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LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Central Michigan University

| Monday, March 26, 2012

The ‘Vagina Monologues’ brings out more than 600 people Saturday, 3A

[cm-life.com]

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

Students studying abroad remains consistent

LCME focuses on three strengths

By Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Community engagement, sucessful structure, experience cited By David Oltean Senior Reporter

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education cited three areas of strength in the preliminary accreditation report for Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine. The report, made available on CMU’s website on Wednesday, cited engagement with the regional community, a successfully-created structure for implementing a regional approach to medical education and the university’s experience with distance learning as strengths of CMED. Along with the strengths, the report cited six areas of “insufficient progress toward compliance” and 10 areas in “compliance with monitoring” after an LCME survey team evaluated CMED in November. The report also cited the completion of CMU’s on-campus medical facility as a strength. “The College of Medicine’s recent completion, on time and under budget, of its core teaching and administrative facility enhances the college’s ability to recruit both faculty and students,” the report stated. CMED Dean Ernest Yoder said he was excited after hearing the school would receive preliminary accreditation and be one of only 137 M.D.-granting medical schools. “CMED is very pleased with the findings of the LCME,” Yoder wrote in a letter regarding the accreditation report. “The LCME cites CMU’s extensive experience with distance learning and multiple delivery methods for instruction as a key strength along with the engagement of members of the regional community in the creation of CMED’s mission to train future physicians to address a growing shortage of doctors in mid- and northern Michigan.” Six areas were acknowledged as having “insufficient progress toward compliance” in the report, including a need for improvement on the standards of conduct for faculty and students, a lack of instructional faculty, a lack of detailed plans for medical students’ research plans and a need for a better method of evaluating the learning environment. Ten areas were cited as compliant, with a need of monitoring. A LCME | 2A

[INSIDE] w About 3,000 people expected to attend Jane Goodall speech Wednesday in McGuirk, 3A

[ CM- LIFE.COM ] w Check out the Pow Wow photo gallery w Baseball highlights from this weekend

Photos by CharLotte bodak/Staff photographer

ontario resident Hayden Recollet, 10, dances the junior men’s traditional “chicken dance” during the 23rd annual Pow Wow Saturday afternoon in McGuirk Arena. “I’ve been dancing ever since I was 2,” Recollet said. “I enjoy this dance, because I get to imitate the Alberta chicken.”

Pow wow 23rd Annual CMU Pow Wow ‘Celebrating Life’ attended by more than 2,000; unique meaning for many

oklahoma resident Preston Tone-Pah-Hote laughs alongside Wisconsin resident Ray Cadotte after competing in the Men’s War Dance in which Cadotte and Tone-Pah-Hote took first and second place Saturday afternoon at McGuirk Arena. “I’ve been dancing since I was 2,” Tone-Pah-Hote said. “It was always fun for my family to sing and dance while honoring our ancestors’ traditions.”

Canada resident Heidi Leduc sits in front of her booth surrounded by products, which are all made by hand, while stringing a dreamcatcher Saturday evening at McGuirk Arena. Leduc has been creating products for Pow wows for the past 20 years with her husband. “It’s a great lifestyle,” said Leduc. “We have other businesses that we run but this is the fun one.”

By Paulina Lee | Staff Reporter

Master of Ceremonies Jason Whitehouse said “a Pow wow is social gathering” during the first grand entry Saturday at the 23rd Annual Central Michigan University Pow wow. This year the social gathering, based on the theme “Celebrating Life,” ran for a full 10 hours from 12 p.m. to just after 10 p.m on Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday at the Events Center. Attendance was higher than last year’s Pow wow with a little more than 2,000 in attendance. “It was a great turnout overall, from the community to dancers,” said Colleen Green, director of Native American Programs. “This was a great weekend overall, great food and great weather.” The Pow wow meant something different to everyone involved, and for some, it was a celebration. “A Pow wow is a celebration of life, a gathering of people from all over, that started over hundreds of years ago,” said Mike Perez, a Bay City resident. “People travel from all over the country to meet in the middle and celebrate for days, to see people from all over and celebrate dance and culture.” As leader of the Anishnabe Ogitchedaw Warrior Society, a veterans’ group,

Perez said he was honored to carry the Eagle Staff during the first grand entry Saturday. “The Eagle staff is a representation of our culture,” Perez said. The staff is a representation of all Native American nations. Perez was an active dancer during the grand entry, as people walked and danced during the grand entry. “I feel the music, and I have to dance,” he said. “My back will suffer later.” For attendees, a Pow wow can be primary opportunity to learn about culture. Following the grand entry were intertribal dances, which invited everyone, no matter their race, to join. “Let’s just do it,” said Gross Pointe freshman Jen

Wisconsin resident David Cleveland dances in attire he made himself completely by hand during the Men’s Traditional dance competition Saturday afternoon at McGuirk Arena. “This is my first time to a Pow wow here in Michigan,” Cleveland said. “I really like it here.”

Stratelak, who then joined the dance with her friend Danielle Hartman, a Gross Pointe resident. They were two of about 20 non-tribal participants who got up to dance. “Everyone is dancing and I just wanted to dance, because I wanted to be a part of it,” Stratelak said. She is studying Anthropology and said she’s interested in learning more about Native American cultures. “I like it. No, I love it,” she said. “We’re having a lot of fun.” In addition to joining in on the traditional Native American dancing, attendees could also sample native food such as Indian tacos, blanket dogs, fry bread and nachos.

“An Indian taco is like a typical taco but has bread instead of a shell,” said Hunter Carrick, a professor of biology. “I liked it.” Attendees could also try award-winning fry bread made from flour, milk, sugar and water from vendor Sista’s Grub. For dancers, a Pow wow is a time to perform and have a good time. Ten-year-old Hayden Recollet said he has been dancing at Pow Wows since he was 11 months old and has already danced at five Pow Wows this year. “I dance the Prairie Chicken dance,” Recollet said. “It’s a dance to just show off.” Recollet said he even made $13 from dancing.

93 Years of Serving as Central Michigan University’s Independent Voice

A POW WOW | 2A

The Study Abroad program has managed to remain a constant for Central Michigan University students despite the rise and fall of Michigan’s economy. The Office of International Affairs and Study Abroad provides about $160,000 in scholarships each year to students studying abroad, and Study Abroad Adviser Amber Schneider said the possibility of getting this money kept study abroad popular even during poor economic times. Additionally, individual departments typically offer scholarships to students studying abroad on a case-bycase basis. “The number of students dipped slightly with the economy, but this year I think we’ll have a large number of students going,” Schneider said. “CMU started putting together a lot of study abroad scholarships to encourage participation, and it’s definitely paid off.” Applications from the 20112012 school year are still being processed, but Schneider said during the 2010-2011 school year, 455 students went abroad and the number has remained consistent. Students are most drawn to study abroad in one of three places, Schneider said. “In 2010-2011, the top three countries were England, Italy and France, although China and Mexico are also very popular study abroad destinations,” she said. Last year, study abroad participants ranged from freshmen to graduate students. The freshmen class had four percent of students study abroad, sophomore class had 17 percent, the juniors had 22 percent, seniors had 39 percent and graduate students had 18 percent, Schneider wrote in an email. To keep participation high, the Office of International Affairs and Study Abroad hosts a number of events geared at students throughout the year, in addition to an extremely detailed website available to the public. “We send information to students by email, hold an annual Study Abroad Fair each September and host a Study Abroad Expo in January. The office also works with faculty and many departments to approve study abroad courses for fulfillment of degree requirements,” Schneider said. “There are also many scholarship opportunities available, both on campus and nationally, to help make study abroad affordable for all students.” Rockford junior Ashleigh Kline studied abroad during the spring 2011 term and went to Angers, France. She said the program she was involved with was planned well, and the cost wasn’t overwhelming thanks to scholarship opportunities. “I received scholarships from the study abroad office, my department and a private donor,” Kline said. “The study abroad office was very helpful to me because they broke down every part of my trip that needed consideration. From how to apply to payment, getting there, living there and travel, the specific program meetings that were required were phenomenal. The study abroad office educated students and not only informs them how to be safe abroad but also how to get the best out of their trip.” university@cm-life.com


2A || Monday, March 26, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

EVENTS CALENDAR TODAY

w Be a Kid Dinner, Hosted by Circle K, will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. in Powers Hall Room 136. Food and games will be provided for $5. w Live Your Life Through Open Mic will be held from 8 to 10 p.m. at Coco Joe’s, 4855 E. Blue Grass Road. The night will include slam poetry, stand-up comedy and acoustic guitar performances to raise awareness for suicide and families in crisis. The cover is $2.

TUESDAY

w Artist Reception for "China, a View from the Clouds" will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Center for Inclusion and Diversity, room 108 in the Bovee University Center.

Corrections Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2012 Volume 93, Number 73

cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

POW WOW | continued from 1A

“I don’t know why they threw money on the floor (while I was dancing),” he said. “I guess just because they thought I was good.” His mother, Tracy, is also a dancer and competed in the Women’s Fancy dance, which she said had a “very energetic style.” The two traveled from Sudbury, Ontario for the Pow wow. Everything they wore, except for the bells strapped around their ankles, was handmade by Tracy or by friends. For some CMU studentathletes, the Pow wow meant something different entirely, as it relates to the Chippewa name they wear to represent the school when they travel across the nation. “I feel like a lot more student-athletes would appreciate the name more if they came,” said Tamica Harbour, a track and field athlete. “There’s more behind it, like the culture.” The Ohio junior said it was her third year coming to the Pow wow. “Being a Chippewa means a lot,” Harbour said. “It instills pride, honor and integrity, and we should be proud to be a part of it.” For vendors, the Pow wow

was a chance to showcase their various items such as T-shirts, moose skin moccasins, organic goat milk soap, beadwork, jewelry, books, CDs and DVDs. Ken Ratte with his wife, Heidi Leduc, traveled from Quebec to the Pow wow for the first time. The couple travel to 25 to 30 Pow wows a year selling handmade dream catchers and various jewelry. “To me, this Pow wow means commerce,” he said. But outside of commerce, Ratte said he is also a traditional dancer. “I dance for my ancestors to make sure they can continue dancing through me, as my kids will dance for me,” he said. But there is no dancing without drummers. Bear Creek, a 15-man group comprised of men from Ontario and Michigan, won first place at last year’s Pow wow, and received the honor of being the host drum this year. Drumming is evaluated on togetherness, drumming, singing, timing and overall feeling of the song. Lead singer of Bear Creek, Gabe Gaudet, said the drum is made from bull hide, and

Photos by Charlotte Bodak/Staff photographer

Wisconsin resident David Cleveland smiles and relaxes while watching the festivities at the 23rd Annual Central Michigan University Pow wow before having to put on his attire for the Men’s Traditional dance competition Saturday afternoon at McGuirk Arena. “This is my first time to a Pow wow in Michigan,” he said.

the drumsticks are handmade from the flag poles of bikes, sponge material and leather. “We drum to give good energy to the Pow wow and make the dancers dance,” the Toronto resident said. “For me, a Pow wow is a place I can go celebrate, have a good time and be a native guy.” student-life@cm-life.com

IN THE NEWS

Kansas returns to its identity as it reaches Final Four been envisioned when the Jayhawks opened practice in October. Not with one returning starter and an incoming class cut short because of ineligible players. And not with a team that took earlier than expected pratfalls in each of its last two NCAA Tournaments. But there they were Sunday in the Edward Jones Dome, cutting nets and ordering gumbo for their Final Four trip to New Orleans and a national semifinal against Ohio State at 7:49 p.m. Saturday. “I think this would have

By Blair Kerkhoff McClatchy Newspapers

ST. LOUIS — Thomas Robinson beckoned for more noise just as he applied scissors to the net. Giddy Kansas fans were happy to oblige. Elijah Johnson ran through the tunnel punching clenched fists in the air. Tyshawn Taylor shouted, “Gonna get me some gumbo!” The sights and sounds that punctuated second-seeded Kansas’ 80-67 conquest of topseeded North Carolina for the Midwest Regional championship on Sunday could not have

been a year that if we got to the second weekend, most Kansas faithful would have been happy,” said Jayhawks coach Bill Self, who’s in the Final Four for the second time after winning the NCAA title in 2008. “But I don’t think those guys would have been satisfied.” Those guys are the ones who locked the Tar Heels in a vice grip in the game’s second half and especially over the final six minutes. At the most critical juncture of the season, when the game had been a battle of wills between North Carolina’s offen-

IN THE NEWS Trayvon Martin death could be turning point, says Rev. Jesse Jackson ates fundamental change?” Jackson told the capacity crowd at the Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Eatonville, Fla. “If it’s a moment, we go home. If it’s a movement, we go to war.” He characterized Martin’s death as a transformative event reminiscent of the killings of Emmett Till in 1955, Mississippi civil rights activist Medgar Evers in 1963 and Martin

Luther King Jr. in 1968. But Jackson was concerned that the hooded sweat shirt has come to symbolize Martin when Martin should instead be a symbol of racial injustice and civil rights. The unarmed teenager was shot to death last month in Sanford, Fla., by a Neighborhood Watch captain who thought he looked suspicious.

for the first class in the fall of 2013. Yoder said the areas of insufficient progress were not concerning, but will rather help to guide development of the school, curriculum and staff. The first interim report, due to LCME by April 15, will address student assessment, educational program objectives, policy and procedures for adverse actions, regional accreditation, bylaws and information about selection criteria and procedures.

“We’ve seen the expectations for the three interim reports due in April, August and December, so we will submit the required information in those reports, and they will acknowledge receipt,” Yoder said. “If they have additional questions, then they would generate those for us, and if they wanted anything additional besides what we sent in the reports, they would ask for that.”

By Jeff Kunerth The Orlando Sentinel

EATONVILLE, Fla. — Preaching before an estimated 1,600 people Sunday, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said the death of Trayvon Martin could be a tragic moment or the beginning of a movement. “How do we go from a moment to a movement that cre-

LCME | continued from 1A

LCME is requiring CMED officials to submit three interim reports over the course of the year to update the state of areas with insufficient progress or a need of monitoring. Yoder said the ongoing conversations with LCME will help to ensure the school is prepared

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sive mastery — operating at near full capacity even without injured point guard Kendall Marshall — and Kansas’ defensive toughness, the Jayhawks prevailed. North Carolina forward John Henson stepped to the freethrow line when the teams returned from a timeout with 3:58 left and made one of two, trimming Kansas’ lead to 6867. To this point, after a frenzied first half that ended in a 47-47 deadlock, the Jayhawks had opened small leads only to have North Carolina offer an answer.

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3A

INSIDE LIFE Monday, March 26, 2012

Ariel Black, Managing Editor | news@cm-life.com | 989.774.4343 Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | studentlife@cm-life.com | 989.774.4340 Emily Grove, Metro Editor | metro@cm-life.com | 989.774.4342 Aaron McMann, University Editor | university@cm-life.com | 989.774.4344

| cm-life.com

Republican primary subject of last Speak Up, Speak Out event of semester Tuesday By Justin Hicks Staff Reporter

Photos by Victoria Zegler/Staff Photographer

Massachusetts junior Sarah McNeill acts out a sex worker for women who discusses the intriguing details of her career and her love of giving women pleasure in ‘The Women Who Loved To Make Vaginas Happy’ Saturday night during The Vagina Monologues in Plachta auditorium. Central Michigan University brought the production to campus this year to raise money for Women and Girls of Haiti, SAPA and VOX’s 2nd annual Sextival, which raises money for Women’s Aid of Mount Pleasant.

Womenly parts

The ‘Vagina Monologues’ brings out more than 600 people Saturday By Sienna Monczunski | Staff Reporter Emily Nuss said the most difficult part of performing in the “Vagina Monologues” was attempting to portray the emotion of a woman who had been sexually abused. “I think we’re all really exhausted. At times it was a bit difficult, because some of the scenes were so emotional,” the Lansing senior said. “I’ve never experienced the trauma of being sexually abused, so it was a bit difficult to portray that emotion.” More than 600 people attended the first two showings of “Vagina Monologues” in Moore Hall’s Plachta Auditorium Saturday. The productions made more than $1,000 in ticket sales. All of the proceeds will go to Women and Girls of Haiti, Voices for Planned Parenthood and Sexual Aggression Peer Advocates. The event, known as V-Day, was planned to raise awareness and help end violence against women and girls. Some of the monologues presented included “Because He Liked to Look at it,” “My Angry Vagina” and “My Vagina Was my Village.” The play featured a combination of humor, facts of sexual abuse, the four letter

word and even the story of a woman who has never looked at her vagina. The spotlight monologue told the story of women affected by the natural disasters of Haiti and New Orleans and women who are sexually abused in the Congo. “Vagina Monologues” was originally written by Eve Ensler who interviewed hundreds of women about experiences they’ve had with their vaginas, with the goal of giving women a voice to talk about things they’ve never talked about before. “It sounded interesting, so I

decided to come see what it’s about,” Fenton sophomore Sean Rositano said. “I’m a bit conservative, so some of it was really shocking, but I understood they had to be that way in order to get their point across.” Before the play, directors Jordan Wyer and Jolie Masters, both Kentwood seniors, thanked audience members for coming.

“It was amazing; they had so much energy,” St. Johns senior Libby Aldrich said. “It’s nice that they fed off the energy of the crowd. The more laughs they got, the more funny they became. They did really well considering they only had six practices.”

Greek life at Central Michigan University has established a “Greeks Clean up the Streets” program designed to beautify and work with the community. Sigma Alpha Epsilon brother Jon Reusch, a Macomb senior, and Jeff Pickler, code enforcement officer for the city of Mount Pleasant, were responsible for setting up the group. Reusch said the main idea of the program is “to improve the image and increase positive awareness of what Greek life can do by providing a service for the community of Mount Pleasant.” Jeff Pickler, who has worked as the city’s code enforcement officer for more than 14 years,

said “This isn’t a one-time litter pick-up. This is going to be an ongoing relationship with students and the community, and we’re very excited about it.” The first clean-up took place after St. Patrick’s Day on March 18. A group of about 40 volunteers from Greek sororities and fraternities met in the Grawn Hall parking lot at 2 p.m. They then divided into groups of about four people and set out to clean Main, Douglas, University, Franklin, High and Washington streets. Those who participated received vests, gloves and plastic bags that were provided by the city for clean-up duties. Also on hand were cookies and bottled water for everyone involved. Both Reusch and Pickler said they were more than happy with

the number of volunteers who showed up to help out. “We were looking for 20 to 24 people when we started, and we definitely exceeded that,” Pickler said. “It was an excellent turnout for our first event.” Reusch said he recruited volunteers by speaking during group meetings such as the Panhellenic Council and through Greek Force. He said he received a lot of positive feedback. “They’re extremely excited to do good for the community and to clean up the area they live in,” he said. Jacob Kobylarz, a sophomore from Westland and a member of Sigma Tau Gamma, said he came out to help because it was such a nice day, and volunteering for the program was an easy way to make a big difference. He

also said he hopes the program relieves any tension there may be between Greek life and residents of Mount Pleasant. “I feel like Greeks have been getting a bad rap lately by having too much fun partying and not showing respect to the community, so I feel like this is a good way to reach out and show we care,” Kobylarz said. Pickler said sometimes people unfairly associate negative ideas about the Greek community, and this was a great way for them to see positive impacts. “This is something where we can visually see improvement, and we can see the accomplishment of a cleaner neighborhood,” he said. A Greek | 5A

university@cm-life.com

Goodall expected to attract 3,000 By Jessica Fecteau Senior Reporter

studentlife@cm-life.com

Greek program aims to establish cleaning partnership By Eric Stafford Staff Reporter

The 2012 primaries and presidential election will be the topic of discussion Tuesday during the final scheduled Speak Up, Speak Out forum at 7 p.m. in the Bovee University Center Auditorium. “Elections 2012: The Power of the Primaries” is the series finale and will be facilitated by communication professor Jeff Drury. The two-hour forum will open with a 20- to 30-minute video before Drury takes over in leading the group discussion until 9 p.m. “The video is to get everyone on the same page and to understand some background information,” Drury said. “The forum is designed for people who have interest in politics but maybe don’t know a lot about it.” Panelists include Central Michigan Life Staff Reporter Theresa Clift, College Republicans’ Nathan Inks, College Democrats’ Alex Middlewood and political science professor J. Cherie Strachan. “I’m very excited about our panelists,” Drury said. “We always try to balance viewpoints, and we wanted to make sure we were representing both parties as the student body is concerned.” Having representation of both a conservative and liberal student group on campus is important in covering multiple view points, said Middlewood, vice president of communications for the College Democrats. Middlewood said the media has given the primaries too much attention, and there

was an overabundance of debates, while major world issues — like the crisis in Syria — receive little coverage. Megan Gill, secretary for the College Republicans, said she agreed there was an excessive amount of debates, though she felt the coverage of the primaries has been reasonable. “The media’s extensive coverage of each primary and caucus is justified, because the nominee has not yet been determined,” Gill said. “However, when you have multiple debates in a single week, candidates merely end up reiterating their talking points, and the debates lose their effectiveness.” Drury anticipates the discussion of the role of gender within the campaign will be a popular topic Tuesday. “With all the stuff going on with Rush Limbaugh, contraceptives, abortion and reproductive health, it should be interesting,” Drury said. “Also we’ll hear about the media and its role in the campaign and how it works at the primary level.” Higher education will be an expected topic of interest as well, given that the audience will be primarily college students. The event is open to the public and is expected to attract students with a wide range of political knowledge. “I think it’ll be a mixture of students,” Middlewood said. “I know a lot of professors offer extra credit to people who go, especially for political science classes. There’s always an opportunity to learn more.”

World-renowned primatologist, anthropologist and conservationist Jane Goodall will be speaking on campus Wednesday in McGuirk Arena. Central Michigan University paid $60,000 to the Jane Goodall Institute to have Goodall come to campus and the event, part of CMU’s intermittent Speaker Series, is free for people who attend, said University Events Director Rob Ebner. Those interested in attending can obtain a free ticket from the CMU Box Office to reserve a seat. The 77-year-old is best known for her work studying chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania and and her work on conservation and animal welfare issues. Her speech, “Making a Difference,” will focus on the Gombe chimpanzees and the work of the Jane Goodall Institute. About 3,000 people are

expected to attend, including students and faculty from other universities in Michigan, Ebner said. Jane Goodall Goodall was chosen to come to campus because of the large interest from students in the biology department. “We have one of the largest departments of masters on this campus in biology in that area,” Ebner said. “The Speaker Series goal is really to tie in an educational aspect of the university any time we bring somebody in.” Contribution for the sponsorship of Goodall’s visit came largely from the Provost’s Office and Council of Deans, said Professor of Biology and Speaker Series Committee Chairwoman Anna Monfils. A Goodall | 6A

Midnight release of ‘The Hunger Games’ attracts students in droves By Sarah Donetti Staff Reporter

Lines of excited students filled Celebration Cinema, 4935 E. Pickard Road, on Thursday night, anticipating the midnight release of “The Hunger Games.” About 1,450 tickets were sold prior to the night of the showings and took up several soldout screens. According to BoxOfficeMojo, Thursday’s opening night was the fifth-largest box office success ever, and the film had raked in about $155 million nationally, as of Sunday. The excitement and number of preordered tickets surpassed the expectations of the theater, said Operations Manager Greg Howell. “We originally thought the attendance would be about half of the crowd we got for the ‘Twi-

light’ and ‘Harry Potter’ films,” Howell said. “Once we started selling tickets early on Feb. 22 and saw a ton of tickets being sold out, we began to see it was going to be bigger.” “The Hunger Games,” based on a 2008 novel written by Suzanne Collins, takes place in a post-apocalyptic North America where the nation of Panem holds an annual survival competition between 24 young adults. The main character of the novel, Katniss Everdeen, becomes one of the participants after volunteering to take the place of her younger sister in the competition. Howell said some of the eagerness for the film was probably because of its similarities to “Twilight” and “Harry Potter” in being part of a recent, popular book series. “It has that rabid fanbase that

we love,” Howell said. “It also really helps these films that they’re strongly marketed to females — you didn’t see this kind of marketing toward a female audience 20 years ago.” While waiting in the theater lobby, Big Rapids resident Corbin Hammond said the book’s popularity was partially because of its appeal across many genres. “It’s got stuff for everybody,” Hammond said. “There’s romance, gore and fighting and a great story.” White Lake senior Michelle Vermilya said she read the book in December and liked its attention to detail. “It’s a very graphic and fun read,” Vermilya said. “My favorite character is Peeta, because he seems very genuine.” Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature Joseph

Inside w Staff Reporter Jordan LaPorte reviews ‘The Hunger Games,’ 5B Sommers, who has taught about “The Hunger Games” in ENG 482: Fantasy for Youth classes and also went to a midnight showing, said the novel appeals to young adults because much of it is a reflection of America today. “The author Suzanne Collins makes astute points about the decline of America through stuff like reality TV,” Sommers said. “It hits young adults as they go to college and start wondering why they’re here when there seems to be so little opportunity out there right now.” As Constantine freshman Salina Bosworth left the theater after the film, she said she found it true to the book and planned on

Kaitlin Thoresen/Assistant Photo Edior

Remus senior Dana Flachs checks ticket stubs as people go into the midnight premiere of “The Hunger Games” late Thursday night at Celebration Cinemas, 4935 E. Pickard Road.

coming to the midnight showing for the sequel next year. “It was the best book-to-movie I’ve seen in a long time,” Bosworth said.

Sommers said he thought the movie could have done more to express the book’s themes.

A Hunger | 6A


4A

VOICES Monday, March 26, 2012

| cm-life.com

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” – The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Editorial Board: Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief | Ariel Black, Managing Editor | Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator | Aaron McMann, University Editor | Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor | Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer

EDITORIAL | Questions the sub-committee on higher education should consider

Octavia Carson Staff Reporter

Equal representation needed in U.S. Senate As I sit here and look at the statistics over and over, my mind is blown. Currently only 17 members of the U.S. Senate are women. I thought my voice was being heard, but clearly it is not. I am being misrepresented in so many ways. Although women make up 51 percent of the United States population, we are not represented this way in the United States political arena. Yet, in other places around the world, women have had more political representation. In 2010, there were 89 other countries ahead of the United States when it came to women in politics. These statistics make me feel ashamed to be an American, but at the same time, they make me feel as though I have a job to do. I need to make others aware of this issue. The United States prides itself on equality and justice for all, but we continue to struggle with it. It was only recently that this information came to my attention, and I learned the fight for equality is continuing even in 2012. I thought our society should have it together by now, but I thought wrong. It was only weeks ago someone asked me if I was a feminist, and I was appalled. I thought to myself, “Do I seem like someone who would be radical?” Then I became educated on what a feminist truly stands for. I learned a feminist is not out there to hate men or make it seem as though women are above all. A feminist is someone who wants equality for all people. If it is that simple, then why didn’t I understand this concept before? Well, the answer is easy. The media often portrays feminists as radical people, and it shapes our opinion of the term “feminist” into something with a negative shadow. A number of men consider themselves feminists as well. There are many men proud to stand up and say they are a feminist. They believe their female counterparts should receive equal treatment. This may be shocking to some people, but why shouldn’t everyone want equality for all? Isn’t that the end goal? It is important to have equal representation in Congress, because if women do not have representation, then overall equality will never be accomplished. Sure, we all can make a change, start to consider ourselves a feminist and become more open-minded about this situation, but in a democracy, permanent change comes in the form of legislation. If there is not an equal representation in Congress, then the laws passed will not always represent equality.

O

Answers needed

n Wednesday, University President George Ross will be one of three university presidents to testify in front of the House Subcommittee on Higher Education in Lansing.

While the committee is free to ask any questions it might have about the university, there are several this Editorial Board feels need to be answered by Ross. Can there be any justification for recent frivolous spending, and will there ever be a way to make up for it with fundraising? With news that Central Michigan University spent $10 million in reserve funding for the Events Center without telling the public came another point that may have been missed. “Look, if we fall short in our fundraising for the medical school, we will probably use university reserves, (too),” Ross said to the Academic Senate on Feb. 15. That day, he also announced the biosciences building would be the biggest financial investment of the university, with the project slated to cost $95 million. If it’s clear that CMU can’t make enough private fundraising money to pay for the Events Center, how on earth does it plan to make enough money to cover the College of Medicine, the biosciences building or any other future projects? Will a shift toward more online classes really improve student learning or just make more money for the university? There is an increased emphasis toward taking classes online, even for on-campus students. These classes appear to offer less direct instructional contact and collaborative learning, yet they cost no less to enroll in than those taught on campus. Will further pushes toward online learning serve the best interests of students at CMU and colleges across the state, or are such programs merely designed to minimize expenses for the university? Is the CMU Board of Trustees actually active in the decisionmaking process or rather just a group that meets to

E-mail | editor@cm-life.com Mail | 436 Moore Hall Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 Fax | 989.774.7805

Central Michigan Life

approve whatever administrators want? Would a state-wide central governing board be more useful than the current trustees? As it stands, trustees rarely ask questions during their meetings on CMU’s campus, and even more rarely pose hard questions to administrators. A governing board of a university should have disagreements and not rubber-stamp everything sent its way. People who truly care about an institution often disagree about how best to run it. Effective oversight sometimes requires less than cheery relations — a sacrifice our trustees seem unwilling to make. Are the reserve funds being used correctly? It’s been well-documented that the university has had to dip into reserve funds to help fund various projects in the last few years, but is that an effective use of money often characterized as a “rainy day fund?” We venture that it is not, especially given the state’s current economic condition. Is CMU prepared to weather a significant decrease in enrollment? Would it be better prepared had its funds not been spent on such expansive new projects? Why is there such a lack of transparency at CMU? While the details were sent to the state about the funding of the Events Center, the true nature was never publicly disclosed. It had to be uncovered by CM Life. When hard questions were asked in the Academic Senate about online promotional materials still referring to the complex as “fully privately funded,” those references were scrubbed immediately, without making those recent alterations clear on the pages. Was this the proper method of disclosure at a public institution? Are the current projects the university is spending money

on essential for the operation of CMU? Does CMU really need a College of Medicine? Administrators would tell you the answer is yes, but the truth might not be so clear. In fact, according to documents distributed by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education following an onsite assessment in November, CMED was lacking in six distinct areas necessary for a good program. Oakland University, which is also opening a college of medicine, was lacking in none. This begs the question; is CMED the right call for CMU? Will the shared governance committee actually matter? The committee, approved by the Academic Senate, could be the answer to some leadership problems at the university. But it is difficult to see how an administration that has grown quite comfortable existing without oversight would respond to a system of shared governance. Have the concerns brought up in several votes of no confidence against Ross or Provost Gary Shapiro been answered? A wave of votes of no confidence against Ross and Shapiro first began at the A-Senate’s Dec. 6, 2011 meeting. Since then, 17 academic departments along with the Council of Chairs and university librarians have followed suit. Alone, the A-Senate vote was a bold move, but the number of units that have joined it clearly shows there are flaws with CMU’s leadership — flaws that are not going unnoticed. It’s a hard question to ask, but a necessary one, especially because CMU gets nearly $70 million in state funding each year. If there are so many clear issues with this administration, should Ross and the others be left accountable for all that money?

Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (e-mail excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via e-mail. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received.

Catey Traylor Senior Reporter

Dear ladies, let’s have some class

This column is dedicated to all of the ladies in Mount Pleasant. Listen up. I know the weather has been gorgeous, and we’re all dying to wear those summer clothes we found on sale during the winter months, but let’s remember to keep it classy. We have reputations to uphold here. For the past two weeks, daytime highs have been around the ‘70s, trees have begun to bloom, the sun has been shining and Chippewas have certainly taken full advantage of the weather. Skipping classes to lay out, frequenting Doozie’s, hosting cook outs and corn hole games have been regular sightings on campus. All of these things remind me of the season I love the most, and the atmosphere in Mount Pleasant when it’s nice out is unlike any other. Unfortunately, the nice weather also drives people to believe they have the right to wear anything they would please. Yes, tank tops, short shorts and sundresses are great summer staples, but when the whole class can see your leopard print bra through your tank that is two sizes too small or we witness your thong fall out of your shorts when you take your seat, you’ve taken it too far. I understand you’ve been cooped up in jackets and jeans all winter and are dying to show off your summer bod, but leave some things to the imagination. Especially when you’re in class. Please. For the sake of us all. I heard a girl in class the other day (leopard print bra girl, actually) say she wished the boys in our lab would stop staring at her, because “they’re all perverts.” It took everything I had not to tell her to sit down and shut up. Moral of the story; if you wear clothes that scream “look at my bra and thong,” boys are going to look at your bra and thong. One more point; as much as I love summer weather and hate to be a “Debbie Downer,” I’d just like to make sure we’re all aware that we live in Michigan, and this streak of fantastic weather probably will not last. For example, in the next week, highs are supposed to range from high 40s to low 60s, thunderstorms are projected for three of the seven days, and on the days it’s not rainy, it’s supposed to be cloudy. I’m not saying it’s time to break out the parkas and snow shoes, but nobody should be surprised when Michigan weather once again screws us all, and we’re stuck in another tornado. That being said, let’s learn, as a gender, to distinguish between an outfit that is appropriate to be worn to the Wayside and an outfit that is appropriate to be worn to a biology lab. Please and thank you, in advance.

ANDREW DOOLEY [WORKBIRD]

Editorial Eric Dresden, Editor-in-Chief Ariel Black, Managing Editor Andrew Dooley, Student Life Editor Emily Grove, Metro Editor Aaron McMann, University Editor Amelia Eramya, Lead Designer Matt Thompson, Sports Editor Mike Mulholland, Photo Editor Katie Thoresen, Assistant Photo Editor Adam Kaminski, Video Editor Connor Sheridan, Online Coordinator Advertising Becca Baiers, India Mills, Anne Magidsohn Advertising Managers Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey, Production Leader Kathy Simon, Assistant Director of Student Media Neil C. Hopp, Adviser to Central Michigan Life

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and every Wednesday during CMU’s summer sessions. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis.

Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Neil C. Hopp serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central

Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the

Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is College Publisher. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed.

Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


cm-life.com/category/news

[News]

Central Michigan Life || Monday, March 26, 2012 || 5A

The Broadway Bistro opening next month, to offer vegetarian options By Stephanie Titsworth Staff Reporter

Mike Mulholland/Photo Editor

Inkster sophomore Joshua Taylor performs as Grandchild during Thursday’s performance of “Unsaid,” a slam choreopoem directed by Kevin Currier.

Student play ‘The Unsaid’ debuts in Moore Hall’s Theatre-on-the-Side By John Priest Staff Reporter

“The Unsaid,” an original play directed by Alpena graduate student Kevin Currier, debuted Thursday night to a packed house in Moore Hall’s Theatreon-the-Side. Described as a “slam choreopoem,” the production, adapted from original poetry written by the cast and crew by Florida senior Richard Bronson, is part dramatic monologue and part poetry. “The Unsaid” will be showing at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday in the Theatre-on-the-Side in Moore Hall, with doors opening at 7 p.m. Currier called the production “reader’s theater.” “The actors go on stage and present poetry to the audience,” Currier said. The production is comprised of six actors, each of whom alternate reading poetry meditating on the theme of loss, grief and reconciliation.

“It started back in early summer, when Richard lost his mom,” Currier said. “He wasn’t able to talk about it all summer, and he started writing poetry about it. We wanted to expand on that.” Currier’s and Bronson’s main goal is for the audience to relate on a personal level to the characters struggles with grief. “Almost everyone has been through the grieving process,” Currier said. “Anyone who knows grief personally knows the ‘five stages’ don’t exist. It’s a personal experience.” “The Unsaid” is designed to be unconventional; from its postmodern concept — the play has no defined plot or ending — to its immersive, colorful set, designed to represent a fractured sense of grief and personal loss. ���This has to be an emotionally-driven experience,” Currier said. “I want the audience to just let go. The overall idea is to make them think with their emotions. I just want them to feel it.” The script was a collaborative

Pickler said the “Greeks Clean up the Streets” program will hopefully work to form a stronger relationship among Greek life, code enforcement, office of public works and the police. “Students will actually get to meet city representatives in a positive manner, so they can put a face to the name, and hopefully this will develop trust and make a better working relationship,” he said. The program is planned to continue to meet for the rest of the semester and most likely into following semesters. The dates for the meetings will be Saturday and on April 22, 29 and May 6. They will all begin at 1 p.m. in the Grawn parking lot and are open to anyone who wants to help.

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effort, with Currier, Bronson and faculty member Sadie Chandler holding a series of workshops with the actors to develop their parts. Actor and Saint Clair Shores resident David Giles, a junior at Mid-Michigan Community College, said the workshop process was extremely helpful. “I’m into acting, not poetry,” Giles said. “I’ve never thought of myself as a writer, so it really helped. We talked about our experiences and brought our ideas in. Things to get us into the mindset for writing poetry. Now I want to write more.” The theater space doubles as an art gallery, where Plymouth artist William Carl Hornshaw Jr.’s work is on display. Hornshaw’s haunting, sculptural paintings, made with polyurethane, are designed to compliment the production’s environment. “I started to cry. It was really moving,” said Taylor Johnson, a Belding sophomore.

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livery service in hopes of catering to people without cars. “This restaurant will be like no other,” Scott said. “We have a lot of healthy food available, and with the delivery service, our customers won’t even have to leave their house or business; we’ll come right to them.” Henning is also the owner of Central Michigan Catering, where he works with Scott. Scott said he has been waiting to open his own business for quite a while. He is currently Henning’s chef at Central Michigan Catering, and the two have known each other for more than five years. Scott said he is ready to be his own boss and is excited

to see where the Bistro will lead him in his career. Carson City senior Lindsey Brown said she is looking forward to The Broadway Bistro opening. “I’m really excited for a healthy restaurant to come to Mount Pleasant,” Brown said. “It opens up a lot of opportunities for jobs, as well as good food.” After remodeling the building, Henning and Scott both said they cannot wait for opening day. The two owners spent two months on the remodeling project and are relieved the restaurant is almost ready to open. They are looking to hire and encourage anyone interested to come by the restaurant to apply. metro@cm-life.com


6A || Monday, March 26, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/news

[News] University Roundup

Biking | Spring brings cyclists out

Anti-aging research advances By Alayna Smith Staff Reporter

Victoria Zegler/Staff Photographer

Mount Pleasant residents Megan English, left, and Hannah Kahn begin their bike ride Thursday evening in Island Park in downtown Mount Pleasant.

Voter ID laws stir controversy for Republicans, Democrats By John Irwin Staff Reporter

Fears of voter fraud are the forces behind new voter identification laws being passed by states around the country, but some say those fears are overplayed. States such as Georgia, Kansas, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania have passed controversial laws that require eligible voters to show photo ID at the polling place in order to vote, in an effort to cut down on voter fraud. Other states, including Michigan, request photo ID but are not required. In Michigan, if a voter does not have a photo ID, the voter must sign a form saying they are not in possession of ID. Some critics say voter fraud is an overblown issue and is being used as an excuse to disenfranchise the poor and minorities. Political Science Professor James Hill said voter fraud certainly exists but is overplayed. “There is certainly some degree of voter fraud in any

Hunger | continued from 3A

“There were all these things that really resonated in the book that just aren’t there (in the movie),” he said. “The actors and actresses were good; it was the script and directing that was the problem. I would say the movie’s not a must-see, but

Goodall | continued from 3A

About 100 students were nominated to attend a speaker panel featuring Goodall before her speech at 8 p.m. “About a week before spring break, we asked faculty from the anthropology and biology departments to nominate students who would be interested in asking her questions,” Monfils said. Kelly Jo Baker was nominated by Monfils to attend the

situation,” Hill said. “The question becomes ‘Do you want to disenfranchise the many to get the few?’ Unfortunately, it would appear that the motives of some who claim voter fraud is a huge threat to our democracy mask their real intentions, which have a more partisan purpose.” Political Science Department Chairman Orlando Perez agreed. “The fact is that these moves to establish ID laws are aimed at reducing turnout among minority populations or among students,” Perez said. “They are driven by the Republican Party in order to reduce turnout of traditionally Democratic groups.” Nine states have either passed new voter ID laws or tightened existing ones since the beginning of last year, though the U.S. Justice Department has rejected two of them in South Carolina and in Texas, saying they place an unnecessary burden on minority voters. A 2007 report by the Brennan

Center for Justice at New York University Law School found “it is more likely to be struck by lightning than that (a voter) will impersonate another voter at the polls.” It also found voter fraud cases in Michigan “would amount to a rate at most of 0.0027 percent.” The report showed states with ID laws had the lowest voter turnout rates in the country. The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, disputed the Brennan study, saying it is “clear in its intentions, fuzzy in its methodology and wrong in its conclusions. Such doomsday predictions of widespread disfranchisement are increasingly being exposed as untrue as more legitimate research is performed and reported.” Similarly, a study conducted by the University of Delaware and the University of NebraskaLincoln found “concerns about voter-identification laws affecting turnout are much ado about nothing.”

the book is a must-read.” In the theater lobby, members of the Harry Potter Alliance collected canned goods and donations for the Isabella Community Soup Kitchen as part of their “Hunger Is Not a Game” campaign. Some of the excitement during the movie screenings wasn’t all from the movie alone. Sanford senior Bethany Juen said an intense part of the movie was disrupted

in one of the screenings when one of the padded sections of a wall fell down. “There was a noise in the back of the theater,” Juen said. “When I looked over, there were three people with their arms over their heads holding up this piece of padding. Nobody was hurt, though, so it was pretty funny.”

pre-speech panel. “Jane Goodall was the first person I can remember idolizing early in my life, and I still do,” the Clare junior said. “She emanates magnanimity and undying kindness coupled with an intuitive unprejudiced compassion for all people, animals and the environment.” Baker said she is looking forward to hearing the inspiring knowledge and advice Goodall has to pass on to the audience. Monfils said Goodall is a real pioneer in pursuing things

she has a passion about. “I think that can speak to anyone; it doesn’t have to just speak to students interested in animal behavior,” Monfils said. “I think this is an example of a truly remarkable woman, and regardless if you’re interested in science, she is an enormous role model for women.” A book signing will follow the speech, and Jane Goodall Institute merchandise and memberships will be available for sale on site.

Kony 2012 video promoting wrong issue The recent viral release of the Kony 2012 video has caused a stir amongst student populations across the country, raising awareness about the Lord’s Resistance Army leader Joseph Kony in Northern Uganda. The video may not be quite what it seems though, the Western Herald reports. The problem with the video is simply a misrepresentation of the situation and informa-

metro@cm-life.com

and rumors have spread that he is now either dead or in hiding but far away from Northern Uganda. “It is a valid issue, but the way it is used, it is more of a benefit for (Invisible Children),” Hudson said. “Just like what happened with the Red Movement in Africa, it is all publicity and will die out.” university@cm-life.com

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Researchers at the University of Michigan may have unlocked the secret to fending off, or at least slowing down, the aging process, the Michigan Daily reports. The key to anti-aging lies within the synthesizing of chemicals to increase calcium flow to cell lysosomes, which serve as recycling centers for cellular waste. “The importance will be similar to the trash-removal system in our daily lives that includes trash bins and janitors,” Haoxing Xu, head of the research team and an assistant professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at U-M, told the Michigan Daily. “Increased cellular-recycling activities could provide a treatment for diseased cells with excessive accumulation in the lysosome and/or slow trafficking.” Xu said research will need to continue for at least two more years before commercialization of a drug would be possible. This research includes animal experiments, pre-clinical and clinical research, as the teams tries to find ways to increase calcium flow to diseased cells. The benefits of the new research and potential drug reach farther than simply cosmetic. “This work might provide an alternative strategy to treat lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative disorders,” Dongbiao Shen, a graduate student research assistant in Xu’s lab, told the Michigan Daily.

tion, Western Michigan University junior Dana Hudson told the Western Herald. “It’s good to bring him to justice, but it’s also good to know that he is not active in Uganda anymore,” Hudson, chairman of Stand for Africa at WMU, told the Western Herald. “I feel that a lot of the video was political propaganda, and it’s known that the problem is not there anymore.” Kony was indicted in 2005,

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SPORTS Central Michigan Life

Section B

| Monday, March 26, 2012

| cm-life.com

M

[I N S I D E] w Softball ‘trying to fine-tune’ against Detroit before hitting MAC play, 2B w Tyler Hall makes his comeback felt for baseball team, 3B w Weaver, Arnold create tight-knit pitcher-catcher bond, 4B

w Team hits walk off to take series against Buffalo, 3B

A M H C P S AC

Gymnastics wins conference tournament, qualifies for regionals By Seth Newman | Staff Reporter

The Central Michigan gymnastics team qualified for regionals Saturday by winning the MAC tournament at Northern Illinois. Head coach Jerry Reighard found out where the Chippewas play regionals at last night, check cm-life.com for an update. The Chippewas claimed first place Saturday with a score of 195.675. Kent State finished second with a score of 195.225, while Western Michigan finished third. file photo by jake may

Kristin Teubner saved her best performance of the day for the floor exercise. Teubner was named Senior MAC Gymnast of the Year, scoring the highest mark at the entire meet with a 9.925 to take the title on the floor. “I don’t even have words for it,” Teubner said. “I’m just so happy.”

file photo by jake may

file photo by mike mulholland

In 28 years, head coach Jerry Reighard has won eight MAC Coach Of The Year honors. On Saturday, he won his ninth. Reighard had to coach the team through an injury-plagued season but was still able to capture first place in the regular season and the MAC Championships.

Sophomore Brittany Petzold took the title of best all-arounder at the meet. Petzold finished with a score of 39.150. Petzold helped carry the team for much of the season and will be counted on as the new leader next year. “It’s good to know that all my hard work in practice paid off,” Petzold said. “It’s just a really good feeling.”

file photo by ashley miller

file photo by mike mulholland

Sophomore Meaghan McWhorter took the title on the vault exercise, scoring a careerbest 9.9. McWhorter told head coach Jerry Reighard before the meet that she was going to score a 9.9. “What a time to finally do it,” Reighard said.

Freshman Taylor Noonan and senior Kristin Teubner shared the title on the balance beam with a score of 9.825. Noonan came to CMU as a balance-beam specialist and has been one of the most consistent scorers this season. “She put together a beautiful routine on the beam today,” Reighard said.

The star of the tournament was CMU sophomore Brittany Petzold. Petzold won first place as an all-arounder, with a score of 39.150. Senior Kristin Teubner finished fourth as an all-arounder and freshman Halle Moraw finished eighth. Reighard was delighted with Petzold’s performance at the tournament. “We are extremely proud of Brittany Petzold,” Reighard said. “I can tell you no other sophomore works as hard as she does at practice. Her title was well-deserved.” Petzold embraced the feeling afterwards. “It felt really good to be first place all-around,” Petzold said. “It’s good to know all the hard work I put in paid off. The team really came together too, and we had each other’s backs. We had a whole bunch of injuries at the beginning of the season, but we just pushed through it to win a championship.” The title was never in doubt. “They were extremely excited, as we led from start to finish,” Reighard said. “It was a tight race at every rotation, but we kept picking up tenths. The story was balance beam, where we had the highest team score.” Before the meet, Reighard preached to his team to go all out instead of being guarded. The team did just that. “We went absolutely all-out today and didn’t hold anything back,” Reighard said. “Nothing lacked today. The effort was what I wanted, and more importantly, the attitude was we are going to win this. They went out and did that.” Sophomore Meaghan Mc-

Whorter took the title on vault with a 9.9. Reighard and McWhorter knew she had the ability to do it. “She comes into practice everyday saying she is going to score a 9.9,” Reighard said. “That hadn’t happened up until today, and what a day to do it.” McWhorter said she had been waiting to do this all year. “I’ve done it countless times in practice,” McWhorter said. “I’ve just been waiting to pull it off at a meet, and I did it at the MAC Championship.” The titles kept coming as freshman Taylor Noonan took first place on balance beam. “She had a beautiful beam routine,” Reighard said. “We predicted that if she put it together at the MAC Championships she would win.” Teubner took home a couple titles herself, as she repeated as the floor event champion, scoring a 9.925, the highest score at the competition, and won senior MAC Gymnast of the Year. Teubner could hardly put her feelings into words. “I’m just so happy about today,” Teubner said. “I don’t even have words for it. I felt really bad about bars after messing up, but my teammates and coaches helped me. I just went out there and did the best I could. It happened to be the best of the day. To be able to perform well all year round and win the senior MAC Gymnast of the Year has been a goal of mine from the start.” The last title of the day was given to Reighard for MAC Coach of the Year. sports@cm-life.com

track and field

Ryan McCullough sets hammer throw record at LSU Relays Randolph: ‘One of the best openers that I’ve seen.’ By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

Ryan McCullough started off the outdoor track and field season with a recordsetting performance in Baton Rouge, La. Friday, the Central Michigan senior thrower set a school record in the hammer throw with a distance of 204 feet, 2 inches. It is the 10th-

best distance in the nation so far, according to the Track and Field Results Reporting System. M c - Willie Randolph Cullough also finished 11th in the discus with a distance of 148-07. His performance underscored the successful weekend for the team as a whole throughout the weekend. The weekend was especially unique for director of track and field Willie Randolph. It

was his first time back in the New Orleans area after he left in 2006 to coach at the University of Louisville. “At the beginning of the weekend, it was nervewracking to go back to a place that wasn’t so positive when I left,” Randolph said. “Then it was humbling and exciting, because I got to see former athletes and friends.” Randolph said some of his former athletes drove from up to three hours away to see him. Also, one of Randolph’s former University of New Orleans assistants, Trent Ellis, now coaches at LSU, the host

of the meet. He said he considers it the best start to the season since he began at CMU in 2009. “I think we had a good opener, one of the best openers that I’ve seen since I started here,” Randolph said. The meet was unscored, but strong performances from the 34 CMU athletes who competed at the LSU Relays hints to what could be upcoming. Junior runner Renaldo Powell placed third in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 14.65 during the first outdoor meet of the season.

Megan Heffner finished fifth in the women’s 400m hurdles with a time of 1:03.09. The women’s 4x400m relay placed fourth with a time of 3:48.04. The men’s relay finished seventh with a time of 3:14.55. “We hope this continues through to the end of the season at conference and nationals,” Randolph said. “We saw a lot of production.” CMU will compete at the Toledo Collegiate Challenge in Toledo, Ohio Saturday. sports@cm-life.com

Breaking records Ryan McCullough w Last year during his junior season, he set the weight throw record at 202 feet and five inches at the John Jacobs Invitational on April 15. w Friday, he broke the record he already held with a 204 feet and two inch toss at the LSU invitational. Senior year toss: w 204 feet, two inches Junior year record: w 202 feet, five inches


2B || Monday, March 26, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

Softball schedule

Baseball schedule

Past five games

Past five games

March 16 North Dakota W, 7-0

March 18 at Tennessee Tech L, 13-14

March 16 Indiana L, 3-5

March 20 Northwood W, 4-3

March 17 UIC L, 1-0

March 23 Buffalo W, 7-2

March 17 MSU W, 8-4

March 24 Buffalo L, 10-11

March 18 Wright State W, 9-0

March 25 Buffalo W, 14-13

Next five games

Next five games

Tuesday at Detroit 2 p.m.

Wednesday at MSU 3:05 p.m.

Tuesday at Detroit 4 p.m.

Friday at Bowling Green 3 p.m.

Friday at Kent State 1 p.m.

Saturday at Bowling Green 2 p.m.

Friday at Kent State 3 p.m.

Sunday at Bowling Green 1 p.m.

Saturday at Buffalo 2 p.m.

April 4 at Michigan 4:05 p.m. File photo by Andrew Kuhn

Brittany Petzold

Baseball Standings Team

West Division MAC

Western Michigan 2-0 Toledo 2-1 CMU 2-1 Eastern Michigan 2-1 Northern Illinois 0-2 Ball State 0-2

Overall

9-10 11-13 10-12 8-14 5-18 3-14

East Division Team

MAC

Overall

Kent State Akron Miami Ohio Buffalo Bowling Green

2-0 2-0 1-2 1-2 1-2 0-2

10-10 9-14 13-11 10-12 7-11 8-14

Baseball results Friday

CMU 7, Buffalo 2 W: Cooper (1-2) L: Copping (1-2) S: none

Hr: none RBI: Russell 2, Regnier 3, Arnold 1, Theunissen 1

CMU 10, Buffalo 11 W: Crum (1-4) L: Dodridge (1-3) S: Burke (1)

Hr: Pollack, Scahill, Scarcello, Lally SB: Kanz

CMU 14, Buffalo 13 W: Enns (1-0) L: Burke (2-1)

Hr: Dean, Hall RBI: Hall 4, Russell 3, Theunissen 2, Dean 2, Houlihan 1

Saturday

Sunday

Softball ‘trying to fine-tune’ against Detroit before hitting MAC play By Adam Niemi Staff Reporter

Players on the Central Michigan softball team reflected off of head coach Margo Jonker’s sunglasses as she stood against the fence by the dugout and watched them go through drills. As she answered a question about the upperclassmen on the team stepping up and leading the team, she interrupted herself. “You need your upperclassmen to be the leaders and – Lauren make sure you don’t flip the glove! Keep it down,” she said and returned to the answer, “you need them to set the tone for the whole team.” Jonker said she knows, as the team plays at the University of Detroit on Tuesday, the success of the season rests on whether all the young players progress. CMU has a two-game win streak going into the double-header that begins at 2 p.m. Twelve of the 19 players on the team are freshmen and sophomores. Jonker said she is

preparing the team in oversight of the whole season, instead of specific games. “We’re not preparing for Detroit specifi- Margo Jonker cally,” Jonker said. “Prior to the game, we’ll go over their tendencies, what kind of pitches they throw and things like that.” Senior infielder Molly Coldron leads the team with four home runs and 20 RBIs. She is hitting .333 and has four doubles and a triple. Junior outfielder Macy Merchant leads the team with a .423 batting average. CMU plays its first MidAmerican Conference games in a double-header at Kent State on March 30. “We’re trying to fine-tune different aspects of the game,” Jonker said. “It’s always a matter of progressing.” Jonker said the team has been successful overcoming the

“Absolutely nothing comes easy in this game.” Margo Jonker, head coach

mental element of the game to play cohesively. “This team has done a great job, up to this point, of playing team softball,” Jonker said. “Absolutely nothing comes easy in this game,” she said. “What we’ve done consistently is our pitching. Our hitting is getting better.” The first home game is April 4 against Michigan State at 4 p.m. sports@cm-life.com

Softball standings West Division

Team

CM Life Athlete of the Week: Brittany Petzold Sophomore Brittany Petzold helped the gymnastics team win the Mid-American Conference tournament championships by winning the MAC all-around

championship. Her score of 39.150 was just better than second place Marie Case from Kent State. She scored in the top-10 of three events and tied for fourth on the uneven parallel bars. Honorable mention: Kristin Teubner In the senior’s last go-

around, she won the MAC title for the MAC on the balance beam and floor exercise. She was awarded with the MAC Senior Gymnast of the Year award after the MAC tournament. Teubner and Petzold will both be competing in Regionals next weekend.

You Are Invited! Psychology Advising Night TUESDAY

March 27

Bovee UC Isabella Room 5:00 -7:00 PM • Assistance with course selection • Sign a Major or Minor • Information on graduate programs • What can you do with a major in psychology? • Study Abroad information available

All Are Welcome!

Overall

Ball State 16-7 CMU 11-11 Western Michigan 9-9 Northern Illinois 12-13 Eastern Michigan 9-14 Toledo 6-16

East Division Team

Overall

BGSU Miami (OH) Akron Kent State Ohio Buffalo

14-8 15-9 11-11 12-14 9-12 7-11

our

MAKING MArk

CENTRALMICHIGANUNIVERSITY

FACEBOOK.COM/MAKEMARKCMU

MAY GRADS! LIKE OUR PAGE BY MAY 1 TO BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN A FREE 16GB IPAD!

! u o Y s t Wan Editor In Chief is responsible for directing the overall news and editorial operation of the paper. The Editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The Editor has final student authority in decisions and is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Friday, April 13, 2012 to select the Editor in Chief for CM Life for Summer and Fall 2012. The selected CM Life Editor in Chief will later interview and select all other staff editors prior to the end of the spring 2012 semester. In order to facilitate electronic transmission of application materials to board members, PLEASE EMAIL a copy of your resume in a PDF format, email a Microsoft Word document answering the application questions and have your letters of recommendation emailed to: hopp1nc@ cmich.edu. Managing Editor is responsible to the Editor in Chief and oversees the news editors. News Editors are responsible to the Managing Editor and oversee the total news gathering operation and the content of the newspaper.

News Page Designers should be trained in journalistic and grammatical style as well as Adobe InDesign. Duties include page layout, headline writing and proofreading.

Applications for Summer and Fall 2012 semester now available at the CM Life front desk. You must be enrolled as at least a half-time student in good academic standing to be eligible for these positions.

Sports Editor is responsible for the sports news gathering of the newspaper. The Sports Editor assigns articles, edits copy, designs pages and writes headlines for sports pages. Photography Editor coordinates photography for Central Michigan Life. Administrative ability and photography experience necessary. Person must be able to direct photography staff and make assignments. Must have Photoshop experience. Staff Photographers work under the direction of the Photo Editor in covering campus and community news, sports and entertainment events. Staff Writers are needed within the news, sports and

entertainment departments to cover a wide range of campus and community beats. Although journalism or writing backgrounds are helpful, they are not required Reporters should be mature, dedicated, responsible, hard-working and willing to learn.

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APPLICATIONS DEADLINE: MONDAY, APRIL 2 • 5 PM 436 Moore Hall • CMU • Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • 989/774-3493 • Fax 989/774-3040


cm-life.com/category/sports

baseball

Team hits walk off to take series with Buffalo, 14-13 CMU starts 2-1 in MAC play By Kristopher Lodes Staff reporter

It didn’t look good for Central Michigan going into the bottom of the fifth inning down 12-4 to Buffalo with the series on the line. But that didn’t faze the Chippewas (11-13, 2-1 MAC), after coming up short Saturday, losing 11-10. The team had an opportunity to redeem itself and did, winning Sunday 14-13 at Theunissen Stadium. CMU, trailing 13-10 in the bottom of the ninth, scored four runs with one out. The winning two-run RBI coming off the bat of senior designated hitter Nate Theunissen. “I was just thinking, I need to find some barrel,” Theunissen said. “Everybody was doing their part getting on base, and I was just trying to keep it going.” After falling behind eight runs, freshman third baseman Joey Houlihan hit an RBI single; then, on a passed ball, junior Jordan Adams scored from third base, making it 12-6. With two outs, senior centerfielder Tyler Hall hit a home run to right field, making it a 12-9 game. “(Buffalo) banged the ball, and we didn’t really have an answer until Dylan Rheault and (Dietrich) Enns came in,” head coach Steve Jaksa said. “Then we were able to put on the rally shoes, and thank goodness for that.” Senior Ryan Longstreth allowed six earned runs on nine hits in three innings. Senior Jon Weaver came in the fourth inning and gave up three hits on three runs. Freshman pitcher Matt Trowbridge lasted just one inning after giving up four

football

Linebacker added from Holland By Brandon Champion Staff Reporter

Central Michigan head football coach Dan Enos announced the addition of linebacker Nathan Ricketts to the team’s 2012 recruiting class Friday. The Holland native will join the 25 other newcomers previously announced on Feb 1. Last season, he was a Parade Magazine All-American after making 168 tackles for a team that finished 9-3 overall, advanced to the regional finals and posted the first two postseason wins in school history. Rivals, a recruiting website, had him listed as a three-star prospect with offers from Western Michigan and Toledo. He was named to the Associated Press Division 3/4 honorable mention all-state team, selected to play in the 2012 MHSFCA East-West AllStar Game and ranked No. 52 on the Detroit News Blue Chip list. While at Holland High School, he averaged 14 tackles per game and was credited with a career-high 24 tackles in a 56-50 loss to Kenowa Hills last season. Ricketts also caught five touchdown passes last fall on offense. “Nathan will be an outstanding addition to our football program,” Enos said. “He is a tough, athletic player who can help our defense for years to come, and we are looking forward to seeing him in the maroon and gold.” Ricketts will join CMU for preseason workouts in August. The Chippewas are losing captain linebackers Armond Staten and Mike Petrucci after they exhausted their eligibility. sports@cm-life.com

Central Michigan Life || Monday, March 26, 2012 || 3B

[Sports]

photos by andrew kuhn/staff photographer

Junior pitcher Pat Kaminska delivers a pitch to home plate during Saturday’s game against Buffalo at Theunissen Stadium in Mount Pleasant. The Chippewas lost to the Bulls 11-10.

Senior outfielder Sam Russell rounds third before scoring during Friday’s game against Buffalo at Theunissen Stadium in Mount Pleasant. The Chippewas beat the Bulls 7-2.

hits and two runs. “We were hoping good things would happen when he (Dietrich Enns) went in there, and Dylan (Rheault) was just tired, so we had to get Enns in,” Jaksa said. “He hadn’t thrown in a while and everyone said he was ready, and it looks like he is.” Saturday, the Chippewas were in a similar situation down in the ninth inning in another high-scoring affair, but Buffalo was able to hold off the rally that time as it took game two of the series 11-10. Friday, CMU senior pitcher Zach Cooper held the potent Bulls offense to two a

d v

e

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runs and struck out 10 batters, making him No. 10 all time on the CMU all-time strikeout list. “Big win, especially the way we lost yesterday (Saturday),” Jaksa said. “We know how it is to start in a hole, but it is much better to start 2-1 than 1-2.” The Chippewas hit the road for the next five games, starting Wednesday, before getting back to Mid-American Conference play Friday through Sunday at Bowling Green. The team finishes the road stretch April 4 at Michigan. sports@cm-life.com i

s e

m

e

n

t

Dr. Jane Goodall Speaking at Events Center The events Center will be hosting keynote speaker dr. Jane Goodall this Wednesday, march 28 at 8:00pm. dr. Goodall is a primatologist, ethologist, and anthropologist whose work with wild chimpanzees made her a household name. dr. Goodall is also a United nations messenger of Peace and a dame of the British empire. dr. Goodall’s work and legacy have been covered in international film, television, and literature. dr. Goodall’s speech titled making a difference, spans from her earliest field studies and experiences to her most recent work with wildlife and the environment. dr. Goodall will also be speaking about environmental threats facing our planet while providing a message of hope that both encourages and inspires. Those in attendance will be motivated to do their part to improve the environment as well. This year marks the 35th anniversary of the Jane Goodall institute, which works extensively towards the conservation of natural habitats and to support animal welfare issues. another of the institute’s primary objectives is to help develop communitycentered conservation efforts across the african continent. as a global icon, dr. Goodall was also the originator of roots & shoots, the institute’s international humanitarian and environmental program for youth. assistant director of events and Conference services, emily mcClure, explained, “dr. Jane Goodall is a fantastic addition to the CmU Presidents Office speaker series. dr. Goodall’s lifetime of experience has drawn a diverse crowd from all over michigan.” mcClure also shared, “We are very excited that CmU has the opportunity to host dr. Goodall and are looking forward to her speech.” This event is free to all community members and students, but tickets are needed to attend and seating is reserved. a book signing will follow dr. Goodall’s speech; merchandise and memberships will be available for sale on site as well. For free reserved tickets please email the CmU box office at: ticketcentral@cmich.edu or call (888) 347-3872. Please call or stop by the Box Office to order your tickets, for ada accommodations contact student diversity services or call 989-774-3355 at least one week in advance.

urec.cmich.edu 989-774-3686

Centerfielder Tyler Hall makes his comeback felt for team By Kristopher Lodes Staff Reporter

Last season, Tyler Hall batted .367, leading the Central Michigan baseball team to its second-straight MidAmerican Conference West Division Championship. He played and started in all 58 games last season, but this season he got off to a different start. The senior centerfielder began the season with an injured leg and was labeled on a week-to-week basis. “I tore my medial meniscus, and I went in and repaired it,” Hall said. “I feel 100 percent, and my legs are getting back to where they were muscular wise.” This week, the Chippewas welcomed back their 2011 MVP, and he made an instant impact. In his first at-bat against Northwood Tuesday, he hit a single up the middle into centerfield. Friday, the team opened up MAC play against Buffalo, and Hall showed his glove and legs are back as well with an over-theshoulder catch in centerfield and then doubled off the runner on first to get CMU out of the inning. Saturday, in a high-scoring game, Hall earned his first two RBIs of the season with a single to centerfield in the third inning and again in the fourth inning. The next day, with CMU down 12-6, he came up after going 0-for-3. He came up with a three-run home run that got his team back in the game. “It was a little slow at the start and I expected it, but I got into a groove,” Hall said. “I started seeing the ball a lot better than I was, and I feel a lot better getting back on the field.” Last season, Hall mainly played third base but now has started his first three games in centerfield giving

“It was a little slow at the start and I expected it, but I got into a groove. I started seeing the ball a lot better than I was, and I feel a lot better getting back on the field.” Tyler Hall senior Eric Wrozek the spot at third, who has been giving the bottom of the Chippewa lineup some pop with several home runs last weekend at Tennessee Tech. “I’m pretty versatile you can put me anywhere, and I can play the position,” Hall said. “I’m just thankful to be playing and getting back on the field.” With Hall being out, head coach Steve Jaksa was able

to find out who could step up around him in the batting order. “With him missing the games, it allowed us (to) figure out who was going to be around him,” Jaksa said. “He is protected well with (William) Arnold, Sammy Russell and (Nate) Theunissen. We have a plethora of guys who can swing the bat.” sports@cm-life.com

NING E P O B JO

Central eview R 2012-13 EDITOR IN CHIEF

Editor in Chief is responsible for the overall content, design and publication of The Central Review, the official student literary magazine of Central Michigan University. The magazine is published once each during the fall and spring semesters. Responsibilities include organizing content and writing contests, publicizing categories for submission, supervising contributing staff writers, layout and design, securing bids for printing and distribution of magazine to campus locations. Apply at 436 Moore Hall, CMU

April 2 • 5 p.m. y, da on M e: in dl ea D The Student Media Board of Directors will select the editor-in-chief for this publication.


4B || Monday, March 26, 2012 || Central Michigan Life

cm-life.com/category/sports

[Sports]

William Arnold, Jon Weaver create tight-knit catcher-pitcher bond By John Manzo Staff Reporter

About a month ago, Central Michigan senior catcher William Arnold was in the midst of discussing the respect between pitchers and catchers. And that’s when CMU senior pitcher Jon Weaver pulled a low blow, throwing a tennis ball beneath Arnold’s waist. All in fun, Arnold said, “I’ll get you back.” But according to Weaver, he’s still waiting for Arnold’s revenge. Despite their comical personalities, these two — as well as the entire pitching/catching staff — get along well. The pitchercatcher relationship is important, because they work handin-hand, game after game. “I get along with (catchers) all really well, actually,” Weaver said. “Out of all the people I hang out with on the team, I’d say the majority of the time it’s with the catchers, especially Will.” Arnold, who was named the Louisville Slugger National

Player of the Week on Feb. 21 after hitting four home runs and eight RBIs in a weekend series against Troy, wasn’t originally a catcher. The Mount Pleasant native was recruited as a shortstop, but the move was made to put Arnold at catcher – a position he hadn’t played much of since little league. “Catching is a lot of fun,” Arnold said. “It’s definitely a whole different game than anyone ever realizes. It’s much more mental than any other position, and I definitely enjoy that part of the game.” Head coach Steve Jaksa is glad the change has worked out. He said Arnold’s passed-ball count is down, and Arnold’s athletic ability made the switch effective. “He’s a good athlete, and we’re able to do that,” Jaksa said about Arnold’s position change. “It’s been really good for him and really good for us. It’s a twoway street.”

Arnold is in the midst of his second season as a catcher, and he’s making strides. Last year, assistant coach Jeff Opalewski decided what pitches were to be thrown throughout the course of a game. Now, Arnold is in command. “Will calls his own game, and I don’t think I’ve shook him off, maybe once,” Weaver said. “He knows what I want to do, and we just go out and do it.” Arnold said he gets along with all of the pitchers, but the bond between him and Weaver is tight because of their days on the same summer league team. The two have been a part of the Lima Locos’ baseball program for the past two years in Lima, Ohio, and this tight-knit relationship has built trust that has branched to all the pitchers and catchers. “I think the more they learn each other, the more they trust each other,” Jaksa said. “There’s a trust that’s so very important.” sports@cm-life.com

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Senior pitcher Jon Weaver and senior catcher William Arnold talk things over on the mound during Saturday’s game against Buffalo at Theunissen Stadium in Mount Pleasant. The Chippewas lost to the Bulls 11-10.

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MakingA

Difference:

an evening with Dr. Jane Goodall

Photo Courtesy of Michael Neugebauer

T

he legendary primatologist and conservationist will share her insight from more than five decades of work with Gombe chimpanzees, current threats facing the planet, and reasons for hope in these complex times. Dr. Goodall will: • provide insight into the person behind the research. • discuss The Jane Goodall Institute and it’s mission. • provide a book signing following speech

Sponsored by: Speaker Series University Events, Program Board, Biology Department, College of Science and Technology, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Wednesday

March 28, 2012

8:00 PM at McGuirk Arena EVENT FREE, TICKET NEEDED

Ticket Central Phone: 989-774-3000 Email: ticketcentral@cmich.edu Website: centralboxoffice.cmich.edu For more information about Dr. Goodall, please visit www.janegoodall.org


cm-life.com/category/sports

Central Michigan Life || Monday, March 26, 2012 || 5B

[vibe]

movie review

‘The Hunger Games’ good but takes one step back for every two steps forward teens are forced to kill one another. Instead, the deaths are merely glossed over, and the camera shakes so much during fights it will be a chore for audiences to keep up. It effectively robs the games of having any emo-

By Jordan LaPorte Staff Reporter

tional impact. “The Hunger Games” is still a good movie but one that seems to take one step back for every two steps forward.

‘The hunger games’

Considering what the book “The Hunger Games” is based on, the filmmakers had ample opportunity w Genre: Drama, Sci-Fi to create a film that offered studentlife@cm-life.com w Rating: PG-13 a compelling experience to longtime fans and newcomers alike. While they succeed at making “The Hunger Games” an enjoyable experience overall, it’s an experience held back by uneven pacing, poor character development and the filmmakers’ aversion taking Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • w Michigan Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com Life • 436 Central MooretoHall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www.cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www.cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com any risks. photo courtesy of lions gate films inc. Banks, ed playing Effie Trinket, and Ad Jennifer Lawrence, playing Katniss Everdeen. The filmed stars Jennifer aElizabeth Placing a Classifi Ad Placing a Classifi ed Ad Rates ed a Classifi Ad Placing Classifi Classifi Ad ed Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy ed &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Rates ed Ad Policy &Classifi Lawrence as the protagoCM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because CMEverdeen, Life will not knowingly advertising which CM Life reflects willLawrence, not discrimination knowingly accept because advertising which CM Life reflects will not discrimination knowingly because advertising which reflects discrimination because pens to Katniss, the film-accept nist Katniss whoaccept tors, excluding Rates: 15 word minimu Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 race, religion, sexto orreject national Byorigin, Phone: 989-774-3493 race, religion, sexto orreject national CM Lifecolor, reserves the right or origin, and CM Life reserves the right to By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or andof CM race, Life color, reserves religion, the right sexto orreject national or origin, andof CM Lifecolor, reserves the right or origin, andof makers seemed to expect volunteers herself for the put on pretty lackluster without which is in the opinion of the Studen discontinue, without notice, advertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media discontinue, without notice, advertising which isdiscontinue, in the opinion without of thenotice, Studentadvertising Media which is discontinue, in the opinion without of the notice, Student advertising Media which is in the opinion of the Student Media By Fax: 989-774-7805 By Fax: Board, 989-774-7805 ByPleasant, Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic centered Bold, italic centered Bold, italic and ,games, Mt. 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Any duelike canad beattractors. the CM Life officredit ce In Person: Moore Hall fi436 rst date of Any credit due can the befipicked rst date up of at publication. the CM Life Any offi credit ce due the befipicked rst have date up of at publication. the CM Life Any officredit ce duelike canad beattractors. the CM Life officredit ce within 30 days of termination of the an error, report it to the C within 30 days of termination of the an error, report it to the Classifi ed ad. If you find within 30 days of termination the ad. If you find within an error, 30 days report of seems termination it to the Classifi the ed ad. If you find within anthe error, 30 days report of termination it toThe the Classifi the ed ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classifi ed ad. If you find appeared inMonday-Friday film. her Hours: sister from having to 8ofa.m.-5 pacing. Sometimes it 13+ Issues: $7.00 p Hours: 8ofa.m.-5 p.m. 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 issue Hours: Monday-Friday 8ofa.m.-5 p.m. a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday p.m. Dept. We areper only responsible for the first day’s insertion. ept advertising which refl ects discrimination Dept. We are only responsible for the firstimmediately. day’s insertion. Dept. immediately. We are because only responsible for the Dept. fi15 rstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are onlyper responsible for ed the Dept. fiad rstimmediately. day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the firstimmediately. day’s insertion. Rates: word minimum classifi film makes one of the charcompete. Lawrence toormove through seemingly tional origin, and CM Life reserves the puts right to reject vertising is in the opinion of the Student Media deaths seem really 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! on a which strong performance important events much too acter’s Bold, italic and centered REACH MORE THAN ALWAYS 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! 32,000 REACH READERS MORE DAY! EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ePUBLISHING standards of CM Life. CM Life willTHAN be responsible for TO ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF important, but the dying throughout the film, givquickly without ever buildtype are available along e extent of cancelling the charge for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue WITH A VALID COLLEGE ID. with other features character hadspecial barely been ing Katniss a rough exterior ch an error. Credit for such an error is limited to ing only any tension. For examad attractors. 7-12 Issues: $7.25 perinissue ywhile credit due can showing be picked up enough at the CM Life offi ce “The Reaping” the like movie before that ple, seemed still f the ad. If you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00aperpoint. issue This makes it really have been there is like it should yemotion responsible forto the fireveal rst day’s insertion. more depth to her than ini- scene filled with emotion hard for viewers unfamilIt’s and foreboding but instead iar with the books to care tially meets the eye. ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Many of the adult actors feels rushed and rather at all about the death of a Big Boy.™ completely undeveloped do a fine job as well. Stan- meaningless. On the other hand, some character. ley Tucci, Elizabeth Banks, CHOOSE FROM MEAT OR ZEASTY MARINARA SAUCE OVER SPAGHETTI NOODLES. The final problem with Donald Sutherland and scenes during the games SERVED WITH A GRILLED GARLIC ROLL AND CHOICE OF SIDE OR CEASAR SALAD. Woody Harrelson are just a themselves seemed to drag “The Hunger Games” is the few of the adult actors who until their relatively mun- games themselves are pretOffer only available at the following location: *Dine-In Only. ty tame. Audiences should are able to breathe life into dane conclusion. Big Boy is a registered trademark of Big Boy Restaurants International LLC 1623 S. MISSION, MT. PLEASANT ©2012 Big Boy Restaurants International LLC While audiences will be disturbed by witnessing the characters they portray. PHONE: (989) 772-2476 Most of the younger ac- surely care about what hap- a barbaric event where 24

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Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • w Michigan Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Life • 436 Central Moore Hall, Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, • www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Central Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

Placing a Classifi Ad Classifi ed Ad Placing a Classifi Ad Classifi ed Ad ed Ad Placing Classifi a Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Ad Classifi ed Ad ed Policy Classifi ed Ad Policy Classifi eded Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates

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will notects knowingly acceptbecause advertising whichcolor, reflects discrimination because of race, color, r CM will notects knowingly accept advertising which refl discrimination of race, religion, wingly accept advertising CM Life which willrefl notects knowingly discrimination acceptbecause advertising CM of Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of Life race, which color, refl religion, discrimination because of Life race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimu Rates: 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 CM word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimum per classifi ed ad By Phone: 989-774-3493 Phone: 989-774-3493 989-774-3493 sex or national and CM Life reserves right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, adv sex or national and CM Life reserves the right advertising to origin, reject or discontinue, withoutthe notice, gin,By andPhone: CM Life reserves sex or thenational right to origin, reject By or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national right advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without the notice, right advertising to origin, reject or discontinue, without notice, which is in the opinion of the Media Board, is notCM in keeping of and CM$7.75 Life. CM Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 which is$7.75 in the opinion of the Media Board, is notCM in keeping withStudent the standards of and CM$7.75 Life. Lifeissue will with the standards Bythe Fax: 989-774-7805 on of Student Media which Board, is in is the not opinion in keeping of with Student the standards Media which Board, of CM is in is Life. the notCM opinion in keeping Life will of with Student the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will withStudent the standards of and CM Life. Lifeissue will BytheFax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic Bold, italic Bold, italic 1-2 Issues: p 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per 1-2 Issues: per be responsible for errors only to extent of cancelling the charge for the are space us be responsible for errors only to extent of typographical cancelling the charge for thethe space used and ypographical errors only be to responsible the extentfor of typographical cancelling the errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of typographical cancelling and charge for thethe space used and type are centered type are centered type By Website: www.cm-life.com By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p om By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue thecentered 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue valueless suchto anonly error. Credit for such an error is limited the first date of with publicati valueless suchto anonly error. Credit for such an error is by limited the first date of with publication. Any to only available along available along available along by such an error. Creditrendered for such an valueless error is by limited suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto anonly error. the Credit first rendered date for such of publication. an error is by limited Any the first rendered date of with publication. Any In Person: 436 Moore Hall 7-12 Issues: $7.25 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue In Person: 436 Moore Hall In Person: 436 Moore Hall credit due can be picked up at the CM Life offi ce within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you fi nd other special other special features other special features a credit can be picked up at the CM offifeatures ce within days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, picked up at the CM Life credit office due within can30 bedays picked of termination up at the CM of Life the credit ad. office Ifdue you within can find30 be an days picked error, of termination up at the CM of Life the ad. office Ifdue you within find30 an days error, of termination of Life the ad. If you find30an error, Issues: $7.00 p report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for thelike fi13+ rstad day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. like ad attractors. attractors. report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. ifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad ect or discontinue, without notice, advertising eping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with limited to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features ys of termination of the ad. If you find an error, CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. onsible the first day’s insertion. By for Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or

Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www.cm-life.com REACH MORE THAN 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS REACH MORE THAN 32,000 EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF 32,000 PUBLISHING REACH READERS MORE DAY! THAN EACH32,000 PUBLISHING READERS ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN ATREADERS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Placing a Classified Ad Classified Ad Policy & Rates discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media By Fax: 989-774-7805 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for type are available along ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only like ad attractors. 7-12TO Issues: $7.25 per issue NOTICES In Person: 436 the first date of publication. Any credit due can be SALE picked up at the CM Life offi ce NOTICES RENT FOR NOTICES NOTICES WANTED TO RENT WANTED FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED NOTICES TOMoore RENTHall WANTED TO RENT WANTED RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE withinTO 30 days of termination of the ad. If NOTICES you find an error, report it to the Classified 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue Hours: Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE LOST &FOR FOUND SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY!

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4 Person Bedroom WANTED BUY WANTED TO BUY 4 HAPPYTO ADS HAPPY ADS 5 Person 5 Bedroom Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com NO DEPOSIT – 4-5 BEDROOM REAL ESTATE PERSONALS Win the use a FREE Shuttle Classifi to Campus FREERates Internet & Cable Placing a of Classifi ed Ad Classified Ad Policy ed• Ad @ Signing!

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1-2 Person CM Life will not knowingly accept 2 advertising which reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, Bedroom sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising

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which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will SAVE TIME! APPLY ONLINE TODAY! be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any Pet Friendly credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, LiveWithUnited.com report it to the Classified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion.

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3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue

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Classifieds Classifieds lassifi eds ifi eds lassifieds

typographical errors only to theLife extent•of436 cancelling the charge for the space used 3-6 Issues: $7.50 issue Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. MI ••per www/cm-life.com 6B || Monday,Central Mar. 26, Michigan 2012 || Central Michigan Life cm-life.com/news with other special features Central Michigan Life •AT 436 Central Moore Michigan CMU, Life Mt. Pleasant, Pleasant, •AT 436WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Central Moore MI 48859 48859 Hall, Michigan CMU, www/cm-life.com Life Mt. Pleasant, • 436 Moore MI 48859 Hall, CMU, • www/cm-life.com Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com and rendered valueless byOPEN such an error. Credit for such an Hall, error is limited to only PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN ALWAYS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, report it to Ad the Classifi ed Classifi ed Classifi ed Ad Issues:ed $7.00 perPolicy issue fied ed Ad Ad Placing a Classifi Ad Placing Classifi ainsertion. Classifi ed Ad Policy ed Policy Ad 13+ Classifi Ad Classifi ed Ad Classifi edPolicy Ad Rates Rates Classified Ad Rates Classifi Dept. immediately. We are onlyed responsible for the first day’s type are available along

Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com Central Michigan Life •accept 436 advertising Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com CM ects discrimination of color, religion, Rates: 15 minimum per ed CM Life Life will will not not knowingly knowingly accept advertising CM which Life which willrefl refl not ects knowingly discrimination acceptbecause because advertising CM of race, Life race, which will color, refl notects knowingly religion, discrimination accept because advertising of race, which color, reflects religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Rates: 15 word word minimum per classifi classifi Rates: ed ad ad 15 word minimum per classifi Rates: ed ad 15 word minimu PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS sex and CM reserves right to or discontinue, without notice, ByAd Phone: 989-774-3493 989-774-3493 ed Classifi ed Policy Classifi Rates without notice, advertising sex or or national national origin, origin,By andPhone: CM Life Life reserves sex the or the national rightAd to reject origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without sex or the notice, national rightadvertising advertising to origin, reject or and discontinue, CM Life reserves without the notice, right advertising toed rejectAd or discontinue, edByAd Classifi ed Ad Policy Classifi ed AdwithRates which the Student Media Board, isisnot in with the of Life. CM italic 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per whichisisin inthe theopinion opinionof of theFax: Student Media which Board, is in the not opinion inkeeping keeping of the withStudent thestandards standards Media which Board, ofCM CM is in is Life. the not CM opinion in Life keeping Lifewill will of the withStudent the standards Media Board, of CM is Life. notCM in keeping Lifeissue will the Bold, standards ofand CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Fax: 989-774-7805 By 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue 1-2 Issues: per 1-2 Issues: $7.75 p

be for the of cancelling charge for space used and centered type CM Life will not knowingly accept errors advertising which reflects of the race, color, religion, Rates: word minimum per ed beresponsible responsible fortypographical typographical errorsonly only beto to responsible theextent extent for ofdiscrimination typographical cancellingthe thebecause errors charge only be for to responsible thethe space extent used for of typographical cancelling and the errors charge only for to thethe space extent used of cancelling and classifi the charge for theare space used and om centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue omBy Website: www.cm-life.com Byaccept Website: www.cm-life.com 3-615 Issues: $7.50 per issueclassifi 3-6ad Issues: $7.50 per issue CM or Lifenational will not knowingly advertising which refl ects because of race, color, religion, available along rendered valueless by Credit for such an error isisdiscrimination limited to only the fiwithout of Any Rates: 15 word minimum per ed ad sex origin, and CM Life reserves right to reject or discontinue, notice, advertising available along with rendered valueless bysuch suchan anerror. error. Creditrendered forthe such an valueless error by limited such to an only error. the Credit first rstdate rendered date for such ofpublication. publication. an valueless error is by limited Any suchto an only error. the Credit fi rst date for such of publication. an error is limited Any to only the fi rst date ofwith publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue sex or national origin, and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising other special features 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue credit due can be picked up at the CM Life offi ce within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you fi nd an error, In Person: 436 Moore Hall Person: 436 Moore Hall which isdue in the opinion ofIn the Student Media Board, is not in keeping standards of Life. Life willof termination Bold, and other special features 1-2 per issue credit can be picked up at the CM Life credit offi ce due within can 30 be days picked of with termination up the at the CM of Life the credit ad. offiCM ce Ifdue you within can fiCM nd30 be an days picked error, up at the CM ofIssues: Life the ad. office If$7.75 you within find 30an days error, of termination of italic the ad. If you find an error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will like ad attractors. Bold, italic and report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for fi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue be responsible for typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. report it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. report We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s report insertion. We are it to only the Classifi responsible ed Dept. for the immediately. fi rst day’s insertion. We are only responsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. a.m.-5 Hours: p.m.Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 Hours: p.m. Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue be responsible for typographical errors only the an extent the charge for the used and centeredalong type are available with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit forto such errorofiscancelling limited to only first date of space publication. om 3-6 Issues: $7.50 7-12 Issues: $7.25 perissue issue Central Michigan Life • 436theMoore Hall, CMU,Any Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 •per www.cm-life.com

centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 p available along with 7-12 Issues: $7.25 other special features 13+ $7.00 like adIssues: attractors.

available along with

rendered by such Credit an error is limited to only theoffirst publication. Any other special features credit duevalueless can be picked upan aterror. the CM Life for offisuch ce within 30 days of termination thedate ad. of If you find an error, 7-12 Issues: $7.25per per issue AT 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! OPEN AT other special features 32,000 REACH READERS MORE 32,000 PUBLISHING READERS MORE DAY! THAN EACH 32,000 PUBLISHING ALWAYS DAY! EACH OPEN PUBLISHING AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS DAY! OPEN WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIF credit due canClassifi be picked up at the CM Life offi ce within days of termination theALWAYS ad. If you find an error, 13+ Issues: $7.00 issue like ad attractors. report it THAN toEACH the edREACH Dept. immediately. We are only 30 responsible for theREADERS first of day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. 13+Classifi Issues: $7.00 like& adRates attractors. report it to the Classifi Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. a.m.-5 p.m. Placing a ed Classifi ed Ad edper Adissue Policy 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS OPEN ATwhich WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS CM Life will not knowingly accept advertising reflects discrimination because Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad 32,000 READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS ATandWWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS By Phone: 989-774-3493 of race, color, religion, sex orOPEN national origin, CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising which is in the opinion of the Student Media •Fax: 436 989-774-7805 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com , Life Mt. MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com ByPleasant, 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and centered Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will be responsible for

By Website: www.cm-life.com Classified Ad Policy Policy In Person: 436 Moore Hall

type are available along

3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue with other special features 7-12TO Issues: $7.25 per issue like ad attractors. WANTED TO RENT WANTED RENT NOTICES FOR SALE FOR SALE NOTICES WANTED NOTICES TO RENT WANTED NOTICES TO WANTED NOTICES TO RENT NOTICES TO RENT WANTED TO RENT FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR FOR SALE FOR SALE withinSALE 30 daysRENT of termination of the ad. If FOR you find anSALE error, report it to the ClassifiWANTED ed 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue wingly accept advertising which refl ects discrimination because of race, color, religion, discrimination because of race, color, religion, Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 15MI Rates: 15 word minimum classifi n LifeHours: • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, 48859 • www/cm-life.com Rates: word minimum per classifi ed ad Dept. immediately. We are only per responsible for ed the fiad rst day’s insertion. typographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used

and rendered valueless byed such an error.Rates Credit for such an error is limited to only Classifi Ad Classified Ad Rates the first date of publication. Any credit due can be picked up at the CM Life office

gin, and CM Life reserves right advertising to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising ect or discontinue, withoutthe notice, on of the Media Board, notCM in keeping of CM$7.75 Life. CM Lifeissue will Bold, italic and eping withStudent the standards of CM is Life. Life will with the standards 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue Bold, italic and 1-2 Issues: per ypographical only extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are cancelling the errors charge for to thethe space used and centered type are 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue available along with by suchto anonly error. Credit for such an error is limited the first date of publication. Any available along with limited the first date of publication. Any to only because owingly accept advertising which reflects discrimination of race,$7.25 color, per religion, 7-12 $7.25 perper issue 15Issues: word minimum classifi edspecial ad features 7-12 Issues: issue Rates: other picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, other special features ays termination the ad. If you find error, gin,ofand CM Life of reserves the right toan reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising 13+ $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. Issues: $7.00 per issue sifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the fi13+ rst day’s insertion. like adIssues: attractors. onsible for the fi rst day’s insertion. on of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the standards of CM Life. CM Life will Bold, italic and 1-21Issues: $7.75 issue NEW, NEW, NEW block from cam-perDANCERS WANTED. NO EXPERIypographical errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and centered type are pus 5 b3-6 e d r Issues: oom d$7.50 u p l e xperENCE issue NECESSARY. SUPPLEMENT available along with by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication.Olivieri-homes.com Any 989-773-2333. YOUR PART TIME. APPLY 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issueINCOME other special features picked up at the CM Life office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, AT MICELI!S CORNER. 989-539-3401 WESTPOINT VILLAGE - 2 BED 13+ Issues: $7.002 perA issue like6ad attractors.P M . sified Dept. immediately. We are only responsible for the first day’s insertion. FTER MASTER BATH LIKE NEW, Warm SHUTTLE SERVICE facebook.com/micelis.corner.showShuttle to Campus. (989)779-9999 girls. Public www.LiveWithUnited.com CM Life Classifieds • 774-3493 Transportation 436 Moore Hall • www.cm-life.com Services of the

AUTOS FOR SALE SALE WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES LOST & FOUND AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS SALE AUTOS SALE edAUTOS AUTOS FOR SALE OPEN AUTOS SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES Classifi ed Ad32,000 Policy Classifi Ad Rates REACH MORE THAN READERS EACH PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS LOST FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND LOST &FOR FOUND WANTED TO RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR& SALE FOR SALE HELP WANTED HELP WANTED AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT LOST & FOUND HELP WANTED HELP HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP HELP GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT FOR RENT FOR RENT FORWANTED RENT AUTOS FOR SALE AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES LOST &WANTED FOUND MIGHTY MINISGARAGE BLOOMFIELD HILLS RENTAL ComWORK ON MACKINAC Island This pany needs summer help! Up to Summer- Make lifelong friends. The HELP HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES SPECIAL SECTION SECTION PUBLISHING DAY! ALWAYS AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS PETS FOR RENT WANTED TO ALWAYS AT PETS WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION PETS PETS PETS PETS an hour. Outdoor work, good Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge WANTED TO RENT OPEN WANTED TO RENT OPEN WANTED TO RENT RENT SPECIAL WANTED TO RENT $12.00 WANTED TO RENT HELP WANTED WANTED HELPPETS WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES FOR RENT driving record, and lifting required. Call Shops are looking for help in all areas: Wayne at 248-332-4700. Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. HousTRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL PETS PETS MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES WANTED TO RENT ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES CM LIFE CLASSIFIEDS SPECIAL SECTION PETSALWAYS OPEN PETS ing, bonus, and discounted meals. WANTED TO RENT SPECIAL SECTION 436 Moore PUBLISHING DAY! AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Hall, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 ( 9 0 6 ) 8 4 7 - 7 1 9 6 . (989) 774-3493 • www.cm-life.com www.theislandhouse.com TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS Isabella County REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS PERSONALS TRAVEL ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES Transportation GIRL AND GUY ROOMMATES WANTED TO RENT CommissionFOR WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE WANTED TO RENT NOTICES SALE NEEDED FOR 2012- 12013 school REAL ESTATE PERSONALS PERSONALS WANTED e a rREAL .HAPPY w w wESTATE . bTO e ADS s t r oBUY lBUY lc.com HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS WANTED BUY 989•772•9441 WANTED BUY y586-321-1112. WANTED TO WANTED BUY WANTED BUY PERSONALS PERSONALS HAPPYTO ADS HAPPYTO ADS HAPPYTO ADS HAPPYTO ADS HAPPY ADS Central Michigan Life • 436 Moore Hall, CMU, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 • www/cm-life.com AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES LOST & FOUND LOST & FOUND WANTED TOa RENT WANTED TO RENT NOTICES FOR SALE WANTED TO BUY HAPPY HAPPY ADS PlacingADS Classified Ad Classifi ed Ad Policy Classified Ad Rates WANTED TO BUY HAPPY ADS HAPPY ADS HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES HELP Dice!s Auto Scrap. UNWANTED VEHIGARAGE SALES FORWANTED RENT FOR RENT CM Life will not knowingly accept whichthem. reflects discrimination because of race, color, religion, CLES we buy advertising them we haul Rates: 15 word minimum per classified ad AUTOS FOR SALE SERVICES SERVICES By Phone: 989-774-3493 LOST & QUIET, FOUND sex orclean, national and CM Life reserves the right to reject or discontinue, without notice, advertising GREAT HOUSE. no origin, 989-772-5428. WE ARE PLEDGED to the letpets, studious women roommates. which is in the opinion of the Student Media Board, is not in keeping with the PETS standards of CM Life. CM Life will By Fax: 989-774-7805 Bold, italic and ter andPETS spirit of U.S. policy for 1-2 Issues: $7.75 per issue SPECIAL SECTION SPECIAL SECTION WANTED RENT WANTED TOof equal RENT $185/ month plus TO utilities. Summerfor typographical PETS be responsible errors only to the extent of cancelling the charge for the space used and the achievement housing centered type are By Website: www.cm-life.com 3-6 Issues: $7.50 per issue HELP WANTED GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES and school year. 773-9191. FOR RENT opportunity throughout the Nation. available along with rendered valueless by such an error. Credit for such an error is limited to only the first date of publication. Any 7-12 Issues: $7.25 per issue other special features Person: 436 MooreadverHall OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS WeIn encourage support an affirmative "HIDDEN OAKS GOLF Opencredit due can be picked up at the CM LifeCourse: office within 30 days of termination of the ad. If you find an error, 2 Master ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES tising and marketing program in which there 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 13+ Issues: $7.00 per issue like ad attractors. ings for bartenders, beverage cart,responsible for the first day’s insertion. it to the Classifi ed Dept. immediately. We are only Hours: Monday-Friday Bedrooms Each Withreport Personal Bath are no barriers toPETS obtaining housing because SPECIAL proshop, cart barn, SECTION grounds crew. ExPETS WANTED RENT Full Size Washer &TO Dryer Includes of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familperience helpful, apply in person Internet & cable 989-773-2333 ial status, or national origin. REACH MORE THAN 32,000 READERS DAY! ALWAYS OPEN AT WWW.CM-LIFE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS email Golf@HiddenOaksGolf.com." www.olivieri-homes.com REAL ESTATEEACH orPUBLISHING PERSONALS REAL ESTATE PERSONALS IMMEDIATE OPENING PART-TIME ROOMMATES TRAVEL MOTORCYCLES UNION MOTORCYCLES .com SQUARE APTS - 2 PER 2

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Across 1 Filled tortilla 5 “__ to the Chief” 9 Lincoln’s legendary log home 14 “Pronto!” initials 15 Killer whale 16 Barely ahead in the game 17 Elegant business garb 20 Spirited meeting? 21 Cell phone message 22 Building site 23 Seemingly forever 25 Office seeker, briefly 27 Elegant business dinner 34 Tolkien tree creature 35 Concerning a heart chamber 36 New York NFL team, familiarly 38 “__ is human ...” 40 Down with the mouth

41 “__, girl!”: words of encouragement 42 __-American 43 Quick on the uptake 45 Down in the mouth 46 Elegant business accommodations 49 Diplomat’s HQ 50 Captain of the Nautilus 51 Imitate 54 Pub order 57 Increase, as production 61 Elegant business reward 64 Smudge 65 Catchall abbr. 66 Heidi’s mountains 67 Mother-of-pearl 68 Not just one 69 Quiz, e.g. Down 1 Body art, for short 2 Tennis great Arthur 3 Dear, in Bologna 4 Warm-up act 5 “Heaven forbid”

6 Magnate Onassis 7 Rapper whose name sounds like a refreshing beverage 8 Tie, as shoes 9 Usual procedure 10 “The Simpsons” storekeeper 11 Heat, as water 12 Captivated by 13 Egg holder 18 Chevy Volt or Nissan Leaf 19 Kick out 24 Most certain 26 Danish toy block maker 27 Greek cheese 28 Wall switch words 29 Wombs 30 Cowboy’s rope 31 Galileo was the first to observe its rings 32 Cause to chuckle 33 Okay, in law 37 Okays with a head bob 39 Wander 41 Naval petty officer

43 Comparable in size 44 Wealthy group 47 __ State Building 48 Alley prowler 51 Part of NBA: Abbr. 52 Soft cotton 53 One in business who is no stranger to the elegant things in this puzzle 55 Feeling no pain 56 The Musketeers, e.g. 58 Global extremity 59 Strike callers 60 Annoying one 62 At a distance 63 Superlative suffix


March 26, 2012