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NO. 25 | VOL. 98

CENTRAL MICHIGAN

LIFE

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APR. 20, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS

DELTA PHI EPSILON We spoke with Athletic Chair and competitor, Paige from DPhiE. Tell us about the ladies on the team! We have quite a few sisters who are repeat players, whereas it’s my first year in the sorority so it’s my first year playing as well as Jenna and Tabitha (not in picture shown). We most all played high school sports and decided to play again. We had a lot of people who played floor hockey last year for the chapter and came back for the aggression. We have two captains, both Fraternity men, we asked them to help us because they’re hockey fanatics and we needed the help to know where to stand and what does a “crease” mean? All that type of stuff. It’s really laid back and luckily,

we all show up at the SAC with enough people to play. For our volleyball team we actually have practices, but hard between all our schedules to get a court and sticks for floor hockey, so we haven’t actually had any practices for floor hockey. We just show up for the games and hopefully remember how to hold the stick from last week. What has been the best memory competing with this team? I like the way all of us talk to each other and get the everyone’s mentality back up to where we all have the same goal. Clearly, we always want to win, but the main goal is to have a good time… and to be safe because in all of IM Sports this year we’ve always had an injury and we’re trying to stay away from that.

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

NEWS EDITOR EVAN SASIELA

11 Incoming SGA president Owens and vice president Sturvist discuss plans for next year

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR MIKAYLA CARTER

SOCIAL CAFE MANAGER SAM VAN CAMP

DESIGN EDITOR ASHLEY SIMIGIAN

PUBLIC RELATIONS

climate in the U.S. is more divided than ever before

13 Diversity and inclusion symposium discusses key trends, workplace environment

STREET SQUAD MANAGER MITCHELL HATTY

PAGE DESIGNER PAIGE BLAKESLEE

18 Alumnus, Washington Post editor discusses return to campus

PROFESSIONAL STAFF

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR SHELBY WEBSTER

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS DAVE CLARK

NEWS EDITOR GREG HORNER NEWS EDITOR SARAH WOLPOFF

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12 Community leaders say the political

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ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR ANNAH HORAK

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SPORTS 23 Baseball fell to Notre Dame in Clash at Comerica 24 Jake Peister devotes his track career to his childhood friend

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A SENATE: Faculty criticized President Ross for unequal budget cuts and avoiding deficit responsibility

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NEWS

APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Academic senators question equity of cuts, fault of deficit By Emma Dale Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Faculty in the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences said they are being unfairly impacted by the $20 million budget deficit and confronted President George Ross at the Academic Senate meeting on Tuesday. Academic Senators questioned Ross about budget details at the meeting April 18. While some expressed concern that certain colleges are receiving disproportional cuts, others accused Ross of evading responsibility for the budget shortfall. The president did not answer some questions, but continued to stress that the university prioritizes maintaining a strong financial base. Senator David Smith of the Philosophy and Religion department said he is concerned that CHSBS is facing the hardest consequences at the university. He questioned if all colleges are receiving cuts by the same standard. “The cut in my college is 9.4 percent,” Smith said. “Whereas the (student credit hour) projection is (decreased) about 5 percent. Other colleges experience a similar proportion in their cut, (while ours

has) nearly doubled.” Ross responded by saying he was unable to provide enrollment projections and cut percentages at the meeting. However, he encouraged senators to attend the Budget Deficit Forum where Joe Garrison, director of financial planning, will discuss the budget in more detail. The Budget Deficit Forum is at 3:30 on Friday, April 21 in French Auditorium. Smith stated in an email he is confident that Ross could have answered his question at the meeting. “The reason he wouldn’t answer, I suspect, is because the cuts to CHSBS are unfairly high,” he wrote is a follow up email to CM Life. Senator Mark Freed of the English Language and Literatures department directly confronted Ross with complaints of how administrators are avoiding responsibility of the budget deficit. In search for accountability, he asked whether Ross believed the administration made decisions that were financially detrimental to the university. “The faculty and (Academic Senate) are in charge of the curriculum,” Freed said. “That’s our job, we’re supposed to look after the curriculum. The administration is supposed to find the money to do it. You’re supposed to find the money to do what we think is

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Ariana Strzalka | Staff Photographer Senator Ian Mull expresses his concern regarding the university budget during the Academic Senate meeting on April 18 in Pearce Hall.

academically necessary.” Freed said Ross has implied that the college deans and departments are mostly responsible for the budget shortfall. “Rather than turning its back on the colleges with the fallout, I think the (Academic Senate) would like to know — what’s your sense of responsibility for the situation we’re in?” Freed asked. Because the university operates with the Responsibility Management Centered budget model, deans have greater authority regarding fiscal decisions. Ross

Budget deficit forum slated for Friday in French Auditorium By Evan Sasiela News Editor news@cm-life.com

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said some responsibility can be attributed to lower levels of the administration. “We made a conscious decision to go to a decentralized budget model,” Ross said. “We are so decentralized (that) I don’t make expenditure decisions in colleges. I don’t make expenditure decisions in divisions.” Although Ross asserted he does not make budget decisions within the departments, he said that he and the Board of Trustees are ultimately responsible for the financial health of the university.

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Vice President of Finance and Administration Barrie Wilkes and Central Michigan University’s Budget Priorities Committee will present an allcampus budget forum at 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 21 in French Auditorium. Administrators will provide data regarding how enrollment affects the budget. They will also address audience questions, according to a CMU press release distributed Monday. Last month the university announced it is facing a projected two-year budget deficit of $20 million. Monday’s press release states that the university will implement a 4-percent total base budget reductions. Wilkes said budget adjustments will be finalized next month. In the press release, Provost Michael Gealt and Wilkes said nearly 30 vacant staff positions will be eliminated. An estimated 24 staff members will be laid off. No regular faculty members are expected to be laid off. The university also will not offer a retirement incentive package. In addition, a staff rehiring/reclassification

freeze has been established and will be in effect through June 30. The release states, “This is especially important for unionized positions, to allow any bumping to be finalized.” The staff postings in progress will continue. Colleges and academic departments will adjust fixed-term faculty as they monitor course registration. CMU student credit hours have declined by 44,318 — or 7 percent — from a decade ago. Transfer student and online enrollment have also declined, the release states. The declines were: • Nearly 16,100 fewer credit hours taken in the College of Education and Human Services • More than 12,300 fewer credit hours taken in the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences • Nearly 11,000 fewer credit hours taken in the College of Communication and Fine Arts • A loss of 225 student credit hours in the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions • A loss of nearly 1,500 student credit hours in the College of Science and Engineering • A loss of nearly 4,600 student credit hours in the Master of Science Administration Program


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APR. 20, 2017

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OPINIONS

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APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

High time for change For years, the DEA has listed pot as a Schedule I drug, but it should be legal for all uses

EDITORIAL

F

or the past two decades, states and cities across America have legalized the use of marijuana for not only medical use, but recreational purposes. Despite those changes on the local and state level, the federal government continues to categorize marijuana as a Schedule I drug. This causes marijuana to be surrounded by misleading stigmas that pose issues socially and scientifically. Americans’ opinions about marijuana are changing. We think the federal government’s stance on it should reflect that. It’s time we, as a country, embrace the legalization of marijuana for all uses. According to Pew Research Center, 53 percent of Americans think marijuana should be legal, while 69 percent believe alcohol is worse for their health than pot. Michigan is among the 28 states with laws permitting use of medical cannabis. Eight other states have legalized recreational use of the drug. States who have legalized it for recreational use are beginning to witness the financial benefits of regulating and taxing the sale of the drug. Colorado is a great example of a state that is reaping some benefits of legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. The state took in $53 million in tax dollars from marijuana sales in

Ann Arbor Monroe Street Hash Bash Facebook | Courtesy Photo People gather and hold signs at Hash Bash 2015 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 4, 2015, on the campus of the University of Michigan.

the first year of legalization. Washington made more than $250 million in excise taxes in 2014, and legal pot sales in the U.S. were reported at $5.4 billion in 2015. History has shown that prohibition does not work.  Like the prohibition on alcohol, the country’s war on drugs, namely marijuana, has been ineffective at limiting the public’s access to it. Spend a weekend on this college campus and it becomes obvious that pot is not hard to find. If people want to smoke weed, they will. The war on drugs has cost the U.S. more than $1 trillion since 1971 and has created an illegal black-market marijuana industry. Instead of spending billions of dollars trying to stop marijuana use, the Drug Enforcement Administration should spend its resources combating the country’s opioid-addiction crisis

— America’s real public health concern. Prescription opioid and heroin overdoses killed more than 33,000 Americans in 2015, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. No one has overdosed on pot.  The DEA maintains its stance that marijuana has a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use and lacks an acceptable level of safety for use even under medical supervision. Researchers have found that marijuana has medical benefits for cancer patients and individuals suffering from other chronic pain, but there is not a lot of research on long-term and other recreational use. This is, in part, because the DEA has controlled much of the marijuana research done since pot was listed Schedule I in the early 1970s.  This is why it must be taken off the Schedule I list. We will never know all of the potential

benefits and risks of marijuana until the DEA stops limiting access to conducting research.  In the meantime, thousands of American lives are being incarcerated on simple marijuana charges every year. U.S. law enforcement agencies arrested 620,000 people nationwide for possession of marijuana in 2014, according to data released by the FBI. Possession of marijuana charges made up 44 percent of all drug-related arrests that year. In many cases, minorities are particularly targeted by law enforcement. A 2013 study by the ACLU concluded black users in Colorado were 3.75 times more likely than whites users to be arrested for possession of marijuana in 2013. It’s time we think openly about marijuana and stop mislabeling it. The benefits of legalizing it far outweigh the risks.


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017

WHAT YOU SAID W

ith vacant positions expecting to be terminated and staff members laid off, Vice President of Finance and Administration Barrie Wilkes and Central Michigan University’s Budget Priorities Committee will present an all-campus budget forum 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 21 in French

Auditorium in the Education and Human Services Building. Administrators will provide data regarding enrollment and the budget. They will also address any audience questions, according to a CMU press release distributed Monday. Here’s what you on social media you would like to see addressed Friday:

“If you really care about the quality of instruction at CMU, you should attend the budget forum and make your concerns known to the administration. (You should also go to), the Board of Trustees meeting. They listen to students.” - Tracy Brown

OPINIONS

“Cutting academics is a big “fuck you” to each and every student who attends this university. We pay so much money to get an education, but we see our education being prioritized lower than athletics and new buildings/programs.” - Sav Coltrain “So 54 jobs at CMU are gone and 24 people are being laid off, while 30 vacant positions are not being filled. Even worse, the lowest tier of faculty is being cut. No retirement incentive means young professors are being screwed and ones who could be incentivized into freeing a space for them by retiring won’t.” - Malachi Barrett

CM Life alumnus continues award-winning career as editorial cartoonist Drew Sheneman is an award-winning illustrator and cartoonist who got his start at CM Life at Central Michigan University in the late 1990s. Sheneman interned with Detroit News and The Oakland Press while in college. He currently works at The Star-Ledger in Newark, New Jersey. His work is syndicated nationally through Tribune Content Agency. He has been awarded The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists John Locher Award, The Charles Schulz Award from The Scripps Howard Foundation, the New York Society of Sheneman Professional Journalists and more.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Kate Carlson MANAGING EDITOR | Ben Solis OPINION EDITOR | Andrew Surma MULTIMEDIA EDITOR | Brianne Twiddy NEWS EDITOR | Greg Horner NEWS EDITOR | Evan Sasiela NEWS EDITOR | Sarah Wolpoff DESIGN EDITOR | Ashley Simigian

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College

Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


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APR. 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APR. 20, 2017

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APR. 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017

NEWS

New SGA president wants organization to be more involved By Haley Les Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

At 12:30 a.m. on April 4 the results came in. Midland senior Anna Owens jumped out of her chair and cheered as she learned she officially won the student body’s vote for Student Government Association president. Owens was elected SGA president for the 2017-18 academic year with her running mate, Cheboygan sophomore Derek Sturvist. “I’m just ready to get going,” Sturvist said. “I’m glad to be done with the campaign and am excited to do what we can.” Central Michigan University is grappling with a projected two-year $20 million budget deficit.  Because of this, Owens wants to transform SGA into more of a project-based registered student organization. “We want to make sure that we are using our budget and doing what we can to use the resources that already exist on campus,” Owens said. Owens said if SGA needs to go to the administration to see what type of money they need first-hand, it will do also.

Madeline Tunison | Staff Photographer Derek Sturvist, left, and Anna Ownes, right, pose for a photo on April 17 in the Bovee University Center.

ANNA OWENS Now that the election is over, Owens said she cannot wait to start making a change on campus.

“The election was very eye-opening,” Owens said. “I saw a lot of things and we heard a lot of feedback that was disheartening just to know all of the things that we should have been doing or even could have been doing better that we weren’t.” Owens said it is important to make sure that all RSOs believe their time in SGA is meaningful. This necessity was something Owens had started to realize while she was in the vice president position. “We want to make sure that we really are tapping into that resource so that we know what we can do to really improve the organization for next year,” Owens said. One of the main goals that Owens would like to achieve would be to get SGA more involved with the Mary Ellen Brandell Volunteer Center.  Next year, SGA will institute a volunteer coordinator position.  The position will work with SGA and the volunteer center to coordinate action the organizations can cooperate on, Owens said. The volunteer coordinator position is still available. SGA will meet when the new school year starts, so Owens and Sturvist want every RSO

on campus to be a part of SGA and appoint a representative to participate in SGA’s weekly meetings. “We want to make sure that we are reaching out and letting students know when the meeting times begin and also asking them what they want to see from SGA,” Owens said.

DEREK STURVIST After Owens and Sturvist saw how much they complimented each other, he agreed to be her running mate. Sturvist became involved with SGA after being elected a senator as a freshman. “I always thought it was a good channel for making change and a good way for staying connected on campus,” Sturvist said. Previously, Sturvist had been the SGA City Commission liaison and would like to grow the relationships with the City of Mount Pleasant. Sturvist said his goal for SGA is to make sure everyone is involved. “We really want to make sure that everyone in SGA understands what is going on and understands the ways they can navigate the organization,” he said.

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NEWS

12

APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Griffin Policy Forum discusses polarization in politics By Emma Dale Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Political disagreements today are no different now than they were in the past — there is just a stronger sense of divide in the country regarding the issues, said panelists at the Griffin Policy Forum. More than 100 people gathered April 17 in Powers Ballroom to attended the “Civility, Engagement and Polarized Politics” panel discussion. The forum featured five Michigan leaders as panelists, who discussed the extent and effect of polarization in American politics. All of the panelists have served as Griffin Endowed Chairs at Central Michigan University — a position created to honor men and women with an established history in public service. Those who have worked as a Griffin chair all share the ambition to build and strengthen political consciousness in the student body. Panelists included U.S. Sen. Gary Peters, University of Michigan professor and political

People don’t trust their political leaders. They think their political leaders have paralyzed the political process. (But) we the people have done it to ourselves. Craig Ruff, University of Michigan Professor

consultant Craig Ruff, former state representative Maxine Berman, Bill S. Ballenger, political reporter and creator of The Ballenger Report, and current Griffin Endowed Chair, Gary Randall. Power of the government is in the hands of the people, the panelists said. Ruff said while politicians are leaders, they are moreover followers of the people in their political party. “People don’t trust their political leaders,”

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Ariana Strzalka | Staff Photographer A panel of Michigan leaders at the Griffin Policy Forum discuss political issues in American government on April 17 in the Powers Hall Ballroom.

Ruff said. “They think their political leaders have paralyzed the political process. (But) we the people have done it to ourselves.” Berman said citizens need to take responsibility for the way politics has become divided. Many of the speakers agreed and said being active and engaged in political discourse is important. “This is why your activism is so important, which is a part of this forum,” Peters said. “It starts with all of you, it starts with your friends. We’ve got to get past this and find some kind of common ground before we’re going to be able to get through this issue.” Panelists agreed that polarization in the political climate is largely caused by social media, the amount of money spent during campaigns, gerrymandering and term limits within state government that don’t allow for the development of opposing party relationships. The panel discussed how partisan division in the U.S. that created such polarization only seems extreme today because of the role technology plays in society. News is consumed most frequently online, on social media such as Facebook. However, reading the news through social media has resulted in confirmation bias in readers, panelists said. Social media has “exasperated” problems that have always been there before, Ruff said. The digital age has brought on the highest concentration of political disagreement, and the public needs to be more realistic about what government can and cannot do, Berman added.

“Social media has made probably the biggest difference,” Berman said. “People (have) access to everything at their fingertips, momentarily, whenever they want. There is an obligation to try to filter through some of this, to be a little more suspicious.” Peters shifted the discussion toward gerrymandering, the manipulation of district boundaries to ensure people of similar political ideology are dominating certain areas during elections. He said it’s a serious issue because district election winners are essentially already decided before the general election even occurs. Grand Rapids graduate student Kayla Foley said the forum was helpful because it showed students and attendees how they can make a difference. “Just (by) seeing how issues directly affect the people who are actually (involved), it’s a learning experience at that point,” Foley said. “You can see (what) you can do, what things can be done to try to help build those bridges (and) what strategies those people (are using).” Grand Blanc junior Elizabeth Trombley said one reason she attended the forum is because she’s a strong supporter of Peters. She also wanted to take advantage of the opportunity to see established leaders discuss their perspectives and thinks it’s essential to be politically informed. “(People should) be involved in politics and government cause it’s what affects you,” Trombley said. “Even (at) a local level, not just nationally, just be involved in that — (don’t) just be a bystander.”


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017

NEWS

Diversity and inclusion symposium emphasizes awareness By Katelyn Chace Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Paying attention to surroundings was emphasized by Andrés Tapia, a senior partner for Korn Ferry Leadership & Talent Consulting, during his keynote address at Central Michigan University’s Diversity and Inclusion Symposium on Wednesday in the Bovee University Center Rotunda. The symposium highlighted trends of diversity and inclusion. It included Tapia’s keynote speech, breakout sessions and concluded with a lunch. Tapia discussed his book, “The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity.” Tapia is also a part of the Worldwide Speakers Group and is a senior partner and global solutions leader for the Workforce Perfor-

mance, Inclusion and Diversity Practice for Korn Ferry. During Tapia’s speech, he said he wants minorities in higher positions and said someone’s sexual orientation should not conflict with their work life. He made audience members interact and tackled social norms, Southfield sophomore Gabrielle Patmon said she was a little intimidated by Tapia at first, but enjoyed what he had to say “I had never been to a symposium before but it sounded really interesting,” Patmon said. “I am happy that I decided to go because it was a good experience and I feel like I learned something.” Patmon said she wants to start paying more attention to what is happening around her. She added Tapia helped her realize how she sometimes shuts out her surroundings. “(Tapia) made me realize that

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pelling Myths: Breaking Down Boundaries for Creating More Inclusive Environment.” Speakers included JoEllen Delucia, associate professor of English; Ulana Klymyshyn, emeritus in Inclusion and Diversity; and Katrina Piatek-Jimenez, professor of Mathematics Education. “I did enjoy (Tapia) and what he had to say but I really liked (Delucia’s) activity during her presentation,” said Canton Township junior Breanna Warner, who attended the symposium for the first time. “She handed out pieces of paper with a chart on it. The directions were to fill it out how I saw myself. For example, I put that I am a heterosexual white female. Then we were instructed to rank what we care about personally.” Warner said she enjoyed how the group leaders asked the audience how they felt about labelling themselves, and if anyone

Madeline Tunison | Staff Photographer Andrés Tapia speaks at the Diversity and Inclusion symposium on April 19 in the Bovee University Center.

unconsciously I put up walls around me to the outside world and I only focus on what is important in the moment,” she said. Patmon said she enjoyed when Tapia had the audience pick a goal for their day, week and year. Her goal for the day is to talk to a stranger, goal for the week is to have a conversation with one of her professors and her goal for

the year is to make at least six new friends by the end of the year. “It may not seem like much but I think if everyone put their best foot forward, things could be a lot better,” Patmon said. At the end of his speech, Tapia split the audience into two different groups to listen to others talk about diversity in their own way. One of the two options was “Dis-

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14

COVER STORY APRIL 20, 2017

Science vs. policy: Examining the clash over cannabis As marijuana becomes more socially accepted, scientists say federal regulations put an unnecessary strain on medical research.

By Sarah Wolpoff News Editor news@cm-life.com

Travis Welsh spends several hours a day attending his information technology classes and working. But by the end of his day, the pain from the arthritis in his knee begins to bother him. To treat his pain, Welsh, 22, retires to his room where he plants himself on his tattered leather chair and takes his medicine — a pipe-full of Blissful Wizard, his favorite strain of marijuana. “I’ll feel better in 15 minutes,” he said. “It seems very immediate compared to other (medications).” Welsh applied and received his medical marijuana card in May 2016 for a diagnosis of chronic knee pain from arthritis in his joints. Smoking

marijuana and “dabbing” concentrates are his preferred method of treatment. It’s entirely legal for him to possess his medication under Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Act, signed into law in 2008. Michigan is among most states in the U.S. with laws authorizing medical cannabis. Medical use of the plant and its flower buds to treat chronic pain and mental health disorders is legal in 28 states. Another 17 states allow limited uses, such as permitting less psychoactive varieties of marijuana for cases of epilepsy. While marijuana is still illegal by federal standards, researchers continue to suggest that cannabis provides strong pain and nausea relief for people with chronic disorders. They also propose its pain-killing elements can reduce opioid use and

addiction, improve quality of life and may even promote efficient thinking for patients. Researchers are also disclosing discoveries that the plant could benefit patients with muscle spasms and mental health disorders such as anxiety, PTSD and depression. The U.S. Department of Justice categorizes cannabis as a Schedule I controlled substance, the most restricted class of drugs on record. That means U.S. policy makers have determined that marijuana has no medicinal value and is considered as deadly and addictive as heroin and MDMA. With a Schedule 1 classification, research is difficult to conduct in America, which is falling behind in scientific advancements compared to other countries, said Yannick Marchalant, a neuroscience professor and

researcher at CMU. “It’s very hard to get licensed to do (research) with it,” he said. With these breakthroughs in mind, cannabis researchers from around the nation are making an argument for federal changes in the restriction and regulation of marijuana. While researchers agree there is a clear medicinal value of cannabis, they are unsure of its extent. As the drug’s popularity continues to skyrocket, they maintain that more research is needed to benefit the patients and recreational users who will undoubtedly continue to smoke.

BENEFITS AND DOWNFALLS, ACCORDING TO SCIENCE Its taboo status in America stems from a century’s worth of misinformation and dueling economic and

political influences, many of which are based in unscientific explanations of the benefits and downfalls of pot. In order to show any conclusive results of medical benefit, research has to be separated from political influence to observe its actual effects on the body. For starters, studies show that marijuana affects users by fluctuating excitation in certain areas in the brain. One area, Marchalant describes, is an axon in the brain stem that is responsible for sensing toxins in the body. Smoking cannabis “tampers with the sensation of toxicity” by making the region less active. “(Users) will tolerate toxins more,” Marchalant said. “It’s very good for patients that (need) drugs that are fairly aggressive for their treatment, but have side effects that


CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APR. 20, 2017

15

New laws bring clarity to medical marijuana in Michigan By CM Life Staff Reports

Josh Barnhart | Staff Photographer Laingsburgs senior Mitchell Brown takes a dab of marijuana concentrate on April 17 at 618 South Washington Street.

are making them sick.” Sometimes the science surrounding medical marijuana gets misrepresented by activists seeking a scientific sword to wield in the battle for legalization. Most researchers steadfastly believe medical cannabis does not treat illness. It can, however, be an effective form of temporary relief, Marchalant said. While it is beneficial to have a natural substance that alleviates pain, promoting it as a treatment for conditions is not based in fact. “A lot of people think it does everything, it’s a miracle drug,” Marchalant said. “Then you have the opposite where people think it’s not doing anything (and) has no medicinal value. Of course, the truth is probably right in the middle.” For example, there is a clear medicinal value for cancer and AIDS patients, Marchalant said. Marijuana is also an antiemetic, which can be used to help these patients eat when they lose their appetites. Due to its powerful pain relieving properties, patients and casual users will often self-medicate with marijuana, said Staci Gruber, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Gruber’s research is focused on the effects of cannabis on patients, specifically considering quality of life and executive functioning — the mental skill that enables people to do tasks and make conscious decisions. After three months of observation, Gruber found that patients were experiencing significant improvements in their quality of life. They reported feeling less general depression and improved sleep habits, along with greater social functioning. Her lab also found that patients using cannabis were improving in executive functioning abilities, being able to think more clearly, solving complicated puzzles and making faster decisions. She attributes these findings to symptom relief. “This is important because, with regard to what we know about recreational users, this is an area where we’ve seen (reductions in functioning),” Gruber said. Recreational users are known to smoke with intentions to get “high” at the expense of smooth thinking, Gruber explained. So, she finds these results especially intriguing. Gruber was one of three researchers presenting on current cannabis research

at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference from Feb. 16 - 20 in Boston. For now, she and other researchers strongly support medical marijuana for symptom relief purposes only. However, the “research remains in its infancy,” Gruber said, and further exploration of the plants medicinal value is critical.

THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE ON MEDICAL CANNABIS For Laingsburg senior Mitchell Brown, legal medical marijuana concentrates help him feel less nauseas in the morning, preparing him for a day on campus. Brown, 22, uses weed to treat irritable bowel syndrome, chronic headaches and depression. He also said the symptom relief offered by cannabis makes him a better student overall. “If I had to go to school and be uncomfortable all day, then I wouldn’t be as into it,” Brown explained. “I feel like I have a better learning experience than I would if didn’t (use cannabis).” Before Brown became a cannabis w WEED | 20

Gov. Rick Snyder signed a package of bills in December 2016 that constitute the largest change in medical marijuana laws since voters legalized its usage. Snyder’s approval of the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act sets up a process for regulating growers, processors, secure transporters, provisioning centers and safety compliance facilities. The MMFLA allows municipalities to opt in and pass their own regulations for dispensaries and other medical marijuana facilities in the jurisdiction. The act also creates a Medical Marihuana Licensing Board, which will consist of five members appointed by Snyder. This board will have the power to approve and renew licenses for medical marijuana facilities, revoke or suspend licenses and investigate individuals applying for licenses or complaints received about someone who is licensed. Michael J. Loepp, a communications representative for the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, said the act will create a process similar to how the state regulates liquor licenses.  Municipalities will be able to opt in and pass ordinances under the MMFLA on Dec. 15, and facilities will be able to request licenses after that date. Members of the Mount Pleasant City Commission expressed an interest in opting in at a meeting held with planning commissioners on March 13. On April 10, Mayor Kathy Ling appointed members to a medical marijuana committee that comprises 7 voting members and 3 staff liaisons. City Manager Nancy Ridley a “potential benefit” of allowing medical marijuana facilities to operate in Mount Pleasant would be an increase in tax revenue. She said the new laws improve statewide rules regarding medical marijuana, and she’s waiting for the committee will help sort out the MMFLA’s impact on the community. Municipalities can charge an annual fee of up to $5,000 on a licensee to help reimburse administrative and enforcement costs. Municipalities will be able to tax marijuana facilities like any other business

THE STATE TAX WILL ALSO IMPOSE A THREE PERCENT TAX ON DISPENSARIES. THAT MONEY WOULD BE ALLOCATED TO THE FOLLOWING:

30% 30% 25% 5% 5%

to the state to counties in which a marijuana facility is located, allocated in proportion to the number of marijuana facilities within the county. To municipalities in which a marijuana facility is located, allocated in proportion to the number of marijuana facilities within the municipality. to the Michigan commission on law enforcement standards for training local law enforcement officers. to the department of state police.


16

APR. 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017

NEWS

Psychology research focuses on leadership, urgency skills news@cm-life.com

The Industrial/Organizational Psychology program is working with Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine to research developing methods to train medical students teamwork and leadership skills in urgent situations. Texas graduate student Bailey Schrock said nurses, physicians and physician assistants are working together to save lives and sometimes fatal errors might occur due to a lack of training on teamwork and communication. This program is designed to help prevent these errors.

The research will test skills such as communication and leadership. This is done by administrating a situational judgment test created by the researchers. The test consists of scenarios that require critical skills needed for a job. Participants are required to rank multiple choice responses from most to least effective in handling situations. “We may describe a scenario where a co-worker has started arguing with you about who should perform certain tasks,” said Matt Prewett, the head of the research. “How should (a worker) respond to the situation?” The last two pages of the test

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consist of a self-report needed for comparison to the actual test results. Participants then view a lecture before completing the next step — the simulations. “One thing we are doing to prove that the situational judgment test is accurate in testing

one’s soft skills is evaluating students work through simulations,” Prewitt said. “If our test is correlating with soft skills, it should relate to students’ effectiveness in these scenarios.” There are two simulations involved in the situational

on qualities of environmental awareness, communication, team structure, mutual support and leadership. The situational judgment test is then administered after training to see if medical students improved on their soft skills. Prewett hopes the data will show the situational judgment test is valid and works well. The test would fill the hole in which there are no cost-effective assessments for evaluating soft skills in the work place. “This research has the potential to save lives if the skills learned in these scenarios are successful,” said Gainesville, Florida, graduate student Rusty Gillain.

17TH ANNUAL READER’S CHOICE AWARDS!

GAN I H C I M RAL

CENT

Mackenzie Brockman | Staff Photographer Texas doctoral student Bailey Schrock, left, Dr. Matt Prewett from the Psychology Department, center, and Florida doctoral student Rusty Gillain, right, pose for a portrait on April 13 in the College of Medicine.

judgment test. The simulations are recorded and judged by expert raters. The first simulation consists of a medical student who is assuming the role of a nurse. The student must correct the doctor when they ask for the wrong dosage of medicine. This test relies heavily on effective communication skills. The second simulation involves a medical student who walks in to see a collapsed mannequin with two frightened bystanders surrounding it. The job of the medical student is to demonstrate leadership and mutual support while the bystanders assist in CPR and call 911. Both tests are measured

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18

APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Washington Post editor returns to campus By Claire Kupris Freelance Reporter news@cm-life.com

The man who works with audience engagement at one of the biggest outlets in the country got his start at Central Michigan University. Mark W. Smith, an editor who deals with audience engagement at the Washington Post, returned to campus April 7-8 to receive the Department of Journalism Alumnus of the Year Award. The 2007 graduate also gave presentations at the Michigan Community College Press Association Conference. Smith previously worked at the Jackson CitizenPatriot, Detroit Free Press and USA Today. The former Central Michigan Life editor-in-chief also teaches journalism courses at the University of Maryland. CM Life spoke to Smith about his career and how he sees the state of journalism. CM Life: What was the biggest challenge while working for CM Life? Smith: The administration and us not having

a good relationship at the time. We did not have access and that was really hard. I do not think we ever really put our arms around a good strategy on how to make it better, we just had the role as chief instigator and it was a part of our role to always repair it. But the hardest part was access and apathy among student readers. How has your job as a journalist evolved since leaving Central Michigan University? My first job at the Jackson Citizen-Patriot was half working with the web and the other half of my job was print design. I am now on a team at the Post and we all have different specialties. You have someone who is focused on a social platform. It is important to have experts in all those places. What has changed is that it has become more robust and strategic. It isn’t about shoveling content onto a platform but really having an understanding about what that platform is and the kinds of content that should be created for it. Whether it is cutting a video for Facebook differently than for the “.com” or something else. It creates a lot of layers for work but it is important for whatever platform you are

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on that you are authentically there and are creating content that is truly honest for it. What would you suggest to aspiring journalists to focus on while pursuing a career in journalism? You just have to be more curious than the other people around you. Be curious about what is happening around you. If in your newsroom you see something happening or you have seen a Tweet take off in some way, ask about why that happened or how that happened or why they thought to do it in that way. If you are at your internship and there is something you do not understand, it should make you uncomfortable. Learn every piece. Learn how the newspaper people decide what goes on the front page or how the social team decides what goes on Facebook. Ask a ton of questions and be curious. You won the CMU Department of Journalism Alumnus of the Year. How does that feel? What does that mean to you? It is a great honor. I am very lucky to come from Central Michigan. I think this is a place where you can make an impact through sheer will and desire. I think you get to have experimentation here where you really can make a career if you are curious and make good connections with reporters and other people who work within newspapers. I gave everything to CM Life.

LIFE IN BRIEF

Binge Yan | Staff Photographer Mark W. Smith speaks during the Journalism Banquet on April 7 in Powers Ballroom.

What are your future goals? To figure out everything with the web and identify new forms of journalism in whatever platforms. It is easy to think that there is not much of a future in journalism, especially print journalism, but newsrooms are currently and will continue to be so hungry for new ideas and innovation. We need you, we need fresh ideas and there are plenty of places hiring. If it is something you really care about, getting news out into the world, there will be a position for you. I am excited to continue to help others figure that out.

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

SPORTS MANAGEMENT STUDENTS HOST ANGEL WINGS 5K FOR CANCER PATIENTS, FAMILIES Sports Management students are using their senior capstone project to support cancer patients and affected families. The 40 students in PES 480: “Integration of Sport Management Theory and Practice” are hosting the Angel Wings 5k Walk and Run on April 29 at Island Park near downtown Mount Pleasant. Registration for the race will begin at 9 a.m. and the run will kick off at 10 a.m. Angel Wings strives to make a positive impact for cancer patients and their loved ones. According to the charity’s website,

it helps families who have lost a parent to cancer through financial scholarships and raises awareness about cancer through education. The Angel Wings Fund has been the chosen beneficiary for the sports management capstone for five consecutive years. Jackson senior Logan Burns said the class hopes to raise $10,000 for their philanthropic cause. “It’s about supporting people,” Burns said. More than 60 participants are already registered to run, but the organizers hope to surpass 200 participants.

Registration is $20 for adults and $10 for children. There is also a family package for two adults and any number of children available for $50. Anyone can register for the event at www.eventbrite. com/e/5th-annualangel-wings-5k-runwalkregistration-32904427027.  There is also a GoFundMe account for those who cannot attend the race but still wants to contribute. Monetary contributions can be made at www.gofundme.com/ AngelWings5kRun. - Quinn Kirby, Staff Reporter


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patient, his doctor prescribed him an array of pills to treat his ailments. Ultimately, Brown was unhappy with the side effects of other drugs — particularly those prescribed for his bouts of depression. “Earlier in life, I didn’t like the way antidepressants and anti-anxiety (medications) were (working) in my system,” Brown said. “I felt like it dulled me to the world and didn’t make me a better person.” Brown was able to significantly reduce his use of pharmaceutical drugs. He no longer uses prescription pills every day and only takes them as needed. This is a common claim for people who use medical marijuana. Cannabis has been shown to help decrease use of pharmaceuticals in areas with legal regulation. Several researchers have reported that because the plant contributes to pain management, it can help reduce

APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM opioid use. Mark Ware is the director of clinical research at the Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit of the McGill University Health Centre. He also presented at the AAAS conference earlier this year. Ware said research shows that in areas with forms of legalized cannabis, opioid-based mortality decreased by 25 percent. “This is suggesting that patients who are using cannabis are able to, or seem to be willing to reduce their other medications,” Ware said. Gruber expounded on this point at the conference. Her research found a 15 percent decrease in antidepressant use in patients and 42.8 percent decrease in opioid use. Welsh said it’s important for medical cannabis to be accessible to all people. His argument is that patients should have options when seeking a treatment regimen that works best for them. Specifically, Welsh believes marijuana is a natural remedy with relatively mild side effects compared to pharmaceutical medications used to treat the

same conditions. “When taking (pharmaceuticals), it could do so much more to you than you really want it to,” Welsh said. “With cannabis, you really know what you’re getting into.” The trouble in promoting marijuana

as a medicinal substance comes from its psychoactive properties, or “high” feeling. Marchalant said this is the most concerning side effect of cannabis for legislators considering reducing the Schedule I classification. Simply put, the high is never a “good

thing” when marketing medication, he added. Getting high is associated with consuming THC, the strongest and most present cannabinoid, a chemical compound found in the plant. Ryan Vandrey, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at

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21

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017 John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, presented research at AAAS about the effects of different dosages and consuming habits. The negative consequences associated with marijuana include sleepiness, increased heart rate, hunger, paranoia, dizziness and nausea. Vandrey said these symptoms rarely occur and are often a direct product of higher THC content found in certain strains of marijuana. For Welsh, cannabis only negatively affects him when he smokes too much. “It’s like any medication, in moderation it’s fine,” Welsh said. Considering the effects of THC content, Vandrey said it’s important for cannabis users to have control of the dose while medicating. However, because the state and federal governments have implemented inconsistent policies, plant quality is poorly regulated. After testing products at dispensaries and comparing results to the labels, Vandrey’s research found that only 17 percent of legally sold marijuana products were accurately labeled. False labels were often lower than the actual THC content. “There’s concern over the lack of quality control and oversight of cannabis in the U.S.,” he stressed. “I think that’s something that needs to be addressed.”

WHEN POLICY HINDERS SCIENTIFIC ADVANCEMENTS Most states have legalized some form of medical marijuana, but because research is so restricted in the U.S., drug policy is outpacing the science. Brown said he doesn’t understand why the government isn’t more supportive of marijuana research, but does understand the contentious history of prohibition and propaganda shaping attitudes toward marijuana. Brown thinks the government should prioritize testing so it can take a definitive stance. Regulations tend to endorse cannabis products more if it emphasizes other cannabinoids such as CBD I and CBD II. However, while there is less of a psychoactive element in CBD, the medical benefits are also much more mild, Marchalant added. “The only way we can find out how good or poor it is for health in general is to try it out on the population,” he said. As more states pass medical legislation, the doors are opening for researchers interested in the observational effects of marijuana on behavior, Marchalant said. However, investigating the physical and medical components of the plant is much more difficult. If a researcher wanted to work with a marijuana plant, they would need to apply for various approvals and licenses. They can only get the product from one growing facility in the country, located at the University of Mississippi. The process can take years to complete.

“We live in a very pragmatic world,” Marchalant said. “If you take three years to conduct your research, your research will probably be dead by then.” Most researchers use synthetic THC in their labs in part because it is more easily accessible, Marchalant said. He suspects synthetic THC may be more impactful as a medication anyways, because it utilizes the benefit of one cannabinoid as opposed to the collective effect of 400 cannabinoids that are found in the plant naturally. Still, Vandrey maintains that marijuana is becoming increasingly popular and more widely accepted for recreational use, too. That said, there needs to be a healthy push in momentum toward studying the plant in whole. The disparity between federal policy and societal practices hinders research in a way that is disadvantageous to both users and science. Vandrey describes the struggles of cannabis research as a “catch-22.” Efficient studies to understand the effects of cannabis and how to properly prescribe it cannot be done until it is removed from the Schedule 1 category, he said. Yet, it cannot be removed until more research is done to support its benefits. “Efforts to try and reconcile this and to help put science in line with policy is important,” he said. Gruber agreed, and emphasized the need for more research on dosages, long-term effects and cognitive abilities is necessary for both medical and recreational users. “Research is knowledge and knowledge is power,” Gruber concluded at the conference. “I would always underscore the importance of more research in each of these areas.” Because marijuana is widely supported by the public and helps so many people with medical conditions, Welsh said it’s the government’s responsibility to let science happen. He hopes that science showing the benefits of medical cannabis will help continue the journey toward full legalization. Because the drug is becoming so socially accepted, he believes legalization is bound to happen eventually. “It’s not as big of a deal as it’s been made out to be in the past and people are finally realizing it,” Welsh said. “Trying to resist or advocate against it is a waste of time because legalization is inevitable. It’s only slowing the process.”

NEWS

Josh Barnhart | Staff Photographer Ph.D. student Tomas Barrett, of Ireland, writes information down while working in a laboratory on April 18 on the second floor of the Health Professions Building.

WATCH:

Central Michigan Life sat down with two medical marijuana patients as they smoke and discuss the benefits of pot. LittleCaesarsQTR01262017.indd 1

1/23/17 10:19 AM


SPORTS

22

APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Spring Game offers football a chance to introduce new system By Dylan Goetz Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

On April 22, the Central Michigan football team will have an opportunity to showcase its new-look offense to fans in the annual Spring Game. The game is scheduled for 1 p.m. at Kelly/Shorts Stadium. Coming off a season where CMU football earned a 6-7 record with a 55-10 loss to Tulsa in the Miami Beach Bowl, the Chippewas are aiming to bounce back with a new offensive system and quarterback. Since Cooper Rush has no more years of eligibility, head coach John Bonamego has assumed the task of finding a new quarterback to run the offense. Tony Poljan is leading the pack at the moment, but graduate transfer Shane Morris from University of Michigan may shake things up in the fall when he arrives.  For now, students and fans can expect Poljan to get the bulk of the snaps in the Spring Game in Kelly/Shorts Stadium.  While some players see the Spring Game as the most exciting part of spring practice, Bonamego described the game as a “dress-rehearsal” to prepare for the fall season. 

File Photo | Rich Drummond Head coach John Bonamego addresses the football team after their spring game on April 16, 2016 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Fans can catch a glimpse of the new spread offense that was implemented this spring, led by new offensive coordinator Chris Ostrowsky. He was the former head coach at Northern Michigan University, and led a team who averaged over 30 points per game last season. On National Signing Day 2017, CMU scored 26 recruits, almost double the amount of recruits brought in for the 2016-17 season (14). The 2017 recruiting class features 14 defenders and 12 offensive players. The class is also punctuated by tight end

Keegan Cossou, defensive lineman Johnathan Berghorst and safety Devonni Reed. This year also marks Bonamego’s third year with the team after being hired in 2015.

POSITIONS TO WATCH CMU lost 16 players to graduation, including their star quarterback in Rush. Bonamego said the running back position may be one of the team’s deepest positions. Running back Romello Ross will return to a crowded running back situation after missing the 2016-17 season

due to a torn ACL. Senior Devon Spalding is expected to lead the group, but Ross and sophomore Johnathon Ward could be battling for the No. 2 spot behind Spalding. “I try to help (the other running backs) out as much as I can and they help me out too,” Spalding said. “It is a brand new offense, (so) we are all starting from square one. I lead vocally and try to help the younger guys out as much as possible and direct the team in the way that I think is best. I say what I need to say, but I also lead by example as well.”

Another position battle that might play out during the Spring Game is between junior Tommy Lazzaro and freshman Austin Hergott who are dueling for the backup quarterback spot. Lazzaro has more experience than Hergott, but since there is a new offensive system, Bonamego said that they both have a chance. The Chippewas have an experienced receiving core returning, which is ideal for a spread offense. Bonamego said senior tight end Tyler Conklin has surfaced as a leader and starters Corey

Willis and Mark Chapman are returning at wide receiver. “We talk about getting the ball in the hands of our playmakers a great deal,” Bonamego said. “That includes that running back group and also our fairly talented wide receiver group. We have a good number of playmakers on offense when you look at (Corey) Willis, (Mark) Chapman, (Brandon) Childress, (Eric) Cooper and certainly Conklin who has emerged as a significant weapon.” Willis is returning with accolades as CMU’s offensive player of the year in 2016. He led the team with 71 receptions, 1087 yards and nine touchdowns last season. Conklin ranked third in receptions and caught for 11 touchdowns in his junior season. The team also returns many starters on defense. Senior defensive end Joe Ostman is back to help anchor the defensive line. Juniors Amari Coleman and Josh Cox are returning at cornerback and Sophomore Malik Fountain at linebacker. Bonamego said the safety position is one to look out for because there are multiple defenders fighting for a starting position after the graduation of Tony Annese.

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | APRIL 20, 2017

SPORTS

Five-run third inning dooms baseball in Clash at Comerica By Kullen Logsdon and Dylan Goetz Staff Reporters sports@cm-life.com

A five-run third inning blew open a scoreless game Tuesday as the Notre Dame Fighting Irish stormed past the Central Michigan baseball team, 8-3 in the Clash at Comerica in Detroit. Sophomore right-handed pitcher Michael Brettell (5-2) got the start for the Chippewas and was pulled after the third inning in which the first six batters reached base. The Fighting Irish (16-20, 7-11 ACC) scored on three RBI-singles and a bases-loaded walk to go up 5-0, digging CMU into a hole it could not recover from. Central Michigan drops to 19-17 on the season and has lost three of its last five games after winning seven straight. The Chippewas, however, remain in first place in the Mid-American Conference West Division at 8-1.  CMU has participated in the Clash at Comerica for seven-straight years. Previously, the Chippewas faced Michigan State in Comerica Park, which resulted in multiple dramatic results.  Zack Heeke described the opportunity of playing at Comerica Park as a “dream come true.” Alex Borglin also said even after four years, he still gets excited to play on the big stage. A total of 365 people were in the stands in Comerica Park on Tuesday. Head coach Steve Jaksa said that playing in the Clash of Comerica is a great opportunity for the players and good for the university.  After dropping two-straight games against Western Michigan and Notre Dame, CMU sits at 19-17 and 8-1 in Mid-American Conference play. Last season after the Clash at Comerica, CMU’s record was 7-26. CMU sits at the top of the MAC. Bowling Green is second in the MAC East Division with a 4-8 conference record. Game one starts at 3 p.m. on Friday, April 21 in Bowling Green, Ohio.

Josh Barnhart | Staff Photographer

Freshman infielder Zach Heeke stands on the deck circle on April 18 at Comerica park.

Mary Lewandowski | Photo Editor

Sophomore outfielder Ty Rollin, left, high fives sophomore catcher Evan Kratt, right, after Kratt scores a run during the Chippewas game on April 18 at Comerica Park.

Josh Barnhart | Staff Photographer The CMU baseball team huddles before a game April 18 at Comerica Park.


SPORTS

24

APRIL 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Childhood friend’s suicide helps fuel jumper’s athletic success By Jake Clark Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Every time Jake Peister competes, he pays tribute to his childhood friend. “I play for my best friend in high school who made the decision to take his own life,” Peister said. Peister’s friend, Joey, was a sophomore when he committed suicide. Joey was a fellow triple jumper on Peister’s track team who was dedicated to his sport and never missed practice. Joey’s passion for the sport has pushed Peister to excel on Central Michigan’s track team as the seventh-ranked triple jumper in the Great Lakes Region. When Joey didn’t show up to practice one Friday, Peister and Joey’s brother Cole knew something was wrong.  They came home to find Joey had hung himself in his garage. “His family came over and we took him down, then we called the police,” Peister said.  “(Cole and I) knew he had been bullied badly, and there had been a few attempts in the past. I thought that was all over. I was in the blind.” Cole was one of Peister’s best friends growing up

Josh Barnhart | Staff Photographer Junior long jumper Jake Peister sits in front of the landing pit on April 10 in the Indoor Athletic Complex.

as next-door neighbors in Blue Springs, Missouri. Joey was two years younger than Cole, and the three of them became inseparable in high school. “We came to each other’s houses for Christmas,” Peister said. “They were like family to me. (Joey) was like my little brother.” When Joey started high school during Cole and

Peister’s junior year, Joey joined track, soccer and football so they could spend more time together. Peister’s track team had a meet the day after Joey’s death. It would have been easy and understandable to sit out, overcome by grief to mourn his friend.  Instead, Peister decided to honor his friend’s memory by competing at his highest level. At that meet, not 24 hours after his best friend’s suicide, Peister broke the state record in triple jump. He said that as uncanny as it sounds, it was the motivation of Joey’s death that allowed him to compete to the best of his ability. Peister’s girlfriend, fellow sophomore and triple jumper Calli Stemple, says Peister still talks about Joey all the time. “We met freshman year while living in the same dorm,” she said. “After a few weeks of dating him, he told me about his friend. It’s what motivates him to do his best. “After he won the state title his senior year, he even put his medal on his gravestone. Even now he visits it all the time. That’s how big an impact Joey has on Jake’s life.” After Joey’s death, Peister dedicates every facet of his life to his memory. Not just in track, but how he lives daily.

“I want to make decisions he’d be proud of me for,” Peister said. “Every time I compete, if I have a bad day or if I’m just grumpy, I remember to live my life for him. I would want him to be proud of everything I do.” An example of Peister’s undying motivation to live his life in Joey’s memory is his dedication to church. The two went together every week, as it was a big part of Joey’s life. Peister, along with a few other Central Michigan track student-athletes, pray before every meet and practice. This is just one way he memorializes his childhood best friend. He, Cole and other high school friends also made a fundraiser for Joey’s mother, covering all of her funeral expenses. They have a scholarship for their high school for a single student voted upon by their peers. With that thought forever scarred on Peister, he swears to be the best person he can be, because he knows words can affect everyone you meet.  “I always wonder if there’s something more I could have done,” Peister said. “Maybe there was something more we could have done to help him.”

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Across Jim and Wanda both have some apples. If Jim gives Wanda an apple, they will both have the same number of apples. However, if Wanda gives Jim an apple, Jim will have twice as many as Wanda. How many apples do Jim and Wanda have?

ANSWER Jim has 7 apples and Wanda has 5 apples

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28. Fad pencil-topper doll, once 29. “The stage ___” 30. City where Canada’s parliament meets 31. IRS employee (abbr.) 32. Cue stick application 33. Pianist Watts 34. Yuletide song 38. Extend across 40. Rapa ___ (Easter Island, to natives) 41. Nebr. neighbor 44. Tempter 46. Excessive interest 49. Canine cry 50. Pin-cushion owner 51. City of northern Spain 55. Jeans name 56. Praise highly 58. Superman portrayer Dean 59. Stuff (in) 60. “As God ____ witness...” 61. Little one 62. Thurman of “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” 63. Tap gently 64. Georgia neighbor 66. Afternoon hrs. (Solution on the following page)


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28

APR. 20, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

April 20, 2017  

Central Michigan Life

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