Page 1

DEC. 1, 2016 

NO. 54 | VOL. 97

| 

M O U N T P L E A S A N T, M I

Identity crisis Anxiety, anger is the new normal as students grapple with race and gender intimidation on campus, throughout nation

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

KENNY ROGERS | DEC. 10 • A DICKENS OF A KILLING (A MURDER MYSTERY) | DEC. 23 I LOVE THE 90's TOUR | DEC. 27 • JIM GAFFIGAN | DEC. 28 • NIGHT RANGER/RATT | DEC. 29 LONESTAR/DIAMOND RIO | DEC. 30 • NYE 2017 CELEBRATION | DEC. 31 CLUELESS (A MURDER MYSTERY) | JAN. 5 • MIKE TYSON | JAN. 27 • THE PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE | FEB. 17-18 42588 SECR Dec Entertainment Strip Ad APPROVED.indd 1

SOARING EAGLE BOX OFFICE | ETIX.COM | 1.800.514.ETIX 1.888.7.EAGLE.7 | SOARINGEAGLECASINO.COM

11/28/16 6:26 PM


2

DEC. 1, 2016  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

STAFF

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DOMINICK MASTRANGELO MANAGING EDITOR KATE CARLSON NEWS EDITOR JORDYN HERMANI FEATURES EDITOR BRIANNE TWIDDY PRESENTATION EDITOR ZAHRA AHMAD SPORTS EDITOR ANDREW SURMA ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR GREG WICKLIFFE OPINION EDITOR BEN SOLIS PHOTO EDITOR MONICA BRADBURN

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR RICHARD DRUMMOND DESIGN EDITOR NATE MORRISON ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR ASHLEY SIMIGIAN PAGE DESIGNER LOGAN JOKISCH

6

COVER STORY

OPINION

3

One extra graduation ticket available for Dec. 17 commencement ceremonies

City commission addresses dangers at school crosswalks

5 A look at this past week in crime includes embezzlement

PUBLIC RELATIONS

12 A CMU alumnus was named the

new collections manager of Museum of Cultural and Natural History

MANAGER NICOLE ROBERTS STREET SQUAD MANAGER MADDIE DAVIS

ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR SHELBY WEBSTER

PROFESSIONAL STAFF

ADVERTISING

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS DAVE CLARK

MANAGER RAJAT TANEJA

SPORTS

NEWS

10

SOCIAL CAFE MANAGER SAM VAN CAMP

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR KAYTIE BOOMER

MANAGER LUKE ROGUSKA

NEWS

12

4

STREET SQUAD MANAGER MARANDA DONEY

MANAGER MAUREEN HAMELL

3

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS KATHY SIMON PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DAWN PAINE

SPORTS 13 Six football players earn All-MAC honors

16 Gymnastics looks to regain MAC title crown

DIVERSITY, INCLUSION ASSESSMENT: A third party firm presented research they conducted on CMU’s campus.

SPORTS: Junior guard Marcus Keene leads the country in scoring

EDITORIAL: A recount in Michigan assures the millennial vote mattered

Cover Photo by Taleen Markarian | Freelance Photographer Cover Design by Nate Morrison | Design Editor


3

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016

Consulting firm provides diversity, inclusion plan By Kate Carlson Managing Editor news@cm-life.com

CAROLYN DUNN

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE FOR INSTITUTIONAL DIVERSITY

look at nuances behind the statements in what people, Gealt said. Based on the individual interviews and focus groups, the first group of people expressed that CMU’s student body is not diverse. The majority of online responses said the opposite, but with discrepancies among CMU faculty and staff and African-Americans, who responded CMU as not being diverse. “I don’t think there was any surprising information (presented today),” said Carolyn Dunn, associate director of the Office for Institutional Diversity. “We’ve already been doing a lot of this work.” Dunn’s office has been working on an inclusion and diversity strategic plan and has been waiting for the results of this research before completing the plan, she said. “Changes at the university sometimes move at a glacial pace, but we’ve been waiting for these research results,” Dunn said. Implementing the committee focusing on diversity and inclusion initiatives is a major way Dunn thinks the environment at CMU will improve, she said. Gealt agreed, and said implementation needs to happen right away now that the results of the study are completed. Respondents in both groups felt CMU does value diversity and inclusion, but there was a feeling that more needs to be done, Evans said. Only 35-40 percent of online respondents felt diversity and inclusion were extremely important to CMU. “We want to have some things actually accomplished before the end of this year,” Gealt said. “Some things can be done relatively rapidly, while other things, like change in curriculum, will take a little longer.” For the university to be successful in making diversity and inclusion a priority, Gealt said they have to keep having town hall meetings and “keep the conversation going.”

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

EXTRA GRADUATION TICKET OFFERED FOR DEC. 17 COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES Students attending the Dec. 17 commencement ceremony will now be able to receive an extra ticket for the event. Ticket Central announced the additional ticket for graduates on Nov. 8 through students’ university email accounts. Graduates who need an extra ticket should contact Ticket Central by phone or email at (888)-347-3872 or

ticketcentral@cmich.edu. Students should have their student ID number ready when reserving the extra ticket. The additional ticket will be held at Ticket Central and can be picked up 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until commencement. The ticket can also be picked up on the day of commencement starting

at 7 a.m. For a $3 fee, graduates can also have their tickets mailed to them until Friday, Dec. 2. Additional information about the Dec. 17 commencement ceremonies can be found at www.cmich.edu/ commencement. - Jordyn Hermani, News Editor

LARGE PEPPERONI HOT-N-READY® ALL DAY, EVERY DAY!

MT. PLEASANT 324 S. Mission (989) 773-1121

E. WISCONSIN ST.

S. MISSION ST.

A town hall meeting presented results of inclusion and diversity research conducted on Central Michigan University’s campus by The Barthwell Group, a strategic managing consulting firm, Nov. 30 in Plachta Auditorium. The Barthlow Group presented their findings based off of an online survey sent out to the entire university and interviews and focus groups conducted with students, faculty and staff. The interviews and focus group participants selfidentified as being a part of under-represented groups such as women, LGBTQ, veterans, minority religions and racial groups, and people with disabilities. “CMU’s commitment to diversity and inclusion is unwavering,” said university president George Ross. “This assessment demonstrates our commitment at all levels of the university. We understand it’s important to periodically evaluate our initiatives, our operations and our services.” One of the recommendations the group made to improve the inclusion and diversity environment on campus was to implement a committee that would make inclusion and diversity a priority. Ross said this committee is something that the university will formulate. “The Barthlow consultants worked with four CMU liasons from various stakeholder groups from across the university,” said Michael Gealt, provost and executive vice president. “This (ensured) they could hear a wide ranging sample of the thoughts and perceptions of our faculty, staff students and the sample that they heard we believe is large enough to represent CMU’s population.” More than 2,500 participants took the online survey. About 60 people were interviewed and 13 focus groups were also interviewed as a part of the research. The study aimed at answering ‘What is the status of inclusion and diversity at CMU?’ said Akosua Barthwell Evans, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of The Barthwell Group. The research will also provide information on if CMU is an environment where every individual, regardless of differences, feels “valued and respected and is able to realize his or her potential,” Evans said. After data was gathered, it was analyzed from responses to each question and across the different interviews, focus groups and online responses to

“I don’t think there was any surprising information (presented today), we’ve already been doing a lot of this work.”

LIFE IN BRIEF

NEWS

HIGH ST.

LARGE PEPPERONI AVAILABLE ALL DAY HOT-N-READY® 4-8PM

LITTLE CAESARS® PROUDLY SUPPORTS CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

56624_mm_CLA_DDD_Central_CTRAP_4X4_Ad_4c.indd 1

Plus tax where applicable. Available at participating locations. ©2016 LCE, Inc. 56624

9/6/16 3:10 PM


4

NEWS

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

City Commission talks safety concerns, TimberTown 2.0 By Emily DeRuiter Staff Reporter

LAST CITY COMMISSION MEETING OF THE YEAR

news@cm-life.com

After a Sacred Heart Academy crossing guard was seriously injured this month when he was hit by a car, the Mount Pleasant City Commission wants to improve pedestrian safety. Parents urged the city to make school crosswalks safer and prevent future accidents during the public comment portion of Monday’s commission meeting. Joe Olivieri was one of the parents who asked for action.  “The fellow that hit him said ‘Sorry, I never saw him’,” Olivieri said. “It’s a tricky intersection (and it is) dark this time of year. We want to get the situation resolved before a kid gets hit.”

-

CAMPUS HABITAT !

WHEN:

7 P.M. MONDAY, DEC. 12

CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS MOUNT PLEASANT CITY HALL 320 W. BROADWAY ST.

WHERE:

City Manager Nancy Ridley said she appreciates the community’s input and officials have already been looking into making improvements after the incident took place. No plan is drafted yet, but one is in the making for all local schools.  Parents suggested adding

yellow school signs with lights to roads surrounding the only two non-public schools left without them. They also suggested better lights and vests for the guards might make them more visible, as well as signs and lights for the crosswalks. 

Central The sorting hat will tell us what house you belong in...

Fully furnished and including all utilities, Campus Habitat is surely the best house for you!

You send everyone to Campus Habitat...

806 W Broomfield St, Mt Pleasant (989) 317-0214

SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISING FOR TIMBERTOWN 2.0 With one more meeting left in the year on Monday, Dec. 12, commissioners are busy approving other items and preparing the city budget for the 2017 year.  One of the biggest budget successes was getting the funding for TimberTown 2.0, a large scale playground scheduled to be built in spring 2017. The Mount Pleasant community has donated and fundraised more than the original goal of $50,000. Coupled with a $50,000 match agreement and $75,000 from the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe as part of the two percent agreement, the community has raised more than the amount needed for the high-end remodel.  The commission voted to allow the extra funds left over to be set aside and used in other remodeling projects. For this purpose, the remodel is now budgeted for $351,500. “This will still leave us with enough funds to look at any additional enhancements the community is interested in,” Ridley said. “We will deal with those another night.” COMMUNITY BOARDS SPLIT, BUDGETS AND CONTRACTS APPROVED City commissioners voted to approve splitting up the Tax Increment Finance Authority Board and Downtown Development Authority board. Each board will have nine members, with seven crossover members.  The boards are designed to focus specifically on their area of the community. Crossover members are designed to help the two boards communicate effectively while being split. Other items passed by the

Mikayla Carter | Staff Photographer In this file photo, Mayor Kathy Ling addresses the audience about student voting and making it easier for students to get to the polls for election day on Oct. 3 in the Bovee University Center auditorium.

commission include a labor contract with the Mount Pleasant Association of Fire Fighters and the purchase or lease of property for easement control of airspace. A contract with the Michigan Department of Transportation was approved to use their local bridge funds to pay for the majority of refurbishes on a bridge along Pickard Road. The decking on the surface will be re-done to it’s original size, and the lanes re-striped. 

COMMUNITY COMMENTS Concern for local affairs

went beyond local government for some at the meeting Monday night. Ling intends to sign an open letter to Congress after a city resident on behalf of the Citizens Climate Lobby, which requested the City Commission’s support. The letter calls lawmakers to take action against climate change.  “I shared that with the commission and asked if there were any strong objections, and there were none so I intend to sign that,” Ling said. “Thank you to the Citizens Climate Lobby for bringing that to our attention.”


5

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016

NEWS

Police investigate financial fraud, traffic accidents admitted drinking and driving and was arrested. The damage to the light post cost an estimated $1,000.

By Johnathan Hogan Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Information on two financial fraud investigations was released this week by the Central Michigan University Police Department. A Nov. 9 embezzlement case involving a 55-year-old staff member who used university funds to buy personal building supplies is still being investigated. The total amount taken is still unknown, but it included at least $165 to buy wood to build a cabinet. The incident is also being investigated by Central Michigan University’s Human Resources Department. The CMUPD is also investigating credit card fraud at the MicroChips store in the Bovee University Center. The investigation began Nov. 18 after another law enforcement department arrested a man for credit card fraud and found a MicroChips receipt in his car. Police said the investigation may involve multiple suspects and thousands of dollars in fraud. The investigation remains open.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23 •

A 21-year-old woman was arrested near the intersection of Broomfield and Mission streets for driving without insurance and with a suspended license.

THURSDAY, NOV. 24 •

Police and an ambulance were dispatched to Woldt Hall for a student who was intoxicated. Police determined the student was not intoxicated enough to warrant an arrest or medical attention. While leaving, they found another man, 19, had entered the ambulance. He was arrested for disorderly conduct and minor in possession. Sweeney Hall staff called police after smelling marijuana from a dorm room. Police found several students in the room with 1.26 grams of the drug and a couple of pipes. One student, 18, admitted to owning the drug and was referred to the Office of Student Conduct.

A 22-year-old woman was located after telling a counselor at CMU she wanted to kill herself. She was found in Gratiot County near the location she said she wanted hurt herself at. The woman was unharmed. She was taken to a local hospital for a mental health evaluation. A desk worker in Kulhavi Hall said a student threatened her while entering the dorm. The worker asked the student for her student ID when the student said she was resisting the urge to jump over the desk and attack the worker. The incident was referred to the Office of Student Conduct. A 46-year-old man was cited for driving with a suspended license after he was pulled over near the intersection of High and Henry streets for driving with a suspended license plate. Mount Pleasant Police are investigating a larceny in which a man, 63, reported his son, 36, took several items from his home. The investigation is ongoing.

A 35-year-old man called a towing company after crashing into a light pole on West Campus Drive. When the tow truck driver arrived, the driver had left the scene. Police later located him at the address registered to the vehicle. He

A Rent-A-Center truck was found with graffiti on it. No suspect has been identified. A 55-year-old man reported someone had filed for unemployment benefits in his name with his social security number. No suspect was identified, and the man had no idea how his personal information got out. A 60-year-old woman was arrested for drunk driving near the intersection of Adams and Lyons streets after police pulled her over for leaving a driveway without stopping.

WHEN YOU SIGN A NEW LEASE

No App Fee ($50 Savings)

$200 Utility Fee ($50 Savings) $50 Gift Card

$280

ENTER TO WIN

FIRST MONTH

Free WiFi

Free Child Care

Opt-in online for text message appointment reminders and promotions.

4279 E. Blue Grass Rd. Mt. Pleasant 989.773.1500

2 tickets for Sun. Dec 11th @ 1PM

E S U O IN H

G N I S A E L y!

No Security Deposit

RECEIVE UP TO

A 21-year-old student in Northwest Apartments called police to report his roommate was smoking marijuana. The complainant told police he did not want the incident investigated, but wanted the police report to cite when requesting a new room. The roommate, 22, was a medical marijuana cardholder. A window was found broken near the CMU Bookstore loading dock. The damage was estimated to cost $200. No suspect has been identified. A traffic stop near the intersection of Adams and Fessenden streets led to multiple arrests after several of the passengers were found to have warrants for their arrest. The driver was arrested for driving without a license, the front seat passenger for violating probation by drinking, a woman in the back had warrants for her arrest from Isabella County, Gratiot County and Saginaw-Chippewa Tribal Police. Another woman had a warrant for not reporting to her probation officer, and a man in the back seat was arrested for possessing 5 grams of marijuana and 15 grams of cocaine.

SPIN TO WIN!

TUESDAY, NOV. 22

SUNDAY, NOV. 27 •

MONDAY, NOV. 21

t r a P

SDAY E N D E W ER 7TH

B G OFFICES DECAELLM LEASIN M-5PM IN

COLONY WEST DEERFIELD VILLAGE EMERALD VILLAGE JAMESTOWN POLO VILLAGE

9A

SOUTHPOINT VILLAGE UNION SQUARE WESTERN ISLANDS WESTPOINT VILLAGE YORKSHIRE

FREE FOOD!

(989) 772-2222 • Live with United.com


6

COVER STORY DEC. 1, 2016

Anxiety, fear & polarizing hate Students struggle to navigate post-election reality of nationalism, hate crimes and political activism By Dominick Mastrangelo and Ben Solis Editor-in-Chief and Opinion Editor

M

ost aspects of student life at Central Michigan University are measurable. Enrollment data guides strategic recruitment efforts. Grade point averages are used to help quantify a student’s level of academic success. Yet, there is no metric that can assess an aspect of campus life that has taken a sharp and unexpected turn this semester: A growing level of anxiety among some students about their campus and the country’s future. That anxiety, and conflict, has exhibited itself in different ways — a student rally, two reported incidents of racial intimidation and numerous sto-

Portia Brown Photos by Rich Drummond, Ash Seymour and Quinn Kirby

ries of students who say they are being ostracized for their political beliefs or lifestyles. Last month’s presidential election was a catalyst that served as a political line in the sand further separating an already fractious nation of unsatisfied citizens divided by generations, incomes, races and genders. As the semester winds down, students are preparing to leave a campus community working through an identity crisis. Shortly after they return to begin the Spring 2017 semester, President-elect Donald Trump will be inaugurated on Jan. 20. It seems anxiety may be the new normal for many students for the foreseeable future.

THE POLITICS OF HATE Politically active CMU students say they sometimes face a stigma created by what experts are calling a dangerously polarized discussion on civil liberties in America and a public university’s responsibility in protecting the rights of all students. CMU’s leaders are attempting to balance the free speech rights of students, faculty and staff against a growing anxiety among minority students that they will be further marginalized or threatened by their classmates. In conjunction with various university-wide administrators, the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equity must enforce CMU’s nondiscrimination policy with fairness and protection of civil liberties in mind. Temperance junior Sarah Jeffrey believes this election was a triumph for the conservative ideals of liberty and small government. Trump’s victory represents a rebuke to the liberal policies of President Barack Obama, providing a renewed hope in America’s economic future, said Jeffrey, who is an active member of CMU’s College Republicans. At the same time, Jeffrey said she and her friends don’t agree with some of the actions inspired by Trump’s win. “It breaks my heart, and I think we all have a responsibility to call out something that isn’t right,” Jeffrey said. “Hate won’t get us anywhere.” Still, the divide between Americans is bigger than the results of one election. In April, a Pew Research Center


CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016 poll concluded 86 percent of Democrats thought unfavorably of Republicans. At least 41 percent of those Democrats thought Republicans were a threat to the nation. Republicans had even stronger opinions about Democrats — 91 percent of respondents viewed Democrats as unfavorable, and 45 percent thought Democrats were an existential threat to America. Bridgeport senior Portia Brown said she felt a “chill in the air” on the morning after the Nov. 8 election. For her, and other students of color, that unease was justified. Much of President-elect Donald Trump’s campaign hinged on what they categorized as racist and xenophobic rhetoric aimed at Latinos, Muslim Americans and immigrants from both Latin and Arab countries. With Trump in office, and both legislative houses of the federal government controlled by Republicans, people of color, religious minorities and members of the LGBTQ community fear a reversal of policies that guaranteed them protections against discrimination. The anxiety and tension students are feeling is not without cause. Within days of the election, a wave of reported hate crimes and other racially-motivated incidents of harassment exploded across America. On Wednesday, the Southern Poverty Law Center released a report detailing 867 credible incidents of harassment, bigotry and hate crimes just 10 days after the presidential election. The report only collected face-to-face incidents, and not online harassment. Nearly 1,000 hate crimes in little more than a week. SLPC’s data shows 40 of those moments of outward hate happened in Michigan. Some of those incidents included: • An elderly man in Troy shouted racial slurs while assaulting a Chaldean woman. • Students at a DeWitt school laid down in front of a Latino students building a human chanting “Trump,” and “Build That Wall.” • A lesbian woman in Brighton was approached by two men who told her “Just so you know, we hate f----g d---s and so does our President.” • A man in Kalamazoo told an 18-year-old, black service employee: “I don’t need to ask you for sh--. Donald Trump is president.” He then called her a “black bi---” and spat on her shoes. The president-elect has stoked that uneasiness. On Tuesday, Trump tweeted federally-protected speech may now be open to reinterpretation during his term: “Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag — if they do, there must be consequences — perhaps loss of citizenship or year in jail!” Many members of minority groups, Brown said, are also worried about Trump-inspired hate crimes from Trump supporters attached to white nationalist movements like the Alt-Right.

7

“It is hypocritical when we have a campus that says one set of ideas are OK, and another group’s ideas aren’t. It hurts me as a citizen of this country. It’s become very hard to be a Republican anywhere.” - Sarah Jeffrey, Temperance junior “The rise in hate crimes, the rise in hateful language and bad attitudes are definitely connected to Trump,” she said. “People feel victorious, and Trump has given a stamp of approval on their hate.” When Jeffrey walks around campus wearing her bright red “Make America Great Again” hat, or anything else showing her support for Trump, she said she has also felt judgment from her peers and professors. “I have definitely had hateful words and glances thrown my way,” Jeffrey said. “I can say without a doubt I’ve never felt so uncomfortable voicing my opinion because of the backlash that’s come with this election cycle.”

TENSION IN THE AIR   On a cool autumn day, members of various campus minority groups shared concern for their safety and personal liberties to a crowd of about 300 people outside Warriner Hall while offering support to one another. In that Nov. 15 sign of solidarity, these students and Central Michigan Action committee members discussed the importance of facing gender and racial intimidation and discrimination head on. “I believe the protest was an awesome opportunity for people to feel safe and surround themselves with love and positivity after a rough week,” said Ty Bugbee, a Leslie sophomore and an organizer with CMA. “We don’t have any w ANXIETY | 8

Sarah Jeffrey


COVER STORY

8

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

ANXIETY | CONTINUED FROM 7

Our two bedroom apartments are the perfect size for those looking for more room to cast spells. They’re within walking distance to campus, have laundry in every building, and a dishwasher. And don’t worry about doing magic tricks to pay for bills, they’re all included!*

Park ParkPlace Place Apartments Apartments 1401 E. Bellows St. • Suite E7 • Mt. Pleasant (989) 772-4032 • parkplacecmu@pmapts.com *rent includes electricity, heat, A/C, water, sewer.

other actions planned, but I’d like to urge people that in order to change this atmosphere, we need to continue to show up and put in the work to elect progressive politicians who will serve everybody.” If Trump supporters held a victory rally at CMU in the same fashion, Jeffrey surmises she and her fellow Republicans would be viewed as supporting an administration that is accused of supporting white nationalism and misogyny. “It is hypocritical when we have a campus that says one set of ideas are OK, and another group’s ideas aren’t,” Jeffrey said. “It hurts me as a citizen of this country. It’s become very hard to be a Republican anywhere.” While some mocked the speakers and attendees who participated in the rally, the university’s Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equity has seen an increase in incidents reported since the election, confirmed director Kathy Lasher. It’s difficult to get a sense of what that means because Lasher said any information on those incidents ­— where and when they happened, a general explanation of the incident — is protected by federal law. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is designed to shield student education records from disclosure. Lasher would not confirm if OCRIE is investigating the two incidents reported to Central Michigan

University Police Department. She would not provide any other data on how many incidents have been reported since Nov. 8. “We can’t speak to specific cases if they’re involved in our office due to FERPA concerns,” Lasher said. Many other universities nationwide make investigation materials regarding complaints of gender or racial equity or sexual misconduct public, said Frank LoMonte, executive director of the Student Press Law Center. “It certainly is not true that student privacy covers generic information about the number of complaints,” LoMonte said. “FERPA applies to only individually identifiable education records. We know for a fact that when (for example) sexual assault is publicized, more people come forward.”   Central Michigan Life has submitted a Freedom of Information Act Request asking for any reports of OCRIE investigations of incidents involving racial or gender intimidation or discrimination. The university asked for a six-business-day extension in granting that request on Nov. 29. FBI statistics on hate crimes show Michigan was already experiencing racial violence before the 2016 election. Michigan was in the Top 10 for total hate crimes in America, with 373 reported hate crimes in 2015. On at least two occasions since the election, the CMUPD received complaints of racially-charged intimidation on or near campus. Two incidents were reported by students on Nov. 9. The first involved an African-American student walking on Washington Street who heard someone from inside a passing car scream at her “Trump won you f---ing n----r.” Later in the day, two African-American students confronted a white male student in the Towers Residence Real Food on Campus Dining Hall after he used a racial slur to address a group of AfricanAmerican women discussing Trump. Last year, CMU professor Mary Senter copublished a study of minority students cataloging their experiences with racism at CMU and in Mount Pleasant. Nearly 50 percent said Mount Pleasant has a problem with racism. Another 40 percent said CMU as an institution has the same problem. Brown said she doesn’t feel less safe at CMU since the election. Then again, she said she rarely feels safe anywhere. “I’ve been a black woman my entire life, so in this body, there are few places I feel safe at all,” she said. “That hasn’t changed in the community I live in now, nor the one I came from. But I did feel differently on Nov. 9. You could tell there was tension everywhere.”

THE UNIVERSITY’S ROLE OCRIE must enforce CMU’s nondiscrimination policy with fairness and protection of civil liberties in mind. University leaders are attempting to balance the free speech rights of students, faculty and staff against a growing anxiety among minority students that they will be further marginalized or threatened


9

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016

COVER STORY

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

Ash Seymour | Freelance Photographer

Attendees march during the “Walk Out Protest” on Nov. 15 near Warriner Hall.

by their classmates. According to CMU’s nondiscrimination policy, even if discriminatory actions committed against community members are considered not “unlawful,” CMU might take disciplinary action depending on circumstance. Though the intensity and focus of the conversation about race and gender on campus has changed, CMU’s policy in handling civil rights complaints has not. CMUPD Lt. Cameron Wassman said the department reported both incidents the day after the election to the university’s Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equity. “The university policy does not always require that the action is criminal,” said CMUPD Chief Bill Yeagley. “There are some things that do not rise to the level of criminal that university policy addresses.” The university’s protocol does not regulate the content of speech — including hate speech. To make a complaint, students must visit OCRIE on campus in the Bovee University Center. OC-

STUDENTS CAN CONTACT OCRIE AT 989-774-3253, AND REACH LASHER BY EMAIL AT LASHE1KM@ CMICH.EDU. STUDENTS CAN CONTACT CMUPD AT 989-774-3081.  RIE’s offices are located in Room 306. The complaint protocol states that OCRIE officials will students navigate the complaint process once there. As university officials grapple with this tide of rising tension, CMU professors will also struggle — just like their students — to make sense of it all. Some professors have banned any and all talk of the election in their classrooms just to avoid an outburst in hostilities. Some have canceled classes and fear for their minority students living in Trump’s America. “One of the problems is this country is that for many white people, being called a racist is somehow worse than people actually doing racial things,” said CMU political science professor and Civil Rights scholar Joyce Baugh. “This isn’t just about racial

or political polarization. I think what people have to understand is that there is real fear. “There are people who have family and friends who (may be targeted) and are afraid of what’s going to happen in the next administration.” Baugh also wants Trump supporters to understand the magnitude of that fear, even if they themselves aren’t racists. “What some people who supported Trump who say they’re not racist don’t realize is: by your vote, you’re saying racism and what Trump was saying isn’t important to you,” she said. “By your vote, whether you intend to be racist or not, you did something that helped to promote somebody and a vision for the country that is very hostile toward people of color and the LGBTQ community.”

Not just another showtime!

celebrationcinema.com/midnights “You knew I was waiting for midnight.” Groundhog Day, 1993

CelebrationCinemaQRT10272016.indd 1

10/26/16 2:14 PM


OPINIONS

10

EDITORIAL

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

MAKING SURE OUR VOTES MATTERED

Michigan recount worth time, money spent Throughout the 2016 campaign cycle, one question bothered Central Michigan University students voting for the first time: Do our votes matter? In print and online, we extolled our faith in the electoral process. For us, the election outcome was unfavorable – Central Michigan Life endorsed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. We have not lost faith in that process, blemishes and all. We accepted the results as fair. Now, nearly a month removed from Election Day, computer scientists and data analysts, including one from the University of Michigan, have called the credibility of ballots cast using electronic voting machines into question. Their evidence is shaky at best, but rumblings of tampering or some kind of random technology fault have made enough waves to set off calls for a recount. At present, Green Party candidate Jill Stein is leading the charge, raising nearly enough money to start recounts in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and our home state of Michigan. A recount won’t overturn Trump’s victory. But we should explore whether Michigan’s vote was fair and unhindered. We unequivocally support the recount effort based on principle alone. Recounting ballots that

show even a minute chance of fraud or alteration is necessary to protect the integrity of the electoral process – a process that we hold dear. Stein was expected to file her formal recount request on Wednesday. The federal deadline for Michigan to solidify their official electoral college votes is Dec. 13, making any recount effort a literal race against time. According to the Detroit News, missing that deadline could be costly, and state officials warn that taxpayers could end up footing the bill. Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson estimates that hand-counting the state’s 4.8 million votes could cost up to $2 million if the recount crosses over the December deadline. That money would pay for new recounting infrastructure, including staff and space, and that amount could change depending on how long it takes. Unlike Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, Michigan does not have established rules or an apparatus to conduct postelection audits to check the validity of the results, according to Marc Elias, the Clinton campaign’s general counsel. A post-election audit would look at a random sampling of precincts, tabulating those votes for a second time, and comparing those numbers with

Dennis Van Tine/Abaca Press/TNS Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein on Aug. 19, 2016 at the Holiday Inn Lower East Side, in New York City, N.Y. Stein has said she is pursuing a presidential recount in Michigan because of the number of blank ballots in Michigan’s presidential election results.

the initial election night results. Michigan is not alone – many other states refuse to perform such audits. Elias called that unfortunate. We agree. Each state should perform some sort of double-check to

ensure the accuracy of election night results. At the very least, have a plan on the books in case an audit is necessary. We call on state officials, our legislators and Gov. Rick Snyder to review Michigan’s

policy on post-election audits. All we ask is for our leaders to be responsible stewards of our democracy. We hope that they have as much faith in the process as we do.

The events of this election cycle have been wholly unprecedented. That’s still no excuse to be ill-prepared if irregularities and tampering sours the sanctity of our elections.


11

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016

OPINIONS

A major escalation in the war between bikers and walkers Every day the war rages on between bikers and walkers, and it’s evident that bikers have taken the lead. According to the CMU Bicycle Registration, bicycle riding is a one of the most popular ways of transportation on campus. However, there are more walkers. When bicyclists use the sidewalks as their own lane of traffic, it’s understandable when some students say that our sidewalks are too crowded. In the beginning of this year, my

Rachel Trombetta Columnist

roommate, who is a freshman, was almost hit by a bike while walking to class. Run down. On a sidewalk. She is not the only one who has almost been hit. Just this past week, while walking

to the Towers, a bike lost control on the train tracks, almost hitting a fellow college student. “We already have to watch out for cars, and now bikes too?” my roommate told me after her incident. “Something is wrong with this picture. They should not be allowed on the sidewalks unless they are walking their bike and going the same speed as the rest of us.” I agree, and believe that enough is enough. Us walkers have been pushed

off sidewalks with frowns and glaring eyes for the last time. There are specifically designated areas for bikers and walkers for a reason, and those rules should be followed. Bikers have a biking lane on most roads to begin with, but use sidewalks to weave in and out. Walkers only have one lane to walk on safely. We should not have to move onto the grass because someone with wheels can’t be considerate. And if

Even with poor sound quality, Bluetooth earbuds can come in handy During my freshman year, I used Bose wired headphones to listen to music, and it was a disaster. I learned then that when you walk to class, cords from your headphones shouldn’t tie you down. That’s where Bluetooth wireless headphones came in handy. They free up movement, and if you’re using earbuds, they hide discretely in your ears. And with the absence of a headphone jack in new iPhones, Bluetooth options are imperative. However, there’s one thing you need about this changing wireless market: Buying truly wireless earbuds, which lack any cord whatsoever, is a premature investment of your hard-earned money. Performance of these new types of earbuds is too inconsistent for me to comfortably recommend, so until the technology gets better, stick to corded Bluetooth earbuds for now. If you really want to take the leap into Bluetooth headphones, here are three great options for you to choose from,

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Dominick Mastrangelo MANAGING EDITOR | Kate Carlson FEATURES EDITOR | Brianne Twiddy NEWS EDITOR | Jordyn Hermani OPINION EDITOR | Ben Solis PRESENTATION EDITOR | Zahra Ahmad SPORTS EDITOR | Andrew Surma DESIGN EDITOR | Nate Morrison

Connor Byrne Page Designer

starting with the best wireless earbuds currently on the market. The best earbuds for the price are the Jaybird X2 earbuds. They are absolute beasts. Whether you use them while walking or during the hardest of workouts, these earbuds will not fail you. For the modest price tag, you get a volume and song select control, which also houses a microphone for wireless voice calls. These buds also tote sweat resistance, six tips and three sets of stabilizing wings. These wings situate the bud in your ear comfortably while offering more than enough stability during rigorous activity. These are an all around great choice for newcomers hopping on the

wireless bandwagon. The second-best product comes from Zivigo, a generally unknown manufacturer. You might not know who they are, but they rock the mid-range budget earbud market. At under $50, you cannot go wrong with their IPX7 water resistant earbuds. They, too, sport a mic controller and wing tips to keep them in your ears. This is a great option for users who want a compromise between audio and a budget price tag. Our third contender comes to us from a company called TaoTronics. These sweat-proof earbuds are a perfect option and are a steal for under $25. The battery life is going to be a fraction shorter than the previous two, and from personal use, can’t blast sound like them either. Nevertheless, the sound of money in your wallet will sound just just as nice. If you’re just entering the Bluetooth market, or need a set of buds to chuck into your backpack, this is the ultimate budget saver set for any user.

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

they want to continue using our lanes, it’s time for bikers to get horns or bells. This will allow better communication between those with wheels and those on foot. There will always be a war between bikers and walkers, but it’s time to even the playing field. Bikes are faster than a casual walker and thus should be held more responsible. If anything, bikers could at least give walkers a warning.

SHARE YOUR OPINIONS WITH THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY Central Michigan Life is now hiring Opinion Desk positions including Opinion Editor and columnists. VISIT MOORE HALL 436 TO APPLY.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College

Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Non-university subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


NEWS

12

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Alumnus returns as collections manager at CMU museum By Evan Sasiela Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

When Ron Bloomfield was a student in the early ‘90s at Central Michigan University, he planned on going into secondary education with degrees in English and history. He decided it wasn’t the career for him. While seeking an alternative career, he discovered the Museum of Cultural and Natural History at CMU. With a concentration in museum studies, he found a new passion. “I knew from that day forward exactly what I wanted to do — to work in museums,” Bloomfield said. Bloomfield, a 1993 CMU alumnus, spent 23 years with the Bay County Historical Society. Bloomfield decided to come back CMU as the collections manager at the Museum of Cultural and Natural History in Rowe Hall, the place that helped him discover his passion.

Bloomfield replaced Angela Riedel, who left the museum after eight years to work at Michigan Women’s Historical Center and Hall of Fame, on Nov. 14. “This was an opportunity to come back and work for this institution that helped me when I was young and also to be able to mentor students in the (museum studies) program,” Bloomfield said. When he was a CMU student, Bloomfield worked in the museum and is hoping to give students in the museum studies program the same opportunity. Bloomfield said he likes museums because it’s a different way to learn. “The biggest thing is when I see someone’s face and I see that ‘a-ha’ moment,” Bloomfield said. “You can take all the book learning that you want to and sometimes that doesn’t click with people. Museums are one of those places people learn differently.” Jay Martin, director and and curator at the Museum of Cultural and Natural

History, said he and Bloomfield formed a relationship years ago. They both shared an interest in Great Lakes maritime history preservation and research relative to Great Lakes shipwrecks. “I am very pleased to have Bloomfield rejoin the CMU team and bring his experience back to mentor students here as part of our museum studies program,” Martin said. The Museum of Cultural and Natural history houses preserves historical and CMU items.  The collections include natural history, historical items, geology and anthropology. Bloomfield is in charge of caring for the collections and trains students to work with the collections using database software. Bloomfield said the opportunity at CMU outweighed that at Bay County. Mike Bacigalupo was named interim director at Bay County Historical Society. Bacigalupo said he worked with Bloomfield on multiple projects for eight years in Bay County and called him “the most organized person he has ever met.”

Ash Seymour | Freelance Photographer Ron Bloomfield, 47, discusses his new position at CMU on Nov. 22. Bloomfield manages the collection at the Museum of Natural History, located in Rowe Hall, and is currently working on getting his masters degree in history.

“He is very down-to-earth, and is a smart and brilliant person, especially when it comes to the historical aspect of anything he talks about,” Bacigalupo said. Bacigalupo said Bloomfield asked him to take over his position and said he was honored to accept the position. While managing the collection,

Bloomfield will pursue a master’s degree in history while commuting from the Bay City area. “Bloomfield is the most passionate person when it comes to history (and artifacts),” Bacigalupo said. “I have never seen someone more passionate about his work than (him).”

LOWEST TIRE PRICES Guaranteed!

$

10 OFF

953 - TIRE

THE WORKS

At Krapohl Ford Mt. Pleasant

Servicing All Makes and Models


13

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016

SPORTS

Six Chippewas earn All-MAC honors, two on First Team By Austin Denean Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Six players were named to AllMid-American Conference teams Wednesday. Junior cornerback Amari Coleman and sophomore linebacker Malik Fountain were named to the All-MAC Defensive First-Team. Fountain led the Chippewas in tackles with 84 — 10 of these for loss. Coleman led CMU with four interceptions and 19 pass breakups, each of which are tied for the best in the conference. Junior wide receiver Corey Willis and junior defensive end Joe Ostman were named to the All-MAC Offensive and Defen-

sive Second-Team, respectively.  Willis finished the regular season with 69 receptions for 1,028 yards and nine touchdowns. The Holland native is the first Chippewa to have over 1,000 yards receiving since Titus Davis in 2014. Ostman led CMU with nine sacks and 13.5 tackles for loss. He was third on the team with 64 tackles. The St. Ignace native made the AllMAC Third Team in 2014. Senior quarterback Cooper Rush and junior cornerback Josh Cox were selected to the All-MAC Third-Team. Rush finished the regular season with 3,299 yards passing with 23 touchdowns and 13 interceptions. It is the second time he has made an All-MAC team. He was a SecondTeam offensive player last season.

Rich Drummond | Assistant Photo Editor Junior defensive back Amari Coleman jumps to tip a pass during CMU’s 49-10 loss against WMU on Saturday, Oct. 1 in Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Cox had three interceptions, four pass breakups and 45 tackles this season.

CMU will announce the bowl game the team is playing in on Sunday in the Indoor Athletic Complex.

Monica Bradburn | Photo Editor Sophomore Malik Fountain runs down the ball during the game against Toledo on Nov. 10, 2015, at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Staff Predictions: Bowl Game ANDREW SURMA SPORTS EDITOR

GREG WICKLIFFE ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

AUSTIN DENEAN STAFF REPORTER

Idaho Potato Bowl

Beach Bowl

Idaho Potato Bowl

After a disappointing end to the 2016 season, the Chippewas will limp to Idaho and attempt to avenge its 6-6 season with a bowl game win the Potato Bowl against 6-7 Hawaii. Although the Rainbow Warriors are not close geographically, they most closely line up for a competitive matchup. We’ll know for sure on Sunday, but for now, the Potato Bowl looks like it is where the Chippewas will end up in December.

The Chippewas finished the season with a 1-4 record after a 5-2 start to the season. CMU was able to become bowl eligible after a close win over Ohio. The MAC has six teams who are bowl eligible. Although heading to Miami isn’t the most geographically-convient landing spot for the Chippewas, based on their position in the MAC, it’s a possibility. If CMU plays in the Beach Bowl, it’ll probably face Temple, who is 9-3 on the season.

Dec. 22 | Boise, Idaho

Dec. 19 | Miami

Dec. 22 | Boise, Idaho

The Chippewas will get a chance to end their season with a winning record in a bowl game against a Mountain West opponent. Since Boise State has spent most of the season ranked in the top 25, the next closest team geographically will be Wyoming, who finished its season 8-4. Regardless of opponent, CMU will have an intriguing matchup against an opponent that isn’t likely to appear on the schedule anytime in the near future.


SPORTS

14

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Junior guard leads nation in scoring through first quarter of season By Evan Sasiela Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

Rich Drummond | Assistant Photo Editor

Though Marcus Keene stands at a mere 5-feet9 inches tall, the Central Michigan men’s basketball junior guard makes his presence known in the scoring charts. Through eight games, Keene leads the NCAA with an average of 30.4 points per game. After tying his career high with 36 points in the Chippewas’ 91-81 win over William & Mary on Tuesday, Keene remains at the top of college basketball’s scoring list. The Youngstown State transfer exited Tuesday’s contest averaging 30.4 points per game, leading the next-closest scorer, Alec Peters of Valparaiso, by five points per game. Keene scored 23 points in the second half Tuesday, bolstering his average. The San Antonio native has helped the Chippewas tally a 6-2 record to start the season.  “I honestly feel like I’m in a rhythm right now,” he said. “My teammates are finding me and I’m also creating for myself but right now it feels like I’m in a good rhythm and I’m going to stay with it.” After playing high school basketball at Warren High School in San Antonio, Keene enrolled at Youngstown State, where he led the Penguins with 15.6 points per game in the 2014-15 season. He shot 167-of-372 from the field — good for 45 percent. Following a physical altercation with a Youngstown State teammate, Keene decided to transfer to CMU after the 2015-16 season. He joined forces with former Texas high school opponent and senior guard Braylon Rayson of Dallas.  Rayson said he and Keene knew one of them would be the nation’s leading scorer this season — it was just a matter of who. Eight games into the season, Rayson said he is not jealous of his backcourt mate. “It’s crazy he’s doing it,” Rayson said. “It’s like a dream come true.” Keene was forced to sit out the entire 2015-16 season due to NCAA transfer rules. He was not allowed to travel with the team and could only participate in practice as a scout team player. After watching CMU amass a 17-16 record from the sideline, Keene replaced former MidAmerican Conference Player of the Year runner-up Chris Fowler at the point guard position. He has been held below 30 points in only two games this year — a quarter of CMU’s games


15

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | DEC. 1, 2016 thus far. He scored 23 points in a win over Marygrove College on Nov. 17 before leaving with a lower body injury. He returned in the Chippewas’ next game against Pepperdine in the Lone Star Showcase in Cedar Park, Texas, and netted a career-high 36 point with family members in the audience.  While Keene has shown he is able to drive to the hoop against contact and knock down long-range 3-pointers, he said the key has not been changes to his game, but confidence in his ability. “I’ve got a lot of confidence in myself (and) in my shot to where I know I’m going to be shooting the ball a lot for our team. I know I can get going with a lot of shots like that,” Keene said. “It’s more just putting in a lot of work and confidence with me.” Head Coach Keno Davis said he noticed in practice last season his squad had trouble defending Keene as a scout team player. However, as Keene’s name makes sound waves across the country, Davis said Keene can’t be expected to keep up at this pace every night. “To be at the level that he’s at, it’s not even fair to think he can maintain that level,” Davis said. “He’s going to have great nights and he’s going to have subpar nights. That’s just a part of being

a basketball player at any level, but it’s nice he’s been able to lead us to start out the season.” Keene said he understands he has weapons such as Rayson and junior guard Josh Kozinski who can score as well. “It’s not all about scoring with me,” Keene said. “I try to show people I can also play the point guard role. If teams start adjusting and not letting me score, (Rayson) is going to step up even more (and Kozinski) is going to step up even more. They can’t guard all of us. If they try to slow me down, they’re not going to slow (everybody else) down.” Keene had chances to set his career high on Tuesday, but missed several free throws down the stretch. Keene said he wasn’t mad about missing out on a new career high, but for missing shots he knows he’ll need to make later in the season. “I can’t miss those,” he said. “The reason why I can’t miss those (is) because when the games are closer and there’s one-and-one (free throws) that seal the deal, I’ve got to make those. That’s why I’m mad that I missed those free throws — for later on down the road.” Keene is able to score, but he said his personality also separates him from the pack. “I do get mad, but I also smile a lot because I feel like that makes the other team mad if I’m

SPORTS

Rich Drummond | Assistant Photo Editor Junior guard Marcus Keene, right, attempts a layup during the game against William & Mary on Nov. 29 at McGuirk Arena. Keene finished the game with 36 points.

smiling and also scoring,” Keene said. “I like to smile but I do get mad sometimes too. That’s just me. I like to smile. I’m always smiling.”

Keene and the Chippewas face ArkansasPine Bluff at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3, at McGuirk Arena.

Invitation to Worship

DIRECTORY OF RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS

Brew of the Week

TRULY BLOOD ORANGE ABV: 5%

• A light citrus sweetness • Has the crisp taste of sparkling water. TRY TRULY BLOOD ORANGE AT OUR TASTING ON THURSDAY, DEC. 1ST FROM 3-5PM.

$8.99/6 PACK Between Dec. 1 st — 4th

(989) 772-2310  705 S MISSION ST, MT PLEASANT

Christ The King Lutheran Chapel

1401 S. Washington Street, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 Phone: (989) 773-5050 Sunday Service: 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Service: 7:30 p.m. www.zionchristtheking.com

His House Christian Church

211 West Broomfield Street Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858 Phone: (989) 772-0013 Sundays @ 10am - Church Thursdays @ 7:30pm Pearce Hall 128 www.checkouthishouse.com

Rosebush United Methodist Church 3805 School St. Rosebush, MI 48878

Phone: (989) 433-2957 Sunday @ 10:00 am Monday @ 6:00 pm www.rosebushumc.com

JOIN OUR DIRECTORY LISTING, CALL (989) 774-LIFE


16

SPORTS

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

STAR STUDDED ENTERTAINMENT

CALL 1.800.514.ETIX, VISIT ETIX.COM OR THE SOARING EAGLE/SAGANING BOX OFFICE DEC. 10

TICKETS START AT $34

DEC. 23

TICKETS START AT $44

$50/PERSON • $90/COUPLE

DEC. 28

DEC. 27

DEC. 29

DEC. 30

TICKETS START AT $49 TICKETS START AT $18

TICKETS START AT $18

DEC. 31

JAN. 5

JAN. 27

Rich Drummond | Assistant Photo Editor Sophomore Kasey Janowicz flips during her beam routine during the meet against Western Michigan University on Feb. 21 at McGuirk Arena.

Gymnastics looks to regain Mid-American Conference title By Travis Olson Staff Reporter sports@cm-life.com

$60/PERSON • $100/COUPLE

$50/PERSON • $90/COUPLE

TICKETS START AT $24

FEB. 11

FEB. 17–18

TICKETS JUST $25

SOLD OUT

EAGLE CONCERT EXTRAS DAY OF SHOW:

• $20 IN PREMIUM PLAY* • 15% OFF KIDS QUEST** • FREE DESSERT OR APPETIZER WITH PURCHASE OF ENTRÉE AT SINIIKAUNG STEAK & CHOP HOUSE** *With purchase of two or more tickets in person at the box office prior to the day of show. Total ticket purchase must be valued at $20 or more. Cash or credit sales only. **With ticket purchase.

ENTERTAINMENT ROOM PACKAGES AVAILABLE WATERPARK PACKAGES STARTING AT

189

$

RESORT PACKAGES STARTING AT

229

$

PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS THEN CALL 877.2.EAGLE.2 TO BOOK YOUR ESCAPE!

Get your tickets at the Soaring Eagle box office, etix.com, or call 1.800.514.ETIX

42588 SECR Dec Entertainment CM Life APPROVED.indd 1

11/28/16 6:48 PM

Its season won’t start for another month, but the Central Michigan gymnastics team has its eyes set on regaining the Mid-American Conference Championship. In his 29 years as CMU’s gymnastics head coach, Jerry Reighard has led the team to 14 MAC championships and a winning record in 16 of the past 17 seasons. Last season, the Chippewas finished with a 12-3 record, good for third in the MAC behind Eastern Michigan (1st) and Kent State (2nd), with a conference record of 4-2. The Chippweas season ended in the NCAA Regionals last season with a fifth-place finish, placing them above MAC-rival Kent State. They finished the season ranked 33rd in the country.  The key matchups for the Chippewas this season will be on the road against Kent State

“The goal every year is to win the MAC regular season and tournament championship. The seniors this year look to step up and help lead the Chippewas to the goal.” Jerry Reighard, gymnastics head coach

on Feb. 19 and at home against Rutgers on March 5. Kent State and Central Michigan have been at the top of the MAC for the past 20 years. Only twice in the last two decades has a team other than CMU or KSU won the conference championship. “The goal every year is to win the MAC regular season and tournament championship,” Reighard said. “The seniors this year look to step up and help lead the Chippewas to the goal.” CMU will have to replace Karlee Teet, Jordan Charrette, Taylor Bolender and Megan Lamphere. 

Key returners for the Chippewas will be sophomore Kasey Janowicz and junior Katy Clements. Janowicz was named MAC Freshman of the Year and named to the All-MAC Second Team last season. Janowicz competed in all four events last season, averaging 38.983 points combined in each meet. Clements was also named to the All-MAC Second Team last season. She averaged a 9.75 on beam and a 9.643 on vault. The gymnastics season begins at 1 p.m. on Jan. 8 at McGuirk Arena against Wisconsin EAU Claire/Hamline.


17

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  y  CM-LIFE.COM  y  DEC. 1, 2016

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

SUDOKU

CLASSIFIEDS

To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 - 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column or box. The more numbers you can figure out the easier it gets to solve!

C M - L I F E . CO M /C LA SS I F I E D S

436 MOORE HALL, CMU, MOUNT PLEASANT, MI 48859 P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805

1-2 ISSUES: $8.50 PER ISSUE 3-4 ISSUES: $8.00 PER ISSUE 5-8 ISSUES: $7.75 PER ISSUE 9+ ISSUES: $7.50 PER ISSUE

15 WORD MINIMUM PER CLASSIFIED AD BOLD, ITALIC AND CENTERED TYPE ARE AVAILABLE ALONG WITH OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES LIKE AD ATTRACTORS.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED! COACHES NEEDED

CMLife, CMU’s nationally recognized student media company is always on the lookout for students with great energy and initiative. Apply Today! Moore Hall 436. (989) 774-LIFE

RentAtCMU@com 2nd semester house rental 2 & 4 students Please see online or call Jeff (586)634-1085

for Mid-Michigan Industries (MMI). Assist individuals with various abilities deliver CM Life newspapers two mornings a week – Monday and Thursday.  Other coach positions available as well.   Call MMI and ask for Human Resources at (989) 773-6918 or visit mmionline.com for more information. ICTC/I-Ride is accepting applications for a Vehicle Technician. Starting wage $13.00-$20.23/hr. Candidates must have clean driving record, ability to obtain a Commercial Driver License and DOT physical card. Office located at 2100 E. Transportation Dr., Mt. Pleasant ICTC/I-Ride is scheduling interviews for part time Call Center Operators. Candidates must have customer service skills, computer experience and a desire to assist our community members in providing quality transportation. Call 989.773.2913 ext. 123 to schedule.

FOR RENT 1-6 BEDROOM APTS. Available Immediately. FREE WIFI & Cable, Furnished or Unfurnished, Short Term Leases, Roommates Needed. www.LiveWithUnited.com or (989)772-2222 OAKRIDGE APARTMENTS 1 & 2 Person Full Size Washer & Dryer Free Internet & Cable (989)773-2333 www.om-apts.com UNDER CONSTRUCTION--New 4 BR/4.5 Bath Townhouses, over 2000 sq. ft.! Live large in the Most Luxurious Townhomes in Mt. Pleasant! 773-3890

ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT available immediately! Old Mission Apartments - Very Clean and Spacious. Broadway & Brown Apartments (989)772-3887, broadbrown.com PLEASANT AND SOCIAL female grad student seeking a responsible, focused, and respectful female grad student as a possible roommate May 2017-2018. No pets! Call or text Lindsay at (989)488-0388 if interested. NOW RENTING FOR 2017-2018 YEAR!!!

Prime locations near campus! 1-7 Bedroom houses, apartments and duplexes available starting at $280 per person.Check out our website www.partloproperty.com or call 989-779-9886 to make an appointment to see a property today!

CHERRY STREET TOWNHOUSES ** Walk to Class / Walk Downtown **

CONSTRUCTION SPRING 2017

HERITAGE SQUARE

NOW LEASING!

**Walk to Class / Walk to the Cabin **

FALL 2017 2-6 PERSON HOUSES AND APTS

TOWNHOUSES

FREE INTERNET! FREE CABLE! NO FEES!

2-4 PERSON 4 BEDROOM

TONS OF AMENITIES AND FREEBIES

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED ON THE WEST SIDE OF CAMPUS

FREE CABLE, INTERNET, MICROWAVE, WASHER, DRYER, DISHWASHER

•4 Bed, 2 Bath • Dishwashers • Washer & Dryers

OM-APTS.COM

•3 or 4 People • Central Air • Patios

CALL TODAY! 989-773-2333

CALL TODAY! 989-773-2333

CALL TODAY 989-773-2333

or go to www.olivieri-homes.com

TEXT OMAPTS TO 41411

or go to www.olivieri-homes.com

NEW!

$0 DEPOSIT DOWN! 4, 5 & 6 Bedroom Townhouses • • • • • •

Furnished or Unfurnished FREE High-Speed Internet WALK TO CLASS! FREE Cable TV 24 Hour Maintenance Full Size Washers & Dryers

2, 3, 4, 5 OR 6 BEDROOM APARTMENTS & TOWNHOUSES

Starting at

$245/month

WWW.AMGHOUSING.COM • CALL 989.773.3890

apartment management group

$0 DEPOSIT DOWN & FREE: • Laundry • High-Speed Internet • Cable TV •

apartment management group

Shuttle Service to Campus • Basketball Court • Sand Volleyball

4 BR 4.5 Bath!

Starting at

230/month

$

www.AMGhousing.com • Call 989.773.3890


CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  y  CM-LIFE.COM  y  DEC. 1, 2016

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

Ask about the

CLASSIFIEDS

25%

C M - L I F E . CO M /C LA SS I F I E D S

this could be your message

15 WORD MINIMUM PER CLASSIFIED AD BOLD, ITALIC AND CENTERED TYPE ARE AVAILABLE ALONG WITH OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES LIKE AD ATTRACTORS.

CROSSWORD

e

CHRISTMAS ITEM

One coupon per household per day. Cannot be combined w/ any other offer. No cash back void if copied. EXPIRES 12/17/16

436 MOORE HALL, CMU, MOUNT PLEASANT, MI 48859 P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805

1-2 ISSUES: $8.50 PER ISSUE 3-4 ISSUES: $8.00 PER ISSUE 5-8 ISSUES: $7.75 PER ISSUE 9+ ISSUES: $7.50 PER ISSUE

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

2 BEDROOM DOWNTOWN LOFT apartment 20ft ceilings, brick walls all amenities available in May. Year Lease. Call Tiffany at (989)621-4980

TWO SPRING SUBLEASERS for Jamestown Apartment!!! 2 bedroom, 1 bath, ground floor available. Free wi-fi, cable, gym membership & tanning for the whole semester. Call (616)446-7633 for details!

2 - 2 BEDROOM HOUSES available on attractively landscaped property. Appliances (washer, dryer, range, refrigerator, & dishwasher) are included. Attached garage, utilities & horseboarding not included. Interested? e-mail: extra.ideas@hotmail.com 2-4 BEDROOM HOUSES AVAILABLE NOW with a short term lease option. Move-in ready. Please e-mail amy@labellerealty.net or call (989)817-4935.

LOOKING FOR A ROOMMATE? If you want a roommate who is responsible and pays bills on time. Roomates come in all shapes and sizes. The deal is finding the right person for you! Open up to the possibility of connecting with potential roommates with a classified ad in Central Michigan Life. (989) 774-LIFE.

21. 22. 26. 30. 34.

54. Pickpocket, e.g. 57. Perform again 62. Element in electrodes 63. Locale for King Arthur 66. “We’re in trouble” 67. Moore costar 68. Person with a handle 69. Ilk 70. Red-faced 71. City near Grenoble

Down 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Tailless rodent Zest Loan stats Japanese port Lesley Gore’s “You Don’t ___” In pandemonium Chapeau Poet’s “before” Suburban mail rte. Notes in major chords

11. Make ____ check 12. Pope of 903 13. Mechanical force measurer, for short 18. Rattletrap 21. London’s Big ___ 23. Hill dweller 24. Middle pt. 25. Beatles album 26. In reserve 27. Tiny tribesman 28. Oncle’s wife 29. Looking for, in classified-speak 31. Raines and Fitzgerald 32. Monetary unit of Africa 33. Gapes 38. Jazz legend Fitzgerald 40. Skeptic’s comeback 41. Zodiacal roarer 44. Sask. neighbor 45. Lo-___ (not HD) 46. Festooned 49. “The Threepenny

Opera” writer Bertolt 50. Gen. Pershing’s command 53. Towel off again 54. Shih ___ (Tibetan toy dogs) 55. “____! Cherry-O” (Milton Bradley game) 56. “____ out?” (question to an indecisive pet) 58. Salt on a chemist’s table 59. “Dear ____” 60. ‘63 Liz Taylor role 61. Aquatic bird 63. .ZIP alternative 64. Sch. in Stillwater 65. Cologne conjunction

SUBLEASER NEEDED FOR Spring Semester Tallgrass Apartments. $405/m. Gym nearby, large backyard, full kitchen, W/D, large porch. Bussing to campus available. (989)860-6399 2017-2018 LEASING 1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS one block from the Health Professions Bldg. Heat, water & trash included. 517-749-5532. Take over my lease -- looking for a female to take over my lease. Must meet roommate and managements approval. References required. 231-313-3230. Email lynn062557@yahoo.com BEAUTIFUL CLASSY HOME 4 BR, 2.5 Bath, 2 fireplaces, W/D, dishwasher, Jacuzzi, & garage. Across from Alumni House, yet a quiet setting! Available 2017-2018. (517)204-1604

Emojis Explain... Having to drive to the Fitness Center

^

Grumpy

Tallgrass Fitness Center close by

FOR RENT LOOKING ANOTHER

FOR ROOMMATE?

If you want a roommate who is responsible and pays bills on time. Roomates come in all shapes and sizes. Every color in the rainbow! The deal is finding the right person for you! Open up to the possibility of connecting with potential roommates by a classifieds posting.

NEED A SUBLEASER? List it in the CM Life Classifieds. Call (989) 774-LIFE to place your ad. HOUSING CLOSE TO CAMPUS!! 1-12 bedroom houses, apartments & duplexes for rent. Available 2017-2018. Call (989)773-8850, ext. 204 or 245. www.labellerealty.net LARGE 1 & 2 bedroom apartments on Chippewa River. Call 400-8358. Available NOW! TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT Quiet atmosphere 2 blocks from Meijers Washer/dryer $650 989-773-7370

Polly Wanna Color!

)

35. 36. 37. 39. 42. 43. 47. 48. 51. 52.

Pinnacle Orangish yellow Broke the news Purina product Quay Disney duckling Like pop “Bring ___!” San ___, Marin County Concert cry Standoffish Of the eyes Ultra Large African lake, once PC key Pasture land Pay no mind Sleeper’s headrest Music video channel Pasternak heroine Singer Rimes Observed Comes up short Bring back in

D:

1. 5. 10. 14. 15. 16. 17. 19. 20.

MIGHTY MINI

soldanspet.com

1-5 BEDROOM HOUSES & apartments. Close to campus and downtown. 989-621-7538 for appointment

Across

POWER of a

ANY ONE

OFF

‘‘

18

Calm

NEW 10,000 SQ. FT. FITNESS CENTER

People are much more likely to respond to ads in color.

NO $$ DUE AT SIGNING 989.779.7900 www.TallgrassApts.com

436 Moore Hall • (989) 774-LIFE www.cm-life.com


19

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  y  CM-LIFE.COM  y  DEC. 1, 2016

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE

436 MOORE HALL, CMU, MOUNT PLEASANT, MI 48859 P: 989-774-LIFE F: 989-774-7805

1-2 ISSUES: $8.50 PER ISSUE 3-4 ISSUES: $8.00 PER ISSUE 5-8 ISSUES: $7.75 PER ISSUE 9+ ISSUES: $7.50 PER ISSUE

15 WORD MINIMUM PER CLASSIFIED AD BOLD, ITALIC AND CENTERED TYPE ARE AVAILABLE ALONG WITH OTHER SPECIAL FEATURES LIKE AD ATTRACTORS.

FOR RENT

LOOKING FOR A ROOMMATE? Place an ad in the Central Michigan Life Classified Pages. www.cm-life. com or Call the Central Michigan Life office at 989-774-5433.

989-774-5433

www.cm-life.com

CHINA GARDEN

“ Th e To p 1 0 0 C h i n e s e R e s t a u ra n t i n t h e USA ! ” Voted #1 Chinese restaurant in Isabella County

STUDENT

SPECIAL combination

plates

available!

Dine-in or Carry-out

(989)

773-9858

located in the stadium mall

You can Walk! 1200 W. Campus • 3-4 Bedroom Townhomes • Free Internet & Cable • Two Bath • Practically on Campus

Appian Way

• 3-4 Bedrooms • New Countertops • Washer & Dryer • Close to Campus

• New Appliances • New Hardwood/ • Vinyl Floors

UNION SQUARE

3 & 4 PERSON APARTMENTS | STARTS AT $340

ONE PER $525 | 2 PER 2 BED $310

NO DEPOSIT

• CABLE • WI-FI • SHUTTLE • GYM & TANNING • WASHER & DRYER • DISHWASHER

(989) 773-7272 www.LiveWithUnited.com

Let us be your first choice in urgent care

High St

Bellows

Houses & Townhouses 2-8 Bedrooms CALL FOR APPOINTMENT

(989) 779-9099

ONE BLOCK NORTH OF CAMPUS

DEERFIELD VILLAGE 2, 3, 4 & 5 BEDROOMS | STARTS AT $285

FREE • CABLE • WI-FI

NO DEPOSIT

• GYM & TANNING MEMBERSHIP • SHUTTLE

JAMESTOWN 1, 2, 3, & 5 BEDROOMS | STARTS AT $225

FREE

FREE

• GYM & TANNING MEMBERSHIP • SHUTTLE

• GYM & TANNING MEMBERSHIP

• CABLE • WI-FI

NO DEPOSIT

Phone # (989) 817-4650 Mon through Fri 9am to 9pm Sat 9am to 6pm

(989) 773-9999 773-9999 www.LiveWithUnited.com www.LiveWithUnited.com (989)

SOUTHPOINT VILLAGE FREE

NOW OPEN 520 N. MISSION, MT. PLEASANT

$3 PARTY BUS RIDES EVERY 6TH RIDE FREE

RENT STARTING AT $395

No need to find parking, Readers from all around the area have found their homes in the CMLife Classifieds.

(989)-400-0070

Douglas St

1, 2, AND 3 PERSON Duplexes & Apartments 2017/2018 - Close to campus. Locally owned and managed. No hidden fees, No application fee, No utility fees. www.qualityapts.com 989.772.3894

Mission St

F

OF AMIL MI Y Visit D MI., P FO C o O wwwur webs (989) TCA 77 .fam ite fo R ilyf r help 5-850 E oot ful h care ints 0 .biz !

ALWAYS SAFE, FRIENDLY & COURTEOUS • OPEN 24/7 • CREDIT CARDS, VENMO, SQUARE, CASH ACCEPTED

Arnold St

C M - L I F E . CO M /C LA SS I F I E D S

We Save SOLES!

S Washington St

CLASSIFIEDS

Mission Urgent Care

ELITE TRANSPORTATION OF MICHIGAN

(989) 772-2222 www.LiveWithUnited.com

• CABLE • WI-FI

NO DEPOSIT

• SHUTTLE

(989) 775-5522 www.LiveWithUnited.com

WESTERN ISLANDS WESTPOINT VILLAGE YORKSHIRE COMMONS 4 BEDROOM TOWN HOMES | 2 1/2 BATHS | STARTS AT $410

1 OR 2 PERSON | 2 BED 2 MASTER BATHS | STARTS AT $355

FREE

NO DEPOSIT

• CABLE • WI-FI • GYM & TANNING MEMBERSHIP • WASHER & DRYER • DISHWASHER LOCATED BEHIND MOORE HALL

(989) 772-2222 www.LiveWithUnited.com

2 BED APTS, 2 & 3 BED TOWNHOMES, 2 BATH | STARTS AT $330

FREE

FREE • CABLE • WI-FI

NO DEPOSIT

• GYM & TANNING MEMBERSHIP • SHUTTLE

(989) 779-9999 www.LiveWithUnited.com

NO DEPOSIT

• CABLE • WI-FI • GYM & TANNING MEMBERSHIP • SHUTTLE • POOL & HOT TUB

(989) 773-7272 www.LiveWithUnited.com


20

DEC. 1, 2016  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

FINAL FOUR

CHAMPIONSHIP Visit Facebook.com/URecCMU to vote now for your favorite team to win the IM CHAMPIONSHIP! Voting ends Sunday, Decemeber 4th!

WEEK 1: Grand Fam WEEK 4: Mineral Springs WEEK 1: Sweeney Strikers WEEK 3: Emmons Strikers

IM SPORTS LEADERBOARD TEAMS PLAYED ON Ryan Hager Alex Kraft Omar Baiyasi

10 8 8

GAMES PLAYED Ryan Hager Omar Baiyasi Aaron Beach

43 38 35

WINS Evan Crank Aaron Beach Omar Baiyasi

SPORTING RATING* 27 27 27

Lydia Wetters Ian Kirkpatrick Mitchel Bailhe

4.17 4.17 4.17

*6 OR MORE GAMES PLAYED

The

HAPPY A FREE FRIDAY GROUP FITNESS CLASS

Turbo Kick

P A L T S A L IN ROSE POOL A FREE event for all ages! Saturday, Dec. 10th @ 10:30am - 2:00pm

AQUA FITNESS CLASS SWIM RACES CANNON BALL CONTEST OPEN SWIM PRIZES FREE STUFF AND MORE!!

A combination of kickboxing and dance moves with a unique blend of intervals and strength/endurance training.

DECEMBER 2nd @ ROSE 134

5:30pm

GROUP

Email fikse1ag@cmich.edu for more information

Visit Facebook.com/URecCMU for more

Dec. 1, 2016  

Central Michigan Life