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Life

ALL EYES ON TIPTON

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Football leaning on running back’s strength with inexperience at quarterback»PAGE 3B

THURSDAY, AUG. 22, 2013|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 1 VOL. 95

CMU looking to hire President Ross a housekeeper

Check out our website redesign Monday, Aug. 26.

WHAT'S INSIDE

By John Irwin Managing Editor

Central Michigan University is searching to hire a new housekeeper for President George Ross’ universityprovided residence. The part-time position, open to anyone with prior housekeeping experience, pays $13-$15 per hour for 18-20 hours of work per week, according to the job listing on CMU’s website. Duties listed include making sure “all areas of the home including deck and porch are clean, neat and tidy.” Significantly decreased on-campus undergraduate enrollment this year

UNIVERSITY

INSTA-VIBE

up after 12 or 14 people — actually, our largest crowd inside has been just north of 50 people. So, there’s a housekeeper that maintains the president’s residence.” George Ross Asked what kind of message hiring a housekeeper sends at a time when departments are beginning

to cut back and not fill positions, Ross said he hopes it sends a positive one. “I hope it sends the message that CMU is moving forward,” he said. “It would be no different, in my mind, in saying to you that we’re not going to have custodians in this building cleaning up these offices. It’s just another university building. I expect it to be clean.” Ross called the housekeeper position standard not just for CMU but for most colleges and universities throughout the state. w ROSS | 2A

A Lifelong Journey

John Meixner

CMU PROFESSOR ARRESTED OVER SUMMER TO TEACH IN FALL AS PLANNED Philosophy professor John Meixner was arrested this summer for disturbing the peace after taking photos of young women. w 3A

has left the university with an $18 million budget deficit. As a result, as Ross noted at July’s Board of Trustees meeting, “some vacant staff and faculty positions will not be filled” in the months and years to come to offset declining revenue. Housekeeper is not one of those positions. “It’s not new to the president’s house,” Ross said during a Monday meeting with Central Michigan Life’s editorial staff. “We entertain extensively in that house, and that’s why there’s a housekeeper. My wife doesn’t work here. I do. I’m not going to clean

One couple’s story of overcoming cancer and competing for their dream wedding By Tony Wittkowski Metro Editor

CHECK OUT THE TOP 13 HEADLINES FROM LAST YEAR Eric Fisher, student abduction, dumpster fires and more. w Section D

Life inside

Students worry as tuition, student loan rates increase

»PAGE 6A

Cody Kater named starting quarterback for 2013 season »PAGE 1B

Remembering Josie

»PAGE 4B

17, 800

LOOKING BACK

According to numbers released by Central Michigan University, oncampus undergraduate enrollment is projected to drop 5 to 7 percent this year to between 17,300 and 17,800 students, even though 22,023 applications for on-campus fall enrollment have been submitted to the university as of Aug. 15. According to university officials, that puts applications at an all-time high, despite the drop in enrollment. Interim Director of Admissions Kevin Williams said it’s not a case of the university turning more students away, but rather more students are applying to CMU and then selecting another university. “Along with our many competing public colleges, there are private colleges and community colleges. There are several options to choose from,” Williams said. “We need to get in front of these students, because it is truly a buyer’s market out there.” Now more than ever, Williams said, CMU needs to become increasingly competitive. “Students can shop around for the best option, the best scholarship market,” Williams said. “You have to be proactive; our financial aid packages need to be top-notch, the scholarships we offer have to be top-notch.” Vice President of Enrollment and Student Services Steven Johnson said another reason for declining enrollment is because, with a fully-online application process, more students are beginning the application process and choosing not to finish. “The goal is always to get students to finish that process, yet you will always get students who, once they make the determination to apply, they might not choose to continue that,”

ENROLLMENT BY THE NUMBERS 18, 686

NEW YEAR, NEW WEBSITE Read background on the CMU website changes along with student reaction. w 8A

By Ryan Fitzmaurice Senior Reporter

Catey Traylor

201 2-1 3 Pro 201jected 3-1 4

NEW LOOK

Enrollment numbers fall, number of applicants rise 19, 357

WELCOME WEEKEND POSES NO PROBLEM FOR CAMPUS, LOCAL POLICE Police say they will handle this year’s festivities as they have in the past. w 5A

Taylor Ballek| Photo Editor St. Johns senior Pete Maniez and fiancee Michelle Boog laugh as Pete creates a “meme” Tuesday night to encourage friends on Facebook to vote for them in the Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort Dream Wedding Photo Contest. Currently, they are in first place with 17,965 votes. For more photos of Pete & Michelle, check out cm-life.com.

19, 368

WELCOME BACK

201 0-1 1 201 1-1 2

CHECK OUT YOUR FAVORITE SUMMER PHOTOS IN OUR INSTA-VIBE FEED! You sent us your best photos— see if they made the cut. w 2C

Sitting in their first apartment together, St. Johns seniors Michelle Boog and Pete Maniez begin to run through the various obstacles they have come across in the past decade. The constant subject between the devoted couple is the abnormal growth found in Michelle’s brain in April 2011. “Originally, they had diagnosed Michelle’s pains as migraines,” Pete said while sitting next to his girlfriend of nine years. “But when they chose to do an MRI to doublecheck, they found a tumor, and we were told it was brain cancer.” Out of all the people in the doctor’s office, Pete said it seemed like Michelle was the least scared in the room. w WEDDING | 10A

On-campus undergraduate students

Johnson said. “I can tell you a large number (of students) start the financial aid process and don’t complete it.” Johnson said the university did not deny more students admission this year than in years past. “We did not raise university standards,” Johnson said. “But, we definitely did not lower the university standards.” Williams said he is confident that the university will be able to raise its enrollment to a desirable amount, though that number has not been determined as of yet. w ENROLLMENT | 2A

Center for Inclusion and Diversity

Editor-in-Chief

New year, new look, new paper Over the past couple of years, Central Michigan Life, Central Michigan University’s premier news source and your student voice since 1919, has begun to stray from its primary audience: CMU students. Between faculty and administration tensions, questionable spending of university funds and numerous instances of faculty confusion, the paper has started to become bogged down in covering the bureaucracy of the university and at times lost focus of what it is: a paper run by students, for students. Don’t get me wrong – those issues needed to be covered, and were covered well, but the student voice got lost in many of those stories. I’m here to tell you this is the year that will change. This year, my staff and I are giving the paper back to YOU. We want to hear what you have to say. We want to cover what interests you. We want to know what you love about this place, along with what you love to hate about this place. We want your face, your story and your voice in the paper. Though, that’s not to say we won’t be the same CM Life you’ve come to rely on to report hard-hitting news stories. We’ll still be examining every budget that comes our way, delving into Board of Trustees meetings, and office for Institutional Diversity

Warriner Hall 319 (989) 774-3700 www.cmich.edu/institutional_diversity.htm

holding the faculty and administration of this university accountable. We’ll just be doing that with you in mind. With a new attitude on news coverage, I thought CM Life could use a facelift, too. Something to show we’re serious about these changes and starting fresh with the student body. That’s why we’re launching a brand-new website on Monday, revealing a new in-print design today, will have a new phone app coming soon, and have begun using multimedia and social more than ever before. We’ll be looking for your opinion on Twitter, asking you to send us photos on Instagram, and sharing important articles with you on Facebook. We’ll be hitting campus to feature you and your organizations in videos and photo galleries. And all of that is going on in addition to changes on the advertising side of CM Life. We have ad representatives hard at work to bring attention to some of Mount Pleasant’s best businesses. Take advantage of the deals you find in the paper and online. Let them know you heard about them from CM Life. Show them that this paper means something to you. That being said, we’ll do our best to make your voice heard, but you have to help us. Tell us what’s happening on campus. We spend a majority of our time in the office, making the paper. That means we miss some things happening on campus. It doesn’t mean we don’t want to cover them, though. Here’s my promise to you: We’ll be the watchdogs of this campus, but we need you to be our eyes and ears. Hear something suspicious? Want an event covered? Wish you could get involved? Have a story that needs to be told? Let us know! We’re here for you. I know life gets busy and classes start to consume your days, but don’t forget about us. Come on up to Moore 436. My door’s always open and I’d love to hear your story. editor@cm-life.com

Diversity is about having

a commitment to understand and

appreciate the unique qualities and differences of each individual. -Traci L. Guinn Interim Associate Vice President for Institutional Diversity

King-Chavez-ParKs visiting Professors PrograM

native aMeriCan PrograMs

lesbian gay bisexual transgender queer serviCes

offiCe of diversity eduCation

Pre College PrograMs: gear uP and uPward bound

MultiCultural aCadeMiC student serviCes


News

2A | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

EVENTS CALENDAR TOMORROW w Artists Ted Evans and Jason Matthews will speak about their artwork in the University Art Gallery at 4 p.m.

SATURDAY w Connecting with the “Wild Life” begins at 11 a.m. and runs until 3 p.m. at Deerfield Nature Park, 2425 W. Remus Road. A petting zoo, nature stories, nature hikes, nature activities and crafts and geocaching are available for anyone walking through the park.

CRIME LOG The following incidents occurred from 6 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 13 to 4 a.m., Friday, Aug. 16 as reported by the Mount Pleasant Police Department Aug. 13 w 6:48 a.m. – An officer was investigating a stolen vehicle complaint at 220 E. Bennet St. w 8:10 a.m. – Officers investigated a malicious destruction of property to a vehicle at 508 N. Main St. w 8:11 a.m. – Officers investigated another malicious destruction of property to a vehicle at 1600 N. Mission St. w 12:43 p.m. – Officers investigated a malicious

ENROLLMENT| CONTINUED FROM 1A

SUNDAY w MAINstage begins at 2 p.m. in parking lot 62 east between Kelly/ Shorts Stadium and Rose Pond. Registered student organizations and local businesses will be on hand. Additionally, a zip line, inflatables, games and live music will also be available.

CORRECTIONS

Central Michigan Life has a long-standing commitment to fair and accurate reporting. It is our policy to correct factual errors. Please e-mail news@cm-life.com. © Central Michigan Life 2013 Volume 95, Number 1

“CMU will be fine; they are going to aggressively recruit,” Williams said. “CMU looks the best when we successfully show what we have to offer.”

UNIVERSITY FINANCES, ENROLLMENT GO HAND-IN-HAND

Stabilizing enrollment figures is key for CMU if it hopes to become more financially stable. The Board of Trustees approved a $440-million 201314 budget in July that is about $1 million smaller than the previous academic year. Because of a $12 million general fund deficit and a $6 million auxiliary fund deficit, largely caused by the enrollment drop, the university had to dig deep into its reserve funds to balance its budget. Most colleges and departments (with the notable exception of athletics) saw their budgets essentially stagnate or cut, and University President George Ross warned the board more cuts are on their

destruction of property on a vehicle at 215 E. Bennet St. w 1:43 p.m. – Officers investigated the theft of a purse after a rock was used to smash a windshield to gain access to the item at 503 N. Kinney St. w 5:52 p.m. – A 37-yearold man was arrested for operating a vehicle while intoxicated and for driving with no insurance at 317 N. Mission St. w Aug. 14 3:54 a.m. – A 20-year-old Sanford man was jailed for driving while intoxicated and for being a minor in possession, while two 20-year-old Mount Pleasant women were charged with being minors in possession as well. way, especially if CMU can’t stabilize enrollment. “Unfortunately, fewer students means colleges will need fewer part-time and fixed-term faculty,” Ross told the Board of Trustees during its July meeting. “Additionally, some vacant staff and faculty positions will not be filled.” The Board of Trustees revealed six strategies in July to attract more students to enroll at CMU. With plans to launch an Office of Student Success this fall, the university will work directly with academic colleges, find problem areas in the student body and implement strategies to address those areas. The office will create three new positions

ROSS | CONTINUED FROM 1A

However, Michigan State University spokesman Jason Cody said MSU employs no such worker for its presidential residence. “We obviously have janitorial staff that clean up various university buildings, but there is no housekeeper position,” he said. Cody said MSU President Lou Anna Simon does not live in the presidential residence provided to her, but rather in a private residence. The university residence is used primarily for entertainment. Western Michigan University spokesperson Cheryl Roland said WMU employs a housekeeper for its presidential residence. However, unlike the CMU position, the housekeeper only works 10 hours per week and also cleans the nearby alumni building. Calls placed to Eastern Michigan University, the University of Michigan and Hillsdale College for comment were not returned in and cost roughly $500,000 per year to operate, according to Johnson. The university will also reengineer CMU’s financial aid packages to award more and larger merit-based scholarships. Johnson said specific changes to CMU’s financial aid packages are still being determined. “We’re looking at the numbers and if we want to create any new scholarship programs,” Johnson said. “We have not finalized the types of changes we want to make; that is under review.” The number of academic advisers on campus will increase from 16 to 21 during the fall semester. CMU will also be making several changes in order to recruit

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time for publication. Robert Noggle, the chairperson for the department of religion and philosophy, said although Ross’ residence having a housekeeper is not anything new, it is an “odd message” to send at a time when other departments cannot fill certain positions. “It’s a luxury,” he said. “If you or I wanted a housekeeper, we’d have to pay for one out of our own pockets.” One department feeling the financial pinch is the department of sociology, anthropology and social work. Katherine Rosier, the department chair, declined an interview but said in an email the department has not been given permission for two straight years to replace a professor who retired in May 2012. “I am told by (College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences Dean Pamela Gates) that the current status of this faculty vacancy is ‘funding pulled,’” Rosier wrote. “Five other vacant tenure-track lines in the college, in other departments, have also had their ‘funding pulled.”

Ross, who receives an annual salary of $364,000, said he believes the housekeeper position should continue to be paid for by the university. “(The presidential residence) is a university facility used for university business,” Ross said. He said CMU has employed a housekeeper for decades, and there should be no plans to change that anytime soon. “It’s not me — every university president that has lived in that house for the last 40 years has had a housekeeper,” Ross said. “It’s used primarily for entertainment. We live in one room of the house and everybody else is all over the rest of it.” According to Ross, a clean residence maintained by the housekeeper can do CMU a lot of good. “When we have guests at the president’s house, either alumni or corporate investors, coming into a clean, welcoming place like they would be welcomed any other building on this campus — hopefully that’s the message it sends,” he said.

students more aggressively. Included in these changes is a new customer relationship management system, a computer operated system that will determine a communication plan for prospective students and text, email and mail them on a set schedule. The university will also be making greater efforts to increase recruitment of students in the 9th and 10th grades, as well as students who are from out-of-state.

CMU will also attempt to increase its international student base. CMU has increased its advertising budget. According to University Communications, it brings this year’s marketing expenditures to $923,108.70. “We’re just expanding our reach,” Johnson said. “… we are communicating with prospective high schoolers earlier than we have before.”

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Inside Life

STUDENT LIFE | Samantha Smallish | studentlife@cm-life.com UNIVERSITY | Kyle Kaminski | university@cm-life.com METRO | Tony Wittkowski | metro@cm-life.com

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Professor will THE DOCTORS ARE IN teach in the fall despite summer arrest Meixner arrested for disturbing the peace after taking photos of young women By Tony Wittkowski Metro Editor

A Central Michigan University philosophy professor who was arrested for disturbing the peace this summer will be in class on the first day of the semester. John Meixner, 63, was arrested on Aug. 7 for allegedly taking photos of young girls and women at the Mecosta County Agricultural Free Fair on July 13. “They saw a gentleman taking photos of young children, particularly girls, while they were on rides and while they were walking away from him,” said Mecosta County Sheriff Todd Purcell. ”We did take (his camera) into evidence that evening and did a forensic test on it.” CMU Director of Public Relations Steve Smith said Meixner is scheduled to teach in the fall despite his legal issues. “He will be in the classroom as this matter moves through the legal sysJohn Meixner tem,” Smith Philosophy professor said in an official statement. “Beyond that, we don’t publicly discuss employment issues.” Associate Vice President of Communications Sherry Knight said if a faculty member is involved in a legal issue, the only instance in which the university would launch an investigation would be if a complaint was filed internally. “Nothing will be investigated without a complaint,” Knight said. “The legal system takes precedence.” According to court documents, the pictures Meixner took appeared to be “centered mostly on the buttocks and thigh area” of young girls and adult women. Photos recovered from his Nikon digital camera did not include any faces, and the subjects were fully clothed. Meixner’s defense attorney Daniel O’Neil said he has seen the pictures and that only one was just above the knees of some young girl or woman. “He did nothing illegal,” O’Neil said. “I mean, there are 200 of these photographs of everything and everybody participating at the county fair. Photography is his hobby.” The incident report states Sgt. Michael Mohr was dispatched to the fair with another on-duty officer to respond to complaints of a suspicious individual. In the report, Mohr said he watched Meixner for close to 30 seconds, making a note that during that time when people continued to walk by him, “the subject only picked up his camera and took pictures when it was a very young child who walked by.” O’Neil said Meixner has been talking to the police and prosecutor for several weeks and has been cooperating with the investigation. The defense attorney also gave some insight into what he thought the prosecution was charging him with. “My suspicion is that they are trying to look for something that’s not there, and they couldn’t find it,” O’Neil said. “And now they are falling back on disturbing the peace.”

Meixner’s previous incidents

This is the third time Meixner has been asked to leave a public place for taking photographs, although this is the first instance that has resulted in an arrest. In 2005, CMU Police were called and asked to respond to an incident in the parking lot of Wal-Mart in Mount Pleasant where an older male was seen taking pictures of women from his car. CMU Police Chief Bill Yeagley shared information regarding the incident at Wal-Mart after receiving a Freedom of Information Act request from CM Life. “It was a suspicious situation. When we got there, an officer made contact with the individual and identified the individual and asked him to leave the area,” Yeagley said. “He was making people nervous, but it is not illegal to take photographs of folks in a public place.” Meixner, a 1990 recipient of the CMU Excellence in Teaching award, will appear in Mecosta County’s 77th District Court on Sept. 4 – a week after classes begin – for a pretrial conference on the charge of disturbing the peace. metro@cm-life.com

Christiana Kurtz | Staff Photographer (From left) William Van Wijnen, Paul Markun, Ray Brandburg and Leslie Markun laugh during the ceremony for the medical school opening at the Central Michigan University Events Center on Aug. 4. Leslie Markun is a member of the inaugural class of the medical school, and her family was there to support her during the opening cermony.

what you missed d o w nto w n

Max & Emily’s concert series a charitable success Every summer, famed downtown eatery Max & Emily’s hosts a free Summer Concert Series that attracts thousands of music fans from around the area to enjoy a festive outdoor concert and raise money for charity. This year’s concerts were no different, drawing in an estimated 2,100-2,300 attendees and raising more than $3,000 for the Red Cross infant food pantry program. “We have had great weather this year, so every show went on with a great turnout,” Max & Emily’s General Manager Chris Walton said. “People like to come out to the concerts because we have established ourselves in the community. People know they are going to have a great time, regardless of whether or not they have heard of the band that is playing. We’ve got great quality in show production and great artists on the stage.” - Nathan Clark, Staff Reporter

University

Christiana Kurtz | Staff Photographer Left: People gather in the Central Michigan University Events Center on Aug. 4 for the reception of the medical school opening ceremony. The medical school welcomed the students in its inaugural class during the ceremony. Right: Dr. Julien Rossignol, a professor in the College of Medicine, speaks with Betsy Raleigh during the medical school opening ceremony reception.

Students excited, nervous after first week of classes at brand new College of Medicine By Adrian Hedden Staff Reporter

A

s the first 64 students of Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine recoil from their first week of study, the inaugural class hopes to soon begin shaping the landscape of CMED through a more strenuous workload and quicker academic pacing.

West Bloomfield medical student Kathryn Brandell has observed her fellow students adjusting their lifestyles to the increased workload. Aware that challenges might arise during adjustment, she says “personal growth” is essential during the transition. “It’s been a mixture of being excited and overwhelmed,” Brandell said. “We’re all extremely motivated, but now we have to get back into the swing of things. We’re just rolling with the punches. The faculty and staff have made the transition very enjoyable.”

Maple City medical student Abigail Christiansen says orientation was helpful, but just having an open mind is more essential. “(CMED) is a little different from our undergraduate programs,” she said. “It requires being flexible and an understanding of the studying, preparation and how to absorb the information.” Christiansen looked to weekly quizzes that help faculty measure student progress in preventing any problems the class might have keeping up. “We can all tell the faculty is really excited to have us here,” she said. “The quizzes give (instructors) a good idea of how we’re doing and allow us to maintain the pulse of the college. It’s difficult, but the material is really fun to learn; everything is so important.” Medical student Saavia Girgla, an international student from India, said she looks forward to developing student groups at CMED once the inaugural class has settled in. She says she hasn’t had time to think about clubs during the first week.

“(CMED) is going very well,” she said. “It’s very busy. We’re still getting used to the workload. The pace is much faster. I’m looking forward to starting student groups, but I haven’t had much time to think about it, since we’re so busy with the work.” Senior Associate Dean of Educational Programs at CMED Joel Lanphear said curriculums for the inaugural class began development in 2010. He’s hopeful that CMED will soon begin to fill a need for physicians throughout Michigan. “When the economy became very difficult, a lot of need was created,” Lanphear said of an apparent shortage of physicians in Michigan. “It’s the typical urban problem, but it’s our problem and we care about it.” In developing the medical school, Lanphear said the greatest challenge was assembling his team of qualified faculty and staff to not only usher in the first class, but to cultivate a strong environment for the future of CMED. university@cm-life.com

University

SGA loses buying power as CPF fund fails to adjust for inflation rates By Neil Rosan Staff Reporter

The Student Government Association has lost considerable buying power from the Campus Program Fund over the past several years, and SGA says that is hurting its ability to perform. The CPF is the amount of money SGA is given to distribute across the campus as they see fit. The CPF funds programs such as University Recreation, Program Board, Greek Life and the Leadership Institute. Funding for the program has only dropped around $5,000 since 2001, but the lack of an adjustment for inflation is concerning for the SGA. A preliminary calculation provided by SGA President Marie Reimers shows the fund has lost a total of $292,718 in buying power since 2001, because inflation has not been accounted for. “It’s a crisis at this point, because all these programs who have to match up to inflation are getting funding from a pot of money that has not been adjusted,” Student Budget Allocation Committee Chairperson Kevin White said.

The lack of buying power has forced the SGA to allocate less money than programs request. According to White, the Mary Ellen Brandell Volunteer Center requested a budget of $96,000 for the 2013-14 school year. Due to the loss of buying power, the SGA was only able to allocate $61,000 for the upcoming school year. “If we bring in a concert, we have to pay for the lights, the microphones, the speakers and the security in order to host the event. The bill’s rates are always adjusted to inflation. If our funding isn’t adjusted to inflation, the equipment will be more expensive,” White said. If inflation is not accounted for, White believes cuts could be in the future. “Every year inflation is not adjusted, more programs will have to take cuts. MAINstage will have to be scaled back, and all the other big programs will have to be as well,” he said. “I see it being a problem in the next five to 10 years. We are not going to be able to host programs of the caliber that students expect.” White also believes a loss of

money in these programs could hurt the university. “One of the things that makes CMU great is the fact that we have these great programs,” he said. “We have the best programs in the state and sometime nationally. If we aren’t able to supply them with these things because our funding is at a 2001 level, then why are they going to come here? It could affect enrollment and the retention of students.” Now that the preliminary data has been looked at, SGA will create a committee to look into the effects of inflation on the CPF. White hopes to form the committee at SGA’s next meeting on Sept. 9. “Since I’ve been involved in SGA, this has been something every single e-board and vice president has planned to tackle, and it’s just kind of fell through,” SGA Vice President Patrick O’Connor said. “So, with Kevin’s help, we really plan to get this accomplished.” university@cm-life.com

CMU wins award for collaborative inclusion initiative Central Michigan University received the 2013 Inclusion Cultivates Excellence Award for its “Excellence Though Inclusion” initiative from the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources. “The intent was to change the culture for diversity at CMU,” Amy McGinnis, a CMU human resources faculty member and shepherd of the initiative, said. “We worked primarily with staff to help them understand a little more about working with diverse populations. We created the program in order to change the culture and make it a more welcoming place for everyone.” CUPA-HR gives the award to institutions with initiatives that have made a significant impact on equality and cultural change within the organization. CMU is the second school to receive this award, following Rice University in 2012. - Neil Rosan, Staff Reporter

Board of Trustees

Ten-year plan calls for Cmu to spend $400 million The Board of Trustees was presented with a draft of a capital plan in July that would, if approved in its entirety, have the university spend $400 million over 10 years on 18 different projects. The 10year capital plan was presented ahead of July’s Board of Trustees meeting. It George Ross calls for spending $64 million on new undergraduate housing and $70 million on a College of Business administrative building, among other projects. The trustees did not vote on the plan, but Associate Vice President of Facilities Management Steve Lawrence said a final report will be presented to University President George Ross this month, and a final plan will be presented to the board in September. Ross said any plan “must align with academic prioritization.” “It’s certainly not going to be easy,” Ross said. - John Irwin, Managing Editor


Voices

Editorial Board

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Catey Traylor | editor@cm-life.com MANAGING EDITOR | John Irwin | news@cm-life.com STUDENT LIFE | Samantha Smallish | studentlife@cm-life.com UNIVERSITY | Kyle Kaminski | university@cm-life.com METRO | Tony Wittkowski | metro@cm-life.com

cm-life.com

EDITORIAL |

I

Enrollment, budgets and out-of-state recruitment need attention

Big changes coming for CMU

t might not be pretty, but it’s the truth: Central Michigan University is facing some very serious issues right now. On-campus undergraduate enrollment is expected to plummet this semester, between 5 and 7 percent from last fall. Because of that, the university is deep in the red, facing a $12 million general fund deficit and a $6 million auxiliary fund deficit, which in turn resulted in a significantly smaller budget and could potentially lead to cuts or hiring freezes for departments across the university. Big changes are afoot at CMU as it simultaneously tries to fix its financial problems and retain and attract students. It’s likely to be a complicated and time-consuming process, but it’s imperative that CMU makes sure current students, not anyone else, are foremost

on everyone’s minds when it comes to deciding what steps to take. While the university has repeatedly pointed toward smaller Michigan high school graduating classes rates as the primary cause of the enrollment drop, they’re combatting it with some of the largest marketing efforts in recent years. In 2010, the university’s advertising expenses barely exceeded $40,000. Today, the budget is set at more than $1 million, and we’ve spent more than 80 percent of it and that’s just for the main campus. In January 2012, CMU engaged in strategic enrollment planning for the first time. President George Ross says the

‘The real world is scary’ As a kid, I had a very active fantasy life. My earliest, which resulted in plenty of jeers from my fellow students, was the notion that I was on an alien planet, sent from my home planet to fulfill some intergalactic prophecy and save the world from doom. It might sound like a rip-off of Superman, but it wasn’t. I didn’t wear tights, no maniacal corporations were out to kill me, and Jesus was a character in my fantasy, just don’t ask me how he fit in. In third grade, a deranged Russian criminal broke into our school and used mind-controlled rats to gather parts for a large explosive, which was being held in the library janitor’s closet. In fourth grade, our school was attacked by moth men. This is the same kid, by the way, who in two semesters, might gradu-

ate from college. How in the hell does that happen? It’s not like I don’t have plans; I have, in intimate detail, concocted plans to fake my own death. Don’t believe me? I published it. I might also travel to Europe or join the Peace Corps. Do my best imitation of Hunter S. Thompson. Travel the Amazon rainforest. And if all that somehow falls through, I might even use my hard-earned degree and get a job. But I hope not. Not yet. I’m not ready. The real world is scary. This place used to be scary. With it’s 480-acre campus, cramped residence halls, endless frat parties and overabundance of people. I was dazed, confused and lost for the first two years I was here. But it feels kind of like home to me now. The soft, ember glow of Moore

changes were not a matter of waiting for a problem to arise — but were a matter of significant changes in leadership, philosophy and direction. But as enrollment and the budget wither on the vine, perhaps these questions could have been addressed in a more preemptive fashion. Sure, the first thing on everyone’s mind is, “how can we attract more students?” But throwing money away by updating already new buildings, like the proposed $20 million expansion of the Health Professions Building, is not a viable answer. While it is important to move forward, starting new projects might not be in the university’s best interests for the next two or three years. Attracting out-of-state students is also a concern. According to Ross, 95 percent of CMU students are from Michigan. What does CMU bring to the table in

Hall. My apartment now a sort of riotous sanctuary. The straggling 20-somethings wandering around perpetually at all hours seem the perfect kind of neighbors. As soon as one finds a home, it slowly crumbles. That’s the essence of life. Among with about 56 other things. What do I feel about being a senior this year? It’s expected. It’s new. It feels like well-treaded territory. It’s going to come with great successes and a handful of “come to Jesus” moments. The parties will be monotonous. The companionship will be rejuvenating. I’m expecting the ride of my life, and when next year comes, granting everything goes right, I’ll be somewhere else and lost again. Commence Elton John’s “The Circle of Life.” I rarely ever try to form a connection with anything, but Central Michigan University is where I’ve learned my most important lessons. Pride might come before the fall, but it’s also needed for the rise.

terms of attracting non-Michigan natives? Nice-looking buildings? CMU is a regional school, and it’s important that we recognize that. Out-of-state recruitment, particularly in the Midwest, is important to keep in mind, but it shouldn’t necessarily consume a significant percentage of our marketing budget. Graduates from Illinois aren’t going to come to CMU because Anspach Hall has a new entrance-way. If they decide to come, it will be largely because of our academic programs – and those, as always, need to remain our focus. Global campuses have been a talking point, but compared to the income generated by the main campus, they become irrelevant. The point is the university is the gateway to the professional world. Students work hard, craft their talents and make professional connections. The administration is given money to use not to promote themselves, but rather its students. It’s time for CMU to re-evaluate where money is being spent.

Ryan Fitzmaurice

Senior Reporter Nobody knows what they’re doing, so don’t get so overwhelmed. Always take risks in the right places. And liquor is overrated. Try craft beer. During my internship at the Times Herald in Port Huron this summer, one of their reporters I worked with asked me what I learned from the internship. I meekly responded that I hated that question. “At the end of my first internship, I learned how much I appreciated school,” she said. Damn it, she’s right.

C artoo n

Nathan Clark

Staff Reporter

Being welcomed into a strange new land I’ve finally done it. I’ve made it to Central Michigan University, and I couldn’t be happier about it. At first, transferring to CMU felt like I was entering a foreign land or starting life over again. But after spending a few weeks in town, this place already feels like home. Transferring has been a relatively easy process, most of it being taken care of by the school with little to no input needed on my end. All I needed to do was tell the school what I wanted to major in and they took care of the rest. During the transfer student orientation, the school registered me for a few classes in the fall so I wouldn’t have to scramble looking for a class I needed that still had available seats. I was also offered time with a success coach who could help me make the most out of my time at CMU by introducing me to the various clubs and student organizations on campus. I haven’t felt this well-taken care of in a long time. Sure, transferring might not seem like a big deal to the thousands of students already attending CMU, but it is for me. I didn’t follow the standard life plan that most college students went through to get here. Instead of participating in standardized testing in high school and coming to CMU shortly after finishing, I joined the Army. I traveled the world and came back to Michigan with my GI Bill, ready to finally go to college. Since I never took the standardized testing in high school, and I still didn’t know what I wanted to study, I started my adventure in higher learning at a community college to get my feet wet before attempting to go to a four-year university. Going to college, in general, has already been a fun and rewarding experience. At my previous school, I met all sorts of new and interesting people, made a few new friends and learned more about the world we live in. I can only hope my time at CMU will be just as rewarding. From how the school and community has treated me so far, I’m sure it will.

Central Michigan Life Editorial Catey Traylor, Editor-in-Chief John Irwin, Managing Editor Kyle Kaminski, University Editor Samantha Smallish, Student Life Editor Tony Wittkowski, Metro Editor Kristopher Lodes, Sports Editor Taylor Ballek, Photo Editor Katy Kildee, Assistant Photo Editor Mariah Prowoznik, Lead Designer Luke Roguska, Page Designer Kayla Folino, Page Designer Austin Stowe, Multimedia Editor James Wilson, Social Media Coordinator Nick Dobson, Online Coordinator Advertising managers Julie Bushart Daniel Haremski Gabriella Hoffman Public Relations manager Kaitlyn Blaszczyk

S t u de n t f aces

Get to know Ortonville junior Megan Dallape M

egan Dallape is a Central Michigan University junior from Ortonville. She is double- majoring in Integrated Science and Secondary Education, with a minor in Biology. CM Life: Describe yourself in three words Megan Dallape: I would have to say outgoing, honest and kind. What’s the best part about being a Chippewa?

Megan Dallape

MD: The best part about being a Chippewa would have to be the bond between everyone. Meaning, no matter who you are or where you are going in life, every Chip stands together. It’s like an unspoken bond.

Who’s your role model? MD: My role model, or should I say one of my role models, has always been my grandpa. He has always been such a heartwarming person and always put other people ahead of himself. Even in the last year of his life, he was determined to put others before him. His family was what mattered most to him, and he would always be there for anyone who needed him. I hope to make an impact on someone the same way he has made an impact on me. What’s the best piece of advice you have ever received? MD: The best piece of advice I’ve received would have to be “do what makes you happy.” Don’t

live your life living someone else’s dream. In the end, it has to make you happy and it has to be what you’ve wanted. Life’s short. There are no second chances. What’s your best memory of summer 2013? MD: My best memory of summer 2013 would have to be getting the chance to spend just about my whole summer on Harsens Island with my boyfriend and his family. I’ve never felt so much love come out of a family before. From kayaking to experiencing a fish fry, it has all been some of the best memories I’ve ever made in one of the most beautiful areas in Michigan. This summer has definitely been one to remember.

Professional staff Rox Ann Petoskey Production Leader Kathy Simon Assistant Director of Student Publications Dave Clark Director of Student Publications

E- m a il | e d ito r@ cm - life.co m M a il | 43 6 M o o re H a ll M o u nt Pl e a s a nt , M I 4 8 859 9 8 9.7 74 . L IF E cm-life.com Central Michigan Life welcomes letters to the editor and commentary submissions. Only correspondence that includes a signature (email excluded), address and phone number will be considered. Do not include attached documents via email. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and commentary should not exceed 500 words. All submissions are subject to editing and may be published in print or on cm-life.com in the order they are received.


news

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 5A

weLCome weeKend

Police anticipate the annual influx of students By Megan Pacer Senior Reporter

Local police are looking to keep crime and other issues to a minimum this weekend as students return to Mount Pleasant and many of them party during Welcome Weekend. Isabella County Sheriff Leo Mioduszewski said high visibility and alcohol-related offenses will be the main focuses of his office over the weekend. “We’re going to be bringing extra people in, like we do every year,” Mioduszewski said, referring to collaboration between the county sheriff ’s office and the Michigan State Police. The Isabella County Sheriff ’s Department will turn its focus primarily on apartment complexes outside of campus. Central Michigan University’s campus police might have a different strategy, the end goal remains the same: keeping everyone safe. “We’ll be fully staffed that entire weekend,” CMU Police Chief Bill Yeagley said. “As always, we work very closely with the city police and the sheriff ’s department.” With city police and a few others, campus police will be patrolling popular streets such as Main and Washington in the days leading up to Welcome Weekend in order to remind residents of the rules and regulations in place and to stress the importance of cooperation. As for the Mount Pleas-

ant Police Department, Public Information Officer Jeff Thompson said the department will approach this year as it has in the past. “We will be putting forth the same effort in regards to education, officer presence and enforcement,” Thompson said. “We do Jeff Smith | File Photo anticipate Michigan State Police Troopers detain and search a welcome weekend partier on Aug. 20, that we will 2011 behind a Main Street home. The man was arrested on possession of marijuana and have the open intoxicants. usual crimes are pleased with the outcome.” the landlords and the tenants,” involving public disturbances, As previously reported by Thompson said. but have high hopes that vioCentral Michigan Life, the The city of Mount Pleasant lence and property damage is 2012 Welcome Weekend saw has also taken it upon itself to minimal.” MPPD officers hand out 277 install additional lighting in the According to Thompson, the misdemeanors with 36 people area around South Main Street outcome of last year’s Welsent to jail. By comparison, to promote a safer area. come Weekend was similar to 2011 had 269 people ticketed Mioduszewski said the other years. and 38 jailed. sheriff ’s department will be on “We did have approximately Thompson said the process the lookout for large crowds of the same number of comof educating students on people with the intent of breakplaints, arrests and citations isrules and regulations prior to ing them up. sued (as the previous year). We the weekend is a fairly new “We don’t want large gatherdid have fewer violent crimes method for MPPD. ings of people,” Mioduszereported,” Thompson said. “We have also had an wski said. “That’s usually when “Any time that we have a busy increase in remodeled or new problems get going.” weekend such as Welcome housing in the student section Back and we have little to no that has created a greater sense metro@cm-life.com violence involving citizens, we of pride in the property for both

Police optimistic about campus, city safety By Megan Pacer Senior Reporter

Despite the number of crimes that occurred on and around campus last year, Central Michigan University Police Chief Bill Yeagley said the university remains as safe as it has ever been. According to Yeagley, campus has not seen a significant rise in crimes over the last few years. Last year, it was the nature of the crimes, rather than the number of crimes, that had people worried. “(The numbers) are pretty consistent,” Yeagley said. “There has not been any major change.” Isabella County Sheriff Leo Mioduszewski echoed those thoughts when asked about the issue of safety on and around CMU’s campus. “We’re no different than any other city in the country,” Mioduszewski said. “For a long time, we didn’t see a lot of the violent crimes.”

Moreover, the fact that a student was abducted gave the community the feeling that the area was less safe, when in reality the same number of crimes have been occurring for several years. “We were not surprised at all,” Mioduszewski said. “(But) we were not happy to see it.” According to Yeagley, it was the violent nature of this particular crime that caused students and citizens to become so worried. “What we did have was something that was very horrendous and very unusual for our area,” Yeagley said. “I think it got everyone’s attention, rightfully so.” Mount Pleasant Police have made a few changes to increase the safety of those on and near campus, Mount Pleasant Public Information Officer Jeff Thompson said. “We have not seen a big enough increase trend to war-

The five agencies with jurisdiction w CMU Police w Isabella County Sheriff

Department

w Mount Pleasant Police w Michigan State Police w Tribal Police

rant a drastic reaction, (but) we have revised our city ordinances to better serve the public,” Thompson said. One point stressed by both Thompson and Mioduszewski was how students and citizens can play a big part in their own safety by being more aware of their surroundings and taking extra precautions.

“Don’t bury your head in your phones or tablets,” Thompson said. “Predatory people, same as in the wild, target the weak. That includes anyone not paying attention or traveling alone in the dark.” Mioduszewski also emphasized the importance of not walking alone at night. “Walk with friends,” he said. “Simple things like that can go a long way.”

Students call for greater police presence, visibility By Adrian Hedden Staff Reporter

Following January’s abduction of a student outside the Student Activity Center, Adelce Ferdinandus was afraid to be out alone in the dark of night. But as the Central Michigan University Police Department has been more alert since the attack, the 33-year-old graduate student from Indonesia was relieved to see a safer campus for her to complete her studies. “I was really worried after the incidents,” Ferdinandus said. “I wouldn’t go out after dark. But I’ve seen the police around; they have a good presence. If you’re walking at night in the dark, it’s frightening.” Ferdinandus, along with other CMU students, hoped that a strong police presence on campus, along with greater visibility from outdoor lighting, could deter more crimes from occurring. “Putting up more lighting in the parking lot would be great,” she said. “I see (police) patrolling all the time, so I feel quite safe.” Rachell Weeks, who graduated in 2013, is currently working an internship in the Park Library. The Holland native was worried last year when sporting events left her and her classmates to park in the back of the lots and walk through the darkness to class. “Last year, the parking lots during basketball games were pretty annoying,” she said. “We had to walk through the dark. They need better lighting in the parking lots, making sure that if students are walking that far, it is well-lit.” Along with strong lighting and visibility on campus, CMU Police Chief Bill Yeagley said

collaboration between his and the other four police departments, which serve the campus and outlying community, will ensure that students are safe. “When incidents do occur, there is a cooperative response,” he said. “We meet regularly. We purposely work toward that; visibility is important.” Yeagley said his department has assembled a team of CMU police officers, student government officials and facilities workers to head out onto campus at night to address areas that might require better lighting. And with a camera system providing about 600 eyes on campus, Yeagley is certain CMU is secure. “When people know that (cameras) are there, they tend not to commit crimes as much,” he said. “There are always things to improve on. Not only do I want to help people be safe, but I want people to feel safe.” Yeagley said a number of security vehicles were assigned to the back lots during events and said the university utilizes both marked and plainclothed patrols to prevent crime from occurring. “After last fall, we know people feel less comfortable in the lots,” he said. “We’ve increased overt presence because of that. The kidnapping was very unique for a college campus and the horror here was ‘that doesn’t happen here.’” Yeagley estimated one-third to half of the crimes that occur in the city might involve students and said people under 30 are more likely to break the law. David Price, a 45-year-old resident of Isabella County, has been on campus looking for work in part because his wife attends CMU. He agreed that visibility is an issue and that civilians must look to their own awareness to prevent themselves from being victimized. “As usual, lighting is a big issue,” he said. “Visibility is the best plan you can do. You need witnesses. Police presence is not a real preventative measure. They can’t watch every corner.”

metro@cm-life.com metro@cm-life.com


news

6A | Thursday, Aug 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

students worry as tuition, loan rates rise

Interest rates on student loans Congress reached a compromise reducing interest rates on student loans after months of negotiations

Clare senior Stephen Bott is delighted his time as Chippewa will soon be over. The 21-year-old worries the mounting price of education at Central Michigan University might already be a detriment on his ability to succeed after graduation. A music education major, Bott estimates he has accumulated more than $20,000 in debt. He said it might take him a decade to pay it off. “I’m glad I have only one year of this left,” he said. “I’m starting to run out of scholarships and having to pay out-of-pocket.” Under a federally-mandated compromise on undergraduate loans, student loan rates grew from 3.4 percent to 3.85 percent and are expected to increase in coming years. The law is a compromise between the two parties that will reduce the interest rates of student loans following their doubling on July 1, which concluded after months of congressional bickering. This year’s new rates will allow undergraduates to borrow subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford Loans at 3.9 percent interest rates. Had no federal action occurred, interest rates would have remained at the 6.8 percent mark that they climbed to earlier this year. One aspect of the bill ties student loans to the 10-year Treasury note. This effectively ties student loans to the performance of the economy, instead of being a fixed rate in previous years. However, in order to prevent student loan rates from rising too high, Congress implemented caps on various loans. The caps are 8.25 percent for undergraduates, 9.5 percent for graduates and 10.5 percent for PLUS loan recipients, such as parents. Director of Scholarships and Financial Aid Kirk Yats warns students to only consider direct costs when taking out loans –

%

%

%

%

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By Adrian Hedden & Wyatt Bush Staff & Senior Reporters

%

The numbers in blue represent the current interest rate levels.

Graduate

Undergraduate

The numbers in red represent the interest rate caps put on loans by Congress

Parent

such as tuition, room and board and textbooks. “We always recommend that students only borrow what they need,” Yats said. Yats was also wary of the increased interest rates impeding student success after graduation. “The only people getting the short-end are our student borrowers,” he said of the growing expenses. “We like to keep rates as low as possible for students because it impacts their ability to repay the loans and to live the American dream.” Yats recommends that students take more than the average 12-credit course load. He also suggests 2-year programs at community colleges as possible alternatives to help offset the financial toll. “Work toward a degree at a quicker pace so you can get your degree in four years,” he said. “We all want students to borrow what they need. With decreasing state aid and increasing costs, we expect borrowing rates to increase.” As tuition climbs 2.47 percent for this academic year, from $365

per credit hour for undergraduate students to $374, some students are prepared for the worst. Romulus senior Kaela Torres says the continually increasing tuition rates, which account for about 71 percent of the university’s revenue, is discouraging student enrollment. “The student side really sucks,” she said of increased tuition. “I’m really scared to graduate. Who wants to pay that much to go to school?” Now former CMU student Chris Coats says he was so frustrated by the high costs that he left CMU after just one-anda-half semesters. Majoring in accounting, Coats will be taking his studies – and wallet – to Mid Michigan Community College this fall, hoping to earn his degree at a lower cost. “The tuition rates suck here,” he said. “Students can’t afford it – it’s skyrocketing our debt. It’ll probably be 30 years before we can pay it off. That’s not good for anyone.” university@cm-life.com

University places preemptive cap on student, part-time staff work hours By Mark Johnson Staff Reporter

Central Michigan University students and part-time staff working on campus for 25 or more hours per week will see a reduction in their work hours this fall. The Affordable Care Act, signed by President Barack Obama in 2010. It requires employers who hire 50 or more workers to provide health insurance to employees who average more than 30 hours per week. That goes for private businesses, as well as public entities, including colleges and universities. In response, those working on campus at CMU may not exceed 50 hours per pay period, 25 hours per week. “CMU will be monitoring this beginning in January 2014,” Manager of Student Employment Services Jon Goodwin said. “We will be sending notifications to students about the new rule, but at this time I don’t know in what form or when this will take place.” By January, it is the students’ and employers responsibility to make sure they do not have an on-campus workload exceeding 50 hours per pay period, at risk of being penalized. According to a document posted on the Student Employment Services website, failure to follow this new rule can lead to a decrease in hours, and even termination. CMU could also be fined up to $5 million by the federal government

should they fail to offer health care to students who exceed this cap. “The students have to make sure they don’t work over that amount of hours; that’s their responsibility,” Goodwin said. “This will also be monitored by the university.” Originally scheduled to be implemented by next year, the Obama administration announced it would delay the so-called employer mandate until 2015, citing a need for the U.S. Treasury Department to simplify how businesses report their health care plan information to the government. “Under the provisions of health care reform, employers are penalized, more or less. It could be as high as a $2,000 penalty for every full-time employee,” said Jacqueline Pridgeon, Director of Benefits and Wellness. CMU had different options to pick from when this new reform comes into effect. However, with the small number of students being affected, the most responsible option was to cap working hours, according to Pridgeon. “When we did our analysis and took a look at what the impact would be of the various options that we might have, we

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discovered there were very few students who were actually exceeding a 30-hour average,” Pridgeon said. “So, the direction that we chose to go in was to implement this cap in order to avoid any penalties.” Student Employment Services will be monitoring the students to make sure the new maximum workload is not exceeded. HR-Employment Services will be monitoring temporary staff. “This will affect about 140 students,” Goodwin said. “That 140 is out of 5,700 students working on campus. So, relatively speaking, that’s a small percentage.” Resident assistants and multicultural advisors are also included in the cap. According to the Student Employment Services document, individuals who hold these positions work an average of 40 hours per pay period, so they are advised to not exceed 10 additional hours per pay period at another location. This new measure will also affect 120 temporary staff. For further information and other specifics, see the sidebar document on the Student Employment Services section of CMU’s website.

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 7A

Kus is the only guy who (intimately) knows victoria’s secret Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor Farmington Hills junior Tyler Kus worked at Victoria’s Secret this summer as a sales support assistant. “I guess the one thing I’ve learned is how to make women feel sexy,” Kus said of his experiences.

Student Life Editor Samantha Smallish sat down with a Central Michigan University student who had a unique job for any male employee over the summer: a sales support assistant – at Victoria’s Secret. Tyler Kus, a Farmington Hills junior, spoke with Smallish about his experiences and how his job came about.

We’ll start with the obvious. Why Victoria’s Secret? Tyler Kus: Well, last summer, I worked at Toys-R-Us, and it was a bad experience. As a kid, I thought (working at Toys-R-Us) would be sweet, but I was wrong. A kid took a dump in the aisle once; it was horrible. Anyway, I applied at Victoria’s Secret last summer and they ignored it, so this summer, after I worked at Toys-R-Us and was employee of the month, the employers at VS were impressed and I got the job. What was your most embarrassing moment? TK: My job includes stocking the store and making sure it looks good. I was putting sensors on panties one day, and my first time pinning sensors was on a thong. So, I pinned it and thought all was well until my supervisor showed me where I put the sensor...I had no idea where to put the sensor, though, because there’s so little material.

Needless to say I know now. What about the girlfriend? What did she think? TK: Initially, she wasn’t sure if she liked the idea, but eventually she got used to it. Plus, I get a big employee discount, so she doesn’t mind that part.

And we figured it out and he actually came back and said his girlfriend loved it. I don’t even see a lot of guys shop (at VS). Most guys are with their girlfriends and on their phones trying not to look awkward. Do you plan on working at VS next summer? TK: Well, I’m hoping to get an internship, but I’m definitely going to work Black Friday and over Christmas break.

Were women hesitant to ask you for help? I mean, being a guy, you probably weren’t the most knowledgeable when it comes to the type of merchandise VS sells. TK: I got weird looks. Women think, “Can he help me?” I’ve only had one woman ask me for help. But I know about the store, so I’d be able to help! They just don’t want to ask. What about men? Were they drawn to you for advice?

Looking back, what’s the best piece of knowledge you’ve gained from working at VS? TK: To embrace your look, or yourself. The VS motto is about making women feel sexy. I guess the one thing I’ve learned is how to make women feel sexy. If you or anyone you know has a story that would make for an interesting Q&A, let us know! Email us at news@cm-life.com.

TK: I actually had a guy ask me, “Hey, I feel better asking you what I should get my girlfriend.”

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Rebecca Jones | Courtesy Photo Lake Orion senior Rebecca Jones performs wet chemistry on meteorite samples in the “clean room” of Pheasant Memorial Laboratory at the Institute for Study of the Earth’s Interior at Okayama University in Misasa, Japan.

Japan internship offers senior an out-of-this-world experience By Ryan Fitzmaurice Senior Reporter

Rebecca Jones’ internship came from outer space. Jones, a Lake Orion senior, spent the summer dissecting and researching the Chelyabinsk Meteor, a meteorite roughly 17 to 20 meters in size, that crashed into Chelyabinsk, Russia on Feb. 15. The internship required Jones, a geology major, to do a geochemical analysis on the meteorite, discover more about its properties and bring light to the make-up of outer space. It was the first time Jones had ever tried her hand at geochemistry, but she said she caught on quickly. “We did a bunch of chemistry tests. We tried to figure out what was going on with the meteorite, what processes it had gone through- mechanical processes, chemical processes and other processes, as well,” Jones said. “It allowed us to further discover what our solar system has gone through, what celestial bodies this meteorite came from, or if this meteorite came from a bigger asteroid.”

Although her internship sounds like the plot of a science fiction movie, it came with its own set of challenges. Jones was selected as one of only eight students in the world to research the space rock for the Institute for Study of the Earth Interior at Okayama University in Misasa, Japan. Jones said what they discovered was worthwhile and important, but she isn’t allowed to disclose information. The findings will be released by Okayama University at a later date. Despite the strict confidentiality of the findings, Jones said there was no conspiracy afoot. “We didn’t find any alien lifeforms,” she said. The agreed upon language for the internship was English, which Jones said was good, because absorbed in her work, she missed the only Japanese language class the internship offered. “The communication wasn’t too difficult. Basic communication wasn’t difficult,” Jones said. “Sense of humor was difficult; someone would make a joke and no one would understand it.”

Despite a more intimate knowledge in both geochemistry and meteorites, Jones said she will also be leaving with a range of new favorite dishes. She brought sake – a lemonorange flavoring – home. She also found a new favorite meal, yakisoba, which she described as a stir-fry with shredded, dried fish. Sushi she already loved, but she said it was much better in Japan. “You can find it anywhere in Japan,” Jones said. “Gas station (sushi) in Japan was so good.” For Jones, the internship was the most difficult, but also the most rewarding period of her life. “At the end of the last day, after completing the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my entire life, we were standing up on a podium with all eight of us, and the professor tells us, ‘the eight of you know more about this meteorite than anybody in the world,’” Jones said. “Just seeing them happy for our results and with our accomplishments made it all worth it.”

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News

8A | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Leadership Safari 2013 welcomes largest group of students to date By Nathan Clark Staff Reporter

Combine enthusiastic upperclassmen, open-minded freshmen and transfer students, world-renowned speakers and roughly 200 exotic animals, and you have Central Michigan University’s Leadership Safari program. Leadership Safari, which was started in 1996 by residence hall students, is a week-long event that has been helping new students feel comfortable in their college environments by organizing fun activities, team-building exercises and informative lectures. Safari has been growing in number for the past 17 years, and this year is the largest it has ever been, racking up at 1,888 students. “Safari is a great icebreaker for college. It helps new students adjust to the college environment, meet new people and have fun,” said Parchment senior Steven Steele, a core guide in his third year with Safari. “No

other university in Michigan does this. We’ve got all sorts of activities planned throughout the week: comedians, team building exercises and guest speakers.” Every Leadership Safari has a keynote speaker, and this year was no different. Special guest Nev Schulman, the creator of MTV’s “Catfish,” gave the keynote speech this year, telling students to be true to themselves despite what others might say. “Safari gives students a unique opportunity to get involved with the school right away,” said Galesburg senior Sara Krajnik. “It’s extremely fun, students get to meet new people and participate in team building exercises to strengthen unity.” Students, new and transfers, are shown a promotional video of Leadership Safari at orientation that highlights the activities and events participants enjoy in the program so they can decide if they want to sign up to be part of it. “During orientation, I watched the video for Safari and it looked

like a lot of fun,” said Alexis Foley, a Canton freshman. “We get to meet new people right away and they have cool seminars. I think it will be a lot of fun, but I guess we’ll see.” Although Safari promotes how much fun it is to incoming students, some prefer its logistical benefits. “I like that you get to move in early if you’re part of Safari,” Grand Rapids junior Nate Swanson said. “I’m sure Safari will be fun, but I like being able to move in to the residence halls a little earlier to avoid the rush.” Safari has been a program of students helping and welcoming other students since its inception. Students such as Grayling sophomore Sierra Dyer got a lot out of the program and enjoyed it, later signing up to be part of its staff. “I was part of Safari last year. It was a very positive experience. Now, I’m part of the staff,” Dyer said. “I’m a sophomore now. It was great to see so many new students come out of their shells in the first few days. Safari is having an amazing impact on everyone this year.” studentlife@cm-life.com

Samantha Madar | Staff Photographer Freshman Joshua Stutsman of Sturgis carries teammate Tyler Payne of Milford across the ropes course Monday at the Leadership Safari Challenge Course at the Indoor Athletic Complex.

New email, website implemented, met with mixed reviews By Mark Johnson Staff Reporter & Kyle Kaminski University Editor

Central Michigan University now has a new email system and a revamped university website. Visitors to the university website can expect a flashier look with bolder fonts and an overall new design. In addition, students’ existing Zimbra accounts have all been migrated to Office 365 accounts. Vice President of Information Technology Roger Rehm said all changes were made with existing staff and cost no extra money to create. Chesapeake senior and graphic design major Daniel Dunning helped draft designs for the new site. “I just played a part in helping with the layouts,” Dunning said. “In the initial process, we were looking to create a new design with the bolder colors. So I threw together some layouts and then collaborated with (University Communications). Then, we refined it.”

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Dunning received no additional compensation beyond his regular salary as an employee of the Office of Information Technology. Some students and alumni were unable to send or receive emails after they transitioned to Office 365, but CMU said the issue has been fixed. University email accounts previously had 10 gigabytes of email storage space. With the upgrade to Microsoft, that number will more than double to 25 GB. “The Microsoft Solution is sort of an industry-leading solution,” Rehm said. Central Michigan Life asked students on Facebook what they thought of the technology upgrades. Among the 61 responses, 30 offered criticism of the changes —particularly those with email. “Personally, with the email migration, the Zimbra

software was dreadful to work with on all fronts, and although Office 365 is a lot different and loads slower, it is a million times better than what we had,” Troy junior Scott Stewart said in reply to a CM Life Facebook post. The university website has also seen changes and upgrades. The most prominent upgrades involve design and technical enhancements, in addition to communication and technical issues. Mount Pleasant senior Brian Cone is pleased with the website upgrade, but would have preferred a more timely implementation. “The new website looks good and is easy to navigate,” Cone said. “I only wish that it would have been done right the first time.” university@cm-life.com

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News

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 9A

Marching band prepares for hectic fall schedule By Shawn Tonge Staff Reporter

Emily Brouwer | Staff Photographer Members of the marching band move in place as sophomore Molly Palm claps her hands to keep count during band camp Aug. 20 at the Jack Saunder’s Marching Band Field.

As the Chippewa Marching Band begins to prepare for the fall football season, they continue to strive to live out their motto: “Play with the heart of a true champion.” The Chippewa Marching Band began as the Central Normal Band in 1918, when they performed at several military events After the end of World War I, the band separated and was later re-established in the fall of 1923 by the head of

First Year Experience program restructured By Kate Woodruff Staff Reporter

A new school year brings a new take on the First Year Experience program after former Provost Gary Shapiro announced in late 2012 the class would be suspended for a full year. FYE courses were created by Central Michigan University to help students get acclimated to university life and their new environment. FYE urges students to participate in various campus activities and to discover the numerous resources CMU offers its students. Some students speculated the program was being reviewed due to low attendance, but Claudia Douglass, interim vice provost and overseer of FYE courses, said attendance in the FYE course itself was not the reason for the suspension. “FYE was suspended to study the effectiveness of the course and work to improve student retention,” Douglass said. A summer study was

conducted to suggest the university of any changes or improvements that should be made to the program. As previously reported by Central Michigan Life, former FYE executive Jason Bentley said despite the announcement of suspension, there was a possibility certain sections of the FYE course could still make an appearance in the 2013 course registry for “special needs students.” As Bentley speculated, the course registry now includes the FYE 101 course and will be offered in special sections that appeal to narrower demographics in the 2013-14 school year. The available sections are for athletes, business students, first-year transfer students, MAC/MASS scholars, students in the Education and Human Service Residential College, students participating in the PATHWAYS and STEP programs, those in the First Year Residential Learning Community and a general course offered to those who

U.S. Post Office’s five-day mail delivery proposal shot down by Congress By Kate Woodruff Staff Reporter

The United States Postal Service’s plans to approach Congress about implementing a new mailing system that would reduce mail delivery to only Monday through Friday has been shot down and will not be implemented. “Right now, we are just complying with Congress’ request to bench the issue,” said Sabrina Todd of USPS customer relations. This proposal has caused people to wonder if this proposition will resurface in the future, seeing as how 70 percent of the population were in agreement. Todd confirmed this, saying private studies showed a 7 out of 10-person approval to the proposed five-day mail delivery system.

When asked if the U.S. Postal Service would try revisit the issue, Todd said, “We aren’t sure. The headquarters personnel are currently addressing the matter.” In the statement, it was made clear that packages would continue to be delivered Monday through Saturday, with changes only being made to the mail delivery schedule. The pending date for this change was projected for the month of August. The U.S. Postal Service has become increasingly aware of financial problems and created this proposal as a way to cut costs and reduce debt. According to a national press release by the U.S. Postal Service, the proposal could have saved as much as $2 billion. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has made attempts in

are beginning their first year at CMU. Almost all of the seats are filled for the 2013 fall semester for each available section. Douglass confirmed the special sections will have a focus on retaining students and will run a full 16 weeks, instead of the typical eight. However, even with the increased time commitment, the course will still only offer 1 credit. Fowlerville junior Cara Hutchison, who took the FYE 101 course as a freshman, said her time in the course was beneficial. “Having the peer assistants (the FYE program provided) was a lot of help, because they told us the ins and outs of campus, which was comforting,” she said. “The school just needs to revamp the curriculum for the course and advertise it in a better, more interesting way to get people to sign up for it.” studentlife@cm-life.com

the past to eliminate Saturday mail delivery, but has always encountered delays by Congress who essentially put the issue on the “back burner.” Those who disagree with the elimination of the Saturday mail delivery argue that weekend mail delivery is imperative, because U.S. businesses have been formed with the idea that communication through mail is a possibility six days a week. The argument is that businesses might struggle to succeed if this important resource is eliminated. When asked if it was important to make the switch to a five-day delivery week, many students’ answers were similar to the one given by Fowlerville junior Kara Gagnon: “A regular business week is Monday through Friday anyway, so why not the mail, too?” Gagnon said. “So many things are online now, like applications, paychecks and stubs, etc., that if something can’t wait the weekend, there are other ways to access it.” metro@cm-life.com

CMU’s music department, J. Harold Powers. “This is the 91st season of the Chippewa Marching Band at CMU,” Band Director James Batcheller said. “In addition to our appearances on behalf of the Chippewa football team this year, the Marching Chips will perform in the Homecoming parade.” All 285 members of the marching band met for their first full practice on Aug. 16, and the various sections of the band will continue to rehearse for 10

hours each day until classes start on Aug. 26. The marching band’s first show of the season will take place at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor on Aug. 31 in front of an expected crowd of more than 100,000 fans for the season opener against the University of Michigan. Drum Major Julie Claveau, who has been with the marching band since her freshman year, said the band has been busy preparing for the game since July. “For many, this is their first

time being in the Big House, and certainly the first time for all performing in it,” the Scottville senior said. “We are ready to perform at our best and support the team.” The game at will kick off the band’s busy fall season. They will perform at a total of 11 games in September, October and November and they hope to finish the season playing at the Mid-American Conference Championship Game on Dec. 6 at Detroit. studentlife@cm-life.com

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News

10A | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

WEDDING|

Pete’s hand. “And now, I am getting married.”

THE PROPOSAL

CONTINUED FROM 1A “I remember when we had first found out, I think the fear set in on me,” Pete said. “When I told Michelle what was happening, she was the solid rock, telling me everything was going to be OK.” Within a day, everything changed. Michelle spent three weeks at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, after which she made continued trips back for radiation and chemotherapy treatments in pill form. Then came the seizure and stroke, which confined Michelle to a wheelchair. The prognosis only got worse for Michelle when doctors said they didn’t expect her to walk again without assistance. Both were still students at Central Michigan University and had a month of school to go when it became obvious that Michelle was going to miss the rest of her classes. Both took incompletes. “Pete never left my side when I was at the hospital,” Michelle said, smiling. “I never doubted him, but it was just very nice to have Pete there. Sometimes I struggle with certain things, and he has just been there all along.”

FROM THE BEGINNING

It would be an understatement to label Michelle and Pete as shy people. When Michelle first saw Pete in the summer of 2004, he was playing baseball with her brother Spencer, both of whom were coached by Michelle’s father. “I had no idea who he was, because he had come from a different school,” she said, trying to hide her smile. “I saw him playing on my brother’s baseball team and asked my dad, ‘Who is that?’” Back then, MSN Messenger was beginning to take off, and it proved to be the outlet that brought them together. They would instant message one another, which eventually led to Pete working up enough courage to ask her out during one of their Messenger conversations. They began dating the summer before eighth grade on Aug. 8; an anniversary the couple just celebrated earlier this month. “There was a time at night when I would wait on MSN Messenger for Michelle to get on so I could talk to her,” Pete said. The two had only known each other for a couple of weeks and had hardly any verbal communication between that time, but that didn’t seem to sway Michelle’s opinion of Pete. “I didn’t know that I would always be with him since I was 14, but it just worked out,” Michelle said, squeezing

In the months leading up to her stay in the hospital, Michelle kept coming back to the song “Just the Way You Are,” by Bruno Mars. She had always joked the song was about her. At one point during her stay in the hospital, Michelle was put into a medically induced coma. The doctors said it would be a miracle if she made it through the next 48 hours. “There was a big gathering in the hospital, because everyone wanted to see her,” Pete said, looking down at his hands. “At that point, I thought I was going to lose her.” After she made it through those first two days, Pete decided he was past the point of waiting, so he asked one of Michelle’s roommates for a design she had been interested in for an engagement ring. “I was waiting for the right moment (to propose), and I decided I was done waiting,” he said. “I wanted to propose now, so that we could get to experience that moment no matter what happened.” Lansing senior Taylor Maylee lived with Michelle during their sophomore year at CMU and was familiar with the designs Pete was seeking. “We were going through magazines not too long ago and she kind of said sarcastically, ‘Maybe I should cut this picture of this ring out and put it in Pete’s gym bag,’” Maylee said. Pete went in search of the ring that resembled the drawings pinned on Michelle’s wall, accompanied by Michelle’s roommates and a few family members. “When I walked into the jewelry store, the Bruno Mars song was playing, and it was at that point where you sometimes get those moments in life where you think you are in the exact right place at the right time,” Pete said. Half awake and still groggy, Michelle was greeted with the question she had been expecting to come years later. “I knew that he was going to propose at some point within the next few years,” Michelle said, blinking back tears. “I just didn’t know when. Being in the hospital was unexpected.”

THE WEDDING

The Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort Dream Wedding Contest began June 1 and was later discovered by Michelle. “I first saw it on Facebook, and it had been going on for two weeks,” Michelle said. “So I brought it to Pete’s attention and we sort of went from there.” The contest involves a number of couples vying for the top prize of a wedding

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor St. Johns senior Pete Maniez and fiancee Michelle Boog look at their current standing in the Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort Dream Wedding Photo Contest. The couple is in first place with 17,965 votes.

valued at $40,000, catering for up to 600 people, complementary hotel rooms, a 50-person rehearsal dinner and numerous other bonuses. Despite starting two weeks later than most of the couples, Michelle and Pete are leading in votes, gaining more than 17,000, with the Sept. 30 voting deadline in sight. “It’s amazing that we have received this much support so far,” Pete says shaking his head in disbelief. “Just being in the running is amazing. There are so many other deserving stories.” They started a Facebook page in 2011 called “Prayers for Michelle Boog” and continued to provide updates during her recovery. Support for them came rolling in online, as the page gained more than 900 followers. Halfway through August, Michelle and Pete received a call from the 10th-place couple saying they hoped they were the ones to win. Even now, sitting on the couch, Pete is both anxious and nervous about the last month of voting. Michelle sits beside him with both of her hands clasped around his forearm, like a child hugging a tree. Pete said he’s worried they might be passed in the voting, and admits to having set alarms on his phone to remind him when to vote everyday. As for Michelle’s cancer, doctors have no idea what actually happened. All they can assume is that the treatments did their job. “It’s hard, because so much happened in such a small amount of time,” Michelle said, thinking back to those nights in her hospital

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor St. Johns senior Pete Maniez and fiancee Michelle Boog look at the signatures on the football helmet they received while Michelle was in the hospital battling brain cancer in April of 2011.

bed. “Some of it I don’t remember, some of it I wasn’t coherent, and some of it has just been told to me through other people.” Both of the CMU seniors are hoping to get not only a wedding from the contest, but a celebration of their

lives together. “Whether we win or not, we are still going through the process as if we are not going to win,” Pete said when thinking about the big day. “We are just enjoying the contest, but planning for our wedding in August.”

To vote for Pete and Michelle, check out the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort Dream Wedding Giveaway voting page online. metro@cm-life.com

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News

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 11A

University Cup closes after 19 years of business By Lauren Fowlkes Staff Reporter

It was more than just a coffee shop. University Cup, 1027 S. Franklin St., was a place where students and residents could come get their morning coffee, see a familiar face, study or just hang out. It was a place that provided an alternative to the bar and a home away from home. This was the vision of UCup owners Tim Driessnack and Lori Lapham-Driessnack when they first opened

in 1994, marking their territory as the first campus coffee shop. They were two ambitious newlyweds ready to quit their corporate jobs and embark on a new, exciting journey. “Even when we worked our corporate jobs, we always had that entrepreneur spirit in us,” Tim said. Nineteen years later, Tim and Lori have announced the closing of their beloved coffee shop. “It was a painful decision that we had been struggling with for almost a year now,” Lori said.

With the opening of Starbucks in the Bovee University Center and several Java City locations on campus, UCup was thrown a curveball. “We tried to keep it up as long as we could, but we just could not compete with how convenient the other coffee shops are, being that they are right on campus in the UC and library,” Tim said. The Driessnacks said the biggest thing they will miss is their loyal customers and staff. “I really enjoyed working with college students,”

Tim said. “I got the chance to invest in them by helping mentor them and give advice.” Mid Michigan Community College student Matthew Owen made it a habit to go to U-Cup every Thursday to get a cup of joe with his friends after His House church services. He also went for open mic nights or to study. “Every time I would go there, I would see at least five friends I knew, and we would get the chance to study or just to catch up,” Owen said.

Former student Alexis Nicole started going as a student in 1999. Now, she lives not too far from UCup and has made it a point to visit at least a couple of times a week. When she did go, Nicole typically ordered her usual: a Raspberry Nut Mocha and Calypso Chicken. “It was a really good place to meet up, study and talk … Sad to see it go,” she said. Long-time customer John Gerhard started going to the coffee shop when it first opened. Over the years, Gerhard built relationships with the Driessnacks, baristas and customers. “I met a lot of good peo-

ple over the years,” Gerhard said. “I still keep in touch with a lot of the baristas.” Since Gerhard first started frequenting the shop, he was hooked. “When I had to take trips out-of-town, I would go out of my way to stop by University Cup to get some coffee and to say hi,” Gerhard said. Even though the Franklin Street location is closing, there is good news for the avid U-Cupper: There still is a University Cup location at McLaren-Central Michigan Hospital, located at 1221 South Drive. metro@cm-life.com


News

12A | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

MAINstage to feature more than 300 RSOs, free food MAINstage 2013

MAINstage will host more than 300 registered student organizations and local businesses for students to familiarize themselves with. Date w Sunday Time

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Location

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By Nathan Clark Staff Reporter

Going to college opens thousands of opportunities to meet new people and discover new things. Finding these new and interesting activities can present a challenge, unless students know where to look. Central Michigan University hosts an event with that in mind every year. New and returning students are invited to get familiar with more than 300 campus clubs and local businesses at MAINstage 2013 on Sunday from 2-6

History professor Timothy Hall detests seeing his old textbooks and teaching materials going to waste. “We all become attached to our books and hate to see them destroyed – even if properly recycled – especially if they can be useful to someone else,” Hall said. With the help of Better World Books, a philanthropic, for-profit online bookseller, Hall and other like-minded Central Michigan University officials might be able to keep many of those materials in the hands of students instead of a landfill. Last spring, CMU signed a one-year contract with Better World Books to place five of the company’s bright green book-donation boxes outside of the University Center, Moore Hall, Ronan Hall, the Events Center and the Towers residential halls.

“MAINstage is the capstone of Welcome Week, and a great way for students to find out how to get involved in student organizations and the community.” Various clubs ranging from volunteer groups to Greek life will be available to answer questions along with dozens of community businesses. There will also be live music, games, inflatables and t free food and beverages. The event is free to attend. studentlife@cm-life.com

Paige Calamari | File Photo Mattawan junior Allie Bosch, left, and freshman Liz Bosch enjoy a free meal by Rose Pond Aug. 22, 2010, during MAINstage.

Cheers to a New Semester!

University partners with Better World for book donations By Ben Solis Staff Reporter

p.m. in the parking lot across from the Student Activity Center and Kelly/Shorts Stadium. For the past 15 years, CMU’s Office of Student Activities and Involvement has been helping students connect with student organizations and local businesses by hosting MAINstage and bringing as many businesses and groups under one roof as possible. “We want the students to feel connected to not only the school, but the community as a whole,” Damon Brown, director of the Office of Student Activities and Involvement, said.

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 13A

S 2013 Saturday, August 17 - Wednesday, August 21

• Leadership Safari

Thursday, August 22

• Residence Hall Students Move In • Campus and Community Life Orientation (CCLO) begins in the evening • Fast & Furious 6 - 9pm, Kelly/Shorts Stadium

Friday, August 23

• CCLO Continues - schedule based upon

residence hall assignment • Club SAC - 8pm, Experience the hottest place in town this Friday night...Club SAC! The night begins with Comedian Tracey Ashley and then followed by electrifying music by Sound Productions, bowling, video games, and other free activities! Come out and celebrate the start of an other exciting year at CMU! • Meijer Mania Back to School event - 8pm, buses pick up at East campus, North campus, Towers, and South campus

Saturday, August 24

• CCLO Continues - schedule based upon

residence hall assignment • Max & Emily’s Summer Concert Series - 7pm, featuring Howie Day (Downtown Mt. Pleasant) • Main Street CENTRAL - 8pm-12am, around Fresh Food Market • (Rain Plan is in the Events Center) • Movie Night - All movies begin @ 9pm • The Great Gatsby - Robinson courtyard • Identity Thief - Outside of the Market • Oblivion - the Towers

Sunday, August 25

• Freshstart walk & 5k - 11am at the SAC

Get your year started in the right direction! Join us for a fun walk or jog while experiencing how excersise can improve your overall wellness. Fresh start participants will receive a free walker’s logbook with helpful hints to make walking a safe, fun and beneficial experience as well as other great give-a-ways and prizes! • MainStage - 2pm to 6pm, Kelly/Shorts Stadium Parking Lot Each year thousands of CMU students attend the event. This is a tremendous opportunity for both students and the Mount Pleasant community to get to know each other. In addition, it’s a great way for all students to “connect” to all the great organizations and offices that CMU has to offer.

Monday, August 26

• Classes Begin • Lunch on the lawn - 10am-2pm • Signer/Songwriter Preston Pugmire - 12pm-1pm • Free Food & Giveaways!

Tuesday, August 27

• Don’t Become Academically Adrift - 7pm-9pm,

Discussion of the importance of reading, writing, and time man agement on academic tasks - not just for college, but for sucess after graduation.

Wednesday, August 28

• Get Acquainted Day - 4pm, Warriner Mall

Monday, September 3

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Friday, September 6

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14A | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

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Sports cm-life.com

Family matters:

Two sets of sisters lead field hockey team »PAGE 3B

THURSDAY, AUG. 22, 2013|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 1 VOL. 95

Kater named starting quarterback for 2013 By Kristopher Lodes & Aaron McMann Sports Editor & Senior Reporter

After an offseason of guessing who the man behind center will be, Central Michigan football coach Dan Enos named Cody Kater starting quarterback Wednesday afternoon. Kater, the journeyman from Montague, Mich., albeit small, had the experience advantage against redshirt sophomore Alex Niznak and

redshirt freshman Cooper Rush in the offseason-long quarterback battle. Niznak will be No. 2 on the depth chart, with Rush third. “Alex and Cody, in particular, have raised their level from even the spring until now,” Enos said Wednesday after practice. “Their comfort with the offense was just off the charts. At the end of the day, we thought Cody played a little bit better, a little bit more consistent. He’ll be the starter.

We looked at it more the big picture of all the practices. We put them in team situations every day; they all had chances with the 1s and 2s. It was very difficult, but we feel good about it.” He was recruited by former head coach Butch Jones out of high school and decided to leave with Jones to Cincinnati, but transferred to Grand Rapids Community College after one season to return to CMU. At GRCC, he

led his team to an undefeated season with 2,218 yards passing and 19 touchdowns, while running for 356 yards and nine touchdowns. At CMU, Kater is played sparingly — Enos said Wednesday that Kater or Niznak didn’t give him a shot to win last season – with only two appearances, completing two passes for 12 yards, for the Chippewas in 2012. Now he’s tasked with leading the Chippewas into

Michigan Stadium on Aug. 31 to play No. 17 Michigan. “I’m looking forward to it,” Kater said. “This is why you went to college, to play football at Division 1 – to play football at the highest level. You want to compete your butt off. You’re obviously looking forward to the whole thing, the gameday atmosphere. We know what has to happen.” sports@cm-life.com

Cody Kater

Photo Illustration by Luke Roguska & Taylor Ballek | Assistant Design & Photo Editor

All eyes on Tipton Football leaning on running back’s strength with inexperience at quarterback

By Aaron McMann Senior Reporter

Talk to Zurlon Tipton for five minutes and you get mixed signals. A quiet, shy, down-to-Earth guy from Detroit, he sometimes struggles to find the right thing to say. But he just loves to play football. Start asking him more about football and that confidence, dancing toward cockiness, comes out. But you also get a sense of a young man grow-

Three players set to make impact on field By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

When Jahleel Addae was ranked by ESPN coming out of high school, analysts said he was “a back, wide receiver and return specialist, but is vastly undersized and must be used as a change-of-pace offensively.” A lot has changed for Addae since being ranked 605th in his region. He changed his position to safety, had a break out season in 2010 as a redshirt sophomore, and is now fighting for a spot on the San Diego Chargers roster. Addae is just one example of numerous Chippewas who started as unknowns and created names for themselves. And

ing into a role as a leader. He has to, being one of a handful of experienced seniors on the offense. His coach sees it, too. “He said at (Mid-American Conference) media day that he was going to be more vocal, and I almost fainted,” said head coach Dan Enos. “How can this guy be more vocal? He has been, believe it or not.” But not in the tone you might think. Instead of spewing trash talk on the field or horsing around with teammates, he

with a new season beginning, new dark horse candidates will have to do the same. Senior wide receiver Defarrel Davis was rated four stars by scout.com when he came out of high school in 2010. He played at Nassau Community College in New York before coming to Central Michigan in 2012. The Melvindale, Mich., native has had a year to digest the CMU playbook as a receiver after averaging a team high 24.3 yards on kickoff returns last year. Head coach Dan Enos has been impressed with Davis. “Davis has really emerged; he was a junior college guy who was signed last year,” Enos said. Sophomore Andrew Flory burst onto the scene against Eastern Michigan late last season after fellow wide receiver Titus Davis went down. Flory caught nine passes for 118 yards and two touchdowns that game and continued to be a scoring threat for the rest of the year. Senior defensive back Av-

ery Cunningham faces Flory in practice every day and has been impressed with what he has seen. “The guy just makes big catch after big catch,” Cunningham said. “When Titus Davis was down for us last year, he stepped up for us big time.” On the defensive side of the ball, Cunningham works with defensive lineman Blake Serpa. Serpa finished the 2012 season strong, starting the last eight games of the year and recording his first career sack in the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl at Ford Field in Detroit in December. The redshirt sophomore from Illinois has made the defensive line stronger this year, according to Cunningham. “I think since he has been here he has made a lot of improvements,” Cunningham said. “He is tough, he will be able to rush the passer, and has made improvements to himself..” sports@cm-life.com

understands the situation. Forget the recently resolved quarterback saga. Forget the criticism of Enos’ job as head coach – Tipton, in fact, has a huge amount of respect for his coach and the playbook. For him, it’s about production and getting others involved. Those numbers he posted last year - 1,492 yards rushing and 20 touchdowns - have landed him on a pair of watch lists with some of the best backs in the country. Should he post a repeat performance of

last season, or better, an award could be waiting for him. There’s always the NFL, too. “I feel like I opened a lot of people’s eyes to who Zurlon Tipton is,” Tipton said in July at MAC media day. “But I’m not just stopping there. I feel like there’s a lot more to accomplish. Making those lists is a great honor, but at the end of the day, it’s still a list. I’ve got to go out and prove why I’m on this list.” w TIPTON | 3B

Chippewas to play seven road games By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

Head football coach Dan Enos said he is asked every summer about the difficult schedule his team has to endure.

This summer was no different. And for good reason. Central Michigan faces two BCS schools, a team that went to a BCS bowl last season, and it has to play seven games on the road. The Chippewas will be presented their biggest audience and most difficult test in its first game of the season against the No. 17 Michigan at Michigan Stadium on Aug. 31. Enos has had his own success in Ann Arbor, beating the then No. 1

Bethany Walter | File Photo Defensive back Avery Cunningham lunges to tackle Western Michigan University running back Dareyon Chance on Nov. 3, 2012 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Wolverines 28-27 in 1990 as the starting quarterback for the Michigan State Spartans. But it won’t be easy for his team, who is 0-3 all-time against Michigan. “I have the upmost respect for their program, for (head coach) Brady Hoke, his staff,” Enos said. “It’s going to be good for our football team to go play in that environment on the opening week and say, ‘Hey guys, you’re on national TV, and you’re going to have 100,000 in the stands.’” Senior cornerback Avery Cunningham has connections with Michigan’s archrival in Ohio State, which he rooted for as a child growing up in Cincinnati. “I definitely hold a grudge against Michigan. Being from Ohio, I really don’t like them,” w PREVIEW | 3B

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2B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

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Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 3B

TIPTON | CONTINUED FROM 1

“I’m not just stopping there. I feel like there’s a lot more to accomplish. Making those lists is a great honor, but at the end of the day, it’s still a list. I’ve got to go out and prove why I’m on this list.” Zurlon Tipton, running back

Photos by Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor

From left: junior Maureen Riley, senior Ellen Riley, senior Bailey McKeon and sophomore Taylor McKeon.

Family matters: Two sets of sisters lead field hockey By Morgan Yuncker Staff Reporter

When watching field hockey this season at Central Michigan, fans might think they are suffering from double vision. It’s no mistake, though, as the team consists of two pairs of sisters this year: the Riley sisters and the McKeon sisters. The Pennsylvania-native McKeon sisters – senior Bailey and sophomore Taylor, are entering their second and final year of playing at CMU together. “I think next year will be hard, especially not having someone to talk to and not having family up here,” Taylor said. “I have learned things from (Bailey) on and off the field, especially what it means to be a student-athlete.” The Riley sisters – senior Ellen and junior Maureen of Louisville - have been

at CMU together for three years. Like the McKeons, this will also be their last year playing together. “It will be weird not having her here next year, but I played my high school senior year without her, so it will probably be close to that feeling,” Maureen said. The two have played more than seven years together, so they know a little bit about each other on the field. “I don’t know if I would call them weird sister powers, but I know when she is going to cut and she knows when I will. I also know her voice on the field above everyone else’s, so it makes it easier when we are playing together,” Ellen said. “She is someone I could always talk to and cry to; we cried a lot together,” Maureen said, laughing. This year will be bittersweet for the four teammates as two

PREVIEW | CONTINUED FROM 1 he said. “I always watched the Ohio State versus Michigan rivalry. That’s probably the biggest rivalry in college football, so I definitely watched that and still watch it to this day.” Cunningham and his teammates have another chance to prove themselves against what could be a top-25 opponent on Oct. 19 against Northern Illinois, which finished No. 22 in the final AP Top 25 Poll last season and

came in as the No. 38 team in the USA Today preason coaches poll. At least the Chippewas will be in the friendly confines of Kelly/Shorts Stadium on Homecoming against the Huskies and also on Sept. 21 against Toledo, which also received a vote in the USA Today poll and has been high in the standings of the West Division over the years. In a bit of an oddity in the schedule, CMU has two and

say goodbye to what might be the last season they are able to spend playing the sport they love with their sister. “I think I will be missing the team aspect of things next year. I am going to miss the game and playing it, but I’ll miss playing with her as well,” Ellen said. “I will definitely make it to some of the games next year.”

But, now is not the time to dwell on next season’s changes. With the 2013 season underway, the team has a long way to go. Winning is definitely something on Bailey’s mind, with this being the last year for her to get a Mid-American Conference Championship.

a half weeks off after the NIU game and then plays an all-too-typical weekday game at Ball State on Wednesday, Nov. 6. “I don’t mind it, because it gives our conference exposure,” Enos said. “My whole thing on weekday games is this – don’t make us play on short rest. I think that puts the student athletes at risk.” Senior running back Zurlon Tipton said, as a player, he could not care less when he plays. “Whatever day you play football, you’re blessed and you’re just happy about playing on that day,” he said. “So

if it was on a Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, I’m excited just to play the game.” The team will travel to Kalamazoo on Nov. 16 to play Western Michigan, now led by new head coach P.J. Fleck. Tipton, the workhorse for the offense, has a 2-2 record in his time at CMU against the rival Broncos. “You definitely don’t want to have a losing record against anybody,” Tipton said. “With this win, I’ll definitely enjoy it for the rest of my life.”

sports@cm-life.com

A fifth-year senior for the Chippewas, Tipton essentially missed a year and half of his college career due to injuries. He sat out 11 games in 2009, his freshman season, and missed the final five of the 2011 season with a broken foot. In between, during the 2010 season – Enos’ first in Mount Pleasant – Tipton was a blip on the radar with 203 yards on 56 carries in 10 games. Since arriving on campus during the Butch Jones era, Tipton has bulked up, gotten stronger, and developed into the first legitimate power-back of Enos’ tenure. Enos, a product of the Big Ten environment, has always preached size and depth since coming to CMU. “Last year was really the first year he’s really played running back since his senior year of high school,” Enos said. “So you can see the development in how much he’s improved. I think a lot of it has to do with confidence, but he understands the schemes and has been playing at a very high level.” Add in uncertainty at quarterback, (Cody Kater has played in only two games for CMU) and Tipton’s production becomes key to a successful offense. When asked, he said he doesn’t feel the pressure to carry the offense, citing Enos’ preference for a balanced offense. But deep down, he wants more carries.

“Even when (Ryan) Radcliff was here, I was after coach Enos about needing to run it more – like 80/20,” Tipton said with a laugh. “But he wasn’t having it. I’m not expecting anything but what he expects of me.” Enos considers Tipton an “every-down back,” meaning he can play in most situations, including goal-line plays and short-yard situations. He’ll also get help from sophomore Saylor Lavallii and junior Anthony Garland, who provided short-yardage help when needed last season. Additionally, he’ll benefit from an experienced offensive line, sans first overall NFL draft pick Eric Fisher. Senior Jake Olsen, back for his sixth year, anchors a line that includes three others – Andy Phillips, Nick Beamish and Kevin Henry – with starts under their belt. And when referencing the line, Tipton has learned to use “we.” He credits Fisher and the rest of the line with his successful season last year – he was the first CMU running back to rush for 1,000 yards since Ontario Sneed in 2005 – and realizes it takes more than just his jukes, jives and northsouth running. “Those guys up front, that’s me basically,” he said. “If they’re not there, then there’s no Zurlon Tipton.” sports@cm-life.com

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Sports

4B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Chuck Miller | File Photo Freshman midfielder Josie Seebeck attempts to kick the ball during the first half of the quarterfinal game against Oct. 27th, against Northern Illinois at the CMU Soccer Complex.

Remembering

JOSIE

Friends reflect on her personality, leadership and life By Aaron McMann Senior Reporter

J

osie Seebeck, 19, a sophomore on the Central Michigan University women’s soccer team, died Aug. 4 following a car accident near Lansing on Aug. 2. Seebeck was driving with two teammates, sophomore Christen Chiesa and freshman Maddy Bunnell, returning from a soccer match in Indianapolis when their vehicle rolled near Charlotte, Mich., in Eaton County. The teammates were taken to the hospital, where Seebeck was pronounced dead at 11:40 p.m. two nights later. Chiesa and Bunnell have both been released, but the status of their injuries is unknown. Seebeck, a native of Montgomery, Ala., was a midfielder for the Mid-American Conference West champion Chippewas and ended her freshman season with MAC All-Freshmen team honors. She had one goal and one assist on the year in 14 games. “Our hearts and prayers go out to Josie’s family, friends and teammates,” Director of Athletics Dave Heeke said in a statement. “...This is a tough, tragic time for our soccer studentathletes and the entire CMU Chippewa family.” Seebeck attended Ramstein High School in Germany, where she was a member of the 2012 European Tournament Champions squad and was named All-European Tournament MVP, totaling 20 goals and 16 assists in her senior year. In addition to performing well on the field, Seebeck excelled in the classroom. According to her CMU Athletics profile page, she had a 3.87 GPA through her freshman year.

FRIENDS REMEMBER JOSIE

Meg Hart remembers the bus ride two years ago. It was a youth group trip to Madrid, Spain, and the first time she met Seebeck. She remembers their trips to Kaiserslautern, Germany, or “K-Town” as their group of friends called it, to watch soccer on TV. “When she was up at CMU, she was always busy with soccer training,” Hart said. Hart first met Seebeck in high school. Their families, both fathers in the military, relocated from the D.C. area to Ramstein Air Base in Germany. In June, Josie flew from Texas to D.C. to attend Hart’s graduation party. “She was intensely caring about everybody,” Hart said. “She honestly would go out of her way to help some-

one to become friends with someone. … It just feels like a week ago when she was sitting here with me and all of my friends.” Drew Guffey remembers the time spent kicking the soccer ball around with Seebeck. He remembers the time they spent talking, hours on end. The two met their sophomore year of high school. They both participated in a

have so many great memories with her that I cherish and will remember for the rest of my life.” “My favorite memory of Josie is that of her contagious smile with joy,” Guffey said. “I’m grateful for my time with her.”

COACHES, TEAMMATES REFLECT

Like a seasoned veteran, but only entering her second year of college, Seebeck was always planning her next move. Good midfielders do that. “We joked about how much she would plan life,” said senior midfielder Tory Kinniard, after sharing a laugh with teammate Kaely Schlosser. “She was always looking for the next thing to do.” Peter McGahey, who was named the program’s coach in January, said his players came from throughout the country over the weekend to visit their teammates in the hospital. He called Seebeck a “true student-athlete,” one who played well on the field

“She had the presence of a true leader and played with unmatched grace.” Drew Guffey, high school friend European soccer camp and ended up having several classes together in school. There they grew close. Before he even met her, Guffey recalled Seebeck playing on his sister’s soccer team for a tournament. She was a guest player, but outplayed everyone and “dominated every game.” “(It was) to the point where the German boys in attendance started chanting her name over and over,” Guffey said. “The longer I knew her, and the more I saw her play, it became apparent she had much more than just skill. She always played with so much heart, leaving everything on the field. She had the presence of a true leader and played with unmatched grace.” Guffey spoke to her a day or two before the accident about planning a trip to Europe next summer. “Any time I needed advice, a shoulder to lean on, or just someone to vent to, Josie was my go-to person,” said Guffey, 19, now a student at the College of Charleston. “I

and earned good grades. McGahey also began to notice where her talent was heading. He said he had looked forward to working with Seebeck on her passing game. “One of the things we talked about as a team was players who could change the rhythm of the game,” McGahey said. “Josie had that ability to change the pace of the game with a pass, or defensively.” Neil Stafford, the former CMU head coach whose staff recruited Seebeck, called the news “devastating.” Stafford credits Stephanie Webb, a former graduate assistant coach at CMU, with finding Seebeck. Seebeck visited a CMU summer camp two summers ago, confirming the coaching staff ’s opinion of her ability. “She was an incredibly well-rounded young woman,” Stafford said. “She made our program better, and that’s what we ask everybody to do, to make an impact – she did academically, she did athletically,

and she did with her personality. She fit right in and certainly had the talent, the drive, the passion to elevate our program.” She had so much passion that she scored her only goal last season to seal CMU’s win against Northern Illinois in the quarterfinals of the MAC tournament while recovering from broken ribs. “Anybody who came into contact with Josie just saw how special she was,” Stafford said, his voice cracking. “You just remember her smile. You can remember what a great person she was. The women’s soccer program is now preparing for the regular season opener against Detroit on Sunday. “There truly is no script for us this fall. There is no master plan,” McGahey said. “We’re going to work one day at a time to do our best to be together, to work through our grief and our sadness and our tremendous loss as best we can one day at a time. And some days may be better than others. There are lots of twists and turns, and we’re just going to have to take it one day at a time. But the most important thing was that we’re all going to do that together.”

SEEBECKS: ‘WE JUST NEED TO GO ON’

Before flying back to their home on Randolph Air Force Base in suburban San Antonio, Amy Seebeck, Josie’s mother, said the

family’s close-knit makeup and Catholic faith will help them cope with their daughter’s death. The family will continue to hang Josie’s stocking at Christmas and plans to celebrate her birthday. She would have been 20 on Aug. 19. “She had a bright future,” Amy said. “She was excited about this year at Central Michigan; she just couldn’t wait to play with her teammates and play for coach Peter (McGahey). That freshman year is always that transition year … (and) the groundwork was laid for her to have a good year. It’s sad when you have your dreams cut off.” Amy described her daughter, the oldest of five girls, as a “no-drama girl” who loved gathering people

and planning things. “She was born with that,” Amy said. “She was a natural team player, and she was comfortable around women and men, girls and boys. A lot of her friends in high school were young men. She had a gift for connecting with people.” he had to – “Military brats tend to adapt,” her father, Peter Seebeck, said with a laugh. There will be a candlelight vigil today at 9 p.m. at St. Mary’s University Parish, 1405 Washington St. The CMU Athletics and women’s soccer programs are hosting the vigil and ask the attendees wear bright colored clothing to honor Josie’s life. sports@cm-life.com

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Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 5B

Volleyball looks to bounce back By Joe Judd Staff Reporter

Volleyball has started preparing for the upcoming season after last year’s late season struggles erased a strong start. Going into this season, the team looks to make up for the disappointing finish to its 2012 campaign, just two years removed from winning the Mid-American Conference Championship. Head coach Erik Olson does not shy away from explaining his goals for his team this year. “Our expectations are to contend for a champi-

onship as we always do,” Olson said. CMU began the conference schedule with an impressive six-match winning streak, only to go on and lose five of its final nine matches with an early MAC Tournament exit. “I really like how we played the first half, and I was really disappointed with the six-match losing streak,” Olson said. With the losing streak to end the season, the Chippewas peak came earlier than Olson or his team would like. Despite last season’s setbacks, CMU has plenty of reasons to be hopeful.

Schuette returns to court after injury-plagued 2012 By Taylor DesOrmeau Staff Reporter

Coming off a Mid-American Conference championship in 2011, Katie Schuette’s senior season as an outside hitter for the volleyball team looked promising. Then she suffered a stress fracture in a vertebra during the summer of 2012, which threatened to end her volleyball career. She decided to come back as a graduate student for her final year of eligibility.

“Katie sat out for a good seven, eight months of doing nothing physical other than rehab,” said head coach Erik Olson. “We offered her the ability to graduate and be done. She wants to be here.” Even though she wasn’t able to participate last year, she did what she could to help the team. “Last year I was still a big part of the team,” Schuette said. “We had a pretty good system where I was still helping the players even though I wasn’t physically involved.”

“She felt like whether she earned a starting job or not, she had something to contribute to this program.” Erik Olson, head coach

They have a strong senior core of players, including setter Kelly Maxwell, libero Jenna Coates, middle blocker Danielle Gotham and outside hitter/middle blocker Katie Schuette, who is returning from an injury for her fifth year of eligibility. With the addition of assistant coach Mitch Kallick, CMU is seeking another MAC title, and Kallick has some games marked on the calendar. “The Western (Michigan) match I hear is always a little contentious and always a little aggressive,” Kallick said. “I’m looking forward

to becoming a part of that rivalry at the same time.” Olson doesn’t have any particular games circled on his schedule. But if he did, it would be be one circle around August-November. “Every one of (the games) (are important),” Olson said. “I can’t wait to play every single match.” The Chippewas are preparing for the annual Maroon and Gold Scrimmage on Saturday, shortly followed by their season opener on Aug. 30 against Oakland University at the Oakland Invitational.

Volleyball home matches w w w w w w w w w

Saturday, Aug. 24 Maroon and Gold scrimmage 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27 vs Toledo 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28 vs Ball State 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 vs Kent State 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25 vs Buffalo 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26 vs Akron 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 vs Northern Illinois 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9 vs Western Michigan 7:00 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 vs Eastern Michigan 7:00 p.m.

sports@cm-life.com

The recovery process was not an easy one for Schuette, but she hasn’t needed her back brace for four months and has been playing with the team all spring. Her dedication hasn’t gone unnoticed. “She felt like whether she earned a starting job or not, she had something to contribute to this program,” Olson said. “If she’s physically able, she’s obviously able to help us out in that way as well.” Schuette watched her team struggle in the middle of the season. “It was difficult, but we were all just trying to stick together as a team,” Schuette said. “I think by the end of the season we were back on track.” She and her coach both believe she has bounced back stronger than before. “Thus far, she’s been in the top two at her position throughout preseason, so it’s been great to see,” Olson said. “I would say she’s playing the best volleyball of her career.” sports@cm-life.com

Maxwell brings veteran leadership By Joe Judd Staff Reporter

Going into the 2013 season, the Chippewas have three seniors on their roster along with one graduate student. Part of this nucleus of senior leadership is setter Kelly Maxwell. For Maxwell, it was not a quick journey to where she is now. As a freshman three years ago, she found herself sitting the bench for most of the year behind Catherine Ludwig. “I honestly think that has taught me a lot about

what it means to run the court,” Maxwell said. “It’s given me a lot of character and it’s shown me what it means to be a good athlete.” Now a senior, Maxwell has noticed some changes in the way she goes about her business. “It’s different being a senior and being the one who everyone looks up to,” Maxwell said. “I think I’ve come into that role.” As the new season is fast-approaching, Maxwell recalls last season’s ups and downs and how she looks to use last season as a stepping stone.

“We had a good run at the beginning of the season and tailed off a little bit toward the end,” Maxwell said. “We’re looking to improve on our consistency and we’re going for a 20plus win season.” Maxwell is a team player, doing whatever it takes for the team. She is looking to set goals for not just herself, but her team as well. “Last year, our offensive numbers went down, so I’m going to focus on running a more efficient offense,” she said. sports@cm-life.com

Jeff Smith | File Photo Grand Blanc senior Katie Schuette spikes the ball on July 28, 2010 during a match against Ohio.


Sports

6B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Women’s soccer pushes for MAC supremacy Players to honor Seebeck By Dominick Mastrangelo Staff Reporter

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor Junior forward Laura Gosse fights for possession of the ball against Michigan State forward Lisa Vogel Sunday evening during the exhibition game against the Spartans at the CMU Soccer Complex. Central Michigan won 1-0.

Gosse, Schlosser, Van de Kerkhove will guide morale, play this season By Mark Cavitt & Dominick Mastrangelo Staff Reporters

Just one season after becoming the first Mid-American Conference team to receive an at-large bid in the NCAA tournament, women’s soccer is poised for another successful season. Here are a few things fans should watch for as the Chippewas search for their secondstraight postseason berth and a MAC championship:

KEY PLAYERS

Senior midfielder Kaely Schlosser is the undisputed leader of the team this year

with eight points in 24 shots on goal in 23 games last season. Her vocal style and sheer ability will undoubtedly play a major role in CMU’s success this season. Junior goalkeeper Grace Labrecque started the Chippewas’ first and only exhibition of the year on Aug. 18 against Michigan State, and head coach Peter McGahey said fans can expect to see her in goal for the season opener against Detroit. She had a save percentage of .643 in six games played last season. Sophomore midfielder Eliza Van de Kerkhove was at the top of the list McGahey gave of young players

who might make a splash for the Chippewas this season. She played much of the exhibition against MSU and orchestrated several solid runs leading to scoring chances. Junior forward Laura Gosse returns as one of the Chippewas’ leading scorers from last season. She recorded 11 points last year, including five goals and one assist. Goose was the only player to start all 23 games last season and will look to remain one of the leaders on the team. She is always around the net, having 42 shots on goal last season, good for second on the team.

KEY GAMES

Friday, Sept. 27: CMU will travel to play Kent State, which was 7-3-1 in MAC play last year, and will look to knock off CMU as the pride of the conference in 2013. Sunday, Oct. 6: Eastern Michigan comes to Mount Pleasant after an 8-3 season in MAC play last year, while the team will be in the middle of a crucial mid-season home stand as they host their in-state rival. Friday, Oct. 25: The Chippewas will be in Oxford, Ohio to play Miami of Ohio, which finished 10-0-1 in MAC play a year ago and, as the postseason approaches

CMU will look to grab this key road victory as it hopes to be preparing for the NCAA tournament. The team will once again play a tough non-conference schedule this season with match-ups against Ohio State, West Virginia, Indiana, Pittsburgh, Washington, Detroit and Portland. CMU will play all but two of their non-conference games on the road in preparation for their MAC schedule to begin with the Kent State match. sports@cm-life.com

Before an exhibition Sunday against Michigan State University, the soccer players stood at midfield in a half circle, their heads bowed in mourning. The CMU soccer complex was silent. It was the first time the team had publicly acknowledged and collectively mourned the death of its fallen teammate and friend, sophomore midfielder Josie Seebeck, who was killed in a car accident earlier this month. The team announced there would be a 30-second moment of silence before each game in remembrance of Seebeck. “That moment was focused. It was hard for us. Very difficult,” said head coach Peter McGahey. “It was a very nice tribute to Josie and very important to our team.” The team plans on placing patches on their jerseys to commemorate Seebeck this year. It will serve as a gesture of how her legacy will remain with the team all season long. sports@cm-life.com

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor The girls put Josie Seebeck’s initials on their wrists to honor her during the exhibition game Sunday evening at the CMU Soccer Complex.

New staff preaches work, character and belief By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

A year after making its third NCAA tournament appearance in four years, the women’s soccer team will be led by a new coaching staff. Head coach Peter McGahey, the reigning Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Coach of the Year at Minnesota State University, has taken over after Neil Stafford left for the head coaching job at Cincinnati. McGahey compiled a 74-21-13 record in his five seasons at MSU, which included four trips to the NCAA Division II Tournament. In 2012, the program finished with its best record in history at 17-1-5 and 14-0 in conference play. “There are three things I want to see out of my players,” McGahey said. “The girls play hard, they show tremendous character throughout the game, and that they 100-percent, absolutely believe in each other.” Under his watch as head coach of MSU, 30 players made the All-Conference team during his five seasons. Five players also earned

All-American honors in both academics and athletics. Joining McGahey on staff is assistant coach Gretta Arvesen, who was McGahey’s assistant at MSU for five seasons. During her five seasons as a coach, she also served as the student-athlete advisory committee liaison and as an assistant professor. Nemzerwill be serving as the director of external relations

for the CMU soccer program. Nemzer will also oversee the roles of recruiting and video coordinator, as well as advanced scouting and scheduling. Training the goalkeepers will also be one of Nemzer’s duties. Nemzer held the position of head assistant women’s coach at Division II Fort Hays State University. sports@cm-life.com

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Sports EXTRA POINTs Track and Field

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 7B

Women’s soccer defeats MSU 1-0 in only exhibition game By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

Rose competes at World Championships Track and field senior thrower Alex Rose spent this summer strengthing his bid for a spot on Alex Rose the Samoa Olympics team in 2016. Rose, a 2011 AllAmerican in the discus, was most recently in Moscow competing in the 2013 World Championships for Samoa, where he holds dual citizenship. He earned a spot at the games by breaking the Samoan record with a toss of 59.83 meters in May at Augustana College. Rose also competed in the World University Games in Kazan, Russia in July where he took seventh.

Football

New MAC bowl game in 2014 ESPN has reached a six-year deal to have the Camellia Bowl in Montgomery, Ala. Starting in 2014, the new bowl game will feature teams from the Mid-American Conference and Sun Belt Conference. Montgomery is the third city in Alabama to host a bowl game, along with Mobile and Birmingham. Mobile already is the host of the GoDaddy. comBowl, which showcases the teams from the MAC and Sun Belt, and Central Michigan won in 2009.

HO N O R S

2013 HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES ANNOUNCED The 2013 Marcy Weston Athletics Hall of Fame class features five athletes and one team. Pasquale Galba (baseball), Mike Greenfield (wrestling), Nicole Liphardt (gymnastics), Becky Manson (softball), John Wunderlich (football) and the 1982 softball team will be introduced as the newest members of CMU Athletics Hall of Fame Friday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at the CMU Events Center. The hall of fame started in 1984 and consists of 183 individuals and four teams. - Kristopher Lodes, Sports Editor

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor Senior mid-fielder Kaely Schlosser dribbles down the sidelines during the exhibition game against Michigan State Sunday evening at the CMU Soccer Complex. CMU won 1-0.

Coming off an NCAA tournament appearance last season, women’s soccer started this season with a new coach, the loss of a teammate and their eyes on another tournament appearance. The exhibition against Michigan State University Aug. 18 was the team’s only tune-up in preparation for the opener against Detroit Sunday in Mount Pleasant. Head coach Peter McGahey said he liked the team’s ability to focus late in the game, which led to a game-winning goal in the third period. “I think it’s a great tribute to the girls in terms of their attitude that they put into the game,” McGahey said. “It was a fantastic start to the season to score a goal so late in the third. It was an absolute tribute to the women’s character.” The only goal of the game came in the 89th minute. Sophomore defender Emily Basten was the difference in the game. “The goal definitely started from the back. We were able to win it right from the defensive line,” Basten said. “Everybody had a hand in it, kicking it up the field and I just happened to be in on the end of it. It was a total team effort.” McGahey said the team’s ability to apply pressure defensively was the key in the victory. “I thought defensively we were very good in terms of the collective pressure we were able to put on the ball and at

times get them to play faster than they wanted to,” McGahey said. “The most important part defensively today was that we covered for each other when things broke down.” Junior Grace Labrecque started in goal for the Chippewas. The team lost its starting goalkeeper, Stefanie Turner, and will be looking for others to step up this season. Although there was only one goal in the game, McGahey said he thought that the relentless attacking style the team played with, kept MSU on it’s heels leading to that lone goal. “Offensively, playing a team like Michigan State, who is very organized, we were very persistent in the attack, and we did the right things. The ability to keep passing was the key today for us,” McGahey said. At the 8:05 mark, junior midfielder Emily Cooksey was given a penalty kick after junior forward Laura Gosse was grabbed from behind running toward the goal. The kick missed above the goal, and the game remained scoreless. Senior midfielder Kaely Schlosser gave the Chippewas their best scoring chance when she missed wide right by just a few feet. Both defenses held strong in the second period, just as they did in the first. The Chippewas will begin the season Sunday against Detroit at home. Kickoff is scheduled for 5 p.m. sports@cm-life.com

Good defense leads to game-winning goal as soccer team tops MSU By Dominick Mastrangelo Staff Reporter

Sophomore defender Emily Basten is relentless when she is playing soccer. Even seconds after scoring the game-winning goal for the Chippewas against Michigan State University on Aug. 18 she remained focused. Basten found the back of the net after a hard-fought exhibition. Her rebounding kick, which came just moments after a failed Spartan clearing attempt, snuck under the crossbar with 1:16 remaining in overtime. The Chippewas survived the ensuing minute of play and had won their first and only exhibition of the year. “It was a good feeling … watching the ball go in,” she said. “This victory was a total team effort, though. We played a tough game.” Because it came in an exhibition game, Basten’s goal does not officially go into the record books and the defender is still looking for her first official career goal. “I was really proud of what we were able to do today,” said head coach Peter McGahey. “You saw Michigan State come out and be very organized defensively, and we eventually were able to crack that.” The game-winning goal came just after Spartan Lisa Vogel could not collect a two-line pass and cash in on a wide-open Chippewas net. Freshman goalkeeper Heather Laeufer replaced

Emily Basten

starter Grace Labrecque for the final period and nearly cost the Chippewas the game just before Basten’s goal. “It was just getting Heather some experience, that’s all,” McGahey said. “We still plan on starting Grace in goal come next week.” The Chippewas’ next match is at home Sunday vs. Detroit. McGahey, who prides himself on being a defensive-minded coach, was pleased with his team’s effort in warding off MSU’s scoring chances. “We were able to get good pressure on the ball and get them to play faster,” he said. “We kept the game in front of us. I think that was the difference in this one.”

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8B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

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Family matters:

Two sets of sisters lead field hockey team »PAGE 3B

THURSDAY, AUG. 22, 2013|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 1 VOL. 95

Kater named starting quarterback for 2013 By Kristopher Lodes & Aaron McMann Sports Editor & Senior Reporter

After an offseason of guessing who the man behind center will be, Central Michigan football coach Dan Enos named Cody Kater starting quarterback Wednesday afternoon. Kater, the journeyman from Montague, Mich., albeit small, had the experience advantage against redshirt sophomore Alex Niznak and

redshirt freshman Cooper Rush in the offseason-long quarterback battle. Niznak will be No. 2 on the depth chart, with Rush third. “Alex and Cody, in particular, have raised their level from even the spring until now,” Enos said Wednesday after practice. “Their comfort with the offense was just off the charts. At the end of the day, we thought Cody played a little bit better, a little bit more consistent. He’ll be the starter.

We looked at it more the big picture of all the practices. We put them in team situations every day; they all had chances with the 1s and 2s. It was very difficult, but we feel good about it.” He was recruited by former head coach Butch Jones out of high school and decided to leave with Jones to Cincinnati, but transferred to Grand Rapids Community College after one season to return to CMU. At GRCC, he

led his team to an undefeated season with 2,218 yards passing and 19 touchdowns, while running for 356 yards and nine touchdowns. At CMU, Kater is played sparingly — Enos said Wednesday that Kater or Niznak didn’t give him a shot to win last season – with only two appearances, completing two passes for 12 yards, for the Chippewas in 2012. Now he’s tasked with leading the Chippewas into

Michigan Stadium on Aug. 31 to play No. 17 Michigan. “I’m looking forward to it,” Kater said. “This is why you went to college, to play football at Division 1 – to play football at the highest level. You want to compete your butt off. You’re obviously looking forward to the whole thing, the gameday atmosphere. We know what has to happen.” sports@cm-life.com

Cody Kater

Photo Illustration by Luke Roguska & Taylor Ballek | Assistant Design & Photo Editor

All eyes on Tipton Football leaning on running back’s strength with inexperience at quarterback

By Aaron McMann Senior Reporter

Talk to Zurlon Tipton for five minutes and you get mixed signals. A quiet, shy, down-to-Earth guy from Detroit, he sometimes struggles to find the right thing to say. But he just loves to play football. Start asking him more about football and that confidence, dancing toward cockiness, comes out. But you also get a sense of a young man grow-

Three players set to make impact on field By Seth Newman Staff Reporter

When Jahleel Addae was ranked by ESPN coming out of high school, analysts said he was “a back, wide receiver and return specialist, but is vastly undersized and must be used as a change-of-pace offensively.” A lot has changed for Addae since being ranked 605th in his region. He changed his position to safety, had a break out season in 2010 as a redshirt sophomore, and is now fighting for a spot on the San Diego Chargers roster. Addae is just one example of numerous Chippewas who started as unknowns and created names for themselves. And

ing into a role as a leader. He has to, being one of a handful of experienced seniors on the offense. His coach sees it, too. “He said at (Mid-American Conference) media day that he was going to be more vocal, and I almost fainted,” said head coach Dan Enos. “How can this guy be more vocal? He has been, believe it or not.” But not in the tone you might think. Instead of spewing trash talk on the field or horsing around with teammates, he

with a new season beginning, new dark horse candidates will have to do the same. Senior wide receiver Defarrel Davis was rated four stars by scout.com when he came out of high school in 2010. He played at Nassau Community College in New York before coming to Central Michigan in 2012. The Melvindale, Mich., native has had a year to digest the CMU playbook as a receiver after averaging a team high 24.3 yards on kickoff returns last year. Head coach Dan Enos has been impressed with Davis. “Davis has really emerged; he was a junior college guy who was signed last year,” Enos said. Sophomore Andrew Flory burst onto the scene against Eastern Michigan late last season after fellow wide receiver Titus Davis went down. Flory caught nine passes for 118 yards and two touchdowns that game and continued to be a scoring threat for the rest of the year. Senior defensive back Av-

ery Cunningham faces Flory in practice every day and has been impressed with what he has seen. “The guy just makes big catch after big catch,” Cunningham said. “When Titus Davis was down for us last year, he stepped up for us big time.” On the defensive side of the ball, Cunningham works with defensive lineman Blake Serpa. Serpa finished the 2012 season strong, starting the last eight games of the year and recording his first career sack in the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl at Ford Field in Detroit in December. The redshirt sophomore from Illinois has made the defensive line stronger this year, according to Cunningham. “I think since he has been here he has made a lot of improvements,” Cunningham said. “He is tough, he will be able to rush the passer, and has made improvements to himself..” sports@cm-life.com

understands the situation. Forget the recently resolved quarterback saga. Forget the criticism of Enos’ job as head coach – Tipton, in fact, has a huge amount of respect for his coach and the playbook. For him, it’s about production and getting others involved. Those numbers he posted last year - 1,492 yards rushing and 20 touchdowns - have landed him on a pair of watch lists with some of the best backs in the country. Should he post a repeat performance of

last season, or better, an award could be waiting for him. There’s always the NFL, too. “I feel like I opened a lot of people’s eyes to who Zurlon Tipton is,” Tipton said in July at MAC media day. “But I’m not just stopping there. I feel like there’s a lot more to accomplish. Making those lists is a great honor, but at the end of the day, it’s still a list. I’ve got to go out and prove why I’m on this list.” w TIPTON | 3B

Chippewas to play seven road games By Jeff Papworth Staff Reporter

Head football coach Dan Enos said he is asked every summer about the difficult schedule his team has to endure.

This summer was no different. And for good reason. Central Michigan faces two BCS schools, a team that went to a BCS bowl last season, and it has to play seven games on the road. The Chippewas will be presented their biggest audience and most difficult test in its first game of the season against the No. 17 Michigan at Michigan Stadium on Aug. 31. Enos has had his own success in Ann Arbor, beating the then No. 1

Bethany Walter | File Photo Defensive back Avery Cunningham lunges to tackle Western Michigan University running back Dareyon Chance on Nov. 3, 2012 at Kelly/Shorts Stadium.

Wolverines 28-27 in 1990 as the starting quarterback for the Michigan State Spartans. But it won’t be easy for his team, who is 0-3 all-time against Michigan. “I have the upmost respect for their program, for (head coach) Brady Hoke, his staff,” Enos said. “It’s going to be good for our football team to go play in that environment on the opening week and say, ‘Hey guys, you’re on national TV, and you’re going to have 100,000 in the stands.’” Senior cornerback Avery Cunningham has connections with Michigan’s archrival in Ohio State, which he rooted for as a child growing up in Cincinnati. “I definitely hold a grudge against Michigan. Being from Ohio, I really don’t like them,” w PREVIEW | 3B

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2B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

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Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 3B

TIPTON | CONTINUED FROM 1

“I’m not just stopping there. I feel like there’s a lot more to accomplish. Making those lists is a great honor, but at the end of the day, it’s still a list. I’ve got to go out and prove why I’m on this list.” Zurlon Tipton, running back

Photos by Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor

From left: junior Maureen Riley, senior Ellen Riley, senior Bailey McKeon and sophomore Taylor McKeon.

Family matters: Two sets of sisters lead field hockey By Morgan Yuncker Staff Reporter

When watching field hockey this season at Central Michigan, fans might think they are suffering from double vision. It’s no mistake, though, as the team consists of two pairs of sisters this year: the Riley sisters and the McKeon sisters. The Pennsylvania-native McKeon sisters – senior Bailey and sophomore Taylor, are entering their second and final year of playing at CMU together. “I think next year will be hard, especially not having someone to talk to and not having family up here,” Taylor said. “I have learned things from (Bailey) on and off the field, especially what it means to be a student-athlete.” The Riley sisters – senior Ellen and junior Maureen of Louisville - have been

at CMU together for three years. Like the McKeons, this will also be their last year playing together. “It will be weird not having her here next year, but I played my high school senior year without her, so it will probably be close to that feeling,” Maureen said. The two have played more than seven years together, so they know a little bit about each other on the field. “I don’t know if I would call them weird sister powers, but I know when she is going to cut and she knows when I will. I also know her voice on the field above everyone else’s, so it makes it easier when we are playing together,” Ellen said. “She is someone I could always talk to and cry to; we cried a lot together,” Maureen said, laughing. This year will be bittersweet for the four teammates as two

PREVIEW | CONTINUED FROM 1 he said. “I always watched the Ohio State versus Michigan rivalry. That’s probably the biggest rivalry in college football, so I definitely watched that and still watch it to this day.” Cunningham and his teammates have another chance to prove themselves against what could be a top-25 opponent on Oct. 19 against Northern Illinois, which finished No. 22 in the final AP Top 25 Poll last season and

came in as the No. 38 team in the USA Today preason coaches poll. At least the Chippewas will be in the friendly confines of Kelly/Shorts Stadium on Homecoming against the Huskies and also on Sept. 21 against Toledo, which also received a vote in the USA Today poll and has been high in the standings of the West Division over the years. In a bit of an oddity in the schedule, CMU has two and

say goodbye to what might be the last season they are able to spend playing the sport they love with their sister. “I think I will be missing the team aspect of things next year. I am going to miss the game and playing it, but I’ll miss playing with her as well,” Ellen said. “I will definitely make it to some of the games next year.”

But, now is not the time to dwell on next season’s changes. With the 2013 season underway, the team has a long way to go. Winning is definitely something on Bailey’s mind, with this being the last year for her to get a Mid-American Conference Championship.

a half weeks off after the NIU game and then plays an all-too-typical weekday game at Ball State on Wednesday, Nov. 6. “I don’t mind it, because it gives our conference exposure,” Enos said. “My whole thing on weekday games is this – don’t make us play on short rest. I think that puts the student athletes at risk.” Senior running back Zurlon Tipton said, as a player, he could not care less when he plays. “Whatever day you play football, you’re blessed and you’re just happy about playing on that day,” he said. “So

if it was on a Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, I’m excited just to play the game.” The team will travel to Kalamazoo on Nov. 16 to play Western Michigan, now led by new head coach P.J. Fleck. Tipton, the workhorse for the offense, has a 2-2 record in his time at CMU against the rival Broncos. “You definitely don’t want to have a losing record against anybody,” Tipton said. “With this win, I’ll definitely enjoy it for the rest of my life.”

sports@cm-life.com

A fifth-year senior for the Chippewas, Tipton essentially missed a year and half of his college career due to injuries. He sat out 11 games in 2009, his freshman season, and missed the final five of the 2011 season with a broken foot. In between, during the 2010 season – Enos’ first in Mount Pleasant – Tipton was a blip on the radar with 203 yards on 56 carries in 10 games. Since arriving on campus during the Butch Jones era, Tipton has bulked up, gotten stronger, and developed into the first legitimate power-back of Enos’ tenure. Enos, a product of the Big Ten environment, has always preached size and depth since coming to CMU. “Last year was really the first year he’s really played running back since his senior year of high school,” Enos said. “So you can see the development in how much he’s improved. I think a lot of it has to do with confidence, but he understands the schemes and has been playing at a very high level.” Add in uncertainty at quarterback, (Cody Kater has played in only two games for CMU) and Tipton’s production becomes key to a successful offense. When asked, he said he doesn’t feel the pressure to carry the offense, citing Enos’ preference for a balanced offense. But deep down, he wants more carries.

“Even when (Ryan) Radcliff was here, I was after coach Enos about needing to run it more – like 80/20,” Tipton said with a laugh. “But he wasn’t having it. I’m not expecting anything but what he expects of me.” Enos considers Tipton an “every-down back,” meaning he can play in most situations, including goal-line plays and short-yard situations. He’ll also get help from sophomore Saylor Lavallii and junior Anthony Garland, who provided short-yardage help when needed last season. Additionally, he’ll benefit from an experienced offensive line, sans first overall NFL draft pick Eric Fisher. Senior Jake Olsen, back for his sixth year, anchors a line that includes three others – Andy Phillips, Nick Beamish and Kevin Henry – with starts under their belt. And when referencing the line, Tipton has learned to use “we.” He credits Fisher and the rest of the line with his successful season last year – he was the first CMU running back to rush for 1,000 yards since Ontario Sneed in 2005 – and realizes it takes more than just his jukes, jives and northsouth running. “Those guys up front, that’s me basically,” he said. “If they’re not there, then there’s no Zurlon Tipton.” sports@cm-life.com

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Sports

4B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Chuck Miller | File Photo Freshman midfielder Josie Seebeck attempts to kick the ball during the first half of the quarterfinal game against Oct. 27th, against Northern Illinois at the CMU Soccer Complex.

Remembering

JOSIE

Friends reflect on her personality, leadership and life By Aaron McMann Senior Reporter

J

osie Seebeck, 19, a sophomore on the Central Michigan University women’s soccer team, died Aug. 4 following a car accident near Lansing on Aug. 2. Seebeck was driving with two teammates, sophomore Christen Chiesa and freshman Maddy Bunnell, returning from a soccer match in Indianapolis when their vehicle rolled near Charlotte, Mich., in Eaton County. The teammates were taken to the hospital, where Seebeck was pronounced dead at 11:40 p.m. two nights later. Chiesa and Bunnell have both been released, but the status of their injuries is unknown. Seebeck, a native of Montgomery, Ala., was a midfielder for the Mid-American Conference West champion Chippewas and ended her freshman season with MAC All-Freshmen team honors. She had one goal and one assist on the year in 14 games. “Our hearts and prayers go out to Josie’s family, friends and teammates,” Director of Athletics Dave Heeke said in a statement. “...This is a tough, tragic time for our soccer studentathletes and the entire CMU Chippewa family.” Seebeck attended Ramstein High School in Germany, where she was a member of the 2012 European Tournament Champions squad and was named All-European Tournament MVP, totaling 20 goals and 16 assists in her senior year. In addition to performing well on the field, Seebeck excelled in the classroom. According to her CMU Athletics profile page, she had a 3.87 GPA through her freshman year.

FRIENDS REMEMBER JOSIE

Meg Hart remembers the bus ride two years ago. It was a youth group trip to Madrid, Spain, and the first time she met Seebeck. She remembers their trips to Kaiserslautern, Germany, or “K-Town” as their group of friends called it, to watch soccer on TV. “When she was up at CMU, she was always busy with soccer training,” Hart said. Hart first met Seebeck in high school. Their families, both fathers in the military, relocated from the D.C. area to Ramstein Air Base in Germany. In June, Josie flew from Texas to D.C. to attend Hart’s graduation party. “She was intensely caring about everybody,” Hart said. “She honestly would go out of her way to help some-

one to become friends with someone. … It just feels like a week ago when she was sitting here with me and all of my friends.” Drew Guffey remembers the time spent kicking the soccer ball around with Seebeck. He remembers the time they spent talking, hours on end. The two met their sophomore year of high school. They both participated in a

have so many great memories with her that I cherish and will remember for the rest of my life.” “My favorite memory of Josie is that of her contagious smile with joy,” Guffey said. “I’m grateful for my time with her.”

COACHES, TEAMMATES REFLECT

Like a seasoned veteran, but only entering her second year of college, Seebeck was always planning her next move. Good midfielders do that. “We joked about how much she would plan life,” said senior midfielder Tory Kinniard, after sharing a laugh with teammate Kaely Schlosser. “She was always looking for the next thing to do.” Peter McGahey, who was named the program’s coach in January, said his players came from throughout the country over the weekend to visit their teammates in the hospital. He called Seebeck a “true student-athlete,” one who played well on the field

“She had the presence of a true leader and played with unmatched grace.” Drew Guffey, high school friend European soccer camp and ended up having several classes together in school. There they grew close. Before he even met her, Guffey recalled Seebeck playing on his sister’s soccer team for a tournament. She was a guest player, but outplayed everyone and “dominated every game.” “(It was) to the point where the German boys in attendance started chanting her name over and over,” Guffey said. “The longer I knew her, and the more I saw her play, it became apparent she had much more than just skill. She always played with so much heart, leaving everything on the field. She had the presence of a true leader and played with unmatched grace.” Guffey spoke to her a day or two before the accident about planning a trip to Europe next summer. “Any time I needed advice, a shoulder to lean on, or just someone to vent to, Josie was my go-to person,” said Guffey, 19, now a student at the College of Charleston. “I

and earned good grades. McGahey also began to notice where her talent was heading. He said he had looked forward to working with Seebeck on her passing game. “One of the things we talked about as a team was players who could change the rhythm of the game,” McGahey said. “Josie had that ability to change the pace of the game with a pass, or defensively.” Neil Stafford, the former CMU head coach whose staff recruited Seebeck, called the news “devastating.” Stafford credits Stephanie Webb, a former graduate assistant coach at CMU, with finding Seebeck. Seebeck visited a CMU summer camp two summers ago, confirming the coaching staff ’s opinion of her ability. “She was an incredibly well-rounded young woman,” Stafford said. “She made our program better, and that’s what we ask everybody to do, to make an impact – she did academically, she did athletically,

and she did with her personality. She fit right in and certainly had the talent, the drive, the passion to elevate our program.” She had so much passion that she scored her only goal last season to seal CMU’s win against Northern Illinois in the quarterfinals of the MAC tournament while recovering from broken ribs. “Anybody who came into contact with Josie just saw how special she was,” Stafford said, his voice cracking. “You just remember her smile. You can remember what a great person she was. The women’s soccer program is now preparing for the regular season opener against Detroit on Sunday. “There truly is no script for us this fall. There is no master plan,” McGahey said. “We’re going to work one day at a time to do our best to be together, to work through our grief and our sadness and our tremendous loss as best we can one day at a time. And some days may be better than others. There are lots of twists and turns, and we’re just going to have to take it one day at a time. But the most important thing was that we’re all going to do that together.”

SEEBECKS: ‘WE JUST NEED TO GO ON’

Before flying back to their home on Randolph Air Force Base in suburban San Antonio, Amy Seebeck, Josie’s mother, said the

family’s close-knit makeup and Catholic faith will help them cope with their daughter’s death. The family will continue to hang Josie’s stocking at Christmas and plans to celebrate her birthday. She would have been 20 on Aug. 19. “She had a bright future,” Amy said. “She was excited about this year at Central Michigan; she just couldn’t wait to play with her teammates and play for coach Peter (McGahey). That freshman year is always that transition year … (and) the groundwork was laid for her to have a good year. It’s sad when you have your dreams cut off.” Amy described her daughter, the oldest of five girls, as a “no-drama girl” who loved gathering people

and planning things. “She was born with that,” Amy said. “She was a natural team player, and she was comfortable around women and men, girls and boys. A lot of her friends in high school were young men. She had a gift for connecting with people.” he had to – “Military brats tend to adapt,” her father, Peter Seebeck, said with a laugh. There will be a candlelight vigil today at 9 p.m. at St. Mary’s University Parish, 1405 Washington St. The CMU Athletics and women’s soccer programs are hosting the vigil and ask the attendees wear bright colored clothing to honor Josie’s life. sports@cm-life.com

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Sports

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 5B

Volleyball looks to bounce back By Joe Judd Staff Reporter

Volleyball has started preparing for the upcoming season after last year’s late season struggles erased a strong start. Going into this season, the team looks to make up for the disappointing finish to its 2012 campaign, just two years removed from winning the Mid-American Conference Championship. Head coach Erik Olson does not shy away from explaining his goals for his team this year. “Our expectations are to contend for a champi-

onship as we always do,” Olson said. CMU began the conference schedule with an impressive six-match winning streak, only to go on and lose five of its final nine matches with an early MAC Tournament exit. “I really like how we played the first half, and I was really disappointed with the six-match losing streak,” Olson said. With the losing streak to end the season, the Chippewas peak came earlier than Olson or his team would like. Despite last season’s setbacks, CMU has plenty of reasons to be hopeful.

Schuette returns to court after injury-plagued 2012 By Taylor DesOrmeau Staff Reporter

Coming off a Mid-American Conference championship in 2011, Katie Schuette’s senior season as an outside hitter for the volleyball team looked promising. Then she suffered a stress fracture in a vertebra during the summer of 2012, which threatened to end her volleyball career. She decided to come back as a graduate student for her final year of eligibility.

“Katie sat out for a good seven, eight months of doing nothing physical other than rehab,” said head coach Erik Olson. “We offered her the ability to graduate and be done. She wants to be here.” Even though she wasn’t able to participate last year, she did what she could to help the team. “Last year I was still a big part of the team,” Schuette said. “We had a pretty good system where I was still helping the players even though I wasn’t physically involved.”

“She felt like whether she earned a starting job or not, she had something to contribute to this program.” Erik Olson, head coach

They have a strong senior core of players, including setter Kelly Maxwell, libero Jenna Coates, middle blocker Danielle Gotham and outside hitter/middle blocker Katie Schuette, who is returning from an injury for her fifth year of eligibility. With the addition of assistant coach Mitch Kallick, CMU is seeking another MAC title, and Kallick has some games marked on the calendar. “The Western (Michigan) match I hear is always a little contentious and always a little aggressive,” Kallick said. “I’m looking forward

to becoming a part of that rivalry at the same time.” Olson doesn’t have any particular games circled on his schedule. But if he did, it would be be one circle around August-November. “Every one of (the games) (are important),” Olson said. “I can’t wait to play every single match.” The Chippewas are preparing for the annual Maroon and Gold Scrimmage on Saturday, shortly followed by their season opener on Aug. 30 against Oakland University at the Oakland Invitational.

Volleyball home matches w w w w w w w w w

Saturday, Aug. 24 Maroon and Gold scrimmage 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27 vs Toledo 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28 vs Ball State 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 vs Kent State 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25 vs Buffalo 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26 vs Akron 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 vs Northern Illinois 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9 vs Western Michigan 7:00 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 vs Eastern Michigan 7:00 p.m.

sports@cm-life.com

The recovery process was not an easy one for Schuette, but she hasn’t needed her back brace for four months and has been playing with the team all spring. Her dedication hasn’t gone unnoticed. “She felt like whether she earned a starting job or not, she had something to contribute to this program,” Olson said. “If she’s physically able, she’s obviously able to help us out in that way as well.” Schuette watched her team struggle in the middle of the season. “It was difficult, but we were all just trying to stick together as a team,” Schuette said. “I think by the end of the season we were back on track.” She and her coach both believe she has bounced back stronger than before. “Thus far, she’s been in the top two at her position throughout preseason, so it’s been great to see,” Olson said. “I would say she’s playing the best volleyball of her career.” sports@cm-life.com

Maxwell brings veteran leadership By Joe Judd Staff Reporter

Going into the 2013 season, the Chippewas have three seniors on their roster along with one graduate student. Part of this nucleus of senior leadership is setter Kelly Maxwell. For Maxwell, it was not a quick journey to where she is now. As a freshman three years ago, she found herself sitting the bench for most of the year behind Catherine Ludwig. “I honestly think that has taught me a lot about

what it means to run the court,” Maxwell said. “It’s given me a lot of character and it’s shown me what it means to be a good athlete.” Now a senior, Maxwell has noticed some changes in the way she goes about her business. “It’s different being a senior and being the one who everyone looks up to,” Maxwell said. “I think I’ve come into that role.” As the new season is fast-approaching, Maxwell recalls last season’s ups and downs and how she looks to use last season as a stepping stone.

“We had a good run at the beginning of the season and tailed off a little bit toward the end,” Maxwell said. “We’re looking to improve on our consistency and we’re going for a 20plus win season.” Maxwell is a team player, doing whatever it takes for the team. She is looking to set goals for not just herself, but her team as well. “Last year, our offensive numbers went down, so I’m going to focus on running a more efficient offense,” she said. sports@cm-life.com

Jeff Smith | File Photo Grand Blanc senior Katie Schuette spikes the ball on July 28, 2010 during a match against Ohio.


Sports

6B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Women’s soccer pushes for MAC supremacy Players to honor Seebeck By Dominick Mastrangelo Staff Reporter

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor Junior forward Laura Gosse fights for possession of the ball against Michigan State forward Lisa Vogel Sunday evening during the exhibition game against the Spartans at the CMU Soccer Complex. Central Michigan won 1-0.

Gosse, Schlosser, Van de Kerkhove will guide morale, play this season By Mark Cavitt & Dominick Mastrangelo Staff Reporters

Just one season after becoming the first Mid-American Conference team to receive an at-large bid in the NCAA tournament, women’s soccer is poised for another successful season. Here are a few things fans should watch for as the Chippewas search for their secondstraight postseason berth and a MAC championship:

KEY PLAYERS

Senior midfielder Kaely Schlosser is the undisputed leader of the team this year

with eight points in 24 shots on goal in 23 games last season. Her vocal style and sheer ability will undoubtedly play a major role in CMU’s success this season. Junior goalkeeper Grace Labrecque started the Chippewas’ first and only exhibition of the year on Aug. 18 against Michigan State, and head coach Peter McGahey said fans can expect to see her in goal for the season opener against Detroit. She had a save percentage of .643 in six games played last season. Sophomore midfielder Eliza Van de Kerkhove was at the top of the list McGahey gave of young players

who might make a splash for the Chippewas this season. She played much of the exhibition against MSU and orchestrated several solid runs leading to scoring chances. Junior forward Laura Gosse returns as one of the Chippewas’ leading scorers from last season. She recorded 11 points last year, including five goals and one assist. Goose was the only player to start all 23 games last season and will look to remain one of the leaders on the team. She is always around the net, having 42 shots on goal last season, good for second on the team.

KEY GAMES

Friday, Sept. 27: CMU will travel to play Kent State, which was 7-3-1 in MAC play last year, and will look to knock off CMU as the pride of the conference in 2013. Sunday, Oct. 6: Eastern Michigan comes to Mount Pleasant after an 8-3 season in MAC play last year, while the team will be in the middle of a crucial mid-season home stand as they host their in-state rival. Friday, Oct. 25: The Chippewas will be in Oxford, Ohio to play Miami of Ohio, which finished 10-0-1 in MAC play a year ago and, as the postseason approaches

CMU will look to grab this key road victory as it hopes to be preparing for the NCAA tournament. The team will once again play a tough non-conference schedule this season with match-ups against Ohio State, West Virginia, Indiana, Pittsburgh, Washington, Detroit and Portland. CMU will play all but two of their non-conference games on the road in preparation for their MAC schedule to begin with the Kent State match. sports@cm-life.com

Before an exhibition Sunday against Michigan State University, the soccer players stood at midfield in a half circle, their heads bowed in mourning. The CMU soccer complex was silent. It was the first time the team had publicly acknowledged and collectively mourned the death of its fallen teammate and friend, sophomore midfielder Josie Seebeck, who was killed in a car accident earlier this month. The team announced there would be a 30-second moment of silence before each game in remembrance of Seebeck. “That moment was focused. It was hard for us. Very difficult,” said head coach Peter McGahey. “It was a very nice tribute to Josie and very important to our team.” The team plans on placing patches on their jerseys to commemorate Seebeck this year. It will serve as a gesture of how her legacy will remain with the team all season long. sports@cm-life.com

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor The girls put Josie Seebeck’s initials on their wrists to honor her during the exhibition game Sunday evening at the CMU Soccer Complex.

New staff preaches work, character and belief By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

A year after making its third NCAA tournament appearance in four years, the women’s soccer team will be led by a new coaching staff. Head coach Peter McGahey, the reigning Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Coach of the Year at Minnesota State University, has taken over after Neil Stafford left for the head coaching job at Cincinnati. McGahey compiled a 74-21-13 record in his five seasons at MSU, which included four trips to the NCAA Division II Tournament. In 2012, the program finished with its best record in history at 17-1-5 and 14-0 in conference play. “There are three things I want to see out of my players,” McGahey said. “The girls play hard, they show tremendous character throughout the game, and that they 100-percent, absolutely believe in each other.” Under his watch as head coach of MSU, 30 players made the All-Conference team during his five seasons. Five players also earned

All-American honors in both academics and athletics. Joining McGahey on staff is assistant coach Gretta Arvesen, who was McGahey’s assistant at MSU for five seasons. During her five seasons as a coach, she also served as the student-athlete advisory committee liaison and as an assistant professor. Nemzerwill be serving as the director of external relations

for the CMU soccer program. Nemzer will also oversee the roles of recruiting and video coordinator, as well as advanced scouting and scheduling. Training the goalkeepers will also be one of Nemzer’s duties. Nemzer held the position of head assistant women’s coach at Division II Fort Hays State University. sports@cm-life.com

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Sports EXTRA POINTs Track and Field

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 7B

Women’s soccer defeats MSU 1-0 in only exhibition game By Mark Cavitt Staff Reporter

Rose competes at World Championships Track and field senior thrower Alex Rose spent this summer strengthing his bid for a spot on Alex Rose the Samoa Olympics team in 2016. Rose, a 2011 AllAmerican in the discus, was most recently in Moscow competing in the 2013 World Championships for Samoa, where he holds dual citizenship. He earned a spot at the games by breaking the Samoan record with a toss of 59.83 meters in May at Augustana College. Rose also competed in the World University Games in Kazan, Russia in July where he took seventh.

Football

New MAC bowl game in 2014 ESPN has reached a six-year deal to have the Camellia Bowl in Montgomery, Ala. Starting in 2014, the new bowl game will feature teams from the Mid-American Conference and Sun Belt Conference. Montgomery is the third city in Alabama to host a bowl game, along with Mobile and Birmingham. Mobile already is the host of the GoDaddy. comBowl, which showcases the teams from the MAC and Sun Belt, and Central Michigan won in 2009.

HO N O R S

2013 HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES ANNOUNCED The 2013 Marcy Weston Athletics Hall of Fame class features five athletes and one team. Pasquale Galba (baseball), Mike Greenfield (wrestling), Nicole Liphardt (gymnastics), Becky Manson (softball), John Wunderlich (football) and the 1982 softball team will be introduced as the newest members of CMU Athletics Hall of Fame Friday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at the CMU Events Center. The hall of fame started in 1984 and consists of 183 individuals and four teams. - Kristopher Lodes, Sports Editor

Taylor Ballek | Photo Editor Senior mid-fielder Kaely Schlosser dribbles down the sidelines during the exhibition game against Michigan State Sunday evening at the CMU Soccer Complex. CMU won 1-0.

Coming off an NCAA tournament appearance last season, women’s soccer started this season with a new coach, the loss of a teammate and their eyes on another tournament appearance. The exhibition against Michigan State University Aug. 18 was the team’s only tune-up in preparation for the opener against Detroit Sunday in Mount Pleasant. Head coach Peter McGahey said he liked the team’s ability to focus late in the game, which led to a game-winning goal in the third period. “I think it’s a great tribute to the girls in terms of their attitude that they put into the game,” McGahey said. “It was a fantastic start to the season to score a goal so late in the third. It was an absolute tribute to the women’s character.” The only goal of the game came in the 89th minute. Sophomore defender Emily Basten was the difference in the game. “The goal definitely started from the back. We were able to win it right from the defensive line,” Basten said. “Everybody had a hand in it, kicking it up the field and I just happened to be in on the end of it. It was a total team effort.” McGahey said the team’s ability to apply pressure defensively was the key in the victory. “I thought defensively we were very good in terms of the collective pressure we were able to put on the ball and at

times get them to play faster than they wanted to,” McGahey said. “The most important part defensively today was that we covered for each other when things broke down.” Junior Grace Labrecque started in goal for the Chippewas. The team lost its starting goalkeeper, Stefanie Turner, and will be looking for others to step up this season. Although there was only one goal in the game, McGahey said he thought that the relentless attacking style the team played with, kept MSU on it’s heels leading to that lone goal. “Offensively, playing a team like Michigan State, who is very organized, we were very persistent in the attack, and we did the right things. The ability to keep passing was the key today for us,” McGahey said. At the 8:05 mark, junior midfielder Emily Cooksey was given a penalty kick after junior forward Laura Gosse was grabbed from behind running toward the goal. The kick missed above the goal, and the game remained scoreless. Senior midfielder Kaely Schlosser gave the Chippewas their best scoring chance when she missed wide right by just a few feet. Both defenses held strong in the second period, just as they did in the first. The Chippewas will begin the season Sunday against Detroit at home. Kickoff is scheduled for 5 p.m. sports@cm-life.com

Good defense leads to game-winning goal as soccer team tops MSU By Dominick Mastrangelo Staff Reporter

Sophomore defender Emily Basten is relentless when she is playing soccer. Even seconds after scoring the game-winning goal for the Chippewas against Michigan State University on Aug. 18 she remained focused. Basten found the back of the net after a hard-fought exhibition. Her rebounding kick, which came just moments after a failed Spartan clearing attempt, snuck under the crossbar with 1:16 remaining in overtime. The Chippewas survived the ensuing minute of play and had won their first and only exhibition of the year. “It was a good feeling … watching the ball go in,” she said. “This victory was a total team effort, though. We played a tough game.” Because it came in an exhibition game, Basten’s goal does not officially go into the record books and the defender is still looking for her first official career goal. “I was really proud of what we were able to do today,” said head coach Peter McGahey. “You saw Michigan State come out and be very organized defensively, and we eventually were able to crack that.” The game-winning goal came just after Spartan Lisa Vogel could not collect a two-line pass and cash in on a wide-open Chippewas net. Freshman goalkeeper Heather Laeufer replaced

Emily Basten

starter Grace Labrecque for the final period and nearly cost the Chippewas the game just before Basten’s goal. “It was just getting Heather some experience, that’s all,” McGahey said. “We still plan on starting Grace in goal come next week.” The Chippewas’ next match is at home Sunday vs. Detroit. McGahey, who prides himself on being a defensive-minded coach, was pleased with his team’s effort in warding off MSU’s scoring chances. “We were able to get good pressure on the ball and get them to play faster,” he said. “We kept the game in front of us. I think that was the difference in this one.”

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8B | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

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CMU alum leaves mark on Mount Pleasant

THURSDAY, AUG. 22, 2013|MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.|ISSUE NO. 1 VOL. 95

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From Africa to Mount Pleasant, CMU students share their summer 2013 stories By Adriana Cotero Senior Reporter

Whether taking part in local protests to traveling internationally, some CMU students spent their summers doing things others only dream of. Clarkston senior Anne Drolet is one Chippewa who went abroad this summer, traveling to Accra, Ghana, for three weeks to work with malnourished children. “We focused on nutrition and public health. We spent the first week doing nutritional assessments in preschools and did a community assessment on a rural village. We also visited the governor of Accra to figure out what they are doing about the nutrition problems,” she said. Drolet said her experiences this summer are ones she will never forget. “Working in the hospital has been very memorable. I saw a baby with Kwash. This means the child was so protein-deficient that the skin was starting to fall off. It makes you realize how much we take for granted in this country,” she said. “To see how desperate these children are really hits home for me.” Staying in town over break is always an option and Mount Pleasant junior Holly Burke chose to make the best of her hometown this summer. While in Mount

1: San Francisco, CA 2: Chicago, IL 3: Mount Pleasant, MI 4: Washington, D.C. 5: Accra, Ghana

Anne Drolet Clarkston senior

Pleasant, Burke participated in the “March Against Monsanto” protest on May 25. About 250 people marched in the city to protest the controversial food giant. “We marched against the corporation Monsanto, which controls the majority of the food seed supply. We marched for the labeling of genetically modified foods, and we marched for the future generations, so they have the possibility of at least knowing what is in the foods they eat,” Burke said. While Burke was tackling social issues here in Michigan, one Chippewa took his message to another state. Norway junior Chris Bourgeois spent 10 weeks of his summer spreading his Christian faith to students on the University of Illinois’ campus alongside CMU’s Registered

Student Organization ministry, CRU & Athletes in Action. “There are many different ministry projects all over the world. This one in particular was held in Chicago,” Bourgeois said. Bourgeois said he could have gone home to a steady job this summer, but he decided instead to raise support for his cause. “I had a choice to make: go home for the summer and have a definite good paying job, or raise support to go to Chicago and help complete God’s kingdom. And I truly felt that God had a reason for me to be there. It was so worth the time and effort to get there,” he said. Bourgeois has plans to participate in this cause again during the year, if his schedule allows it. “I have to see what school will look like for me as this year rolls on, but I would absolutely love to participate again in the future,” he said. Raising awareness and funds for people with disabilities through Push American and Pi Kappa Phi, Farmington Hills graduate Spencer Haworth and undergraduate students Rockwood senior Jeremy Osborne and Millington senior Matt Berlin cycled across the country for the Journey of Hope, a 4,000-mile cross-country cycling trip. Haworth works for Push America and was hired in October. He planned the trip down to the minor details. “I planned the entire route, from what roads we take to what we eat and where we stay. Our route began in San Francisco, Calif.,

on June 9, and ended in Washington, D.C . on Aug. 10. The point of this trip was to raise funds and awareness for people with disabilities through Push America, which is the national philanthropy of Pi Kappa Phi,” Haworth said. The 67-day trip included a cycle of 85 miles each day starting from San Francisco, traveling through Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland, and ending on the Capitol Lawn in Washington, D.C. “We visited with organizations that serve people with disabilities in the towns where we stayed. After spending time with the participants, we presented them with a grant check for them to use toward their organization,” Haworth said. Although the trip was tiring, Haworth said the bonds he and his teammates made amongst themselves and with community members made the hardships worth it. “The team is made up of 35 undergrads from across the country, and it’s amazing to see how quickly we bonded,” he said. “It’s a truly an unexplainable bond.” studentlife@cm-life.com

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2C | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Insta-Vibe What did you do this summer?

From camper to counselor: CMU students spend their summers leading Camp Jorn in Wisconsin By Adriana Cotero Senior Reporter

For the past eight years, Ada junior Shannon Dahlquist has spent her summer at YMCA Camp Jorn in Manitowish Waters, Wisc., and this summer was not unlike any other. While Dahlquist once again attended Camp Jorn, she took on a new responsibility this year. “I became a camp counselor, because I wanted to return to this place that I became so closely bonded with when I was younger,” she said. “I wanted to give back to this camp that had served as my home away from home and help create that same special bond between the campers now, like my counselors had done for me.” From camper to counselor, Dahlquist became the general counselor for the 10-week camp that serves as a daycare and co-ed residential day camp for children ages 7 to 16. “The campers I was with all summer stayed a week at a time. We would live in the same cabin, eat meals together and do cabin activities together for the entire week,” Dahlquist said. “When those kids went home at the end of the week, I would have 24 hours off and then the next group of kids would show up and it would start all over again.” Dahlquist said her time at Camp Jorn this summer was a big learning experience, but one she enjoyed every day she was there. “I could not have found a more challenging, fun, or exhausting job than working at Camp Jorn,” she said. Alongside Dahlquist was her best friend and fellow Chippewa Sam Johnson, a Grand Rapids junior. Johnson joined the camp staff for the opportunity to do something she wouldn’t normally do. “I felt like this was the

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perfect time in my life to do something fun and for myself that didn’t necessarily have to do with my career path,” she said. “I knew that after this summer I would have to start getting into internships and other career-oriented occupations, so I essentially had one last summer to go out and just do something fun and amazing, so I did.” While Johnson had never attended the camp in previous years, that did not stop her from creating special bonds with the campers. “When you spend two and a half months with the same people in such a concentrated situation, you start to develop some pretty meaningful relationships,” Johnson said. Overall, Dahlquist said her experience at Camp Jorn was unforgettable. “My experience was incredible,” she said. “I mean, really it was a combination of the perfect opportunity at the perfect time with an amazing group of unforgettable people that made this summer one I will always remember.”

Samantha Johnson| Courtesy Top: Grand Rapids junior Samantha Johnson, left, and director of the craft barn Elizabeth Gering, pose for a picture at Camp Jorn in Wisconsin. Bottom: Johnson with her cabin of 9 to 11-year-old girls at Camp Jorn before they took a three-hour canoe ride to a campsite overnight trip.

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 23, 2013 | 3C

CMU alum leaves mark on Mount Pleasant By Andrea Peck Senior Reporter

As people enter Mount Pleasant from the west side of the state, they’ll be greeted with a maroon and gold bridge reading “Welcome to Mount Pleasant,” all thanks to the creative mind of one Central Michigan University alum. Clay McAndrews, who graduated from CMU in 2013 and majored in Graphic Design, is the mastermind behind the freshly-painted design intended to transform the old railroad viaduct over High Street. Keith and Kurt Feight, father and son, started the project in 2011 to make over the bridge into a sign welcoming visitors to the community. The father/son duo felt the bridge could be used as a way to represent Mount Pleasant and decided they wanted to do something about it. They worked to raise money privately through the Mount Pleasant Community Foundation to pay for the project. According to mpafc.org, the estimated cost of the bridge was $100,000. McAndrews got involved with the project after hearing about the idea from his fraternity housing advisor. “I heard about the project from my fraternity housing advisor, who is a Mount Pleasant native,” McAndrews said. “(He) felt I would be interested in the project because of my involvement in graphic design.” McAndrews said the design process was complicated, but it was worth the effort. “Very rarely is there a design that comes together easily,” he said. “It took a lot of time and we went through more than ten versions of the design before we found one that worked.” McAndrews said he wanted his design to incorporate many different aspects of life in Mount Pleasant. He also wanted to represent CMU and its relationship with the town. “I wanted to focus on bringing in CMU colors to the design, as well as the colors of Mount Pleasant and of Mount Pleasant High School. I wanted a clean and timeless design, and I think that’s what we ended up with,” he said. studentlife@cm-life.com

Clay McAndrews | Courtesy

CMU alum Clay McAndrews stands with the freshly-painted bridge hanging over High Street. He designed the bridge’s new look.

Clay McAndrews | Courtesy

The bridge over High Street before being painted.

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4C | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

By Nathan Clark Staff Reporter

Central Michigan University’s Habitat for Humanity campus chapter has been helping the local affiliate build homes and run fundraisers throughout the school year and over the summer since the group’s inception. “Over the summer, we finished one house, and the family is already moving in,” said Park Forest junior Ashley Pollock, the campus chapter president. “To be exact, the affiliates build the house. We just help supply manpower for the job. The club is like a middleman that helps organize volunteers.” Pollock said the group plans to build birdhouses around campus and is also looking to start a rehabilitation project in the near future. “We want to increase campus involvement with the group and focus on projects around the school,” Pollock said. The Habitat for Humanity affiliates in Mount Pleasant build up to three houses in the area every year, depending on funding for the projects. Funding to build a new home or to fix up a damaged one has always been a challenge for the organization. Whatever materials and manpower Habitat for Humanity is unable to receive

Adriana Cotero

through donations is funded by the volunteers themselves. To raise money, Habitat for Humanity sells items in its ReStore shop, 201 E. Pickard Students who want to help build homes but are unable to do physical labor at a worksite can volunteer to work at the store, where all the profits are used to fund future home construction projects. “People will drop off old furniture, fill out a tax deduction form, and be on their way,” L. Quinn LincolnKeon, manager of Habitat for Humanity of Isabella County, said. “Every cent we make reselling those items goes to paying for the materials or services needed to build a home, like to get a plumber or an electrician.” The ReStore shop has also collected and recycled more than 100,000 pounds of electronic scrap from the Isabella County area this year alone. Lincoln-Keon said CMU always provides a group of willing volunteers, and there is never a shortage of things to do. “Having groups of student volunteers from CMU has always been a blessing.” Lincoln-Keon said. “There is always something they can do for the cause that will help, even if they aren’t out at the house hammering nails.”

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As people age, I believe they begin to realize just how short life really is. With a short life, there is only one way to take advantage of that: to live in the moment. Upon our arrival to college, we are presented with a clean slate, which rarely happens in life. We are granted a fresh start; a time to take on new challenges, gain new knowledge, discover any and all vitality in this world, and break away from the past. Last year was my freshman year, a time when I was able to acquire new insights and gain memorable experiences - many of which might not have happened had I not taken advantage of the moment I was in. I immediately became involved with my major and identified my passion early on by writing for Central Michigan Life. I took many chances, such as betting money behind the blackjack tables at the Soaring Eagle Casino, which I surprisingly found I had a hand for. I also discovered my favorite delivery food, Menna’s Joint. I even had the opportunity to have my first night out at the Wayside, which was quite an experience in itself. I now know how to navigate my way around Central Michigan University. I know how to make it through the Anspach maze, what French Auditorium is, as well as the Rotunda Room. I know the hours of the Student Activity Center and the ins and outs of the Towers. As college students, it can seem like we are always following a set path, from taking classes to planning what we will do with our lives after we graduate. And while most of the time we have to be responsible adults, there is always time to embrace all that life has to offer. This past year I met new people, learned new information, and, well, had one hell of a year. All because I lived in the moment and made the best out of every situation. You only have one life, so why not live it to the fullest?

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 5C

Beaver Island summer classes draw record number of students By Shawn Tonge Staff Reporter

Summer courses at the Central Michigan University Biological Station on Beaver Island drew record numbers of students this year. CMUBS Director Donald Uzarski said about 250 students from the College of Science and Technology attended classes at the station this summer. This is the most student involvement in the history of the program, which has been growing in popularity in recent years. “This is our best year for student numbers, and we have increased our numbers consistently over the past five years,” Uzarski said. Beaver Island is located about 32 miles from Charlevoix in Lake Michigan, near Little Traverse Bay. In addition to offering CMU students a unique opportunity for hands-on research, more than 150 researchers used the station this year to study the ecosystems of the island’s pristine forests and swamps. Twelve courses from the departments of biology, chemistry and earth and atmospheric sciences were offered at CMUBS this summer, Uzarksi said. The classes are shorter than normal semester-long courses, ranging in duration from four days to three weeks. They are intensive, focusing heavily on both lectures and field collection. This summer’s classes started shortly after spring semester and will run into the week leading into the fall semester in August. St. Paul graduate student Thomas Langer is studying for his Master’s Degree in Conservation Biology at CMU. Aside

from taking a course in biological statistics at CMUBS this summer, he is also taking part in field studies of the island’s wetlands and inland lakes. “Something like this allows you to gain hands on experience while getting to know your professor and classmates in ways that just cannot be done while back on campus,” Langer said. “It’s hands-down the most rewarding experience I have had as a college student.” The James C. Gillingham Academic Center, the building for undergraduate study at the station, is equipped with a computer lab, a library, three classrooms and a small, 120-seat lecture hall. The station’s 130-acre campus also includes the research building, which houses eight laboratories and a state-of-theart mesocosm facility, which is used to isolate natural areas for environmental study. In addition to providing field experience for biology students, the station works to solve environmental issues on the island. Researchers are planning to investigate the possible contamination of the island’s inland lakes. The study will analyze how contaminants could affect local fisherman and try to find a solution, if necessary. CMUBS also offers a prefreshman course called BIO 100z. Beaver Island resident Meghan Works was one of the local high school students to take the course this year. “We got to do a lot of field work,” Works said. “Instead of just talking about things, we were actually able to go out and apply what we learned in class.”

Photos Courtesy of Adrian Hedden | Staff Reporter CMU graduate students Alicia McGrew, left, and Andrya Whitten look closely for signs of life in a water sample from Lake Michigan taken in a plankton tow on July 17, on the RV Chippewa at Beaver Island.

studentlife@cm-life.com

“Something like this allows you to gain hands-on experience while getting to know your professor and classmates in ways that just cannot be done while back on campus.” Thomas Langer, St. Paul graduate student

Wisconsin graduate student Andrya Whitten hoses down a plankton net before using it to collect plankton and algae from the RV Chippewa at Beaver Island on July 12.


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6C | Thursday, Aug. 23, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

Students recommend study abroad Summer Study Abroad Italy: 56 students Mexico: 41 students England: 36 students Ghana: 14 students Spain: 13 students Other: 154 students Total : 314 students

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By Dominique Jenkins Staff Reporter

Courtesy Photo by Jenn Tabeek Waterford graduate student Jenn Tabeek poses with a Minneapolis resident during her Alternative Spring Break in Minneapolis in March 2012.

From homework to vacations, three months of summer usually isn’t enough time to fit everything in. So, some Central Michigan University students did both by studying abroad. Grand Rapids junior Kelsey Dunneback spent three weeks of her summer studying Fashion Communication at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design in London. Dunneback said she has always loved traveling and

TY PLEN CE A OF SP ESS FOR L YS! DELA

knew studying abroad would be something she wanted to do while at Central Michigan University. “It made the world seem so much bigger and smaller at the same time, because it made me realize how easy it really is to travel, and that it doesn’t have to be some big, unattainable dream,” she said. According to the Office of Study Abroad, more than 500 CMU students study abroad each year. These students can choose from approximately 40 locations spanning six different continents. Chelsea senior Katy Steklac recently returned from Ghana, where she completed an education service internship through an organization called ProWorld. “I worked at Mary Queen of Peace Catholic School, which houses students from preschool to 9th grade. The Ghanaian school system is so much different than it is here, so it took a while to adjust, but

it was such a great experience,” she said. Steklac said her experience abroad has expanded her knowledge, and any student thinking of going studying abroad should go for it. “For anybody who is thinking about studying abroad, my advice would be to bite the bullet and just do it,” she said. “It is expensive and it is intimidating to dive headfirst into the unknown, but for me, studying abroad has been one of the best ways to learn more about how the world works.” The time to study abroad is now, according to Dunnback. Without the full-time hassle of real world responsibilities, international travel should be something all students look into. “I would definitely recommend studying abroad anywhere to other students, because there’s probably not a better time to do it than when you’re this age,” she said. studentlife@cm-life.com

HERITAGE COLLISION & REPAIRS, INC.

Come into

Courtesy Photo by Jenn Tabeek Waterford graduate student Jenn Tabeek, left, stands next to her co-site leader, Muskegon senior Kaite Young-Kendall, during their Alternative Spring Break trip to Milwaukee, Wisc. in March 2013.

Heritage and drive away a little greener!

Alternative Breaks sees success this summer, plans to expand during year By Andrea Peck Senior Reporter

Rather than lounging on a beach or enjoying time with friends, some Central Michigan University students spent a portion of their summer serving others. Alternative Breaks, which started at CMU in 1994, gives students the opportunity to participate in travel experiences dedicated to social justice as an alternative to standard vacation breaks. This year, 54 students were sent on one of five breaks across the nation, dealing with topics ranging from substance abuse to animal endangerment. Waterford graduate student Jenn Tabeek said all breaks are based on social issues and that students don’t know the location of the break when they sign up, only the issue they will serve with. “This really helps make Alternative Breaks about the service and not just the travel aspect,” she said. The five issues students were assigned this summer included animal endangerment, America’s heroes, education,

Join the

Native American issues and substance abuse. Next year, Alternative Breaks plans to add more issues. “Next summer, our goal is to send out eight, including an international break,” Tabeek said. But, summer alternative breaks aren’t the only thing seeing additions this year. Wyoming graduate student Jason Vasquez said Alternative Breaks will add many new elements during the semester. “As the Alternative Breaks program is celebrating its 20-year anniversary this year, we have a lot of exciting things taking place with the program. For instance, we are adding six more domestic Alternative Winter Breaks, which opens up at least 60 spots for student volunteers to serve local and global communities,” he said. Ada senior Hannah Messer said her Alternative Break changed her life. On her break, Messer said she and the other students worked at a Ronald McDonald House in Memphis, Tenn., where many St. Jude patients stay while receiving treatment. They also worked at a

children’s hospital, shadowing doctors and helping the children. “For anyone who has ever considered going on one, do it. Don’t even hesitate. You do not want to miss out on the opportunity of a lifetime,” she said. Tabeek said students benefit from Alternative Breaks in many ways, including providing students an opportunity to gain service in a field they might be interested in for a career. “Not only do students carry the experience they gained with them for the rest of their lives, but volunteering is also a great way to build a resume,” Tabeek said. Tabeek said there will be 50 breaks this year, including 19 winter breaks, 13 spring breaks, eight summer breaks and 10 weekend breaks. To join Alternative Breaks, students can sign up on Orgsync. There are specific sign-up dates during the year, and they open at 7:30 a.m. The next sign-up date will be for winter breaks on Monday, Sept. 9.

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Vibe

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 7C

His House serves South African widows, orphans By Kate Woodruff Staff Reporter

From the get go, Muskegon senior Jeremy Rank knew South Africa was the place he was meant to be this summer. “After the first two weeks of the trip, I had really been feeling like South Africa was where I belonged,” he said. “I’ve traveled a lot, but I never felt this way about any other place. I felt at home.” Central Michigan University’s His House Christian Fellowship sent 12 students to Richmond, South Africa this summer for a monthlong experience working with widows and orphans. As the trip’s co-leader, Rank said the idea for the trip was initiated by Ivy Blackwell – one of the church’s supporters. Blackwell’s sister, Inka Henderson, works with an organization called Richmond Community Trust. The foundation works with widows and orphans who have no means of supporting themselves. The students worked to deliver vegetables, install garden fences and water tanks and develop land Henderson had acquired to create an orphanage and school. Armada senior Samantha Busch said her time in South Africa was one of the most memorable experiences of her life. She said

Courtesy Photo by Muskegon senior Jeremy Rank The South Africa mission trip group sitting in the back of a Bakkie (pronounced “bucky”). “This was often our mode of transportation,” Rank said.

“(The camp) allowed other team members to step up and take on responsibilities. It was nice to see them step into that role of leadership and develop relationships with the kids,” he said. Rank, an aspiring traveler, said he plans to someday return to South Africa. “I’ve always known I wanted to travel the world, and I knew I would like South Africa as a country,” Rank said. “The people are incredible, (and) the landscape is amazing. When I got there, I wasn’t disappointed. I felt like I belonged.” For more on the trip, check out His House’s blog at richmondsouthafrica2013. blogspot.com.

to children with life-threatening illnesses who often come from surrounding orphanages. Rank said the children’s camp provided an opportunity for mission members to step into a leadership role. He said the camps allowed the members and children to form lasting relationships.

working with the children was rewarding. “All of us worked as volunteers, either leading an activity or leading a group of kids. I had a group of six girls ages 7 to 11, and grew to love them so much in the short time I got to know them. It was probably one of the most emotional and rewarding weeks of my life,” she said. The third week of the trip was focused on “Dare to Dream,” a camp devoted

studentlife@cm-life.com

Beaver Island senior Andrea Moore | Courtesy Photo Andrea Moore completes the rope course at Northwest Trek in Eatonwille, WA.

Students stay busy in Mount Pleasant Andrea Peck Senior Reporter

Muskegon senior Jeremy Rank | Courtesy Photo Muskegon senior Jeremy Rank teaches kids archery at Dare to Dream youth camp for disadvantaged kids in South Africa this summer.

While some Central Michigan University students chose to go home or elsewhere this summer, others opted to stay in Mount Pleasant. Many of those who stayed in the city worked, hung out with friends and took classes. Otisville senior Alexandra Middlewood stayed in Mount Pleasant this summer to do just that. “I worked on campus and took classes,” Middlewood said. “I took two classes and really enjoyed both of them.” Middlewood said she also prepared for the GRE, a standardized test and admissions requirement for many graduate schools. Outside of preparing, Middlewood made time to socialize. “I hung out with the few friends who also stayed in Mount Pleasant and made a few new ones along the way,” she said.

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Others, too, spent time at work and in the classroom but made time for fun, as well. Beaver Island senior Andrea Moore spent her time in Mount Pleasant working on campus and taking classes, but had plenty of time to travel. “After a week of vacation in Washington state, I returned to work in CMU’s chemistry department stockroom,” she said. Moore said Mount Pleasant is very different during the summer than during the school year, and that staying during this time is a worthwhile experience. “Mount Pleasant is amazing in the summer, and I recommend students stay at least one summer during their college careers,” she said. studentlife@cm-life.com

T R IV IA

CONTEST

All correct answers f drawing. 6 correct a or each question, enter you in the answers on Twitter gnswers on Facebook and 6 correct ive you 12 CHANCE S TO WIN!

1

#

# #

What year was maroon & gold chosen as CMU’s school colors? ☐1924

☐1918

2 3 4 5 6

☐1959

☐1941

What year was CMU’s football team formed? ☐1897

☐1902

☐1916

☐1922

SUPER EASY RULES!

What year did CMU join the MAC?

#

#

#

☐1974

☐1973

☐1971

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What year did CMU become the Chippewas? ☐1933

☐1934

☐1941

☐1952

What Homecoming year was Central’s fight song introduced? ☐1902

☐1919

☐1929

☐1934

What year did Central make it’s first bowl appearance? ☐1974

☐1987

☐1990

☐1991

1. Go to CM Life’s Facebook & Twitter pages - Like Us, Follow Us! 2. On each social media site: Tag us, Hashtag “#CMLIFETRIVIA” and then give us the question number and your answer. (Ex: @CMLIFE#CMLIFETRIVIA QUESTION 1:YOURANSWER) 3. Winner will be drawn from all correct entries on 9/20/13. www.facebook.com/cmlife

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cm-life.com

Life

(so far...)

T O P 13 HEAD LINES OF 2013

cm

Nov.

Dec.

Colin Powell serves as keynote speaker for Martin Luther King Jr. Week w 4D

Jan.

Dave Heeke @Dave_Heeke Powerful evening at #CMU. General Colin Powell presentation to full house at Events Center/McGuirk Arena Incredible leader! #fireupchips

Chippewas win Little Caesars Pizza Bowl w 5D

Oct.

Theresa (~T~) @RealOrNotReal The interesting things you find after a CMU/MSU football game: A guy sleeping on the roof of his SUV & another sleeping in the fitting room

MSU rocks Chippewas in 41-7 loss at Kelly/ Shorts Stadium w 5D

Sept.

Women’s basketball has season to remember w 6D

March

Marie Reimers, Patrick O’Connor win SGA election by a landslide w 4D

Student abducted from SAC, suspect shot, killed by police w 2D

Feb.

April

June

Eric Fisher chosen No. 1 in NFL Draft w 5D

July

Jamaal Charles @jcharles25 Nice to have @Big_Fish79 blocking for me! Good pick #ChiefsNation

Student coaches brother, teammates at 2013 Special Olympics Summer Games w 6D

Dumpster, couch fires light up city; three students suspended w 3D

May


Year in Review

2D | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

JAN. 16, 2013

Student abducted from SAC, suspect killed by police CM Life Staff Reports

“There’s no doubt in my mind that had the victim not jumped out of that car, she would not be alive right now.” Leo Mioduszewski, Isabella County sheriff

Gaylord Herald Times | Courtesy Two Michigan State Police vehicles were damaged in the early morning on Jan. 16, in Gaylord following a chase involving Eric Lee Ramsey, a 30year old Shepherd man who abducted a CMU student Wednesday night.

Jeff Smith | File Photo

Campus was shocked Jan. 16 when a senior from the Grand Rapids area was abducted at gunpoint outside the Student Activity Center and sexually assaulted. The suspect, Mount Pleasant resident Eric Lee Ramsey, 30, led police on a chase through northern Michigan that ended in Gaylord. He was shot and killed by a Crawford County deputy after ramming the deputy’s vehicle with a stolen sanitation truck. The student was walking to her vehicle in the SAC parking lot at approximately 9:30 p.m. when Ramsey approached her at gunpoint. Ramsey forced himself into her 2003 Ford Escape and made her drive to a home on South Crawford Road. “(That) night we had an incident that originated on Central Michigan University’s campus which involved a kidnapping, criminal sexual conduct, arson, attempted murder, a stolen vehicle and also a weapons offense,” Isabella County Sheriff Leo Mioduszewski said during a press conference in January. Police said the victim leaped from the moving vehicle and ran to a nearby residence after Ramsey told her he planned to kill her. The victim ran to a home on S. Mission Road and banged on the door until she was let in. Ramsey then parked the car

metro@cm-life.com

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String of armed robberies hits Mount Pleasant community The suspect arrested for allegedly committing an armed robbery at Subway was arraigned on March 12 for 13 counts in connection to the four armed robberies that occurred within the Mount Pleasant city limits in February. Vincent Miguel Belmarez, 28, was arrested Feb. 21 for armed robbery at the Subway restaurant at 203 N. Mission St., located near the intersection of Mission and Mosher Streets. The additional counts included the subject’s original charges, as well as four counts of armed robbery, four counts of assault with a dangerous weapon, four counts of felony firearm and one count of possessing a weapon as a felon. These counts didn’t include any involvement in the first robbery that occurred Feb. 16 at the Next

and began dousing the house with gasoline and lit it on fire before fleeing the scene. The homeowner arrived soon after and was able to put out the flames before severe damage had been done to the property. “There’s no doubt in my mind that had the victim not jumped out of that car, she would not be alive right now,” Mioduszewski said. Police said Ramsey drove off into a field afterward, where he abandoned the victim’s car and fled on foot to a nearby sanitation truck. He stole the truck and drove southbound on Old 127, where he rammed a second state police trooper. Later in the investigation, the Michigan State Police Gaylord post confirmed Ramsey used a BB gun before he forced the victim to begin driving.

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The victim ran to this house in the 10000 block of South Mission Road Jan. 17, where residents contacted police. The suspect, Eric Lee Ramsey, a 30-year-old Shepherd man ,attempted to set the house on fire before fleeing. Burn marks can be seen above the front porch.

CM Life Staff Reports

Eric Lee Ramsey led police on an overnight chase which resulted in his death.

Door Food Store, 2025 13 counts in E. Remus connection to Road. the four armed The four robberies in robberies February Belmarez was charged Arraigned on with took $950,000 bond place between Feb. Charged with four 16 and Feb. counts involving 18. robbery, felonies, The first assault and fire arm business charges Belmarez was alleged Had previously been Vincent Miguel Belmarez to have faces a minimum of 16 years in charged with having robbed is prison if convicted. an open intoxicant Advance in 2009 America, 1717 Suite B S. Mission 17. The Subway armed robSt., with bery came at 10:56 p.m. that the second robbery taknight, with the last one taking place at the Next Door ing place Feb. 18 at a Cash Food Store, 1324 W. High Advance, 100 S. Mission St. St. He faces a minimum of 16 Third was a Marathon years in prison if convicted. gas station off the intersection of Adams Street next to an Isabella Bank on Feb. metro@cm-life.com

earth

The has received

embrace

the of the sun and we shall see

results of that love.

the

- Sitting Bull

The Tradition Continues Between a University and a Nation.

Working Together for our Future

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Year in Review

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 3D

JULY 23, 2013 WEEK OF APRIL 28, 2013

Couch fires light up city

Professor gets prison term for possessing child porn CM Life Staff Reports

Coldwater senior Josh Beckhusen | Courtesy A large fire engulfs two couches and a mattress at the intersection of Franklin and Gaylord streets on April 28.

CMU students facing disciplinary action CM Life Staff Reports

Mount Pleasant firefighters spent the greater part of a week last semester scrambling throughout the city putting out numerous dumpster and couch fires. Main Street and the Jamestown and Deerfield Village apartment complexes each saw one couch fire on May 2, while the Lexington Ridge Apartments, 3700 E. Deerfield Road, saw four dumpster fires, according to Mount Pleasant police. St. Clair Shores junior Alan Innes witnessed the start of the fire on Main Street

as six people carried a couch into the street. “I saw a group of people take the couch out from behind a house, put it in the street, pour gasoline on it, and set it on fire,” Innes said. Around 150 people gathered around the fire chanting “CMU” and “Eric Fisher,” similar to the couch fire on Franklin and Gaylord streets the Sunday before. The Michigan Arson Prevention Committee offered $5,000 for information regarding the fires in Mount Pleasant. According to a Mount Pleasant Fire Department news release,

the fire department responded to 21 dumpster fires and 11 outdoor fires, including furniture fires, between April 28 and May 5. Likewise, the Mount Pleasant Police Department said in a news release the fire department responded to about 40 fire calls in that timespan. Later, five CMU students were identified by the Office of Student Conduct in connection to the furniture and couch fires. Of those students, three were suspended, while the other two face disciplinary action. metro@cm-life.com

Former Central Michigan University professor William Lord Merrill, 58, was sentenced to 70 months in prison at U.S. District Court on July 23 in Bay City for possession of child pornography, according to court documents. Merrill, who taught, among other courses, classes on Internet censorship at CMU, was arrested for possession of more than 100,000 images of child porn on Dec. 19. He entered a guilty plea in March, admitting to receiving child pornography. In exchange for the guilty plea, federal prosecutors dropped a second charge of the same crime and another count of child pornography possession. He resigned from CMU in November after being suspended by the university. According to court documents, Merrill knowingly received child pornography on or

about July 26, 2003. He said he knew the material constituted child pornography as defined by Title 18 in the United States Code 2256. The FBI seized Merrill’s hard drive from his CMU office, in addition to the hard drive that contained child pornography. When a warrant was issued on Nov. 5 to search Merrill’s Mount Pleasant home and office at CMU, items seized and disposed of included all computers, laptops, iPads, VHS tapes, CDs, DVDs, hard drives, phones, media storage drives, knives, handcuffs, USB flashdrives, iPods and prescription pills, according to court documents. Merrill was charged Nov. 8 in Isabella County with a fourcount felony, consisting of one count of possession of sexually abusive material, one count of distributing or promoting child sexually abusive activity, and two counts of using a computer to commit a crime, according to

APRIL 15, 2013

CMU students call Boston a ‘resilient city’ CM Life Staff Reports

The April 15 Boston Marathon bombings did not stifle the spirit of Boston nor ruin the experience of 11 Central Michigan University students who volunteered at the event. Students traveled to Boston with the group Meeting Professionals International. MPI President and Manton senior Nick Viox and Ada senior Shelby King represented the group, saying they were about five miles from the bombs when they went off. Despite the race’s tragic ending, King described the group’s stay at Boston as one of the “best experiences

of her life.” Viox also emphasized the sense of community in Boston. “The people there are so sensational, so welcoming. They really welcome you into their family,” he said. “Once you’re there, you are the Boston family.” The MPI members didn’t see or hear the explosions, and slowly found out about the events that occurred from authorities at the race and from people tweeting and texting about them from home. The bombings unnerved the group, as they had volunteered at the finish line where the explosions occurred only the day before.

William Lord Merrill Former Central Michigan University professor

court records. The investigation began when CMU’s information technology staff noticed a large amount of data being transmitted from a single computer on the network. After tracking the source of transmission, IT disconnected Merrill’s computer from the Internet in hopes that the user would contact IT for support, according to an affidavit. After further inspection of his computer, an IT worker discovered images and videos of child pornography. university@cm-life.com

Two explosions occurred a few seconds apart near the finish line of the marathon at about 2:45 p.m., killing four people and injuring hundreds of others. Authorities identified two brothers, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, a 26-year-old boxer, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a 19-year-old student at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, as eliminate the perpetrators. Tamerlan was later killed after running from authorities. His death certificate lists “gunshot wounds of torso and extremities” and “blunt trauma to head and torso” as cause of death. Dzhokhar was taken into custody after a nightlong manhunt in a Boston suburb. Dzhokhar has been charged with 30 federal counts and has pleaded not guilty on all of them. studentlife@cm-life.com

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Year in Review

4D | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

JAN. 24, 2013

Colin Powell visits

was keynote speaker for Martin Luther King Jr. week CM Life Staff Reports

Retired four-star general and former Secretary of State Colin Powell called for continued faith in the United States and compromise in Washington when he spoke to a sold-out crowd in McGuirk Arena Jan. 24. “It doesn’t take Superman to change this nation, it takes super people,” Powell said. “This country is changing, and both parties need to change with it.” Powell, former Secretary of State from 2001-05 under President George W. Bush, was invited to campus as the keynote speaker for the Martin Luther King Jr. celebration week. Powell opened his speech with a discussion about the influence the Constitution as a “living document” should have on politicians. “The government has

to change and grow as this nation continues to change and grow,” he said. “Change is part of what we are as a diverse group of people.” Tickets were free and available beginning in midNovember. Powell was paid $125,000 for his appearance, with a majority of funds coming from the the Philip A. Hart and William G. Milliken Endowed Speaker Series fund. The Office of Institutional Diversity, Multicultural Academic Students Services, Speaker Series and Program Board also helped fund the event. A respected and wellknown statesman with more than 35 years of military service, Powell rose to captain status within the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War and earned more than 10 separate medals for his duty, including a Purple Heart, Bronze

Star and two Legion of Merit awards. A moderate Republican and rumored vice presidential pick in 2008, Powell endorsed then-Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., over Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. Last year, he endorsed Obama over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. university@cm-life.com

APRIL 8, 2013

Reimers, O’Connor win SGA election by landslide CM Life Staff Reports

Marie Reimers was sworn in as Student Government Association president April 8 after winning the election with 76 percent of the votes. Reimers, a Saginaw senior, and her running mate, Croswell senior Patrick O’Connor, received 692 votes in the election, beating their opponents, Center Line graduate student Jonathan Schuler and vice presidential candidate Darby Hollis, a Westland graduate assistant. Reimers said her initial focus as president will be putting the structure in place to carry out her planned initiatives this year. “In addition to leadership that’s already established,

our main goal right now is to find the right cabinet members to fill in the right positions,” she said. “We want to put our right foot forward going into next year.” O’Connor, who was previously the leader of the House, said he and Reimers will be reaching out to several sections of the student body to fill the needed positions. “We’re really excited to work with the student body,” he said. “We’re going to work really hard at recruiting people and advertising SGA through the campus community.” Reimers ran on several goals, the largest objective of her administration being the establishment of a women’s center on Central Michigan

University’s campus. The SGA supported a bill for the construction of the women’s center during former SGA President and Macomb senior Justin Gawronski’s term last year. Lake Orion freshman Maggie Blackmer ran unopposed and was elected as treasurer. Eleven senators were also elected, also running unopposed. Gawronski said he is pleased that Reimers won the election. “I could not be more pleased with the results of the election. Marie and Patrick will do an amazing job. Maggie will, too, as well as the senators,” Gawronski said. “They know they have a big job ahead of them, and I

Marie Reimers Student Government Association president

am nothing but confident that they will succeed.” studentlife@cm-life.com

FEB. 2013

Campus leaders reject academic calendar change CM Life Staff Reports

A proposed compromise that would have kept the academic calendar at 16 weeks, with two modifications, was passed by the Academic Senate during a meeting on Feb. 12. Without the compromise, the A-Senate would have successfully passed a motion reducing the semester calendar to only 15 weeks and would require classes to begin well before Labor Day. The compromise, proposed by mathematics professor Donna Ericksen and physics professor Joe Finck, moved the Gentle Thursday/Friday days to coincide with the Mount Pleasant High School district’s spring break calendar, and started the semester no more than one week before Labor Day. A letter sent to A-Senate members by chairman Jim McDonald listed the two modifications to the 16-week calendar. “The motion was brought forward because it’s a compromise from a bunch of senators to make it more favorable to students and to incorporate more points of view,” McDonald said. The compromise was reached following months of deliberation, beginning in spring of 2012 and continuing into February 2013. The university, including the Faculty Association, announced their commitment to implement the change in August only to be met with mixed reactions. In October, the Student Government Association announced their opposition to the change and overwhelmingly approved legislation to prevent it. Alone, the SGA’s legislation made little impact on preventing the alteration. However, it jumpstarted then-provost Gary Shapiro to release a comprehensive report on the impact. Following delays, the report was eventually released in January and revealed a hefty financial impact on the university – a conservative estimate of $3 million in additional costs. After the report was released, A-Senate received criticism

Days gone by w Academic Senate forms

committee to consider changes to academic calendar w Motion passed to shorten calendar by one week. August 2012 w Faculty Association and CMU announce commitment to implement changes. September 2012 w Students and faculty offer mixed reactions. October 2012 w SGA announces opposition to changes. w SGA overwhelmingly approves legislation to oppose the changes; A-Senate acknowledges. November 2012 w Provost due to report on subject, delayed for continued discussions. January 2013 w Shapiro’s report reveals $3 million costs. w Residence Life, football, broadcasting, Leadership Safari all speak against changes. w A-Senate votes to reverse change (54-46). Needed a two-thirds majority and failed. February 2013 w Compromise reached and passed. from Residence Life, the football program, the broadcasting department and Leadership Safari. In response, the senate voted to reverse the change. During the Jan. 29 A-Senate meeting, there was some confusion over procedural matters. While the A-Senate voted 54-46 in favor of a proposal to stop the calendar change, a technicality in the wording of the proposal required a two-thirds vote to officially approve it. The Student Government Association fought to ensure the student body’s voice was heard in this matter — presenting a third vote, which ultimately led to the compromise. “The academic calendar will not be starting after Labor Day,” Gawronski said. “(This) means student’s voices were heard. It’s a big win, not just for SGA, but for all students on campus.” university@cm-life.com


Year in Review

Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | 5D

APRIL 25, 2013

Eric Fisher chosen No. 1 in NFL Draft CM Life Staff Reports

Eric Fisher said he thought he had a “really good chance of going No. 1 overall” to the Kansas City Chiefs. His “really good chance” became a reality on April 25, when Fisher was the first player to hear his name called at the 2013 NFL Draft at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. “I’m really excited to be a Kansas City Chief,” Fisher said after being chosen, while trying to hold back his excitement. “What a dream come true and what an amazing opportunity this is for me. It’s hard to process right now what just happened, but I’m so excited to be a part of this organization.” The 6-foot-7, 306-pound offensive tackle said he was unaware the Chiefs would be drafting him until he received the phone call. “I think a lot of people knew more than I did,” he said. “When that phone rang, it was just so surreal. But, honestly, I had no idea I was going to Kansas City.”

Victoria Zegler | File Photo NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, left, and former Central Michigan University left tackle Eric Fisher, hold Fisher’s new Kansas City football jersey after being selected as the No. 1 pick by the Kansas City Chiefs during the 2013 National Football League Draft on April 25 at Radio City Music Hall in New York City.

Fisher’s mom, who has never fallen short of giving him full support, could not hold back the tears when she heard her son’s name called. “I think I saw some tears there,” Fisher said. “I knew she was probably going to cry, but she’s been my biggest supporter for everything in my life. She’s been behind me in everything I wanted to do in life and sacrificed so much to help me get here. She’s worked for 33 years, so hopefully she’ll retire now.” Fisher said he cannot wait to help her out and return the favor. “She’s getting up at five in the morning to go to work and coming home at four (in the afternoon),” Fisher said. “I’m so happy to have the opportunity to let her just enjoy the rest of her life.” Fisher is the starting right tackle for the Chiefs and begins the regular season Sunday, Sept. 8 with a game against Jacksonville. sports@cm-life.com

DEC. 26, 2012

SEPT. 8, 2012

Spartans rock Chippewas in 41-7 loss at Kelly/Shorts

Andrew Kuhn | File Photo Central Michigan University Head Coach Dan Enos raises the Little Ceasars Pizza Bowl championship trophy following CMU’s Dec. 26 2012 24-21 win over Western Kentucky at Ford Field.

CM Life Staff Reports

Little Caesars Pizza Bowl win CM Life Staff Reports

Senior quarterback Ryan Radcliff led the Central Michigan football team to its first bowl win since the 2009 GMAC Bowl. The Chippewas took a 24-21 victory over Western Kentucky in the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl on Dec. 26. CMU loses

Radcliff this season, and the burning question this offseason has been: who will take his place? The answer will come soon as the Chippewas prepare to open the season at the University of Michigan on Saturday, Aug. 31 at 3:30 p.m. sports@cm-life.com

A record crowd of 35,127 filled Kelly/Shorts Stadium last season to see Michigan State University beat Central Michigan University 41-7. Despite the loss, the CMU faithful were loud, and the Spartans took notice. MSU head coach Mark Dantonio has coached some of the largest and loudest venues in college football. While Dantonio roamed the sidelines, he found the crowd just as loud at CMU as anywhere else. “We talked about how it was going to be a loud environment,” Dantonio said. “I had to put cotton in my ear — I promise you; it was loud.” With an estimated 10,000 students in attendance, the south end zone roared while t students packed in throughout the first half. “It was a great, great atmosphere,” said head coach Dan Enos. The big game this season at Kelly/Shorts

Stadium will be held on Saturday, Oct. 19 at 3 p.m., when defending MidAmerican Conference Champions Northern Illinois and Heisman Trophy hopeful Jordan Lynch come to town. The Huskies are coming off a loss in the BCS Orange Bowl against Florida State University. sports@cm-life.com

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Year in Review

6D | Thursday Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

MARCH 16, 2013

JUNE 13, 2013

Willie Randolph out as track and field director, Mark Guthrie hired

Victoria Zegler | File Photo Sophomore guard Crystal Bradford asks her teammates to put “all hands in” during the final timeout of the second half of the Mid-American Conference championship game on March 16 at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.

Heeke said. “Primarily, we needed new leadership and vision for the combined program.” He found Mark Guthrie. “We are really pleased to have landed Mark. He has tremendous experience and background, which quickly vaulted him to the top of the list,” he said. “He understands he can come here and be successful. He wants to win, and we think we can do that here.” Guthrie, who signed a contract that pays him $85,000 a year for five years, won 22 NCAA Division III titles at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and was inducted into the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2008. He was most recently an assistant at the University of Wisconsin. “I always wanted to be a coach at the Division I level,” Guthrie said.

CM Life Staff Reports

It was a tumultuous season for the track and field teams last year. Five members of the Central Michigan men’s track and field team left during the season, an assistant coach was fired and some current athletes were unhappy with Program Director Willie Randolph. Following the indoor Mid-American Conference championships in February, senior Greg Knaus and juniors Ross Parsons, Cory Noeker and Ryan Brooks quit the team within two weeks of each other. Redshirt freshman Derek Thornton left two weeks prior. Knaus, a former captain, said Randolph had shown a lack of respect for his athletes, implemented poor training with a lack of results, and believed more athletes would soon follow. “Things are going so poorly at the top that I believe we won’t be the only

Women’s basketball wins MAC, makes first NCAA appearance since 1984 CM Life Staff Reports

For the first time since 1984, the women’s basketball team went to the “Big Dance” after beating Akron 86-68 in the Mid-American Conference championship game on March 16. The Chippewas had their tickets punched long before the final seconds at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland. “This was the goal,” said head coach Sue Guevara. “To get to

this tournament and win it. Last year was such a heartbreaking loss. Our players remember how they felt this same time last year.” The team took on Oklahoma in the first round, where sophomore guard Crystal Bradford did all she could, but CMU lost 78-73. The 6-foot sophomore from Detroit scored a Central Michigan tournament-record 36 points, hauled down 14 rebounds and recorded nine steals.

Guevara was proud of her team’s efforts as the team represented CMU in the national spotlight. “We kept battling back,” Guevara said. “We did a lot of really good things this year, and I couldn’t be prouder of the effort we gave today.” The Chippewas bring back a lot of talent from the 2013 season and expect to be playing into March again in 2014. sports@cm-life.com

Willie Randolph former Track & Field director.

ones to leave the team,” Knaus said. “I think more people will leave at the end of the season.” After the season, Director of Athletics Dave Heeke decided not to rehire Randolph and began a search for his replacement this summer. “I have been reviewing the program the last few days, and it came to a point where we felt it was in the best interest of the program to move in a different direction,”

sports@cm-life.com

MAY 2013

Student volunteers to coach brother, teammates at 2013 Special Olympics

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127

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TE

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LOT #33

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EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR UPON REqUEsT UPON REqUEsT EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR UPON REqUEsT UPON REqUEsT UPON REqUEsT UPON REqUEsT EVERY 1/2 HOUR UPON REqUEsT EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR EVERY 1/2 HOUR UPON REqUEsT UPON REqUEsT

RUssELL

:55 :59 :00 :02 :15 :19 :20 :21 :22 :22 :23 :24 :25 :29 :33 :40

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COMMUNITY SHUTTLE ROUTES

STOPS EVERY HALF HOUR DURING THE SUMMER (LATE AUGUST - EARLY MAY)

cORPORATE DR.

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WAY

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• LATE AUGUsT - EARLY MAY ONLY •

MAIN sT.

MAROON

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Emily Brouwer | File Photo Oscoda residents Woody Clark and Mattie Labeau pour water on each other on June 1 during the 2013 Special Olympics Michigan State Summer Games at Central Michigan University.

! s u B e h t Ride studentlife@cm-life.com

PAcKARD

Skip the Fuss...

when he turned 18, he wanted to become more involved. “I first started helping out in swimming, and I decided later, why don’t I just start coaching?,” he said. “I’m having a blast with it.” Special Olympics Michigan continues to get thousands of volunteers every year. “There are a lot of CMU or (Michigan State University) students, or people who want to work with people with special needs,” Marcy said.

R. Us D W. c AMP WAsHINGTON

The 2013 Special Olympics Michigan state Summer Games reminded Marcy Ng why she is so proud of her sons. The three-day event, held in Mount Pleasant May 30 through June 1, gave her the opportunity to coach bocce ball with one of her sons, Addison Ng, 20, and watch her other son, Marshall Ng, 22, compete. As a single mom, Marcy said it was heartwarming to see the camaraderie between

the two brothers, especially because they do not get to see each other often, since Addison is a junior at Central Michigan University. “It means a lot to have both of my boys there,” she said. “They love each other. It’s hard for me, because I’m a single mom, and I’ve had to bring both of them up, and they both have turned out pretty darn good.“ Addison began volunteering at the Special Olympics when he was eight, primarily because of his brother, who is cognitively impaired. But,

Timber creek Apts.

CM Life Staff Reports

SOUTH

TO ALMA & LANsING

127

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Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com | Wednesday, July 17, 2013 | 7D

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8D | Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 | Central Michigan Life | cm-life.com

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2013 Back To School Edition  

CM LIFE

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