum for the space used 3-6ad Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features ect or discontinue, advertising and without renderednotice, valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad attractors. 7-12italic Issues: the first date publication. Anywill credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office eping with the standards ofof CM Life. CM Life Bold, and $7.25 per issue 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue cancelling the charge for the space useddiscrimination and wingly accept advertising which refl ects because of race, color, religion, centered type are 3-6firstIssues: $7.50 per issue Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the day’s insertion. available along with limited only thereserves first datethe of publication. Any gin, andtoCM Life right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features ays ofthe termination of the Board, ad. If you find error, with the standards of CM Life. on of Student Media is not inan keeping CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00used perand issue like ad attractors. onsible for the errors first day’s ypographical onlyinsertion. to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space centered type are

Classified Ad Policy

Classified Ad Rates

PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. Classifi ed AdLife Policy & Rates Central Michigan • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com n Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com CM Life will DAY! not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because PUBLISHING ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or Placing a Classifi ed Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Classified Ad RatesClassified Ad Policy & Rates discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which ects discrimination because type are refl available along Mt. MI 48859 •ects www/cm-life.com errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad owingly accepttypographical advertising which refl discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum perorigin, classifi ed ad 3-6 Issues: $7.50 issue ByPleasant, Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sexper or national andother CM Life reserves the right to reject or with special features

by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

andreserves renderedthe valueless by reject such anorerror. Credit for such an error is limited to only gin, and CM Life right to discontinue, without notice, advertising discontinue, without notice,per advertising in the opinion of the Student Media likeisad attractors. 7-12 Issues: $7.25 issuewhich the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office Fax: 989-774-7805 on By of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Board, is not in keeping with theissue standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the for the space used ypographical errorsimmediately. only to theWe extent of cancelling charge for insertion. the space used and centeredcharge type are By Website: www.cm-life.com Dept. are only responsible the for the first day’s 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only available along with by such an error. Credit of such color, an error is limited toRates: only the15 firstword date ofminimum publication.per Any classified discrimination because race, religion, In Person: 436for Moore Hall the fiad rst date of publication. Any credit can be picked up at the CM Life office 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issuedueother special features picked up at the CMwithout Life offinotice, ce within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, ect or discontinue, advertising within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 13+immediately. Issues: issue forlike attractors. sified Dept. immediately. We are only forp.m. the 1-2 first day’s insertion. eping with the standards of CM Life. CMresponsible Life will Dept. We are per only responsible the fiad rst day’s insertion. Bold, italic and$7.00 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with limited to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features ays of termination of the ad. If you find an error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. onsible for the first day’s insertion.

FOR SALE ClassifiedWANTED Ad Rates TO RENT

PolicyNOTICES

WANTED RENT PUBLISHING DAY! LOST & TO FOUND

AUTOS FOR SALE OPEN AT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE SERVICES ALWAYS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

Bold, italic and centered type are available along with other special features like ad attractors.

n PUBLISHING Life •SERVICES 436 Moore Hall, CMU,32,000 Mt. Pleasant, MIALWAYS 48859 • www/cm-life.com AUTOS FOR SALE HELP WANTED REACH MORE THAN READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT LOST & FOUND DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Classified Ad Policy

Classified Ad Rates

HELPPETS WANTED GARAGETO SALES GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION FOR RENT WANTED RENT MIGHTY MINIS owingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad

EXPLORE

Lexington Ridge

ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

gin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without BASIC 2 BEDROOM 1 bath.notice, Close advertising to ADORABLE BREED: SHI CHI PUPon of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life.No CM Life will $300 989-365-3914. campus $280 p/p includes heat. Bold, italic and PIES. 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue pets. Non-smoker. 989-560-7157. ypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with by SHUTTLE such an error. Credit for such an error isCHERRY limited to STREET only the fiTOWN rst dateHOUSES of publication. Any SERVICE 3 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days ofPeople termination of the Free ad. If Cable you find an error, or 4 1 1/2 Bath & Public 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible first day’s insertion. Internet for + the Washer & Dryer Walk to Transportation HUGE SALE! FRIDAY, February Services of the Campus and Downtown Starting at 17th! $2.00 VHS MOVIES - 1,000's in Isabella County $280 per person 989-773-2333. stock! Used DVD 'S- 2.00 off! Used Transportation Blu-Ray movies! Used Games- PS3, Commission DEERFIELD VILLAGE - 2 PER 2 BED, XBOX, 360, Wii--$5.00 off! Used Play4 PER 4 BED, 5 PER 5 BED. Warm ers: Wii/360/Nintendo! C.D.'s-$2.00 Shuttle to Campus. (989)773-9999 off! NEW--TV'S! TV'S! TV'S! $25 OFF www.LiveWithUnited.com HOME SPEAKERS--Paradigm! Surround sound systems- ALL PRICE HERITAGE SQUARE TOWN TV'Sminimum & STERANGES! Also- USED HOUSES Onlybecause 1- 6 bedroom left!color, Free religion, wingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination of race, Rates: 15 word per classified ad REOS! Karaoke discs/ equipmentCable & Internet without + Full notice, Size W/D gin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, advertising rent/ for sale! Alpine Car stereo/ ReCALL NOW TO START SAVING! on of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and $7.75 per issue mote Starters/ 1-2 SiriusIssues: radio/ Installation 989-773-2333. Lifespace will notused knowingly because type of race, ypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge CM for the and accept advertising which reflects discriminationcentered arecolor, religion, available! Free Movie Rental Day! 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue By Phone: 989-774-3493 AVAILABLE JUNE 2 BED- origin, sex2012. or CM Life reserves the701 right N. to reject or discontinue, without notice, available along with advertising by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the fi5TH, rst date ofnational publication. Anyand Main Street Audio/Video, 7-12 Issues: issue ROOM DUPLEX, attached garage which in the of the Student Media Board, $7.25 is not inper keeping with other the standards CM Life. CM Life will specialoffeatures ByupFax: icked at the989-774-7805 CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. Ifisyou findopinion an error, Mission, Mt. Pleasant, 989-773-7370. $290 forper person. No petsfor typographical errors 13+ Issues: issue thelike ad attractors. beinsertion. responsible only to the$7.00 extentper of cancelling charge for the space used and ified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible the first day’s FREE LAYAWAY! By Website: www.cm-life.com 989-400-3003 or 772-5791. rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any In Person: 436 Moore Hall UNION SQUARE APTS credit due can2be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, - 2 PER 2012/Hours: 2013 SCHOOL YEAR. TWO 8 a.m.-5 BED, Beside Target, Warm report Shuttle it to theto Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. Monday-Friday p.m. PERSON house for rent. Walk to Campus. (989)772-2222 DANCERS WANTED. NO EXPERIcampus. Utilities paid and pets welwww.LiveWithUnited.com ENCE NECESSARY. SUPPLEMENT come. Call Jody 989-430-0893 or JUST RELEASED FOR rental 5 bedYOUR INCOME PART TIME. APPLY email jodygirl12000@yahoo.com. room 3 story condo. Washer/dryer. AT MICELI!S CORNER. 989-539-3401 $1200/ month. Available May - 2012. AFTER 6 PM. APARTMENTS AND HOUSES close Walk to campus. 248-496-8861 facebook.com/micelis.corner.showto downtown and campus. View list at rjrassoc@ameritech.net Security Degirls. 810 South University or call posit required. 989-621-7538. 9am- 5pm. KIDS QUEST AND Cyber Quest MAIN STREET LIVING! 3-5 People 3 AND 4 bedroom duplex available for Teammates Kids Quest and Cyber Walk to class and downtown! 2012- 2013 year. Newer with all the Quest seek qualified candidates for 989-773-2333 www.olivieri-homes.com amenities: garage, a/c, washer/dryer, full-time and part-time teammate posibasement. Starting at $310 pp. Call tions at its Soaring Eagle Casino and OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 2 Master P ar tl o P ropert y M a n a g e m e n t Resort location in Mount Pleasant, MI. Bedrooms Each With Personal Bath 989-779-9886 Qualified candidates will enjoy working Full Size Washer & Dryer Includes www.partloproperty.com with children, be positive, energetic, Internet & cable 989-773-2333 flexible, possess exceptional customer www.olivieri-homes.com 4/5 BEDROOM CONDO near CMU service skills, and be able to multi-task GRADUATE STUDENT LOOKING for campus available for 2012- 2013 year. well. Kids Quest and Cyber Quest ofroommate beginning January for two A/C, 2 1/2 baths, w/d starting at $250/ fers paid training, flexible hours, and bedroom apartment in quiet setting. pp. Partlo Property Management health and dental insurance. Please .$297 per month. 989-772-1061. www.partloproperty.com apply in person or online at nptdev@gmail.com 989-779-9886. www.kidsquest.com

SECTION PETS PETS ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES In House ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE PERSONALS AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES LOST FOUND PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR&ESTATE SALE REAL PERSONALS WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FORFOR RENT AUTOS SALE SERVICES LOST & FOUND 989•772•9441 WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS Classified Ad Policy Classifi ed Ad Rates MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, SECTION PETS PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL GARAGE SALES FOR RENT Placing a ClassifiedHELP Ad WANTED Classifi ed Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates WANTED TO RENT NOTICES WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES LOST &ESTATE FOUND centered type are REAL PERSONALS 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES available along with 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. FOR RENT WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS e z REAL ESTATE PERSONALS Pri ALWAYS REACHPETS MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! SPECIAL SECTION PETS ays! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS WANTED TO RENT w a e Giv WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS NOTICESWILL WIN NOTICES WANTEDFOR TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR FOR SALE AUTOS SALE 1 PERSON SERVICES SERVICES LOST & SALE FOUND A TROPICAL CRUISE FOR 2! WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS AUTOS AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND FORFOR RENTSALE

PARTY

Friday, Febuary 17th • 9 - 5pm

FOR RENT PETS

HELP WANTED WANTED TO RENT

GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION

WANTED TO RENT MOTORCYCLES

SPECIAL SECTION ROOMMATES

PETS TRAVEL

ROOMMATES

WESTPOINT VILLAGE - 2 BED 2 MASTER BATH LIKE NEW, Warm Shuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 www.LiveWithUnited.com

AFFORDABLE APTS. 2- 4 people. Free cable + internet. Locally owned. Walk to CMU. Male- female roommate opportunities available immediately. bomackprop@gmail.com 773-0785.

REAL ESTATE

JAMESTOWN APTS - 2 PER 2 BED, 3, 4, or 5 PER 5 BED, Warm Shuttle to Campus, (989)775-5522 www.LiveWithUnited.com

WANTED TO BUY

TRAVEL REAL ESTATE

PERSONALS WANTED TO BUY

Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHICLES we buy them we haul them. 989-772-5428.

HAPPY ADS

Before you leave for

SPRING BREAK

JOIN US FOR FREE PIZZA AND THESE SPECIAL OFFERS:

HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES FOR RENT PETS No Application Fee ($50 Savings) Sign a Lease and Get Either: PETS WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION MOTORCYCLES $25 TARGET Gift Card ROOMMATES or $25 Speedway TRAVEL Gas Card MOTORCYCLES

MOTORCYCLES PERSONALS

WORK ON MACKINAC Island This Summer- Make lifelong friends. The Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge Shops are looking for help in all areas: Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. Housing, bonus, and discounted meals. ( 9 0 6 ) 8 4 7 - 7 1 9 6 . www.theislandhouse.com

REAL ESTATE

HAPPY ADS

AMGhousing.com 773-3890 HAPPY ADS

WANTED TO BUY

DEERFIELD VILLAGE WESTPOINT VILLAGE APPLY ONLINE & RECEIVE $10 MEIJER GIFT CARD

4 Person 4 Bedroom 5 Person 5 Bedroom

Don’t forget to sign a lease!

Receive $100 off your first month’s rent when you sign a lease! (per person)

NO DEPOSIT – 4-5 BEDROOM FREE Gym Membership to Endurance

BRAND NEW FREE INTERNET & CABLE!

(see office for details)

773-9999

LiveWithUnited.com

SIGN A LEASE AND ENTER TO wIN THE USE Of A

42” fLatscreeN tV! BR LEASES AvAILABLE! No $$$ due at sigNiNg

(989) 779-7900

HOURS: MON.–THURS. 9-6, fRi 9-5; SAT. 12-4 • www.tallgrassapts.com

FREE

FRIDAYS!

SUDOKU

SUDOKU GUIDELINES: To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,column and box. The more numbers you can figure out, the easier it gets to solve!

Sign a NEW Lease ANY FRIDAY and Receive

FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE

Application Fee Large Pizza Internet Expanded Cable Firehouse Carwash

E! E TIM V u A S bmit yo r ne! li Su n On catio ive a li p p A ece and r eijer 0 1 $ M rd! a Gift C

$50 Meijer Gift Card Gym Membership to Endurance (See Office for details)

• Deerfield Village • Jamestown

PRESENTED BY:

(989)773-1234

Call for today’s specials or order online at: papajohns.com

LiveWithUnited.com

1-2 Person 2 Bedroom

ASK ABOUT THE TALLGRASS PROMISE!

BLISS

779-9999

APPLY ONLINE AND RECEIVE $10 MEIJER GIFT CARD

has to offer!

3300 EAST DEERFIELD ROAD • (989) 773-3300

Warm Shuttle to Campus

UNION SQUARE

NothiNg caN Measure up to what

By Harry Bliss

APPLy ONLINE & RECIEVE $10 MEIjER GIFT CARD

2 Person 2 Bedroom 2 Master Bathrooms

Warm Shuttle to Campus • FREE Internet & Cable

• INDOOR HEATED POOL • PETS ALLOWED • ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! • FREE ELECTRIC, GAS, HEAT, A/C, WATER, SEWER & TRASH • 24 HOUR MAINTENANCE • ON-SITE LAUNDRY

PERSONALS

• Westpoint Village • Union Square

772-2222 LiveWithUnited.com

Warm Shuttle to Campus • FREE Internet & Cable FREE Gym Membership to Endurance (see office for details)

772-2222

Pet Friendly LiveWithUnited.com


Feb. 17, 2012  

Central Michigan Life

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you