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NO. 43 | VOL. 98

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

Editorial

Our advice? Seek advice

Visit an academic adviser before Nov. 3 if you need help | 6 Sports

It runs in the family Athletics is in the genes of this volleyball senior | 16 News

Bang for your buck Students studied abroad without breaking the bank and you can too | 10

From animatronic bears to the planet Mars, students in the Museum Studies program learn about

MAKING HISTORY OC T. 19, 2017 

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OCT. 19, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM CORRECTION: In our Oct. 16

LIFE CENTRAL MICHIGAN

edition, in a story about the Rock Rally event, Swerrill Hall was incorrectly named as the winner of this year’s Maroon Cup – Larzelere Hall was the winner of the Maroon Cup; Swerrill was the winner of Rock Rally event. Central Michigan Life regrets this error.

NEWS w

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SGA reminds students of Oct. 25 candidate forum, able to meet local leaders

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Drunk driving, road rage incidents in this week’s crime log

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SAPA to host fitness events around CMU for Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Two students go across

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10 the globe, save a buck and tell others to do the same

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STAFF

NEWS

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OPINION In our editorial we don’t want you to fall behind while looking ahead — see an academic adviser to stay prepared for your future semester w SEE PAGE | 14

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SPORTS

PAGE DESIGNER CONNOR BYRNE

MANAGING EDITOR EVAN SASIELA

MANAGER MITCHELL HATTY

ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR GRANT POLMANTEER

PROFESSIONAL STAFF

ADVERTISING

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS DAVE CLARK

FEATURES EDITOR PAIGE SHEFFIELD OPINION EDITOR ELIO STANTE SPORTS EDITOR KULLEN LOGSDON ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR DYLAN GOETZ

Bonamego blames himself for loss to Toledo on Homecoming, looks to rectify with Ball State at 3 p.m. Saturday.

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NEWS EDITOR MITCHELL KUKULKA NEWS EDITOR EMMA DALE

MANAGERS SAMANTHA MEYER DREW FORREST

DESIGN EDITOR ALYSSA TEMPLETON

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JORDYN HERMANI Two former Drug Enforcement Administration agents talk about being portrayed on Netflix’s “Narcos,” taking down Pablo Escobar

PUBLIC RELATIONS

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

NEWS

SGA addresses Homecoming events, senate to further projects By Quinn Kirby Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Student Government Association President Anna Owens thanked members for participating in the homecoming events during the SGA General Board meeting on Oct. 16 in the Bovee University Center Auditorium. “We have two SGA members who are the Gold Ambassadors for Central Michigan University as a whole,” Owens said after recognizing members junior Caroline Murray and senior Jason Hall. To be a Homecoming Ambassador, CMU’s Student Activities and Involvement website states that a candidate for a position must complete “a three step process that includes an application review, presentation and interview and finally a campus vote.” Candidates are selected by review boards and are chosen based on campus involvement, and how well they represent CMU and the Mount Pleasant community. Owens reminded SGA members of the Local Candidates Forum, on Oct. 25 in the Charles V.

Quinn Kirby | Staff Photographer Student Government Association President Anna Owens gives the Executive Council Address on Oct. 16 in the Bovee University Center.

Park Library Auditorium. The purpose of this event is to connect students with leaders in the community in order to help educate them before voting in the Nov. 7 election. Wishing good luck to everyone on their midterm exams, Owens also promoted the availability of Park Library’s new 24/7 study room. She asked at-

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tendees to “please take advantage of it,” adding only a student ID is required for entry. The house is working on legislation that aims to improve the efficiency of Student Observation Survey forms and is planning to partner with the Residence Hall Assembly to organize a Maroon and Gold Ball next semester.

The senate met in the UC Mackinaw Room, where Senate Leader Caroline Murray provided instructions on how senators report on the three office hours they are required to hold per week, as well as how to check out tabling equipment. The senate will be tabling in the Towers Residence Halls community on Oct. 26 from noon to 4 p.m. to connect with constituents. They also want to provide clarity on what senators are working on within SGA and address constituents’ concerns. Senate Leader Caroline Murray reminded senators that the proposals for their senate projects will be due at the beginning of November. Murray described these senate projects as a responsibility each senator has to the college they represent. “These are ongoing things,” she said. “Once a senator finishes their project, they will start a new one.” A senate project is a “tangible way” to help the student body, Murray added. That may be an event, legislation to change campus policy or a planned show of activism. “A lot of these people are here to make a difference on campus, and they’re already coming up with ideas, (like) how they can improve the student body (experience),” Murray said.

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OCT. 19, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

NEWS

City police deal with numerous alcohol offenses on Homecoming By Evan Sasiela Managing Editor news@cm-life.com

The following incidents were handled by the Mount Pleasant Police Department from Oct. 14-15.

consisting of beer bottles, cans and cups. There were smashed pumpkins in the roadway and loud music being played. People were yelling ”(Expletive) the police,” Browne said. A 21-year-old East Lansing man was arrested for operating while intoxicated at Bellows and Crapo. MPPD was dispatched to a “suspicious situation” of an intoxicated person getting into a vehicle and heading on the roadway. The officer observed the vehicle making an improper turn. After a stop, the driver admitted to drinking. Browne said he was not making much sense. He had a blood alcohol content of 0.22. A 32-year-old Mount Pleasant man was arrested for disorderly conduct at Franklin and Andre streets. Browne said police were dispatched to a man sitting on a curb. He was yelling, screaming then stumbled around and fell. He didn’t know where he lived, where he came from or what day it was, Browne said.

OCT. 15 An MPPD officer stopped a vehicle for not having insurance near Broadway and Oak streets, Browne said. Upon stopping the vehicle, the 34-year-old male driver from Mount Pleasant was taken into custody for driving with a suspended license. After a search of the vehicle, the officer found a small bag of marijuana. A 23-year-old Mount Pleasant woman with him had a substance believed to possibly be heroin and was taken into custody. A 22-year-old Mount Pleasant man was cited for allowing a nuisance party and a 20-year-old Mount Pleasant man was cited for allowing a nuisance party and minor in possession (MIP). The gathering occurred at the 900 OCT. 14 block of S. University Avenue. A 22-year-old Alma man was There were Krapohl8thPageEdit101617.pdf large amounts of jailed for a hit and run, 1:39 flee- PM 1 10/13/17 trash and debris in the front lawn ing and eluding and operating

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while intoxicated. Browne said the incident stemmed from a traffic crash. An officer was working in the area of High and Mission streets and observed a black truck slam into a red jeep. An officer visited the scene, but the man jumped back into his truck, hit reverse and took off. The officer attempted to stop the vehicle and followed him for a couple blocks. He was stopped at Thomas and High streets. He had a blood alcohol content of 0.11. It was one of eight OWI arrests city police made this weekend. A 22-year-old LaSalle woman was lodged for operating while intoxicated and failing to report an accident. Central dispatch put out an alert for a possible road rage incident, Browne said. An officer approached the intersection of Bluegrass and Mission streets and found one of the vehicles involved. The officer stopped the vehicle and the woman was taken into custody. What had happened was the vehicle side-swiped another vehicle in the parking lot of Comfort Inn, Browne said. The woman and another occupant engaged in an argument. She returned to her car and fled the scene.

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OPINION

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OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Illustration by Connor Byrne

Don’t let CMU overwhelm you Advising, academic calendar helps you stay on top of classes, important dates As midterm week approaches, it’s easy to forget about deadlines that don’t hinge on your classes — specifically, deadlines that could help you get out of a class that’s more like an anchor than a buoy. We want to help you out so you can stay on top of your academic life. Students should remember that Nov. 3 is the last day students can withdraw from a class and receive a “W”. We encourage students to see an academic adviser. If you don’t know who your adviser is, you can always check online by visiting the Academic Advising and Assistance page on cmich.edu. Freshmen, this may be one of the most impor-

tant meetings of your college careers. Going to an adviser will help you determine the classes you need to complete your major. They can help you map out the classes you should take so EDITORIAL you can graduate in four years. For older students — it may determine if you graduate on time or have to stay another semester. Visit your academic adviser and make sure you have taken all the right classes and have the required credits. According to last year’s data, there were 650

academic advisers for every one student, not including faculty advisers. As class registration comes up, don’t wait to call for an appointment. Even if every adviser isn’t busy, there will be a huge wait and you’re not guaranteed a meeting for Spring 2018. Class registration starts Monday, Oct. 30. For those looking to graduate in Spring 2018, make sure you are on top of your credit requirements and capstone classes. Don’t be the person who doesn’t get into the last class they need and can’t graduate. We know life can feel out of control and you have no time, but make the time to visit an adviser. We were told that if you are looking to

transfer or apply to graduate school, the “W” is totally subjective to the person looking at your transcript. This means it’s a case-by-case basis for wherever you’re applying. Be careful throughout your college career that you don’t withdraw from too many classes. Planning and regularly visiting an academic or faculty adviser can keep you on top of everything. Know that you have many different resources to help sort this out. Everyone struggles keeping up with classes and the different dates in college, but it shouldn’t be overbearing. We’ve all been there.


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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

OPINION

I grew up around guns, support gun ownership and rational gun control The mass shooting in Las Vegas renewed the call for gun control. The response was typical. The left demands more gun control. The right is screaming about the “slippery slope” that will take away every gun in America. This isn’t the conversation we should be having. It shouldn’t be one extreme or another. I grew up around guns. My family owns guns and several family members have a concealed pistol license. I love going to shooting ranges and being in the outdoors with guns. But this fondness and experience hasn’t prevented me and those around me from thinking increased gun control is a valid response to mass shootings. There are gun-owning Americans

Jeremy Agosta Columnist

like me who recognize this isn’t a one-way street. I should start by explaining why many of the people I grew up around and those fearing the “slippery slope” of gun control aren’t irrational. Democrats have allowed an image to be created that if they get elected, they would abolish the Second Amendment and Republicans have done a great job reinforcing that. Republicans aren’t without blame either.

They can’t even whisper the words “gun control” in fear of backlash from their base. With help from the National Rifle Association, they’ve conditioned their base to defend guns in an incredibly passionate way. I remember my dad taking me to a gun store and not being able to walk three feet without hearing someone say, “Obama’s taking our guns.” To most of you, that’s hyperbole. To gun owners, it’s a real fear they’ve all felt because of the national rhetoric surrounding gun control. We love the activities guns allow us to partake in. People here in Michigan treasure hunting and gun sports. They need to be reminded that gun control will not threaten our

recreation and traditions — something I think very few politicians are able to do. This doesn’t rest solely with politicians. No one on the right and no one on the left can sit at the same table and acknowledge that both have valid points. They don’t even realize they have something in common. That commonality is that the majority of Americans, Democrats and Republicans, favor more gun control than is currently in place. Universal background checks, closing the “gun-show loophole” and prohibiting mentally ill persons from owning a gun are three issues we have in agreement. This is where we can make progress. This is where we must stand together against the minority that think these

are non-negotiable. People who do not own guns must acknowledge the importance of guns in American culture. Responsible gun owners should ask themselves if the accessibility to these firearms is worth the possible danger. The way forward demands an adult conversation, understanding and listening to the fears and concerns. The way politicians are debating gun control is like two children putting their fingers in their ears and trying to shout over each other. The conversation America needs to have has to be honest, clear, and respectful to both sides. Whether that’s possible in today’s political climate is uncertain, but nothing is going to change unless it happens.

Letter to the

EDITOR

Society doesn’t support, encourage mental illness treatment for men TO THE EDITOR: After every mass shooting we try to figure out what made the shooters commit such tragedies. I’m stunned that mental illness is not getting the attention it deserves. I understand Stephen Paddock, the Las Vegas shooter, was not suffering from any mental illness, that we know right now, but there’s an odd similarity in mass shootings. Paddock was a male. The Orlando Pulse Nightclub shooter was a male. Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech, Columbine — all the shooters were males. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration concludes roughly 18 percent of adults in America suffer from mental illness.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Jordyn Hermani MANAGING EDITOR | Evan Sasiela OPINION EDITOR | Elio Stante MULTIMEDIA EDITOR | Riley Bussell NEWS EDITOR | Mitchel Kukulka NEWS EDITOR | Emma Dale FEATURES EDITOR | Paige Sheffield DESIGN EDITOR | Alyssa Templeton

Fortunately, we live in a progressive time where mental illness is no longer stigmatized the way it was in the past. But why is it still swept under the rug by many, especially for a particular group of people? According to Time Magazine, 98 percent of attackers in mass shootings are historically male. Since 1966, only three women have committed the same actions. Men are also responsible for 90 percent of homicides in the U.S. This is not to blindly state men are violent. Anyone, regardless of gender, can commit violent acts and crimes. Instead, this is a wake-up call to the unfair norms society expects of men when it comes to mental health.

In a report by Psychology Today, three-quarters of suicide victims in the U.S. are men. It’s estimated every 20 minutes a man commits suicide. Also mentioned in the report, men are less likely to seek treatment for mental illness. I stopped and thought about it, then I realized how true it is in my life. My friend group is predominantly male. Whenever they talk to me about their feelings, it breaks my heart when they feel the need to apologize. It’s concerning to know that I’m not the first, or last, person they have apologized to for doing something so natural. They should have right to cry, rant, vent or say whatever is plaguing them like I and any other woman can without

being judged. It made me realize how men are told to never talk about their feelings in fear of appearing weak and vulnerable to their peers. They’re told to suck it up when their emotions get the best of them. Meanwhile, it seems, women are free to be emotional and discuss their issues. In a world where majority groups are constantly being told to “check their privilege,” people start to forget men do face real problems. When a man speaks up, the general response he now gets is, “What issues do you have?” Society forgets men go through the same mental and emotional obstacles everyone else does. If you are suffering from mental illness,

All letters to the editor or guest columns must include a name, address, affiliation (if any) and phone number for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed, except under extraordinary circumstances. CM Life reserves the right to edit all letters and columns for style, length, libel, redundancy, clarity, civility and accuracy. Letters should be no more than 450 words in length. Longer guest columns may be submitted but must remain under 750 words. Published versions may be shorter than the original submission. CM Life reserves the right to print any original content as a letter or guest column. Please allow up to five days for a staff response, which will include an expected date of publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

Central Michigan Life, the independent voice of Central Michigan University, is edited and published by students of Central Michigan University every Monday, and Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. The newspaper’s online edition, cm-life.com, contains all of the material published in print, and is updated on an as-needed basis. Central Michigan Life serves the CMU and Mount Pleasant communities, and is under the jurisdiction of the independent Student Media Board of Directors. Dave Clark serves as Director of Student Media at CMU and is the adviser to the newspaper. Articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect the position or opinions of Central Michigan University. Central Michigan Life is a member of the Associated Press, the Michigan Press Association, the Michigan Collegiate Press Association, the Associated Collegiate Press, College Newspaper Business & Advertising

do not be afraid to speak up about it. There are many ways to seek treatment for it. Central Michigan University has a counseling center on campus for students located in Foust Hall. The Listening Ear Crisis Center in Mount Pleasant has a 24/7 hotline you can reach at (989) 772-2918. There is always the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. The more we make mental illness a less taboo subject for everyone, including men, the more society can move forward and evolve. Please, never think you are alone or can’t seek help.

CHEYENNE HOLE, Newaygo Senior

Managers Association, the Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce, Central Michigan Home Builders Association, Mount Pleasant Housing Association and the Mount Pleasant Downtown Business Association. The newspaper’s online provider is SN Works. Central Michigan Life is distributed throughout the campus and at numerous locations throughout Mount Pleasant. Nonuniversity subscriptions are $75 per academic year. Back copies are available at 50 cents per copy, or $1 if mailed. Photocopies of stories are 25 cents each. Digital copies of photographs published in Central Michigan Life are available upon request at specified costs. Central Michigan Life’s editorial and business offices are located at 436 Moore Hall, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3493 or 774-LIFE.


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OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

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Jayne, Shelby Jendza, Samantha Jennings, Kyle Jezewski, Kennadie Johnson, Alexis Johnson, Alexandra Johnson, Alyssa Johnson, Ryan Johnson, Alyx Jones, Shyanne Jones, Brent Jordan, Elizabeth Jurek, Ryan Kanicki, Nicole Kantak, Bryce Kanthook, Sydney Kassak, Cecelia Kassuba, Jacob Katselis, Kiriaki Kaupa, Alaina Kazee, Kaden Keene, Steven Kellner, Madelyn

Koseck, Kyle Koseck, Peter Kosinski, Chloe Kosnik, Victoria Kovach, Ryan Kowalczyk, Aaron Kraft, Madison Krausmann, Luke Kretz, Mattilynn Krinke, Anna Kriss, Helena Krokos, Angela Krygier, Kaitlyn Krzesak, Josephine Kucera, Kristine Kurtzman, Paul Kurzawa, Jammie Kurzawa, Dennie Kuzdak, Lauren Kuzniewski, Riley Kwiecinski, Blake La Rue, Mitchell Labadie, Haley LaBaere II, Paul LaBean, Brandon

Longtine, Jessica Lorenz, Marni Lucas, Adelle Lundahl, Bryan Lynch, Bradley Lyon, Lauren Mace, Taylor Mackey, Keegan Mackie, Shelby Magid, Jennah Maher, Michael Maison, Alexander Malott, Jane Manning, Benjamin Marasco, Ryan Marcinkewciz, Tony Marfia, Rebecca Marsh, Allison Marshall, Cassaundra Martin, Zachary Martin, Tyler Mason, Gabrielle Matelski, Brendon Mattingly, Andrea May, Jenna McAtee, Hannah McClain, David McClanahan, Tyler McCleery, Sydnye McConaghy, Ryan McGann, Caroline McGann, Madyson McGill, Chase McKeever, Jessica McLean, Stephen McLendon, Cali 3.0 Grade Point Average McLocklin, Recognition Courtney We would like to recognize the following Fraternity and Sorority members that achieved a McMillen, Daniel 3.0 grade point average or better for spring 2017: Mead, Bryna Meekhof, Michael Meharg, Brandon Meier, Isabel Menard, Jordan Kelly, Alexis Laginess, Tyler Menzo, Sophia Kennedy, Chris- Laird, Morgan Merritt, Jasmine topher Lamm, Jacob Merucci, Spencer Kerry, Rebecca Lanzon, Madison Messinger, Cade King, Courtney LaRowe, Alec Michels, Madeline King, Sarah Larson, Rayna Miedema, Megan King, Julia Lauer, Emily Miele, Michael King-Bates, Lauren Lawrence, Joseph Miller, Jarred Kish, Rachel Lazoen, Erin Miller, Kelsey Kissick, Lauren Lazzara, Nicole Miller, Parker Klak, Elizabeth Lazzari, Joshua Miller, Galen Klamt, Jackson Lebel, Spencer Miller, Mikayla Klein, Cooper LeBlanc, Isabella Miller, Edward Klein, Makenzie Lee, Gracen Millikin, Morgan Kleinjans, Lindsay Lee, Cameron Milliman, Knudsen, Alize Lefler, Andee Katherene Koehn, Mackenzie Lefor, Kyle Mills, Hannah Koenig, Michael Leist, Trevor Miranda, Leticcia Koenigsknecht, Lemanski, Sarah Mock, Tori Amber Lennox, Brittany Moltmaker, Kelly Koivula, Natalie Lerew, Allison Moninger, Melissa Kolbicz, Laura Lewallen, Lauren Monique, Morgan Kongla, Pattalina Libby, Zach Montgomery, Kopacz, Marissa Livingston, Blake Casey Korkis, Marisa Long, Paige Moore, JacQuan

Moore, Meredith Moran, Katlyn Moran, Joseph Morel, Isaiah Morris, Samuel Morrissey, Madalyn Morrow, David Morse, Taylor Mosqueda, Leticia Mostek, Mark Murphy, Bristol Murray, Patrick Myny, Miranda Nesbitt, Faith Neuenfeldt, Sarah New, Caden Nichols, Brooke Nicholson, William Nicholson, Lauren Nieman, Julia Noe, Hampton Nolan, Chelsea Norton, Ryan Nottingham, Conner Novak, Logan Nowaczyk, Emma O’ Brien, Alexander Odor, Alyssa Ogunfiditimi, Omojomiloju Oltman, Emily Oquist, Olivia Osann, Nicholas Osterman, Randy Ostrander, Paige Pallas, Joseph Palma, Megan Panfalone, Sarah Pankey, Samantha Pappa, Brittany Parafin, Kelsey Pardun, Rachel Patrico, Seth Pauck, Clare Peake, Elizabeth Perry, Olivia Pickelsimer, Kevin Pietrzak, Kelsey Pipitone, Alex Pizzimenti, Cristina Platek, Hadley Pleiness, Samantha Poliski, Jennifer Pratt, Brendan Pratt, Margaret Prevost, Cole Price, Jessica Prudhomme, Paige Quick, Tyler Rains, Madison Ramfos, Elexandra Ramon, Antonia Ramsay, Benjamin Rascoe, Kerisa Raymor, Grant Read, Joseph Reams, Katherine Reau, Cassidy

Reed, Sydney Reid, Kendall Reimer, Carly Reina, Samuel Reinbold, Jacob Retberg, Ashley Rice, Abbey Richards, Anton Rickers, Hannah Ricketts, Marissa Riley, Lianna Riley, Brenna Rimando, Stephen- Anthony Ringwelski, Megan Rockafellow, Jillian Rogers, Hallie Roland, Taylor Ronquillo, Macey Rookstool, Mackensey Ross, Taylor Rosser, Colin Rothe, Evan Rouse, Lacey Ruby, Andrew Rudberg, WIlliam Ruddy, Kendra Sabatino, Michael Sahu, Neetesh Salata, Collin Salerno, Jordyn Salwach, Zoe Sanders, Demetrios Sauer, Paige Savage, Alexis Sayles, Erin Schafer, Toni Schempp, Kelsi Schleben, Jacob Schmidtman, Danielle Schmitt, Alexandra Schockling, Lee Scholten, Julia Schroderus, Molly Schuldt, Stephanie Schumacher, Addie Schumaker, Rachel Schweers, Courtney Scott, Megan Sebestin, Fallon Selig, Jackie Selzer, Rachael Serafini, Brinn Sexton, Edgar Sexton, Sydney Shaw, Kathryn Shelton, Kristen Shepherd, Leah Shepherd, Luke Sherman, Julia Shook, Adam Short, Amanda Short, Cameron Silversides, Alexa Simasko, Kelsey Simmons, Blake Simon, Colleen

Skelton, Andrew Skepnek, Andrew Skerbe, Jenna Slater, Lauren Smail, Julia Smith, Michaela Smith, Adam Smith, Nicholas Smith, Benjamin Smith, Kendall Smith, Jackson Smith, Kirk Smith, Evan Smolboski, George Snyder, Jessica Soave, Gina Sobecki, Lauren Spendlove, Abby St Laurent, Jeremy Stahl, Cassie Stanton, Alexis Stanton, Gabrielle Steele, Sydney Stefanovski, Michael Steger, Sydney Steimer, Dalton Sternik, Rachel Steward, Kennedy Stockford, Sarah Streeter, Aloysia Strnad, Kathryn Strong, Sarah Suarez, Vanessa Sugamele, Shannon Sutherland, Ian Sutherland, Dalton Swan, Abigayle Szczurek, Brooke Taylor, Brooke Telesco, Emily TenEyck, Austin Terebus, Mackenzie Thomas, Allison Tierney, Duncan Tkaczyk, Victoria Tomas, Molly Topi, Anxhelo Trainor, Jonna Traynor, Marissa Trudeau, Amanda Tucker, Claire Ulch, Hannah Umlor, Morgan Utterback, Rachel Valensky, Susan Van Arkel, Marcus VanCura, Cole Vandenberghe, Emma Vanderlinden, Trenton VanDoorne, Alyssa VanHoven, Cydney Vanoosten, Scott Vara, Alicia Varacalli, Isabella Vavro, Emily Vendittelli, Kara Vitale, Felicia

Vitale, Tyler Vogt, Collin Wagner, Thomas Waite, Avery Walda, Elliott Waller, Kirstie Ware, Trevor Warrick, Brittany Warznie, Lauren Wasik, Madison Watts, Harrison Waynick, Sydney Weber, Allison Weber, Stephanie Wegener, Ellen Wegner, Jordin Wekwert, Mitchell Wells, Jacob Wendling, Josh Wendt, Julia Wheeler, Nikkia White, Cassidy White, Jeanette White, James White, Jacob White, Taylor White, Chloe Whyte, Dana Wiesemann, Helena Wieske, Adam Wilcox, Alexandrya Wilcox, Logan Wilczewski, Karly Wilder, Michael Wiley, Erik Williams, Vantrell Williams, Dominique Williamson, Mackenzie Williamson, Carleen Willis, Samuel Wingate, Jason Winquist, Megan Wirgau, Alexondra Witzig, Karyssa Wojno, Kennedy Wolford, Alexander Wolvin, Mikayla Wonch, Julie Wong, David Wrubel, Morgan Yakima, Nicole Yankoviak, Sarah Yats, Amanda Yorkey, Alexandra Younes, Omar Young, Molly Zainea, Natalie Zainea, Nicole Zaremba, Lindsey Zelinsky, Taylor Zellner, Kylie Zimmerman, Arleigh Zrinic, Nerma Zwick, Katherine Zywicki, Alison


9

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

LIFE IN BRIEF

NEWS

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

SAPA HOSTS EVENTS TO RAISE AWARENESS DURING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH Austin Berghoefer | Freelance Photographer Former DEA agents Steve Murphy, left, and Javier Pena, right, speak about Pablo Escobar at a lecture on Oct. 17 at Warriner Hall.

Former DEA agents discuss seeing themselves on “Narcos”

To raise awareness about domestic and intimate partner violence, Sexual Aggression Peer Advocates (SAPA) will host various events in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Events include a Zumbathon, a domestic and intimate partner violence awareness program and self-care yoga. SAPA’s Zumbathon is scheduled for 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 20 in the MAC Rooms of the Student Activity Center. Multiple Zumba instructors will lead workouts during the three-hour session. The event is Halloween-themed and costumes are encouraged. Free food, a costume contest and a silent auction are highlights of the event. The event aims to raise awareness of sexual aggression.

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show involving their characters did not actually happen, he said, much of the story is fairly accurate. Murphy said they spent lots of time getting news@cm-life.com to know the actors. He also said the actors went through extensive training for this series, If you let fear control your life, then you can’t completing DEA training courses and learning think straight, said former Drug Enforcement how to work undercover. Administration (DEA) agent Steve Murphy. about The two DEA agents haveo had many This is something he and his partner Javier Pena tarybrushes enclose lk,” a d cum ering. Ta e W y a W tt with death. Pena said he had a gun held to his head had to keep in mind constantly while on the a job. “The of stu mentary about g effects ome w tch, plin CAuditorium, caubyell, ocould d grapthe a: he ewished th ,” and entire time that lk On Tuesday, Oct. 17 in Plachta out“time PM ith Ta 7ary w e g e ry W m lin Ti y nt a o e a b 1 de a W um 10 c e o a h re stututtering. d nt f o “T e a o o , h ,” M ts um : lk tc c c n o a e Ta d ff tio w e e a a . W e g c g ,” out, I’m an actor!” and walk off like they were Murphy and Pena, the DEA agentsCportrayed on the ring. Lo om tch, “The WaayyWth terin pclin utte heW glkgraepffe boouutt abjust tsoof fststut ry ta hrapepeTa PM itg “T ewwaatc enn 7 w m h,like a : ts m lin o g c u C ry c m lin ffe o ta e Ti a d e e g e a 1 m e d m lin 0 o th ,” actors on a movie set. Netflix series “Narcos,” discussed what it was u p 1 C lk c p PM ith o re ra Ta 7 w d o g : e g o a e e . W m lin M g th ,” Ti y a : ring. n Ta W whith : 7cPM tioyoo 10 a hee W ree fststuutttteerin ore “Ttio Time eealinagtc aa 11lk M dd W 10 n:c hLo ffe a hc,c,a“T m M tstsoof get Murphy watched ac partner shot and killed right tracking down narco terrorist Pablo Escobar. The Lo lin n: tio rapppplin eewwatc gra ggeeffe Lo eog th CCoom PM ith 7 w : g e e th m lin aling with 10 e: 7 PMin Miami, which re front of him during a shootout event was presented by Central Michigan s tioin ore 11 TiTim ddeeaUniversity’ Mooo 10 Loccaatio nn: :M Lo he said was his scariestviexperience on the job. Many Program Board. ns pro de ia ic lin c d e c assume their most frightening experience was in In an interview with Central Michigan Life, n rving experie who stutter. vide bsewhat o t h ig n a ro ls y p Colombia and taking down Escobar, Murphy said, but a Murphy and Pena talked about it’ s like having a u ed clinicia nsprovidn idnc Enjo ians ivrie inde y to ic ia es provide rap PM lin ic etheir cn 7 lin : d th xp c e e e m d nc g Ti e in rie c e rv 55 r. e xp se it was really more exciting for them. television series based off lives. ter. 12 perihoststututte in htoobbsecrv xls e :inHgPB nigght ned tiogrv ase ua joyyaani idua Enjo epr. Lo b untt ls wwho rovividd to hra to oicst ee out doing lectures just ig id yto h En ia diviv PM ls 7w ya a pro lin : Pena and started thee “When seenthem TV, it’in sin not like watching u c e nssMurphy id m d Enjoyou ppy Ti e iv raon c PM icia d n 7 55 in lin : th rie c e 12 e to m d PB Ti e y xp H c p e n M 55 n: g ra P rie e 12 in tio 7 e a : rvinHactors thc se Lo m bse n: oc gPBexp Tifor stuue tio rv police yourself at y all,” Murphy about Pedro 25w5ho nighLo 1Pascal ba tttteer.r. groups, but because of the popularity of ttosaid P jo :ivH idB Enjo ndd iv tioinin y aanighth uuaalslswhoest c to id En yato Lo p ra PM e 7 : hance y m p ! Enspeak Ti “Narcos, and Boyd Holbrookth who portray him and Pena on era 55 Time: 7 PM ” they began receiving 1255 stuttetorscome orequests PB12 h H : w n e n tio o a PB c e H m : Lo e at so want to nakete aman ha es of They gncg En Location nnc !En clear Escobar “Narcos.” eewas iti rs ut ha stut nitrse in the shatocolleges. !xc a ho lf in w e te rs e u ne k st o o a t e y rt a t ho m a e w Putake place onth mepeople. nmdwho one aso ep essevil at oelis m sh man killed thosands ofng innocent Though a lot of the events that the xcitiiting oof fso hance noa ggaam in an lfin in sh fethss se eeio urrse !neexc ke plfro rta nad u our o stutthearsn!cEn Put tyo in ee yyo h th ndppaarta w ke a e e m n o lis Pu e na nd m PM io a En 7tteersrs! !En eame at ssionalism :u fess o!12 rofe an !f so moestst snd Tih e gcag urppro o in eH your 55 th w e exgcaithm thaetiosh ne nd PB o eeso in o inuattn t eo e yo lf h : m PM e th n w e 7 rs e : f u k n e o o a c m s y e rt Ti e t a g Lo a m PM o u pmein P urself in theetio so sh : 7an exc 55 f12 nd xcitiitinng game t o12 a55 sPB Ti eH o m sh lis n: a n e ke th a io a n c PB yo in rt a H ss t Lo a lf innd! fecatio n:m anddppartake Put yo Pu ee youursr eproLo alis By Lauren Brown Staff Reporter

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An educational program about domestic violence is scheduled for 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 24 in Anspach Hall room 162. The program will cover topics like resources for survivors of domestic violence and supporting people in intimate partner violence relationships. Self-care yoga is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26 in Kulhavi Hall room 145. SAPA provides confidential support to individuals affected by sexual assault, harassment and intimate partner violence. SAPA operates a confidential 24-hour crisis line: 989-774-2255 and an online crisis chat at sapa.cmich.edu -Paige Sheffield, Features Editor

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OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Students discover ways to make study abr By Alec Jones Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Before Gaylord graduate student Ian Callison studied abroad, not only was he worried about traveling to a new place — he was worried about covering the costs of the experience. Some students might not realize there are different types of plans and low-cost programs available to make traveling abroad possible. The Office of Study Abroad at Central Michigan University currently has around 30 lowcost programs offered during the academic year and the summer. On the low end, programs can cost roughly $8,000 to $8,500. Programs in more expensive destinations can range from $12,000 to $15,000. Callison studied abroad in Singapore during the spring of his sophomore year and in China during the summer before his senior year. His semester in Singapore was part of a low-cost tuition exchange program allowing him to study

Courtesy Photo | Ian Callison Gaylord graduate student Ian Callison poses on Mt. Kinabalu on the Malaysian side of Borneo in Spring 2015.

like the exchange program Callison took part in at Nanyang Technological University.

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abroad while paying for his tuition at CMU. Though some study abroad programs in locations such Australia and New Zealand can be more expensive because of airfare and the cost of living, there are low-cost programs available,

“Most CMU tuition exchanges are the same price as attending CMU for a semester and the housing is often cheaper, but students have to purchase airfare,” said Study Abroad adviser Marko Schubert. “Programs can end up being cheaper than CMU, especially if students live on campus here. Our room and board is comparatively expensive.” Callison said room and board for his program in Singapore was “remarkably inexpensive,” bringing the overall cost down. The Korea University Sejong campus program, another direct exchange program offered at CMU, allows students to pay CMU tuition and also

offers a scholarship that covers room and board and airfare. Another one of the programs with the lowest cost offered at CMU is the University Studies Abroad Consortium (USAC) program in Chiang Mai, Thailand. The estimated program fee for Spring 2018 is $5,595, which includes tuition and housing. The estimated total cost is around $9,000 with airfare and other costs. “There is quite a bit of variety for students who are looking for a cheaper program, and (the cost) has nothing to do with the academic quality or anything,” Schubert said. “It is literally the cost of living and tuition rates abroad that

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

road more affordable

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option,” Hughes said. “There are scholarships out there as long as you are willing to find them.” Students have also been taking it on themselves to raise money to study abroad over the past couple years, Schubert said. “Lately, a lot of students started GoFundMe pages and that seems to work quite well,” Schubert said. “They put it on Facebook, so former teachers or members of their church see, and they like the idea of doing something good for somebody they know really well.” Despite his initial concerns, Callison would recommend studying abroad to other students. “Once you’re there and

around the culture and people, it’s just a life-changing experience,” Callison said. “I hate to say this because I love being at CMU so much, but studying abroad was the highlight of my time here.” Students interested in learning more about study abroad programs and funding options can schedule a time to meet with a study abroad adviser. Students can contact the Office of Study Abroad at 989-7744308 or make an appointment online.

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make the difference.” Students can also decrease the cost by applying for various scholarships from the Office of Study Abroad, and academic colleges and departments. “There are a number of scholarships that CMU gives out,” Schubert said. “Almost every college on campus has a scholarship program that students can look into or even the individual departments that like to give out a little money every year.” Senior Brianna Hughes spent eight weeks in Santiago, Chile and received scholarships from the Office of Study Abroad and the political science department. “Everyone should study abroad or at least consider the

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NEWS

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OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Exhibiting student success Museum acts as laboratory for students, provides hands-on experience By Paige Sheffield Features Editor news@cm-life.com

From exhibits about Mars to programs about shipwrecks and scuba gear, when people visit the Museum of Cultural and Natural History at Central Michigan University, they’ll primarily see student work. Just ask Lake Orion senior Mitchell Bryan, who helped design an educational program that’s used at the Rowe Hall museum. In his public programming class for the museum studies minor, Bryan and his classmates had 45 minutes to develop an educational program. “Get Wrecked!” — the program the class came up with about shipwrecks — demonstrates how ships sink and are preserved and now includes scuba gear. “I don’t think there’s a single thing we do in the museum that isn’t resume-worthy,” Bryan said. The museum acts as a laboratory for students learning about museums, said Jay Martin, director of the museum studies program and the museum. CMU offers a 24-credit minor in museum studies, a major in public history and a master’s degree in Cultural Resource Management, which has three primary concentrations. The primary purpose of the on-campus museum is to educate students in the museum studies programs and other related programs. Martin added this makes the museum different from nearly every museum in the country. “Most museums serve the public,” Martin said. “We do too, but that is a byproduct of what we actually do. What we actually do is produce people who can go right out and work in a museum. The byproduct is super cool exhibits, educational programs, social media, restoration of artifacts — all different kinds of things.” For this reason, Martin said, when undergraduates leave with minors in museum studies, they don’t compete with undergraduates from other programs — they compete with graduate students from other programs. “We’ve had other curators and directors of museums around the state who are involved with those other museum studies programs in the state tell us they would hire our students and have hired our students over their own because ours are so good,” Martin said. The job placement rate for museum studies minors is 70 percent within the first year, Martin

Mackenzie Brockman | Assistant Photo Editor Mount Pleasant graduate student Marc Van Horn speaks to visiting students on Oct. 12 in the Bohannon Schoolhouse.

estimated, which he says is high for a competitive industry where many of the jobs go to people with a graduate degree. The museum studies minor can be paired with a variety of majors. Students in the program learn about education, collections, how museums function in society and how museums impact communities. Noticing that students who went to CMU for their undergraduate degrees would go to other universities for graduate school, Martin said the department created the Cultural Resource Management master’s program. So far, the Cultural Resource Management program with a concentration in museum studies has seen a 100 percent placement rate within six months of graduation. Each year, there are about 18-22 students in the

Cultural Resource Management graduate program and about 50 undergraduate students with the museum studies minor, Martin said.

GAINING HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE Bryan thinks the hands-on opportunities and comprehensive classes make the museum studies program stand out. For him, the most meaningful aspect of the minor was the required internship. He interned at the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont and worked on educational programming. He learned how to design and execute his own educational programs. “Without the internship, it would still be a very good program,” Bryan said. ”(The internship) is really the icing on the cake.” He has worked at the museum on campus for about

a year and a half, and thinks working there gives students a leg up. When students graduate, he said, they will already have years of museum experience. One of the most practical lessons Bryan learned, he said, was in a museum collections course. In the course, students learned to document everything about an object then give each object a catalog ID number to make it easier to keep track of or locate in collections storage. Gladwin senior Ashley Blackburn said other museums studies programs might encourage hands-on experience, but CMU’s program requires it. “The fact that the museum studies actually lives up to what it says it’s going to is very influential,” Blackburn said. She said the experience she’s gained as a museum studies minor is already paying off as she


13

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

Ariana Strzalka | Photo Editor Royal Oak senior Drake Smarch holds an artifact that he uses in the museum studies class to learn the concepts of handling artifacts for museum purposes on Oct. 17 in Rowe Hall.

applies for graduate school. Blackburn wants to be an archivist and had the opportunity to complete a collections internship at the museum at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands when she studied abroad there. Aside from gaining hands-on experience through her internship and volunteering in the museum, Blackburn said the classes in the minor also focus on practical experience. In a class, she and a group of other students designed an exhibit about Mars that’s still in the museum today. Other students in the class designed an exhibit about CMU in the 70s that’s also in the museum. As part of the project, the students also planned an exhibit opening.

FOCUSING ON STUDENT SUCCESS Students have been involved with the museum from the beginning, Martin said. When the museum officially opened in 1970, students helped create the original displays and build cabinets. Students began learning how to work in a museum when the on-campus museum opened, Martin said, but the museum studies program formally existed starting in the 1990s. “You hear a lot now from CMU’s administration about student success,” Martin said. “That’s been a very strong focus of this program for almost 50 years and you can see the results from the number of our students who are out there (working in the field).”

Shelby Township graduate student Antoine Helou studies Cultural Resource Management. He thinks the program’s focus on student success will be useful to him in his career. Helou graduated from Michigan State University with a degree in history and a minor in museum studies. When looking at graduate schools, an adviser at MSU mentioned CMU’s program to him, thinking it aligned with his interests. Helou said he doesn’t know of other universities that offer a degree like CMU’s Cultural Resource Management degree. “The program here really focuses on getting us ready for professional careers after school,” Helou said. “That’s something I didn’t really get in my undergraduate (education). “I’m just happy to be here and I find it so cool that I’m doing all these things — whether it’s interviewing someone, learning about public history and how to run a museum or just maybe cleaning off some nails, wood pieces or glass pieces from an archeology site.” The museum studies program has partnerships with various museums that allow students to gain more experience. In addition to volunteering in the Museum of Cultural and Natural History at CMU, Helou, like other CMU students, has helped out at the Antique Toy and Firehouse Museum in Bay City. The museum in Bay City is looking at reshaping,

NEWS

Ariana Strzalka | Photo Editor Saginaw senior Lillian Hendrick holds a fish that will soon be transferred to another container in the Museum of Cultural and Natural History on Oct. 17 in Rowe Hall.

so they needed people to look at inventory. Helou and other students have looked at the museum’s collections and are thinking about changes and the future of the museum. At CMU’s museum, a 1920s Transport Truck was just added to the collection. Students, including Helou, helped clean the truck and prepare it for its unveiling.They also learned how to start it. “For (museum faculty) to give us experience and actually have trust in us students to help with getting (the Transport Truck) ready for unveiling is really something,” Helou said.

MAINTAINING THE MUSEUM Senior Cassie Olson’s favorite class she has taken is oral history. The interviews students do in that class will become part of a collection at the museum. In addition to working as a student assistant at CMU’s museum, she completed internships with Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and Mackinac State Historic Parks. Olson thinks it’s sad more CMU students don’t visit the museum. Museums might not be on a lot of college students’ radar, she said, but once people visit, they usually find something that interests them. Right now, exhibits in the museum range from bears that roar when people walk by to a virtual reality sandbox.

One interesting artifact the museum has but hasn’t displayed yet, Martin said, is a 9/11 artifact: a sign for the World Trade Center subway station stop. The museum received this artifact by accident. Several years after the terrorist attacks, Martin responded to a callout for museums interested in obtaining artifacts. CMU received the wrong artifact: a filing cabinet. While the filing cabinet was at CMU by mistake, Hurricane Sandy hit New York and destroyed the other remaining cabinets from 9/11. Because one cabinet was unintentionally kept safe at CMU, Martin was offered the opportunity to choose any 9/11 artifact he wanted. He picked the subway sign because he wanted something that could tell a story in a simple and appropriate way, especially for younger people who wouldn’t remember 9/11. Martin said the artifact will likely be displayed on a significant anniversary of 9/11, such as the 20th anniversary. When choosing what artifacts to accept, Martin said, museum staff look for items that are unique or representative, also searching for items that would allow faculty and students to do research. “One of the great things about this program is it allows us to reach the general public and serve them,” Martin said. “At the same time, we’re doing our job for our students.”


SPORTS

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OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Bonamego not ‘satisfied,’ expects better play at Ball State By Dylan Goetz Assistant Sports Editor sports@cm-life.com

Head coach John Bonamego blamed himself after the Central Michigan football team’s 30-10 loss to Toledo on Homecoming last weekend. However, Bonamego is confident his team will not be phased while preparing for another conference matchup on Saturday. CMU (3-4,1-2 in Mid-American Conference) will travel to Muncie, Indiana to face the Ball State Cardinals (2-4, 0-2 in MAC) at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 21 at Scheumann Stadium. Without their starting quarterback and running back, the Ball State Cardinals have lost their last two games by more than 25 points. Against Western Michigan, Ball State fell 55-3, then lost 31-3 to

Allissa Rusco | Staff Photographer Football head coach John Bonamego walks toward reporters after football practice on Oct. 18 at Kelly/ Shorts Stadium.

Akron on Saturday. The Cardinals have lost three straight games. Last season, CMU stole two fourth-quarter interceptions to seal the game against Ball State on homecoming in Kelly/Shorts Stadium, 24-21.

Bonamego said the team was preparing junior quarterback Riley Neal, who missed time last week due to a leg injury. “By no means is anybody satisfied (in the locker room),” Bonamego said. “There is still a lot

left to play for. It’s the MAC, so every week is going to be a dogfight.” Defensive back Josh Cox said the team’s record is in a similar place as it was last year. However, he agreed with Bonamego and said the feeling in the locker

room was strong. “Last year, we broke down internally as a team,” Cox said. “This year, that is definitely not the case. Our seniors are really stepping up to leadership roles and I think that will definitely turn around (our season).” The Chippewas may be without senior running back Devon Spalding and junior tight end Logan Hessbrook, who are doubtful to play on Saturday. Senior wide receiver Corey Willis, who suffered a broken bone in his hand earlier this season, is slowly making his return to the offense. “Corey (Willis) is giving us what he is able to,” Bonamego said. “Every day he gets a little bit more comfortable, but it takes a long time to come back from a broken bone.”

REST OF SEASON The Chippewas’ final Saturday game of the season is this weekend. After Ball State, CMU has four regular season games remaining. All are weekday games. The benefit from having weekday games is CMU could get more notoriety and attention, Bonamego said. “Attendance is where it hurts you. You have students that must get up and go to class the next day and season ticket holders that live out of town, so I think it hurts the attendance of the league.” CMU has two remaining home games. The Chippewas host Eastern Michigan on Nov. 8. before taking on Northern Illinois at Kelly/Shorts Stadium on Nov. 24. The Ball State game is available on ESPN3 or WatchESPN.


CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19, 2017

15


NEWS

16

OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

Senior outside hitter’s college career stays close to home By Mitchell Vosburg Staff Reporter news@cm-life.com

Denise and Scott Robertson wanted something to share with their children they both loved throughout their lives: sports. Redshirt senior Taylor Robertson, now in her fifth season as an outside hitter on the Central Michigan volleyball team, benefited greatly from her parent’s athletic aptitude. “It was very natural for us to make sure we introduced Taylor and her brother Satchel at a young age,” Denise said. “We really wanted to expose them to all kinds of sports to see what they personally liked.” Taylor sparked on interest in volleyball after watching only one match while in middle school. “I saw a volleyball game on ESPN when I was in the seventh grade,” Taylor said. “It looked like so much

TAYLOR ROBERTSON

fun. It was a sport where I was like ‘OK, I can jump. My parents gave me those genes.’” After watching that match, Taylor passed on playing basketball, soccer and track to pursue her love for volleyball, a decision that made her parents — both former basketball players at Roberts Wesleyan College — realize their sport was not in her future. “She didn’t have the natural instinct in basketball we thought she would

have,” Denise said. “One of our friends suggested having her try volleyball, and it clicked for her. We realized we had to learn the game of volleyball, because we knew nothing about volleyball.” Taylor’s love and talent for the game led to multiple colleges recruiting the Midland native. CMU was the first school to recruit Taylor during her sophomore season. CMU proved to be an ideal place for Taylor, who enjoys being close to home. Committing one year before signing her letter of intent was something that surprised Denise and Scott, especially when other colleges began to show interest. “As (Taylor’s senior) year progressed, she began to draw attention from other schools, some as far as the west coast” Denise said. “The only way she could do any official visits for some of the schools was to de-commit.” Taylor graduated from Midland High School in December 2012, allowing her

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is responsible for directing the overall editorial operation of the paper. The editor assumes leadership responsibility in the newsroom. The editor has final student authority in decisions, is responsible for working for the stated objectives of the newspaper and acts as a spokesperson. The Student Media Board of Directors meets on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 to select the Editor in Chief of CM Life for Spring 2018. The editor will interview and hire all other section editors prior to the end of the fall 2017 semester. In order to facilitate electronic transmission of application materials to board members, PLEASE EMAIL a copy of your resume in a PDF format, email a Microsoft Word document answering the application questions at cm-life.com/contact-us and have your letters of recommendation emailed to: clark6da@cmich.edu.

to greyshirt and enroll in classes for the 2013 winter semester. Despite her parents help, Taylor described her first semester as “a rude awakening.” “My parents like to say my dad liked the athlete aspect and my mom was more dedicated to the academic side,” Taylor said. “I always liked school, but trying to manage the two to marry them and keep them separate was the hard part for me.” Taylor missed time during the 2016 season with a torn posterior cruciate ligament in her left knee. The adjustment from playing to watching on the bench proved to be difficult. Taylor was in treatment while her teammates went on with their daily routine. “It felt like I was lost in the background a bit,” Taylor said. “Once I got back in the spring season, I did a good job of making my presence a part of the team again.” Denise reminded Taylor the injury

was out of her control, and a new identity with the team was needed in the meantime. “Everyone on that team has a very special and unique role. You have to embrace it,” Denise said. “You can’t contribute on the court, but you can contribute just as much from the sideline.” Now into her fifth season on the team Taylor has embraced a unique role: team grandma. “I feel that I have good leadership skills, especially outside the court,” Taylor said. “People are always coming to me with problems. I’ve been here for so long and been part of so many team dynamics and coaching staffs.” Head coach Mike Gawlik understands Taylor’s role as “team grandma,” but also sees Taylor’s experience in a different perspective. “It feels like she’s a woman playing amongst girls,” he said. “We look for that experience to come out in the way she plays.”


17

CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM  | OCT. 19 , 2017

MAC Tournament hopes in limbo for women’s soccer By Evan Petzold Staff Reporter

UNDEFEATED AT HOME While CMU is 1-7-0 on the road this season, the team is 4-02 at the CMU Soccer Complex. Junior forward Lexi Pelafas leads the MAC with 12 goals and two assists in 15 games. She also leads the league with 78 shots. Pelafas has two MAC Offensive Player of the Week awards and broke the school goal-scoring record earlier this season. Of Pelafas’ 12 goals, 10 have come at home. Junior goalkeeper Zoie Reed has registered four shutouts at the CMU Soccer Complex, but has never been able to manage one on the road. Reed has a 74.7 save percentage and a 1.33 goals

Cody Scanlan | Staff Photographer Junior forward Lexi Pelafas kicks the ball into the back of the net for the second score of the match on Oct. 5 at the CMU Soccer Complex.

against average in 16 games. Madison Costner poses as another offensive weapon for CMU. The senior forward scored the lone goal for the Chippewas last weekend and is tied for seventh in the MAC with five goals scored. Mary Carlson, a junior, has played a team-high 1,496 minutes and will anchor Central Michigan’s defense. She has two goals and one assist.

SCOUTING REPORT The Huskies’ offense is guided by junior forward Taylor Sarver, who has scored three goals. Redshirt junior midfielder Lauren Gierman is a key part of the attack, dishing six assists and scoring two goals. Gierman’s assist total is good for second in the MAC, behind Bowling Green’s Maureen Kennedy with seven assists.

Northern Illinois will feature Amy Annala, a senior goalkeeper. Through 14 games, Annala has allowed 16 goals and made 47 saves, good for a 74.6 save percentage. The Broncos are led by sophomore midfielder Grace Labadie, who has four goals and one assist in 15 games. Senior forward Emma Kahn is also a threat with three goals logged so far. With a team-high three assists this season, senior defender Alyssa Smith has consistently set up Labadie and Kahn. Labadie’s goal total has her tied for 10th in overall goals in the MAC. In net for Western Michigan will be Stephanie Herber, who has seven shutouts this season. The Broncos redshirt senior goalkeeper has converted 70 saves in 15 games, allowing just 14 goals.

NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND CAMPUS

GOLF PLACES EIGHTH AT DAYTON INVITATIONAL After a sixth-place finish in the opening round Monday, the women’s golf team took a step back in the final round Tuesday to finish eighth overall at the Dayton Invitational. Freshman Jami Laude shot a 75 in the final round and a 147 overall to finish tied for fourth place individually. This is Laude’s first top-five finish of her career. It is also the Chippewas’ first top-five finish this season. Laude was nominated for the Mid-American Conference Athlete of the Week. Junior Bria Colosky

sports@cm-life.com

The next three games will decide the fate of the Central Michigan women’s soccer team. CMU currently sits 6-7-3 on the season and 1-5-2 in conference play. To have a chance at participating in the Mid-American Conference tournament on Oct. 29, the Chippewas must improve their record in the final three home games. CMU will host Northern Illinois (8-6-1, 5-3 MAC) at 6 p.m. Thursday and Western Michigan (8-6-1, 3-4-1) at 1 p.m. Sunday. Both games will be played at the CMU Soccer Complex. “It will be nice to play three games in front of the friendly fans,” head coach Peter McGahey said. “At this point in the season, they become like one-game playoff games.” Last year, the Chippewas bounced WMU and were shutout by NIU. Both games were played on the road.

LIFE IN BRIEF

NEWS

posted her best score of the year with a 157 and tied for 35th individually. Senior Natalie Johnson was two strokes behind Colosky with a 159 and tied for 39th individually. Seniors Holly Hines and Kristen Wolfe rounded out play for the Chippewas with a 168 and 170, respectively. Senior Amanda Walsh played as an individual and finished with a 166. Head coach Cheryl Stacy said the team put too much pressure on themselves in the final round. “We play better when we focus on one shot at

a time instead of the final results,” Stacy said. Findlay finished one stroke better than Western Illinois with a 595 to take first place overall. Ellie Cronin of Dayton, Aneta Abrahamova of IUPUI and Bridget Connolly of Western Illinois all tied for first place individually with a 145. This was the final event of the fall season for CMU. The spring season tees off in Lakeland, Florida on Feb. 5, 2018 to start MidAmerican Conference play. -Dylan Goetz, Assistant Sports Editor

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OCT. 19, 2017  |  CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  |  CM-LIFE.COM

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Across

1. Ann’s advicegiving sister 5. Words before snag or homer 9. Taken ___ (startled) 14. ____ gras 15. “____ a Spell on You” (1956 Screamin’ Jay Hawkins song) 16. Like warm s’mores 17. Biting 19. Marked 20. 1972 U.S./U.S.S.R. missile pact 21. Franklin, religiously 23. Appendage 25. Hat 30. Houdini, e.g. 33. 80s-90s Honda model 35. Pinnacle 36. Four-played card game (var.) 37. Patsy Cline tune “That’s ____ Heartache Begins” 39. Hindu spiritual manual

42. Take off 43. Mrs. Ralph Kramden 45. Rant’s partner 47. Angular velocity meas. 48. Straying from the subject 52. Slow outflow 53. Stallone nickname 54. Gentlemen callers 57. Gives out 61. “Mother Goose Suite” composer Maurice 65. Heartened 67. Stupefied 68. Deuterium discoverer 69. Dorothy’s pet 70. White House John 71. Combustible funeral heap 72. One of loose morals

Down

1. Some ship positions 2. When doubled, an island near Tahiti

3. Actress Jessica 4. Blabbermouths 5. Abbrev. for some Japanese royals 6. Apple gadget 7. Adjust, as a radio 8. New York prison 9. Disturb 10. ___ Jovi 11. Perfect, informally 12. Bee follower 13. Marlowe contemporary 18. Right around 22. 3rd largest city in La. (abbr.) 24. Cartographer’s creations 26. Apt papal name 27. One who proffers an arm 28. “It’s ___!” 29. Addicts 30. Alimony receiver, perhaps 31. Little, in Lyon 32. Bonus 33. Complete confusion 34. Pocahontas’s husband John

38. Rent-____ (mall guard) 40. Campaigned 41. Norms, briefly 44. Supporter of addictive behavior 46. Moray hunter 49. Census datum 50. Part of an afternoon service 51. 1986 World Series winners 55. Playwright Alfred 56. Reader of omens 58. Worshiped one 59. Ballet attire 60. Location 61. Slowing, on mus. scores 62. Win at ___ cost 63. Kilmer of Hollywood 64. Ovine female 66. Cyclone center


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OCT. 19, 2017  | CENTRAL MICHIGAN LIFE  | CM-LIFE.COM

HOMECOMING

WRAP-UP 201 7

Medallion Hunt Winner: Larzelere Hall Maroon Cup Winner: Larzelere Hall Golden Goblet Winner: Program Board Greek Cup Winner: Phi Delta Theta Gold Ambassadors:

Congratulations to our Homecoming winners! Keep track of events at: @CMUActivities www.cmich.edu/SAI @CMUActivities

October 19, 2017  

Central Michigan Life